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Sample records for chemical reporter cr

  1. First-Principles Calculations for Chemical Reaction between Sodium Diethyldithiocarbamate and Transition-Metal (Cr) atom to Produce Cr(DDC)3 and Cr(DDC)2ODDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiyanto, Henry; Muhida, Rifki; Kishi, Tomoya; Rempillo, Ofelia; Rahman, Mahmudur; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno; Di\\ {n}o, Wilson Agerico; Matsumoto, Shigeno; Kasai, Hideaki

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the chemical reaction between a Cr transition-metal atom and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC), a complexing agent used to detect and extract Cr in human blood samples. Using density-functional-theory-based calculations, we determine their stable structures of Cr(DDC)2ODDC and Cr(DDC)3 complexes and obtain their dissociation energies. We found dissociation energies of -10.66 and -3.24 eV for Cr(DDC)2ODDC and Cr(DDC)3 complexes, respectively. Hence, on the basis of dissociation energies, we have verified that the reaction of NaDDC with Cr produces Cr(DDC)2ODDC as a major product.

  2. Chemical analysis report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbouzidi, Saliha; Elyahyaoui, Adil; Ghassan, Acil; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report highlights the results of chemical analyzes related to Major elements, traces and heavy metals carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 120 samples. The report presents the analytical techniques used (parameters and methods), a legend and the results tables.

  3. Chemical analysis report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This report highlights the results of chemical analyzes of fluorides, bromides, lithium and boron carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 120 samples. The report presents the analytical techniques used (parameters and methods), a legend and the results tables.

  4. Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Chemicals Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the chemical manufacturing, processing, and use information collected for the 2012 Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule. Users do not have access to the complete CDR data set and should draw conclusions with care.

  5. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K K; Wielandt, D; Schiller, M; Bizzarro, M

    2016-04-22

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr(3+), CrCl(2+) and CrCl2(+)) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr(3+), intermediates in CrCl(2+) and the lightest in CrCl2(+)/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr (in the form of Cr(3+)) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected (53)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(53)Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and (54)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(54)Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr(3+) by >5 days exposure to HNO3H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >∼98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a

  6. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DIVISION SUMMARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawroski, S.; Vogel, R. C.; Levenson, Milton; Munnecke, V. H.

    1963-07-01

    Work reported includes: Chemical-Metallurgical Processing; Fuel Cycle Applications of Volatility and Fluidization Techniques; Calorimetry; Reactor Safety; Energy Conversion; and Determination of Nuclear Constants.

  7. Cr2O3 thin films grown at room temperature by low pressure laser chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, P.M.; Silvestre, A.J.; Conde, O.

    2011-01-01

    Chromia (Cr 2 O 3 ) has been extensively explored for the purpose of developing widespread industrial applications, owing to the convergence of a variety of mechanical, physical and chemical properties in one single oxide material. Various methods have been used for large area synthesis of Cr 2 O 3 films. However, for selective area growth and growth on thermally sensitive materials, laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LCVD) can be applied advantageously. Here we report on the growth of single layers of pure Cr 2 O 3 onto sapphire substrates at room temperature by low pressure photolytic LCVD, using UV laser radiation and Cr(CO) 6 as chromium precursor. The feasibility of the LCVD technique to access selective area deposition of chromia thin films is demonstrated. Best results were obtained for a laser fluence of 120 mJ cm -2 and a partial pressure ratio of O 2 to Cr(CO) 6 of 1.0. Samples grown with these experimental parameters are polycrystalline and their microstructure is characterised by a high density of particles whose size follows a lognormal distribution. Deposition rates of 0.1 nm s -1 and mean particle sizes of 1.85 μm were measured for these films.

  8. Distinct effects of Cr bulk doping and surface deposition on the chemical environment and electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Turgut, E-mail: yilmaz@phys.uconn.edu [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Hines, William [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Sun, Fu-Chang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Pletikosić, Ivo [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Budnick, Joseph [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Valla, Tonica [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Sinkovic, Boris [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Cr doping into the bulk of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} opens an energy gap at the Dirac point which is observable in the non-magnetic state. • Cr surface deposition does not lead to open an energy gap at the Dirac point of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. • Formation of two distinct Bi and Cr core level peaks was observed upon the deposition of Cr on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. - Abstract: In this report, it is shown that Cr doped into the bulk and Cr deposited on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films produced by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have strikingly different effects on both the electronic structure and chemical environment. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) shows that Cr doped into the bulk opens a surface state energy gap which can be seen at room temperature; much higher than the measured ferromagnetic transition temperature of ≈10 K. On the other hand, similar ARPES measurements show that the surface states remain gapless down to 15 K for films with Cr surface deposition. In addition, core-level photoemission spectroscopy of the Bi 5d, Se 3d, and Cr 3p core levels show distinct differences in the chemical environment for the two methods of Cr introduction. Surface deposition of Cr results in the formation of shoulders on the lower binding energy side for the Bi 5d peaks and two distinct Cr 3p peaks indicative of two Cr sites. These striking differences suggests an interesting possibility that better control of doping at only near surface region may offer a path to quantum anomalous Hall states at higher temperatures than reported in the literature.

