WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical sensitivity revisited

  1. Genetic susceptibility factors for multiple chemical sensitivity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Linneberg, Allan; Andersen, Charlotte Brasch; Fenger, Mogens; Dirksen, Asger; Vesterhauge, Søren; Werge, Thomas; Elberling, Jesper; Berg, Nikolaj Drimer

    2010-01-01

    study was to investigate genetic susceptibility factors for MCS and self-reported chemical sensitivity in a population sample. Ninety six MCS patients and 1,207 controls from a general population divided into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity were genotyped for variants in the genes encoding...

  2. Genetic susceptibility factors for multiple chemical sensitivity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Berg Rasmussen, Henrik; Linneberg, Allan; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Fenger, Mogens; Dirksen, Asger; Vesterhauge, Søren; Werge, Thomas; Elberling, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    study was to investigate genetic susceptibility factors for MCS and self-reported chemical sensitivity in a population sample. Ninety six MCS patients and 1,207 controls from a general population divided into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity were genotyped for variants in the genes encoding...... compared in post hoc analyses with all individuals from the population sample (p=0.02). Genetic variants in paraoxonase 1 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase were not associated with MSC or with self-reported chemical sensitivity in the population sample. Our results suggest that variants in the genes...

  3. Chemical Principles Revisited: Archaeological Dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses methods used to date archaeological artifacts and other remains. They include: (1) nuclear dating techniques (radiocarbon dating, accelerator radiocarbon dating, thermoluminescence, and others); (2) chemical dating techniques (amino acid racemization, obsidian hydration dating, elemental content changes, and thermal analysis dating); and…

  4. Multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Kupers, Ron;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent, non-specific symptoms in response to chemically unrelated exposures in non-toxic concentrations. Although the pathophysiology of MCS remains unknown, central sensitization may be an important factor...

  5. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Anne Gram

    Et voksende antal mennesker i Danmark oplever at være overfølsomme over for dufte og kemikalier. Imidlertid er den tilskrevne diagnose Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) ikke medicinsk anerkendt i Danmark pga. mangel på organiske og patofysiologisk basis for symptomerne. Dette speciale bygger på...

  6. Cost-sensitive learning and decision making revisited.

    OpenAIRE

    Viaene, Stijn; Dedene, Guido

    2005-01-01

    In many real-life decision making situations the default assumption of equal misclassification costs underlying pattern recognition techniques is most likely violated. Then, cost-sensitive learning and decision making bring help for making cost-benefit-wise optimal decisions. This paper brings an up-to-date overview of several methods that aim to make a broad variety of error-based learners cost-sensitive. More specifically, we revisit direct minimum expected cost classification, MetaCost, ov...

  7. Complex and detailed balancing of chemical reaction networks revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the notions of complex and detailed balancing for mass action kinetics chemical reaction networks is revisited from the perspective of algebraic graph theory, in particular Kirchhoff’s Matrix Tree theorem for directed weighted graphs. This yields an elucidation of previously

  8. Radioecological sensitivity. Danish fallout data revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danish fallout data covering four decades are interpreted in terms of radioecological sensitivity. The radioecological sensitivity is the time-integrated radionuclide concentration in an environmental sample from a unit ground deposition (e.g. Bq y kg-1 per Gq m-2). The fallout data comprise observed levels of the radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr in precipitation, grass, milk, beef and diet. The data are analysed with different types of radioecological models: traditional UNSCEAR models and more recent dynamic models. The traditional models provide empirical relationships between the annual fallout from precipitation and the annual average levels in grass, milk, beef and diet. The relationships may be derived from spreadsheet calculations. ECOSYS and FARMLAND represent more recent radioecological models, which are available as software for personal computers. These models are more mechanistic and require information on a range of topics, e.g. mode of deposition, nuclide dependent and nuclide independent parameters. The more recent models do not reproduce the fallout data better than the traditional models. But the general features of the more recent models make them suited for prediction of radiological consequences of routine and accidental releases in areas where limited radioecological data are available. The work is part of the NKS/BOK-2.1 project on Important Nordic Food Chains aiming at characterising radioecological sensitivity and variability across the Nordic countries. (au)

  9. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2007-01-30

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  10. Mechanisms of multiple chemical sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Chris

    2002-03-10

    Sensitivity to chemicals is a toxicological concept, contained in the dose-response relationship. Sensitivity also includes the concept of hypersensitivity, although controversy surrounds the nature of effects from very low exposures. The term multiple chemical sensitivity has been used to describe individuals with a debilitating, multi-organ sensitivity following chemical exposures. Many aspects of this condition extend the nature of sensitivity to low levels of exposure to chemicals, and is a designation with medical, immunological, neuropsychological and toxicological perspectives. The basis of MCS is still to be identified, although a large number of hypersensitivity, immunological, psychological, neurological and toxicological mechanisms have been suggested, including: allergy; autosuggestion; cacosomia; conditioned response; immunological; impairment of biochemical pathways involved in energy production; impairment of neurochemical pathways; illness belief system; limbic kindling; olfactory threshold sensitivity; panic disorder; psychosomatic condition; malingering; neurogenic inflammation; overload of biotransformation pathways (also linked with free radical production); psychological or psychiatric illness; airway reactivity; sensitisation of the neurological system; time dependent sensitisation, toxicant induced loss of tolerance. Most of these theories tend to break down into concepts involving: (1) disruption in immunological/allergy processes; (2) alteration in nervous system function; (3) changes in biochemical or biotransformation capacity; (4) changes in psychological/neurobehavioural function. Research into the possible mechanisms of MCS is far from complete. However, a number of promising avenues of investigation indicate that the possibility of alteration of the sensitivity of nervous system cells (neurogenic inflammation, limbic kindling, cacosomia, neurogenic switching) are a possible mechanism for MCS. PMID:11869820

  11. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michelle J.; Zoerb, Matthew C.; Campbell, Nicole R.; Zimmermann, Kathryn J.; Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Bertram, Timothy H.

    2016-04-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e., DMS, β-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, α-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt-1) to DMS, isoprene, and α-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a much weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion-molecule reactions likely proceed through a combination of ligand-switching and direct charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (validated against an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer, where measurements from the two instruments were highly correlated (R2 > 0.95, 10 s averages) over a wide range of sampling conditions.

  12. Revisiting the boiling of primordial quark nuggets at nonzero chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Liu, Tong; Gubler, Philipp; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2015-03-01

    The boiling of possible quark nuggets during the quark-hadron phase transition of the Universe at nonzero chemical potential is revisited within the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach employed for the hadron phase, using two kinds of baryon interactions as fundamental inputs. To describe the deconfined phase of quark matter, we use a recently developed quark mass density-dependent model with a fully self-consistent thermodynamic treatment of confinement. We study the baryon number limit Aboil (above which boiling may be important) with three typical values for the confinement parameter D. It is firstly found that the baryon interaction with a softer equation of state for the hadron phase would only lead to a small increase of Aboil . However, results depend sensitively on the confinement parameter in the quark model. Specifically, boiling might be important during the Universe cooling for a limited parameter range around D 1 / 2 = 170 MeV, a value satisfying recent lattice QCD calculations of the vacuum chiral condensate, while for other choices of this parameter, boiling might not happen and cosmological quark nuggets of 102 < A <1050 could survive.

  13. Pavlovian conditioning and multiple chemical sensitivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, S.; Kreutzer, R

    1997-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning processes may contribute to some symptoms of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). This review summarizes the potential relevance of the literature on conditional taste and olfactory aversions, conditional sensitization, and conditional immunomodulation to understanding MCS. A conditioning-based perspective on MCS suggests novel research and treatment strategies.

  14. CYTOKINE PROFILING FOR CHEMICAL RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CYTOKINE PROFILING FOR CHEMICAL RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS. LM Plitnick1, SE Loveless2, GS Ladics2, MP Holsapple3, MJ Selgrade4, DM Sailstad4 & RJ Smialowicz4. 1UNC, Chapel Hill, NC; 2DuPont Co., Haskell Laboratory, Newark, DE; 3Dow Chemical, Midland, MI & 4USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC.

  15. Multiple chemical sensitivity, en veldefineret lidelse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolstad, Henrik A; Silberschmidt, Martin; Nielsen, Jesper Bo;

    2006-01-01

    Some people react to smells or chemicals at levels far below toxicological thresholds with nonspecific symptoms, fear and social isolation. They may be diagnosed with multiple chemical sensitivity. There is no empirical evidence indicating that this condition is explained by toxicological...... mechanisms, even though a number of theories have been proposed. The authors of this review conclude that this is a functional condition. These patients need information and treatment in accordance with this fact. Instead of being advised how to avoid exposure to chemicals, they should be properly trained in...... appropriate confrontation with the chemicals encountered in everyday life....

  16. Multiple chemical sensitivity, en veldefineret lidelse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolstad, Henrik A.; Silberschmidt, Martin; Nielsen, Jesper Bo;

    2006-01-01

    Some peope react to smells or chemicals at levels far below toxicological thresholds with nonspecific symptoms, fear and social isolation. They may be diagnosed with multiple chemical sensitivity. There is no empirical evidence indicating that this condition is explained by toxicological mechanisms......, even though a number of theories have been proposed. The authors of this review conclude that this is a functional condition. These patients need information and treatment in accordance with this fact. Instead of being advised how to avoid exposure to chemicals, they should be properly trained in...... appropriate confrontation with the chemicals encountered in everyday life....

  17. Chemically sensitive interfaces on SAW devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricco, A.J.; Martin, S.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Crooks, R.M.; Xu, Chuanjing [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Allred, R.E. [Adherent Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, three approaches to the effective use of chemically sensitive interfaces that are not highly chemically selective have been examined: (1) molecular identification from time-resolved permeation transients; (2) using multifrequency SAW devices to determine the frequency dependence of analyte/film interactions; (3) use of an array of SAW devices bearing diverse chemically sensitive interfaces to produce a distinct response pattern for each analyte. In addition to their well-known sensitivity to mass changes (0.0035 monolayer of N{sub 2} can be measured), SAW devices respond to the mechanical and electronic properties of thin films, enhancing response information content but making a thorough understanding of the perturbation critical. Simultaneous measurement of changes in frequency and attenuation, which can provide the information necessary to determine the type of perturbation, are used as part of the above discrimination schemes.

  18. Sensitive Chemical Compass Assisted by Quantum Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, C Y; Quan, H T; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    The radical-pair-based chemical reaction could be used by birds for the navigation via the geomagnetic direction. An inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could response to the weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field and then results in different photopigments in the avian eyes to be sensed. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup for the ultra-sensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via the recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the weak magnetic field.

  19. Chemical feedbacks in climate sensitivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietmüller, Simone; Ponater, Michael; Sausen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Interactively coupled climate chemistry models extend the number of feedback mechanisms in climate change simulations by allowing a variation of several radiatively actice chemical tracers that are prescribed in conventional climate models. Different perturbation experiments including chemical feedbacks were performed using the chemistry-climate model system EMAC coupled to the mixed layer ocean model MLO. The influence of the chemical feedbacks O3, CH4 and N2O on climate response and climate sensitivity is quantified for a series of CO2-perturbation simulations: Equilibrium climate sensitivity is dampened, if chemical feedbacks are included. In case of a CO2 doubling simulation chemical feedbacks decrease climate sensitivity by -3.6% and in case of a 4*CO2 simulation by -8.1%. Analysis of the chemical feedbacks reveals, that the negative feedback of ozone, mainly the feedback of stratospheric ozone, is responsible for this dampening. The radiative feedbacks of CH4 and N2O are negligible, mainly because the model system does not allow interactive emission feedbacks at the Earth's surface for these gases. The feedback of physical parameters is significantly modified by the presence of chemical feedbacks. In case of the CO2-perturbation experiments the negative stratospheric ozone feedback is accompanied by a negative stratospheric H2O feedback change of the same order of magnitude. So the dampening effect of the direct O3 radiative feedback is enhanced. A non-linearity in the damping is found with increasing CO2 concentrations. Reasons are the nonlinear feedbacks of ozone, temperature, and stratospheric water vapor. Additional 6*CO2 simulations with and without chemical feedbacks included show, that the presence of chemic feedbacks helps to prevent a runaway greenhouse effect, as the O3 distribution can react to the upward shift of the tropopause. Also experiments driven by anthropogenic NOx- and CO-emissions were performed, where chemically active trace gases act

  20. Sensitive chemical compass assisted by quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, C. Y.; Ai, Qing; Quan, H. T.; Sun, C. P.

    2012-02-01

    A radical-pair-based chemical reaction might be used by birds for navigation via the geomagnetic direction. The inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could respond to a weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field; this then results in different photopigments to be sensed by the avian eyes. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup, inspired by the avian compass, as an ultrasensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of detection of weak magnetic fields.

  1. Chemical microsensors with molecularly imprinted sensitive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickert, Franz L.; Greibl, Wolfgang; Sikorski, Renatus; Tortschanoff, Matthias; Weber, K.; Bulst, W. E.; Fischerauer, G.

    1998-12-01

    The bottleneck in the development of chemical sensors is the design of the coatings for chemical recognition of the analyte. One pronounced method is to tailor supramolecular cavities for different analytes. Polyfunctional linkers or the embedding of these materials in a polymeric matrix can improve stability and response time of the sensor. An even more favorable method to synthesize chemically sensitive layers is realized by molecular imprinting, since a rigid polymer can be generated directly on the transducer of interest and may be included in its production process. The analyte of interest acts as a template during the polymerization process and is evaporated or extracted by suitable solvents. Due to the cavities formed this polymer enriches analyte molecules, which can be detected by mass- sensitive devices such as QMB or SAW resonators or by optical measurements. This procedure allows both the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with fluorescence or mass sensitive devices. If the print PAHs are varied the polymers are tuned to the desired analyte. The enrichment of solvent vapors or other uncolored specimen by the layer can also be followed by the embedding of carbenium ions used as optical labels.

  2. Infant attachment, adult attachment, and maternal sensitivity: revisiting the intergenerational transmission gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Kazuko Y; Haltigan, John D; Bahm, Naomi I Gribneau

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the intergenerational transmission of attachment, utilizing the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI), the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP), and the Maternal Behavioral Q-Set (MBQS). We revisited fundamental questions in attachment theory and research by examining: (1) the level of intergenerational agreement between maternal attachment representations and infant attachment security, and (2) whether maternal sensitivity serves as an intergenerational mediator between adult and infant attachment security. Significant categorical matches between the AAI and the SSP as well as mean differences for MBQS scores between adult attachment secure-insecure groups were found. Consistent with earlier intergenerational research, maternal sensitivity only partially mediated the AAI-SSP link, indicating the transmission gap remains. Consistent with recent mediation studies, using more contemporary analytical techniques, it was confirmed that maternal sensitivity did mediate the direct pathway between AAI security and SSP security. Thus, the transmission gap appears somewhat different depending on the statistical method used to measure mediation. Post hoc analyses considered mothers' childhood experiences of separation/divorce and this helped make sense of intergenerational mismatches. PMID:27056466

  3. Revisiting the Role of Potassium Sensitivity Testing and Cystoscopic Hydrodistention for the Diagnosis of Interstitial Cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To revisit the diagnostic roles of cystoscopic hydrodistention and the potassium sensitivity test (PST) for the diagnosis of interstitial cystitis (IC). Methods We prospectively enrolled 214 patients clinically diagnosed with IC, 125 non-IC patients who underwent video urodynamic studies and PST, and another 144 non-IC patients who underwent cystoscopic hydrodistention before transurethral surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for the PST and glomerulations after cystoscopic hydrodistention. Results After cystoscopic hydrodistention, glomerulations developed in 211/214 (98.6%) IC patients and 61/144 (42.4%) of the non-IC patients including patients with stones (45/67, 67%), hematuria (2/5, 40%), and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) (6/17, 35%). When positive glomerulation was defined as grade 2 or more, the sensitivity was 61.7%. The PST was positive in 183/214 (85.5%) IC patients and 7/17 (41%) with hypersensitive bladder, 7/32 (22%) with detrusor overactivity, 5/27 (18%) with SUI, 2/21 (10%) with lower urinary tract symptoms, and 2/25 (8%) with bladder outlet obstruction. The PST had a sensitivity of 85.5% and a specificity of 81.6% for diagnosis of IC. IC patients with a positive PST had a significantly smaller urgency sensation capacity, smaller voided volume, and greater bladder pain score. Conclusions Both the PST and glomerulations after hydrodistention are sensitive indicators of IC, but the specificity of glomerulations in the diagnosis of IC is lower than that of the PST. A positive PST is associated with a more hypersensitive bladder and bladder pain, but not the grade of glomerulations in IC patients. Neither test provided 100% diagnostic accuracy for IC, we might select patients into different subgroups based on different PST and hydrodistention results, not for making a diagnosis of IC but for guidance of different treatments. PMID:26999787

  4. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Vela, Alberto [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  5. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μe) and chemical hardness (ηe) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μe. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (-I), positive (-A), and zero values of the fractional charge (-(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  6. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μe) and chemical hardness (ηe) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μe. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness

  7. Noise sensitivity and multiple chemical sensitivity scales: Properties in a population based epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Heinonen-Guzejev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise sensitivity is considered to be a self-perceived indicator of vulnerability to stressors in general and not noise alone. Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS has to some extent been accompanied by noise sensitivity, indicating a moderate correspondence between them. The aim of this study is to investigate if the Weinstein′s Noise Sensitivity Scale and Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory′s (QEESI Chemical Intolerance Subscale can differentiate noise sensitivity and MCS as different entities, and if there are overlaps in the characteristics of noise sensitivity and MCS. In 2002, 327 individuals (166 men, 161 women; age range 45 - 66 years from the Finnish Twin Cohort answered a questionnaire on noise-related and MCS items. Somatic, psychological, and lifestyle factors were obtained through earlier questionnaires for the same individuals. Both confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses (CFA and EFA of the questionnaire items on the Weinstein′s Noise Sensitivity Scale and QEESI′s Chemical Intolerance Subscale indicated the presence of three factors - Noise Sensitivity, Chemical Sensitivity, and Ability to Concentrate factors - arising from the forming of two factors from the items of the Weinstein′s scale. In the regression analyses, among all subjects, the Noise Sensitivity Factor was associated with neuroticism and smoking, and the Chemical Sensitivity Factor was associated with allergies and alcohol use. The study indicates that the Weinstein′s Noise Sensitivity Scale and QEESI′s Chemical Intolerance Subscale differentiate noise sensitivity and MCS as different entities.

  8. Sensitive Diagnostics for Chemically Reacting Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Aamir

    2015-11-02

    This talk will feature latest diagnostic developments for sensitive detection of gas temperature and important combustion species. Advanced optical strategies, such as intrapulse chirping, wavelength modulation, and cavity ringdown are employed.

  9. The vomeronasal organ and chemical sensitivity: a hypothesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Glenn J; Kipen, Howard M

    2002-01-01

    Environmental exposures to very low levels of airborne chemicals are associated with adverse symptoms, often affecting multiple organ systems, in the phenomenon of chemical sensitivity (CS). Recent surveys suggest a significant prevalence of chemically sensitive subjects in the United States, but the mechanism linking exposure to symptoms remains unclear, despite the advancement of a variety of theoretical models. In many of these models, exposure of the nasal respiratory system to an airborn...

  10. Bragg grating chemical sensor with hydrogel as sensitive element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaomei Liu(刘小梅); Shilie Zheng(郑史烈); Xianmin Zhang(章献民); Jun Cong(丛军); Kangsheng Chen(陈抗生); Jian Xu(徐坚)

    2004-01-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based chemical sensor using hydrogel, a swellable polymer, as sensitive element is demonstrated. The sensing mechanism relies on the shift of Bragg wavelength due to the stress resulted from volume change of sensitive swellable hydrogel responding to the change of external environment. A polyacrylamide hydrogel fiber grating chemical sensor is made, and the experiments on its sensitivity to the salinity are performed. The sensitivity is low due to the less stress from the shrinking or swelling of hydrogels. Reducing the cross diameter of the grating through etching with hydrofluoric acid can greatly improve the sensitivity of the sensor.

  11. Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geonyeop; Yang, Gwangseok; Cho, Ara; Han, Jeong Woo; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-05-25

    We report defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (e.g., 33% improvement in NO2 sensing and 614% improvement in NH3 sensing). A conventional reactive ion etching system was used to introduce the defects in a controlled manner. The sensitivity of graphene-based chemical sensors increased with increasing defect density until the vacancy-dominant region was reached. In addition, the mechanism of gas sensing was systematically investigated via experiments and density functional theory calculations, which indicated that the vacancy defect is a major contributing factor to the enhanced sensitivity. This study revealed that defect engineering in graphene has significant potential for fabricating ultra-sensitive graphene chemical sensors. PMID:26679757

  12. Chemically Sensitive Imaging of MgP with STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Greg; Ho, Wilson

    2014-03-01

    Since its invention, the STM has been limited by its lack of sensitivity to chemical structures in molecules. Recent advances in scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as non-contact AFM and scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy have enabled imaging of the internal structure and bonding of aromatic molecules such as pentacene and PTCDA. Here, we present a novel method of using the STM to image magnesium porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Au(110) with chemical sensitivity. In our previous study, we have shown that hydrogen molecules weakly adsorb on Au(110), exhibiting both vibrational and rotational IETS spectra. Exploiting the sensitivity of the vibrational and rotational mode energies to the local chemical environment, we perform dI/dV and d2I/dV2 imaging at different bias voltages, highlighting the various parts of the MgP molecule. In particular, we are able to image the positions of the nitrogen atoms in MgP. d2I/dV2 spectral mapping reveals that the origin of the chemical sensitivity comes from an energy shift of the rotational peak as the tip is scanned across the molecule, indicating a changing potential landscape for the H2. Similar d2I/dV2 imaging with a CO terminated tip reveals no chemical sensitivity to nitrogen.

  13. Experimental strategies for research on multiple chemical sensitivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, B.

    1997-01-01

    Skepticism about the validity of the multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) syndrome stems in part from the lack of supporting experimental data. Performing the relevant experiments requires investigators to take account of broad variations in sensitivity and the need to establish reproducibility. The research approach best suited for MCS studies is the single-subject design. In contrast with conventional group designs, such designs emphasize repeated observations on individual subjects. Repeate...

  14. Moods as ups and downs of the motivation pendulum: Revisiting Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Pearlson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motivation is a key neurobehavioral concept underlying adaptive responses to environmental incentives and threats. As such, dysregulation of motivational processes may be critical in the formation of abnormal behavioral patterns/tendencies. According to the long standing model of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST, motivation behaviors are driven by three neurobehavioral systems mediating the sensitivity to punishment, reward or goal-conflict. Corresponding to current neurobehavioral theories in psychiatry, this theory links abnormal motivational drives to abnormal behavior; viewing depression and mania as two abnormal extremes of reward driven processes leading to either under or over approach tendencies, respectively. We revisit the RST framework in the context of bipolar disorder (BD and challenge this concept by suggesting that dysregulated interactions of both punishment and reward related processes better account for the psychological and neural abnormalities observed in BD. We further present an integrative model positing that the three parallel motivation systems currently proposed by the RST model, can be viewed as subsystems in a large-scale neurobehavioral network of motivational decision making.

  15. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  16. Reactive chromophores for sensitive and selective detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; Wald, Lara; Paul, Kateri; Hancock, Lawrence F.

    2005-05-01

    A reactive chromophore developed at MIT exhibits sensitive and selective detection of surrogates for G-class nerve agents. This reporter acts by reacting with the agent to form an intermediate that goes through an internal cyclization reaction. The reaction locks the molecule into a form that provides a strong fluorescent signal. Using a fluorescent sensor platform, Nomadics has demonstrated rapid and sensitive detection of reactive simulants such as diethyl chloro-phosphate (simulant for sarin, soman, and related agents) and diethyl cyanophosphate (simulant for tabun). Since the unreacted chromophore does not fluoresce at the excitation wavelength used for the cyclized reporter, the onset of fluo-rescence can be easily detected. This fluorescence-based detection method provides very high sensitivity and could enable rapid detection at permissible exposure levels. Tests with potential interferents show that the reporter is very selective, with responses from only a few highly toxic, electrophilic chemicals such as phosgene, thionyl chloride, and strong acids such as HF, HCl, and nitric acid. Dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), a common and inactive simu-lant for other CW detectors, is not reactive enough to generate a signal. The unique selectivity to chemical reactivity means that a highly toxic and hazardous chemical is present when the reporter responds and illustrates that this sensor can provide very low false alarm rates. Current efforts focus on demonstrating the sensitivity and range of agents and toxic industrial chemicals detected with this reporter as well as developing additional fluorescent reporters for a range of chemical reactivity classes. The goal is to produce a hand-held sensor that can sensitively detect a broad range of chemical warfare agent and toxic industrial chemical threats.

  17. On a "Level-Sensitive" Headcount Ratio: Revisiting Shorrocks' Poverty Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sreenivasan

    2008-01-01

    It is often argued that indicators of achievement or deprivation should be measured such that they display a property of "level-sensitivity", whereby a given change in the indicator acquires a greater significance the higher (lower) the level of achievement (deprivation) at which the change occurs. In this note, it is shown that a level-sensitive…

  18. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy to treat multiple chemical sensitivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, S; Hauge, Christian Riis; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2012-01-01

    of an 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy program (MBCT) for adults with MCS and to evaluate possible effects on psychological distress and illness perception. The study design was a randomized clinical trial. The MBCT programme comprised 8 weekly sessions of 2½ hours. Forty-two adults were......Multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) is a medically unexplained and socially disabling disorder characterized by negative health effects attributed to exposure to common airborne chemicals. Currently, there is no evidence-based treatment. The objectives of the study were to assess the feasibility...... screened for eligibility and 37 were included. Mean age of the participants was 51.6 years, 35 (94.6%) were female and 21 (56.8%) were unemployed. Measures of psychological distress and illness perceptions were assessed at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks and at 3 months follow-up. No significant differences in...

  19. Introducing Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Reactions Using the Gillespie Algorithm and MATLAB: Revisited and Augmented

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoti, A.; Fan, L. T.; Cruz, J.; Chou, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    The stochastic simulation of chemical reactions, specifically, a simple reversible chemical reaction obeying the first-order, i.e., linear, rate law, has been presented by Martinez-Urreaga and his collaborators in this journal. The current contribution is intended to complement and augment their work in two aspects. First, the simple reversible…

  20. Chemical Kinetics, Heat Transfer, and Sensor Dynamics Revisited in a Simple Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sad, Maria E.; Sad, Mario R.; Castro, Alberto A.; Garetto, Teresita F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experiment about thermal effects in chemical reactors is described, which can be used to illustrate chemical reactor models, the determination and validation of their parameters, and some simple principles of heat transfer and sensor dynamics. It is based in the exothermic reaction between aqueous solutions of sodium thiosulfate and…

  1. The credible forensic psychiatric evaluation in multiple chemical sensitivity litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R I

    1998-01-01

    The forensic psychiatrist must be able to perform a credible psychiatric evaluation and render a competent psychiatric opinion in hotly contested multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) litigation. Forensic psychiatrists are often requested to evaluate MCS claimants by third party payers, employers, lawyers, and government agencies regarding health care costs and disability payments, workers' compensation claims, unemployment benefits, workplace accommodation reimbursements for special housing and environmental needs, civil litigation, and other claims. The credible forensic psychiatric evaluation of MCS litigants is described using the multiaxial diagnostic system of DSM-IV. Forensic psychiatrists must avoid becoming polarized by the current MCS controversy. The ethical requirements of honesty and striving for objectivity can be met by keeping separate the roles of therapist and expert, staying abreast of the scientific literature regarding MCS, and understanding the role of the psychiatric expert in MCS litigation. PMID:9785280

  2. Chemosensory perception, symptoms and autonomic responses during chemical exposure in multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna Sara; Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a prevalent medically unexplained symptom characterized by symptom reactions to everyday chemical exposure below hygienic thresholds. The aim of this study was to investigate the expressions of hyper-reactivity in MCS during whole-body exposure to l...... found for breathing rate or tonic electrodermal activity responses. Conclusions: We conclude that MCS sufferers differ from healthy controls in terms of autonomic responses, symptoms and chemosensory perception during chemical exposure......./m3. Results: MCS participants, compared with controls, reported greater perceived odor intensities, more unpleasantness to the exposure and increasing symptoms over time. MCS participants also expressed higher pulse rate and lower pulse rate variability than controls did. No group differences were...

  3. Application of Metabolomics to Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Yuki; Nakashita, Chihiro; Lu, Xi; Hisada, Aya; Miyazaki, Wataru; Azuma, Kenichi; Tanigawa, Mari; Uchiyama, Iwao; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is an acquired chronic disorder characterized by nonspecific symptoms in multiple organ systems associated with exposure to low-level chemicals. Diagnosis of MCS can be difficult because of the inability to assess the causal relationship between exposure and symptoms. No standardized objective measures for the identification of MCS and no precise definition of this disorder have been established. Recent technological advances in mass spectrometry have significantly improved our capacity to obtain more data from each biological sample. Metabolomics comprises the methods and techniques that are used to determine the small-level molecules in biofluids and tissues. The metabolomic profile-the metabolome-has multiple applications in many biological sciences, including the development of new diagnostic tools for medicine. We performed metabolomics to detect the difference between 9 patients with MCS and 9 controls. We identified 183 substances whose levels were beyond the normal detection limit. The most prominent differences included significant increases in the levels of both hexanoic acid and pelargonic acid, and also a significant decrease in the level of acetylcarnitine in patients with MCS. In conclusion, using metabolomics analysis, we uncovered a hitherto unrecognized alteration in the levels of metabolites in MCS. These changes may have important biological implications and may have a significant potential for use as biomarkers. PMID:26832623

  4. [Recent development in animal testing to predict the skin and respiratory sensitizing potential of chemicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Kohji

    2010-01-01

    The identification of chemicals with skin and/or respiratory sensitizing potential is important for the prevention of allergic diseases in both living and work environments. Although a number of animal models for respiratory allergic diseases have been reported, none of these models meets the goals of broad assessments of chemical sensitizing potential. We are attempting to develop a test for predicting the respiratory sensitization of chemicals. In the evaluation of skin sensitization of chemicals, the mostly used predictive tests are the guinea pig maximization test, Buehler test, and mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA). However, only LLNA has been validated formally and independently. Recent studies have revealed that EC3 estimated by LLNA correlates well with human skin sensitizing potency and the threshold for the induction of skin sensitization in the human repeat patch test. Thus, LLNA can predict the potency of skin sensitizing potential of a chemical and its risk in humans. PMID:20134104

  5. Allergological and Toxicological Aspects in a Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo D. Pigatto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS is a chronic condition characterized by an exaggerated response to toxicants. We ascertained the prevalence of allergy to metals and toxicological aspects in MCS patients. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of 41 patients with MCS. We performed patch testing (n=21 for dental series and did lymphocyte transformation test (n=18 for metals. We measured mercury in samples of blood (n=19, urine (n=19, saliva (n=20, and scalp hair (n=17 to investigate the association between mercury levels and cases of MCS. Results. The prevalence of metal immune hypersensitivity in a subset of 26 patients was 92.3 percent. Elevations of mercury occurred in 81.2 percent (26 of 32. The mean (±SD in blood concentrations of mercury was 7.6±13.6 μg/L; mean in urine was 1.9±2.5 μg/L; mean in scalp hair was 2.2±2.5 μg/g; mean in saliva was 38.1±52.1 μg/L. Subgroup analyses showed that elevation of mercury levels in biological matrices were associated with mercury amalgams in patients with MCS (22 patients, compared with controls (8 patients (odds ratio 11 : 95 percent confidence interval 1.5 to 81.6; P=0.023. Conclusions. Our data show an increased prevalence of metal allergy and elevation of mercury levels in bioindicators among patients with MCS.

  6. Clinical characteristics of chemical sensitivity: an illustrative case history of asthma and MCS.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, G H

    1997-01-01

    A case history of the induction of asthma and chemical sensitivity in a 42-year-old registered nurse illustrates several of the characteristic features of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). This patient's problems started shortly after moving into a new home under construction, with associated chemical exposures. Other MCS patients report the onset of the condition with other chemical exposures such as those encountered at their places of work or use of pesticides at their residences. Patie...

  7. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]·2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ∼90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance ((19)F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8](2-) anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2(6+) unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8](2-) and [Re2Br8](2-) analogues. PMID:27171734

  8. Prymnesium parvum revisited: relationship between allelopathy, ichthyotoxicity, and chemical profiles in 5 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossom, Hannah E; Rasmussen, Silas A; Andersen, Nikolaj G; Larsen, Thomas O; Nielsen, Kristian F; Hansen, Per J

    2014-12-01

    Bioassay-guided discovery of ichthyotoxic algal compounds using in vivo fish assays is labor intensive, costly, and highly regulated. Since the mode of action of most known algal-mediated fish-killing toxins is damage to the cell membranes in the gills, various types of cell-based bioassays are often used for bioassay guided purification of new ichthyotoxins. Here we tested the hypothesis that allelopathy is related to ichthyotoxicity and thus that a microalgal bioassay can be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity by comparing the toxicity of five strains of Prymnesium parvum toward rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 10 g) and the microalga Teleaulax acuta. No relationship between median effective concentrations (EC50s) on fish and median lethal concentrations (LC50s) on algae was observed in the 5 strains showing that a microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity. Fish were more sensitive to P. parvum with EC50s ranging from 6×10(3) to 40×10(3) cells ml(-1), compared to the test alga where LC50s ranged from 30×10(3) to nearly non-toxic at 500×10(3) cells ml(-1). In addition, the cellular concentrations of two recently suggested ichthyotoxins produced by P. parvum, the "golden algae toxins", GAT 512 and a novel GAT 510, did not show any relationship to either ichthyotoxicity or allelopathy, and are not the biologically relevant toxins, but are simply lipids found in algal chloroplasts. Finally, we demonstrate that the recently suggested ichthyotoxin, oleamide, could not be detected in any of the five P. parvum strains above the limit of detection, nor was it found in a (13)C-labeled strain. Instead we document that oleamide can easily be extracted from plastic materials, which may have been the source of oleamide reported previously. PMID:25456230

  9. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K.; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-06

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]· 2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ~90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (19F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8] 2- anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2 6+ unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8] 2- and [Re2Br8] 2- analogues.

  10. Prymnesium parvum revisited: Relationship between allelopathy, ichthyotoxicity, and chemical profiles in 5 strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blossom, Hannah E., E-mail: hblossom@bio.ku.dk [Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Strandpromenaden 5, 3000 Helsingør (Denmark); Rasmussen, Silas A. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 221, 2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Nikolaj G. [Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Strandpromenaden 5, 3000 Helsingør (Denmark); Larsen, Thomas O.; Nielsen, Kristian F. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 221, 2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Per J. [Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Strandpromenaden 5, 3000 Helsingør (Denmark)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Five strains of P. parvum were tested for toxicity towards rainbow trout and microalgae. • Toxicity towards microalgae was not correlated to toxicity towards fish. • A microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a reliable proxy for ichthyotoxicity. • Concentrations of GATs were low and not correlated to effects on fish or on algae. • P. parvum does not produce oleamide based on {sup 13}C labeling and extraction in glass. - Abstract: Bioassay-guided discovery of ichthyotoxic algal compounds using in vivo fish assays is labor intensive, costly, and highly regulated. Since the mode of action of most known algal-mediated fish-killing toxins is damage to the cell membranes in the gills, various types of cell-based bioassays are often used for bioassay guided purification of new ichthyotoxins. Here we tested the hypothesis that allelopathy is related to ichthyotoxicity and thus that a microalgal bioassay can be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity by comparing the toxicity of five strains of Prymnesium parvum toward rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 10 g) and the microalga Teleaulax acuta. No relationship between median effective concentrations (EC{sub 50}s) on fish and median lethal concentrations (LC{sub 50}s) on algae was observed in the 5 strains showing that a microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity. Fish were more sensitive to P. parvum with EC{sub 50}s ranging from 6 × 10{sup 3} to 40 × 10{sup 3} cells ml{sup −1}, compared to the test alga where LC{sub 50}s ranged from 30 × 10{sup 3} to nearly non-toxic at 500 × 10{sup 3} cells ml{sup −1}. In addition, the cellular concentrations of two recently suggested ichthyotoxins produced by P. parvum, the “golden algae toxins”, GAT 512 and a novel GAT 510, did not show any relationship to either ichthyotoxicity or allelopathy, and are not the biologically relevant toxins, but are simply lipids found in algal chloroplasts. Finally, we demonstrate that the recently

  11. Prymnesium parvum revisited: Relationship between allelopathy, ichthyotoxicity, and chemical profiles in 5 strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Five strains of P. parvum were tested for toxicity towards rainbow trout and microalgae. • Toxicity towards microalgae was not correlated to toxicity towards fish. • A microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a reliable proxy for ichthyotoxicity. • Concentrations of GATs were low and not correlated to effects on fish or on algae. • P. parvum does not produce oleamide based on 13C labeling and extraction in glass. - Abstract: Bioassay-guided discovery of ichthyotoxic algal compounds using in vivo fish assays is labor intensive, costly, and highly regulated. Since the mode of action of most known algal-mediated fish-killing toxins is damage to the cell membranes in the gills, various types of cell-based bioassays are often used for bioassay guided purification of new ichthyotoxins. Here we tested the hypothesis that allelopathy is related to ichthyotoxicity and thus that a microalgal bioassay can be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity by comparing the toxicity of five strains of Prymnesium parvum toward rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 10 g) and the microalga Teleaulax acuta. No relationship between median effective concentrations (EC50s) on fish and median lethal concentrations (LC50s) on algae was observed in the 5 strains showing that a microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity. Fish were more sensitive to P. parvum with EC50s ranging from 6 × 103 to 40 × 103 cells ml−1, compared to the test alga where LC50s ranged from 30 × 103 to nearly non-toxic at 500 × 103 cells ml−1. In addition, the cellular concentrations of two recently suggested ichthyotoxins produced by P. parvum, the “golden algae toxins”, GAT 512 and a novel GAT 510, did not show any relationship to either ichthyotoxicity or allelopathy, and are not the biologically relevant toxins, but are simply lipids found in algal chloroplasts. Finally, we demonstrate that the recently suggested ichthyotoxin, oleamide, could not be detected in any of the

  12. Increased capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia in patients with multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger;

    2011-01-01

    the underlying cause of pathophysiological mechanisms triggering multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) remains disputed.Recently, alterations in the central nervous system, for example,central sensitization, similar to various chronic pain disorders, have been suggested. Capsaicin is used in...... experimental pain models to provoke peripheral and central sensitization. In patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia and temporal summation were assessed as markers for abnormal central nociceptive processing together with neurogenic inflammation (flare)....

  13. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were...

  14. Chemical protection and sensitization to ionizing radiation:molecular investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical radioprotection and radiosensitization are induced by the presence of certain chemical compounds, which reduce or enhance the effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms. Such substances are either naturally present or may be artificially introduced in the living cells. Chemical radioprotectors are interesting for possible application in the health protection of both professionally exposed workers and patients treated by radiation for diagnostic and thereapeutic purposes. Interest in chemical radiosensitization has increased recently because of its potential application in the radiotherapy of tumours. Both radioprotection and radiosensitization occur by means of complicated mechanisms, which at first correspond to very fast reactions. The mechanism of the interaction between such substances and radiation-induced biological radicals has been investigated by means of pulse radiolysis and rapid mixing techniques. Examples of the application of these techniques are given to illustrate how information has been obtained on the molecular basis of radiation chemical modi-fication at the cellular level. In particular some interactions between model systems of biological interest (DNA, DNA components, enzymes, amino acids, etc.) and sulphur-containing radioprotectors (glutathione, cysteine, etc.) and/or electroaffinic radiosensitizers, are described. (H.K.)

  15. CPMG sequences with enhanced sensitivity to chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved relaxation-compensated Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences are reported for studying chemical exchange of backbone 15N nuclei. In contrast to the original methods [J. P. Loria, M. Rance, and A. G. Palmer, J. Am. Chem. Soc.121, 2331-2332 (1999)], phenomenological relaxation rate constants obtained using the new sequences do not contain contributions from 1H-1H dipole-dipole interactions. Consequently, detection and quantification of chemical exchange processes are facilitated because the relaxation rate constant in the limit of fast pulsing can be obtained independently from conventional 15N spin relaxation measurements. The advantages of the experiments are demonstrated using basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

  16. Sensitive and fast mutation detection by solid phase chemical cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Lotte; Justesen, Just; Kruse, Torben A

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a solid phase chemical cleavage method (SpCCM) for screening large DNA fragments for mutations. All reactions can be carried out in microtiterwells from the first amplification of the patient (or test) DNA through the search for mutations. The reaction time is significantly...... reduced compared to the conventional chemical cleavage method (CCM), and even by using a uniformly labelled probe, the exact position and nature of the mutation can be revealed. The SpCCM is suitable for automatization using a workstation to carry out the reactions and a fluorescent detection-based DNA...

  17. Non-allergic cutaneous reactions in airborne chemical sensitivity--a population based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Linneberg, Allan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan;

    2011-01-01

    relationship between cutaneous reactions from patch testing and self-reported severity of chemical sensitivity to common airborne chemicals. A total of 3460 individuals participating in a general health examination, Health 2006, were patch tested with allergens from the European standard series and screened...... for chemical sensitivity with a standardised questionnaire dividing the participants into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity. Both allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions--defined as irritative, follicular, or doubtful allergic reactions--were analysed in relationship with severity of...... chemical sensitivity. Associations were controlled for the possible confounding effects of sex, age, asthma, eczema, atopic dermatitis, psychological and social factors, and smoking habits. In unadjusted analyses we found associations between allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions on patch testing...

  18. Quantum limit for avian magnetoreception: How sensitive can a chemical compass be?

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Jianming; Plenio, Martin B

    2011-01-01

    The chemical compass model, based on radical pair reactions, is a fascinating idea to explain avian magnetoreception. At present, questions concerning the key ingredients responsible for the high sensitivity of a chemical compass and the possible role of quantum coherence and decoherence remain unsolved. Here, we investigate the optimized hyperfine coupling for a chemical compass in order to achieve the best magnetic field sensitivity. We demonstrate that its magnetic sensitivity limit can be further extended by simple quantum control and may benefit from additional decoherence. The present results also provide routes towards the design a biomimetic weak magnetic field sensor.

  19. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Gas Sensitive Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Vallejos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of recent research efforts and developments for the fabrication of metal-oxide gas sensors using chemical vapour deposition (CVD, presenting its potential advantages as a materials synthesis technique for gas sensors along with a discussion of their sensing performance. Thin films typically have poorer gas sensing performance compared to traditional screen printed equivalents, attributed to reduced porosity, but the ability to integrate materials directly with the sensor platform provides important process benefits compared to competing synthetic techniques. We conclude that these advantages are likely to drive increased interest in the use of CVD for gas sensor materials over the next decade, whilst the ability to manipulate deposition conditions to alter microstructure can help mitigate the potentially reduced performance in thin films, hence the current prospects for use of CVD in this field look excellent.

  20. Impact of self-reported multiple chemical sensitivity on everyday life: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Brorson, Stig; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a descriptive term covering symptoms attributed to exposure to common airborne chemicals. There are no internationally accepted criteria, but it has been suggested that MCS is a chronic and disabling condition. However, details of the impact of M...

  1. Direct Atom Imaging by Chemical-Sensitive Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Tobias; Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert; Krull, Dominique; Westphal, Carsten

    2016-05-11

    In order to understand the physical and chemical properties of advanced materials, functional molecular adsorbates, and protein structures, a detailed knowledge of the atomic arrangement is essential. Up to now, if subsurface structures are under investigation, only indirect methods revealed reliable results of the atoms' spatial arrangement. An alternative and direct method is three-dimensional imaging by means of holography. Holography was in fact proposed for electron waves, because of the electrons' short wavelength at easily accessible energies. Further, electron waves are ideal structure probes on an atomic length scale, because electrons have a high scattering probability even for light elements. However, holographic reconstructions of electron diffraction patterns have in the past contained severe image artifacts and were limited to at most a few tens of atoms. Here, we present a general reconstruction algorithm that leads to high-quality atomic images showing thousands of atoms. Additionally, we show that different elements can be identified by electron holography for the example of FeS2. PMID:27070050

  2. Moods as ups and downs of the motivation pendulum: revisiting reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) in bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gonen, Tal; Sharon, Haggai; Pearlson, Godfrey; Hendler, Talma

    2014-01-01

    Motivation is a key neurobehavioral concept underlying adaptive responses to environmental incentives and threats. As such, dysregulation of motivational processes may be critical in the formation of abnormal behavioral patterns/tendencies. According to the long standing model of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), motivation behaviors are driven by three neurobehavioral systems mediating the sensitivity to punishment, reward or goal-conflict. Corresponding to current neurobehavioral ...

  3. Non-allergic cutaneous reactions in airborne chemical sensitivity--a population based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Dirksen, Asger;

    2011-01-01

    relationship between cutaneous reactions from patch testing and self-reported severity of chemical sensitivity to common airborne chemicals. A total of 3460 individuals participating in a general health examination, Health 2006, were patch tested with allergens from the European standard series and screened...... chemical sensitivity. Associations were controlled for the possible confounding effects of sex, age, asthma, eczema, atopic dermatitis, psychological and social factors, and smoking habits. In unadjusted analyses we found associations between allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions on patch testing...

  4. Some Sensitivity Studies of Chemical Transport Simulated in Models of the Soil-Plant-Litter System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C.L.

    2002-10-28

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO{sub 2}) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO{sub 2} and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  5. Lakatos Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social sciences as…

  6. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  7. Amphibian Metamorphosis: A Sensitive Life Stage to Chemical and Non-chemical Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphibian metamorphosis is a dynamic period of post-embryonic development which transforms the larval anuran into the juvenile. The body structure is remodeled through a variety of processes which may be perturbed by exposure to chemicals as well as other environmental stressors....

  8. Gas chemical sensitivity of a CMOS MEMS cantilever functionalized via evaporation driven assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work demonstrates an electrostatically actuated resonant microcantilever fabricated in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor process and functionalized with a chemically sorbent polymer layer for the detection of volatile organic compounds. Deposition of the chemically sorbent layer is controlled through evaporation-driven assembly. Analytical and finite element analysis models of the deposited polymer layer on the microcantilever resonant frequency and mass sensitivity are presented. Fabrication of the chemical sensor, including a description of polymer deposition through evaporation-driven assembly within a capillary, is detailed. The completely functionalized resonator demonstrates a limit of detection of 1.6 ppm for toluene. An optimal polymer sensitive layer deposition of 42% of the total beam length is measured from frequency instability and sensitivity tests. (paper)

  9. Resonant absorption of a chemically sensitive layer based on waveguide gratings

    OpenAIRE

    Davoine, Laurent; Paeder, Vincent; Basset, Guillaume; Schnieper, Marc; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    A colorimetric sensor providing a direct visual indication of chemical contamination was developed. The sensor is a combination of a chemically sensitive dye layer and a resonant waveguide grating. Enhancement of the light absorption by the photonic structure can be clearly seen. The detection is based on the color change of the reflected light after exposure to a gas or a liquid. Low-cost fabrication and compatibility with environments where electricity cannot be used make this device very a...

  10. Experiences of persons with multiple chemical sensitivity with mental health providers

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson PR; Lockaby SD; Bryant JM

    2016-01-01

    Pamela Reed Gibson, Sharon D Lockaby, Jenna Michele Bryant Department of Psychology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA, USA Abstract: In this paper, we summarize the results of an online survey of persons in the United States with chemical intolerance/multiple chemical sensitivity who sought help from mental health providers, including counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, and others. Respondents reported on their most recent contact with a provider, describing reasons for the c...