  9. Chemical Data Reporting rule (CDR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains information on chemicals that company's produce domestically or import into the United States during the principal reporting year. For the 2012...

  10. Microstructure Evolution and Chemical Analysis on Carbon Steels and Fe-Cr-Mo Alloys after FAC Simulation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Taeho; Lee, Yun Ju; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is an environment assisted degradation of structural materials, which usually occurs in pipelines of power plants. There have been many studies to investigate the fundamental mechanism and corresponding countermeasures against FAC, and recently the carbon steels have been replaced by ASTM A 335 P22, which contains approximately 2.2 wt.% of Cr and 1 wt.% of Mo. By enhancing passivity of P22 by Cr, it is reported that FAC rate has been greatly reduced. However, while corrosion behavior of Fe-based alloys is relatively well known, their behavior under high-temperature flowing water is not well investigated. In other words, effects of Cr and its corrosion and oxidation behavior is not clearly revealed. Furthermore, it is known that Mo enhances the pitting corrosion resistance of alloys however its mechanism is not clearly investigated. Recently, replacement of Mo in alloy contents has been widely studied because of the cost of Mo. Carbon steels undergo severe environmental-assisted degradation behavior so called FAC, and as its countermeasure the carbon steel has been replaced by P22 which contains Cr and Mo. It is generally known that Cr and Mo enhances passivity of Fe-based alloys however their corrosion and oxidation behavior has not been fully investigated especially in high-temperature flowing water environments. In this study, we employed HRTEM and synchrotron XAS techniques in order to investigate detailed microstructure evolution and chemical bonding of the commercialized carbon steel and the Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. From the analysis, it is found that while carbon steels exhibit porous oxide P22 exhibit oxide structures with thin Cr-rich oxide and spinel. Therefore, carbon steel undergoes severe FAC compared to P22 however effects of Cr and Mo and their behavior in high-temperature flowing water will be investigated.

  11. Chromium Extraction via Chemical Processing of Fe-Cr Alloys Fine Powder with High Carbon Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, D. M.; Navarro, R. C. S.; Souza, R. F. M.; Brocchi, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Ferrous alloys are important raw materials for special steel production. In this context, alloys from the Fe-Cr system, with typical Cr weight fraction ranging from 0.45 to 0.95, are prominent, particularly for the stainless steel industry. During the process in which these alloys are obtained, there is considerable production of fine powder, which could be reused after suitable chemical treatment, for example, through coupling pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical processes. In the present study, the extraction of chromium from fine powder generated during the production of a Fe-Cr alloy with high C content was investigated. Roasting reactions were performed at 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C) with 300 pct (w/w) excess NaOH in an oxidizing atmosphere (air), followed by solubilization in deionized water, selective precipitation, and subsequent calcination at 1173 K (900 °C) in order to convert the obtained chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3. The maximum achieved Cr recovery was around 86 pct, suggesting that the proposed chemical route was satisfactory regarding the extraction of the chromium initially present. Moreover, after X-ray diffraction analysis, the final produced oxide has proven to be pure Cr2O3 with a mean crystallite size of 200 nm.

  12. Influence of chemical composition in crystallographic texture Fe-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, L.B.; Guimaraes, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    The use of steels with higher contents of Mo in the oil industry has been an alternative to reduce the effect of naphthenic corrosion in refining units. The addition of Mo in Fe-Cr alloys in the same manner that increases resistance to corrosion naphthenic causes some difficulties such as difficulty of forming, welding and embrittlement. In this work, experimental ingots of Fe-Cr-Mo alloys (Cr - 9, 15 and 17%, Mo - 5, 7 and 9%) were melted in vacuum induction furnace and hot and cold rolled in a laboratory rolling mill. The influence of chemical composition on crystallographic texture of samples subjected to the same thermo-mechanical treatment was analyzed by x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that fiber (111) becomes more intense with increasing Mo and/or Cr contents. (author)

  13. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 6. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. D Joseph A K Yadav S N Jha D Bhattacharyya. Volume 36 Issue 6 November 2013 pp ...

  14. Chemical effect on total mass attenuation coefficients of V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeguet, Oe.; Colak, S.; Bueyuekkasap, E.; Kuecuekoender, A.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed interpretation of data obtained from X-ray transmission measurements usually depends on the assumption that the contribution of each element is additive. This assumption yields the mixture rule for X-ray attenuation coefficients which is valid if molecular and chemical effects are negligible. Total mass attenuation coefficients of V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni in various their compounds was measured. Absorption corrections were carried on data for ligands in the compounds. It was found that V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni had different total mass attenuation coefficients in the different compounds. Results were compared with theoretical values of HUBBELL and SELTZER. (author)

  15. Characteristics of neutron-irradiated CR-39 foils treated by sequential chemical and electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.; Dajko, G.; Turek, K.; Spurny, F.

    1982-01-01

    The density of background spots revealed by chemical (CE) and electrochemical (ECE) etching and by their sequential application (CE + ECE) has been measured in several sorts of CR-39 material. The trends in the variation of sensitivity to Am-Be neutrons have been determined in CR-39 sheets covered by thick proton-radiator, when changing the field strength, frequency, etchant concentration, pre-etch duration and the fluence of neutrons. The results are analyzed in order to find out an optimum set of experimental parameters which may be proposed to attain high registration sensitivity to neutrons. (author)

  16. Chemical diffusion of Cr, Ni and Si in welded joints. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Ciha, K.

    1987-01-01

    The results are given of a study in chemical diffusion in welded joints P2/A and P3/A. P2 stands for the steel (Fe-17.48 Cr-8.15 Ni-0.14 Si), P3 for (Fe-18.52 Cr-8.20 Ni-1.78 Si) and A for the Fe-Arema. Triadic sandwiche-like samples were diffusion heated at temperatures from 920 to 1170 degC. The concentration distributions N(x,t) of the given elements were measured with microprobe JXA-3A. The evaluation of the experimental data was carried out either by Grube's method, or in some cases by the spline-polynomial method. The evaluated diffusivities D-bar satisfy the Arrhenius relation and yield the standard diffusion characteristics D 0 and H. The diffusivities D-bar of Cr, Ni and Si in P1/A, in P2/A and P3/A welded joints vary with Si content in P1, P2 and P3 alloys, similar to the Cr-51 and Ni-63 self-diffusivities in Fe-18 Cr-12 Ni-X Si steels, and tend to increase with increasing Si content. The values D-bar measured in the vicinity of grain boundaries are higher than the bulk diffusion coefficients. The most rapid diffusant is Si and the slowest one Ni. Thus, the relations D-bar Si :D-bar Cr :D-bar Ni ≅ 6:3:1 (P3/A) and D-bar Si :D-bar Cr :D-bar Ni ≅ 1.7:1.4:1 (P3/A) are valid at 1050 degC. Comparing the results with those published if can be noted that the Cr-51 and Ni-63 self-diffusion in Fe-18 Cr-12 Ni-X Si steels is faster than chemical diffusion of these elements in the said steel welded joints P2/A and P3/A; X varies from 0.14 to 1.98. (author). 7 tabs., 7 figs., 20 refs

  17. Biological and chemical removal of Cr(VI) from waste water: cost and benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Aynur; Arisoy, Münevver

    2007-08-17

    The objective of the present study is cost and benefit analysis of biological and chemical removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] ions. Cost and benefit analysis were done with refer to two separate studies on removal of Cr(VI), one of heavy metals with a crucial role concerning increase in environmental pollution and disturbance of ecological balance, through biological adsorption and chemical ion-exchange. Methods of biological and chemical removal were compared with regard to their cost and percentage in chrome removal. According to the result of the comparison, cost per unit in chemical removal was calculated 0.24 euros and the ratio of chrome removal was 99.68%, whereas those of biological removal were 0.14 and 59.3% euros. Therefore, it was seen that cost per unit in chemical removal and chrome removal ratio were higher than those of biological removal method. In the current study where chrome removal is seen as immeasurable benefit in terms of human health and the environment, percentages of chrome removal were taken as measurable benefit and cost per unit of the chemicals as measurable cost.