  11. Zeolite fiber integrated microsensors for highly sensitive point detection of chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hui, Juan; Dong, Junhang; Xiao, Hai

    2006-05-01

    A zeolite-fiber integrated chemical sensor was developed for in situ point detection of chemical warfare agents. The sensor was made by fine-polishing the MFI polycrystalline zeolite thin film synthesized on the endface of the single mode optical fiber. The sensor device operates by measuring the optical thickness changes of the zeolite thin film caused by the adsorption of analytes into the zeolite channels. The sensor was demonstrated for sensitive detection of toluene and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP).

  12. Proteomic Alterations in B Lymphocytes of Sensitized Mice in a Model of Chemical-Induced Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Haenen; Jeroen A.J. Vanoirbeek; Vanessa De Vooght; Liliane Schoofs; Benoit Nemery; Elke Clynen; Hoet, Peter H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim The role of B-lymphocytes in chemical-induced asthma is largely unknown. Recent work demonstrated that transferring B lymphocytes from toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-sensitized mice into naïve mice, B cell KO mice and SCID mice, triggered an asthma-like response in these mice after a subsequent TDI-challenge. We applied two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to describe the “sensitized signature” of B lymphocytes comparing TDI-sensitized mice with control mi...

  13. Sensemaking Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Robin; Cornelissen, Joep

    2014-01-01

    We critique and extend theory on organizational sensemaking around three themes. First, we investigate sense arising non-productively and so beyond any instrumental relationship with things; second, we consider how sense is experienced through mood as well as our cognitive skills of manipulation ...... research by revisiting Weick’s seminal reading of Norman Maclean’s book surrounding the tragic events of a 1949 forest fire at Mann Gulch, USA....

  14. Identifying and characterizing chemical skin sensitizers without animal testing: Colipa's research and method development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, P; Ashikaga, T; Bessou-Touya, S; Schepky, A; Gerberick, F; Kern, P; Marrec-Fairley, M; Maxwell, G; Ovigne, J-M; Sakaguchi, H; Reisinger, K; Tailhardat, M; Martinozzi-Teissier, S; Winkler, P

    2010-09-01

    The sensitizing potential of chemicals is usually identified and characterized using one of the available animal test methods, such as the mouse local lymph node assay. Due to the increasing public and political concerns regarding the use of animals for the screening of new chemicals, the Colipa Skin Tolerance Task Force collaborates with and/or funds research groups to increase and apply our understanding of the events occurring during the acquisition of skin sensitization. Knowledge gained from this research is used to support the development and evaluation of novel alternative approaches for the identification and characterization of skin sensitizing chemicals. At present one in chemico (direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA)) and two in vitro test methods (cell based assays (MUSST and h-CLAT)) have been evaluated within Colipa inter-laboratory ring trials and accepted by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) for pre-validation. Data from all three test methods will be used to support the development of testing strategy approaches for skin sensitizer potency prediction. The replacement of the need for animal testing for skin sensitization risk assessment is viewed as ultimately achievable and the next couple of years should set the timeline for this milestone. PMID:20624454

  15. Ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR for a rapid and sensitive chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, Susanna; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V.; Mankinen, Otto; Zhang, Guannan; Kantola, Anu M.; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian; Koptyug, Igor V.; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2015-09-01

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy relies on the versatile chemical information conveyed by spectra. To complement conventional NMR, Laplace NMR explores diffusion and relaxation phenomena to reveal details on molecular motions. Under a broad concept of ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR, here we introduce an ultrafast diffusion-relaxation correlation experiment enhancing the resolution and information content of corresponding 1D experiments as well as reducing the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude or more as compared with its conventional 2D counterpart. We demonstrate that the method allows one to distinguish identical molecules in different physical environments and provides chemical resolution missing in NMR spectra. Although the sensitivity of the new method is reduced due to spatial encoding, the single-scan approach enables one to use hyperpolarized substances to boost the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the overall sensitivity of multidimensional Laplace NMR.

  16. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  17. Development and validation of animal-free test methods to predict the skin sensitizing potential of chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Bauch, Caroline D.

    2013-01-01

    Skin sensitization is the development of the allergic contact dermatitis caused by chemicals. Regulatory accepted methods to assess skin sensitizing potential of chemicals are animal based tests, but increasing interest in animal welfare presses the development of animal-free methods. The aim of this work was the development, establishment and validation of several alternative methods to animal testing to predict the skin sensitizing potential of chemicals. Therefore several methods reflectin...

  18. Allergic skin inflammation induced by chemical sensitizers is controlled by the transcription factor Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ali, Zeina; Gerbeix, Cédric; Hemon, Patrice; Esser, Philipp R; Martin, Stefan F; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia

    2013-07-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is induced by low-molecular weight electrophilic chemicals and metal ions. Chemical contact sensitizers trigger reactive oxygen species production and provoke electrophilic stress, leading to the accumulation of the transcription factor nuclear-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in innate immune cell types. The objective of this work was to identify the role of Nrf2 in the regulation of ACD. We used the local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the mouse ear swelling test (MEST) to study the role of Nrf2 in both the sensitization and elicitation phase in nrf2 knockout (nrf2(-/-)) and wild-type (nrf2(+/+)) mice. Five chemicals were used: two compounds known to react with cysteine residues, 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and cinnamaldehyde (CinA); one sensitizer known to exhibit mixed reactivity to cysteine and lysine residues, isophorone diisocyanate; and one reacting specifically with lysine residues, trimellitic anhydride and croton oil, a well-known irritant. In the MEST assay, DNCB (1 and 2%) induced a significant increase in ear thickness in nrf2(-/-) compared with nrf2(+/+) mice, suggesting a role for Nrf2 in the control of the inflammatory process. When DNCB was used at 0.25 and 0.5% or when mice were treated with CinA, inflammation was found only in nrf2(-/-) mice. In the LLNA, all chemical sensitizers induced an increase of lymphocyte proliferation in nrf2(-/-) compared with nrf2(+/+) mice for the same chemical concentration. These results reveal an important role for Nrf2 in controlling ACD and lymphocyte proliferation in response to sensitizers. PMID:23564646

  19. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R., E-mail: mundy.william@epa.gov

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  20. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  1. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chonglin; Nash, Patrick; Ma, Chunrui; Enriquez, Erik; Wang, Haibing; Xu, Xing; Bao, Shangyong; Collins, Gregory

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+d} (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  2. Pyruvate carboxylase as a sensitive protein biomarker for exogenous steroid chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessing protein responses to endocrine disrupting chemicals is critical for understanding the mechanisms of chemical action and for the assessment of hazards. In this study, the response of the liver proteome of male rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) and females treated with 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) were analyzed. A total of 23 and 24 proteins were identified with differential expression in response to E2 and MT, respectively. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) was the only common differentially expressed protein in both males and females after E2- and MT-treatments. The mRNA as well as the protein levels of PC were significantly down-regulated compared with that of the controls (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that endocrine disruptors interfere with genes and proteins of the TCA cycle and PC may be a sensitive biomarker of exposure to exogenous steroid chemicals in the liver of fish. - Highlights: • The hepatic proteomes of rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) exposed to E2 and MT were analyzed. • Differentially expressed proteins (23 and 24 respectively) were identified following E2 and MT exposure. • Four differentially expressed proteins associated with chemical stimulus were characterized. • PC was identified as a responsive biomarker for both estrogens and androgens. - Our results suggest PC may be a sensitive biomarker of exposure to exogenous steroid chemicals in the liver of fish

  3. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Christian Riise; Rasmussen, Alice; Piet, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a medically unexplained condition characterized by symptoms from multiple organ systems following the perception of common odorants. The condition can cause severe functional impairment for afflicted individuals. The aim of this study was to assess...... the effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for individuals with MCS. METHODS: The intention-to-treat sample (ITT) included 69 individuals who had been randomized to either MBCT or treatment as usual (TAU). The primary outcome measure was the Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity...

  4. Chemical Sensing Sensitivity of Long-Period Grating Sensor Enhanced by Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jien-Neng Wang; Jaw-Luen Tang

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective method is proposed to improve spectral sensitivity and detection limit of long period gratings for refractive index or chemical sensing, where the grating surface is modified by a monolayer of colloidal gold nanoparticles. The transmission spectra and optical properties of gold nanospheres vary with the different refractive index of the environment near the surface of gold nanospheres. The sensor response of gold colloids increases linearly with solvents of increasing r...

  5. Acquiring symptoms in response to odors: a learning perspective on multiple chemical sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bergh, Omer; Devriese, Stephan; Winters, Winnie; Veulemans, Hendrik; Nemery, Benoit; Eelen, Paul; Van de Woestijne, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter, a learning account is discussed as a potential explanation for the symptoms in multiple chemical sensitivity. Clinical evidence is scarce and anecdotal. A laboratory model provides more convincing results. After a few breathing trials containing CO2-enriched air as an unconditioned stimulus in a compound with harmless odor substances as conditioned stimuli, subjective symptoms are elicited and respiratory behavior is altered by the odors only. Also, mental images can become c...

  6. Pattern formation of a thin film is characteristically sensitive to chemical stimuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface structure of a soy milk skin, as a simple artificial film, was found to be characteristically sensitive to chemical stimuli. The surface structure of the film was imaged by AFM and the shape and size of concavities on the film were analyzed to characterize the chemical response. This characteristic pattern formation of the soy milk skin is discussed in relation to the surface aggregation, electronic charge and solubility of soy protein molecules around the air/water interface. We believe that the investigation of such an artificial film prepared under nonequilibrium conditions could lead to the creation of a novel artificial film that can variously form the spatial structure to the chemical environment

  7. Research and Development Aspects on Chemical Preparation Techniques of Photoanodes for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilofar Asim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs as a low-cost and environmentally friendly photovoltaic (PV technology has prompted many researchers to improve its efficiency and durability. The realization of these goals is impossible without taking into account the importance of the materials in DSSCs, so the focus on the preparation/deposition methods is essential. These methods can be either chemical or physical. In this study, the chemical applied methods that utilize chemical reaction to synthesize and deposit the materials are covered and categorized according to their gas phase and liquid phase precursors. Film processing techniques that can be used to enhance the materials' properties postpreparation are also included for further evaluation in this study. However, there is a variety of consideration, and certain criteria must be taken into account when selecting a specific deposition method, due to the fact that the fabrication conditions vary and are unoptimized.

  8. Assessment of the sensitizing potency of low molecular weight chemicals : employment of a regression method in vivo and in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Och, Franciscus Martinus Maria van

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important allergic diseases caused by chemicals, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) or skin sensitization, forms a serious problem for individuals experiencing such a reaction. The prevalence of CHS tends to grow proportionally to the increasing exposure to an expanding variety of chemicals. Predictive animal tests to identify sensitizing properties of chemicals are therefore carried out at a large scale. For a better risk assessment, a more quantitative assessment of the sensitiz...

  9. Prymnesium parvum revisited: relationship between allelopathy, ichthyotoxicity, and chemical profiles in 5 strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blossom, Hannah E.; Rasmussen, Silas Anselm; Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted;

    2014-01-01

    (Oncorhynchusmykiss, 10 g) and the microalga Teleaulax acuta. No relationship between median effective concentrations(EC50s) on fish and median lethal concentrations (LC50s) on algae was observed in the 5 strains showingthat a microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity. Fish were more sensitive......Bioassay-guided discovery of ichthyotoxic algal compounds using in vivo fish assays is labor intensive,costly, and highly regulated. Since the mode of action of most known algal-mediated fish-killing toxinsis damage to the cell membranes in the gills, various types of cell-based bioassays are often...... five P. parvum strains above the limit of detection, nor was it found in a13C-labeled strain. Instead we document thatoleamide can easily be extracted from plastic materials, which may have been the source of oleamidereported previously....

  10. High Sensitivity, Low Power Nano Sensors and Devices for Chemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Powell, Dan; Getty, Stephanie; Lu, Yi-Jiang

    2004-01-01

    The chemical sensor market has been projected to grow to better than $40 billion dollars worldwide within the next 10 years. Some of the primary motivations to develop nanostructured chemical sensors are monitoring and control of environmental pollution; improved diagnostics for consumption; improvement in measurement precision and accuracy; and improved detection limits for Homeland security, battlefield environments, and process and quality control of industrial applications. In each of these applications, there is demand for sensitivity, selectivity and stability of environmental and biohazard detection and capture beyond what is currently commercially available. Nanotechnology offers the ability to work at the molecular level, atom by atom, to create large structures with fundamentally new molecular organization. It is essentially concerned with materials, devices, and systems whose structures and components exhibit novel and significantly improved physical, chemical and biological properties, phenomena, and process control due to their nanoscale size. One such nanotechnology-enabled chemical sensor has been developed at NASA Ames leveraging nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxide nanobelts or nanowires, as a sensing medium bridging a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) realized through a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The DE fingers are fabricated on a silicon substrate using standard photolithography and thin film metallization techniques. It is noteworthy that the fabrication techniques employed are not confined to the silicon substrate. Through spin casting and careful substrate selection (i.e. clothing, glass, polymer, etc.), additional degrees of freedom can be exploited to enhance sensitivity or to conform to unique applications. Both in-situ growth of nanostructured materials and casting of nanostructured dispersions were used to produce analogous chemical sensing devices.

  11. Reactive chromophores for sensitive and selective detection of chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; la Grone, Marcus; Wald, Lara; Aker, Craig; Dock, Matt; Hancock, Lawrence F.; Fagan, Steve; Paul, Kateri

    2004-08-01

    A new sensor for highly toxic species including chemical warfare (CW) agents has been developed. This sensor is based on a unique CW indicating chromophore (CWIC) developed by Professor Tim Swager at MIT. The CWIC was designed to be sensitive to the reactivity that makes these chemicals so toxic. Since it requires the reactivity of the agent to be detected, the CWIC technology has shown remarkable selectivity for nerve agent surrogates and some other highly toxic species, thereby demonstrating the potential to provide low false alarm rate detection. Since the chromophore has mini-mal fluorescence prior to reaction with an electrophilic and toxic chemical, the sensor acts in a dark field fluorescence mode. This provides the sensor with exceptional sensitivity and a potential to detect priority analytes well below levels detected by current hand held sensors. Finally, it is based on a simple optical detection scheme that enables small and rugged sensors to be developed and produced at a low enough cost so they can be widely utilized.

  12. The Chemical Composition Contrast between M3 and M13 Revisited: New Abundances for 28 Giant Stars in M3

    CERN Document Server

    Sneden, C; Guhathakurta, P; Peterson, R C; Fulbright, J P; Sneden, Christopher; Kraft, Robert P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peterson, Ruth C.; Fulbright, Jon P.

    2003-01-01

    We report new chemical abundances of 23 bright red giants of the globular cluster M3, based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the Keck I telescope. Combining these data with a previously-reported small sample of M3 giants obtained with the Lick 3m telescope, we compare [X/Fe] ratios for 28 M3 giants with 35 M13 giants, and with halo field stars. All three groups exhibit C depletion with advancing evolutionary state beginning at the RGB bump region. but the overall depletion in the clusters is larger than that of the field stars. The behaviors of O, Na, Mg and Al are distinctively different among the three stellar samples. Both M3 and M13 show evidence of high-temperature proton capture synthesis from the ON, NeNa, and MgAl cycles, while there is no evidence for such synthesis among halo field stars. But the degree of such extreme proton-capture synthesis in M3 is smaller than it is in M13, and no indication that O depletions are a function of advancing evolutionary state as has been claimed for M13. We...

  13. Sensitivity analysis for the comparative assessment of chemical and radiological risks from the waste isolation pilot plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of sensitivity analyses performed on the models that define a method for the comparative assessment of chemical and radionuclide risks. The comparative risk assessment method was developed to compare the chemical and radionuclide health risks to workers and the general public that may be associated with the disposal of transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify those model variables that have the greatest impact on the estimation of chemical and radionuclide risks. This paper presents the resulting variables that ranked highest overall in sensitivity on twelve models used in these analyses

  14. Nanoporous framework materials interfaced with mechanical sensors for highly-sensitive chemical sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-Hwan; Skinner, Jack L.; Houk, Ronald J. T.; Fischer, Roland A.; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Allendorf, Mark D.; Yusenko, Kirill; Meilikhov, Mikhail; Hesketh, Peter J.; Venkatasubramanian, Anandram; Thornberg, Steven Michael

    2010-04-01

    We will describe how novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be interfaced with common mechanical sensors, such as surface acoustic wave (SAW), microcantilever array, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and subsequently be used to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Chemical detection using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices (i.e. SAWs, microcantilevers) requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Unlike traditional organic polymers, which are dense, the nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM allow for greater analyte uptake and enhance transport into and out of the sensing layer. This enhancement over traditional coatings leads to improved response times and greater sensitivity, while their ordered structure allows chemical tuning to impart selectivity. We describe here experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and volatile organic compound (VOCs), and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Molecular simulation shows that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. For example, a suite of MOFs can select for strongly interacting organics (explosives, CWMD) vs. lighter volatile organics at trace concentrations. At higher gas pressures, the CWMD are deselected in favor of the volatile organics. We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM on the surface of microcantiliver arrays, QCM crystals, and SAW devices, and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of NFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response

  15. Effect of basic additives on sensitivity and diffusion of acid in chemical amplification resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Koji; Ushirogouchi, Tohru; Nakase, Makoto

    1995-06-01

    The effect of amine additives in chemical amplification resists is discussed. Phenolic amines such as 4-aminophenol and 2-(4-aminophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane were investigated as model compounds from the viewpoint of sensitivity, diffusion and resolution. Equal molar amounts of acid and amine deactivated at the very beginning of post-exposure bake, and could not participate in decomposing the inhibitor as a catalyst. Only the acid which survived from the deactivation diffuses in the resist, decomposing the inhibitors from the middle to late stage of PEB. The basic additives reduce the diffusion range of the acid, especially for long-range diffusion, resulting in higher contrast at the interfaces between the exposed and unexposed areas. In addition, the amine concentration required is found to be less than the concentration which causes the resist sensitivity to start decreasing.

  16. Highly sensitive methanol chemical sensor based on undoped silver oxide nanoparticles prepared by a solution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have prepared silver oxide nanoparticles (NPs) by a simple solution method using reducing agents in alkaline medium. The resulting NPs were characterized by UV-vis and FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. They were deposited on a glassy carbon electrode to give a sensor with a fast response towards methanol in liquid phase. The sensor also displays good sensitivity and long-term stability, and enhanced electrochemical response. The calibration plot is linear (r2 = 0.8294) over the 0.12 mM to 0.12 M methanol concentration range. The sensitivity is ∼ 2.65 μAcm-2 mM-1, and the detection limit is 36.0 μM (at a SNR of 3). We also discuss possible future prospective uses of this metal oxide semiconductor nanomaterial in terms of chemical sensing. (author)

  17. Characterization of aerosol-containing chemical simulant clouds using a sensitive, thermal infrared imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey L.; D'Amico, Francis M.; Kolodzey, Steven J.; Qian, Jun; Polak, Mark L.; Westerberg, Karl; Chang, Clement S.

    2011-05-01

    A sensitive, ground-based thermal imaging spectrometer was deployed at the Army's Dugway Proving Ground to remotely monitor explosively released chemical-warfare-agent-simulant clouds from stand-off ranges of a few kilometers. The sensor has 128 spectral bands covering the 7.6 to 13.5 micron region. The measured cloud spectra clearly showed scattering of high-elevation-angle sky radiance by liquid aerosols or dust in the clouds: we present arguments that show why the scattering is most likely due to dust. This observation has significant implications for early detection of dust-laden chemical clouds. On one hand, detection algorithms must properly account for the scattered radiation component, which would include out-of-scene radiation components as well as a dust signature; on the other hand, this scattering gives rise to an enhanced "delta-T" for detection by a ground-based sensor.

  18. Integration of polymer electrolytes in dye sensitized solar cells by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mesoporous titanium dioxide electrode of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) has been successfully filled with polymer electrolyte to replace the conventional liquid electrolyte. Polymer electrolyte was directly synthesized and deposited using the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process, and an iodide-triiodide redox couple in different redox solvents was then incorporated into the polymer. We have investigated different candidate polymer electrolytes, including poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA). The open circuit voltage of cells fabricated with iCVD PHEMA was found to be higher when compared with a liquid electrolyte that is attributed to a lower rate of electron recombination.

  19. Experimental assessment of the sensitiveness of an electrochemical oscillator towards chemical perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela C A Ferreira

    Full Text Available In this study we address the problem of the response of a (electrochemical oscillator towards chemical perturbations of different magnitudes. The chemical perturbation was achieved by addition of distinct amounts of trifluoromethanesulfonate (TFMSA, a rather stable and non-specifically adsorbing anion, and the system under investigation was the methanol electro-oxidation reaction under both stationary and oscillatory regimes. Increasing the anion concentration resulted in a decrease in the reaction rates of methanol oxidation and a general decrease in the parameter window where oscillations occurred. Furthermore, the addition of TFMSA was found to decrease the induction period and the total duration of oscillations. The mechanism underlying these observations was derived mathematically and revealed that inhibition in the methanol oxidation through blockage of active sites was found to further accelerate the intrinsic non-stationarity of the unperturbed system. Altogether, the presented results are among the few concerning the experimental assessment of the sensitiveness of an oscillator towards chemical perturbations. The universal nature of the complex chemical oscillator investigated here might be used for reference when studying the dynamics of other less accessible perturbed networks of (biochemical reactions.

  20. The Chemical Composition Contrast between M3 and M13 Revisited: New Abundances for 28 Giant Stars in M3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneden, Christopher; Kraft, Robert P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peterson, Ruth C.; Fulbright, Jon P.

    2004-04-01

    We report new chemical abundances of 23 bright red giant members of the globular cluster M3, based on high-resolution (R~45,000) spectra obtained with the Keck I telescope. The observations, which involve the use of multislits in the HIRES Keck I spectrograph, are described in detail. Combining these data with a previously reported small sample of M3 giants obtained with the Lick 3 m telescope, we compare metallicities and [X/Fe] ratios for 28 M3 giants with a 35-star sample in the similar-metallicity cluster M13, and with Galactic halo field stars having [Fe/H]=A(Si), we derive little difference in [X/Fe] ratios in the M3, M13, or halo field samples. All three groups exhibit C depletion with advancing evolutionary state beginning at the level of the red giant branch ``bump,'' but the overall depletion of about 0.7-0.9 dex seen in the clusters is larger than that associated with the field stars. The behaviors of O, Na, Mg, and Al are distinctively different among the three stellar samples. Field halo giants and subdwarfs have a positive correlation of Na with Mg, as predicted from explosive or hydrostatic carbon burning in Type II supernova sites. Both M3 and M13 show evidence of high-temperature proton-capture synthesis from the ON, NeNa, and MgAl cycles, while there is no evidence for such synthesis among halo field stars. But the degree of such extreme proton-capture synthesis in M3 is smaller than it is in M13: the M3 giants exhibit only modest deficiencies of O and corresponding enhancements of Na, less extreme overabundances of Al, fewer stars with low Mg and correspondingly high Na, and no indication that O depletions are a function of advancing evolutionary state, as has been claimed for M13. We have also considered NGC 6752, for which Mg isotopic abundances have been reported by Yong et al. Giants in NGC 6752 and M13 satisfy the same anticorrelation of O abundances with the ratio (25Mg+26Mg)/24Mg, which measures the relative contribution of rare to

  1. Selective and Sensitive Sensing of Flame Retardant Chemicals Through Phage Display Discovered Recognition Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyo-Eon; Zueger, Chris; Chung, Woo-Jae; Wong, Winnie; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-11

    We report a highly selective and sensitive biosensor for the detection of an environmentally toxic molecule, decabrominated diphenyl ether (DBDE), one of the most common congeners of the polybrominated frame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)), using newly discovered DBDE peptide receptors integrated with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FET). The specific DBDE peptide receptor was identified using a high-throughput screening process of phage library display. The resulting binding peptide carries an interesting consensus binding pocket with two Trp-His/Asn-Trp repeats, which binds to the DBDE in a multivalent manner. We integrated the novel DBDE binding peptide onto the CNT-FET using polydiacetylene coating materials linked through cysteine-maleimide click chemistry. The resulting biosensor could detect the desired DBDE selectively with a 1 fM detection limit. Our combined approaches of selective receptor discovery, material nanocoating through click chemistry, and integration onto a sensitive CNT-FET electronic sensor for desired target chemicals will pave the way toward the rapid development of portable and easy-to-use biosensors for desired chemicals to protect our health and environment. PMID:26455834

  2. Non-specific chemical inhibition of the Fanconi anemia pathway sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquemont Céline

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum compounds such as cisplatin and carboplatin are DNA crosslinking agents widely used for cancer chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness of platinum compounds is often tempered by the acquisition of cellular drug resistance. Until now, no pharmacological approach has successfully overcome cisplatin resistance in cancer treatment. Since the Fanconi anemia (FA pathway is a DNA damage response pathway required for cellular resistance to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents, identification of small molecules that inhibit the FA pathway may reveal classes of chemicals that sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin. Results Through a cell-based screening assay of over 16,000 chemicals, we identified 26 small molecules that inhibit ionizing radiation and cisplatin-induced FANCD2 foci formation, a marker of FA pathway activity, in multiple human cell lines. Most of these small molecules also compromised ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci formation and homologous recombination repair, indicating that they are not selective toward the regulation of FANCD2. These compounds include known inhibitors of the proteasome, cathepsin B, lysosome, CHK1, HSP90, CDK and PKC, and several uncharacterized chemicals including a novel proteasome inhibitor (Chembridge compound 5929407. Isobologram analyses demonstrated that half of the identified molecules sensitized ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin. Among them, 9 demonstrated increased efficiency toward FA pathway-proficient, cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Six small molecules, including bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor, CA-074-Me (cathepsin B inhibitor and 17-AAG (HSP90 inhibitor, synergized with cisplatin specifically in FA-proficient ovarian cancer cells (2008 + FANCF, but not in FA-deficient isogenic cells (2008. In addition, geldanamycin (HSP90 inhibitor and two CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01 and SB218078 exhibited a significantly stronger synergism with cisplatin in FA

  3. A dataset on 145 chemicals tested in alternative assays for skin sensitization undergoing prevalidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy A; Foertsch, Leslie; Emter, Roger; Jaworska, Joanna; Gerberick, Frank; Kern, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Skin sensitization is a key endpoint for cosmetic ingredients, with a forthcoming ban for animal testing in Europe. Four alternative tests have so far been submitted to ECVAM prevalidation: (i) MUSST and (ii) h-Clat assess surface markers on dendritic cell lines, (iii) the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) measures reactivity with model peptides and (iv) the KeratinoSens(TM) assay which is based on detection of Nrf2-induced luciferase. It is anticipated that only an integrated testing strategy (ITS) based on a battery of tests might give a full replacement providing also a sensitization potency assessment, but this concept should be tested with a data-driven analysis. Here we report a database on 145 chemicals reporting the quantitative endpoints measured in a U937- test, the DPRA and KeratinoSens(TM) . It can serve to develop data-driven ITS approaches as we show in a parallel paper and provides a view as to the current ability to predict with in vitro tests as we are entering 2013. It may also serve as reference database when benchmarking new molecules with in vitro based read-across and find use as a reference database when evaluating new tests. The tests and combinations thereof were evaluated for predictivity, and overall a similar predictivity was found as before on three-fold smaller datasets. Analysis of the dose-response parameters of the individual tests indicates a correlation to sensitization potency. Detailed analysis of chemicals false-negative and false-positive in two tests helped to define limitations in the tests but also in the database derived from animal studies. PMID:23576290

  4. Novel chemically cross-linked solid state electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Xiong; Tan Weiwei; Xiang Wangchun [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Lin Yuan, E-mail: Linyuan@iccas.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Jingbo, E-mail: jbzhang@iccas.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xiao Xurui; Li Xueping; Zhou Xiaowen; Fang Shibi [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-08-01

    Poly(vinylpyridine-co-ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (P(VP-co-MEOMA)) and {alpha},{omega}-diiodo poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide) (I[(EO){sub 0.8}-co-(PO){sub 0.2}]{sub y}I) were synthesized and used as chemically cross-linked precursors of the electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells. Meanwhile, {alpha}-iodo poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide) methyl ether (CH{sub 3}O[(EO){sub 0.8}-co-(PO){sub 0.2}]{sub x}I) was synthesized and added into the electrolyte as an internal plasticizer. Novel polymer electrolyte resulting from chemically cross-linked precursors was obtained by the quaterisation at 90 {sup o}C for 30 min. The characteristics for this kind of electrolyte were investigated by means of ionic conductivity, thermogravimetric and photocurrent-voltage. The ambient ionic conductivity was significantly enhanced to 2.3 x 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1} after introducing plasticizer, modified-ionic liquid. The weight loss of the solid state electrolyte at 200 {sup o}C was 1.8%, and its decomposition temperature was 287 {sup o}C. Solid state dye-sensitized solar cell based on chemically cross-linked electrolyte presented an overall conversion efficiency of 2.35% under AM1.5 irradiation (100 mW cm{sup -2}). The as-fabricated device maintained 88% of its initial performance at room temperature even without sealing for 30 days, showing a good stability.

  5. Sensitivity enhancement of chemically amplified resists and performance study using EUV interference lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Elizabeth; Nagahara, Seiji; Yildirim, Oktay; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Meeuwissen, Marieke; Nagai, Tomoki; Naruoka, Takehiko; Verspaget, Coen; Hoefnagels, Rik; Rispens, Gijsbert; Shiraishi, Gosuke; Terashita, Yuichi; Minekawa, Yukie; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Oshima, Akihiro; Vockenhuber, Michaela; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL, λ = 13.5 nm) is the most promising candidate to manufacture electronic devices for future technology nodes in the semiconductor industry. Nonetheless, EUVL still faces many technological challenges as it moves toward high-volume manufacturing (HVM). A key bottleneck from the tool design and performance point of view has been the development of an efficient, high power EUV light source for high throughput production. Consequently, there has been extensive research on different methodologies to enhance EUV resist sensitivity. Resist performance is measured in terms of its ultimate printing resolution, line width roughness (LWR), sensitivity (S or best energy BE) and exposure latitude (EL). However, there are well-known fundamental trade-off relationships (LRS trade-off) among these parameters for chemically amplified resists (CARs). Here we present early proof-of-principle results for a multi-exposure lithography process that has the potential for high sensitivity enhancement without compromising other important performance characteristics by the use of a Photosensitized Chemically Amplified Resist (PSCAR). With this method, we seek to increase the sensitivity by combining a first EUV pattern exposure with a second UV flood exposure (λ = 365 nm) and the use of a PSCAR. In addition, we have evaluated over 50 different state-of-the-art EUV CARs. Among these, we have identified several promising candidates that simultaneously meet sensitivity, LWR and EL high performance requirements with the aim of resolving line space (L/S) features for the 7 and 5 nm logic node (16 nm and 13 nm half-pitch HP, respectively) for HVM. Several CARs were additionally found to be well resolved down to 12 nm and 11 nm HP with minimal pattern collapse and bridging, a remarkable feat for CARs. Finally, the performance of two negative tone state-of-the-art alternative resist platforms previously investigated was compared to the CAR performance at and

  6. Study sensitivity: Evaluating the ability to detect effects in systematic reviews of chemical exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Glinda S; Lunn, Ruth M; Ågerstrand, Marlene; Glenn, Barbara S; Kraft, Andrew D; Luke, April M; Ratcliffe, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    A critical step in systematic reviews of potential health hazards is the structured evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the included studies; risk of bias is a term often used to represent this process, specifically with respect to the evaluation of systematic errors that can lead to inaccurate (biased) results (i.e. focusing on internal validity). Systematic review methods developed in the clinical medicine arena have been adapted for use in evaluating environmental health hazards; this expansion raises questions about the scope of risk of bias tools and the extent to which they capture the elements that can affect the interpretation of results from environmental and occupational epidemiology studies and in vivo animal toxicology studies, (the studies typically available for assessment of risk of chemicals). One such element, described here as "sensitivity", is a measure of the ability of a study to detect a true effect or hazard. This concept is similar to the concept of the sensitivity of an assay; an insensitive study may fail to show a difference that truly exists, leading to a false conclusion of no effect. Factors relating to study sensitivity should be evaluated in a systematic manner with the same rigor as the evaluation of other elements within a risk of bias framework. We discuss the importance of this component for the interpretation of individual studies, examine approaches proposed or in use to address it, and describe how it relates to other evaluation components. The evaluation domains contained within a risk of bias tool can include, or can be modified to include, some features relating to study sensitivity; the explicit inclusion of these sensitivity criteria with the same rigor and at the same stage of study evaluation as other bias-related criteria can improve the evaluation process. In some cases, these and other features may be better addressed through a separate sensitivity domain. The combined evaluation of risk of bias and

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy substantially reduces symptom severity and social disability associated with multiple chemical sensitivity: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Jesper; Gulmann, Nils; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic nonallergic, multisymptom disorder triggered by common environmental chemicals in concentrations considered nontoxic for most individuals. The condition may lead to loss of occupation and social isolation, and no effective treatment has been report....... Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a safe and effective treatment of severe depression and medical conditions such as chronic pain disorders....

  8. Chemical Principles Revisited: Molecular Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Reviewed are experimental methods (diffraction, spectroscopic, and resonance methods) used to obtain the structural parameters of bond angles and bond lengths in molecules. The valence shell electron pair repulsion theory (VSEPR) is summarized and applied to several real molecules. (CS)

  9. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  10. Hypnosis as sole anaesthesia for skin tumour removal in a patient with multiple chemical sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, E; Pasquali, S; Zanette, G; Casiglia, E

    2013-09-01

    A female patient with multiple chemical sensitivity and previous anaphylactoid reactions to local anaesthetics was admitted for removal of a thigh skin tumour under hypnosis as sole anaesthesia. The hypnotic protocol included hypnotic focused analgesia and a pre-operative pain threshold test. After inducing hypnosis, a wide excision was performed, preserving the deep fascia, and the tumour was removed; the patient's heart rate and blood pressure did not increase during the procedure. When the patient was de-hypnotised, she reported no pain and was discharged immediately. Our case confirms the efficacy of hypnosis and demonstrates that it may be valuable as a sole anaesthetic method in selected cases. Hypnosis can prevent pain perception and surgical stress as a whole, comparing well with anaesthetic drugs. PMID:23845031

  11. High sensitivity detection and characterization of the chemical state of trace element contamination on silicon wafers

    CERN Document Server

    Pianetta, Piero A; Baur, K; Brennan, S; Homma, T; Kubo, N

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the speed and complexity of semiconductor integrated circuits requires advanced processes that put extreme constraints on the level of metal contamination allowed on the surfaces of silicon wafers. Such contamination degrades the performance of the ultrathin SiO sub 2 gate dielectrics that form the heart of the individual transistors. Ultimately, reliability and yield are reduced to levels that must be improved before new processes can be put into production. It should be noted that much of this metal contamination occurs during the wet chemical etching and rinsing steps required for the manufacture of integrated circuits and industry is actively developing new processes that have already brought the metal contamination to levels beyond the measurement capabilities of conventional analytical techniques. The measurement of these extremely low contamination levels has required the use of synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) where sensitivities 100 times better than conv...

  12. General practitioners' experiences with provision of healthcare to patients with self-reported multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Rasmussen, Alice; Thorsen, Hanne; Elberling, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe general practitioners' (GPs') evaluation of and management strategies in relation to patients who seek medical advice because of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). DESIGN: A nationwide cross-sectional postal questionnaire survey. The survey included a sample of 1000 Danish...... GPs randomly drawn from the membership list of GPs in the Danish Medical Association. SETTING: Denmark. RESULTS: Completed questionnaires were obtained from 691 GPs (69%). Within the last 12 months 62.4% (n = 431) of the GPs had been consulted by at least one patient with MCS. Of these, 55.2% of the...... GPs evaluated the patients' complaints as chronic and 46.2% stated that they were rarely able to meet the patients' expectations for healthcare. The majority, 73.5%, had referred patients to other medical specialties. The cause of MCS was perceived as multi-factorial by 64.3% of the GPs, as somatic...

  13. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloyeau, D.; Nelayah, J.; Wang, G.; Ricolleau, C. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Paris Diderot/CNRS, UMR 7162, Batiment Condorcet, 4 rue Elsa Morante, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Oikawa, T. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Paris Diderot/CNRS, UMR 7162, Batiment Condorcet, 4 rue Elsa Morante, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); JEOL Ltd, 1-2 Musashino 3-Chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)

    2012-09-17

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  14. Chemical Sensing Sensitivity of Long-Period Grating Sensor Enhanced by Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jien-Neng Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and effective method is proposed to improve spectral sensitivity anddetection limit of long period gratings for refractive index or chemical sensing, where thegrating surface is modified by a monolayer of colloidal gold nanoparticles. Thetransmission spectra and optical properties of gold nanospheres vary with the differentrefractive index of the environment near the surface of gold nanospheres. The sensorresponse of gold colloids increases linearly with solvents of increasing refractive index.The results for the measurement of sucrose and sodium chloride solutions are reported,which show that this type of sensor can provide a limiting resolution of ~10-3 to ~10-4 forrefractive indices in the range of 1.34 to 1.39 and a noticeable increase in detection limit ofrefractive index to external medium.

  15. Sensitivity effects in Uk'37 paleotemperature estimation by chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaler, R; Grimalt, J O; Pelejero, C; Calvo, E

    2000-12-15

    Analysis of C37 alkenone mixtures by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID) and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in the chemical ionization mode (CI) shows that the later is useful for paleotemperature estimation when ammonia is used as reagent gas. Conversely, the use of isobutane gives rise to Uk'37 readings that are dependent on the amount of C37 alkenones introduced in the system, being unreliable for paleoclimatic studies. However, ammonia CI GC/MS may produce Uk'37 measurements that deviate from those obtained by GC-FID, the method calibrated for temperature estimation from algal cultures and marine sedimentary data. The differences result from changes in relative sensitivity between the di- and triunsaturated alkenones and depend on the instrument used and operational conditions. This problem is solved in the present study by determination of the response factor linear equations for each alkenone and their average relative sensitivity (R) using mixtures of known composition. These parameters allow the transformation of the GC/MS readings into the GC-FID equivalents using the following equation: UG = R x UM/(1 - UM(1 - R)). Examples of the suitability of this approach are given. PMID:11140754

  16. Progress in resolution, sensitivity, and critical dimensional uniformity of EUV chemically amplified resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James; Cameron, James; Jain, Vipul; LaBeaume, Paul; Coley, Suzanne; Ongayi, Owendi; Wagner, Mike; Rachford, Aaron; Biafore, John

    2013-03-01

    This paper will discuss further progress obtained at Dow for the improvement of the Resolution, Contact critical dimension uniformity(CDU), and Sensitivity of EUV chemically amplified resists. For resolution, we have employed the use of polymer-bound photoacid generator (PBP) concept to reduce the intrinsic acid diffusion that limits the ultimate resolving capability of CA resists. For CDU, we have focused on intrinsic dissolution contrast and have found that the photo-decomposable base (PDB) concept can be successfully employed. With the use of a PDB, we can reduce CDU variation at a lower exposure energy. For sensitivity, we have focused on more efficient EUV photon capture through increased EUV absorption, as well as more highly efficient PAGs for greater acid generating efficiency. The formulation concepts will be confirmed using Prolith stochastic resist modeling. For the 26nm hp contact holes, we get excellent overall process window with over 280nm depth of focus for a 10% exposure latitude Process window. The 1sigma Critical dimension uniformity [CDU] is 1.1 nm. We also obtain 20nm hp contact resolution in one of our new EUV resists.

  17. Sensitive detection of rutin based on {beta}-cyclodextrin-chemically reduced graphene/Nafion composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Kunping; Wei Jinping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Chunming, E-mail: wangcm@lzu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-05-30

    Highlights: > {beta}-CD-graphene composite obtained via a simple sonication-induced assembly. > Accelerating electron transfer on electrode to amplify the electrochemical signal. > A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for rutin detection. > Good selectivity and reproducibility for the detection of rutin in real samples. - Abstract: An electrochemical sensor based on chemically reduced graphene (CRG) was developed for the sensitive detection of rutin. To construct the base of the sensor, a novel composite was initially fabricated and used as the substrate material by combining CRG and {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD) via a simple sonication-induced assembly. Due to the high rutin-loading capacity on the electrode surface and the upstanding electric conductivity of graphene, the electrochemical response of the fabricated sensor was greatly enhanced and displayed excellent analytical performance for rutin detection from 6.0 x 10{sup -9} to 1.0 x 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1} with a low detection limit of 2.0 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1} at 3{sigma}. Moreover, the proposed electrochemical sensor also exhibited good selectivity and acceptable reproducibility and could be used for the detection of rutin in real samples. Therefore, the present work offers a new way to broaden the analytical applications of graphene in pharmaceutical analysis.

  18. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, Katarzyna E; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol's ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  19. Exploring the chemical sensitivity of a carbon nanotube/green tea composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanan; Lee, Yang Doo; Vedala, Harindra; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2010-11-23

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess unique electronic and physical properties, which make them very attractive for a wide range of applications. In particular, SWNTs and their composites have shown a great potential for chemical and biological sensing. Green tea, or more specifically its main antioxidant component, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been found to disperse SWNTs in water. However, the chemical sensitivity of this SWNT/green tea (SWNT/EGCG) composite remained unexplored. With EGCG present, this SWNT composite should have strong antioxidant properties and thus respond to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we report on fabrication and characterization of SWNT/EGCG thin films and the measurement of their relative conductance as a function of H(2)O(2) concentrations. We further investigated the sensing mechanism by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and field-effect transistor measurements (FET). We propose here that the response to H(2)O(2) arises from the oxidation of EGCG in the composite. These findings suggest that SWNT/green tea composite has a great potential for developing simple resistivity-based sensors. PMID:21043457

  20. High sensitivity detection and characterization of the chemical state of trace element contamination on silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing the speed and complexity of semiconductor integrated circuits requires advanced processes that put extreme constraints on the level of metal contamination allowed on the surfaces of silicon wafers. Such contamination degrades the performance of the ultrathin SiO2 gate dielectrics that form the heart of the individual transistors. Ultimately, reliability and yield are reduced to levels that must be improved before new processes can be put into production. It should be noted that much of this metal contamination occurs during the wet chemical etching and rinsing steps required for the manufacture of integrated circuits and industry is actively developing new processes that have already brought the metal contamination to levels beyond the measurement capabilities of conventional analytical techniques. The measurement of these extremely low contamination levels has required the use of synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) where sensitivities 100 times better than conventional techniques have been achieved. This has resulted in minimum detection limits for transition metals of 8 x 107 atoms/cm2. SR-TXRF studies of the amount of metal contamination deposited on a silicon surface as a function of pH and oxygen content of the etching solutions have provided insights into the mechanisms of metal deposition from solutions containing trace amounts of metals ranging from parts per trillion to parts per billion. Furthermore, by using XANES to understand the chemical state of the metal atmos after deposition, it has been possible to develop chemical models for the deposition processes. Examples will be provided for copper deposition from ultra pure water and acidic solutions. (author)

  1. THP-1 monocytes but not macrophages as a potential alternative for CD34+ dendritic cells to identify chemical skin sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early detection of the sensitizing potential of chemicals is an emerging issue for chemical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In our institute, an in vitro classification model for prediction of chemical-induced skin sensitization based on gene expression signatures in human CD34+ progenitor-derived dendritic cells (DC) has been developed. This primary cell model is able to closely mimic the induction phase of sensitization by Langerhans cells in the skin, but it has drawbacks, such as the availability of cord blood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether human in vitro cultured THP-1 monocytes or macrophages display a similar expression profile for 13 predictive gene markers previously identified in DC and whether they also possess a discriminating capacity towards skin sensitizers and non-sensitizers based on these marker genes. To this end, the cell models were exposed to 5 skin sensitizers (ammonium hexachloroplatinate IV, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, eugenol, para-phenylenediamine, and tetramethylthiuram disulfide) and 5 non-sensitizers (L-glutamic acid, methyl salicylate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, tributyltin chloride, and zinc sulfate) for 6, 10, and 24 h, and mRNA expression of the 13 genes was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. The transcriptional response of 7 out of 13 genes in THP-1 monocytes was significantly correlated with DC, whereas only 2 out of 13 genes in THP-1 macrophages. After a cross-validation of a discriminant analysis of the gene expression profiles in the THP-1 monocytes, this cell model demonstrated to also have a capacity to distinguish skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. However, the DC model was superior to the monocyte model for discrimination of (non-)sensitizing chemicals.

  2. A new type of functional chemical sensitizer MgH2 for improving pressure desensitization resistance of emulsion explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y. F.; Yan, S. L.; Ma, H. H.; Shen, Z. W.; Liu, R.

    2016-03-01

    In millisecond-delay blasting and deep water blasting projects, traditional emulsion explosives sensitized by the chemical sensitizer NaNO2 often encounter incomplete explosion or misfire problems because of the "pressure desensitization" phenomenon, which seriously affects blasting safety and construction progress. A MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosive was invented to solve these problems. Experimental results show that MgH2 can effectively reduce the problem of pressure desensitization. In this paper, the factors which influence the pressure desensitization of two types of emulsion explosives are studied, and resistance to this phenomenon of MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosives is discussed.

  3. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Carolina H. Andrade; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop ...

  4. Evaluation of sensitivity for positive tone non-chemically and chemically amplified resists using ionized radiation: EUV, x-ray, electron and ion induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Washio, Masakazu; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2013-03-01

    The different exposure sources induce a different energy deposition in resist materials. Linear energy transfer (LET) effect for resist sensitivity is very important issue from the viewpoint of radiation induced chemical reactions for high-volume nanofabrication. The sensitivities of positive tone non-chemically (non-CA, ZEP) and chemically amplified (CA, UV-3) resist materials are evaluated using various ionized radiation such as EUV, soft X-rays, EB and various ion beams. Since the notations of sensitivity of resist vary with exposure sources, in order to evaluate systematically, the resist sensitivity were estimated in terms of absorbed dose in resist materials. Highly-monochromated EUV and soft X-rays (6.7 nm - 3.1 nm) from the BL27SU of the SPring-8, high energy ion beams (C6+, Ne10+, Mg12+, Si14+ , Ar18+, Kr36+ and Xe54+) with 6 MeV/u from MEXP of HIMAC, EB from low energy EB accelerator (Hamamatsu Photonics, EB-engine®, 100 kV) and EB lithography system (30 keV and 75keV) were used for the exposure. For non-CA and CA resist materials, it was found that LET effects for sensitivity would be hardly observed except for heavier ion beams. Especially, in the case of the high energy ion beam less than Si14+ with 6 MeV/u, it is suggested that the radiation induced chemical reaction would be equivalent to EUV, soft X-ray and EB exposure. Hence, it indicates that the resist sensitivity could be systematically evaluated by absorbed dose in resist materials.

  5. LSENS: A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. Part 3: Illustrative test problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, David A.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 3 of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 3 explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results. These problems illustrate the various capabilities of, and reaction models that can be solved by, the code and may provide a convenient starting point for the user to construct the problem data file required to execute LSENS. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  6. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for multiple chemical sensitivity: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hauge Christian Riise; Bonde Peter Jens E; Rasmussen Alice; Skovbjerg Sine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a condition characterized by recurrent, self-reported symptoms from multiple organ systems, attributable to exposure to a wide range of chemically unrelated substances at low levels. The pathophysiology is unknown, and affected individuals generally favor avoidance of the symptom triggering substances as a coping strategy. The impact of MCS on daily life may thus be severe. An intervention that may effectively reduce the impact of MCS...