  18. Influence of chemical composition in crystallographic texture Fe-Cr-Mo alloys; Influencia da composicao quimica na textura cristalografica de ligas Fe-Cr-Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, L.B.; Guimaraes, R.F. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. da Industria; Abreu, H.F.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The use of steels with higher contents of Mo in the oil industry has been an alternative to reduce the effect of naphthenic corrosion in refining units. The addition of Mo in Fe-Cr alloys in the same manner that increases resistance to corrosion naphthenic causes some difficulties such as difficulty of forming, welding and embrittlement. In this work, experimental ingots of Fe-Cr-Mo alloys (Cr - 9, 15 and 17%, Mo - 5, 7 and 9%) were melted in vacuum induction furnace and hot and cold rolled in a laboratory rolling mill. The influence of chemical composition on crystallographic texture of samples subjected to the same thermo-mechanical treatment was analyzed by x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that fiber (111) becomes more intense with increasing Mo and/or Cr contents. (author)

  19. Cr(VI) adsorption from electroplating plating wastewater by chemically modified coir pith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksabye, Parinda; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2012-07-15

    Coir pith samples were chemically modified by grafting with acrylic acid for the removal of Cr(VI) from electroplating wastewater. The presence of acrylic acid on the coir pith surface was verified by a scanning electron microscope with an electron dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TG). The carbonyl groups (C==O) from the carboxylic acids (COOH) increased on the coir pith surface after grafting with acrylic acid. In addition, the thermal stability of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith also improved. The optimum conditions for grafting the acrylic acid on the coir pith consisted of 2 M acrylic acid and 0.00125 M ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN, as an initiator). The maximum Cr(VI) removal (99.99 ± 0.07%) was obtained with the following conditions: a 1.3% (w/v) dosage of acrylic acid-grafted coir pith, a system pH of 2, a contact time of 22 h, a temperature of 30 °C, a particle size of <150 μm and an initial Cr(VI) of 1,171 mg l(-1). At system pH of 2, Cr(VI) in the HCrO(4)(-) form can be adsorbed with acrylic acid-grafted coir pith via an electrostatic attraction. The adsorption isotherm of 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith exhibited a good fit with the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of the 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was 196.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent, whereas for coir pith without grafting, the maximum Cr(VI) removal was 165.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent. The adsorption capacity of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith for Cr(VI) was higher compared to the original coir pith. This result was due to the enhancement of the carbonyl groups on the coir pith surface that may have involved the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The X-ray absorption near edged structure (XANES) and desorption studies suggested that most of the Cr(III) that presented on the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was due to the Cr(VI) being reduced to Cr(III) on the adsorbent surface. FTIR

  20. Chemical and Morphological Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered at Different Bias Voltages Cr-Al-C Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei Obrosov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available MAX phases (M = transition metal, A = A-group element, and X = C/N are of special interest because they possess a unique combination of the advantages of both metals and ceramics. Most attention is attracted to the ternary carbide Cr2AlC because of its excellent high-temperature oxidation, as well as hot corrosion resistance. Despite lots of publications, up to now the influence of bias voltage on the chemical bonding structure, surface morphology, and mechanical properties of the film is still not well understood. In the current study, Cr-Al-C films were deposited on silicon wafers (100 and Inconel 718 super alloy by dc magnetron sputtering with different substrate bias voltages and investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, and nanoindentation. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM was used to analyze the correlation between the growth of the films and the coating microstructure. The XPS results confirm the presence of Cr2AlC MAX phase due to a negative shift of 0.6–0.9 eV of the Al2p to pure aluminum carbide peak. The XRD results reveal the presence of Cr2AlC MAX Phase and carbide phases, as well as intermetallic AlCr2. The film thickness decreases from 8.95 to 6.98 µm with increasing bias voltage. The coatings deposited at 90 V exhibit the lowest roughness (33 nm and granular size (76 nm combined with the highest hardness (15.9 GPa. The ratio of Al carbide to carbide-like carbon state changes from 0.12 to 0.22 and correlates with the mechanical properties of the coatings. TEM confirms the columnar structure, with a nanocrystalline substructure, of the films.