  7. Paracelsus Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    a public health viewpoint, toxicology needs to provide better guidance on decision-making under ever-present uncertainty. In this role, we need to learn from the stalwart Paracelsus the insistence on relying on facts rather than authority alone to protect against chemical hazards....

  8. Chemical reactivity trends of ergotamine and butenolide from electrostatic potentials and charge sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of reactivity indices, including maps of the electrostatic potential and local and condensed Fukui function (FF) indices in the atomic resolution, are reported for two vasoconstricting mycotoxins: butenolide and ergotamine; both the finite difference approach of Parr and Yan as well as charge sensitivity analysis, determining the charge responses via the inversion of the hardness tensor, have been used to generate the FF data. These two routes of arriving at the atomic FF indices provide an opportunity to evaluate the available parametrizations of the semiempirical NDDO-type of methods which have been used to determine the input charge distribution; namely, the best parametrization should generate consistent FF predictions resulting from both approaches. For butenolide, the MNDO parametrization was found to fulfill this consistency requirement. The chemical reactivity information has been used to trace possible similarities in reactivity trends of the butenolide molecule and the related fragment of ergotamine, toward hypothetical nucleophilic, electrophilic, and radical attacks. These predictions have been compared to experimental data available for other unsaturated lactones. 13 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab

  9. A highly stable and sensitive chemically modified screen-printed electrode for sulfide analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here a highly stable and sensitive chemically modified screen-printed carbon electrode (CMSPE) for sulfide analysis. The CMSPE was prepared by first ion-exchanging ferricyanide into a Tosflex anion-exchange polymer and then sealing with a tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel layer. The sol-gel overlayer coating was crucial to stabilize the electron mediator (i.e., Fe(China)63-) from leaching. The strong interaction between the oxy-hydroxy functional group of sol-gel and the hydrophilic sites of Tosflex makes the composite highly rigid to trap the ferricyanide mediator. An obvious electrocatalytic sulfide oxidation current signal at ∼0.20 V versus Ag/AgCl in pH 7 phosphate buffer solution was observed at the CMSPE. A linear calibration plot over a wide range of 0.1 μM to 1 mM with a slope of 5.6 nA/μM was obtained by flow injection analysis. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was 8.9 nM (i.e., 25.6 ppt). Practical utility of the system was applied to the determination of sulfide trapped from cigarette smoke and sulfide content in hot spring water

  10. Chemical reactivity trends of ergotamine and butenolide from electrostatic potentials and charge sensitivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrozek, J.; Michalak, A. [Jagiellonian Univ., Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-05

    A set of reactivity indices, including maps of the electrostatic potential and local and condensed Fukui function (FF) indices in the atomic resolution, are reported for two vasoconstricting mycotoxins: butenolide and ergotamine; both the finite difference approach of Parr and Yan as well as charge sensitivity analysis, determining the charge responses via the inversion of the hardness tensor, have been used to generate the FF data. These two routes of arriving at the atomic FF indices provide an opportunity to evaluate the available parametrizations of the semiempirical NDDO-type of methods which have been used to determine the input charge distribution; namely, the best parametrization should generate consistent FF predictions resulting from both approaches. For butenolide, the MNDO parametrization was found to fulfill this consistency requirement. The chemical reactivity information has been used to trace possible similarities in reactivity trends of the butenolide molecule and the related fragment of ergotamine, toward hypothetical nucleophilic, electrophilic, and radical attacks. These predictions have been compared to experimental data available for other unsaturated lactones. 13 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  11. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and

  12. Comovement Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Honghui Chen; Vijay Singal; Robert F. Whitelaw

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence of excessive comovement among stocks following index additions (Barberis, Shleifer, and Wurgler, 2005) and stock splits (Green and Hwang, 2009) challenges traditional finance theory. Based on a simple model, we show that the bivariate regressions relied upon in the literature often provide little or no information about the economic magnitude of the phenomenon of interest, and the coefficients in these regressions are very sensitive to time-variation in the characteristics of ...

  13. Lack of contralateral suppression in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in multiple chemical sensitivity: a clinical correlation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Micarelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS is a chronic disorder characterized by a variety of symptoms associated with the exposure to chemicals at a concentration below the toxic level. Previous studies have demonstrated peculiar responses in brain activity in these patients with respect to sensory stimuli while the association between chemical sensitivity and other environmental intolerances such as noise sensitivity has been questioned by researchers. In this study, a cohort of 18 MCS patients underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE testing with and without contralateral suppression to evaluate the functionality of the medial olivocochlear (MOC reflex involved in speech-in-noise sensitivity. Results were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 20 and correlation analysis with disease onset and quick environmental exposure sensitivity inventory (qEESI symptom severity scale was performed. Subjects affected by MCS showed statistically significant impairment of MOC reflex, and the onset of the disease and several symptom subscales showed to be correlated to such reduction in some of the frequencies tested. These data suggest that alterations of MOC reflex could be part of the complex features of this disease although more studies are needed to further explore auditory perception disorders in environmental intolerances.

  14. Lack of contralateral suppression in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in multiple chemical sensitivity: a clinical correlation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Bruno, Ernesto; Ottaviani, Fabrizio; Alessandrini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic disorder characterized by a variety of symptoms associated with the exposure to chemicals at a concentration below the toxic level. Previous studies have demonstrated peculiar responses in brain activity in these patients with respect to sensory stimuli while the association between chemical sensitivity and other environmental intolerances such as noise sensitivity has been questioned by researchers. In this study, a cohort of 18 MCS patients underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) testing with and without contralateral suppression to evaluate the functionality of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex involved in speech-in-noise sensitivity. Results were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 20) and correlation analysis with disease onset and quick environmental exposure sensitivity inventory (qEESI) symptom severity scale was performed. Subjects affected by MCS showed statistically significant impairment of MOC reflex, and the onset of the disease and several symptom subscales showed to be correlated to such reduction in some of the frequencies tested. These data suggest that alterations of MOC reflex could be part of the complex features of this disease although more studies are needed to further explore auditory perception disorders in environmental intolerances. PMID:27157687

  15. Multinomial pattern matching revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Multinomial pattern matching (MPM) is an automatic target recognition algorithm developed for specifically radar data at Sandia National Laboratories. The algorithm is in a family of algorithms that first quantizes pixel value into Nq bins based on pixel amplitude before training and classification. This quantization step reduces the sensitivity of algorithm performance to absolute intensity variation in the data, typical of radar data where signatures exhibit high variation for even small changes in aspect angle. Our previous work has focused on performance analysis of peaky template matching, a special case of MPM where binary quantization is used (Nq = 2). Unfortunately references on these algorithms are generally difficult to locate and here we revisit the MPM algorithm and illustrate the underlying statistical model and decision rules for two algorithm interpretations: the 1-of-K vector form and the scalar. MPM can also be used as a detector and specific attention is given to algorithm tuning where "peak pixels" are chosen based on their underlying empirical probabilities according to a reward minimization strategy aimed at reducing false alarms in the detection scenario and false positives in a classification capacity. The algorithms are demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations on the AFRL civilian vehicle dataset for variety of choices of Nq.

  16. Involvement of Subcortical Brain Structures During Olfactory Stimulation in Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrini, Marco; Micarelli, Alessandro; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Bruno, Ernesto; Danieli, Roberta; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Öberg, Johanna; Pagani, Marco; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-03-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) patients usually react to odour compounds and the majority of neuroimaging studies assessed, especially at the cortical level, many olfactory-related correlates. The purpose of the present study was to depict sub-cortical metabolic changes during a neutral (NC) and pure (OC) olfactory stimulation by using a recently validated (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/computer tomography procedure in 26 MCS and 11 healthy (HC) resting subjects undergoing a battery of clinical tests. Twelve subcortical volumes of interest were identified by the automated anatomical labeling library and normalized to thalamus FDG uptake. In both groups, when comparing OC to NC, the within-subjects ANOVA demonstrated a relative decreased metabolism in bilateral putamen and hippocampus and a relative increased metabolism in bilateral amygdala, olfactory cortex (OLF), caudate and pallidum. The between-groups ANOVA demonstrated in MCS a significant higher metabolism in bilateral OLF during NC. As in HC subjects negative correlations were found in OC between FDG uptake in bilateral amygdala and hippocampus and odor pleasantness scale, the latter positively correlated with MCS subjects' bilateral putamen FDG uptake in OC. Besides FDG uptake resemblances in both groups were found, for the first time a relative higher metabolism increase in OLF in MCS subjects at rest with respect to HC was found. When merging this aspect to the different subcortical FDG uptake correlations patterns in the two groups, the present study demonstrated to describe a peculiar metabolic index of behavioral and neurological aspects of MCS complaints. PMID:26438099

  17. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric ozone loss to uncertainties in chemical reaction kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Kawa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact and significance of uncertainties in model calculations of stratospheric ozone loss resulting from known uncertainty in chemical kinetics parameters is evaluated in trajectory chemistry simulations for the Antarctic and Arctic polar vortices. The uncertainty in modeled ozone loss is derived from Monte Carlo scenario simulations varying the kinetic (reaction and photolysis rate parameters within their estimated uncertainty bounds. Simulations of a typical winter/spring Antarctic vortex scenario and Match scenarios in the Arctic produce large uncertainty in ozone loss rates and integrated seasonal loss. The simulations clearly indicate that the dominant source of model uncertainty in polar ozone loss is uncertainty in the Cl2O2 photolysis reaction, which arises from uncertainty in laboratory-measured molecular cross sections at atmospherically important wavelengths. This estimated uncertainty in JCl2O2 from laboratory measurements seriously hinders our ability to model polar ozone loss within useful quantitative error limits. Atmospheric observations, however, suggest that the Cl2O2 photolysis uncertainty may be less than that derived from the lab data. Comparisons to Match, South Pole ozonesonde, and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS data all show that the nominal recommended rate simulations agree with data within uncertainties when the Cl2O2 photolysis error is reduced by a factor of two, in line with previous in situ ClOx measurements. Comparisons to simulations using recent cross sections from Pope et al. (2007 are outside the constrained error bounds in each case. Other reactions producing significant sensitivity in polar ozone loss include BrO+ClO and its branching ratios. These uncertainties challenge our confidence in modeling polar ozone depletion and projecting future changes in response to changing halogen

  18. Oxidative phosphorylation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nath, Sunil; Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are revisited. New experimental data on the involvement of succinate and malate anions respectively in oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are presented. These new data offer a novel molecular mechanistic explan...

  19. Sensitivity of chemical transport model simulations to the duration of chemical and transport operators: a case study with GEOS-Chem v10-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, S.; Martin, R. V.; Keller, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Chemical transport models involve considerable computational expense. Fine temporal resolution offers accuracy at the expense of computation time. Assessment is needed of the sensitivity of simulation accuracy to the duration of chemical and transport operators. We conduct a series of simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model at different temporal and spatial resolutions to examine the sensitivity of simulated atmospheric composition to temporal resolution. Subsequently, we compare the tracers simulated with operator durations from 10 to 60 min as typically used by global chemical transport models, and identify the timesteps that optimize both computational expense and simulation accuracy. We found that longer transport timesteps increase concentrations of emitted species such as nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide since a more homogeneous distribution reduces loss through chemical reactions and dry deposition. The increased concentrations of ozone precursors increase ozone production at longer transport timesteps. Longer chemical timesteps decrease sulfate and ammonium but increase nitrate due to feedbacks with in-cloud sulfur dioxide oxidation and aerosol thermodynamics. The simulation duration decreases by an order of magnitude from fine (5 min) to coarse (60 min) temporal resolution. We assess the change in simulation accuracy with resolution by comparing the root mean square difference in ground-level concentrations of nitrogen oxides, ozone, carbon monoxide and secondary inorganic aerosols with a finer temporal or spatial resolution taken as truth. Simulation error for these species increases by more than a factor of 5 from the shortest (5 min) to longest (60 min) temporal resolution. Chemical timesteps twice that of the transport timestep offer more simulation accuracy per unit computation. However, simulation error from coarser spatial resolution generally exceeds that from longer timesteps; e.g. degrading from 2° × 2.5° to 4° × 5

  20. Parallel R&D Paths Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Frederic Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper revisits the logic of pursuing parallel R&D paths when there is uncertainty as to which approaches will succeed technically and/or economically. The previous findings by Richard Nelson and the present author are reviewed. A further analysis then seeks to determine how sensitive optimal strategies are to parameter variations and the extent to which parallel and series strategies are integrated. It pays to support more approaches, the deeper the stream of benefits is and the lower is...

  1. Revisiting dandruff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Xhauflaire-Uhoda, E; Piérard, G E

    2006-10-01

    Dandruff is a common scalp disorder affecting almost half of the postpubertal population of any ethnicity and both genders. It may, however, represent a stubborn esthetical disturbance often source of pruritus. Skin biocenosis, in particular the Malassezia spp. flora, plays a key aetiologic role, in combination with the unusual capacity of some corneocytes to be coated by these yeasts. Substantial evidence indicates that keratinocytes play an active role in the generation and expression of immunopathological reactions. This is probably the case in dandruff. Upon stimulation of a critical colonization of corneocytes by Malassezia yeasts, the release of pro-inflammatory mediators is increased. This could lead to the subclinical microinflammation present in dandruff. In seborrheic dermatitis, local deposits of immunoglobulins and the release of lymphokines are responsible for the recruitment and local activation of leukocytes leading to the eventual amplification of the inflammatory reaction. Some ancillary non-microbial causes of dandruff may operate through physical or chemical irritants. Many methods have been described for rating dandruff. Our favourite tools are clinical examination and squamometry. Dandruff can precipitate telogen effluvium and exacerbate androgenic alopecia. Antidandruff formulations exhibiting some direct or indirect anti-inflammatory activity can improve both dandruff and its subsequent hair cycle disturbance. PMID:18489295

  2. Experimental Assessment of the Sensitiveness of an Electrochemical Oscillator towards Chemical Perturbations

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Graziela C. A.; Batista, Bruno C.; Hamilton Varela

    2012-01-01

    In this study we address the problem of the response of a (electro)chemical oscillator towards chemical perturbations of different magnitudes. The chemical perturbation was achieved by addition of distinct amounts of trifluoromethanesulfonate (TFMSA), a rather stable and non-specifically adsorbing anion, and the system under investigation was the methanol electro-oxidation reaction under both stationary and oscillatory regimes. Increasing the anion concentration resulted in a decrease in the ...

  3. Fast variance reduction for steady-state simulation and sensitivity analysis of stochastic chemical systems using shadow function estimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We address the problem of estimating steady-state quantities associated to systems of stochastic chemical kinetics. In most cases of interest, these systems are analytically intractable, and one has to resort to computational methods to estimate stationary values of cost functions. In this work, we introduce a novel variance reduction algorithm for stochastic chemical kinetics, inspired by related methods in queueing theory, in particular the use of shadow functions. Using two numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method for the calculation of steady-state parametric sensitivities and evaluate its performance in comparison to other estimation methods

  4. Fast variance reduction for steady-state simulation and sensitivity analysis of stochastic chemical systems using shadow function estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Lygeros, John; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    We address the problem of estimating steady-state quantities associated to systems of stochastic chemical kinetics. In most cases of interest, these systems are analytically intractable, and one has to resort to computational methods to estimate stationary values of cost functions. In this work, we introduce a novel variance reduction algorithm for stochastic chemical kinetics, inspired by related methods in queueing theory, in particular the use of shadow functions. Using two numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method for the calculation of steady-state parametric sensitivities and evaluate its performance in comparison to other estimation methods.

  5. Gas Sensing of SnO2 Nanocrystals Revisited: Developing Ultra-Sensitive Sensors for Detecting the H2S Leakage of Biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Chen, Yuejiao; Ma, Jianmin

    2014-08-01

    As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

  6. An olfactory-limbic model of multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome: Possible relationships to kindling and affective spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, I.R.; Miller, C.S.; Schwartz, G.E. (Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson (United States))

    1992-08-01

    This paper reviews the clinical and experimental literature on patients with multiple adverse responses to chemicals (Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome-MCS) and develops a model for MCS based on olfactory-limbic system dysfunction that overlaps in part with Post's kindling model for affective disorders. MCS encompasses a broad range of chronic polysymptomatic conditions and complaints whose triggers are reported to include low levels of common indoor and outdoor environmental chemicals, such as pesticides and solvents. Other investigators have found evidence of increased prevalence of depression, anxiety, and somatization disorders in MCS patients and have concluded that their psychiatric conditions account for the clinical picture. However, none of these studies has presented any data on the effects of chemicals on symptoms or on objective measures of nervous system function. Synthesis of the MCS literature with large bodies of research in neurotoxicology, occupational medicine, and biological psychiatry, suggests that the phenomenology of MCS patients overlaps that of affective spectrum disorders and that both involve dysfunction of the limbic pathways. Animal studies demonstrate that intermittent repeated low level environmental chemical exposures, including pesticides, cause limbic kindling. Kindling (full or partial) is one central nervous system mechanism that could amplify reactivity to low levels of inhaled and ingested chemicals and initiate persistent affective, cognitive, and somatic symptomatology in both occupational and nonoccupational settings. As in animal studies, inescapable and novel stressors could cross-sensitize with chemical exposures in some individuals to generate adverse responses on a neurochemical basis. The olfactory-limbic model raises testable neurobiological hypotheses that could increase understanding of the multifactorial etiology of MCS and of certain overlapping affective spectrum disorders. 170 refs.

  7. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. 2: Code description and usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 2 of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 2 describes the code, how to modify it, and its usage, including preparation of the problem data file required to execute LSENS. Code usage is illustrated by several example problems, which further explain preparation of the problem data file and show how to obtain desired accuracy in the computed results. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions. Part 1 (NASA RP-1328) derives the governing equations describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved by lSENS. Part 3 (NASA RP-1330) explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity-analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results.

  8. Effect of Hydroxyl Concentration on Chemical Sensitivity of Polyvinyl Alcohol/Carbon-Black Composite Chemiresistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity and selectivity of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) / carbon black composite films have been found to vary depending upon the hydroxylation percentage (''-OH'') of the polymer. These chemiresistors made from PVA films whose polymer backbone is 88% hydroxylated (PVA88) have a high sensitivity to water, while chemiresistors made from PVA75 have a higher sensitivity to methanol. The minor differences in polymer composition result in films with different Hildebrand volubility parameters. The relative responses of several different PVA-based chemiresistors to solvents with different volubility parameters are presented. In addition, polyvinyl acetate (PVAC) films with PVA88 are used in an array to distinguish the responses to methanol-water mixtures

  9. Effect of Hydroxyl Concentration on Chemical Sensitivity of Polyvinyl Alcohol/Carbon-Black Composite Chemiresistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Robert C.; Patel, Sanjay V.; Yelton, W. Graham

    1999-05-19

    The sensitivity and selectivity of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) / carbon black composite films have been found to vary depending upon the hydroxylation percentage ("-OH") of the polymer. These chemiresistors made from PVA films whose polymer backbone is 88% hydroxylated (PVA88) have a high sensitivity to water, while chemiresistors made from PVA75 have a higher sensitivity to methanol. The minor differences in polymer composition result in films with different Hildebrand volubility parameters. The relative responses of several different PVA-based chemiresistors to solvents with different volubility parameters are presented. In addition, polyvinyl acetate (PVAC) films with PVA88 are used in an array to distinguish the responses to methanol-water mixtures.

  10. High sensitivity stand-off detection and quantification of chemical mixtures using an active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-05-01

    High sensitivity detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in a stand-off configuration is a highly sought after capability across the security and defense sector. Specific applications include assessing the presence of explosive related materials, poisonous or toxic chemical agents, and narcotics. Real world field deployment of an operational stand-off system is challenging due to stringent requirements: high detection sensitivity, stand-off ranges from centimeters to hundreds of meters, eye-safe invisible light, near real-time response and a wide chemical versatility encompassing both vapor and condensed phase chemicals. Additionally, field deployment requires a compact, rugged, power efficient, and cost-effective design. To address these demanding requirements, we have developed the concept of Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS), which can be also described as a middle infrared hyperspectral coherent lidar. Combined with robust spectral unmixing algorithms, inherited from retrievals of information from high-resolution spectral data generated by satellitebased spectrometers, ACLaS has been demonstrated to fulfil the above-mentioned needs. ACLaS prototypes have been so far developed using quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and interband cascade lasers (ICL) to exploit the fast frequency tuning capability of these solid state sources. Using distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, demonstration and performance analysis were carried out on narrow-band absorbing chemicals (N2O, H2O, H2O2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H6) at stand-off distances up to 50 m using realistic non cooperative targets such as wood, painted metal, and bricks. Using more widely tunable external cavity QCL, ACLaS has also been demonstrated on broadband absorbing chemicals (dichloroethane, HFC134a, ethylene glycol dinitrate and 4-nitroacetanilide solid) and on complex samples mixing narrow-band and broadband absorbers together in a realistic atmospheric background.

  11. Sensitivity of neuroprogenitor cells to chemical-induced apoptosis using a multiplexed assay suitable for high-throughput screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-throughput methods are useful for rapidly screening large numbers of chemicals for biological activity, including the perturbation of pathways that may lead to adverse cellular effects. In vitro assays for the key events of neurodevelopment, including apoptosis, may be used in a battery of tests for detecting chemicals that could result in developmental neurotoxicity. Apoptosis contributes to nervous system development by regulating the size of the neuroprogenitor cell pool, and the balance between cellular proliferation and apoptosis during neuroprogenitor cell proliferation helps to determine the size and shape of the nervous system. Therefore, chemicals that affect apoptosis during neuronal development can have deleterious effects on the developing brain. The present study examined the utility of a high-throughput assay to detect chemical-induced apoptosis in mouse or human neuroprogenitor cells, as well as differentiated human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Apoptosis was assessed using an assay that measures enzymatic activity of caspase-3/7 in a rapid and cost efficient manner. The results show that all three commercially available models generated a robust source of proliferating neuroprogenitor cells, and that the assay was sensitive and reproducible when used in a multi-well plate format. There were differences in the response of rodent and human neuroprogenitor cells to a set of chemicals previously shown to induce apoptosis in vitro. Neuroprogenitor cells were more sensitive to chemical-induced apoptosis than differentiated neurons, suggesting that neuroprogenitor cells are one of the cell models that should be considered for use in a developmental neurotoxicity screening battery

  12. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  13. Studying one-dimensional characteristics of gamma-families, sensitive to chemical composition of cosmic rays in region of ultrahigh energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A definition of chemical composition of primary cosmic rays (PCR) is an important problem in interpretation of experimental results with X-ray emulsion chambers (XREC). In this work the parameters, sensitive to chemical compositions of PCR, are analyzed by XREC method. A number of parameters of the gamma-families formed in PCR by primary protons and nuclei are considered and sensitivity of γ-family parameters to chemical composition of PCR is obtained. (authors)

  14. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part I: QSAR models of skin sensitization and their application to identify potentially hazardous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repetitive exposure to a chemical agent can induce an immune reaction in inherently susceptible individuals that leads to skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been reported as skin sensitizers, there have been very few rigorously validated QSAR models with defined applicability domains (AD) that were developed using a large group of chemically diverse compounds. In this study, we have aimed to compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset related to chemically-induced skin sensitization, use this data to generate rigorously validated and QSAR models for skin sensitization, and employ these models as a virtual screening tool for identifying putative sensitizers among environmental chemicals. We followed best practices for model building and validation implemented with our predictive QSAR workflow using Random Forest modeling technique in combination with SiRMS and Dragon descriptors. The Correct Classification Rate (CCR) for QSAR models discriminating sensitizers from non-sensitizers was 71–88% when evaluated on several external validation sets, within a broad AD, with positive (for sensitizers) and negative (for non-sensitizers) predicted rates of 85% and 79% respectively. When compared to the skin sensitization module included in the OECD QSAR Toolbox as well as to the skin sensitization model in publicly available VEGA software, our models showed a significantly higher prediction accuracy for the same sets of external compounds as evaluated by Positive Predicted Rate, Negative Predicted Rate, and CCR. These models were applied to identify putative chemical hazards in the Scorecard database of possible skin or sense organ toxicants as primary candidates for experimental validation. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin sensitization dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin sensitization. • Developed models have higher prediction accuracy than OECD QSAR Toolbox. • Putative

  15. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part I: QSAR models of skin sensitization and their application to identify potentially hazardous compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Vinicius M. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Muratov, Eugene [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, A.V. Bogatsky Physical-Chemical Institute NAS of Ukraine, Odessa 65080 (Ukraine); Fourches, Denis [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole [ILS/Contractor Supporting the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM), P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Andrade, Carolina H. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Repetitive exposure to a chemical agent can induce an immune reaction in inherently susceptible individuals that leads to skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been reported as skin sensitizers, there have been very few rigorously validated QSAR models with defined applicability domains (AD) that were developed using a large group of chemically diverse compounds. In this study, we have aimed to compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset related to chemically-induced skin sensitization, use this data to generate rigorously validated and QSAR models for skin sensitization, and employ these models as a virtual screening tool for identifying putative sensitizers among environmental chemicals. We followed best practices for model building and validation implemented with our predictive QSAR workflow using Random Forest modeling technique in combination with SiRMS and Dragon descriptors. The Correct Classification Rate (CCR) for QSAR models discriminating sensitizers from non-sensitizers was 71–88% when evaluated on several external validation sets, within a broad AD, with positive (for sensitizers) and negative (for non-sensitizers) predicted rates of 85% and 79% respectively. When compared to the skin sensitization module included in the OECD QSAR Toolbox as well as to the skin sensitization model in publicly available VEGA software, our models showed a significantly higher prediction accuracy for the same sets of external compounds as evaluated by Positive Predicted Rate, Negative Predicted Rate, and CCR. These models were applied to identify putative chemical hazards in the Scorecard database of possible skin or sense organ toxicants as primary candidates for experimental validation. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin sensitization dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin sensitization. • Developed models have higher prediction accuracy than OECD QSAR Toolbox. • Putative

  16. A comparison of chemical shift sensitivity of trifluoromethyl tags: optimizing resolution in {sup 19}F NMR studies of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Libin; Larda, Sacha Thierry; Frank Li, Yi Feng [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Manglik, Aashish [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States); Prosser, R. Scott, E-mail: scott.prosser@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    The elucidation of distinct protein conformers or states by fluorine ({sup 19}F) NMR requires fluorinated moieties whose chemical shifts are most sensitive to subtle changes in the local dielectric and magnetic shielding environment. In this study we evaluate the effective chemical shift dispersion of a number of thiol-reactive trifluoromethyl probes [i.e. 2-bromo-N-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (BTFMA), N-(4-bromo-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (3-BTFMA), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol (BTFP), 1-bromo-3,3,4,4,4-pentafluorobutan-2-one (BPFB), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-one (BTFA), and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl-1-thiol (TFET)] under conditions of varying polarity. In considering the sensitivity of the {sup 19}F NMR chemical shift to the local environment, a series of methanol/water mixtures were prepared, ranging from relatively non-polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 4) to polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 0.25). {sup 19}F NMR spectra of the tripeptide, glutathione ((2S)-2-amino-4-{[(1R)-1-[(carboxymethyl)carbamoyl] -2-sulfanylethyl]carbamoyl}butanoic acid), conjugated to each of the above trifluoromethyl probes, revealed that the BTFMA tag exhibited a significantly greater range of chemical shift as a function of solvent polarity than did either BTFA or TFET. DFT calculations using the B3LYP hybrid functional and the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, confirmed the observed trend in chemical shift dispersion with solvent polarity.

  17. Chemical Assembly of Zinc Oxide Aggregated Anodes on Plastic Substrates at Room Temperature for Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The ZnO aggregates are chemically assembled on the ITO-PET substrate by the room-temperature chemical treatment of the drop-cast ZnO nanoparticle layer on the substrate. • The enhanced light scattering ability and superior electron transport property are measured in the ZnO aggregated anode. • A notable efficiency of 5.16% is achieved in the flexible dye-sensitized solar cell using the ZnO aggregated anode with a light scattering layer. • Good flexibility of the ZnO nanostructured anodes fabricated free of high-temperature treatment and mechanical compression is demonstrated. - Abstract: A notable efficiency of 5.16% is achieved in the flexible dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using a ZnO aggregated anode with a light scattering layer facilely fabricated on the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated-polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The ZnO aggregates composed of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and room-temperature (RT) grown nanostructures are chemically assembled on the ITO-PET substrate by the RT chemical treatment of the drop-cast ZnO NP layer on the substrate. The enhanced light scattering ability and superior electron transport property are measured in the ZnO aggregated matrix anode. A ZnO particle layer is further drop-cast on the ZnO aggregated matrix anode followed by another RT chemical treatment to form the light scattering layer. Dynamics of electron transport and recombination measurements indicate that an efficient electron collection is performed in the flexible ZnO anode fabricated free of high-temperature treatment and mechanical compression. Moreover, efficient photovoltaic performances are also monitored in both concave-downward and concave-upward bending configurations of the ZnO DSSCs, demonstrating the good flexibility of the ZnO nanostructured anodes

  18. 1/N expansions for central potentials revisited in the light of hypervirial and Hellmann-Feynman theorems and the principle of minimal sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypervirial and Hellmann-Feynman theorems are used in the methods of 1/N expansion to construct Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation expansion for bound-state energy eigenvalues of spherical symmetric potentials. A new iteration procedure of calculating correction terms of arbitrarily high orders is obtained for any kind of 1/N expansion. The recurrence formulas for three variants of the 1/N expansion are considered in this work, namely, the 1/n expansion, the shifted and unshifted 1/N expansions which are applied to the Gaussian and Patil potentials. As a result, their credibility could be reliably judged when account is taken of high order terms of the eigenenergies. It is also found that there is a distinct advantage in using the shifted 1/N expansion over the two other versions. However, the shifted 1/N expansion diverges for s states and in certain cases is not applicable as far as complicated potentials are concerned. In an effort to solve these problems we have incorporated the principle of minimal sensitivity in the shifted 1/N expansion as a first step toward extending the scope of applicability of that technique, and then we have tested the obtained approach to some unfavorable cases of the Patil and Hellmann potentials. The agreement between our numerical calculations and reference data is quite satisfactory. (author)

  19. Chemical derivatization for enhancing sensitivity during LC/ESI-MS/MS quantification of steroids in biological samples: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Shoujiro

    2016-09-01

    Sensitive and specific methods for the detection, characterization and quantification of endogenous steroids in body fluids or tissues are necessary for the diagnosis, pathological analysis and treatment of many diseases. Recently, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) has been widely used for these purposes due to its specificity and versatility. However, the ESI efficiency and fragmentation behavior of some steroids are poor, which lead to a low sensitivity. Chemical derivatization is one of the most effective methods to improve the detection characteristics of steroids in ESI-MS/MS. Based on this background, this article reviews the recent advances in chemical derivatization for the trace quantification of steroids in biological samples by LC/ESI-MS/MS. The derivatization in ESI-MS/MS is based on tagging a proton-affinitive or permanently charged moiety on the target steroid. Introduction/formation of a fragmentable moiety suitable for the selected reaction monitoring by the derivatization also enhances the sensitivity. The stable isotope-coded derivatization procedures for the steroid analysis are also described. PMID:26454158

  20. Sensitivity analysis of large system of chemical kinetic parameters for engine combustion simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, H; Sanz-Argent, J; Petitpas, G; Havstad, M; Flowers, D

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the authors applied the state-of-the art sensitivity methods to downselect system parameters from 4000+ to 8, (23000+ -> 4000+ -> 84 -> 8). This analysis procedure paves the way for future works: (1) calibrate the system response using existed experimental observations, and (2) predict future experiment results, using the calibrated system.

  1. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  2. Sensitivities of Two Zebrafish TRPA1 Paralogs to Chemical and Thermal Stimuli Analyzed in Heterologous Expression Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Mai; Kurogi, Mako; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is the only member of the mouse, chick, and frog TRPA family, whereas 2 paralogs (zTRPA1a and zTRPA1b) are present in zebrafish. We herein investigated functional differences in the 2 zebrafish TRPA1s. HEK293T cells were used as heterologous expression systems, and the sensitivities of these cells to 4 chemical irritants (allyl isothiocyanate [AITC], caffeine, auto-oxidized epigallocatechin gallate [EGCG], and hydrogen peroxide [H2O2]) were compared with Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Sensitivities to the activators for AITC, oxidized EGCG, and H2O2 were higher in cells expressing zTRPA1a than in those expressing zTRPA1b, whereas caffeine appeared to activate both cells equally. We also characterized the thermal sensitivity of Xenopus oocytes expressing each TRPA1 electrophysiologically using a 2-electrode voltage clamp. Although endogenous currents induced by a cold stimulation were observed in control oocytes in some batches, oocytes expressing zTRPA1b showed significantly stronger cold- and heat-induced responses. However, significant thermal activation was not observed in oocytes expressing zTRPA1a. The results obtained using in vitro expression systems suggest that zTRPA1a is specialized for chemical sensing, whereas zTRPA1b responds to thermal stimuli. Furthermore, characterization of the chimeric molecule of TRPA1a and 1b revealed the importance of the N-terminal region in chemical and thermal sensing by zTRPA1s. PMID:26826723

  3. Sensitivity of chemical reaction networks: a structural approach 3. Regular multimolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic mathematical analysis of the qualitative steady-state response to rate perturbations in large classes of reaction networks. This includes multimolecular reactions and allows for catalysis, enzymatic reactions, multiple reaction products, nonmonotone rate functions, and non-closed autonomous systems. Our structural sensitivity analysis is based on the stoichiometry of the reaction network, only. It does not require numerical data on reaction rates. Instead, we impose mild and generic nondegeneracy conditions of algebraic type. From the structural data, only, we derive which steady-state concentrations are sensitive to, and hence influenced by, changes of any particular reaction rate - and which are not. We also establish transitivity properties for influences involving rate perturbations. This allows us to derive an influence graph which globally summarizes the influence pattern of the given network. The influence graph allows the computational, but meaningful, automatic identification ...

  4. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology. The aim of this stud...... excessive upper airway inflammatory processes....... was to examine baseline and low dose n-butanol-induced upper airway inflammatory response profiles in MCS subjects versus healthy controls. Eighteen participants with MCS and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Epithelial lining fluid was collected from the nasal...... inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05) at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences. We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom...

  5. Rapid and Sensitive Reporter Gene Assays for Detection of Antiandrogenic and Estrogenic Effects of Environmental Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... cancer cells with an estrogen response element–luciferase vector. Thus, FuGene may prove to be valuable in diverse reporter gene assays involving transient transfections for screening of potential endocrine disruptors for (anti)androgenic and (anti)estrogenic properties....

  6. Onium salts as radiation-sensitive acid generators for resists with chemical amplification (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessity of mastering alternative lithographic processes for development and production of 64 and 256 Mbit dynamic random-access memory units has been substantiated. It is shown that conventional positive photoresists based on diazonaphthoquinone and novalac resins do not meet the requirements of modern microlithography. The concept of chemical amplification offered a means for developing adequate topological structures with sizes of resist components of 0.35 μm or less. Onium salts are universal and efficient acid generators for resists with chemical amplification. Studies in the field of photo- and radiochemistry of onium salts have been summarized and correlated. It has been shown that the quantum yield and distribution of photolysis products are governed to a major extent by geminal and bulk recombination. Specific features of photolysis and radiolysis of onium salts in a polymer matrix are considered

  7. Porous solgel fiber as a transducer for highly sensitive chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shiquan; Winstead, Christopher B; Singh, Jagdish P; Jindal, Rajeev

    2002-08-15

    A novel solgel process for making porous silica fiber and doping the fiber core with sensing material is described. A CoCl(2) -doped solgel fiber was fabricated and was used to construct an active-core optical fiber moisture sensor. Test results show that the sensitivity of the active-core optical fiber sensor is much higher than that of an evanescent-wave-based optical fiber sensor. PMID:18026453

  8. Radiation chemical and biological examinations on sensitizers: mitomycin C, folic acid, procarbazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical and radiobiological examinations of the sensitizers Mitomycin C (MMC), Folic acid (FA) and Procarbazine (PC) were performed. In the radiochemical part, absorption spectroscopy and HPLC analysis were used to follow the radiolysis of MMC, FA and PC in aqueous solutions, in presence of air, Argon and N2O. The G initial value for the substrate decomposition was found. Possible reaction mechanisms for the reaction: sensitizers with OH- radicals and solvated electrons are given. Pulse radiolysis investigations to study the kinetic of OH- attack on FA yielded K (OH + FA)=1,3.1010 dm3 mol-1 S-1. For the radical disappearance, a reaction mechanism 2nd order with 2k=3,1.108 dm3 mol-1 S-1 (short-lived radical) and 2k=6,5.107 dm3 mol-1 S-1 (long-lived radical) was found. Pulse radiolysis investigations to study the kinetic of the OH- attack on PC yielded values for the velocity constant of the radical formation as well as one short-lived and one long-lived radical disappearance. Quantum chemistry calculations through VAMP6.1 (computer program) produced electron densities from PC, enthalpy formation and total energies of possible radicals resulted from the OH attack. In the radiobiological part, the bacteria EcAB1157 was used. Toxicity tests in air and Argon, depending on pH , sensitizers concentrations and exposition time were performed. The determination of the surviving curves in presence of air, Ar and N2O with different concentrations, dose rates and two pH values (6,2 and 7,4) with MMC, FA and PC allowed to prove their efficiency and action as sensitizers. (nevyjel)

  9. A Novel Thermal Sensor for the Sensitive Measurement of Chemical Oxygen Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Na Yao; Zhuan Liu; Ying Chen; Yikai Zhou; Bin Xie

    2015-01-01

    A novel rapid methodology for determining the chemical oxygen demand (COD) based on a thermal sensor with a flow injection analysis system was proposed and experimentally validated. The ability of this sensor to detect and monitor COD was based on the degree of enthalpy increase when sodium hypochlorite reacted with the organic content in water samples. The measurement results were correlated with COD and were compared against the conventional method using potassium dichromate. The assay requ...

  10. Bitter-sensitive gustatory receptor neuron responds to chemically diverse insect repellents in the common malaria mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Jackson T.; Dickens, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    Female mosquitoes feed on blood from animal hosts to obtain nutritional resources used for egg production. These contacts facilitate the spread of harmful human diseases. Chemical repellents are used to disrupt mosquito host-seeking and blood-feeding behaviors; however, little is known about the gustatory sensitivity of mosquitoes to known repellents. Here, we recorded electrical responses from gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) housed within the labellar sensilla of female Anopheles quadrimaculatus to N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), picaridin, IR3535, 2-undecanone, p-menthane-3,8-diol, geraniol, trans-2-hexen-1-ol, quinine, and quinidine. A bitter-sensitive GRN responded to all tested repellents and quinine, a known feeding deterrent. Responses of the bitter-sensitive neuron to quinine and an isomer, quinidine, did not differ. Delayed bursts of electrical activity were observed in response to continuous stimulation with synthetic repellents at high concentrations. Electrophysiological recordings from bitter-sensitive GRNs associated with mosquito gustatory sensilla represent a convenient model to evaluate candidate repellents.

  11. Bitter-sensitive gustatory receptor neuron responds to chemically diverse insect repellents in the common malaria mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Jackson T; Dickens, Joseph C

    2016-06-01

    Female mosquitoes feed on blood from animal hosts to obtain nutritional resources used for egg production. These contacts facilitate the spread of harmful human diseases. Chemical repellents are used to disrupt mosquito host-seeking and blood-feeding behaviors; however, little is known about the gustatory sensitivity of mosquitoes to known repellents. Here, we recorded electrical responses from gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) housed within the labellar sensilla of female Anopheles quadrimaculatus to N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), picaridin, IR3535, 2-undecanone, p-menthane-3,8-diol, geraniol, trans-2-hexen-1-ol, quinine, and quinidine. A bitter-sensitive GRN responded to all tested repellents and quinine, a known feeding deterrent. Responses of the bitter-sensitive neuron to quinine and an isomer, quinidine, did not differ. Delayed bursts of electrical activity were observed in response to continuous stimulation with synthetic repellents at high concentrations. Electrophysiological recordings from bitter-sensitive GRNs associated with mosquito gustatory sensilla represent a convenient model to evaluate candidate repellents. PMID:27108454

  12. Chemical characteristics and acid sensitivity of boreal headwater lakes in northwest Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean S. BIRKS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Boreal ecosystems in northwest Saskatchewan may be threatened by acidification as this area is downwind of atmospheric emissions sources from regional oil sands mining operations. To evaluate the status of lakes in this region, a survey of 259 headwater lakes was conducted during 2007–2008 within ~300 km of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Acid sensitivity by ecoregion increased from Mid-Boreal Upland to Churchill River Upland to Athabasca Plain, with 60% of lakes classified as sensitive (50–200 μeq L–1 acid neutralizing capacity (ANC, and 8% as very sensitive (<50 μeq L–1 ANC to acid deposition. Organic anions dominated the acidity balance in most lakes, but non-marine sulphate varied positively with lake elevation and % upland cover (r2 = 0.24. Base cation concentrations (Ca, Mg, K, Na were correlated with % deciduous forest in the catchment area (r2 = 0.33, while dissolved organic carbon (DOC was related most strongly to % bog and lake flushing variables (r2 = 0.53. Variation in runoff coefficients derived by isotope mass balance corresponded with catchment area attributes that proxy controls on evaporation, infiltration and storage, and showed some ecoregional differences. The findings have implications for assignment of runoff values required to calculate critical loads of acidity. Although acidification appears not to be significantly advanced, many dilute oligotrophic lakes with pH 6.0 to pH 6.5 are vulnerable to acid deposition.

  13. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor

    OpenAIRE

    Cedergreen, Nina; Nørhave, Nils Jakob; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8–24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing ...

  14. Bilayer ZnO nanostructure fabricated by chemical bath and its application in quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical bath method was used to synthesize bilayer ZnO nanostructure on ITO glass in the alkaline solution. As revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the product consists of a layered structure of ZnO nanorods at the bottom and nanoflower atop. The as-prepared sample was assembled in quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC), which obtained the incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 15% at 400 nm and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.45%. Therefore, this novel bilayer ZnO nanostructure has the potential for application in solar cell device as the photoelectrode.

  15. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  16. Colloquial Hebrew Imperatives Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolozky, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    In revisiting Bolozky's [Bolozky, Shmuel, 1979. "On the new imperative in colloquial Hebrew." "Hebrew Annual Review" 3, 17-24] and Bat-El's [Bat-El, Outi, 2002. "True truncation in colloquial Hebrew imperatives." "Language" 78(4), 651-683] analyses of colloquial Hebrew imperatives, the article argues for restricting Imperative Truncation to the…

  17. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...

  18. Life quality index revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    The derivation of the life quality index (LQI) is revisited for a revision. This revision takes into account the unpaid but necessary work time needed to stay alive in clean and healthy conditions to be fit for effective wealth producing work and to enjoyable free time. Dimension analysis...

  19. The Linguistic Repertoire Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the relevance of poststructuralist approaches to the notion of a linguistic repertoire and introduces the notion of language portraits as a basis for empirical study of the way in which speakers conceive and represent their heteroglossic repertoires. The first part of the article revisits Gumperz's notion of a linguistic…

  20. Concurrent shear stress and chemical stimulation of mechano-sensitive cells by discontinuous dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Mitchell, Arnan; McIntyre, Peter; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2016-03-01

    Microfluidic platforms enable a variety of physical or chemical stimulation of single or multiple cells to be examined and monitored in real-time. To date, intracellular calcium signalling research is, however, predominantly focused on observing the response of cells to a single mode of stimulation; consequently, the sensitising/desensitising of cell responses under concurrent stimuli is not well studied. In this paper, we provide an extended Discontinuous Dielectrophoresis procedure to investigate the sensitising of chemical stimulation, over an extensive range of shear stress, up to 63 dyn/cm(2), which encompasses shear stresses experienced in the arterial and venus systems (10 to 60 dyn/cm(2)). Furthermore, the TRPV4-selective agonist GSK1016790A, a form of chemical stimulation, did not influence the ability of the cells' to remain immobilised under high levels of shear stress; thus, enabling us to investigate shear stress stimulation on agonism. Our experiments revealed that shear stress sensitises GSK1016790A-evoked intracellular calcium signalling of cells in a shear-stimulus dependent manner, as observed through a reduction in the cellular response time and an increase in the pharmacological efficacy. Consequently, suggesting that the role of TRPV4 may be underestimated in endothelial cells-which experience high levels of shear stress. This study highlights the importance of conducting studies at high levels of shear stress. Additionally, our approach will be valuable for examining the effect of high levels of shear on different cell types under different conditions, as presented here for agonist activation. PMID:27099646

  1. Sensitivity of biomarkers to changes in chemical emissions in the Earth's Proterozoic atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Grenfell, John Lee; Gebauer, Stefanie; von Paris, Philip; Godolt, Mareike; Hedelt, Pascal; Patzer, Beate; Stracke, Barbara; Rauer, Heike

    2011-01-01

    The search for life beyond the Solar System is a major activity in exoplanet science. However, even if an Earth-like planet were to be found, it is unlikely to be at a similar stage of evolution as the modern Earth. It is therefore of interest to investigate the sensitivity of biomarker signals for life as we know it for an Earth-like planet but at earlier stages of evolution. Here, we assess biomarkers i.e. species almost exclusively associated with life, in present-day and in 10% present at...

  2. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R2 = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q2ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin sensitization and skin

  3. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Vinicius M. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Muratov, Eugene [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, A.V. Bogatsky Physical–Chemical Institute NAS of Ukraine, Odessa 65080 (Ukraine); Fourches, Denis [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole [ILS/Contractor supporting the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM), P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Andrade, Carolina H. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  4. Correlating chemical sensitivity and basal gene expression reveals mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Matthew G.; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Cheah, Jaime H.; Adams, Drew J.; Price, Edmund V.; Gill, Shubhroz; Javaid, Sarah; Coletti, Matthew E.; Jones, Victor L.; Bodycombe, Nicole E.; Soule, Christian K.; Alexander, Benjamin; Li, Ava; Montgomery, Philip; Kotz, Joanne D.; Hon, C. Suk-Yee; Munoz, Benito; Liefeld, Ted; Dančík, Vlado; Haber, Daniel A.; Clish, Clary B.; Bittker, Joshua A.; Palmer, Michelle; Wagner, Bridget K.; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cellular gene expression in response to small-molecule or genetic perturbations have yielded signatures that can connect unknown mechanisms of action (MoA) to ones previously established. We hypothesized that differential basal gene expression could be correlated with patterns of small-molecule sensitivity across many cell lines to illuminate the actions of compounds whose MoA are unknown. To test this idea, we correlated the sensitivity patterns of 481 compounds with ~19,000 basal transcript levels across 823 different human cancer cell lines and identified selective outlier transcripts. This process yielded many novel mechanistic insights, including the identification of activation mechanisms, cellular transporters, and direct protein targets. We found that ML239, originally identified in a phenotypic screen for selective cytotoxicity in breast cancer stem-like cells, most likely acts through activation of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2). These data and analytical tools are available to the research community through the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal. PMID:26656090

  5. Sensitivity of the deep-sea amphipod Eurythenes gryllus to chemically dispersed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Gro Harlaug; Coquillé, Nathalie; Le Floch, Stephane; Geraudie, Perrine; Dussauze, Matthieu; Lemaire, Philippe; Camus, Lionel

    2016-04-01

    In the context of an oil spill accident and the following oil spill response, much attention is given to the use of dispersants. Dispersants are used to disperse an oil slick from the sea surface into the water column generating a cloud of dispersed oil droplets. The main consequence is an increasing of the sea water-oil interface which induces an increase of the oil biodegradation. Hence, the use of dispersants can be effective in preventing oiling of sensitive coastal environments. Also, in case of an oil blowout from the seabed, subsea injection of dispersants may offer some benefits compared to containment and recovery of the oil or in situ burning operation at the sea surface. However, biological effects of dispersed oil are poorly understood for deep-sea species. Most effects studies on dispersed oil and also other oil-related compounds have been focusing on more shallow water species. This is the first approach to assess the sensitivity of a macro-benthic deep-sea organism to dispersed oil. This paper describes a toxicity test which was performed on the macro-benthic deep-sea amphipod (Eurythenes gryllus) to determine the concentration causing lethality to 50 % of test individuals (LC50) after an exposure to dispersed Brut Arabian Light (BAL) oil. The LC50 (24 h) was 101 and 24 mg L(-1) after 72 h and 12 mg L(-1) at 96 h. Based on EPA scale of toxicity categories to aquatic organisms, an LC50 (96 h) of 12 mg L(-1) indicates that the dispersed oil was slightly to moderately toxic to E. gryllus. As an attempt to compare our results to others, a literature study was performed. Due to limited amount of data available for dispersed oil and amphipods, information on other crustacean species and other oil-related compounds was also collected. Only one study on dispersed oil and amphipods was found, the LC50 value in this study was similar to the LC50 value of E. gryllus in our study. Since toxicity data are important input to risk assessment and net

  6. Chemical sensitive interfacial free volume studies of nanophase Al-rich alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Al-based nanocrystalline alloys have attracted substantial interest due to their outstanding mechanical properties. These alloys can be obtained by crystallization of melt-spun amorphous precursors or by grain refinement upon repeated cold-rolling of elemental layers. For both synthesis routes, the nanocrystallization process is sensitively affected by interfacial chemistry and free volumes. In order to contribute to an atomistic understanding of the interfacial structure and processes during nanocrystallization, the present work deals with studies of interfacial free volumes by means of positron-annihilation-spectroscopy. In addition to positron lifetime spectroscopy which yields information on the size of free volumes, coincident Doppler broadening of the positron-electron annihilation photons is applied as novel technique for studying the chemistry of interfaces in nanophase materials on an atomistic scale. Al-rich alloys of the above mentioned synthesis routes were studied in this work. (author)

  7. Chemical crosslinking of acrylic acid to form biocompatible pH sensitive hydrogel reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Lim Sze; Ahmad, Ishak; Lazim, Mohd Azwani Shah Mat [Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Amin, Mohd. Cairul Iqbal Mohd [Faculty of Pharmacy, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    The purpose of this study is to produce a novel pH and temperature sensitive hydrogel, composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and cellulose nanocrystal (CNC). CNC was extracted from kenaf fiber through a series of alkali and bleaching treatments followed by acid hydrolysis. The PAA was then subjected to chemical cross-linking using the cross-linking agent (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide) with CNC entrapped in PAA matrix. The mixture was casted onto petri dish to obtain disc shape hydrogel. The effects of reaction conditions such as the ratio of PAA and CNC on the swelling behavior of the hydrogel obtained towards pH and temperature were studied. The obtained hydrogel was further subjected to different tests such swelling test for swelling behaviour at different pH and temperature along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology analysis. The hydrogel obtained showed excellent pH sensitivity and obtained maximum swelling at pH 7. Besides that, hydrogel obtained showed significant increase in swelling ratio when temperature of swelling medium was increased from 25°C to 37°C. SEM micrograph showed that the pore size of the hydrogel decreases with increase of CNC content proving that the hydrogel structure became more rigid with addition of CNC. The PAA/CNC hydrogel with such excellent sensitivity towards pH and temperature can be developed further as drug carrier.

  8. Chemical crosslinking of acrylic acid to form biocompatible pH sensitive hydrogel reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lim Sze; Ahmad, Ishak; Lazim, Mohd Azwani Shah Mat; Amin, Mohd. Cairul Iqbal Mohd

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to produce a novel pH and temperature sensitive hydrogel, composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and cellulose nanocrystal (CNC). CNC was extracted from kenaf fiber through a series of alkali and bleaching treatments followed by acid hydrolysis. The PAA was then subjected to chemical cross-linking using the cross-linking agent (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide) with CNC entrapped in PAA matrix. The mixture was casted onto petri dish to obtain disc shape hydrogel. The effects of reaction conditions such as the ratio of PAA and CNC on the swelling behavior of the hydrogel obtained towards pH and temperature were studied. The obtained hydrogel was further subjected to different tests such swelling test for swelling behaviour at different pH and temperature along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology analysis. The hydrogel obtained showed excellent pH sensitivity and obtained maximum swelling at pH 7. Besides that, hydrogel obtained showed significant increase in swelling ratio when temperature of swelling medium was increased from 25°C to 37°C. SEM micrograph showed that the pore size of the hydrogel decreases with increase of CNC content proving that the hydrogel structure became more rigid with addition of CNC. The PAA/CNC hydrogel with such excellent sensitivity towards pH and temperature can be developed further as drug carrier.

  9. Chemical crosslinking of acrylic acid to form biocompatible pH sensitive hydrogel reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to produce a novel pH and temperature sensitive hydrogel, composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and cellulose nanocrystal (CNC). CNC was extracted from kenaf fiber through a series of alkali and bleaching treatments followed by acid hydrolysis. The PAA was then subjected to chemical cross-linking using the cross-linking agent (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide) with CNC entrapped in PAA matrix. The mixture was casted onto petri dish to obtain disc shape hydrogel. The effects of reaction conditions such as the ratio of PAA and CNC on the swelling behavior of the hydrogel obtained towards pH and temperature were studied. The obtained hydrogel was further subjected to different tests such swelling test for swelling behaviour at different pH and temperature along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology analysis. The hydrogel obtained showed excellent pH sensitivity and obtained maximum swelling at pH 7. Besides that, hydrogel obtained showed significant increase in swelling ratio when temperature of swelling medium was increased from 25°C to 37°C. SEM micrograph showed that the pore size of the hydrogel decreases with increase of CNC content proving that the hydrogel structure became more rigid with addition of CNC. The PAA/CNC hydrogel with such excellent sensitivity towards pH and temperature can be developed further as drug carrier

  10. Revisiting the carbonyl n → π* electronic excitation through topological eyes: expanding, enriching and enhancing the chemical language using electron number distribution functions and domain averaged Fermi holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro-Costas, David; Francisco, Evelio; Pendás, Ángel Martín; Mosquera, Ricardo A

    2015-10-21

    The theory of chemical bonding is underdeveloped in electronic excited states, even in small molecules. Fortunately, real space tools may be used to offer rich images of simple excitation processes, as is shown in this work. The statistics of electron populations, through a fruitful combination of electron distribution functions (EDFs) and domain averaged Fermi holes (DAFHs), was used to enlighten our chemical knowledge of a paradigmatic process: the n → π* excitation in formaldehyde. Interestingly, our results are perfectly compatible with an alternative perception of the electronic transition: the rotation of one averaged-electron in the oxygen lone pair. This topological model does not require inter-orbital jumps to explain the final electron distribution and, in our humble opinion, this fact makes it, to some extent, more realistic. Finally, other far-reaching conclusions emerge smoothly from our analysis: (i) the σ link may contribute less to the total bond order (as measured by the delocalization index) of a polar double bond than the π one; (ii) populating an antibonding orbital does not necessarily imply decreasing the bond order of its corresponding bond. PMID:26168082

  11. Sensitivity of Biomarkers to Changes in Chemical Emissions in the Earth's Proterozoic Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Grenfell, John Lee; von Paris, Philip; Godolt, Mareike; Hedelt, Pascal; Patzer, Beate; Stracke, Barbara; Rauer, Heike

    2010-01-01

    The search for life beyond the Solar System is a major activity in exoplanet science. However, even if an Earth-like planet were to be found, it is unlikely to be at a similar stage of evolution as the modern Earth. It is therefore of interest to investigate the sensitivity of biomarker signals for life as we know it for an Earth-like planet but at earlier stages of evolution. Here, we assess biomarkers i.e. species almost exclusively associated with life, in present-day and in 10% present atmospheric level oxygen atmospheres corresponding to the Earth's Proterozoic period. We investigate the impact of proposed enhanced microbial emissions of the biomarker nitrous oxide, which photolyses to form nitrogen oxides which can destroy the biomarker ozone. A major result of our work is regardless of the microbial activity producing nitrous oxide in the early anoxic ocean, a certain minimum ozone column can be expected to persist in Proterozoic-type atmospheres due to a stabilising feedback loop between ozone, nitrou...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF XANTHOMONAS AXONOPODIS PV. PUNICAE ISOLATES FROM WESTERN MAHARASHTRA AND THEIR SENSITIVITY TO CHEMICAL TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. RAGHUWANSHI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial blight of pomegranate caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae is a major biotic constraint inpeninsular India. Field survey was undertaken in the major pomegranate growing regions of Western Maharashtra,which revealed the high prevalence of bacterial blight incidence in Solapur, Sangli and Nashik districts. Fourdifferent isolates of this pathogen were obtained from the highly infected plant materials collected during the fieldsurvey. X. axonopodis pv. punicae was detected from infected plant material and its identity was confirmed bymorphological, physiological, hypersensitive and pathogenicity tests. Nashik isolate was most virulent. On InterSimple Sequence Repeat (ISSR analysis they formed separate clusters with Akkalkot-Solapur isolate being mostdivergent, while Deola-Nashik and Sangamner-Ahmednagar isolates were most similar. Six chemical treatmentsshowed complete control under in vitro conditions while rest varied in their response to isolates. Completecontrol in all four isolates was observed with Bordeaux mixture (1%; captan (0.25% + Copper oxychloride(0.3%, captan (0.25% + copper hydroxide (0.3%, bromopol (500 ppm + copper oxychloride (0.3%,streptocycline (250 ppm + copper hydroxide (0.3%, streptocycline (500 ppm + copper hydroxide (0.3%during in vitro study

  13. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergreen, Nina; Nørhave, Nils Jakob; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8-24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12-24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  14. Validation of WRF/Chem model and sensitivity of chemical mechanisms to ozone simulation over megacity Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Medhavi; Mohan, Manju

    2015-12-01

    Regional Chemical transport models (CTM) are used extensively for modeling of Ozone concentration. WRF/Chem is one such CTM that includes various chemical mechanisms and is used for simulation of Ozone and other pollutant concentration at desired time step. This study focuses on the robustness of WRF/Chem simulated Ozone concentrations over a sub tropical urban airshed of megacity Delhi. Detailed analysis has been presented for the veracity of two different chemical mechanisms namely; Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBMZ) and Regional Atmospheric Chemical Model (RACM). It was observed that simulated Ozone concentrations are better predicted with CBMZ mechanism and is highly sensitive to the rate constants. The Ozone concentrations are analyzed for precursors such as Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and Carbon-monoxide (CO) as well as temperature considering their strong dependence on Ozone formation. A consistent positive correlation between Ozone concentration and temperature is noted whereas; NOx and CO show inverse relationship with Ozone. Further, Ozone concentration range vis-à-vis model performance is scrutinized. A poor model for low Ozone concentration levels is observed and a highly satisfactory for moderate Ozone concentration levels while satisfactory for higher Ozone levels. Despite of the limitations observed during model evaluation of Ozone predictions for low Ozone levels, it is concluded that WRF/Chem could effectively be applied for understanding its trends, tropospheric chemistry and air quality assessment for regulatory purposes at moderate Ozone concentration levels. Further, it is recommended that model implementation shall be made for policy decisions cautiously with due consideration to the magnitudes of Ozone levels present in the study domain and the performance measures in the specific concentration range.

  15. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  16. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  17. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  18. The bar instability revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Chiodi, Filippo; Andreotti, Bruno; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relati...

  19. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  20. Sensitivity Amplification in the Phosphorylation-Dephosphorylation Cycle: Nonequilibrium steady states, chemical master equation and temporal cooperativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Hao

    2009-01-01

    A new type of cooperativity termed temporal cooperativity [Biophys. Chem. 105 585-593 (2003), Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 58 113-142 (2007)], emerges in the signal transduction module of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC). It utilizes multiple kinetic cycles in time, in contrast to allosteric cooperativity that utilizes multiple subunits in a protein. In the present paper, we thoroughly investigate both the deterministic (microscopic) and stochastic (mesoscopic) models, and focus on the identification of the source of temporal cooperativity via comparing with allosteric cooperativity. A thermodynamic analysis confirms again the claim that the chemical equilibrium state exists if and only if the phosphorylation potential $\\triangle G=0$, in which case the amplification of sensitivity is completely abolished. Then we provide comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis with the first-order and zero-order assumptions in phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle respectively. Furthermore, it is interesti...

  1. A sensitive and environmentally friendly method for determination of chemical oxygen demand using NiCu alloy electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► NiCu alloy modified electrode is used to determine chemical oxygen demand. ► NiCu alloy can effectively oxidize a wide range of organic compounds. ► Compared with the existing methods, this method has wide linear range and high sensitivity. ► The results are linearly correlated to those by the classic dichromate method. ► The proposed method has an excellent practical perspective in water quality control. - Abstract: A simple, sensitive and environmentally friendly method was developed for determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) by cyclic voltammetry using nickel–copper (NiCu) alloy electrode. The structure and the electrochemical behavior of NiCu alloy electrode were investigated by atomic force microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. The results indicated that NiCu alloy film with high quality was stably modified on the surface of glass carbon (GC) electrode, which could effectively oxidize a wide range of organic compounds. Subsequently, the parameters affecting the analytical performance were investigated, including pH, dissolved oxygen and concentration of chloride ion. Under optimized conditions, the linear range was 10–1533 mg L−1 and the detection limit was 1.0 mg L−1. The results obtained from the proposed method were linearly correlated to those by the classic dichromate method (r = 0.9978, p < 0.01, n = 13). Finally, the validated method was used to determine the COD values of surface water, reclaimed water and wastewater. It was shown that the proposed method had an excellent practical perspective on determination of COD in water quality control and pollution evaluation.

  2. Preparation of activated carbons from olive-tree wood revisited. I. Chemical activation with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ould-Idriss, A.; Cuerda-Correa, E.M.; Fernandez-Gonzalez, C.; Alexandre-Franco, M.F.; Gomez-Serrano, V. [Extremadura Univ., Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry; Stitou, M. [Univ. Abdelmalek Esaadi, Tetouan (Morocco). Dept. de Chimie; Macias-Garcia, A. [Extremadura Univ., Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Mechanical, Energetic and Materials Engineering

    2011-02-15

    In the conditioning tasks of olive-tree a large amount of a woody residue is generated. Such a residue has been traditionally used as a domestic fuel. In the last decades, however, this kind of use has lost importance and the preparation of activated carbons from olive-tree wood appears as an attractive alternative to valorize this by-product. In this study, the optimization of the chemical activation method with phosphoric acid for the production of activated carbon has been analyzed. The results obtained clearly show that samples prepared at 350 and 400 C exhibit a discrete porous development. On the contrary, when the carbonization temperature increases above 450 C the presence of a well-developed mesoporosity is observed. The mercury intrusion curves indicate that the samples exhibit a noticeably developed mesopore volume as well as a wide variety of mesopores ranging from 40 up to 1100 Aa of diameter. If the appropriate conditions are used, it is possible to prepare activated carbons showing tailored properties in terms of micro- or mesoporous texture and surface area. (author)

  3. Chemical sensing employingpH sensitive emeraldine base thin film for carbon dioxide detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia-Vladu, Mihai

    impedance spectroscopy measurements, revealed valuable information about conduction mechanisms at pH levels were the overall conductivity of the film remained unchanged. Typical impedance spectra for the emeraldine thin films for a frequency sweep between 3.2 E7 to 1 Hz shows a single semicircle. The overall conductivity of the film (5x10-4 S/cm) does not change when CO 2 is bubbled through the water in which the sensor is immersed, but an additional semicircle starts to appear at low (less than 200 Hz) frequency corresponding to lowering the pH of the solution below 5.0. The original semicircle diminishes in size but maintains its initial peak frequency. The EB film is very sensitive to pH changes, therefore an additional semicircle appears in unpurified argon gas due to the reduction of the pH of water solution to 4.65. The same mechanism is displayed in hydrochloric acid solutions of various pH. The formation of the second semicircle depends on the initial conductivity of the emeraldine base film, a film displaying an initial conductivity of 4.8 x 10-3 S/cm forming the second semicircle at a pH of 5.85. The appearance of the second semicircle is most likely due to a preferential protonation in the insulating matrix of the polymer film. The overall conductivity of the film increases when the level of protonation in the insulating portion of the film reached a level close to the protonation level in the scattered metallic islands, allowing the electron-hopping mechanism to became active. The sensor output is stable and reproducible even after 11 months passed from the polymer film deposition.

  4. Novel Carbazole-Based Hole-Transporting Materials with Star-Shaped Chemical Structures for Perovskite-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min Soo; Sung, Sang Do; Choi, In Taek; Kim, Hyoungjin; Hong, MunPyo; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Wan In; Kim, Hwan Kyu

    2015-10-14

    Novel carbazole-based hole-transporting materials (HTMs), including extended π-conjugated central core units such as 1,4-phenyl, 4,4'-biphenyl, or 1,3,5-trisphenylbenzene for promoting effective π-π stacking as well as the hexyloxy flexible group for enhancing solubility in organic solvent, have been synthesized as HTM of perovskite-sensitized solar cells. A HTM with 1,3,5-trisphenylbenzene core, coded as SGT-411, exhibited the highest charge conductivity caused by its intrinsic property to form crystallized structure. The perovskite-sensitized solar cells with SGT-411 exhibited the highest PCE of 13.00%, which is 94% of that of the device derived from spiro-OMeTAD (13.76%). Time-resolved photoluminescence spectra indicate that SGT-411 shows the shortest decay time constant, which is in agreement with the trends of conductivity data, indicating it having fastest charge regeneration. In this regard, a carbazole-based HTM with star-shaped chemical structure is considered to be a promising candidate HTM. PMID:26352372

  5. A miniature photoelectrochemical sensor based on organic electrochemical transistor for sensitive determination of chemical oxygen demand in wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianjun; Lin, Shiwei; Zeng, Min; Yang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    A three-electrode configuration is often required in the conventional photoelectrochemical measurements. Nevertheless, one common drawback is the reference electrode and the counter electrode used in the measurements, which has been proved to be an impediment for the miniaturization. In this study, a simple, cost-effective and miniature photoelectrochemical sensor based on high sensitive organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) is developed and used for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewaters. The devices show detection limit down to 0.01 mg/L COD, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the conventional photoelectrochemical method. The excellent sensing performance can be contributed to the novel sensing mechanism of OECT devices. That is, the devices are sensitive to the potential changes induced by the photoelectrochemical reaction on TiO2 nanotube arrays gate electrodes. Real sample analyses are also carried out. The results demonstrate that the measured COD values using the OECT devices and the standard dichromate methods are in a good agreement. Since the proposed sensor is constructed on a miniature transistor, it is expected that the device shows a promising application on the integrated COD monitoring platform. PMID:26971805

  6. Dry transfer of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces for tunnel junction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a dry transfer method that can tranfer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces. The graphene grown on copper (Cu) foil substrate was first transferred onto a freestanding 4 μm thick sputtered Cu film using the conventional wet transfer process, followed by a dry transfer process onto the target surface using a polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The dry-transferred graphene has similar properties to traditional wet-transferred graphene, characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. It has a sheet resistance of 1.6 ∼ 3.4 kΩ/□, hole density of (4.1 ∼ 5.3) × 1012 cm−2, and hole mobility of 460 ∼ 760 cm2 V−1 s−1 without doping at room temperature. The results suggest that large-scale CVD-grown graphene can be transferred with good quality and without contaminating the target surface by any liquid. Mg/MgO/graphene tunnel junctions were fabricated using this transfer method. The junctions show good tunneling characteristics, which demonstrates the transfer technique can also be used to fabricate graphene devices on liquid-sensitive surfaces. (paper)

  7. Dry transfer of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces for tunnel junction applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying; Chen, Ke

    2015-01-01

    We report a dry transfer method that can tranfer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces. The graphene grown on copper (Cu) foil substrate was first transferred onto a freestanding 4 μm thick sputtered Cu film using the conventional wet transfer process, followed by a dry transfer process onto the target surface using a polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The dry-transferred graphene has similar properties to traditional wet-transferred graphene, characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. It has a sheet resistance of 1.6 ˜ 3.4 kΩ/□, hole density of (4.1 ˜ 5.3) × 1012 cm-2, and hole mobility of 460 ˜ 760 cm2 V-1 s-1 without doping at room temperature. The results suggest that large-scale CVD-grown graphene can be transferred with good quality and without contaminating the target surface by any liquid. Mg/MgO/graphene tunnel junctions were fabricated using this transfer method. The junctions show good tunneling characteristics, which demonstrates the transfer technique can also be used to fabricate graphene devices on liquid-sensitive surfaces.

  8. Sensitivity of the invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea to candidate control chemicals: The role of dissolved oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Inês C; Garrido, Rita; Ré, Ana; Gomes, João; Pereira, Joana L; Gonçalves, Fernando; Costa, Raquel

    2015-12-01

    The freshwater Corbicula fluminea is a major aquatic nuisance worldwide. Current pest control methods raise cost-effectiveness and environmental concerns, which motivate research into improved mitigation approaches. In this context, the susceptibility of the clams to chemicals under reduced oxygen conditions was examined. Biocides with different mechanisms of toxicity (niclosamide, polyDADMAC, ammonium nitrate, potassium chloride and dimethoate) were tested under normoxic (>7 mg L(-1) dissolved O2) and hypoxic (ammonium nitrate and dimethoate, clam mortality enhancements up to 400% were observed under hypoxia as compared to dosing upon normal dissolved oxygen conditions. For polyDADMAC and potassium chloride, substantially lower mortality enhancements were found. The differences in the clams' sensitivity to the chemicals under hypoxia could be linked to the expected mechanisms of action. This suggests that judicious selection of the biocide is essential if optimized combined control treatments are to be designed and provides an insight into the interference of frequent hypoxia events in the response of natural clam populations to contaminant loads. PMID:26254082

  9. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  10. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 2: Base Case and Sensitivity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103) of this series describes a new rotary reactor for gas-fueled chemical-looping combustion (CLC), in which, a solid wheel with microchannels rotates between the reducing and oxidizing streams. The oxygen carrier (OC) coated on the surfaces of the channels periodically adsorbs oxygen from air and releases it to oxidize the fuel. A one-dimensional model is also developed in part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103). This paper presents the simulation results based on the base-case design parameters. The results indicate that both the fuel conversion efficiency and the carbon separation efficiency are close to unity. Because of the relatively low reduction rate of copper oxide, fuel conversion occurs gradually from the inlet to the exit. A total of 99.9% of the fuel is converted within 75% of the channel, leading to 25% redundant length near the exit, to ensure robustness. In the air sector, the OC is rapidly regenerated while consuming a large amount of oxygen from air. Velocity fluctuations are observed during the transition between sectors because of the complete reactions of OCs. The gas temperature increases monotonically from 823 to 1315 K, which is mainly determined by the solid temperature, whose variations with time are limited within 20 K. The overall energy in the solid phase is balanced between the reaction heat release, conduction, and convective cooling. In the sensitivity analysis, important input parameters are identified and varied around their base-case values. The resulting changes in the model-predicted performance revealed that the most important parameters are the reduction kinetics, the operating pressure, and the feed stream temperatures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Comparison of Chemical Sensitivity of Fresh and Long-Stored Heat Resistant Neosartorya fischeri Environmental Isolates Using BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArray System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Panek

    Full Text Available Spoilage of heat processed food and beverage by heat resistant fungi (HRF is a major problem for food industry in many countries. Neosartorya fischeri is the leading source of spoilage in thermally processed products. Its resistance to heat processing and toxigenicity makes studies about Neosartorya fischeri metabolism and chemical sensitivity essential. In this study chemical sensitivity of two environmental Neosartorya fischeri isolates were compared. One was isolated from canned apples in 1923 (DSM3700, the other from thermal processed strawberry product in 2012 (KC179765, used as long-stored and fresh isolate, respectively. The study was conducted using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray platforms of chemical sensitivity panel and traditional hole-plate method. The study allowed for obtaining data about Neosartorya fischeri growth inhibitors. The fresh isolate appeared to be much more resistant to chemical agents than the long-stored isolate. Based on phenotype microarray assay nitrogen compounds, toxic cations and membrane function compounds were the most effective in growth inhibition of N. fischeri isolates. According to the study zaragozic acid A, thallium(I acetate and sodium selenate were potent and promising N. fischeri oriented fungicides which was confirmed by both chemical sensitivity microplates panel and traditional hole-plate methods.

  12. Comparison of Chemical Sensitivity of Fresh and Long-Stored Heat Resistant Neosartorya fischeri Environmental Isolates Using BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArray System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Jacek; Frąc, Magdalena; Bilińska-Wielgus, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Spoilage of heat processed food and beverage by heat resistant fungi (HRF) is a major problem for food industry in many countries. Neosartorya fischeri is the leading source of spoilage in thermally processed products. Its resistance to heat processing and toxigenicity makes studies about Neosartorya fischeri metabolism and chemical sensitivity essential. In this study chemical sensitivity of two environmental Neosartorya fischeri isolates were compared. One was isolated from canned apples in 1923 (DSM3700), the other from thermal processed strawberry product in 2012 (KC179765), used as long-stored and fresh isolate, respectively. The study was conducted using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray platforms of chemical sensitivity panel and traditional hole-plate method. The study allowed for obtaining data about Neosartorya fischeri growth inhibitors. The fresh isolate appeared to be much more resistant to chemical agents than the long-stored isolate. Based on phenotype microarray assay nitrogen compounds, toxic cations and membrane function compounds were the most effective in growth inhibition of N. fischeri isolates. According to the study zaragozic acid A, thallium(I) acetate and sodium selenate were potent and promising N. fischeri oriented fungicides which was confirmed by both chemical sensitivity microplates panel and traditional hole-plate methods. PMID:26815302

  13. Analogue Magnetism Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Osano, Bob

    2016-01-01

    In this article we revisit the significance of the often debated structural similarity between the equations of electromagnetism and fluid dynamics. Although the matching of the two sets of equations has successfully been done for non-dissipative forms of the equations, little has been done for cases where the dissipative terms are non-negligible. We consider the consequence of non-negligible viscosity and diffusivity, and how the fine-tuning of these parameters could allow fluid dynamics to be used to indirectly study certain properties of magnetic fields.

  14. Bottomonium spectrum revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Jorge; Ortega, Pablo G.; Entem, David R.; Fernández, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    We revisit the bottomonium spectrum motivated by the recently exciting experimental progress in the observation of new bottomonium states, both conventional and unconventional. Our framework is a nonrelativistic constituent quark model which has been applied to a wide range of hadronic observables from the light to the heavy quark sector, and thus the model parameters are completely constrained. Beyond the spectrum, we provide a large number of electromagnetic, strong and hadronic decays in order to discuss the quark content of the bottomonium states and give more insights about a better way to determine their properties experimentally.

  15. T-duality revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Plauschinn

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the transformation rules of the metric and Kalb-Ramond field under T-duality, and express the corresponding relations in terms of the metric G and the field strength H = dB . In the course of the derivation, we find an explanation for potential reductions of the isometry group in the dual background. The formalism employed in this paper is illustrated with examples based on tori and spheres, where for the latter we construct a new non-geometric background.

  16. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro;

    2012-01-01

    as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison......Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them, such...

  17. Reframing in dentistry: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekalakshmi; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Asokan, Sharath

    2013-01-01

    The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child's behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice. PMID:24021326

  18. Role of oxidative stress in ERK and p38 MAPK activation induced by the chemical sensitizer DNFB in a fetal skin dendritic cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, MT; Duarte, CB; Gonçalo, Margarida; Lopes, MC

    2005-01-01

    The intracellular mechanisms involved in the early phase of dendritic cell (DC) activation upon contact with chemical sensitizers are not well known. The strong skin sensitizer 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) was shown to induce the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in DC. In the present study, we investigated a putative role for oxidative stress in DNFB-induced MAPK activation and upregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD40. In a DC line generated from fetal mouse sk...

  19. Cortical activity during olfactory stimulation in multiple chemical sensitivity: a {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara [University Tor Vergata, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome (Italy); Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine Karolinska Hospital Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden); Micarelli, Alessandro; Alessandrini, Marco [University Tor Vergata, Department of Medical Science and Translational Medicine, Rome (Italy); Genovesi, Giuseppe [University La Sapienza, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); University La Sapienza, Regional Center for Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention of MCS, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, Orazio [University Tor Vergata, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome (Italy); IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the differences in brain glucose consumption during olfactory stimulation between subjects affected by multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) and a group of healthy individuals. Two {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 26 subjects (6 men and 20 women; mean age 46.7 ± 11 years) with a clinical diagnosis of MCS and in 11 healthy controls (6 women and 5 men; mean age 45.7 ± 11 years), the first scan after a neutral olfactory stimulation (NS) and the second after a pure olfactory stimulation (OS). Differences in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were analysed by statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). In controls OS led to an increase in glucose consumption in BA 18 and 19 and a reduction in glucose metabolism in BA 10, 11, 32 and 47. In MCS subjects, OS led to an increase in glucose consumption in BA 20, 23, 18 and 37 and a reduction in glucose metabolism in BA 8, 9 and 10. The results of our study suggest that cortical activity in subjects with MCS differs from that in healthy individuals during olfactory stimulation. (orig.)

  20. Activated chemical defense in aplysina sponges revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Carsten; Ebel, Rainer; Proksch, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Sponges of the genus Aplysina accumulate brominated isoxazoline alkaloids in concentrations that sometimes exceed 10% of their dry weight. We previously reported a decrease in concentrations of these compounds and a concomitant increase in concentrations of the monocyclic nitrogenous compounds aeroplysinin-1 and dienone in Aplysina aerophoba following injury of the sponge tissue. Further investigations indicated a wound-induced enzymatic cleavage of the former compounds into the latter, and demonstrated that these reactions also occur in other Aplysina sponges. A recent study on Caribbean Aplysina species, however, introduced doubt regarding the presence of a wound-induced bioconversion in sponges of this genus. This discrepancy motivated us to reinvestigate carefully the fate of brominated alkaloids in A. aerophoba and in other Aplysina sponges following mechanical injury. As a result of this study we conclude that (1) tissue damage induces a bioconversion of isoxazoline alkaloids into aeroplysinin-1 and dienone in Aplysina sponges, (2) this reaction is likely catalyzed by enzymes, and (3) it may be ecologically relevant as the bioconversion products possibly protect the wounded sponge tissue from invasion of bacterial pathogens. PMID:16525873

  1. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  2. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  3. Reliable disease biomarkers characterizing and identifying electrohypersensitivity and multiple chemical sensitivity as two etiopathogenic aspects of a unique pathological disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belpomme, Dominique; Campagnac, Christine; Irigaray, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Much of the controversy over the causes of electro-hypersensitivity (EHS) and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) lies in the absence of both recognized clinical criteria and objective biomarkers for widely accepted diagnosis. Since 2009, we have prospectively investigated, clinically and biologically, 1216 consecutive EHS and/or MCS-self reporting cases, in an attempt to answer both questions. We report here our preliminary data, based on 727 evaluable of 839 enrolled cases: 521 (71.6%) were diagnosed with EHS, 52 (7.2%) with MCS, and 154 (21.2%) with both EHS and MCS. Two out of three patients with EHS and/or MCS were female; mean age (years) was 47. As inflammation appears to be a key process resulting from electromagnetic field (EMF) and/or chemical effects on tissues, and histamine release is potentially a major mediator of inflammation, we systematically measured histamine in the blood of patients. Near 40% had a increase in histaminemia (especially when both conditions were present), indicating a chronic inflammatory response can be detected in these patients. Oxidative stress is part of inflammation and is a key contributor to damage and response. Nitrotyrosin, a marker of both peroxynitrite (ONOO°-) production and opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), was increased in 28% the cases. Protein S100B, another marker of BBB opening was increased in 15%. Circulating autoantibodies against O-myelin were detected in 23%, indicating EHS and MCS may be associated with autoimmune response. Confirming animal experiments showing the increase of Hsp27 and/or Hsp70 chaperone proteins under the influence of EMF, we found increased Hsp27 and/or Hsp70 in 33% of the patients. As most patients reported chronic insomnia and fatigue, we determined the 24 h urine 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS)/creatinin ratio and found it was decreased (<0.8) in all investigated cases. Finally, considering the self-reported symptoms of EHS and MCS, we serially measured the brain blood

  4. Sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of UTLS secondary sulfate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring upper-tropospheric-lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS sulfate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulfuric acid/water droplets, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulfate and bisulfate ions and the undissociated sulfuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulfuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interfering parameters like the ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile uncertainties

  5. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  6. Quantum duel revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the quantum two-person duel. In this problem, both Alice and Bob each possess a spin-1/2 particle which models dead and alive states for each player. We review the Abbott and Flitney result—now considering non-zero α1 and α2 in order to decide if it is better for Alice to shoot or not the second time—and we also consider a duel where players do not necessarily start alive. This simple assumption allows us to explore several interesting special cases, namely how a dead player can win the duel shooting just once, or how can Bob revive Alice after one shot, and the better strategy for Alice—being either alive or in a superposition of alive and dead states—fighting a dead opponent. (paper)

  7. Firewall Configuration Errors Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wool, Avishai

    2009-01-01

    The first quantitative evaluation of the quality of corporate firewall configurations appeared in 2004, based on Check Point FireWall-1 rule-sets. In general that survey indicated that corporate firewalls were often enforcing poorly written rule-sets, containing many mistakes. The goal of this work is to revisit the first survey. The current study is much larger. Moreover, for the first time, the study includes configurations from two major vendors. The study also introduce a novel "Firewall Complexity" (FC) measure, that applies to both types of firewalls. The findings of the current study indeed validate the 2004 study's main observations: firewalls are (still) poorly configured, and a rule-set's complexity is (still) positively correlated with the number of detected risk items. Thus we can conclude that, for well-configured firewalls, ``small is (still) beautiful''. However, unlike the 2004 study, we see no significant indication that later software versions have fewer errors (for both vendors).

  8. Logistics Innovation Process Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Su, Shong-Iee Ivan; Yang, Su-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to learn more about logistics innovation processes and their implications for the focal organization as well as the supply chain, especially suppliers. Design/methodology/approach – The empirical basis of the study is a longitudinal action research project...... that was triggered by the practical needs of new ways of handling material flows of a hospital. This approach made it possible to revisit theory on logistics innovation process. Findings – Apart from the tangible benefits reported to the case hospital, five findings can be extracted from this study: the logistics...... innovation process model may include not just customers but also suppliers; logistics innovation in buyer-supplier relations may serve as an alternative to outsourcing; logistics innovation processes are dynamic and may improve supplier partnerships; logistics innovations in the supply chain are as dependent...

  9. Reframing in dentistry: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child′s behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  10. Klein's double discontinuity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winsløw, Carl; Grønbæk, Niels

    2014-01-01

    bridging measures, success rates and many other aspects of these “entrance transition” problems. In this paper, we consider the inverse transition, experienced by university students as they revisit core parts of high school mathematics (in particular, calculus) after completing the undergraduate......Much effort and research has been invested into understanding and bridging the ‘gaps’ which many students experience in terms of contents and expectations as they begin university studies with a heavy component of mathematics, typically in the form of calculus courses. We have several studies of...... mathematics courses which are mandatory to become a high school teacher of mathematics. To what extent does the “advanced” experience enable them to approach the high school calculus in a deeper and more autonomous way ? To what extent can “capstone” courses support such an approach ? How could it be hindered...

  11. Quantum duel revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; Paiva, Milena M.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the quantum two-person duel. In this problem, both Alice and Bob each possess a spin-1/2 particle which models dead and alive states for each player. We review the Abbott and Flitney result—now considering non-zero α1 and α2 in order to decide if it is better for Alice to shoot or not the second time—and we also consider a duel where players do not necessarily start alive. This simple assumption allows us to explore several interesting special cases, namely how a dead player can win the duel shooting just once, or how can Bob revive Alice after one shot, and the better strategy for Alice—being either alive or in a superposition of alive and dead states—fighting a dead opponent.

  12. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Belenchia, Alessio; Liberati, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-en...

  13. Identification of Lilial as a fragrance sensitizer in a perfume by bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and structure-activity relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, E G; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Bruze, M;

    2000-01-01

    Fragrance materials are among the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to identify in a perfume fragrance allergens not included in the fragrance mix, by use of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships...... (SARs). The basis for the investigation was a 45-year-old woman allergic to her own perfume. She had a negative patch test to the fragrance mix and agreed to participate in the study. Chemical fractionation of the perfume concentrate was used for repeated patch testing and/or repeated open application...... chemical structure, indicating an ability to modify skin proteins and thus behave as a skin sensitizer, were tested on the patient. The patient reacted positively to the synthetic fragrance p-t-butyl-alpha-methylhydrocinnamic aldehyde (Lilial), a widely used fragrance compound not present in the fragrance...

  14. Visible-light sensitization of TiO2 photocatalysts via wet chemical N-doping for the degradation of dissolved organic compounds in wastewater treatment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased pollution of ground and surface water and emerging new micropollutants from a wide variety of industrial, municipal, and agricultural sources has increased demand on the development of innovative new technologies and materials whereby challenges associated with the provision of safe potable water can be addressed. Heterogeneous photocatalysis using visible-light sensitized TiO2 photocatalysts has attracted a lot of attention as it can effectively remove dissolved organic compound in water without generating harmful by-products. On this note, recent progress on visible-light sensitive TiO2 synthesis via wet chemical N-doping method is reviewed. In a typical visible-light sensitive TiO2 preparation via wet chemical methods, the chemical (e.g., N-doping content and states) and morphological properties (e.g., particle size, surface area, and crystal phase) of TiO2 in as-prepared resultants are sensitively dependent on many experimental variables during the synthesis. This has also made it very difficult to provide a universal guidance at this stage with a certainty for each variable of N-doping preparation. Instead of one-factor-at-a-time style investigation, a statistically valid parameter optimization investigation for general optima of photocatalytic activity will be certainly useful. Optimization of the preparation technique is envisaged to be beneficial to many environmental applications, i.e., dissolved organic compounds removal in wastewater treatment

  15. LSENS, A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for Homogeneous Gas-Phase Reactions. Part 2; Code Description and Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part II of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part II describes the code, how to modify it, and its usage, including preparation of the problem data file required to execute LSENS. Code usage is illustrated by several example problems, which further explain preparation of the problem data file and show how to obtain desired accuracy in the computed results. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions. Part I (NASA RP-1328) derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved by LSENS. Part III (NASA RP-1330) explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity-analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results.

  16. Deposition of Lead Sulfide Nanostructure Films on TiO2 Surface via Different Chemical Methods due to Improving Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • TiO2 surface was fabricated by electrophoresis deposition method. • PbS nanostructure layers were deposited on the TiO2 surface via different chemical methods. • The effects of chemical deposition methods on the optical properties of fabricated surfaces were studied. • Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were made with the fabricated TiO2/PbS surfaces. • The effects of different deposition methods on DSSC performance were investigated. -- Abstract: In this work TiO2 P25 was deposited successfully on the FTO glass by electrophoresis method. Different chemical methods were served for deposition of nanosized PbS such as chemical bath deposition (CBD) and successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Also in this paper, nanosized lead sulfide was successfully deposited on TiO2 surface by hydrothermal (HT) and microwave (MW) methods. Also TiO2/PbS nanocomposite was synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method and deposited on FTO glass by doctor blade (DB) technique. Dye sensitized solar cells were fabricated from prepared electrodes, Pt as counter electrode, dye solution and electrolyte. The effect of chemical deposition methods were investigated on surface quality, optical properties and solar cell efficiency. The observation showed that using different chemical methods for deposition of PbS on TiO2 surface is led to fabrication solar cells with different efficiencies and performances. The electrodes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cross-section SEM, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV–Vis spectroscopy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) made by the fabricated electrodes as working electrode and then were investigated by current density-voltage (J-V) curve and electrochemical

  17. Old and stable soil organic matter is not necessarily chemically recalcitrant: Implications for modeling concepts and temperature sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleber, M.; Nico, P.S.; Plante, A.; Filley, T.; Kramer, M.; Swanston, C.; Sollins, P.

    2010-03-01

    Soil carbon turnover models generally divide soil carbon into pools with varying intrinsic decomposition rates. Although these decomposition rates are modified by factors such as temperature, texture, and moisture, they are rationalized by assuming chemical structure is a primary controller of decomposition. In the current work, we use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation to explore this assumption. Specifically, we examined material from the 2.3-2.6 kg L{sup -1} density fraction of three soils of different type (Oxisol, Alfisol, Inceptisol). The density fraction with the youngest {sup 14}C age (Oxisol, 107 years) showed the highest relative abundance of aromatic groups and the lowest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio as determined by NEXAFS. Conversely, the fraction with the oldest C (Inceptisol, 680 years) had the lowest relative abundance of aromatic groups and highest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio. This sample also had the highest proportion of thermally labile materials as measured by DSC, and the highest ratio of substituted fatty acids to lignin phenols as indicated by CuO oxidation. Therefore, the organic matter of the Inceptisol sample, with a {sup 14}C age associated with 'passive' pools of carbon (680 years), had the largest proportion of easily metabolizable organic molecules with low thermodynamic stability, whereas the organic matter of the much younger Oxisol sample (107 years) had the highest proportion of supposedly stable organic structures considered more difficult to metabolize. Our results demonstrate that C age is not necessarily related to molecular structure or thermodynamic stability, and we suggest that soil carbon models would benefit from viewing turnover rate as codetermined by the interaction between substrates, microbial actors, and abiotic driving variables. Furthermore, assuming that old carbon is composed

  18. Enhancing the detection sensitivity of trace analysis of pharmaceutical genotoxic impurities by chemical derivatization and coordination ion spray-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lin; Sun, Mingjiang; An, Jianguo; Liu, David Q; Chen, Ted K; Kord, Alireza S

    2010-01-15

    Many pharmaceutical genotoxic impurities are neutral molecules. Trace level analysis of these neutral analytes is hampered by their poor ionization efficiency in mass spectrometry (MS). Two analytical approaches including chemical derivatization and coordination ion spray-MS were developed to enhance neutral analyte detection sensitivity. The chemical derivatization approach converts analytes into highly ionizable or permanently charged derivatives, which become readily detectable by MS. The coordination ion spray-MS method, on the other hand, improves ionization by forming neutral-ion adducts with metal ions such as Na(+), K(+), or NH(4)(+) which are introduced into the electrospray ionization source. Both approaches have been proven to be able to enhance the detection sensitivity of neutral pharmaceuticals dramatically. This article demonstrates the successful applications of the two approaches in the analysis of four pharmaceutical genotoxic impurities identified in a single drug development program, of which two are non-volatile alkyl chlorides and the other two are epoxides. PMID:19954782

  19. In-situ Real-Time Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compound Exposure and Heart Rate Variability for Patients with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Mizukoshi; Kazukiyo Kumagai; Naomichi Yamamoto; Miyuki Noguchi; Kazuhiro Yoshiuchi; Hiroaki Kumano; Kou Sakabe; Yukio Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    In-situ real-time monitoring of volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure and heart rate variability (HRV) were conducted for eight multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) patients using a VOC monitor, a Holter monitor, and a time-activity questionnaire for 24 h to identify the relationship between VOC exposure, biological effects, and subjective symptoms in actual life. The results revealed no significantly different parameters for averaged values such as VOC concentration, HF (high frequency), a...

  20. A controlled study of the effect of a mindfulness-based stress reduction technique in women with multiple chemical sensitivity, chronic fatigue syndrome, and fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Sampalli, Tara

    2009-01-01

    Tara Sampalli1, Elizabeth Berlasso1, Roy Fox1, Mark Petter21Nova Scotia Environmental Health Centre, Fall River, Nova Scotia, Canada; 2Doctoral Candidate, Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, CanadaBackground: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on women diagnosed with conditions such as multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and fibromyalgia (FM). Methods: The interventi...

  1. Revisiting energy efficiency fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lombard, L.; Velazquez, D. [Grupo de Termotecnia, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Ortiz, J. [Building Research Establishment (BRE), Garston, Watford, WD25 9XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Energy efficiency is a central target for energy policy and a keystone to mitigate climate change and to achieve a sustainable development. Although great efforts have been carried out during the last four decades to investigate the issue, focusing into measuring energy efficiency, understanding its trends and impacts on energy consumption and to design effective energy efficiency policies, many energy efficiency-related concepts, some methodological problems for the construction of energy efficiency indicators (EEI) and even some of the energy efficiency potential gains are often ignored or misunderstood, causing no little confusion and controversy not only for laymen but even for specialists. This paper aims to revisit, analyse and discuss some efficiency fundamental topics that could improve understanding and critical judgement of efficiency stakeholders and that could help in avoiding unfounded judgements and misleading statements. Firstly, we address the problem of measuring energy efficiency both in qualitative and quantitative terms. Secondly, main methodological problems standing in the way of the construction of EEI are discussed, and a sequence of actions is proposed to tackle them in an ordered fashion. Finally, two key topics are discussed in detail: the links between energy efficiency and energy savings, and the border between energy efficiency improvement and renewable sources promotion.

  2. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major...

  3. Cultural Warping of Childbirth, Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2007-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education revisits Doris Haire's classic 1972 article, “The Cultural Warping of Childbirth,” and describes the birth culture of today. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

  4. Influence of the physical–chemical properties of polyaniline thin films on the final sensitivity of varied field effect sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Hugo José Nogueira Pedroza Dias, E-mail: hugodiasmello@usp.br; Heimfarth, Tobias; Mulato, Marcelo

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the use of electrodeposited polyaniline (PANI) thin sensing films in pH sensors. Two configurations of the Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor (EGFET) sensor were studied: the Single EGFET (S-EGFET) and the Instrumental Amplifier EGFET (IA-EGFET) setups. The films were analyzed in both systems and the sensitivity and linearity of each sensor were compared. Initial sensitivities (70–80 mV/pH) measured in the IA-EGFET were reduced due to polymer bulk protonation after a prior measurement in the S-EGFET system. Films with high amount of deposited polymer had their sensitivities least reduced. Bulk protonation occurred due to the step potential applied to the reference electrode in the S-EGFET system. These changes were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visible reflectance spectroscopy and evaluation of CIE L*a*b* color scale. PANI pH EGFET sensors exhibited good linearity and stability that along with their high sensitivity, easy processing and low cost film production have large potential applications. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited polyaniline thin films were analyzed in two EGFET setups. • Polymer protonation provided changeable sensitivities. • Color and morphological variation confirm polymer aggregation and electrical changes.

  5. Influence of the physical–chemical properties of polyaniline thin films on the final sensitivity of varied field effect sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the use of electrodeposited polyaniline (PANI) thin sensing films in pH sensors. Two configurations of the Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor (EGFET) sensor were studied: the Single EGFET (S-EGFET) and the Instrumental Amplifier EGFET (IA-EGFET) setups. The films were analyzed in both systems and the sensitivity and linearity of each sensor were compared. Initial sensitivities (70–80 mV/pH) measured in the IA-EGFET were reduced due to polymer bulk protonation after a prior measurement in the S-EGFET system. Films with high amount of deposited polymer had their sensitivities least reduced. Bulk protonation occurred due to the step potential applied to the reference electrode in the S-EGFET system. These changes were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visible reflectance spectroscopy and evaluation of CIE L*a*b* color scale. PANI pH EGFET sensors exhibited good linearity and stability that along with their high sensitivity, easy processing and low cost film production have large potential applications. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited polyaniline thin films were analyzed in two EGFET setups. • Polymer protonation provided changeable sensitivities. • Color and morphological variation confirm polymer aggregation and electrical changes

  6. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-13

    A rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system for fast open-path quantification of multiple chemicals and mixtures is presented. The ECQCL system is swept over its entire tuning range (>100 cm-1) at frequencies up to 200 Hz. At 200 Hz the wavelength tuning rate and spectral resolution are 2x104 cm-1/sec and < 0.2 cm-1, respectively. The capability of the current system to quantify changes in chemical concentrations on millesecond timescales is demonstrated at atmospheric pressure using an open-path multi-pass cell. The detection limits for chemicals ranged from ppb to ppm levels depending on the absorption cross-section.

  7. Evaluation of the skin sensitizing potency of chemicals by using the existing methods and considerations of relevance for elicitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basketter, David A; Andersen, Klaus E; Liden, Carola;

    2005-01-01

    The Technical Committee of Classification and Labelling dealing with harmonized classification of substances and classification criteria under Directive 67/548/EEC on behalf of the European Commission nominated an expert group on skin sensitization in order to investigate further the possibility...

  8. The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre;

    2012-01-01

    To identify specific cases, classes or specific use situations of chemicals for which 'safety thresholds' or 'safety limits' were set (in regulations, standards, in scientific research/clinical work, etc.) and critically review the scientific and methodological parameters used to set those limits....

  9. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO. PMID:26653465

  10. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Long

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA linear functionalized polymer (PLF, was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, mustard gas (HD, chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES, 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can’t be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  11. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yin; Wang, Yang; Du, Xiaosong; Cheng, Luhua; Wu, Penglin; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA) linear functionalized polymer (PLF), was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW) device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), mustard gas (HD), chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES), 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP) and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can't be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed. PMID:26225975

  12. Influence of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O additive on the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with chemical sintered scattering layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Zhang, E-mail: lanzhang@hqu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Environment-Friendly Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Wu Jihuai, E-mail: jhwu@hqu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Environment-Friendly Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Lin Jianming; Huang, Miaoliang [Engineering Research Center of Environment-Friendly Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layers for highly efficient photoelectrodes. Display Omitted Highlights: > A chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer was prepared. > The nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer can offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties. > The DSSC with this nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer in the photoelectrode shows obviously enhanced photovoltaic performance. > The influence of additional amount of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O chemical sintering agent on the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs was studied. - Abstract: A bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} (nc-TiO{sub 2}) layer able to offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties was prepared with a simple method through adding the basic NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O agent into an acid nc-TiO{sub 2} paste to form some big rod-like nc-TiO{sub 2} aggregates by the chemical sintering process. The influence of additional amount of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O on the photovoltaic performance of the dye-sensitized solar cell with this bi-functional nc-TiO{sub 2} layer in the photoelectrode was studied. It was found that through controlling the additional amount of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and the thickness of the bi-functional nc-TiO{sub 2} layer, the highest energy conversion efficiency about 8.11% could be obtained, which was much higher than that of the dye-sensitized solar cell containing a single nc-TiO{sub 2} layer prepared with the original acid nc-TiO{sub 2} paste (4.34%).

  13. Influence of NH3.H2O additive on the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with chemical sintered scattering layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO2 layers for highly efficient photoelectrodes. Display Omitted Highlights: → A chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO2 layer was prepared. → The nanocrystalline TiO2 layer can offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties. → The DSSC with this nanocrystalline TiO2 layer in the photoelectrode shows obviously enhanced photovoltaic performance. → The influence of additional amount of NH3.H2O chemical sintering agent on the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs was studied. - Abstract: A bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO2 (nc-TiO2) layer able to offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties was prepared with a simple method through adding the basic NH3.H2O agent into an acid nc-TiO2 paste to form some big rod-like nc-TiO2 aggregates by the chemical sintering process. The influence of additional amount of NH3.H2O on the photovoltaic performance of the dye-sensitized solar cell with this bi-functional nc-TiO2 layer in the photoelectrode was studied. It was found that through controlling the additional amount of NH3.H2O and the thickness of the bi-functional nc-TiO2 layer, the highest energy conversion efficiency about 8.11% could be obtained, which was much higher than that of the dye-sensitized solar cell containing a single nc-TiO2 layer prepared with the original acid nc-TiO2 paste (4.34%).

  14. Atmospheric predictability revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzie S. R. Froude

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the potential to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP by estimating upper and lower bounds on predictability by re-visiting the original study of Lorenz (1982 but applied to the most recent version of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF forecast system, for both the deterministic and ensemble prediction systems (EPS. These bounds are contrasted with an older version of the same NWP system to see how they have changed with improvements to the NWP system. The computations were performed for the earlier seasons of DJF 1985/1986 and JJA 1986 and the later seasons of DJF 2010/2011 and JJA 2011 using the 500-hPa geopotential height field. Results indicate that for this field, we may be approaching the limit of deterministic forecasting so that further improvements might only be obtained by improving the initial state. The results also show that predictability calculations with earlier versions of the model may overestimate potential forecast skill, which may be due to insufficient internal variability in the model and because recent versions of the model are more realistic in representing the true atmospheric evolution. The same methodology is applied to the EPS to calculate upper and lower bounds of predictability of the ensemble mean forecast in order to explore how ensemble forecasting could extend the limits of the deterministic forecast. The results show that there is a large potential to improve the ensemble predictions, but for the increased predictability of the ensemble mean, there will be a trade-off in information as the forecasts will become increasingly smoothed with time. From around the 10-d forecast time, the ensemble mean begins to converge towards climatology. Until this point, the ensemble mean is able to predict the main features of the large-scale flow accurately and with high consistency from one forecast cycle to the next. By the 15-d forecast time, the ensemble mean has lost

  15. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The

  16. Marine Natural Products Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Clifford W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Reports the chemistry of saxitoxin, a paralytic shellfish poison, and other toxins, including the structure of aplysiatoxins. Discusses the chemical signals and defense agents used in intra- and inter- species communication; anticancer agents; and organometallics in the marine environment. (MA)

  17. Quality control of automotive engine oils with mass-sensitive chemical sensors--QCMs and molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickert, F L; Forth, P; Lieberzeit, P A; Voigt, G

    2000-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted polyurethanes were used as sensor materials for monitoring the degradation of automotive engine oils. Imprinting with characteristic oils permits the analysis of these complex mixtures without accurately knowing their composition. Mass-sensitive quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) coated with such layers exhibit mass effects in addition to frequency shifts caused by viscosity, which can be compensated by an uncoated quartz or a non-imprint layer. Incorporation of degradation products into the imprinted coatings is a bulk phenomenon, which is proven by variation of the sensor layer height. Therefore, the resulting sensor effects are determined by the degradation products in the oil. PMID:11227411

  18. Remembered Experiences and Revisit Intentions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Tourism is an experience-intensive sector in which customers seek and pay for experiences above everything else. Remembering past tourism experiences is also crucial for an understanding of the present, including the predicted behaviours of visitors to tourist destinations. We adopt a longitudinal...... approach to memory data collection from psychological science, which has the potential to contribute to our understanding of tourist behaviour. In this study, we examine the impact of remembered tourist experiences in a safari park. In particular, using matched survey data collected longitudinally and PLS...... path modelling, we examine the impact of positive affect tourist experiences on the development of revisit intentions. We find that longer-term remembered experiences have the strongest impact on revisit intentions, more so than predicted or immediate memory after an event. We also find that remembered...

  19. Revisiting Mutual Fund Performance Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Angelidis, Timotheos; Giamouridis, Daniel; Tessaromatis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Mutual fund manager excess performance should be measured relative to their self-reported benchmark rather than the return of a passive portfolio with the same risk characteristics. Ignoring the self-reported benchmark introduces biases in the measurement of stock selection and timing components of excess performance. We revisit baseline empirical evidence in mutual fund performance evaluation utilizing stock selection and timing measures that address these biases. We introduce a ...

  20. Markowitz Revisited: Social Portfolio Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Gasser, Stephan; Kremser, Thomas; Rammerstorfer, Margarethe; Weinmayer, Karl

    2014-01-01

    In recent years socially responsible investing has become an increasingly more popular subject with both private and institutional investors. At the same time, a number of scientific papers have been published on socially responsible investments (SRIs), covering a broad range of topics, from what actually defines SRIs to the financial performance of SRI funds in contrast to non-SRI funds. In this paper, we revisit Markowitz' Portfolio Selection Theory and propose a modification...

  1. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major challenge on the substantive level is the integration of soft and hard managerial functions, while the concepts used in presenting these should at least in transition be able to contain a distinction bet...

  2. Lipid-polymer nanoparticles encapsulating doxorubicin and 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemical therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xianwei; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Lili; Zheng, Mingbin; Zheng, Cuifang; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Pengfei; Ma, Yifan; Tao, Qian; Cai, Lintao

    2013-05-01

    Nanomedcine holds great potential in cancer therapy due to its flexibility on drug delivery, protection, releasing, and targeting. Epigenetic drugs, such as 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine (DAC), are able to cause reactive expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) in human cancers and, therefore, might be able to enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy. In this report, we fabricated a lipid-polymer nanoparticle for codelivery of epigenetic drug DAC and traditional chemotherapeutic drug (DOX) to cancer cells and monitored the growth inhibition of the hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) on cancer cells. Our results showed that NPs encapsulating DAC, DOX, or both, could be effectively internalized by cancer cells. More importantly, incorporating DAC into NPs significantly enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to DOX by inhibiting cell growth rate and inducing cell apoptosis. Further evidence indicated that DAC encapsulated by NPs was able to rescue the expression of silenced TSG in cancer cells. Overall our work clearly suggested that the resulting lipid-polymer nanoparticle is a potential tool for combining epigenetic therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:23570548

  3. Structure sensitive chemical reactivity by palladium concave nanocubes and nanoflowers synthesised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhala, S.; Sudheeshkumar, V.; Vinod, C. P.

    2014-06-01

    Palladium nanocubes and their transformation to concave nanocubes and nanoflowers are realised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium and at room temperature using cationic surfactants. The concave nanocubes and nanoflowers were found to be enclosed by high index facets. The under co-ordinated atoms present on the high index facets make these nanostructures chemically more active towards Suzuki coupling and Heck coupling reactions compared to the conventional nanocubes and spherical nanoparticles of similar size.Palladium nanocubes and their transformation to concave nanocubes and nanoflowers are realised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium and at room temperature using cationic surfactants. The concave nanocubes and nanoflowers were found to be enclosed by high index facets. The under co-ordinated atoms present on the high index facets make these nanostructures chemically more active towards Suzuki coupling and Heck coupling reactions compared to the conventional nanocubes and spherical nanoparticles of similar size. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional HRTEM images, UV-Vis spectra and details of TOF calculation. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01283f

  4. Radiation sensitizations at DNA-level by chemical and biological agents. Coordinated programme on improvement of radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sensitization by chemical agents at DNA level is discussed. Procaine, Halothan and Metronidazole showed no significant effect on unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mouse spleen cells, investigated by autoradiography and no effect on rejoining of DNA single strand breaks after gamma or UV irradiation. Oxyphenbutazon and prednisolone reduced the replicative DNA synthesis in vitro and in vivo but there was only little effect on DNA repair in the in vivo experiments. These two substances showed also a small reduction in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis (PAR synthesis). 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) in combination with UV irradiation showed that 5-MOP was more toxic than mutagen, but induced much less DNA crosslinks than 8-MOP. Autoradiographic studies of radiation sensitization by biological agents showed significant inhibition of UDS in Yoshida tumor cells after acute mycoplasma infection in rats. Nucleoid sedimentation studies showed only in the case of Yoshida tumor cells after mycoplasma infection a dramatic effect in the sedimentation behaviour. Sensitization of cells by changing chromatin structure was also studied. Benzamide, 3-NH2-benzamide, 3-Methoxybenzamide, Spermine, Theophyllin and Caffeine were tested in different concentrations on replicative DNA synthesis, UDS after UV irradiation and PAR synthesis Chinese hamster ovary cells. 5-Methoxybenzamide was the strongest sensitizer and inhibitor of the PAR synthesis, and was used in further experiments. Results of KFA Juelich on sensitization of a mamma-adenocarcinoma EO 771 on C57 B1 mice are given. Replicative DNA synthesis, DNA repair and PAR synthesis were compared in spleen cells and adenocarcinoma cells after treatment with 5-Methoxybenzamide. An inhibitory effect on UDS could be shown only in adenocarcinoma cells but not in the mice spleen cells

  5. Variable sensitivity of organic light-emitting diodes to operation-induced chemical degradation: Nature of the antagonistic relationship between lifetime and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakov, Denis Y.; Young, Ralph H.

    2010-10-01

    The efficiency of any organic light-emitting diode (OLED) decreases with prolonged operation. In fluorescent OLEDs containing the standard hole-transporting material NPB [N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1-naphthyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine], prolonged operation also results in chemical degradation of the NPB. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the extent and location of chemical changes are consistent with the hypothesis that chemical degradation of NPB is largely responsible for the loss of device efficiency and that the degradation is initiated by bond-breaking in excited-state NPB. Blue fluorescent OLEDs with low operating voltages and high luminance efficiencies tend to lose efficiency much faster than OLEDs with higher operating voltages and lower efficiencies. Even so, the two types exhibit approximately the same kind and degree of chemical degradation after operation for equal times at equal current densities. In the low-voltage OLEDs, the electric field in the light-emitting layer is weaker, and the concentration of NPB radical-cations near the emission zone is smaller than in the higher-voltage devices. Apparently for this reason, degradation products impair the luminescent efficiency more severely in the low-voltage OLEDs. Such differing sensitivity of low-voltage and high-voltage OLEDs to the same amount of chemical degradation is further demonstrated by experiments with OLEDs that have been doped intentionally with a contaminant modeling a degradation product at realistic concentrations. It is also supported by a substantial recovery of efficiency after a conversion of a degraded low-voltage device into a high-voltage device by replacement of the cathode and electron-injecting interface.

  6. From solution to in-cell study of the chemical reactivity of acid sensitive functional groups: a rational approach towards improved cleavable linkers for biospecific endosomal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Sylvain A; Leriche, Geoffray; Mosser, Michel; Nothisen, Marc; Muller, Christian D; Remy, Jean-Serge; Wagner, Alain

    2016-06-01

    pH-Sensitive linkers designed to undergo selective hydrolysis at acidic pH compared to physiological pH can be used for the selective release of therapeutics at their site of action. In this paper, the hydrolytic cleavage of a wide variety of molecular structures that have been reported for their use in pH-sensitive delivery systems was examined. A wide variety of hydrolytic stability profiles were found among the panel of tested chemical functionalities. Even within a structural family, a slight modification of the substitution pattern has an unsuspected outcome on the hydrolysis stability. This work led us to establish a first classification of these groups based on their reactivities at pH 5.5 and their relative hydrolysis at pH 5.5 vs. pH 7.4. From this classification, four representative chemical functions were selected and studied in-vitro. The results revealed that only the most reactive functions underwent significant lysosomal cleavage, according to flow cytometry measurements. These last results question the acid-based mechanism of action of known drug release systems and advocate for the importance of an in-depth structure-reactivity study, using a tailored methodology, for the rational design and development of bio-responsive linkers. PMID:27169758

  7. Isoform-specific modulation of the chemical sensitivity of conserved TRPA1 channel in the major honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Tropilaelaps mercedesae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaofeng; Kashio, Makiko; Peng, Guangda; Wang, Xinyue; Tominaga, Makoto; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    We identified and characterized the TRPA1 channel of Tropilaelaps mercedesae (TmTRPA1), one of two major species of honeybee ectoparasitic mite. Three TmTRPA1 isoforms with unique N-terminal sequences were activated by heat, and the isoform highly expressed in the mite's front legs, TmTRPA1b, was also activated by 27 plant-derived compounds including electrophiles. This suggests that the heat- and electrophile-dependent gating mechanisms as nocisensitive TRPA1 channel are well conserved between arthropod species. Intriguingly, one TmTRPA1 isoform, TmTRPA1a, was activated by only six compounds compared with two other isoforms, demonstrating that the N-terminal sequences are critical determinants for the chemical sensitivity. This is the first example of isoform-specific modulation of chemical sensitivity of TRPA1 channel in one species. α-terpineol showed repellent activity towards T. mercedesae in a laboratory assay and repressed T. mercedesae entry for reproduction into the brood cells with fifth instar larvae in hives. Thus, α-terpineol could be used as the potential compound to control two major honeybee ectoparasitic mites, T. mercedesae and Varroa destructor, in the apiculture industry. PMID:27307515

  8. Constraining the sensitivity of iodide adduct chemical ionization mass spectrometry to multifunctional organic molecules using the collision limit and thermodynamic stability of iodide ion adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Iyer, Siddarth; Mohr, Claudia; Lee, Ben H.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Kurtén, Theo; Thornton, Joel A.

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ions formed per number density of analytes) is fundamentally limited by the collision frequency between reagent ions and analytes, known as the collision limit, the ion-molecule reaction time, and the transmission efficiency of product ions to the detector. We use the response of a time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) to N2O5, known to react with iodide at the collision limit, to constrain the combined effects of ion-molecule reaction time, which is strongly influenced by mixing and ion losses in the ion-molecule reaction drift tube. A mass spectrometric voltage scanning procedure elucidates the relative binding energies of the ion adducts, which influence the transmission efficiency of molecular ions through the electric fields within the vacuum chamber. Together, this information provides a critical constraint on the sensitivity of a ToF-CIMS towards a wide suite of routinely detected multifunctional organic molecules for which no calibration standards exist. We describe the scanning procedure and collision limit determination, and we show results from the application of these constraints to the measurement of organic aerosol composition at two different field locations.

  9. A spinosyn-sensitive Drosophila melanogaster nicotinic acetylcholine receptor identified through chemically induced target site resistance, resistance gene identification, and heterologous expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gerald B; Chouinard, Scott W; Cook, Kevin R; Geng, Chaoxian; Gifford, Jim M; Gustafson, Gary D; Hasler, James M; Larrinua, Ignacio M; Letherer, Ted J; Mitchell, Jon C; Pak, William L; Salgado, Vincent L; Sparks, Thomas C; Stilwell, Geoff E

    2010-05-01

    Strains of Drosophila melanogaster with resistance to the insecticides spinosyn A, spinosad, and spinetoram were produced by chemical mutagenesis. These spinosyn-resistant strains were not cross-resistant to other insecticides. The two strains that were initially characterized were subsequently found to have mutations in the gene encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit Dalpha6. Subsequently, additional spinosyn-resistant alleles were generated by chemical mutagenesis and were also found to have mutations in the gene encoding Dalpha6, providing convincing evidence that Dalpha6 is a target site for the spinosyns in D. melanogaster. Although a spinosyn-sensitive receptor could not be generated in Xenopus laevis oocytes simply by expressing Dalpha6 alone, co-expression of Dalpha6 with an additional nAChR subunit, Dalpha5, and the chaperone protein ric-3 resulted in an acetylcholine- and spinosyn-sensitive receptor with the pharmacological properties anticipated for a native nAChR. PMID:19944756

  10. Chemical synthesis of CdS onto TiO2 nanorods for quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sachin A.; Patil, Dipali S.; Lokhande, Abhishek C.; Gang, Myeng Gil; Shin, Jae Cheol; Patil, Pramod S.; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    A quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) is fabricated using hydrothermally grown TiO2 nanorods and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) deposited CdS. Surface morphology of the TiO2 films coated with different SILAR cycles of CdS is examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy which revealed aggregated CdS QDs coverage grow on increasing onto the TiO2 nanorods with respect to cycle number. Under AM 1.5G illumination, we found the TiO2/CdS QDSSC photoelectrode shows a power conversion efficiency of 1.75%, in an aqueous polysulfide electrolyte with short-circuit photocurrent density of 4.04 mA/cm2 which is higher than that of a bare TiO2 nanorods array.

  11. Chemical and structural analysis of solvothermal synthesized tungsten oxide nanotube without template and its hydrogen sensitive property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Imaged models of formation of nanotube during crystal growth: (a) precursor react with each other; (b) the crystal plane bended as crystallization; (c) the nanotube formed finally. Highlights: • The WO3 naonotube was prepared by solvothermal method without any addition. • The steric effect and the nucleation and growth mechanism resulted in the nanotube. • The nanotube film surface showed high oxygen vacancies. • The nanotube film showed diffusion dominated sensitivity. -- Abstract: Tungsten oxide nanotubes were synthesized by solvothermal process without template. The steric effect and the concentration of WCl6 are the dominant factors for the formation mechanism of the nanotube. The steric effect was experimentally and systematically studied with solvents including ethanol, isopropanol, n-propanol and butylalcohol, which have different molecular configuration and length, while the effect of concentration was investigated by characterizing the nanostructured productions. The samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface chemistry of the nanotube is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that the solvents species and WCl6 concentration obviously diversified the morphologies of the products; the nanotubes synthesized with isopropanol composed of W18O49 phase; the crystal defects (O atom vacancy) formed during rapid crystallization could be modified by heat treatment. The DC electrical response of the nanotube thin film to hydrogen was measured the temperature range from 200 °C to 300 °C, which indicated a decline in electrical resistance with good sensitivity, and showed the mechanism that the reaction limited process works at low temperature, whereas the diffusion limited process works at higher temperature

  12. N-Nitrosodiethanolamine Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jan Rud; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg; Carlsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn; Senning, A.

    1980-01-01

    N-nitrosodiethanolamine is believed to be a weakly carcinogenic chemical, and as it occurs widely--in consumer products for example--it may constitute a significant hazard to humans. However, the chemical evidence concerning the identity, purity and properties of N-nitrosodiethanolamine is...... incomplete, and this casts some doubt on the basis of the current interest in this substance. In the present paper a purification procedure of synthetic N-nitrosodiethanolamine based on high-performance liquid chromatography is given. Other fractionation procedures such as gas liquid chromatography, ambient...

  13. Industrialization and inequality revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molitoris, Joseph; Dribe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    , relative differences between socioeconomic groups remained virtually constant. The results also show that child mortality continued to be sensitive to short-term fluctuations in wages and that there were no socioeconomic differences in this response. We argue that the persistent inequality in living...

  14. The LINA Study: Higher Sensitivity of Infant Compared to Maternal Eosinophil/Basophil Progenitors to Indoor Chemical Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Hörnig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Enhanced eosinophil/basophil (Eo/B progenitor cell levels are known to be associated with allergic inflammation and atopy risk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different indoor exposures on the recruitment and differentiation of Eo/B progenitors in mother-child pairs. Methods. In 68 mother-child pairs of the LINA study peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used to assess Eo/B colony forming units (CFUs. Information about disease outcomes and indoor exposures was obtained from questionnaires. Indoor concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs were measured by passive sampling. Results. Infant’s Eo/B CFUs were positively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke, disinfectants, or VOCs. In contrast, for maternal Eo/B CFUs, only a few associations were seen. Higher numbers of infant Eo/B CFUs were observed in children with wheezing symptoms within the second year of life. Conclusions. We demonstrate that infant’s hematopoietic cells seem to respond with more sensitivity to environmental exposure compared to maternal cells. At least in infants, an activation of these hematopoietic cells by environmental exposure could contribute to an enhanced risk for the development of respiratory outcomes.

  15. Fluorescence Ratiometric Assay Strategy for Chemical Transmitter of Living Cells Using H2O2-Sensitive Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxia; Li, Shengliang; Feng, Liheng; Nie, Chenyao; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2015-11-01

    A new water-soluble conjugated poly(fluorene-co-phenylene) derivative (PFP-FB) modified with boronate-protected fluorescein (peroxyfluor-1) via PEG linker has been designed and synthesized. In the presence of H2O2, the peroxyfluor-1 group can transform into green fluorescent fluorescein by deprotecting the boronate protecting groups. In this case, upon selective excitation of PFP-FB backbone at 380 nm, efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFP-FB backbone to fluorescein occurs, and accordingly, the fluorescence color of PFP-FB changes from blue to green. Furthermore, the emission color of PFP-FB and the FRET ratio change in a concentration-dependent manner. By taking advantage of PFP-FB, ratiometric detection of choline and acetylcholine (ACh) through cascade enzymatic reactions and further dynamic monitoring of the choline consumption process of cancer cells have been successfully realized. Thus, this new polymer probe promotes the development of enzymatic biosensors and provides a simpler and more effective way for detecting the chemical transmitter of living cells. PMID:26451624

  16. In Chemico Evaluation of Tea Tree Essential Oils as Skin Sensitizers: Impact of the Chemical Composition on Aging and Generation of Reactive Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Wang, Mei; Vasquez, Yelkaira; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-07-18

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is an essential oil obtained from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia, M. linariifolia, or M. dissitiflora. Because of the commercial importance of TTO, substitution or adulteration with other tea tree species (such as cajeput, niaouli, manuka, or kanuka oils) is common and may pose significant risks along with perceived health benefits. The distinctive nature, qualitative and quantitative compositional variation of these oils, is responsible for the various pharmacological as well as adverse effects. Authentic TTOs (especially aged ones) have been identified as potential skin sensitizers, while reports of adverse allergic reactions to the other tea trees essential oils are less frequent. Chemical sensitizers are usually electrophilic compounds, and in chemico methods have been developed to identify skin allergens in terms of their ability to bind to biological nucleophiles. However, little information is available on the assessment of sensitization potential of mixtures, such as essential oils, due to their complexity. In the present study, 10 "tea tree" oils and six major TTO constituents have been investigated for their sensitization potential using a fluorescence in chemico method. The reactivity of authentic TTOs was found to correlate with the age of the oils, while the majority of nonauthentic TTOs were less reactive, even after aging. Further thio-trapping experiments with DCYA and characterization by UHPLC-DAD-MS led to the identification of several possible DCYA-adducts which can be used to deduce the structure of the candidate reactive species. The major TTO components, terpinolene, α-terpinene, and terpinene-4-ol, were unstable under accelerated aging conditions, which led to the formation of several DCYA-adducts. PMID:27286037

  17. Different pH-sensitivity patterns of 30 sodium channel inhibitors suggest chemically different pools along the access pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Alexandra; Lenkey, Nora; Pesti, Krisztina; Fodor, Laszlo; Mike, Arpad

    2015-01-01

    The major drug binding site of sodium channels is inaccessible from the extracellular side, drug molecules can only access it either from the membrane phase, or from the intracellular aqueous phase. For this reason, ligand-membrane interactions are as important determinants of inhibitor properties, as ligand-protein interactions. One-way to probe this is to modify the pH of the extracellular fluid, which alters the ratio of charged vs. uncharged forms of some compounds, thereby changing their interaction with the membrane. In this electrophysiology study we used three different pH values: 6.0, 7.3, and 8.6 to test the significance of the protonation-deprotonation equilibrium in drug access and affinity. We investigated drugs of several different indications: carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, lidocaine, bupivacaine, mexiletine, flecainide, ranolazine, riluzole, memantine, ritanserin, tolperisone, silperisone, ambroxol, haloperidol, chlorpromazine, clozapine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, amitriptyline, imipramine, desipramine, maprotiline, nisoxetine, mianserin, mirtazapine, venlafaxine, nefazodone, and trazodone. We recorded the pH-dependence of potency, reversibility, as well as onset/offset kinetics. As expected, we observed a strong correlation between the acidic dissociation constant (pKa) of drugs and the pH-dependence of their potency. Unexpectedly, however, the pH-dependence of reversibility or kinetics showed diverse patterns, not simple correlation. Our data are best explained by a model where drug molecules can be trapped in at least two chemically different environments: A hydrophilic trap (which may be the aqueous cavity within the inner vestibule), which favors polar and less lipophilic compounds, and a lipophilic trap (which may be the membrane phase itself, and/or lipophilic binding sites on the channel). Rescue from the hydrophilic and lipophilic traps can be promoted by alkalic and acidic extracellular pH, respectively. PMID:26441665

  18. Sensitivity of chemistry-transport model simulations to the duration of chemical and transport operators: a case study with GEOS-Chem v10-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Sajeev; Martin, Randall V.; Keller, Christoph A.

    2016-05-01

    Chemistry-transport models involve considerable computational expense. Fine temporal resolution offers accuracy at the expense of computation time. Assessment is needed of the sensitivity of simulation accuracy to the duration of chemical and transport operators. We conduct a series of simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model at different temporal and spatial resolutions to examine the sensitivity of simulated atmospheric composition to operator duration. Subsequently, we compare the species simulated with operator durations from 10 to 60 min as typically used by global chemistry-transport models, and identify the operator durations that optimize both computational expense and simulation accuracy. We find that longer continuous transport operator duration increases concentrations of emitted species such as nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide since a more homogeneous distribution reduces loss through chemical reactions and dry deposition. The increased concentrations of ozone precursors increase ozone production with longer transport operator duration. Longer chemical operator duration decreases sulfate and ammonium but increases nitrate due to feedbacks with in-cloud sulfur dioxide oxidation and aerosol thermodynamics. The simulation duration decreases by up to a factor of 5 from fine (5 min) to coarse (60 min) operator duration. We assess the change in simulation accuracy with resolution by comparing the root mean square difference in ground-level concentrations of nitrogen oxides, secondary inorganic aerosols, ozone and carbon monoxide with a finer temporal or spatial resolution taken as "truth". Relative simulation error for these species increases by more than a factor of 5 from the shortest (5 min) to longest (60 min) operator duration. Chemical operator duration twice that of the transport operator duration offers more simulation accuracy per unit computation. However, the relative simulation error from coarser spatial resolution generally

  19. Engineered nanoparticles: Revisiting safety concerns in light of ethno medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkhiwala, Suhani; Bakshi, Sonal R.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoparticles are a miracle invention of the century that has opened novel avenues of applications in various fields. The safety aspect of exposure to nanoparticles for humans, plants, animals, soil micro-flora, and ecosystem at large has been questioned. The safety concern can be addressed by laboratory studies to assess the actual risk and recommend exposure limits and related regulation. There is also a suggestion for considering the nanoparticle form of conventional compounds as a new chemical and subject it to safety assessment in line with the chemical regulatory agencies. In the light of the current scenario of popularity and safety concerns regarding nanoparticles, the use of ancient metal based forms like, Bhasma is revisited in the present article. The current approach of green synthesis of nanoparticles is compared with the Ayurveda Rasayana Shastra guidelines of Bhasma preparation and modern preparation of engineered nanoparticles. Since the benefits of nanotechnology are undeniable, and safety concerns are also not ungrounded, there is a pressing need to revisit the ways nanoparticles are manufactured, and to carry out safety assessment by the techniques specially adapted for this novel compound. PMID:26664232

  20. Revisiting Twomey's approximation for peak supersaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Shipway

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Twomey's seminal 1959 paper provided lower and upper bound approximations to the estimation of peak supersaturation within an updraft and thus provides the first closed expression for the number of nucleated cloud droplets. The form of this approximation is simple, but provides a surprisingly good estimate and has subsequently been employed in more sophisticated treatments of nucleation parametrization. In the current paper, we revisit the lower bound approximation of Twomey and make a small adjustment that can be used to obtain a more accurate calculation of peak supersaturation under all potential aerosol loadings and thermodynamic conditions. In order to make full use of this improved approximation, the underlying integro-differential equation for supersaturation evolution and the condition for calculating peak supersaturation are examined. A simple rearrangement of the algebra allows for an expression to be written down that can then be solved with a single lookup table with only one independent variable for an underlying lognormal aerosol population. While multimodal aerosol with N different dispersion characteristics requires 2N+1 inputs to calculate the activation fraction, only N of these one-dimensional lookup tables are needed. No additional information is required in the lookup table to deal with additional chemical, physical or thermodynamic properties. The resulting implementation provides a relatively simple, yet computationally cheap, physically based parametrization of droplet nucleation for use in climate and Numerical Weather Prediction models.

  1. Revisiting Twomey's approximation for peak supersaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Shipway

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Twomey's seminal 1959 paper provided lower and upper bound approximations to the estimation of peak supersaturation within an updraft and thus provides the first closed expression for the number of nucleated cloud droplets. The form of this approximation is simple, but provides a surprisingly good estimate and has subsequently been employed in more sophisticated treatments of nucleation parametrization. In the current paper, we revisit the lower bound approximation of Twomey and make a small adjustment which can be used to obtain a more accurate calculation of peak supersaturation under all potential aerosol loadings and thermodynamic conditions. In order to make full use of this improved approximation, the underlying integro-differential equation for supersaturation evolution and the condition for calculating peak supersaturation are examined. A simple rearrangement of the algebra allows for an expression to be written down which can then be solved with a single lookup table with only one independent variable for an underlying lognormal aerosol population. Multimode aerosol with only N different dispersion characteristics require only N of these one-dimensional lookup tables. No additional information is required in the lookup table to deal with additional chemical, physical or thermodynamic properties. The resulting implementation provides a relatively simple, yet computationally cheap and very accurate physically-based parametrization of droplet nucleation for use in climate and NWP models.

  2. The effect of bulking agents on the chemical stability of acid-sensitive compounds in freeze-dried formulations: sucrose inversion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Enxian; Ewing, Susan; Gatlin, Larry; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2009-09-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of amorphous bulking agents on the chemical stability of freeze-dried materials. Polyvinylpyrrolidone and dextran of different molecular weights and lactose were used as bulking agents, and sucrose was used as an example of an acid-sensitive compound. Lyophiles containing bulking agent and sucrose at 10:1 (w/w) ratio, citrate buffer, and optionally bromophenol blue (pH indicator) were tested by X-ray powder diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and Karl Fischer titrimetry. Diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy was used to obtain the concentration ratio of the deprotonated (In(2-)) to the protonated (HIn(-)) indicator species, from which the Hammett acidity function (H(2-)) was calculated. The extent of sucrose inversion in lyophiles stored at 60 degrees C was quantified by HPLC. The bulking agent had a major impact on both the apparent solid-state acidity (H(2-)) and the degradation rate, with the degradation rate constants value highest for dextran lyophiles (most "acidic", lower H(2-)) followed by lactose and polyvinylpyrrolidone lyophile (least "acidic", higher H(2-)). The Hammett acidity function can be used as an empirical solid-state acidity scale, to predict the rank-order stability of acid-sensitive compounds in lyophiles prepared with different bulking agents. PMID:19544366

  3. FIA-automated system used to electrochemically measure nitrite and its interfering chemicals through a 1-2 DAB / Au electrode: gain of sensitivity at upper potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of nitrite and its interfering-chemicals (paracetamol, ascorbic acid and uric acid) was performed employing a Flow-injection Analysis (FIA) system, which was automated using solenoid valves and air-pump. It is very important to quantify nitrite from river water, food and biologic fluids due to its antibacterial capacity in moderated concentrations, or its toxicity for human health even at low concentrations (> 20 μmol L−1 in blood fluids). Electrodes of the electrochemical planar sensor were defined by silk-screen technology. The measuring electrode was made from gold paste covered with 1-2 cis Diaminobenzene (DAB), which allowed good selectivity, linearity, repeatability, stability and optimized gain of sensitivity at 0.5 VAg/AgClNafion®117 (6.93 μA mol−1 L mm−2) compared to 0.3 VAg/AgClNafion®117. The reference electrode was obtained from silver/palladium paste modified with chloride and covered with Nafion® 117. The auxiliary electrode was made from platinum paste. It was noteworthy that nitrite response adds to the response of the studied interfering-chemicals and it is predominant for concentrations lower than 175 μmol L−1.

  4. Fractional enrichment of proteins using [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source facilitates measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts with improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Khan, Shahid N. [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden); Kay, Lewis E. [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, One King’s College Circle (Canada); Lundström, Patrik, E-mail: patlu@ifm.liu.se [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    A selective isotope labeling scheme based on the utilization of [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source during protein overexpression has been evaluated for the measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts using Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments. As expected, the fractional incorporation of label at the Cα positions is increased two-fold relative to labeling schemes based on [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose, effectively doubling the sensitivity of NMR experiments. Applications to a binding reaction involving an SH3 domain from the protein Abp1p and a peptide from the protein Ark1p establish that accurate excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts can be obtained from RD experiments, with errors on the order of 0.06 ppm for exchange rates ranging from 100 to 1000 s{sup −1}, despite the small fraction of {sup 13}Cα–{sup 13}Cβ spin-pairs that are present for many residue types. The labeling approach described here should thus be attractive for studies of exchanging systems using {sup 13}Cα spin probes.

  5. Specialty optical fibers: revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2011-10-01

    The paper contains description of chosen aspects of analysis and design of tailored optical fibers. By specialty optical fibers we understand here the fibers which have complex construction and which serve for the functional processing of optical signal rather than long distance transmission. Thus, they are called also instrumentation optical fibers. The following issues are considered: transmission properties, transformation of optical signal, fiber characteristics, fiber susceptibility to external reactions. The technology of tailored optical fibers offers a wider choice of the design tools for the fiber itself, and then various devices made from these fiber, than classical technology of communication optical fibers. The consequence is different fiber properties, nonstandard dimensions and different metrological problems. The price to be paid for wider design possibilities are bigger optical losses of these fibers and weaker mechanical properties, and worse chemical stability. These fibers find their applications outside the field of telecommunications. The applications of instrumentation optical fibers combine other techniques apart from the photonics ones like: electronic, chemical and mechatronic.

  6. Des aliments tu feras medecine: Hippocrate revisite

    OpenAIRE

    Lahlou, Saadi

    1999-01-01

    "Let foods be your medicine Hippocrates revisited". In this article the author discusses the behaviour of consumers, concepts of 'health foods' and helth eating towards food and the rise of businesses built around the health food industry.

  7. Peppermint antioxidants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachi, Liza G; De Maria, Carlos A B

    2015-06-01

    This review discusses the relationship between the chemical composition and antioxidant property of peppermint tisane and essential oil. Phenolic acids (e.g. rosmarinic and caffeic acids), flavones (e.g. luteolin derivatives) and flavanones (e.g. eriocitrin derivatives) are possibly the major infusion antioxidants. Vitamin antioxidants (e.g. ascorbic acid and carotenoids) are minor contributors to the overall antioxidant potential. Unsaturated terpenes having a cyclohexadiene structure (e.g. terpinene) and minor cyclic oxygenated terpenes (e.g. thymol), may contribute to antioxidant potential whilst acyclic unsaturated oxygenated monoterpenes (e.g. linalool) may act as pro-oxidants in essential oil. Findings on the antioxidant potential of major cyclic oxygenated terpenes (menthol and menthone) are conflicting. Antioxidant behaviour of aqueous/organic solvent extracts and essential oil as well as the effect of environmental stresses on essential oil and phenolic composition are briefly discussed. PMID:25624208

  8. Energy in synthetic fertilizers and pesticides: Revisited. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.; Turhollow, A.F.; Nyangito, H.O. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

    1994-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals that are derived from fossil-fuels are the major energy intensive inputs in agriculture. Growing scarcity of the world`s fossil resources stimulated research and development of energy-efficient technology for manufacturing these chemicals in the last decade. The purpose of this study is to revisit the energy requirements of major plant nutrients and pesticides. The data from manufacturers energy survey conducted by The Fertilizer Institute are used to estimate energy requirements of fertilizers. Energy estimates for pesticides are developed from consulting previously published literature. The impact of technical innovation in the fertilizer industry to US corn, cotton, soybean and wheat producers is estimated in terms of energy-saving.

  9. Sternal wound infection revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternal wound infections (SWIs) can be subdivided into two types, superficial or deep, that require different treatments. The clinical diagnosis of superficial SWI is normally easy to perform, whereas the involvement of deep tissues is frequently difficult to detect. Therefore, there is a need for an imaging study that permits the assessment of SWIs and is able to distinguish between superficial and deep SWI. The present work was a prospective study aiming to evaluate the role of technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) labelled leucocyte scan in SWI management. Twenty-eight patients with suspected SWIs were included in the study. On the basis of clinical examination they were subdivided into three groups: patients with signs of superficial SWI (group 1), patients with signs of superficial SWI and suspected deep infection (group 2) and patients with suspected deep SWI without superficial involvement (group 3). Ten patients previously submitted to median sternotomy, but without suspected SWI, were also included in the study as a control group (group 4). All patients with suspected SWI had bacteriological examinations of wound secretion, if present. In addition 99mTc-HMPAO labelled leucocyte scan was performed in all patients. The patients of groups 1, 2 and 3 were treated on the basis of the clinical signs and microbiological findings, independently of the scintigraphic results. The patients of group 4 did not receive treatment. The final assessment of infection was based on histological and microbiological findings or on long-term clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and positive and negative predictive values for scintigraphic and non-scintigraphic results were calculated. In the diagnosis of superficial and deep SWI, clinical and microbiological examination (combined) yielded, respectively, a sensitivity of 68.7% and 100%, a specificity of 77.3% and 80.8%, an accuracy of 73.7% and 86.8%, a positive predictive value of 68

  10. Revisiting T2KK and T2KO physics potential and $\

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, Kaoru; Okamura, Naotoshi; Takaesu, Yoshitaro

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the sensitivity study of the Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Korea (T2KK) and Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Oki (T2KO) proposals where a water Cerenkov detector with the 100 kton fiducial volume is placed in Korea ($L = 1000$ km) and Oki island ($L = 653$ km) in Japan, respectively, in addition to the Super-Kamiokande for determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and leptonic CP phase ($\\delta_{CP}$). We systematically study the running ratio of the $\

  11. Configurational Entropy Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2007-09-01

    Entropy change is categorized in some prominent general chemistry textbooks as being either positional (configurational) or thermal. In those texts, the accompanying emphasis on the dispersal of matter—independent of energy considerations and thus in discord with kinetic molecular theory—is most troubling. This article shows that the variants of entropy can be treated from a unified viewpoint and argues that to decrease students' confusion about the nature of entropy change these variants of entropy should be merged. Molecular energy dispersal in space is implicit but unfortunately tacit in the cell models of statistical mechanics that develop the configurational entropy change in gas expansion, fluids mixing, or the addition of a non-volatile solute to a solvent. Two factors are necessary for entropy change in chemistry. An increase in thermodynamic entropy is enabled in a process by the motional energy of molecules (that, in chemical reactions, can arise from the energy released from a bond energy change). However, entropy increase is only actualized if the process results in a larger number of arrangements for the system's energy, that is, a final state that involves the most probable distribution for that energy under the new constraints. Positional entropy should be eliminated from general chemistry instruction and, especially benefiting "concrete minded" students, it should be replaced by emphasis on the motional energy of molecules as enabling entropy change.

  12. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  13. Changes in cerebral blood flow during olfactory stimulation in patients with multiple chemical sensitivity: a multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Azuma

    Full Text Available Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS is characterized by somatic distress upon exposure to odors. Patients with MCS process odors differently from controls. This odor-processing may be associated with activation in the prefrontal area connecting to the anterior cingulate cortex, which has been suggested as an area of odorant-related activation in MCS patients. In this study, activation was defined as a significant increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF because of odorant stimulation. Using the well-designed card-type olfactory test kit, changes in rCBF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC were investigated after olfactory stimulation with several different odorants. Near-infrared spectroscopic (NIRS imaging was performed in 12 MCS patients and 11 controls. The olfactory stimulation test was continuously repeated 10 times. The study also included subjective assessment of physical and psychological status and the perception of irritating and hedonic odors. Significant changes in rCBF were observed in the PFC of MCS patients on both the right and left sides, as distinct from the center of the PFC, compared with controls. MCS patients adequately distinguished the non-odorant in 10 odor repetitions during the early stage of the olfactory stimulation test, but not in the late stage. In comparison to controls, autonomic perception and negative affectivity were poorer in MCS patients. These results suggest that prefrontal information processing associated with odor-processing neuronal circuits and memory and cognition processes from past experience of chemical exposure play significant roles in the pathology of this disorder.

  14. Cysteine-10 on 17 β -Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 Has Stabilizing Interactions in the Cofactor Binding Region and Renders Sensitivity to Sulfhydryl Modifying Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashev, Lyubomir G; Atanasov, Atanas G; Baker, Michael E; Odermatt, Alex

    2013-01-01

    17 β -Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17 β -HSD1) catalyzes the conversion of estrone to the potent estrogen estradiol. 17 β -HSD1 is highly expressed in breast and ovary tissues and represents a prognostic marker for the tumor progression and survival of patients with breast cancer and other estrogen-dependent tumors. Therefore, the enzyme is considered a promising drug target against estrogen-dependent cancers. For the development of novel inhibitors, an improved understanding of the structure-function relationships is essential. In the present study, we examined the role of a cysteine residue, Cys(10), in the Rossmann-fold NADPH binding region, for 17 β -HSD1 function and tested the sensitivity towards sulfhydryl modifying chemicals. 3D structure modeling revealed important interactions of Cys(10) with residues involved in the stabilization of amino acids of the NADPH binding pocket. Analysis of enzyme activity revealed that 17 β -HSD1 was irreversibly inhibited by the sulfhydryl modifying agents N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and dithiocarbamates. Preincubation with increasing concentrations of NADPH protected 17 β -HSD1 from inhibition by these chemicals. Cys(10)Ser mutant 17 β -HSD1 was partially protected from inhibition by NEM and dithiocarbamates, emphasizing the importance of Cys(10) in the cofactor binding region. Substitution of Cys(10) with serine resulted in a decreased protein half-life, without significantly altering kinetic properties. Despite the fact that Cys(10) on 17 β -HSD1 seems to have limited potential as a target for new enzyme inhibitors, the present study provides new insight into the structure-function relationships of this enzyme. PMID:24348564

  15. Cysteine-10 on 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 Has Stabilizing Interactions in the Cofactor Binding Region and Renders Sensitivity to Sulfhydryl Modifying Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomir G. Nashev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD1 catalyzes the conversion of estrone to the potent estrogen estradiol. 17β-HSD1 is highly expressed in breast and ovary tissues and represents a prognostic marker for the tumor progression and survival of patients with breast cancer and other estrogen-dependent tumors. Therefore, the enzyme is considered a promising drug target against estrogen-dependent cancers. For the development of novel inhibitors, an improved understanding of the structure-function relationships is essential. In the present study, we examined the role of a cysteine residue, Cys10, in the Rossmann-fold NADPH binding region, for 17β-HSD1 function and tested the sensitivity towards sulfhydryl modifying chemicals. 3D structure modeling revealed important interactions of Cys10 with residues involved in the stabilization of amino acids of the NADPH binding pocket. Analysis of enzyme activity revealed that 17β-HSD1 was irreversibly inhibited by the sulfhydryl modifying agents N-ethylmaleimide (NEM and dithiocarbamates. Preincubation with increasing concentrations of NADPH protected 17β-HSD1 from inhibition by these chemicals. Cys10Ser mutant 17β-HSD1 was partially protected from inhibition by NEM and dithiocarbamates, emphasizing the importance of Cys10 in the cofactor binding region. Substitution of Cys10 with serine resulted in a decreased protein half-life, without significantly altering kinetic properties. Despite the fact that Cys10 on 17β-HSD1 seems to have limited potential as a target for new enzyme inhibitors, the present study provides new insight into the structure-function relationships of this enzyme.

  16. Aqueous chemical synthesis of large-scale ZnO aggregates with high-efficient light-scattering and application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► An aqueous chemical method for preparing polydispersed ZnO aggregates is presented. ► TEA concentration is crucial to morphology and performance of ZnO electrode films. ► Efficiencies of 3.91% and 2.22% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. ► Application of ZnO aggregates in the flexible photoanode for the first time. -- Abstract: We report on the synthesis of polydisperse ZnO aggregates with large average diameter of 700 ± 150 nm comparable to the wavelengths of the visible region, and their implementation in both rigid and flexible photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The ZnO aggregates were prepared through an aqueous chemical method in triethanolamine (TEA)-based aqueous system, followed by the characterizations of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). It was found that the size of as-prepared ZnO aggregates could be experimentally controlled by varying TEA concentrations initially added. With a TEA concentration of 25%, ∼700 nm-sized ZnO aggregates based film exhibited the highest reflectance of 75–90% in the visible wavelength region. The photoelectrical efficiencies of the corresponding cells based on rigid and flexible photoanodes were achieved maximum up to be 3.91% and 2.22% under 100 mW cm−2 AM 1.5 illumination, respectively. The excellent performance was mainly due to the more efficient light-harvest of the electrode film indicated by the incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) and lower charge transfer resistance at the ZnO/dye/electrolyte interface evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

  17. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  18. Wire chambers revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) have long been used as position-sensitive charged particle detectors in nuclear and high-energy physics. MWPCs are large-area gas-filled ionisation chambers in which large arrays of fine wires are used to measure the position of ionisation produced in the gas by the passage of charged particles. The important properties of MWPCs are high-spatial-resolution, large-area, high-count-rate performance at low cost. For research applications, detectors several metres square have been built and small-area detectors have a charged particle resolution of 0.4 mm at a count rate of several million per second. Modification is required to MWPCs for nuclear medicine imaging. A gamma rays or X-rays cannot be detected directly, they must be converted into photo- or Compton scatter electrons. Photon-electron conversion requires the use of high atomic number materials in the body of the chamber. Pressurised xenon is the most useful form of ''gas only'' photon-electron convertor and has been used successfully in a gamma camera for the detection of gamma rays at energies below 100 keV. This camera has been developed specifically for high-count-rate first-pass cardiac imaging. This high-pressure xenon gas MWPC is the key to a highly competitive system which can outperform scintillator-based systems. The count rate performance is close to a million counts per second and the intrinsic spatial resolution is better than the best scintillator-based camera.The only clinical detector have been developed for positron emission tomography, where thin lead or lead-glass can provide an acceptable convertor for 511 keV photons. Two MWPC positron cameras have been evaluated clinically and one is now routine use in clinical oncology. The problems of detection efficiency have not been solved by these detectors although reliability and large-area PET imaging have been proven. (orig./HSI)

  19. Sensitivity of tropospheric chemical composition to halogen-radical chemistry using a fully coupled size-resolved multiphase chemistry/global climate system – Part 1: Halogen distributions, aerosol composition, and sensitivity of climate-relevant gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Long

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Observations and model studies suggest a significant but highly non-linear role for halogens, primarily Cl and Br, in multiphase atmospheric processes relevant to tropospheric chemistry and composition, aerosol evolution, radiative transfer, weather, and climate. The sensitivity of global atmospheric chemistry to the production of marine aerosol and the associated activation and cycling of inorganic Cl and Br was tested using a size-resolved multiphase coupled chemistry/global climate model (National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM; v3.6.33. Simulation results showed strong meridional and vertical gradients in Cl and Br species. The simulation reproduced most available observations with reasonable confidence permitting the formulation of potential mechanisms for several previously unexplained halogen phenomena including the enrichment of Br− in submicron aerosol, and the presence of a BrO maximum in the polar free troposphere. However, simulated total volatile Br mixing ratios were generally high in the troposphere. Br in the stratosphere was lower than observed due to the lack of long-lived organobromine species in the simulation. Comparing simulations using chemical mechanisms with and without reactive Cl and Br species demonstrated a significant temporal and spatial sensitivity of primary atmospheric oxidants (O3, HOx, NOx, CH4, and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC's to halogen cycling. Simulated O3 and NOx were globally lower (65% and 35%, respectively, less in the planetary boundary layer based on median values in simulations that included halogens. Globally, little impact was seen in SO2 and non-sea-salt SO42− processing due to halogens. Significant regional differences were evident: the lifetime of nss-SO42− was extended downwind of large sources of SO2. The burden and lifetime of DMS (and its oxidation products were lower by a factor of 5 in simulations that included halogens, versus those without

  20. Lymphoblastoid lines and skin fibroblasts from patients with tuberous sclerosis are abnormally sensitive to ionizing radiation and to a radiomimetic chemical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphoblastoid lines, derived by transforming peripheral blood lymphocytes with Epstein-Barr virus, and skin fibroblast lines were established from two patients with tuberous sclerosis. The number of viable lymphoblastoid cells was determined by their ability to exclude the vital dye trypan blue after their irradiation with x-rays or 254 nm ultraviolet light. The growth of fibroblasts was determined by their ability to form colonies after treatment with the radiomimetic, DNA-damaging chemical N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The tuberous sclerosis lymphoblastoid lines were hypersensitive to x-rays but had normal sensitivity to the ultraviolet radiation. The tuberous sclerosis fibroblast lines were hypersensitive to the N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The hypersensitivity of tuberous sclerosis cells to x-rays and to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine is believed to reflect defective repair of DNA damaged by these agents and may provide the basis for in vitro, including prenatal, diagnostic tests for tuberous sclerosis

  1. A remote coal deposit revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen-Kofoed, Jørgen A.; Kalkreuth, Wolfgang; Petersen, Henrik I.;

    2012-01-01

    In 1908, members of the “Danmark Expedition” discovered a coal deposit in a very remote area in western Germania Land, close to the margin of the inland ice in northeast Greenland. The deposit was, however, neither sampled nor described, and was revisited in 2009 for the first time since its...... discovery. The outcrops found in 2009 amount to approximately 8 m of sediment including a coal seam of 2 m thickness. More outcrops and additional coal deposits most certainly are to be found, pending further fieldwork. The deposits are Middle Jurassic, Callovian, in age and were deposited in a floodplain...... environment related to meandering river channels. Spores and pollen in the lower fluvial deposits reflect abundant vegetation of ferns along the river banks. In contrast, a sparse spore and pollen flora in the coals show a mixed vegetation of ferns and gymnosperms. Based on proximate and petrographic analyses...

  2. Sensitivity to chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in the food preferences. Examples in the evolutionary scale: 1. Role of the walking leg chemoreceptors in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus Clarkii 2. PROP bitter taste sensitivity and its nutritional implications in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Melis, Melania

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied two examples of the sensitivity to chemical stimuli and its role in the food preferences in two models of the evolutionary scale. The red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) (Crustacea: Decapoda) is an invasive species of freshwater habitats that has spread worldwide. In crayfish, like in other decapod crustaceans, reception of chemical cues occurs by way of peripheral chemoreceptors grouped within sensory hairs and typically located on the cuticle ...

  3. Sensitive monitoring of monoterpene metabolites in human urine using two-step derivatisation and positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Lukas [Institute and Outpatient Clinic of Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schillerstrasse 25/29, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Belov, Vladimir N. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Facility for Synthetic Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Göen, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Goeen@ipasum.med.uni-erlangen.de [Institute and Outpatient Clinic of Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schillerstrasse 25/29, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-09-02

    Highlights: •Sensitive monitoring of 10 metabolites of (R)-limonene, α-pinene, and Δ{sup 3}-carene in human urine samples. •Fast and simple sample preparation and derivatisation procedure using two-step silylation for unreactive tertiary hydroxyl groups. •Synthesis of reference substances and isotopically labelled internal standards of (R)-limonene, α-pinene, and Δ{sup 3}-carene metabolites. •Study on (R)-limonene, α-pinene, and Δ{sup 3}-carene metabolite background exposure of 36 occupationally unexposed volunteers. -- Abstract: A gas chromatographic–positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometric (GC–PCI-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of 10 oxidative metabolites of the monoterpenoid hydrocarbons α-pinene, (R)-limonene, and Δ{sup 3}-carene ((+)-3-carene) in human urine was developed and tested for the monoterpene biomonitoring of the general population (n = 36). The method involves enzymatic cleavage of the glucuronides followed by solid-supported liquid–liquid extraction and derivatisation using a two-step reaction with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and N-(trimethylsilyl)imidazole. The method proved to be both sensitive and reliable with detection limits ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 μg L{sup −1}. In contrast to the frequent and distinct quantities of (1S,2S,4R)-limonene-1,2-diol, the (1R,2R,4R)-stereoisomer could not be detected. The expected metabolite of (+)-3-carene, 3-caren-10-ol was not detected in any of the samples. All other metabolites were detected in almost all urine samples. The procedure enables for the first time the analysis of trace levels of a broad spectrum of mono- and bicyclic monoterpenoid metabolites (alcohols, diols, and carboxylic acids) in human urine. This analytical procedure is a powerful tool for population studies as well as for the discovery of human metabolism and toxicokinetics of monoterpenes.

  4. Biological definition of multiple chemical sensitivity from redox state and cytokine profiling and not from polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a poorly clinically and biologically defined environment-associated syndrome. Although dysfunctions of phase I/phase II metabolizing enzymes and redox imbalance have been hypothesized, corresponding genetic and metabolic parameters in MCS have not been systematically examined. Objectives: We sought for genetic, immunological, and metabolic markers in MCS. Methods: We genotyped patients with diagnosis of MCS, suspected MCS and Italian healthy controls for allelic variants of cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A5), UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT1A1), and glutathione S-transferases (GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1). Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids, antioxidant (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and glutathione metabolizing (GST, glutathione peroxidase (Gpx)) enzymes, whole blood chemiluminescence, total antioxidant capacity, levels of nitrites/nitrates, glutathione, HNE-protein adducts, and a wide spectrum of cytokines in the plasma were determined. Results: Allele and genotype frequencies of CYPs, UGT, GSTM, GSTT, and GSTP were similar in the Italian MCS patients and in the control populations. The activities of erythrocyte catalase and GST were lower, whereas Gpx was higher than normal. Both reduced and oxidised glutathione were decreased, whereas nitrites/nitrates were increased in the MCS groups. The MCS fatty acid profile was shifted to saturated compartment and IFNgamma, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, PDGFbb, and VEGF were increased. Conclusions: Altered redox and cytokine patterns suggest inhibition of expression/activity of metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in MCS. Metabolic parameters indicating accelerated lipid oxidation, increased nitric oxide production and glutathione depletion in combination with increased plasma inflammatory cytokines should be considered in biological definition and diagnosis of MCS.

  5. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  6. Women with multiple chemical sensitivity have increased harm avoidance and reduced 5-HT(1A receptor binding potential in the anterior cingulate and amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Hillert

    Full Text Available Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS is a common condition, characterized by somatic distress upon exposure to odors. As in other idiopathic environmental intolerances, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Contrary to the expectations it was recently found that persons with MCS activate the odor-processing brain regions less than controls, while their activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC is increased. The present follow-up study was designed to test the hypotheses that MCS subjects have increased harm avoidance and deviations in the serotonin system, which could render them intolerant to environmental odors. Twelve MCS and 11 control subjects, age 22-44, all working or studying females, were included in a PET study where 5-HT(1A receptor binding potential (BP was assessed after bolus injection of [(11C]WAY100635. Psychological profiles were assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Swedish universities Scales of Personality. All MCS and 12 control subjects were also tested for emotional startle modulation in an acoustic startle test. MCS subjects exhibited significantly increased harm avoidance, and anxiety compared to controls. They also had a reduced 5-HT(1A receptor BP in amygdala (p = 0.029, ACC (p = 0.005 (planned comparisons, significance level 0.05, and insular cortex (p = 0.003; significance level p<0.005 with Bonferroni correction, and showed an inverse correlation between degree of anxiety and the BP in the amygdala (planned comparison. No group by emotional category difference was found in the startle test. Increased harm avoidance and the observed changes in the 5-HT(1A receptor BP in the regions processing harm avoidance provides a plausible pathophysiological ground for the symptoms described in MCS, and yields valuable information for our general understanding of idiopathic environmental intolerances.

  7. Chemical reactions in TiO2/SnO2/TiCl4 hybrid electrodes and their impacts to power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chuen-Shii; Jhang, Jhih-Wei; Chou, Sheng-Wei; Wu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the applicability of TiO2/SnO2/TiCl4 hybrid electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by combining chemical modeling with experimentation. The interfacial chemical reactions in a TiO2/SnO2/TiCl4 system were simulated using a thermochemistry software package, which led to the design and testing of hybrid working electrodes. Chemical thermodynamic modeling proved that TiCl4 is an effective agent in removing Tin+ (nSnCl2), which is an unexpected side effect of TiCl4 treatment enabling the absorption of visible light. The proposed approach is ideally suited to establishing relationships between chemistry theory and the structure and performance of advanced DSSCs as well as photo-electro-chemical systems.

  8. Visible-light sensitization of TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts via wet chemical N-doping for the degradation of dissolved organic compounds in wastewater treatment: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Zhang@unisa.edu.au [University of Cincinnati, Environmental Engineering and Science Program, School of Energy, Environmental, Biological and Medical Engineering (United States); Jia, Baoping; Wang, Qiuze [Changzhou University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Dionysiou, Dionysois [University of Cincinnati, Environmental Engineering and Science Program, School of Energy, Environmental, Biological and Medical Engineering (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Increased pollution of ground and surface water and emerging new micropollutants from a wide variety of industrial, municipal, and agricultural sources has increased demand on the development of innovative new technologies and materials whereby challenges associated with the provision of safe potable water can be addressed. Heterogeneous photocatalysis using visible-light sensitized TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts has attracted a lot of attention as it can effectively remove dissolved organic compound in water without generating harmful by-products. On this note, recent progress on visible-light sensitive TiO{sub 2} synthesis via wet chemical N-doping method is reviewed. In a typical visible-light sensitive TiO{sub 2} preparation via wet chemical methods, the chemical (e.g., N-doping content and states) and morphological properties (e.g., particle size, surface area, and crystal phase) of TiO{sub 2} in as-prepared resultants are sensitively dependent on many experimental variables during the synthesis. This has also made it very difficult to provide a universal guidance at this stage with a certainty for each variable of N-doping preparation. Instead of one-factor-at-a-time style investigation, a statistically valid parameter optimization investigation for general optima of photocatalytic activity will be certainly useful. Optimization of the preparation technique is envisaged to be beneficial to many environmental applications, i.e., dissolved organic compounds removal in wastewater treatment.

  9. Development of multi-residue and selective methods for the ultra-sensitive determination of endocrine disrupting chemicals in aqueous samples

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hoeck, Els

    2009-01-01

    Since World War II, the world has witnessed a large increase in the production of chemicals. Some of these chemicals, like pesticides, were designed for wide spread use. Others, like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were rather accidentally released into the environment by leakages or waste dumping. At that time, little or no attention was paid to the possible consequences that could result from the use, misuse and distribution of these chemicals. This ignorance changed with the publicati...

  10. Sensitivity to grid resolution in the ability of a chemical transport model to simulate observed oxidant chemistry under high-isoprene conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Karen; Jacob, Daniel J.; Fisher, Jenny A.; Kim, Patrick S.; Marais, Eloise A.; Miller, Christopher C.; Travis, Katherine R.; Zhu, Lei; Yantosca, Robert M.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Cohen, Ron C.; Dibb, Jack E.; Fried, Alan; Mikoviny, Tomas; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-04-01

    Formation of ozone and organic aerosol in continental atmospheres depends on whether isoprene emitted by vegetation is oxidized by the high-NOx pathway (where peroxy radicals react with NO) or by low-NOx pathways (where peroxy radicals react by alternate channels, mostly with HO2). We used mixed layer observations from the SEAC4RS aircraft campaign over the Southeast US to test the ability of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model at different grid resolutions (0.25° × 0.3125°, 2° × 2.5°, 4° × 5°) to simulate this chemistry under high-isoprene, variable-NOx conditions. Observations of isoprene and NOx over the Southeast US show a negative correlation, reflecting the spatial segregation of emissions; this negative correlation is captured in the model at 0.25° × 0.3125° resolution but not at coarser resolutions. As a result, less isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway in the model at 0.25° × 0.3125° resolution (54 %) than at coarser resolution (59 %). The cumulative probability distribution functions (CDFs) of NOx, isoprene, and ozone concentrations show little difference across model resolutions and good agreement with observations, while formaldehyde is overestimated at coarse resolution because excessive isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway with high formaldehyde yield. The good agreement of simulated and observed concentration variances implies that smaller-scale non-linearities (urban and power plant plumes) are not important on the regional scale. Correlations of simulated vs. observed concentrations do not improve with grid resolution because finer modes of variability are intrinsically more difficult to capture. Higher model resolution leads to decreased conversion of NOx to organic nitrates and increased conversion to nitric acid, with total reactive nitrogen oxides (NOy) changing little across model resolutions. Model concentrations in the lower free troposphere are also insensitive to grid resolution. The

  11. Fine structure of the butterfly diagram revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Balázs

    The latitudinal time distribution of sunspots (butterfly diagram) was studied by Becker (1959) and Antalová & Gnevyshev (1985). Our goal is to revisit these studies. In the first case we check whether there is a poleward migration in sunspot activity. In the second case we confirm the results, and make more quantitative statements concerning their significance and the position of the activity peaks.

  12. The Rotating Morse-Pekeris Oscillator Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Morse-Pekeris oscillator model for the calculation of the vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules is revisited. This model is based on the realization of a second-order exponential expansion of the centrifugal term about the minimum of the vibrational Morse oscillator and the subsequent analytical resolution of the resulting…

  13. Application of WRF/Chem-MADRID and WRF/Polyphemus in Europe – Part 2: Evaluation of chemical concentrations, sensitivity simulations, and aerosol-meteorology interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Seigneur

    2013-02-01

    better the observations of PM10 concentrations at all sites. The differences between model predictions and observations are mostly caused by inaccurate representations of emissions of gaseous precursors and primary PM species, as well as biases in the meteorological predictions. The differences in model predictions are caused by differences in the heights of the first model layers and thickness of each layer that affect vertical distributions of emissions, model treatments such as dry/wet deposition, heterogeneous chemistry, and aerosol and cloud, as well as model inputs such as emissions of soil dust and sea-salt and chemical boundary conditions of CO and O3 used in both models. WRF/Chem-MADRID shows a higher sensitivity to grid resolution than WRF/Polyphemus at all sites. For both models, the use of a finer grid resolution generally leads to an overall better statistical performance for most variables, with greater spatial details and an overall better agreement in temporal variations and magnitudes at most sites. The use of online BVOC emissions gives better statistical performance for hourly and max 8-h O3 and PM2.5 and generally better agreement with their observed temporal variations at most sites. Because it is an online model, WRF/Chem-MADRID offers the advantage to account for various feedbacks between meteorology and chemical species. The simulations show that aerosol leads to reduced net shortwave radiation fluxes, 2-m temperature, 10-m wind speed, PBL height, and precipitation and increases aerosol optical depth, cloud condensation nuclei, cloud optical depth, and cloud droplet number concentrations over most of the domain. However, this model comparison suggests that atmospheric pollutant concentrations are most sensitive in state-of-the-science air quality models to vertical structure, inputs, and parameterizations for dry/wet removal of gases and particles in the model.

  14. Revisiting the 1761 Transatlantic Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Wronna, Martin; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The tsunami catalogs of the Atlantic include two transatlantic tsunamis in the 18th century the well known 1st November 1755 and the 31st March 1761. The 31st March 1761 earthquake struck Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. The earthquake occurred around noontime in Lisbon alarming the inhabitants and throwing down ruins of the past 1st November 1755 earthquake. According to several sources, the earthquake was followed by a tsunami observed as far as Cornwall (United Kingdom), Cork (Ireland) and Barbados (Caribbean). The analysis of macroseismic information and its compatibility with tsunami travel time information led to a source area close to the Ampere Seamount with an estimated epicenter circa 34.5°N 13°W. The estimated magnitude of the earthquake was 8.5. In this study, we revisit the tsunami observations, and we include a report from Cadiz not used before. We use the results of the compilation of the multi-beam bathymetric data, that covers the area between 34°N - 38°N and 12.5°W - 5.5°W and use the recent tectonic map published for the Southwest Iberian Margin to select among possible source scenarios. Finally, we use a non-linear shallow water model that includes the discretization and explicit leap-frog finite difference scheme to solve the shallow water equations in the spherical or Cartesian coordinate to compute tsunami waveforms and tsunami inundation and check the results against the historical descriptions to infer the source of the event. This study received funding from project ASTARTE- Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe a collaborative project Grant 603839, FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3

  15. A rapid and sensitive UHPLC-FT-ICR MS/MS method for identification of chemical constituents in Rhodiola crenulata extract, rat plasma and rat brain after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Li, Yanting; Ma, Li; Liu, Tianfeng; Wu, Yawen; Xu, Rui; Song, Aihua; Yin, Ran

    2016-11-01

    A rapid and sensitive UHPLC-FT-ICR MS/MS method was developed for the first time to analyze the extract of Rhodiola crenulata and the constituents absorbed into rat blood and brain after oral administration. Under the optimized conditions, a total of 64 chemical constituents were identified or tentatively characterized in vitro in 30min, and also 24 and 9 chemical constituents were detected in rat plasma and brain respectively, by comparing the retention time, accurate mass and/or MS/MS data of blank and dosed sample. The results indicated that the developed UHPLC-FT-ICR MS/MS method was suitable for detection and identifying the chemical constituents in Rhodiola crenulata extract, rat plasma and rat brain, and it could be used as a powerful and reliable analytical strategy for rapid identification of chemical constituents in vitro and in vivo for other traditional Chinese herbal medicines (TCMs). Furthermore, the detected chemical constituents in rat brain could be speculated to be the pharmacodynamic substances of Rhodiola crenulata for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it could also provide useful chemical information for further mass spectrometry imaging and bioactive substances research on Rhodiola crenulata. PMID:27591603

  16. An updated Quantitative Water Air Sediment Interaction (QWASI) model for evaluating chemical fate and input parameter sensitivities in aquatic systems: application to D5 (decamethylcyclopentasiloxane) and PCB-180 in two lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Donald; Hughes, Lauren; Powell, David E; Kim, Jaeshin

    2014-09-01

    The QWASI fugacity mass balance model has been widely used since 1983 for both scientific and regulatory purposes to estimate the concentrations of organic chemicals in water and sediment, given an assumed rate of chemical emission, advective inflow in water or deposition from the atmosphere. It has become apparent that an updated version is required, especially to incorporate improved methods of obtaining input parameters such as partition coefficients. Accordingly, the model has been revised and it is now available in spreadsheet format. Changes to the model are described and the new version is applied to two chemicals, D5 (decamethylcyclopentasiloxane) and PCB-180, in two lakes, Lake Pepin (MN, USA) and Lake Ontario, showing the model's capability of illustrating both the chemical to chemical differences and lake to lake differences. Since there are now increased regulatory demands for rigorous sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, these aspects are discussed and two approaches are illustrated. It is concluded that the new QWASI water quality model can be of value for both evaluative and simulation purposes, thus providing a tool for obtaining an improved understanding of chemical mass balances in lakes, as a contribution to the assessment of fate and exposure and as a step towards the assessment of risk. PMID:24997940

  17. Accounting for China's Growth in 1952-2008: China's growth performance debate revisited with a newly constructed data set

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Harry X.

    2011-01-01

    Using a "data fundamentalist approach," this study revisits the long debate about China's growth performance by seriously tackling the existing data problems that have been the major obstacles to a proper assessment of China's growth performance. First, this study examines and adjusts the serious break in the official employment statistics in 1990. Second, it provides an adjustment for the numbers employed by a human capital effect. Third, it tests the sensitivity of Maddison's (1998a) "zero ...

  18. Effect of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate on swelling and on metformin hydrochloride release behavior of chemically crosslinked pH–sensitive acrylic acid–polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Akhtar, Muhammad Faheem; Ranjha, Nazar Muhammad; Hanif, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background The present work objective was to prepare and to observe the effect of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate on swelling and on drug release behavior of pH-sensitive acrylic acid–polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel. Methods In the present work, pH sensitive acrylic acid–polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels have been prepared by free radical polymerization technique in the presence of benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. Different crosslinker contents were used to observe its effect on swelling and on drug rel...

  19. Revisiting Pattern Structures for Structured Attribute Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Mehwish; Buzmakov, Aleksey; Napoli, Amedeo; Sailanbayev, Alibek

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit an original proposition on pattern structures for structured sets of attributes. There are several reasons for carrying out this kind of research work. The original proposition does not give many details on the whole framework, and especially on the possible ways of implementing the similarity operation. There exists an alternative definition without any reference to pattern structures, and we would like to make a parallel between two points of view. Moreover we disc...

  20. Hyperinflation in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Szybisz, M. A.; Szybisz, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to address the description of hyperinflation regimes in economy. The spirals of hyperinflation developed in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua are revisited. This new analysis of data indicates that the episodes occurred in Brazil and Nicaragua can be understood within the frame of the model available in the literature, which is based on a nonlinear feedback (NLF) characterized by an exponent $\\beta>0$. In the NLF model the accumulated consumer price index carries a finite ...

  1. Directed animals and Gas Models Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Le Borgne, Yvan; Marckert, Jean-François

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit the enumeration of directed animals using gas models. We show that there exists a natural construction of random directed animals on any directed graph together with a particle system that explains at the level of objects the formal link known between the density of the gas model and the generating function of directed animals counted according to the area. This provides some new methods to compute the generating function of directed animals counted according to area...

  2. THE MATHEMATICAL FOUNDATIONS OF GENERAL RELATIVITY REVISITED

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Francois Pommaret

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present for the first time an elementary summary of a few recent results obtained through the application of the formal theory of partial differential equations and Lie pseudogroups in order to revisit the mathematical foundations of general relativity. Other engineering examples (control theory, elasticity theory, electromagnetism) will also be considered in order to illustrate the three fundamental results that we shall provide successively. 1) VESSIOT VERSU...

  3. Revisiting the texture zero neutrino mass matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Madan; Gupta, Manmohan

    2016-01-01

    In the light of refined and large reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$, we have revisited the texture three and two zero neutrino mass matrices in the flavor basis. For Majorana neutrinos, it has been explicitly shown that all the texture three zero mass matrices remain ruled out. Further, for both normal and inverted mass ordering, for the texture two zero neutrino mass matrices one finds interesting constraints on the Dirac-like CP violating phase $\\delta$ and Majorana phases $\\rho$ and $\\sigma$.

  4. Szemer\\'edi's regularity lemma revisited

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Szemer\\'edi's regularity lemma is a basic tool in graph theory, and also plays an important role in additive combinatorics, most notably in proving Szemer\\'edi's theorem on arithmetic progressions . In this note we revisit this lemma from the perspective of probability theory and information theory instead of graph theory, and observe a variant of this lemma which introduces a new parameter $F$. This stronger version of the regularity lemma was iterated in a recent paper of the author to repr...

  5. Spine revisited: Principles and parlance redefined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A revised appreciation of the evolution and the nature of bone in general and of vertebrae in particular, allows revisiting the human spine to usher in some new principles and more rational parlance, that embody spine′s phylogeny, ontogeny, anatomy and physiology. Such an approach accords primacy to spine′s soft-tissues, and relegates to its bones a secondary place.

  6. ConocoPhillips’ share price model revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Kitov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Three years ago we found a statistically reliable link between ConocoPhillips’ (NYSE: COP) stock price and the difference between the core and headline CPI in the United States. In this article, the original relationship is revisited with new data available since 2009. The agreement between the observed monthly closing price (adjusted for dividends and splits) and that predicted from the CPI difference is confirmed. The original quantitative link is validated. In order to improve the accurac...

  7. The association between null mutations in the filaggrin gene and contact sensitization to nickel and other chemicals in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Johansen, J D; Linneberg, A;

    2010-01-01

    It was recently shown that filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations are positively associated with nickel sensitization. We have hypothesized that histidine-rich filaggrin proteins in the epidermis chelate nickel ions and prevent their skin penetration and exposure to Langerhans cells. Furthermore, we...

  8. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of transformation-sensitive polypeptides during chemically, spontaneously, and oncogene-induced transformation of rat liver epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, P J; Luo, L D; Fujimoto, Y; Bisgaard, H C

    1992-01-01

    Recently, we described the establishment of a computerized database of rat liver epithelial (RLE) cellular polypeptides (Wirth et al., Electrophoresis, 1991, 12, 931-954). This database has now been expanded to include the analysis of cellular polypeptide alterations during chemically (aflatoxin B1...

  9. Impact of chemical and meteorological boundary and initial conditions on air quality modeling: WRF-Chem sensitivity evaluation for a European domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Mathias; Müller, Mathias D.; Jorba, Oriol; Parlow, Eberhard; Liu, L.-J. Sally

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of different chemical and meteorological boundary and initial conditions on the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with its chemistry extension (WRF-Chem). The evaluation is done for July 2005 with 50 km horizontal resolution. The effect of monthly mean chemical boundary conditions derived from the chemical transport model LMDZ-INCA on WRF-Chem is evaluated against the effect of the preset idealized profiles. Likewise, the impact of different meteorological initial and boundary conditions (GFS and Reanalysis II) on the model is evaluated. Pearson correlation coefficient between these different runs range from 0.96 to 1.00. Exceptions exists for chemical boundary conditions on ozone and for meteorological boundary conditions on PM10, where coefficients of 0.90 were obtained. Best results were achieved with boundary and initial conditions from LMDZ-INCA and GFS. Overall, the European simulations show encouraging results for observed air pollutant, with ozone being the most and PM10 being the least satisfying.

  10. Sensitivity of inhibition of rat liver mitochondrial outer-membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase by malonyl-CoA to chemical- and temperature-induced changes in membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, M P; Zammit, V A

    1990-01-01

    We have tested the possibility that alterations in the fluidity of the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria could result in changes in the sensitivity of overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I) to malonyl-CoA [Zammit (1986) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 14. 676-679]. The sensitivity of CPT I to malonyl-CoA inhibition was measured by using highly purified mitochondrial outer membranes prepared from fed or 48 h-starved rats in the presence and absence of agents that increase membrane fluidity by perturbing membrane lipid order [benzyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol (3-methylbutan-l-ol) and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl-8-(cis-2-n-octylpropyl)octanoate (A2C)]. All these agents resulted in marked decreases in the ability of malonyl-CoA to inhibit CPT I. This effect was accompanied by a modest increase in the absolute activity of CPT I in the absence of malonyl-CoA when the short-chain alcohols were used, but not when A2C was used, suggesting that the effect of increased membrane fluidity to decrease the malonyl-CoA sensitivity of CPT I may occur independently from other actions that may affect more directly the active site of the enzyme. In confirmation of the potential importance of fluidity changes, we showed that a marked increase in sensitivity of CPT I to malonyl-CoA could be produced when assays were performed at lower temperatures than those normally employed. These observations are discussed in the context of the slowness of the changes in CPT I sensitivity to malonyl-CoA inhibition that are induced by physiological perturbations. PMID:2268270

  11. Highly sensitive and selective analysis of urinary steroids by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with positive chemical ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) provides greater separation space than conventional GC. Because of fast peak elution, a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) is the usual structure-specific detector of choice. The quantitative capabilities of a novel GC×GC fast quadrupole MS were investigated with electron ionization (EI), and CH4 or NH3 positive chemical ionization (PCI) for analysis of endogenous urinary steroids targeted in anti-doping tests. Average precisions ...

  12. P2X3 receptors mediate visceral hypersensitivity during acute chemically-induced colitis and in the post-inflammatory phase via different mechanisms of sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemie Deiteren

    Full Text Available Experiments using P2X3 knock-out mice or more general P2X receptor antagonists suggest that P2X3 receptors contribute to visceral hypersensitivity. We aimed to investigate the effect of the selective P2X3 antagonist A-317491 on visceral sensitivity under physiological conditions, during acute colitis and in the post-inflammatory phase of colitis.Trinitrobenzene sulphonic-acid colitis was monitored by colonoscopy: on day 3 to confirm the presence of colitis and then every 4 days, starting from day 10, to monitor convalescence and determine the exact timepoint of endoscopic healing in each rat. Visceral sensitivity was assessed by quantifying visceromotor responses to colorectal distension in controls, rats with acute colitis and post-colitis rats. A-317491 was administered 30 min prior to visceral sensitivity testing. Expression of P2X3 receptors (RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry and the intracellular signalling molecules cdk5, csk and CASK (RT-PCR were quantified in colonic tissue and dorsal root ganglia. ATP release in response to colorectal distension was measured by luminiscence.Rats with acute TNBS-colitis displayed significant visceral hypersensitivity that was dose-dependently, but not fully, reversed by A-317491. Hypersenstivity was accompanied by an increased colonic release of ATP. Post-colitis rats also displayed visceral hypersensitivity that was dose-dependently reduced and fully normalized by A-317491 without increased release of ATP. A-317491 did not modify visceral sensitivity in controls. P2X3 mRNA and protein expression in the colon and dorsal root ganglia were similar in control, acute colitis and post-colitis groups, while colonic mRNA expression of cdk5, csk and CASK was increased in the post-colitis group only.These findings indicate that P2X3 receptors are not involved in sensory signaling under physiological conditions whereas they modulate visceral hypersensitivity during acute TNBS-colitis and even more so in the post

  13. Sensitivity Study of Cross-Atlantic Dust Transport to Dust Emissions, Chemical Aging and Removal Processes and Comparison with Ground and Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Mohamed; Metzger, Swen; Klingmüller, Klaus; Steil, Benedikt; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    Representing transatlantic dust transport is one of the challenges in climate modeling and of key importance, because of its large impact on the Earth's radiation budget. Desert dust, emitted from the Sahara, is regularly transported westwards across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Caribbean. The balance between emissions and removal processes, as well as the manifold chemical reactions control the impact of dust on the atmospheric composition and the interaction of dust with climate change. During transatlantic transport, dust undergoes chemical aging, which involves various heterogeneous reactions that strongly depend on the mineral composition of dust (alkalinity), the surface chemistry and the associated aerosol water uptake. In this study, different parameters affecting the long-range dust transport are studied with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC. We consider chemical speciation of primary sea salt and dust particles and account for major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2) and anions (Cl-, SO42-, HSO4-), calculated online with meteorology, i.e., feeding back onto precipitation and changing surface wind speed and roughness. We resolve the chemical aging of primary particles through explicit neutralization reactions of the cations and anions with major oxidation products (H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, NH3) from natural and anthropogenic air pollution sources, which can condense on the particles surface during long-range transport and undergo gas-liquid-solid aerosol partitioning, depending on the concentration level of emissions and the transport processes of the primary and secondary aerosols and their precursor gases. Comprehensive analysis of the different parameters affecting the long-range transport, which include the emission flux and particle size distributions, aging mechanism, convection scheme, wet and dry scavenging, show a strong dependence of the dust concentration and optical properties over the Caribbean mainly on the chemical aging of dust during long

  14. Physico-chemical study of new functionalized surfactants having thermo sensitive de-mixing behaviour: use in extraction of uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New thermo-sensitive functionalized surfactants with metal-chelating properties have been developed and their physical-chemistry studied. They associate a polyethoxylated nonionic surfactant (CiEj) block and a amino-acid residue as a chelating group. Functionalization preserves both properties of the thermo-sensitive surfactant moiety and the chelating group, a diamide closed to uranyl ionophore.The complexing group participates to the polar head group of the surfactant, increasing the area per molecule. As a result, functionalized surfactants form spherical micelles when diluted in water, and the concentrated part of their phase diagrams exhibits structures having higher curvatures than the nonionic precursor CiEj. The structure of the uranyl - diamide complex has been elucidated by NMR and ESI-MS and is of the type UO2(NO3)2.L; the associated complexation constant, which is very low, has been evaluated by 1H NMR.A nitrate salt, LiNO3, is added at high concentration to improve complexation. The effect of this salt has been analyzed, and was found to be rather similar to the effect on classical CiEj. When uranyl nitrate complexation occurs, the cloud point decreases dramatically, together with the reduction of the area per head group at micelle/solution interface. This effect can be minimized by using a nonionic precursor having a larger polar head group. The functionalized surfactants have been tested in the cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate, and have proved their efficiency. Those results demonstrate the viability of the functionalized surfactants design, with a covalent link between a thermo-sensitive surfactant block and a chelating group. (author)

  15. Chemical design of pH-sensitive nanovalves on the outer surface of mesoporous silicas for controlled storage and release of aromatic amino acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roik, N. V.; Belyakova, L. A.

    2014-07-01

    Mesoporous silicas with hexagonally arranged pore channels were synthesized in water-ethanol-ammonia solution using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as template. Directed modification of silica surface with N-[N‧-(N‧-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups was realized by postsynthetic activation of halogenoalkylsilicas, which have surface uniformly or selectively distributed 3-chloropropyl groups, with 2-aminodiphenylamine in the liquid phase. Chemical composition of silica materials was estimated by IR spectroscopy and chemical analysis of the surface products of reactions. Characteristics of porous structure of MCM-41-type silicas were determined from X-ray and low-temperature nitrogen ad-desorption measurements. Release ability of synthesized silica carriers was established on encapsulation of 4-aminobenzoic acid in pore channels and subsequent delivery at pH=6.86 and pH=1.00. It was found that N-[N‧-(N‧-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups block pore entrances at neutral pH preventing 4-aminobenzoic acid release. At pH=1.00 repulsion of positively charged surface aromatic amino groups localized near pore orifices provides unhindered liberation of aromatic amino acid from mesoporous channels.

  16. Chemical design of pH-sensitive nanovalves on the outer surface of mesoporous silicas for controlled storage and release of aromatic amino acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesoporous silicas with hexagonally arranged pore channels were synthesized in water–ethanol-ammonia solution using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as template. Directed modification of silica surface with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups was realized by postsynthetic activation of halogenoalkylsilicas, which have surface uniformly or selectively distributed 3-chloropropyl groups, with 2-aminodiphenylamine in the liquid phase. Chemical composition of silica materials was estimated by IR spectroscopy and chemical analysis of the surface products of reactions. Characteristics of porous structure of MCM-41-type silicas were determined from X-ray and low-temperature nitrogen ad-desorption measurements. Release ability of synthesized silica carriers was established on encapsulation of 4-aminobenzoic acid in pore channels and subsequent delivery at pH=6.86 and pH=1.00. It was found that N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups block pore entrances at neutral pH preventing 4-aminobenzoic acid release. At pH=1.00 repulsion of positively charged surface aromatic amino groups localized near pore orifices provides unhindered liberation of aromatic amino acid from mesoporous channels. - Graphical abstract: Blocking of pores with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups at pH=6.86 for storage of ABA and opening of pore entrances at pH=1.00 for unhindered ABA liberation. - Highlights: • Modification of MCM-41 with N-[N -(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups. • Study of release ability of synthesized silica carriers in relation to amino acid. • Controlled blocking and opening of pores by amino groups at pH change were performed. • Retention of amino acid at pH=6.86 and its liberation at pH=1.00 was proved

  17. Sensitization of CdS nanoparticles onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) fabricated by chemical bath deposition method for effective removal of Cr(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Lee, Caroline Sunyong, E-mail: sunyong523@gmail.com

    2013-09-16

    RGO (Reduced Graphene Oxide)–CdS composites were successfully synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method onto soda lime glass substrate at low temperature (70 °C). Their structural, optical and morphological properties were studied using X-ray diffraction, UV–Vis spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, Field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. It is clearly seen that spherically shaped CdS nanoparticles with an average diameter 30 nm are uniformly coated over the entire graphene sheet. Further, synthesized CdS nanoparticles and RGO–CdS nanocomposites were investigated for the reduction of Cr(VI) under visible light. The photocatalytic results show that photodegradation rate of RGO–CdS composites is two times higher than that of CdS nanoparticles toward reduction of Cr(VI). The improved photocatalytic performance by combining RGO with CdS nanoparticles, is attributed to its increased specific surface area (47.44 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), efficient transportation of photoelectrons and improved absorbance of CdS nanoparticles. Therefore, it was found that RGO in RGO–CdS composites makes a significant impact on photocatalytic activity toward reduction of Cr(VI), making an excellent candidate for water refiner. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Chemical bath deposition was used to deposit CdS nanoparticles over graphene sheets. • RGO/CdS shows effective photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) under visible light. • High photocurrent of RGO/CdS proved reduction in recombination due to graphene. • High specific surface area (47.44 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) of RGO/CdS improves Cr(VI) adsorption.

  18. Chemical design of pH-sensitive nanovalves on the outer surface of mesoporous silicas for controlled storage and release of aromatic amino acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roik, N.V., E-mail: roik_nadya@ukr.net; Belyakova, L.A.

    2014-07-01

    Mesoporous silicas with hexagonally arranged pore channels were synthesized in water–ethanol-ammonia solution using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as template. Directed modification of silica surface with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups was realized by postsynthetic activation of halogenoalkylsilicas, which have surface uniformly or selectively distributed 3-chloropropyl groups, with 2-aminodiphenylamine in the liquid phase. Chemical composition of silica materials was estimated by IR spectroscopy and chemical analysis of the surface products of reactions. Characteristics of porous structure of MCM-41-type silicas were determined from X-ray and low-temperature nitrogen ad-desorption measurements. Release ability of synthesized silica carriers was established on encapsulation of 4-aminobenzoic acid in pore channels and subsequent delivery at pH=6.86 and pH=1.00. It was found that N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups block pore entrances at neutral pH preventing 4-aminobenzoic acid release. At pH=1.00 repulsion of positively charged surface aromatic amino groups localized near pore orifices provides unhindered liberation of aromatic amino acid from mesoporous channels. - Graphical abstract: Blocking of pores with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups at pH=6.86 for storage of ABA and opening of pore entrances at pH=1.00 for unhindered ABA liberation. - Highlights: • Modification of MCM-41 with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups. • Study of release ability of synthesized silica carriers in relation to amino acid. • Controlled blocking and opening of pores by amino groups at pH change were performed. • Retention of amino acid at pH=6.86 and its liberation at pH=1.00 was proved.

  19. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Pappomonas spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Pappomonas is revisited here with the purpose of...... providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history aspects and biogeography that can serve as a reference for the future. The examination of a substantial number of cells unequivocally supports the elevation to species level of P. borealis stat...

  20. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  1. Neutralino Dark Matter from Indirect Detection Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Grajek, Phill; Phalen, Daniel J; Pierce, Aaron; Watson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    We revisit indirect detection possibilities for neutralino dark matter, emphasizing the complementary roles of different approaches. While thermally produced dark matter often requires large astrophysical "boost factors" to observe antimatter signals, the physically motivated alternative of non-thermal dark matter can naturally provide interesting signals, for example from light wino or Higgsino dark matter. After a brief review of cosmic ray propagation, we discuss signals for positrons, antiprotons, synchrotron radiation and gamma rays from wino annihilation in the galactic halo, and examine their phenomenology. For pure wino dark matter relevant to the LHC, PAMELA and GLAST should report signals.

  2. Conjure Revisited: Towards Automated Constraint Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Akgun, Ozgur; Hnich, Brahim; Jefferson, Chris; Miguel, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Automating the constraint modelling process is one of the key challenges facing the constraints field, and one of the principal obstacles preventing widespread adoption of constraint solving. This paper focuses on the refinement-based approach to automated modelling, where a user specifies a problem in an abstract constraint specification language and it is then automatically refined into a constraint model. In particular, we revisit the Conjure system that first appeared in prototype form in 2005 and present a new implementation with a much greater coverage of the specification language Essence.

  3. Polynomial chaotic inflation in supergravity revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nakayama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a polynomial chaotic inflation model in supergravity which we proposed soon after the Planck first data release. Recently some issues have been raised in Ref. [12], concerning the validity of our polynomial chaotic inflation model. We study the inflaton dynamics in detail, and confirm that the inflaton potential is very well approximated by a polynomial potential for the parameters of our interest in any practical sense, and in particular, the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio can be estimated by single-field approximation. This justifies our analysis of the polynomial chaotic inflation in supergravity.

  4. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  5. Persegrams of Compositional Models Revisited: conditional independence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroušek, Radim

    Malaga: University Malaga, 2008 - (Magdalena, L.; Ojeda Aciego, M.; Verdegay, J.), s. 915-922 ISBN 978-84-612-3061-7. [12th International Conference on Information Processing and Management of Uncertianlty in Konowledge-based Systems . Malaga (ES), 22.06.2008-27.06.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : conditional independence * probability distribution * multidimensionality Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/MTR/jirousek-persegrams of compositional models revisited conditional independence.pdf

  6. Re-visiting the Piper Alpha accident

    OpenAIRE

    Dykesteen, Mette Kahrs

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis has been to re-visit the Piper Alpha accident using the latest version of the FLACS simulation code. In 1988/89 simulations of the gas explosion in the C Module of Piper Alpha were performed by Jan Roar Bakke and Idar Storvik at Christian Michelsen Institute, in conjunction with the investigation after the accident. For these simulations the computer code FLACS was used [1, 2]. In this thesis, the same simulation cases have been looked into, and the results o...

  7. Isotopic Diversity Indices: How Sensitive to Food Web Structure?

    OpenAIRE

    Brind 'amour, Anik; Dubois, Stanislas F.

    2013-01-01

    Recently revisited, the concept of niche ecology has lead to the formalisation of functional and trophic niches using stable isotope ratios. Isotopic diversity indices (IDI) derived from a set of measures assessing the dispersion/distribution of points in the δ-space were recently suggested and increasingly used in the literature. However, three main critics emerge from the use of these IDI: 1) they fail to account for the isotopic sources overlap, 2) some indices are highly sensitive to the ...

  8. Capacitive chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  9. Photovoltaic performance of bifacial dye sensitized solar cell using chemically healed binary ionic liquid electrolyte solidified with SiO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A bifacial DSSC is realized and irradiated from front and rear sides. ► Maximum efficiency was found for 70% PMII/30% (EMIB(CN)4) electrolyte composition. ► A significant increase in photocurrent using 0.1 M GuSCN and 0.4 M NMB was observed. ► Addition of SiO2 nanoparticles to the electrolyte enhanced photovoltaic efficiency. ► Dispersed SiO2 particles are found to be more efficient compared to SiO2 overlayer. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the effect of electrolyte composition, photoanode thickness, and the additions of GuSCN (guanidinium thiocyanate), NMB (N-methylbenimidazole), and SiO2 on the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs (dye sensitized solar cells). A bifacial DSSC is realized and irradiated from front and rear sides. The devices give maximum photovoltaic efficiencies for 70% PMII (1-propyl-3-methyl-imidazolium iodide)/30% (EMIB(CN)4) (1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetracyanoborate) electrolyte composition and 10 μm thick photoanode coating which is considered to be the ideal coating thickness for the diffusion length of electrolyte and dye absorption. A significant increase in the photocurrent for DSSCs with optimum molarity of 0.1 M GuSCN was observed due to decreased recombination which is believed to be surface passivation effect at photoanode electrolyte interface suppressing recombination rate. Moreover, optimum NMB molarity was found to be 0.4 for maximum efficiency. Addition of SiO2 to the electrolyte both as an overlayer and dispersed particles enhanced rear side illuminated cells where dispersed particles are found to be more efficient for the front side illuminated cells due to additional electron transport properties. Best rear side illuminated cell efficiency was 3.2% compared to front side illuminated cell efficiency of 4.2% which is a promising result for future rear side dye sensitized solar cell applications where front side illumination is not possible like tandem structures and for cells working from

  10. The dynamin chemical inhibitor dynasore impairs cholesterol trafficking and sterol-sensitive genes transcription in human HeLa cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Girard

    Full Text Available Intracellular transport of cholesterol contributes to the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis by mechanisms that are yet poorly defined. In this study, we characterized the impact of dynasore, a recently described drug that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of dynamin, a GTPase regulating receptor endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Dynasore strongly inhibited the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL in HeLa cells, and to a lower extent in human macrophages. In both cell types, dynasore treatment led to the abnormal accumulation of LDL and free cholesterol (FC within the endolysosomal network. The measure of cholesterol esters (CE further showed that the delivery of regulatory cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER was deficient. This resulted in the inhibition of the transcriptional control of the three major sterol-sensitive genes, sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCoAR, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. The sequestration of cholesterol in the endolysosomal compartment impaired both the active and passive cholesterol efflux in HMDM. Our data further illustrate the importance of membrane trafficking in cholesterol homeostasis and validate dynasore as a new pharmacological tool to study the intracellular transport of cholesterol.

  11. Copper doped borate dosimeters revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We render a panoramic overview on copper (Cu) doped borate dosimeters. Preparing a dosimeter by mixing specific materials with precise weights and methods is a never-ending quest. The recommended composition is highly decisive for accurate estimation of the absorbed dose, prediction of the biological outcome, determination of the treatment dose for radiation therapy and facilitation of personal monitoring. Based on these principles, the proposed dosimeter must cover a series of dosimetric properties to realize the exact results and assessment. The doped borate dosimeters indeed demonstrate attractive thermoluminescence (TL) features. Several dedicated efforts are attempted to improve the luminescence properties by doping various transition metals or rare-earth elements. The Cu ion being one of the preferred activators shows excellent TL properties as revealed via detail comparison with other dosimeters. Two oxide states of Cu (Cu+ and Cu++) with reasonable atomic number allow easy interaction with boron network. Interestingly, the intrinsic luminescent centers of borate lattice are in cross linked with that of Cu+ ions. Thus, the activation of borate dosimeter with Cu ions for the enhancement of the TL sensitivity is recognized. These dosimeters reveal similar glow curves as the standard TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) one irrespective of the use of modifiers and synthesis techniques. They display high sensitivity, low fading, dose response linearity over wide range and practical minimum detectable dose. Furthermore, the effective atomic number being the most beneficial aspect (equivalent to that of human tissue) of borate dosimeters do not show any change due to Cu ion activations. The past development, major challenges, excitement, applications, recent progress and the future promises of Cu doped borate TL dosimeters are highlighted. - Highlights: • The manuscript gives a panoramic overview on copper doped borate dosimeters. • Cu ions activated technique in borate

  12. Copper doped borate dosimeters revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alajerami, Y.S.M. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Department of Medical Radiography, Al-Azhar University, Gaza Strip, Palestine (Country Unknown); Hashim, S., E-mail: suhairul@utm.my [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Oncology Treatment Centre, Sultan Ismail Hospital, 81100 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ghoshal, S.K. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mhareb, M. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Saleh, M.A. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); National Atomic Energy Commission (NATEC), Sana' a (Yemen)

    2014-11-15

    We render a panoramic overview on copper (Cu) doped borate dosimeters. Preparing a dosimeter by mixing specific materials with precise weights and methods is a never-ending quest. The recommended composition is highly decisive for accurate estimation of the absorbed dose, prediction of the biological outcome, determination of the treatment dose for radiation therapy and facilitation of personal monitoring. Based on these principles, the proposed dosimeter must cover a series of dosimetric properties to realize the exact results and assessment. The doped borate dosimeters indeed demonstrate attractive thermoluminescence (TL) features. Several dedicated efforts are attempted to improve the luminescence properties by doping various transition metals or rare-earth elements. The Cu ion being one of the preferred activators shows excellent TL properties as revealed via detail comparison with other dosimeters. Two oxide states of Cu (Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup ++}) with reasonable atomic number allow easy interaction with boron network. Interestingly, the intrinsic luminescent centers of borate lattice are in cross linked with that of Cu{sup +} ions. Thus, the activation of borate dosimeter with Cu ions for the enhancement of the TL sensitivity is recognized. These dosimeters reveal similar glow curves as the standard TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) one irrespective of the use of modifiers and synthesis techniques. They display high sensitivity, low fading, dose response linearity over wide range and practical minimum detectable dose. Furthermore, the effective atomic number being the most beneficial aspect (equivalent to that of human tissue) of borate dosimeters do not show any change due to Cu ion activations. The past development, major challenges, excitement, applications, recent progress and the future promises of Cu doped borate TL dosimeters are highlighted. - Highlights: • The manuscript gives a panoramic overview on copper doped borate dosimeters. • Cu ions activated

  13. A revisit to cockroach allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookrung, Nitat; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2010-01-01

    Among cockroaches (CR) that live in people's homes, two species, i.e., German CR (Blattella germanica) and American CR (Periplaneta americana) predominate in temperate and tropical areas, respectively. CR is an important source of inhalant indoor allergens that sensitize atopic subjects to (localized) type I hypersensitivity or atopy including allergic rhinitis and atopic asthma. In Thailand the predominant CR species is P. americana. CR allergens are found throughout CR infested houses; the number found in kitchens correlates with the degree of CR infestation while sensitization and reactivation of the allergic morbidity are likely to occur in the living room and bedroom. Levels of the CR allergens in homes of CR allergic Thais, measured by using locally made quantification test kits, revealed that the highest levels occur in dust samples collected from the wooden houses of urban slums and in the cool and dry season. CR allergens are proteins that may be derived from any anatomical part of the insect at any developmental stage. The allergens may be also from CR secretions, excretions, body washes or frass. The proteins may be the insect structural proteins, enzymes or hormones. They may exist as dimers/multimers and/or in different isoforms. Exposure to CR allergens in infancy leads to allergic morbidity later in life. Clinical symptoms of CR allergy are usually more severe and prolonged than those caused by other indoor allergens. The mechanisms of acute and chronic airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) have been addressed including specific IgE- and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms, i.e., role of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2). Participation of various allergen activated-CD4+ T cells of different sublineages, i.e., Th2, Th17, Th22, Th9, Th25, Tregs/Th3 as well as invariant NKT cells, in asthma pathogenesis have been mentioned. The diagnosis of CR allergy and the allergy intervention by CR population control are also discussed. PMID:21038777

  14. The role of brand destination experience in determining revisit intention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Jan; Barnes, Stuart; Sørensen, Flemming

    experience, which provides a more holistic and unified view of the brand destination. The research uses a logistic regression model to determine the role of satisfaction and brand experience in determining revisit intentions. The study also examines differences among subgroups and four brand experience sub......-constructs. The findings suggest that brand experience is an important determinant of revisit intentions, but that there is variation among respondent groups. The paper rounds off with conclusions and implications for research and practice....

  15. Ground Zero revisits shape outbreaks: Zika and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Manrique, Pedro D; Johnson, Neil F

    2016-01-01

    During an infection outbreak, many people continue to revisit Ground Zero - such as the one square mile of Miami involved in the current Zika outbreak- for work, family or social reasons. Public health planning must account for the counterintuitive ways in which this human flow affects the outbreak's duration, severity and time-to-peak. Managing this flow of revisits can allow the outbreak's evolution to be tailored.

  16. VULCAN: an Open-Source, Validated Chemical Kinetics Python Code for Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Grosheintz, Luc; Rimmer, Paul B; Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-source and validated chemical kinetics code for studying hot exoplanetary atmospheres, which we name VULCAN. It is constructed for gaseous chemistry from 500 to 2500 K using a reduced C- H-O chemical network with about 300 reactions. It uses eddy diffusion to mimic atmospheric dynamics and excludes photochemistry. We have provided a full description of the rate coefficients and thermodynamic data used. We validate VULCAN by reproducing chemical equilibrium and by comparing its output versus the disequilibrium-chemistry calculations of Moses et al. and Rimmer & Helling. It reproduces the models of HD 189733b and HD 209458b by Moses et al., which employ a network with nearly 1600 reactions. Further validation of VULCAN is made by examining the theoretical trends produced when the temperature-pressure profile and carbon-to-oxygen ratio are varied. Assisted by a sensitivity test designed to identify the key reactions responsible for producing a specific molecule, we revisit the quenching ap...

  17. Controlling the interfacial concentrations of I3− and Li+ ions in illuminated ruthenium (II) complex-sensitized nanoparticulate TiO2 photoanodes chemically coated by poly(amidoamide) dendrimers generation 4.0 for enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruthenium (II) complex-sensitized TiO2 electrodes were chemically coated with NH2-terminated poly(amidoamide) dendrimers generation 4.0 in order to improve the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells using these photoanodes. The presence of dendrimers in these photodevices produced a global photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 6.78%, which was higher than that obtained for photocells without them (5.43%). The experimental results indicated that this treatment of the dye-sensitized TiO2 electrodes allowed for controlling the concentrations of I3− anions and Li+ cations into the dendrimers-modified dyed-TiO2 pores during operation of the photocells. Consequently, the charge interception reaction and the charge accumulation process at the conduction band of the TiO2 electrodes were simultaneously balanced by the establishment of I2···NH2, NH···I− and C = O···Li+ bonds at the branches of the confined dendrimers for increasing their global conversion efficiency

  18. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Visible) investigations, NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA) parameters of 2,6-Diamino-4-chloropyrimidine for dye sensitized solar cells using density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladis Anitha, E; Joseph Vedhagiri, S; Parimala, K

    2014-10-24

    The molecular structure, geometry optimization, vibrational frequencies of organic dye sensitizer 2,6-Diamino-4-chloropyrimidine (DACP) were studied based on Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrum was investigated by time dependent DFT (TD-DFT). Features of the electronic absorption spectrum in the UV-Visible regions were assigned based on TD-DFT calculation. The absorption bands are assigned to transitions. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO2 electrode and dye sensitizer DACP is due to an electron injection process from excited dye to the semiconductor's conduction band. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOS) have also been determined. The chemical shielding anisotropic (CSA) parameters are calculated from the NMR analysis, Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. PMID:25459717

  19. Chemical applicability domain of the Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) for skin sensitisation potency. Part 3. Apparent discrepancies between LLNA and GPMT sensitisation potential: False positives or differences in sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David W; Schultz, Terry W; Api, Anne Marie

    2016-10-01

    The Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) is the gold standard regulatory toxicology test for skin sensitisation along with the guinea pig maximisation test (GPMT). Compared with the GPMT, LLNA uses fewer animals, it is quantitative, and it gives a numerical prediction of potency. However several concerns have been raised with this assay, mainly related to false positives and false negatives. Over the years, many authors, including the developers of the assay, have presented cases where there have been discrepancies between the GMPT and LLNA results. Several theories have been put forward for these discrepancies, the main one being the "over-sensitivity" of the GPMT. This paper analyses the data from a systematic study, published in three papers from 2008 to 2011, covering several classes of chemicals, in particular unsaturated fatty acids, sugar surfactants and ethoxylated alcohols, with many cases of chemicals testing positive in the LLNA being negative in the GPMT. Based on consideration of reaction chemistry and structural alerts, it is concluded that these discrepancies are not LLNA false positives, but can be rationalised in terms of the different protocols of the assays. PMID:27477089

  20. Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003741.htm Sensitivity analysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sensitivity analysis determines the effectiveness of antibiotics against microorganisms (germs) ...

  1. Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different from ... small intestine. Some of the symptoms of gluten sensitivity are similar to celiac disease. They include tiredness ...

  2. Chemical allergy in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimber, Ian; Basketter, David A; Thyssen, Jacob P;

    2014-01-01

    reaction; that is, allergic contact dermatitis or sensitization of the respiratory tract associated with occupational asthma. Studies in rodents have revealed that differential forms of allergic sensitization to chemicals are, in large part at least, a function of the selective development of discrete......Abstract There is considerable interest in the immunobiological processes through which the development of allergic sensitization to chemicals is initiated and orchestrated. One of the most intriguing issues is the basis for the elicitation by chemical sensitizers of different forms of allergic...... functional sub-populations of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes. Evidence for a similar association of chemical allergy in humans with discrete T-lymphocyte populations is, however, limited. It is of some interest, therefore, that two recent articles from different teams of investigators have shed new light on...

  3. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2006-01-01

    the Fermi energy lies in a spectral gap, we rigorously prove theWidom-Streda formula. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in......This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. At zero temperature and zero frequency, if...... field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed, in contrast to earlier work....

  4. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse...... conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers of the strength of the magnetic field B. Then the linear term in B of this expansion is written down in terms of the zero...... magnetic field Green function and the zero field current operator. In the periodic case, the linear term in B of the conductivity tensor is expressed in terms of zero magnetic field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed...

  5. Visser's Massive Gravity Bimetric Theory Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    de Roany, Alain; Pacheco, J A de Freitas

    2011-01-01

    A massive gravity theory was proposed by Visser in the late nineties. This theory, based on a backgroung metric $b_{\\alpha \\beta}$ and on an usual dynamical metric $g_{\\alpha \\beta}$ has the advantage of being free of ghosts as well as discontinuities present in other massive theories proposed in the past. In the present investigation, the equations of Visser's theory are revisited with a particular care on the related conservation laws.\\ It will be shown that a multiplicative factor is missing in the graviton tensor originally derived by Visser, which has no incidence on the weak field approach but becomes important in the strong field regime when, for instance, cosmological applications are considered. In this case, contrary to some previous claims found in the literature, we conclude that a non-static background metric is required in order to obtain a solution able to mimic the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology.

  6. The Faraday effect revisited General theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cornean, H D; Pedersen, T G

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers of the strength of the magnetic field $B$. Then the linear term in $B$ of this expansion is written down in terms of the zero magnetic field Green function and the zero field current operator. In the periodic case, the linear term in $B$ of the conductivity tensor is expressed in terms of zero magnetic field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed, in contrast to earlier work.

  7. Three dimensional maximally supersymmetric field theory revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field theoretical realization of maximally extended supersymmetry algebra in 3 dimensions is revisited here. The existence of an interacting field theory which also manifests the full automorphism demands the existence of extra global symmetry transformations. They form the infinite-dimensional group of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of an internal 3-dimensional space. Upon regularization, it will be truncated to a finite-dimensional unitary group. This extra symmetry together with multiplicity of component fields allow one to consistently introduce self-interactions through Nambu brackets or matrix 4-commutators. It turns out that there exists a conformal field theory which is invariant under OSp(4 | 8) x U(N) groups of global transformations. Relaxing full automorphism to its biggest subgroup, one can consistently mass-deforms the theory. In addition to ordinary associative algebraic structures, a non-associative structure also underlies this theory. (author)

  8. Sparse random matrices: The eigenvalue spectrum revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the derivation of the density of states of sparse random matrices. We derive a recursion relation that allows one to compute the spectrum of the matrix of incidence for finite trees that determines completely the low concentration limit. Using the iterative scheme introduced by Biroli and Monasson [J. Phys. A 32, L255 (1999)] we find an approximate expression for the density of states expected to hold exactly in the opposite limit of large but finite concentration. The combination of the two methods yields a very simple geometric interpretation of the tails of the spectrum. We test the analytic results with numerical simulations and we suggest an indirect numerical method to explore the tails of the spectrum. (author)

  9. Revisiting light neutralino scenarios in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez, Daniel Albornoz; Boehm, Celine

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the case of a light neutralino LSP in the framework of the MSSM. We consider a model with eleven free parameters. We show that all scenarios where the annihilation of light neutralinos rely mainly on the exchange of a light pseudoscalar are excluded by direct detection searches and by Fermi measurements of the gamma-flux from dwarf spheroidal galaxies. On the other hand, we find scenarios with light sleptons that satisfy all collider and astroparticle physics constraints. In this case, the lower limit on the LSP mass is 12.6 GeV. We discuss how the parameter space of the model will be further probed by new physics searches at the LHC.

  10. Revisiting monotop production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheneb, Idir; Deandrea, Aldo; Fuks, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Scenarios of new physics where a single top quark can be produced in association with large missing energy (monotop) have been recently studied both from the theoretical point of view and by experimental collaborations. We revisit the originally proposed monotop setup by embedding the effective couplings of the top quark in an SU(2)L invariant formalism. We show that minimality selects one model for each of the possible production mechanisms: a scalar field coupling to a right-handed top quark and an invisible fermion when the monotop system is resonantly produced, and a vector field mediating the interactions of a dark sector to right-handed quarks for the non-resonant production mode. We study in detail constraints on the second class of scenarios, originating from contributions to standard single top processes when the mediator is lighter than the top quark and from the dark matter relic abundance when the mediator is heavier than the top quark.

  11. The Species Problem in Myxomycetes Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Laura M; Stephenson, Steven L

    2016-08-01

    Species identification in the myxomycetes (plasmodial slime molds or myxogastrids) poses particular challenges to researchers as a result of their morphological plasticity and frequent alteration between sexual and asexual life strategies. Traditionally, myxomycete morphology has been used as the primary method of species delimitation. However, with the increasing availability of genetic information, traditional myxomycete taxonomy is being increasingly challenged, and new hypotheses continue to emerge. Due to conflicts that sometimes occur between traditional and more modern species concepts that are based largely on molecular data, there is a pressing need to revisit the discussion surrounding the species concept used for myxomycetes. Biological diversity is being increasingly studied with molecular methods and data accumulates at ever-faster rates, making resolution of this matter urgent. In this review, currently used and potentially useful species concepts (biological, morphological, phylogenetic and ecological) are reviewed, and an integrated approach to resolve the myxomycete species problem is discussed. PMID:27351595

  12. Revisiting instanton corrections to the Konishi multiplet

    CERN Document Server

    Alday, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the calculation of instanton effects in correlation functions in ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM involving the Konishi operator and operators of twist two. Previous studies revealed that the scaling dimensions and the OPE coefficients of these operators do not receive instanton corrections in the semiclassical approximation. We go beyond this approximation and demonstrate that, while operators belonging to the same ${\\cal N}=4$ supermultiplet ought to have the same conformal data, the evaluation of quantum instanton corrections for one operator can be mapped into a semiclassical computation for another operator in the same supermultiplet. This observation allows us to compute explicitly the leading instanton correction to the scaling dimension of operators in the Konishi supermultiplet as well as to their structure constants in the OPE of two half-BPS scalar operators. We then use these results, together with crossing symmetry, to determine instanton corrections to scaling dimensions of twist-four operators with ...

  13. Revisiting Weak Simulation for Substochastic Markov Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, David N.; Song, Lei; Zhang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of branching-time relations for probabilistic systems has been investigated thoroughly by Baier, Hermanns, Katoen and Wolf (2003, 2005), including weak simulation for systems involving substochastic distributions. Weak simulation was proven to be sound w.r.t. the liveness fragment...... of the logic PCTL\\x, and its completeness was conjectured. We revisit this result and show that soundness does not hold in general, but only for Markov chains without divergence. It is refuted for some systems with substochastic distributions. Moreover, we provide a counterexample to completeness....... In this paper, we present a novel definition that is sound for live PCTL\\x, and a variant that is both sound and complete. A long version of this article containing full proofs is available from [11]....

  14. Seasonal dating of Sappho's 'Midnight Poem' revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; George, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Sappho was a Greek lyric poet who composed a significant array of pristine poetry. Although much of it has been lost, her reputation has endured thanks to numerous surviving fragments. One of her contributions includes the so-called 'Midnight Poem', which contains a line about the Pleiades, setting sometime before midnight, and supposedly observed from the island of Lesbos. This poem also refers to the setting of the Moon. Sappho's Midnight Poem thus represents a prime example of where ancient poetry and astronomy merge, and it also offers the possibility of seasonal dating. Previously, Herschberg and Mebius (1990) estimated that the poem was composed in late winter/early spring, a time frame that is not unusual for lyrics of an amorous nature. The aim of our paper is to revisit this earlier finding by using modern-day software. Our study confirms Herschberg and Mebius' result, but also conveys further information.

  15. Neutrino dark energy. Revisiting the stability issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coupling between a light scalar field and neutrinos has been widely discussed as a mechanism for linking (time varying) neutrino masses and the present energy density and equation of state of dark energy. However, it has been pointed out that the viability of this scenario in the non-relativistic neutrino regime is threatened by the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations associated with a negative adiabatic sound speed squared. In this paper we revisit the stability issue in the framework of linear perturbation theory in a model independent way. The criterion for the stability of a model is translated into a constraint on the scalar-neutrino coupling, which depends on the ratio of the energy densities in neutrinos and cold dark matter. We illustrate our results by providing meaningful examples both for stable and unstable models. (orig.)

  16. Revisiting Lepton Flavour Universality in B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Pattori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Lepton flavour universality (LFU) in B-decays is revisited in a model-independent way by considering semileptonic operators defined at a scale Lambda above the electroweak scale v. The importance of quantum effects, so far neglected in the literature, is emphasised. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Lambda down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGE) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and tau decays and visible lepton flavour violating (LFV) effects in the processes tau -> mu ll, tau -> mu rho, tau -> mu pi and tau -> mu eta^(') are induced.

  17. Resolution of Reflection Seismic Data Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus; Zunino, Andrea

    lower vertical resolution of reflection seismic data. In the following we will revisit think layer model and demonstrate that there is in practice no limit to the vertical resolution using the parameterization of Widess (1973), and that the vertical resolution is limited by the noise in the data. In......The Rayleigh Principle states that the minimum separation between two reflectors that allows them to be visually separated is the separation where the wavelet maxima from the two superimposed reflections combine into one maximum. This happens around Δtres = λb/8, where λb is the predominant...... general, we discuss that the resolution of reflection seismic data is controlled by the noise level and the a priori information available...

  18. Revisiting the OH-CH correlation in diffuse clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjea, Bhaswati

    2016-04-01

    Based on the analysis of available published data and archival data along 24 sightlines (5 of which are new) we derive more accurate estimates of the column densities of OH and CH towards diffuse/translucent clouds and revisit the typically observed correlation between the abundances of these species. The increase in the sample size was possible because of the equivalence of the column densities of CH derived from a combination of the transitions at 3137 & 3143 Å, and a combination of transitions at 3886 & 3890 Å, which we have demonstrated here. We find that with the exception of four diffuse clouds, the entire source sample shows a clear correlation between the column densities of OH and CH similar to previous observations. The analysis presented also verifies the theoretically predicted oscillator strengths of the OH A-X (3078 & 3082 Å), CH B-X (3886 & 3890 Å) and C-X (3137 & 3143Å) transitions. We estimate N(H) and N(H2) from the observed E(B - V) and N(CH) respectively. The N(OH)/N(CH) ratio is not correlated with the molecular fraction of hydrogen in the diffuse/translucent clouds. We show that with the exception of HD 34078 for all the clouds the observed column density ratios of CH and OH can be reproduced by simple chemical models which include gas-grain interaction and gas-phase chemistry. The enhanced N(OH)/N(CH) ratio seen towards the 3 new sightlines can be reproduced primarily by considering different cosmic ray ionization rates.

  19. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  20. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Schaft, Arjan van der

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we

  1. Sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General remarks on sensitivity analysis, the study of changes in a model output produced by varying model inputs, are made first. Sampling methods are discussed, and three sensitivity measures: partial rank correlation, derivative or response surface, and partial variance are described. Some sample results for a 16-input, 13-output hydrodynamics model are given. Both agreement and disagreement were found among the sensitivity measures. 4 figures

  2. Radiation sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following classes of radiosensitizers are discussed: electron affinic compounds, pyrimidine analogs, and antibiotics. Metronidazole and nitroimidazole are discussed as examples of electron-affinic compounds. Studies on the enhancement ratio for sensitization of x-irradiated hamster cells showed that these drugs sensitize at concentrations much lower than the toxic concentrations. Criteria for a clinically useful hypoxic cell sensitizer are listed and mechanisms of electron-affinic sensitizers are discussed. The radiosensitizing effects of the pyrimidine analogs, BUDR, BCDR, IUDR, CUDR, and FUDR, are examined and the enhancement of radiation effects by the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil, is discussed. Other agents discussed are methotrexate, actinomycin D, bleomycin, and adriamycin

  3. Revisting the boiling of quark nuggets at nonzero chemical potential

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ang; Liu, Tong; Gubler, Philipp; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2013-01-01

    The boiling of possible quark nuggets during the quark-hadron phase transition of the Universe at nonzero chemical potential is revisited within the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach employed for the hadron phase, using two kinds of baryon interactions as fundamental inputs. To describe the deconfined phase of quark matter, we use a recently developed quark mass density-dependent model with a fully self-consistent thermodynamic treatment of confinement. We study the baryon number li...

  4. In situ chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes on hollow CoFe2O4 as an efficient and low cost counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong; Jiao, Qingze; Zhang, Shenli; Zhao, Yun; Wu, Qin; Li, Hansheng

    2016-09-01

    The composites of hollow CoFe2O4 and carbon nanotubes (h-CoFe2O4@CNTs) are successfully prepared by using a simple hydrothermal process coupling with the in-situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as electrocatalytic materials for counter electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells. The CNTs are uniformly grown on the surface of hollow CoFe2O4 particles verified by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements. The electrochemical performances of hollow CoFe2O4@CNTs composites are evaluated by the EIS, Tafel polarization and CV measurements, and exhibiting high electrocatalytic performance for the reduction of triiodide. The presence of conductive polypyrrole nanoparticles could further improve the conductivity and catalytic performance of the resultant composites. Controlling the thickness of composites film, the optimum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 6.55% is obtained, which is comparable to that of the cells fabricated with Pt counter electrode (6.61%). In addition, the composites exhibit a good long-term electrochemical stability in I3-/I- electrolyte.

  5. Sensitivity of high-spectral resolution and broadband thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of secondary sulfate aerosols in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The observation of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols (SSA) and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations (with better spatial resolution than limb observations) is a fundamental tool to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Thermal infrared (TIR) observations are sensitive to the chemical composition of the aerosols due to the strong spectral variations of the imaginary part of the refractive index in this band and, correspondingly, of the absorption, as a function of the composition Then, these observations are, in principle, well adapted to detect and characterize UTLS SSA. Unfortunately, the exploitation of nadir TIR observations for sulfate aerosol layer monitoring is today very limited. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of TIR satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS SSA layers. The sulfate aerosol particles are assumed as binary systems of sulfuric acid/water solution droplets, with varying sulphuric acid mixing ratios. The extinction properties of the SSA, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. High-spectral resolution pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on

  6. Allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ree, Ronald; Hummelshøj, Lone; Plantinga, Maud; Poulsen, Lars K.; Swindle, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Allergic sensitization is the outcome of a complex interplay between the allergen and the host in a given environmental context. The first barrier encountered by an allergen on its way to sensitization is the mucosal epithelial layer. Allergic inflammatory diseases are accompanied by increased...... play a dominant role, B cells switch to IgE-production, a process that is more effective at young age. IgE-producing plasma cells have been shown to be long-lived, hiding in the bone-marrow or inflammatory tissues where they cannot easily be targeted by therapeutic intervention. Allergic sensitization...

  7. Charge symmetry breaking in $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    The large charge symmetry breaking (CSB) implied by the $\\Lambda$ binding energy difference $\\Delta B^{4}_{\\Lambda}(0^+_{\\rm g.s.})\\equiv B_{\\Lambda}(_{\\Lambda}^4$He)$-$$B_{\\Lambda}(_{\\Lambda}^4$H) = 0.35$\\pm$0.06 MeV of the $A=4$ mirror hypernuclei ground states, determined from emulsion studies, has defied theoretical attempts to reproduce it in terms of CSB in hyperon masses and in hyperon-nucleon interactions, including one pion exchange arising from $\\Lambda-\\Sigma^0$ mixing. Using a schematic strong-interaction $\\Lambda N\\leftrightarrow\\Sigma N$ coupling model developed by Akaishi and collaborators for $s$-shell $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei, we revisit the evaluation of CSB in the $A=4$ $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei and extend it to $p$-shell mirror $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei. The model yields values of $\\Delta B^{4}_{\\Lambda} (0^+_{\\rm g.s.})\\sim 0.25$ MeV. Smaller size and mostly negative $p$-shell binding energy differences are calculated for the $A=7-10$ mirror hypernuclei, in rough agreement with the few available dat...

  8. No-scale ripple inflation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the no-scale ripple inflation model, where no-scale supergravity is modified by an additional term for the inflaton field in the Kähler potential. This term not only breaks one SU(N,1) symmetry explicitly, but also plays an important role for inflation. We generalize the superpotential in the no-scale ripple inflation model slightly. There exists a discrete Z2 symmetry/parity in the scalar potential in general, which can be preserved or violated by the non-canonical nomalized inflaton kinetic term. Thus, there are three inflation paths: one parity invariant path, and the left and right paths for parity violating scenario. We show that the inflations along the parity invariant path and right path are consistent with the Planck results. However, the gavitino mass for the parity invariant path is so large that the inflation results will be invalid if we consider the inflaton supersymmetry breaking soft mass term. Thus, only the inflation along the right path gives the correct and consistent results. Notably, the tensor-to-scalar ratio in such case can be large, with a value around 0.05, which may be probed by the future Planck experiment

  9. Spin-orbit evolution of Mercury revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Noyelles, Benoit; Makarov, Valeri; Efroimsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a peculiar case, in that it is locked into the 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. Its rotation period, 58 days, is exactly two thirds of its orbital period. It is accepted that the eccentricity of Mercury (0.206) favours the trapping into this resonance. More controversial is how the capture took place. A recent study by Makarov has shown that entrapment into this resonance is certain if the eccentricity is larger than 0.2, provided that we use a realistic tidal model, based on the Darwin-Kaula expansion of the tidal torque, including both the elastic rebound and anelastic creep of solids. We here revisit the scenario of Mercury's capture into the supersynchronous spin-orbit resonances. The study is based on a realistic model of tidal friction in solids, that takes into account the rheology and the self-gravitation of the planet. Developed in Efroimsky, it was employed by Makarov et al. to determine the likely spin state of the planet GJ581d, with its eccentricity evolution taken into account. It was also u...

  10. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-07-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  11. ANAL FISSURE REVISITED : A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Anal fissure is one of the most common anorectal problems. Anal fissure is largely associated with high anal sphincter pressures and most treatment options are based on reducing anal pressures. There are many options to treat chronic fissures in ano. Some of them are non - surgical while the others are su rgical. The efficacy claimed by each of the prevalent method is very high but the inconsistencies and contraindications are equally strong. To date, lateral sphincterotomy has been favoured by most of the proctologists, because it is the least extensive su rgical procedure and is offering a long lasting relief in sphincter spasm. Various management technique are reviewed in this article along with Advancement flap for anterior fissure and a new method combining the age - old technique of Lord's manual dilatati on followed by radio surgery is also highlighted along with their complications. The addition of radio surgery is found useful for refreshing the edges of the fissure and to tackle pathologies namely sentinel pile, small internal piles or hypertrophied ana l papillae often found associated with chronic fissures. Revisiting the trends of treatment of chronic anal fissures, the most preferred options are the manual dilatation with radio surgery and the subcutaneous lateral anal sphincterotomy. Both methods are easy to perform, have negligible complications and no special setup is needed, except the radio surgical unit, in case of the first procedure.

  12. Revisiting the argument from fetal potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Bertha

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential. First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed. Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus.

  13. Revisiting the relaxation dynamics of isolated pyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero, Raúl; Ovejas, Virginia; Fernández-Fernández, Marta; Longarte, Asier, E-mail: asier.longarte@ehu.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apart. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Peralta Conde, Álvaro [Centro de Láseres Pulsados (CLPU), Edificio M3, Parque Científico, 37185 Villamayor (Spain)

    2014-07-07

    Herein, the interpretation of the femtosecond-scale temporal evolution of the pyrrole ion signal, after excitation in the 267–217 nm interval, recently published by our group [R. Montero, A. Peralta Conde, V. Ovejas, M. Fernández-Fernández, F. Castaño, J. R. Vázquez de Aldana, and A. Longarte, J. Chem. Phys.137, 064317 (2012)] is re-visited. The observation of a shift in the pyrrole{sup +} transient respect to zero delay reference, initially attributed to ultrafast dynamics on the πσ{sup *} type state (3s a{sub 1} ← π 1a{sub 2}), is demonstrated to be caused by the existence of pump + probe populated states, along the ionization process. The influence of these resonances in pump-prone ionization experiments, when multi-photon probes are used, and the significance of a proper zero-time reference, is discussed. The possibility of preparing the πσ{sup *} state by direct excitation is investigated by collecting 1 + 1 photoelectron spectra, at excitation wavelengths ranging from 255 to 219 nm. No conclusive evidences of ionization through this state are found.

  14. The Super-GUT CMSSM Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Mustafayev, Azar; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    We revisit minimal supersymmetric SU(5) grand unification (GUT) models in which the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) are universal at some input scale, $M_{in}$, above the supersymmetric gauge coupling unification scale, $M_{GUT}$. As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), we assume that the scalar masses and gaugino masses have common values, $m_0$ and $m_{1/2}$ respectively, at $M_{in}$, as do the trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters $A_0$. Going beyond previous studies of such a super-GUT CMSSM scenario, we explore the constraints imposed by the lower limit on the proton lifetime and the LHC measurement of the Higgs mass, $m_h$. We find regions of $m_0$, $m_{1/2}$, $A_0$ and the parameters of the SU(5) superpotential that are compatible with these and other phenomenological constraints such as the density of cold dark matter, which we assume to be provided by the lightest neutralino. Typically, these allowed regions appear for $m_0$ and $m_{1/...

  15. Nursing knowledge, theory and method revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, K; Kenrick, M; Woods, S

    1997-10-01

    With the approach of the 21st century, nursing is having to respond to diverse influences which are remoulding the professional landscape. Not least of these is the changing status of western economies which underpins a drive towards evidence-based practice and an increased emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches to health care delivery. Certainty in health care is now a thing of the past. Central to the way the nursing profession embraces the future is its underlying philosophy: that which articulates professional values and shapes practice, research, education and management. In a time of change it is therefore essential to revisit the philosophical framework which underpins nursing. The debate in nursing research and theory appears to have stressed the polarization of viewpoints. It may be the case that feminist writers, ethnographers, positivist researchers and nursing theorists, in defending their own points of view, diminish rather than enhance professional dialogue. This paper reviews the nature of this debate within nursing and considers the implications that a dichotomous position may have for knowledge, theory and research method within the current context of health care. It then suggests a philosophical framework which could be relevant and accessible across the whole spectrum of nursing activity. In so doing, the paper aims to contribute to the discussion around epistemology and method in a way which encompasses the diversity found within the broad church of nursing. PMID:9354995

  16. Searle's"Dualism Revisited"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P., Henry

    2008-11-20

    A recent article in which John Searle claims to refute dualism is examined from a scientific perspective. John Searle begins his recent article 'Dualism Revisited' by stating his belief that the philosophical problem of consciousness has a scientific solution. He then claims to refute dualism. It is therefore appropriate to examine his arguments against dualism from a scientific perspective. Scientific physical theories contain two kinds of descriptions: (1) Descriptions of our empirical findings, expressed in an every-day language that allows us communicate to each other our sensory experiences pertaining to what we have done and what we have learned; and (2) Descriptions of a theoretical model, expressed in a mathematical language that allows us to communicate to each other certain ideas that exist in our mathematical imaginations, and that are believed to represent, within our streams of consciousness, certain aspects of reality that we deem to exist independently of their being perceived by any human observer. These two parts of our scientific description correspond to the two aspects of our general contemporary dualistic understanding of the total reality in which we are imbedded, namely the empirical-mental aspect and the theoretical-physical aspect. The duality question is whether this general dualistic understanding of ourselves should be regarded as false in some important philosophical or scientific sense.

  17. Pair Production Constraints on Superluminal Neutrinos Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

    2012-02-16

    We revisit the pair creation constraint on superluminal neutrinos considered by Cohen and Glashow in order to clarify which types of superluminal models are constrained. We show that a model in which the superluminal neutrino is effectively light-like can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint. In summary, any model for which the CG pair production process operates is excluded because such timelike neutrinos would not be detected by OPERA or other experiments. However, a superluminal neutrino which is effectively lightlike with fixed p{sup 2} can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint because of energy-momentum conservation. The coincidence involved in explaining the SN1987A constraint certainly makes such a picture improbable - but it is still intrinsically possible. The lightlike model is appealing in that it does not violate Lorentz symmetry in particle interactions, although one would expect Hughes-Drever tests to turn up a violation eventually. Other evasions of the CG constraints are also possible; perhaps, e.g., the neutrino takes a 'short cut' through extra dimensions or suffers anomalous acceleration in matter. Irrespective of the OPERA result, Lorentz-violating interactions remain possible, and ongoing experimental investigation of such possibilities should continue.

  18. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  19. Carbon emission from global hydroelectric reservoirs revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-12-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs have been of great concerns recently, yet the significant carbon emitters of drawdown area and reservoir downstream (including spillways and turbines as well as river reaches below dams) have not been included in global carbon budget. Here, we revisit GHG emission from hydropower reservoirs by considering reservoir surface area, drawdown zone and reservoir downstream. Our estimates demonstrate around 301.3 Tg carbon dioxide (CO2)/year and 18.7 Tg methane (CH4)/year from global hydroelectric reservoirs, which are much higher than recent observations. The sum of drawdown and downstream emission, which is generally overlooked, represents 42 % CO2 and 67 % CH4 of the total emissions from hydropower reservoirs. Accordingly, the global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 92 g CO2/kWh and 5.7 g CH4/kWh. Nonetheless, global hydroelectricity could currently reduce approximate 2,351 Tg CO2eq/year with respect to fuel fossil plant alternative. The new findings show a substantial revision of carbon emission from the global hydropower reservoirs. PMID:24943886

  20. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  1. Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It is found mainly in foods but ... products like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different ...

  2. 77 FR 74685 - Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Chemical-Terrorism Vulnerability Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... (IFR), implementing this statutory mandate at 72 FR 17688. Section 550 of the Homeland Security... SECURITY Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Chemical- Terrorism Vulnerability Information... financial information, Chemical-terrorism Vulnerability Information (CVI), Sensitive Security...

  3. Radioecological sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the release of radionuclide into the environment it is important to be able to readily identify major routes of radiation exposure, the most highly exposed individuals or populations and the geographical areas of most concern. Radioecological sensitivity can be broadly defined as the extent to which an ecosystem contributes to an enhanced radiation exposure to Man and biota. Radioecological sensitivity analysis integrates current knowledge on pathways, spatially attributes the underlying processes determining transfer and thereby identifies the most radioecologically sensitive areas leading to high radiation exposure. This identifies where high exposure may occur and why. A framework for the estimation of radioecological sensitivity with respect to humans is proposed and the various indicators by which it can be considered have been identified. These are (1) aggregated transfer coefficients (Tag), (2) action (and critical) loads, (3) fluxes and (4) individual exposure of humans. The importance of spatial and temporal consideration of all these outputs is emphasized. Information on the extent of radionuclide transfer and exposure to humans at different spatial scales is needed to reflect the spatial differences which can occur. Single values for large areas, such as countries, can often mask large variation within the country. Similarly, the relative importance of different pathways can change with time and therefore assessments of radiological sensitivity are needed over different time periods after contamination. Radioecological sensitivity analysis can be used in radiation protection, nuclear safety and emergency preparedness when there is a need to identify areas that have the potential of being of particular concern from a risk perspective. Prior identification of radioecologically sensitive areas and exposed individuals improve the focus of emergency preparedness and planning, and contribute to environmental impact assessment for future facilities. The

  4. Keratinocyte gene expression profiles discriminate sensitizing and irritating compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briel, R.J. van de; Pennings, J.L.A.; Baken, K.A.; Pronk, T.E.; Boorsma, A.; Gottschalk, R.; Loveren, H. van

    2010-01-01

    Many chemicals can induce allergic contact dermatitis. Because evaluation of skin sensitizing potential by animal testing is prohibited for cosmetics, and screening of many chemicals is required within Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals, urgent need exists for predi

  5. Intramolecular Amide Hydrolysis in N-Methylmaleamic Acid Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intramolecular amide hydrolysis of N-methylmaleamic acid have been revisited by use of density functional theory and inclusion of solvent effects. The results indicate that concerted reaction mechanism is favored over stepwise reaction mechanism. This is in agreement with the previous theoretical study. Sovlent effects have significant influence on the reaction barrier.

  6. High precision mass measurements in Ψ and Υ families revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision mass measurements in Ψ and Υ families performed in 1980-1984 at the VEPP-4 collider with OLYA and MD-1 detectors are revisited. The corrections for the new value of the electron mass are presented. The effect of the updated radiative corrections has been calculated for the J/Ψ(1S) and Ψ(2S) mass measurements

  7. Bohr’s ‘Light and Life’ revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    I revisit Niels Bohr’s famous 1932 ‘Light and Life’ lecture, confronting it with current knowledge. Topics covered include: life origin and evolution, quantum mechanics and life, brain and mind, consciousness and free will, and light as a tool for biology, with special emphasis on optical tweezers and their contributions to biophysics. Specialized knowledge of biology is not assumed.

  8. Closing Achievement Gaps: Revisiting Benjamin S. Bloom's "Learning for Mastery"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of achievement gaps among different subgroups of students has been evident in education for many years. This manuscript revisits the work of renowned educator Benjamin S. Bloom, who saw reducing gaps in the achievement of various groups of students as a simple problem of reducing variation in student learning outcomes. Bloom observed…

  9. Educational Administration and the Management of Knowledge: 1980 Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the thesis of a 1980 paper that suggested a new approach to educational administration based upon the New Sociology of Education. In particular it updates answers to the six key questions asked by that paper: what counts as knowledge; how is what counts as knowledge organised; how is what counts as knowledge transmitted; how is…

  10. Transport benchmarks for one-dimensional binary Markovian mixtures revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classic benchmarks for transport through a binary Markovian mixture are revisited to look at the probability distribution function of the chosen 'results': reflection, transmission and scalar flux. We argue that the knowledge of the ensemble averaged results is not sufficient for reliable predictions: a measure of the dispersion must also be obtained. An algorithm to estimate this dispersion is tested. (author)

  11. The Wealth Paradox Revisited: Credit Market Imperfections and Child Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Congdon Fors, Heather

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the model of child labor in a peasant household presented in Bhalotra and Heady (2003), and demonstrate that the e¤ect of credit market imperfections on child labor di¤ers between households that save and households that borrow. This in turn is important for the interpretation of empirical results.

  12. Dynamics of Shape Fluctuations of Quasi-spherical Vesicles Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, L.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Kleis, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of spontaneous shape fluctuations of a single, giant quasi-spherical vesicle formed from a single lipid species is revisited theoretically. A coherent physical theory for the dynamics is developed based on a number of fundamental principles and considerations, and a sy...

  13. Additively homomorphic encryption with a double decryption mechanism, revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, A.; Kronberg, M.; Trei, W.; Katzenbeisser, S.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the notion of additively homomorphic encryption with a double decryption mechanism (DD-PKE), which allows for additions in the encrypted domain while having a master decryption procedure that can decrypt all properly formed ciphertexts by using a special master secret. This type of encryp

  14. Revisiting Jack Goody to Rethink Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits Goody's arguments about literacy's influence on social arrangements, culture, cognition, economics, and other domains of existence. Whereas some of his arguments tend toward technological determinism (i.e., literacy causes change in the world), other of his arguments construe literacy as a force that shapes and is shaped by…

  15. Revisiting the calculation of effective free distance of turbo codes

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzigeorgiou, I; Wassell, I. J.

    2008-01-01

    The expression for the minimum Hamming weight of the output of a constituent convolutional encoder, when its input is a weight-2 sequence is revisited. The new expression particularly facilitates the calculation of the effective free distance of recently proposed schemes, namely non-systematic turbo codes and pseudo-randomly punctured turbo codes.

  16. A Simple Algorithm for Maximum Margin Classification, Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Har-Peled, Sariel

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we revisit the algorithm of Har-Peled et. al. [HRZ07] for computing a linear maximum margin classifier. Our presentation is self contained, and the algorithm itself is slightly simpler than the original algorithm. The algorithm itself is a simple Perceptron like iterative algorithm. For more details and background, the reader is referred to the original paper.

  17. A Multi-Level Model of Moral Functioning Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Don Collins

    2009-01-01

    The model of moral functioning scaffolded in the 2008 "JME" Special Issue is here revisited in response to three papers criticising that volume. As guest editor of that Special Issue I have formulated the main body of this response, concerning the dynamic systems approach to moral development, the problem of moral relativism and the role of…

  18. Revisiting the Role of Organizational Effectiveness in Educational Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Linda S.

    Organizational effectiveness ought to play a role in educational evaluation, and the development of alternative perspectives for viewing organizations could be a starting point for revisiting organizational evaluation in education. Five possible perspectives and criteria for evaluating organizations have been developed. If an organization is…

  19. "An analysis of the classical Doppler Effect"[1] revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Nafornita, Corina

    2004-01-01

    After having shown that the formula which describes the Doppler effect in the general case holds only in the case of the "very high" frequency assumption, we derive free of assumptions Doppler formulas for two scenarios presented in the revisited paper.

  20. Revisiting El Niño Modokis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, Shamal; Ashok, Karumuri; Swapna, P.; Sabin, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    The suggestion that there exist two types of El Niño in the tropical Pacific has generated a debate in the community. Applying various linear and non-linear approaches and composite analysis technique on observed and reanalyzed climate datasets primarily for the 1950-2010 period, we revisit the variability of the tropical Pacific in the light of this debate. Our objective is to examine whether the proposed El Niño Modokis need a classification distinct from canonical El Niños. Even if the distinction is subject to short data records, we demonstrate that the El Niño Modoki events indeed display a seasonal evolution and teleconnections different from the canonical El Niños, and that the distinction is not subject to inclusion of the two extreme El Niños 1982 and 1997 as canonical El Niños. We show that the El Niño Modoki events are not an artifact associated with the orthogonality constraint associated with the EOF technique. Our cluster analysis shows that evolutions of the canonical El Niño and El Niño Modokis through various seasons differ from one another. Importantly, the dynamic and thermodynamic air-sea coupling strength is distinctly different between the El Niño Modoki and the canonical El Niño events. We find that, dynamic feedback intensity is stronger for El Niño Modoki (canonical El Niño) during boreal summer (winter); though the air-sea coupling strength, a major contributor to Bjerknes feedback, is maximum for Modokis during the developing stages, it decreases thereafter. In case of thermodynamic feedback intensity, SST-wind-evaporation feedback is dominant for El Niños while SST-SHF feedback is important during El Niño Modokis. However, we find that the thermodynamic feedback values significantly differ across the flux datasets.

  1. Clifford Algebra Implying Three Fermion Generations Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author's idea of algebraic compositeness of fundamental particles, allowing to understand the existence in Nature of three fermion generations, is revisited. It is based on two postulates. Primo, for all fundamental particles of matter the Dirac square-root procedure √p2 → Γ(N)·p works, leading to a sequence N=1, 2, 3, ... of Dirac-type equations, where four Dirac-type matrices Γ(N)μ are embedded into a Clifford algebra via a Jacobi definition introducing four ''centre-of-mass'' and (N - 1) x four ''relative'' Dirac-type matrices. These define one ''centre-of-mass'' and N - 1 ''relative'' Dirac bispinor indices. Secundo, the ''centre-of-mass'' Dirac bispinor index is coupled to the Standard Model gauge fields, while N - 1 ''relative'' Dirac bispinor indices are all free indistinguishable physical objects obeying Fermi statistics along with the Pauli principle which requires the full antisymmetry with respect to ''relative'' Dirac indices. This allows only for three Dirac-type equations with N = 1, 3, 5 in the case of N odd, and two with N = 2, 4 in the case of N even. The first of these results implies unavoidably the existence of three and only three generations of fundamental fermions, namely leptons and quarks, as labelled by the Standard Model signature. At the end, a comment is added on the possible shape of Dirac 3 x 3 mass matrices for four sorts of spin-1/2 fundamental fermions appearing in three generations. For charged leptons a prediction is mτ = 1776.80 MeV, when the input of experimental me and mμ is used. (author)

  2. Backwardation in energy futures markets: Metalgesellschaft revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy supply contracts negotiated by the US Subsidiary of Metalgesellschaft Refining and Marketing (MGRM), which were the subject of much subsequent debate, are re-examined. The contracts were hedged by the US Subsidiary barrel-for-barrel using short-dated energy derivatives. When the hedge program experienced difficulties, the derivatives positions were promptly liquidated by the parent company. Revisiting the MGRM contracts also provides the opportunity to explore the latest evidence on backwardation in energy markets. Accordingly, the paper discusses first the theoretical reasons for backwardation, followed by an empirical examination using the MGRM data available at the time of the hedge program in 1992 and a second set of data that became available in 2000. By using a more up-to-date data set covering a longer time period and by controlling the time series properties of the data, the authors expect to provide more reliable empirical evidence on the behaviour of energy futures prices. Results based on the 1992 data suggest that the strategy employed by MGRM could be expected to be profitable while the risks are relatively low. However, analysis based on the 2000 data shows lower, although still significant profits, but higher risks. The final conclusion was that the likelihood of problems similar to those faced by MGRM in 1992 are twice as high with the updated 2000 data, suggesting that the risk-return pattern of the stack-and-roll hedging strategy using short-dated energy future contracts to hedge long-tem contracts is less appealing now than when MGRM implemented its hedging program in 1992. 24 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  3. On modeling hydraulic fracture in proper variables: stiffness, accuracy, sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Mishuris, Gennady; Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The problem of hydraulic fracture propagation is considered by using its recently suggested modified formulation in terms of the particle velocity, the opening in the proper degree, appropriate spatial coordinates and $\\varepsilon$-regularization. We show that the formulation may serve for significant increasing the efficiency of numerical tracing the fracture propagation. Its advantages are illustrated by re-visiting the Nordgren problem. It is shown that the modified formulation facilitates (i) possibility to have various stiffness of differential equations resulting after spatial discretization, (ii) obtaining highly accurate and stable numerical results with moderate computational effort, and (iii) sensitivity analysis. The exposition is extensively illustrated by numerical examples.

  4. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  5. Sensitive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret

    Present paper discusses sources of innovation as heterogenic and at times intangible processes. Arguing for heterogeneity and intangibility as sources of innovation originates from a theoretical reading in STS and ANT studies (e.g. Callon 1986, Latour 1996, Mol 2002, Pols 2005) and from field work...... in the area of mental health (Dupret Søndergaard 2009, 2010). The concept of sensitive innovation is developed to capture and conceptualise exactly those heterogenic and intangible processes. Sensitive innovation is therefore primarily a way to understand innovative sources that can be......, but are not necessarily, recognized and acknowledged as such in the outer organisational culture or by management. The added value that qualifies these processes to be defined as “innovative” are thus argued for along different lines than in more traditional innovation studies (e.g. studies that build on the classic...

  6. First principles view on chemical compound space: Towards atomistic control of molecular properties

    CERN Document Server

    von Lilienfeld, O A

    2012-01-01

    A well-defined notion of chemical space is essential for gaining rigorous control of properties through variation of elemental composition and atomic configurations. Here, we revisit the atomistic first principles perspective on chemical compound space. First, we review chemical space in terms of conceptual density functional and molecular grand-canonical ensemble theory. Subsequently, compound-pairs, "alchemical" interpolation and reference compounds, and the relevance of property non-linearity are discussed. Thereafter, we will focus on recent contributions for accelerating atomistic simulations based on modern statistical data analysis methods (artificial intelligence). The crucial role of good descriptors for chemical compounds will be addressed.

  7. Revisit ocean thermal energy conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    by-products, especially drinking water, aquaculture and mariculture, can easily translate into billions of dollars in business opportunities. The current status of the OTEC system definitely deserves to be carefully revisited. This paper will examine recent major advancements in technology, evaluate costs and effectiveness, and assess the overall market environment of the OTEC system and describe its great renewable energy potential and overall benefits to the nations of the world

  8. Nuclear non-proliferation: Revisiting the basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1970 Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), with 188 States party, represents the cornerstone of the global nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament effort -- and despite recent challenges, it has never been more relevant than it is today. But if we are to move forward, it is essential to revisit a number of the basic assumptions and features of the existing regime, and consider a number of new approaches. A key assumption at the core of the NPT was that the asymmetry between nuclear-weapon States and non-nuclear-weapon States would gradually disappear. Progress has been made on the nuclear disarmament front, but much more remains to be done. Nuclear disarmament strategies have for the most part focused on the negotiation of bilateral nuclear arms control agreements between the holders of the two largest nuclear arsenals, and a few multilateral agreements designed to curb the quantitative and qualitative development of nuclear weapons. With the end of the Cold War as an impetus, some progress was made in the early and mid-1990s, but the process unfortunately slowed in the latter part of the decade. The discoveries of a clandestine nuclear weapon programme in Iraq after the 1991 Gulf War made it painfully clear that the IAEA verification system, with its focus on declared nuclear activities and its limited rights of access to information and sites, was not adequate for the IAEA to provide the comprehensive peaceful use assurances required under the NPT. This stark realization prompted the international community to significantly expand the IAEA's verification rights. These new rights were incorporated into a 1997 protocol additional to safeguards agreements, with a request for all States to subscribe to it. For the IAEA to provide the required assurances, it must have the required authority. It is clear that the success of the IAEA verification regime will depend heavily on achieving universal adherence to the required safeguards agreements

  9. The significance test controversy revisited the fiducial Bayesian alternative

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoutre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this book is not only to revisit the “significance test controversy,”but also to provide a conceptually sounder alternative. As such, it presents a Bayesian framework for a new approach to analyzing and interpreting experimental data. It also prepares students and researchers for reporting on experimental results. Normative aspects: The main views of statistical tests are revisited and the philosophies of Fisher, Neyman-Pearson and Jeffrey are discussed in detail. Descriptive aspects: The misuses of Null Hypothesis Significance Tests are reconsidered in light of Jeffreys’ Bayesian conceptions concerning the role of statistical inference in experimental investigations. Prescriptive aspects: The current effect size and confidence interval reporting practices are presented and seriously questioned. Methodological aspects are carefully discussed and fiducial Bayesian methods are proposed as a more suitable alternative for reporting on experimental results. In closing, basic routine procedures...

  10. Revisiting the Panko-Halverson Taxonomy of Spreadsheet Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Panko, Raymond R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to revisit the Panko-Halverson taxonomy of spreadsheet errors and suggest revisions. There are several reasons for doing so: First, the taxonomy has been widely used. Therefore, it should have scrutiny; Second, the taxonomy has not been widely available in its original form and most users refer to secondary sources. Consequently, they often equate the taxonomy with the simplified extracts used in particular experiments or field studies; Third, perhaps as a consequ...

  11. The Houk–List transition states for organocatalytic mechanisms revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Alan; Boto, Roberto A.; Dingwall, Paul; Contreras-Garcia, Julia; Harvey, Matt J; Mason, Nicholas J; Rzepa, Henry S

    2014-01-01

    The ten year old Houk–List model for rationalising the origin of stereoselectivity in the organocatalysed intermolecular aldol addition is revisited, using a variety of computational techniques that have been introduced or improved since the original study. Even for such a relatively small system, the role of dispersion interactions is shown to be crucial, along with the use of basis sets where the superposition errors are low. An NCI (non-covalent interactions) analysis of the transition sta...

  12. China in 2005 Revisited: The Implications of International Capital Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Ianchovichina, Elena; McDougall, Robert; Hertel, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper revisits the analysis of the implications of China's economic growth on her trading partners presented in Arndt et al. (1997) using a dynamic, applied general equilibrium model that features international capital mobility. We find that accounting for the impact of China's growth on international capital markets reverses some of the findings in the paper by Arndt et al. In particular, net creditor regions lose while net debtor regions benefit from an economic slowdown in China du...

  13. Revisiting Barriers to Trade: Do Foregone Health Benefits Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sidi; Kerr, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examins the question of revisiting the imposition of existing trade barriers in one case of an evolving marketplace – when a traditional food product is altered to provide, or discovered to have, human health benefits that increases their value to consumers. In other words, the food becomes a functional food. A functional food has the potential provide direct benefits to consumers as well as indirect benefits to society in the form of health care cost savings. If the trade barrier ...

  14. Probit Model Estimation Revisited: Trinomial Models of Household Car Ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Bunch, David S; Kitamura, Ryuichi

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we revisit various important issues relating to practical estimation of the multinomial probit model, using an empirical analysis of car ownership as a test case. To provide context, a brief literature review of empirical probit studies is included. Estimates are obtained for a full range of model specifications, including models with random (uncorrelated and correlated) taste variation and/or a general random error structure, and issues of estimability, specification testing, a...

  15. The transverse momentum dependent statistical parton distributions revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Bourrely, Claude; Buccella, Franco; Soffer, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The extension of the statistical parton distributions to include their transverse momentum dependence (TMD) is revisited by considering that the proton target has a finite longitudinal momentum. The TMD will be generated by means of a transverse energy sum rule. The new results are mainly relevant for electron-proton inelastic collisions in the low $Q^2$ region. We take into account the effects of the Melosh-Wigner rotation for the helicity distributions.

  16. The Transverse Momentum Dependent Statistical Parton Distributions Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrely, Claude; Buccella, Franco; Soffer, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The extension of the statistical parton distributions to include their transverse momentum dependence (TMD) is revisited by considering that the proton target has a finite longitudinal momentum. The TMD will be generated by means of a transverse energy sum rule. The new results are mainly relevant for electron-proton inelastic collisions in the low Q2 region. We take into account the effects of the Melosh-Wigner rotation for the helicity distributions.

  17. Simulation of Two-Way Pushdown Automata Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Glück

    2013-01-01

    The linear-time simulation of 2-way deterministic pushdown automata (2DPDA) by the Cook and Jones constructions is revisited. Following the semantics-based approach by Jones, an interpreter is given which, when extended with random-access memory, performs a linear-time simulation of 2DPDA. The recursive interpreter works without the dump list of the original constructions, which makes Cook's insight into linear-time simulation of exponential-time automata more intuitive and the complexity arg...

  18. The angular momentum of baryons and dark matter halos revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole....

  19. Trade and civil conflict : revisiting the cross-country evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Cali, Massimiliano; Mulabdic, Alen

    2014-01-01

    This paper revisits and expands the evidence on the impact of trade shocks on intra-state conflict with a large sample of developing countries in the 1960-2010 period. The results suggest that increases in the prices of a country's exported commodities raise the country's risk of civil conflict and its duration. The effect on conflict risk is mainly driven by the price of point-source comm...

  20. Revisiting regional trade agreements and their impact on services trade

    OpenAIRE

    Marconini, Mario

    2009-01-01

    This issue paper, titled 'Revisiting Regional Trade Agreements and Their Impact on Services Trade' written by Mr. Mario Marconini, is a contribution to that process. The paper exhaustively reviews services disciplines included in several Free Trade Agreements (FTA). The aim of the paper is to enable stakeholders to understand how rules and commitments regarding trade in services have been introduced in FTAs, and how those policies might impact sustainable development in developing countries. ...

  1. New Families in the Stable Homotopy of Spheres Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jin Kun

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a new family in the stable homotopy of spheres πt-6S representedby hngoγ3 ∈ E26,t in the Adams spectral sequence which revisits the bn-1g0γ3-elements ∈πt-7S con-structed in [3], where t = 2pn(p- 1) +6(p2 + p+ 1)(p- 1) and p ≥ 7 is a prime, n ≥ 4.

  2. Revisiting k-means: New Algorithms via Bayesian Nonparametrics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulis, Brian; Jordan, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Bayesian models offer great flexibility for clustering applications---Bayesian nonparametrics can be used for modeling infinite mixtures, and hierarchical Bayesian models can be utilized for sharing clusters across multiple data sets. For the most part, such flexibility is lacking in classical clustering methods such as k-means. In this paper, we revisit the k-means clustering algorithm from a Bayesian nonparametric viewpoint. Inspired by the asymptotic connection between k-means and mixtures...

  3. Revisiting the Response Mechanism of Polymeric Membrane Based Heparin Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Andrea K.; Höfler, Lajos; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometric membrane electrodes that respond to heparin and other polyanions were introduced in the early 1990s. Herein, the mechanism of polymer membrane electrode type heparin sensors is revisited. The extraction/diffusion of heparin is studied via both potentiometric and impedance spectroscopic techniques using a pre-fractionated heparin preparation that contains polyanionic species > 10000 Daltons. The reversal in EMF response using this heparin preparation indicates diffusion of highe...

  4. The Dutch Disease revisited: absorption constraint and learning by doing

    OpenAIRE

    Iacono, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This paper revisits the Dutch disease by analyzing the general equilibrium effects of a resource shock on a dependent economy, both in a static and dynamic setting. The novel aspect of this study is to incorporate two features of the Dutch disease literature that have only been analyzed in isolation from each other: capital accumulation with absorption constraint and productivity growth induced by learning by doing. The conventional result of long-run exchange rate appreciation is maintained ...

  5. Audit probability versus effectiveness: The Beckerian approach revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Rablen, M

    2014-01-01

    This is the accepted version of the following article: RABLEN, M. D. (2014), Audit Probability versus Effectiveness: The Beckerian Approach Revisited. Journal of Public Economic Theory, 16: 322–342, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpet.12062/abstract. The Beckerian approach to tax compliance examines how a tax authority can maximize social welfare by trading-off audit probability against the fine rate on undeclared tax. This paper offers...

  6. Clausius/Cosserat/Maxwell/Weyl Equations: The Virial Theorem Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Pommaret, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    This paper must be published under the title " FROM THERMODYNAMICS TO GAUGE THEORY: THE VIRIAL THEOREM REVISITED " as a chapter of a forthcoming book " GAUGE THEORY AND DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY " published by Nova Editors. In 1870, R. Clausius found the virial theorem which amounts to introduce the trace of the stress tensor when studying the foundations of thermodynamics, as a way to relate the absolute temperature of an ideal gas to the mean kinetic energy of its molecules. In 1901, H. Poin...

  7. Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catassi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a syndrome characterized by intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in subjects who are not affected by either celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). The prevalence of NCGS is not clearly defined yet. Indirect evidence suggests that NCGS is slightly more common than CD, the latter affecting around 1% of the general population. NCGS has been mostly described in adults, particularly in females in the age group of 30-50 years; however, pediatric case series have also been reported. Since NCGS may be transient, gluten tolerance needs to be reassessed over time in patients with NCGS. NCGS is characterized by symptoms that usually occur soon after gluten ingestion, disappear with gluten withdrawal, and relapse following gluten challenge within hours/days. The 'classical' presentation of NCGS is a combination of irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, bowel habit abnormalities (either diarrhea or constipation), and systemic manifestations such as 'foggy mind', headache, fatigue, joint and muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, dermatitis (eczema or skin rash), depression, and anemia. In recent years, several studies explored the relationship between the ingestion of gluten-containing food and the appearance of neurological and psychiatric disorders/symptoms like ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, schizophrenia, autism, depression, anxiety, and hallucinations (so-called gluten psychosis). The diagnosis of NCGS should be considered in patients with persistent intestinal and/or extraintestinal complaints showing a normal result of the CD and WA serological markers on a gluten-containing diet, usually reporting worsening of symptoms after eating gluten-rich food. NCGS should not be an exclusion diagnosis only. Unfortunately, no biomarker is sensitive and specific enough for diagnostic purposes; therefore, the diagnosis of NCGS is currently based on

  8. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  9. Olfactory sensitivity in mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermannová, M; Pinc, L; Jebavý, L

    2016-07-18

    Olfaction enables most mammalian species to detect and discriminate vast numbers of chemical structures called odorants and pheromones. The perception of such chemical compounds is mediated via two major olfactory systems, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system, as well as minor systems, such as the septal organ and the Grueneberg ganglion. Distinct differences exist not only among species but also among individuals in terms of their olfactory sensitivity; however, little is known about the mechanisms that determine these differences. In research on the olfactory sensitivity of mammals, scientists thus depend in most cases on behavioral testing. In this article, we reviewed scientific studies performed on various mammalian species using different methodologies and target chemical substances. Human and non-human primates as well as rodents and dogs are the most frequently studied species. Olfactory threshold studies on other species do not exist with the exception of domestic pigs. Olfactory testing performed on seals, elephants, and bats focused more on discriminative abilities than on sensitivity. An overview of olfactory sensitivity studies as well as olfactory detection ability in most studied mammalian species is presented here, focusing on comparable olfactory detection thresholds. The basics of olfactory perception and olfactory sensitivity factors are also described. PMID:27070753

  10. Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitive immunoassay methods should be applied to small molecules of biological importance, which are non-immunogenic by themselves, such as small peptide hormones (e.g. bradykinin), plant hormones (e.g. indoleacetic acid), nucleotides and other small molecules. Methods of binding these small molecules, as haptens, to immunogenic carriers by various cross-linking agents are described (dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, tolylene-diisocyanate and glutaraldehyde), and the considerations involved in relation to the methods of binding and the specificity of the antibodies formed are discussed. Some uses of antibody bound to bromoacetyl cellulose as an immuno adsorbent convenient for assay of immunoglobulins are described. Finally, the sensitive immunoassay method of chemically modified phage is described. This includes methods of binding small molecules (such as the dinitrophenyl group, penicillin, indoleacetic acid) or proteins (such as insulin, immunoglobulins) to phages. Methods of direct chemical conjugation, or an indirect binding via anti-phage Fab, are described. The phage inactivation method by direct plating and its modifications (such as decision technique and complex inactivation) are compared with the more simple end-point titration method. The inhibition of phage inactivation has some advantages as it does not require radioactive material, or expensive radioactive counters, and avoids the need for separation between bound and unbound antigen. Hence, if developed, it could be used as an alternative to radioimmunoassay. (author)

  11. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  12. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  13. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers : transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Giselle M.; Marques Júnior, Wilson; Soares, A. J.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solution of the Boltzmann equation is determined through an expansion in Sonine polyn...

  14. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; der Schaft, Arjan van

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we can characterize the space of equilibrium points and provide simple dynamical analysis on the state space modulo the space of equilibrium points.

  15. On the Mathematical Structure of Balanced Chemical Reaction Networks Governed by Mass Action Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    der Schaft, Arjan van; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress on the interplay between graph theory, dynamics, and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics. For reaction networks possessing a thermodynamic equilibrium we derive a compact formulation exhibiting at the same time the structure of the complex graph and the stoichiometry of the network, and which admits a direct thermodynamical interpretation. This formulation allows us to easily characterize the set ...

  16. Identification and Sensitivity Analysis for Multiple Causal Mechanisms: Revisiting Evidence from Framing Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Teppei; Imai, Kosuke

    2013-01-01

    Social scientists are often interested in testing multiple causal mechanisms through which a treatment affects outcomes. A predominant approach has been to use linear structural equation models and examine the statistical significance of the corresponding path coefficients. However, this approach implicitly assumes that the multiple mechanisms are causally independent of one another. In this article, we consider a set of alternative assumptions that are sufficient to identify the average caus...

  17. Environmental policies in a differentiated oligopoly revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Kenji [School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin Univ., Uegahara 1-1-155, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 662-8501 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Constructing a model of polluting oligopoly with product differentiation, we consider how product differentiation, together with the presence and absence of free entry, affects optimal pollution tax/subsidy policies. The sign of the short- and long-run optimal pollution taxes are highly sensitive to the parameter measuring product differentiation as well as the presence of free entry. How they are affected by a change in product differentiation, which is not addressed in the existing literature, is also made clear. (author)

  18. Revisiting Wilson loops for nonrelativistic backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Thiago R.

    2015-12-01

    We consider several configurations that describe Wilson loops in nonrelativistic field theories, and for some of them we find systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Also, we find a nontrivial drag force at zero temperature, which suggests that the parameter controlling the deviation of the nonrelativistic space from the relativistic space may be related to the chemical potential of these systems. Moreover, we reconsider some known configurations in the literature and we perform further analysis.

  19. Chemical machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yardimeden

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials. Advantages and disadvantages of the chemical machining are mentioned.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, chemical machining process was described its importance as nontraditional machining process. The steps of process were discussed in detail. The tolerances of machined parts were examined.Findings: Paper describes the chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials.Practical implications: The machining operation should be carried out carefully to produce a desired geometry. Environmental laws have important effects when chemical machining is used.Originality/value: The importance of nontraditional machining processes is very high.

  20. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  1. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level. PMID:15923917

  2. Revisiting the boiling of primordial quark nuggets in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ang; Gubler, Philipp; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2013-01-01

    The boiling of quark nuggets during the quark-hadron phase transition in the early Universe is revisited within the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach employed for the hadron phase, using two kinds of baryon interactions as fundamental inputs. To describe the deconfined phase of quark matter, we use the recently developed quark mass density-dependent model with a fully self-consistent thermodynamic treatment of confinement. We study the the baryon number limit $A_{\\rm boil}$ (above which boiling may be important) with three typical values for the confinement parameter $D$. We find that the baryon interaction with a softer equation of state for the hadron phase would only lead to a slightly higher limit. However, results depend sensitively on the interacting strength parameter in the quark model. Boiling might be important during the Universe cooling for a limited parameter range around $D^{1/2} = 170$ MeV, a value satisfying recent lattice QCD calculations of the vacuum chiral condensate. While in ot...

  3. Simulating runoff under changing climatic conditions: Revisiting an apparent deficiency of conceptual rainfall-runoff models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Keirnan J. A.; Peel, Murray C.; Western, Andrew W.; Zhang, Lu; Peterson, Tim J.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrologic models have potential to be useful tools in planning for future climate variability. However, recent literature suggests that the current generation of conceptual rainfall runoff models tend to underestimate the sensitivity of runoff to a given change in rainfall, leading to poor performance when evaluated over multiyear droughts. This research revisited this conclusion, investigating whether the observed poor performance could be due to insufficient model calibration and evaluation techniques. We applied an approach based on Pareto optimality to explore trade-offs between model performance in different climatic conditions. Five conceptual rainfall runoff model structures were tested in 86 catchments in Australia, for a total of 430 Pareto analyses. The Pareto results were then compared with results from a commonly used model calibration and evaluation method, the Differential Split Sample Test. We found that the latter often missed potentially promising parameter sets within a given model structure, giving a false negative impression of the capabilities of the model. This suggests that models may be more capable under changing climatic conditions than previously thought. Of the 282[347] cases of apparent model failure under the split sample test using the lower [higher] of two model performance criteria trialed, 155[120] were false negatives. We discuss potential causes of remaining model failures, including the role of data errors. Although the Pareto approach proved useful, our aim was not to suggest an alternative calibration strategy, but to critically assess existing methods of model calibration and evaluation. We recommend caution when interpreting split sample results.

  4. Fourth-order gravity as the inflationary model revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, S; Watanabe, N

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the simplest (fourth-order or quadratically generated) modified gravity model in four space-time dimensions. It is equivalent to the certain quintessence model via a Legendre-Weyl transform. By using the quintessence scalar potential we compute the (CMB) observables of inflation associated with curvature perturbations (namely, the scalar and tensor spectral indices, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio) by using the most recent WMAP5 experimental bound. Our results include the next-to-leading terms with respect to the inverse number of e-foldings.

  5. Revisiting perfect fluid dark matter: Observational constraints from our galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Potapov, Alexander A.; Garipova, Guzel M.; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2016-01-01

    We revisit certain features of an assumed spherically symmetric perfect fluid dark matter halo in the light of the observed data of our galaxy, the Milky Way (MW). The idea is to apply the Faber–Visser approach of combined observations of rotation curves and lensing to a first post-Newtonian approximation to “measure” the equation of state ω(r) of the perfect fluid galactic halo. However, for the model considered here, no constraints from lensing are used as it will be sufficient to consider ...

  6. Nonextensive Nambu Jona-Lasinio model of QCD matter revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Rozynek, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    We present a revisited version of the nonextensive QCD-based Nambu - Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model describing the behavior of strongly interacting matter proposed by us some time ago. As before, it is based on the nonextensive generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) statistical mechanics used in the NJL model to its nonextensive version based on Tsallis statistics, but this time it fulfils the basic requirements of thermodynamical consistency. Different ways in which this can be done, connected with different possible choices of the form of the corresponding nonextensive entropies, are presented and discussed in detail. The corresponding results are compared, discussed and confronted with previous findings.

  7. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    OpenAIRE

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and th...

  8. Modulational instability in a passive fiber cavity, revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezyulin, D A; Konotop, V V; Taki, M

    2011-12-01

    Modulation instability in a passive fiber cavity is revisited. We address the problem in the statement with a continuous-time Ikeda map, rather than in the mean-field limit. It is found that plane wave solutions are unstable for both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes of an optical fiber. The origin of the instability in the continuous-time Ikeda map is in the mode mixing introduced by the beam splitter. The obtained conditions for the instability were compared with ones known for the discrete-time Ikeda map, showing appreciable difference, which, however reduces in the mean-field limit. PMID:22139263

  9. Hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian chain statistics revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polińska, P; Gillig, C; Wittmer, J P; Baschnagel, J

    2014-02-01

    Conformational properties of regular dendrimers and more general hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian statistics for the spacer chains between branching points are revisited numerically. We investigate the scaling for asymptotically long chains especially for fractal dimensions df = 3 (marginally compact) and df = 2.5 (diffusion limited aggregation). Power-law stars obtained by imposing the number of additional arms per generation are compared to truly self-similar stars. We discuss effects of weak excluded-volume interactions and sketch the regime where the Gaussian approximation should hold in dense solutions and melts for sufficiently large spacer chains. PMID:24574057

  10. Small-angle scattering theory revisited: Photocurrent and spatial localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    In this paper theory on collective scattering measurements of electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas is revisited. We present the first full derivation of the expression for the photocurrent beginning at the basic scattering concepts. Thereafter we derive detailed expressions for the auto......- and crosspower spectra obtained from measurements. These are discussed and simple simulations made to elucidate the physical meaning of the findings. In this context, the known methods of obtaining spatial localization are discussed and appraised. Where actual numbers are applied, we utilize....... Saffman et al., "CO2 laser based two-volume collective scattering instrument for spatially localized turbulence measurements,"Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 2579-2592 (2001)]....

  11. The Re/Os Clock Revisited

    CERN Multimedia

    Leal, L C; Kitis, G; Guber, K H; Quaranta, A; Koehler, P E

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the proposed project of an accurate measurement of the relevant neutron cross sections of $^{186}$Os and $^{187}$Os is to remove the principal nuclear physics uncertainties in the analysis of the Re/Os cosmochronometer. The necessary cross section information will be obtained in complementary experiments at the nTOF facility at CERN and at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator. Transformation of these results into significantly improved stellar reaction rates will allow to evaluate the age of the elements in the framework of galactic chemical evolution models.

  12. Sensitivities in global scale modeling of isoprene

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlmann, R.; M. G. Lawrence; Pöschl, U.; P. J. Crutzen

    2003-01-01

    A sensitivity study of the treatment of isoprene and related parameters in 3D atmospheric models was conducted using the global model of tropospheric chemistry MATCH-MPIC. A total of twelve sensitivity scenarios which can be grouped into four thematic categories were performed. These four categories consist of simulations with different chemical mechanisms, different assumptions concerning the deposition characteristics of intermediate products, as...

  13. Chemical networks*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One o...

  14. Irish Chemical News

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, Margaret; Hobbs, Patrick; Hodnett, Kieran; Coleman, Simon; Florea, Larisa; Diamond, Dermot; Nolan, Hugo; Keyes, Tia E.; Thébault, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Patrick; Wall, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Contents: Obituary: Dr Paraic James -- Chemical Sensing with Autonomous Devices in Remote Locations: Why is it so difficult and how do we deliver revolutionary improvements in performance? -- Sensitizing Polyoxometalate Photochemistry for Photoelectrochemical Applications -- Paris Agreement: Developing clean technologies for a better future. -- Protecting Endangered Elements Report -- DCU’s New “Water Institute” -- Dioxin/PCB Analysis by High Resolution Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry...

  15. Aptamers and Capillary Electrophoresis: physico-chemical characterization of free aptamers in solution or grafted on nanoparticles, and study of their affinity towards a proteic target in view of their use in sensitive diagnosis methods

    OpenAIRE

    Girardot, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are short oligonucleotides selected by SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and showing great affinity and specificity towards their target. This work deals with the physico-chemical characterization of aptamers and the study of their affinity towards their target, using capillary electrophoresis, through the example of an aptamer selected against a highly basic protein, lysozyme. After having evaluated several modifications of the capillary surface, the ...

  16. Generalized tolerance sensitivity and DEA metric sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Luka Neralić; Richard E. Wendell

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between Tolerance sensitivity analysis in optimization and metric sensitivity analysis in Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Herein, we extend the results on the generalized Tolerance framework proposed by Wendell and Chen and show how this framework includes DEA metric sensitivity as a special case. Further, we note how recent results in Tolerance sensitivity suggest some possible extensions of the results in DEA metric sensitivity.

  17. Miniature Chemical Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew C. R. Pipino

    2004-12-13

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

  18. Shukla-Eliasson Attractive Force: Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Akbar-Moghanjoughi, M

    2012-01-01

    By investigation of the dielectric response of a Fermi-Dirac plasma in the linear limit and evaluation of the electrostatic potential around the positive stationary test charge, we find that the Shukla-Eliasson attractive force is present for the plasma density range expected in the interiors of large planets for a wide range of plasma atomic-number. This research which is based on the generalized electron Fermi-momentum further confirms the existence of the newly discovered Lennard-Jones-like attractive potential and its inevitable role in plasma crystallization in the cores of planets. Moreover, it is observed that the characteristics of the attractive potential is strongly sensitive to the variation of the plasma density and composition. Current research can also have applications in the study of strong laser-matter interactions and innertially confined plasmas.

  19. Revisiting the thermochemistry of chlorine fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, H R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, accurate calculations of standard enthalpies of formation of chlorine fluorides (ClF$_n$, n=1--7; Cl$_2$F and Cl$_3$F$_2$) were performed through the isodesmic reactions scheme. It is argued that, for many chlorine fluorides, the gold standard method of quantum chemistry (CCSD(T)) is not capable to predict enthalpy values nearing chemical accuracy if atomization scheme is used. This is underpinned by a thorough analysis of total atomization energy results and the inspection of multireference features of these compounds. Other thermodynamic quantities were also calculated at different temperatures. In order to complement the energetic description, elimination curves were studied through density functional theory as a computationally affordable alternative to highly correlated wave function-based methods.

  20. Chemical machining

    OpenAIRE

    A. Yardimeden; T. Ozben; O. Cakir

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and mac...

  1. Particle Filtering for Attitude Estimation Using a Minimal Local-Error Representation: A Revisit

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Lubin

    2014-01-01

    In this note, we have revisited the previously published paper "Particle Filtering for Attitude Estimation Using a Minimal Local-Error Representation". In the revisit, we point out that the quaternion particle filtering based on the local/global representation structure has not made full use of the advantage of the particle filtering in terms of accuracy and robustness. Moreover, a normalized quaternion determining procedure based on the minimum mean-square error approach has been investigate...

  2. Revisiting diagenesis on the Ontong Java Plateau: Evidence for authigenic crust precipitation in Globorotalia tumida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Oscar; Read, Elizabeth; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Rau, Christoph; Elderfield, Henry

    2015-11-01

    The calcite tests of foraminifera lie in marine sediments for thousands to millions of years, before being analyzed to generate trace element and isotope paleoproxy records. These sediments constitute a distinct physio-chemical environment from the conditions in which the tests formed. Storage in sediments can modify the trace element and isotopic content of foraminiferal calcite through diagenetic alteration, which has the potential to confound their paleoceanographic interpretation. A previous study of Globorotalia tumida from the Ontong Java Plateau, western equatorial Pacific, found that preferential dissolution of higher-Mg chamber calcite and the preservation of a low-Mg crust on the tests significantly reduced whole-test Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca. Here we revisit specimens with a combination of synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (sXCT) and electron probe microanalyses to reevaluate the nature of their diagenetic alteration. The dissolution of higher-Mg calcite with depth was directly observed in the sXCT data, confirming the inference of the previous study. The sXCT data further reveal a thickening of the chemically and structurally distinct calcite crust with depth. We propose that these crusts have a diagenetic origin, driven by the simultaneous dissolution of high-Mg chamber calcite and precipitation of low-Mg crust from the resulting modified pore water solution. While the breadth of the study is limited by the nature of the techniques, the observation of both dissolution and reprecipitation of foraminiferal calcite serves to demonstrate the action of two simultaneous diagenetic alteration processes, with significant impacts on the resulting paleoproxy signals.

  3. Review - Revisiting Rituals in a Changing Tibetan World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kilby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Katia Buffetrille (ed. 2012. Revisiting Rituals in a Changing Tibetan World. Leiden: Brill. Volume 31 in Brill's Tibetan Studies Library. Featuring Buddhist ritual life in its diverse manifestations across the Tibetan Plateau, this volume engages the task of defining 'ritual' by analyzing moments of ritual change. Whether political regime change, technological innovation, or social upheaval, external catalysts of religious transformation have been prominently visible in the Tibetan cultural world since the mid-twentieth century. This volume takes up the sociopolitical shifts of the recent period as a call to investigate how rituals change under fire, thereby furthering our understanding of the relationship between ritual structures and the historical contexts in which they find expression. Ritual's intertwinement with political events, symbols, and attitudes is the resounding theme presented herein, as each chapter makes efforts to disambiguate the complex causes and contours of ritual change in a particular case study. Several chapters seek to distinguish deep structural transformation in ritual from the harnessing of ritual elements for single instances of political or social action. Others debate the ambiguous role of spaces, practices, or ideas that are employed in ritual but also in political or economic contexts. Finally, each chapter challenges in some way the polarization of ritual conservatism and the 'invention of tradition' (Ranger and Hobsbawm 1983. Revisiting Rituals is an edited collection of conference papers...

  4. Chemical Radioprotectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Upadhyay

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Protection of biological systems against radiation damage is of paramount importance during accidental and unavoidable exposure to radiation. Several physico-chemical and biological factors collectively contribute to the damage caused by radiation and are, therefore, targets for developing radioprotectors. Work on the development of chemicals capable of protecting biological systemsfrom radiation damage was initiated nearly six decades ago with cysteine being the first molecule to be reported. Chemicals capable of scavenging free radicals, inducing oxygen depletion,antioxidants and modulators of immune response have been some of the radioprotectors extensively investigated with limited success. Mechanism of action of some chemical radioprotectors and their combinations have been elucidated, while further understanding is required in many instances. The present review elaborates on structure-activity relationship of some of the chemical radioprotectors, their evaluation, and assessment, limitation, and future prospects.

  5. Physico-chemical Analysis, Microbial Isolation, Sensitivity Test of the Isolates and Solar Disinfection of Water Running in Community Taps and River Kandutura in Nakuru North Sub-county, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Waithaka, Paul N; Maingi, John Muthini; Nyamache, Anthony Kebira

    2015-01-01

    Nakuru North sub-county is a peri-urban area which has both dry and wet seasons. Its residents rely mostly on untreated water sources for daily water needs due to unreliable water supply from the urban council. However, this water has not been evaluated on its quality despite residents solely depending on it. This study was aimed at determining the physico-chemical and bacteriological quality of water drawn from River Kandutura and water taps in Nakuru North sub-county. In addition, the study...

  6. The Rhume springs revisited: A multi-tracer approach to one of the largest European carbonate-gypsum karst systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Schmiedinger, Iris; Dellwig, Olaf; Escher, Peter; Weise, Stephan M.

    2014-05-01

    Modern karst ground water systems are at the cutting edge between atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere and are impacted by the biosphere and anthroposphere. The hydrogeochemical processes in karst terrains are sensitive to both climate change and anthropogenic activity, thereby affecting the quality of these ground waters. Therefore, understanding the transport processes and hydrogeochemical interactions between surface and ground waters is of fundamental importance for the prediction of future quality developments of large drinking water resources. The system of the Rhume spring, at the SW border of the Harz Mountains (Germany), one of the largest the largest European karst springs, has been investigated for hydrogeochemical and isotope variations to study the impact of river waters on the Rhume spring system. Rivers from the Harz Mountains are infiltrating Quaternary strata and emerging, after a passage through Permian (Zechstein) carbonate and sulfate rocks at the Rhume springs. By using a hydrogeochemical tracer approach it was found earlier, that an old mineralized ground water that had been modified by subterrestrial water-rock interactions is mixed with less mineralized younger karst waters before emerging in the different Rhume spring pits [1-4]. In the present communication, we present new results from a revisit of the Rhume springs and the rivers and streams in the direct and tributary recharge areas focussing on trace metal concentrations and multi-stable isotope signatures under different hydrological conditions. It was the aim of the investigation to re-analyze the proposed mixing model and provide additional evidence for a relative age estimate (H-3 dating) of the different waters emerging in the Rhume spring area. One focus was set on a high water-impact period. By the application of a multi-tracer approach (e.g., Sr, Ba, Fe, Mn, Mo, PO4, Si), and different isotope systems (S-32/S-34 in sulfate; O-16, O-17, O-18, H-1, H-2, and H-3 in water, C-12/C

  7. What do we mean by sensitivity analysis? The need for comprehensive characterization of "global" sensitivity in Earth and Environmental systems models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin V.

    2015-05-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an essential paradigm in Earth and Environmental Systems modeling. However, the term "sensitivity" has a clear definition, based in partial derivatives, only when specified locally around a particular point (e.g., optimal solution) in the problem space. Accordingly, no unique definition exists for "global sensitivity" across the problem space, when considering one or more model responses to different factors such as model parameters or forcings. A variety of approaches have been proposed for global sensitivity analysis, based on different philosophies and theories, and each of these formally characterizes a different "intuitive" understanding of sensitivity. These approaches focus on different properties of the model response at a fundamental level and may therefore lead to different (even conflicting) conclusions about the underlying sensitivities. Here we revisit the theoretical basis for sensitivity analysis, summarize and critically evaluate existing approaches in the literature, and demonstrate their flaws and shortcomings through conceptual examples. We also demonstrate the difficulty involved in interpreting "global" interaction effects, which may undermine the value of existing interpretive approaches. With this background, we identify several important properties of response surfaces that are associated with the understanding and interpretation of sensitivities in the context of Earth and Environmental System models. Finally, we highlight the need for a new, comprehensive framework for sensitivity analysis that effectively characterizes all of the important sensitivity-related properties of model response surfaces.

  8. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  9. Revisiting cytogenetic paradigms armed with new tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It could be argued that most of the fundamental tenets of radiation biology were either discovered, or subsequently confirmed, by observing eukaryotic chromosomes under the microscope. These include, but are certainly not limited to, dose-response relationships with respect to intensity (dose rate/dose fractionation) and radiation quality (LET/track structure). Chromosome aberrations are exquisitely sensitive indicators of radiation damage, and provide quantitative information of biological effect on a cell-by-cell-basis. As such, they have long been a favored endpoint for theoreticians, thereby figuring prominently in the development of generalized models of radiation action. Most of these seminal contributions to radiation biology occurred over a period of time when cytogenetic techniques were, of course, less refined than today. Considering the increasing rate at which technological advances have been made available to the researcher over the past few years, a reexamination of some of the radiological principles that cytogenetics helped to found seems in order. As an example of such effort, this talk will center around improvements to the use of whole chromosome painting by FISH- principally combinatorial painting techniques like mFISH and SKY- for the purposes of examining in greater detail structural aberrations to chromosomes produced following exposure to ionizing radiations of differing quality and intensity. This and related approaches by various laboratories around the world have turned up a few surprise discoveries that do not always fit established paradigms, and which serve to sharpen arguments that have been used to buttress existing models of aberration formation

  10. Texton gradients: the texton theory revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, B

    1986-01-01

    A brief outline of the texton theory was given in several review papers (Julesz and Bergen 1983; Julesz 1984a, b, 1985) without going into details. Here a more complete version of the texton theory is presented, with emphasis on the critical distances within which the density of textons is determined by the preattentive system. Particularly some recent findings by Sagi and Julesz (1985a, b) influenced the current version of the texton theory. The stimuli are restricted to drawings composed of line segments that permit a precise definition of neighborhoods and distances to which the line segments and texture elements have to be confined in order to quality for preattentive texture discrimination. These critical distances and the aperture of focal attention are scaled by the average size of the texture elements. Furthermore, it is stressed that even when the stimuli are restricted to line segments, the blobs outlined by line segments behave like textons. The preattentive system ignores the exact shape of these blobs, but is sensitive to their average width, length, and orientation. PMID:3741897

  11. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) is the principal mechanism for the intermolecular or intramolecular redistribution of electronic energy following molecular excitation. In terms of fundamental quantum interactions, the process is properly described in terms of a virtual photon transit between the pre-excited donor and a lower energy (usually ground-state) acceptor. The detailed quantum amplitude for RET is calculated by molecular quantum electrodynamical techniques with the observable, the transfer rate, derived via application of the Fermi golden rule. In the treatment reported here, recently devised state-sequence techniques and a novel calculational protocol is applied to RET and shown to circumvent problems associated with the usual method. The second-rank tensor describing virtual photon behavior evolves from a Green's function solution to the Helmholtz equation, and special functions are employed to realize the coupling tensor. The method is used to derive a new result for energy transfer systems sensitive to both magnetic- and electric-dipole transitions. The ensuing result is compared to that of pure electric-dipole-electric-dipole coupling and is analyzed with regard to acceptable transfer separations. Systems are proposed where the electric-dipole-magnetic-dipole term is the leading contribution to the overall rate

  12. DMPD: TLR signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16006187 TLR signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-...nalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpathway. PubmedID 16006187 Title TL...R signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpat

  13. Revisiting Stacking Fault Energy of Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arpan

    2016-02-01

    The stacking fault energy plays an important role in the transition of deformation microstructure. This energy is strongly dependent on the concentration of alloying elements and the temperature under which the alloy is exposed. Extensive literature review has been carried out and investigated that there are inconsistencies in findings on the influence of alloying elements on stacking fault energy. This may be attributed to the differences in chemical compositions, inaccuracy in measurements, and the methodology applied for evaluating the stacking fault energy. In the present research, a Bayesian neural network model is created to correlate the complex relationship between the extent of stacking fault energy with its influencing parameters in different austenitic grade steels. The model has been applied to confirm that the predictions are reasonable in the context of metallurgical principles and other data published in the open literature. In addition, it has been possible to estimate the isolated influence of particular variables such as nickel concentration, which exactly cannot in practice be varied independently. This demonstrates the ability of the method to investigate a new phenomenon in cases where the information cannot be accessed experimentally.

  14. Revisiting RG Flow for Kaon Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Paeng, Won-Gi

    2014-01-01

    Kaon condensation in compact-star matter can be considered as a quantum critical phenomenon with the kaon mass tuned to zero by the baryon density plus the electron chemical potential that increases at the increase of the density. We approach this problem with a renormalization group flow at one loop of the system of anti-kaons considered as pseudo-Goldstone bosons coupled to nucleonic matter described as a Fermi liquid near its fixed point. While the Weinberg-Tomozawa term in chiral Lagrangians is of leading order in describing kaon-nucleon interactions in chiral perturbation theory, hence widely employed in the literature, it is irrelevant in the RG sense, therefore plays, if any, a less important role in the condensation process. The consequence is that the $\\Lambda (1405)$ resonance which is driven by the Weinberg-Tomozawa term is irrelevant for triggering kaon condensation. On the contrary, the $KN$ sigma term $\\Sigma_{KN}$, subleading in chiral counting, can play a more crucial role in renormalization g...

  15. The mechanism of borosilicate glass corrosion revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Nagel, Thorsten; Kilburn, Matt R.; Janssen, Arne; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Grange, Marion; Nemchin, Alexander A.

    2015-06-01

    Currently accepted mechanistic models describing aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses are based on diffusion-controlled hydrolysis, hydration, ion exchange reactions, and subsequent re-condensation of the hydrolyzed glass network, leaving behind a residual hydrated glass or gel layer. Here, we report results of novel oxygen and silicon isotope tracer experiments with ternary Na borosilicate glasses that can be better explained by a process that involves the congruent dissolution of the glass, which is spatially and temporally coupled to the precipitation and growth of an amorphous silica layer at an inwardly moving reaction interface. Such a process is thermodynamically driven by the solubility difference between the glass and amorphous silica, and kinetically controlled by glass dissolution reactions at the reaction front, which, in turn, are controlled by the transport of water and solute elements through the growing corrosion zone. Understanding the coupling of these reactions is the key to understand the formation of laminar or more complex structural and chemical patterns observed in natural corrosion zones of ancient glasses. We suggest that these coupled processes also have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  16. Channel blocking of MspA revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Ayomi S; Wang, Hongwang; Basel, Matthew T; Pokhrel, Megh Raj; Gamage, Pubudu Siyambalagoda; Kalita, Mausam; Wendel, Sebastian; Sears, Bryan; Welideniya, Dhanushi; Liu, Yao; Turro, Claudia; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2013-01-01

    Porin A from Mycobacterium smegmatis (MspA) is a highly stable, octameric channel protein, which acts as the main transporter of electrolytes across the cell membrane. MspA features a narrow, negatively charged constriction zone, allowing stable binding of various analytes thereby blocking the channel. Investigation of channel blocking of mycobacterial porins is of significance in developing alternate treatment methods for tuberculosis. The concept that ruthenium(II)quaterpyridinium complexes have the capability to act as efficient channel blockers for MspA and related porins, emerged after very high binding constants were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and steady-state luminescence studies. Consequently, the interactions between the ruthenium(II) complex RuC2 molecules and MspA, leading to RuC2@MspA assemblies, have been studied utilizing time-resolved absorption/emission, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, ζ potential measurements, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The results obtained provide evidence for the formation of clusters/large aggregates of RuC2 and MspA. The results are of interest with respect to utilizing prospective channel blockers in porins. The combination of results from conceptually different techniques shed some light onto the chemical nature of MspA-channel blocker interactions thus contributing to the development of a paradigm for channel blocking. PMID:23214433

  17. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pills, who subsequently become pregnant or have a history of brownish facial discoloration. Scarring Reactivation of cold sores What can I expect after having a chemical peel? All peels require some follow-up care: ...

  18. Unnecessary Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  19. Chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives descriptions of chemical kinetics. It starts summary of chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism, and explains basic velocity law, experiment method for determination of reaction velocity, temperature dependence of reaction velocity, theory of reaction velocity, theory on reaction of unimolecular, process of atom and free radical, reaction in solution, catalysis, photochemical reaction, such as experiment and photochemical law and rapid reaction like flame, beam of molecule and shock tube.

  20. Photo-electrochemical studies of chemically deposited nanocrystalline meso-porous n-type TiO2 thin films for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using simple synthesized azo dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezema, C. G.; Nwanya, A. C.; Ezema, B. E.; Patil, B. H.; Bulakhe, R. N.; Ukoha, P. O.; Lokhande, C. D.; Maaza, Malik; Ezema, Fabian I.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method onto fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrate at room temperature (300 K). Titanium trichloride and sodium hydroxide were used as cationic and anionic sources, respectively. The as-deposited and annealed films were characterized for structural, morphological, optical, electrical and wettability properties. The photoelectrochemical study of TiO2 sensitized with a laboratory synthesized organic dye (azo) was evaluated in the polyiodide electrolyte at 40 mW cm-2 light illumination intensity. The photovoltaic characteristics show a fill factor of 0.24 and solar conversion efficiency value of 0.032 % for a TiO2 thickness of 0.96 µm as compared to efficiency of 0.014 % for rose Bengal of the same thickness.