  1. Development of Cr Electroplated Cladding Tube for preventing Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Woo, Je Woong; Kim, Sung Ho; Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Byung Oon; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Metal fuel has been selected as a candidate fuel in the SFR because of its superior thermal conductivity as well as enhanced proliferation resistance in connection with the pyroprocessing. However, metal fuel suffers eutectic reaction (Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction, FCCI) with the fuel cladding made of stainless steel at reactor operating temperature so that cladding thickness gradually reduces to endanger reactor safety. In order to mitigate FCCI, barrier concept has been proposed between the fuel and the cladding in designing fuel rod. Regarding this, KAERI has initiated barrier cladding development to prevent interdiffusion process as well as enhance the SFR fuel performance. Previous study revealed that Cr electroplating has been selected as one of the most promising options because of its technical and economic viability. This paper describes the development status of the Cr electroplating technology for the usage of fuel rod in SFR. This paper summarizes the status of Cr electroplating technology to prevent FCCI in metal fuel rod. It has been selected for the ease of practical application at the tube inner surface. Technical scoping, performance evaluation and optimization have been carried out. Application to the tube inner surface and in-pile test were conducted which revealed as effective.

  2. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films grown at room temperature by low pressure laser chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, P.M. [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica and ICEMS, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Silvestre, A.J., E-mail: asilvestre@deq.isel.ipl.p [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa and ICEMS, R. Conselheiro Emidio Navarro 1, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Conde, O. [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica and ICEMS, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-03-31

    Chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been extensively explored for the purpose of developing widespread industrial applications, owing to the convergence of a variety of mechanical, physical and chemical properties in one single oxide material. Various methods have been used for large area synthesis of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. However, for selective area growth and growth on thermally sensitive materials, laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LCVD) can be applied advantageously. Here we report on the growth of single layers of pure Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} onto sapphire substrates at room temperature by low pressure photolytic LCVD, using UV laser radiation and Cr(CO){sub 6} as chromium precursor. The feasibility of the LCVD technique to access selective area deposition of chromia thin films is demonstrated. Best results were obtained for a laser fluence of 120 mJ cm{sup -2} and a partial pressure ratio of O{sub 2} to Cr(CO){sub 6} of 1.0. Samples grown with these experimental parameters are polycrystalline and their microstructure is characterised by a high density of particles whose size follows a lognormal distribution. Deposition rates of 0.1 nm s{sup -1} and mean particle sizes of 1.85 {mu}m were measured for these films.

  3. STUDYING THE STRUCTURAL, OPTICAL, CHEMICAL AND ELECTROCHEMICAL ETCHING CHANGES OF CR-39 FOR DOSEMETRIC APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M F; Elshaer, Y H; Taha, Doaa H

    2017-12-01

    The present work shows the induced modification of the structural, optical, chemical etching and electrochemical etching parameters of CR-39 irradiated with alpha-particles. CR-39 polymer track detectors were irradiated with different fluences (1.62 × 106, 2.72 × 106, 3.82 × 106 and 5.21 × 106 particles/cm2) of alpha-particles using 241Am source. The structural and optical properties were measured by FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and UV/Vis spectroscopy, respectively. The FT-IR spectra reveal that no major changes in the typical functional groups of irradiated polymer detectors. The X-ray diffraction patterns show that a broad band in the region of 12° 27°, which refers to the presence of the combination of amorphous and crystalline phases. UV/Vis responses of irradiated polymer track detectors exhibit a single absorption band in the range of 254-352 nm that is correlated to the occurrence of electronic transition. Also, the changes in the chemical and electrochemical parameters due to alpha-irradiation are examined and thoroughly discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  5. Chemical sciences, annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of eleven research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a DOE National Laboratory. In FY 1993, the Division made considerable progress on developing two end-stations and a beamline to advance combustion dynamics at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). In support of DOE's national role in combustion research and chemical science, the beamline effort will enable researchers from around the world to make fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients, and in understanding the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. The Division has continued to place a strong emphasis on full compliance with environmental health and safety guidelines and regulations and has made progress in technology transfer to industry. Finally, the Division has begun a new program in advanced battery research and development that should help strengthen industrial competitiveness both at home and abroad

  6. Chemical sciences, annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of eleven research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a DOE National Laboratory. In FY 1993, the Division made considerable progress on developing two end-stations and a beamline to advance combustion dynamics at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). In support of DOE`s national role in combustion research and chemical science, the beamline effort will enable researchers from around the world to make fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients, and in understanding the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. The Division has continued to place a strong emphasis on full compliance with environmental health and safety guidelines and regulations and has made progress in technology transfer to industry. Finally, the Division has begun a new program in advanced battery research and development that should help strengthen industrial competitiveness both at home and abroad.

  7. Effect of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding characterization between porcelain and metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-H; Lin, M-C; Lee, T-H; Yang, H-W; Chen, F-L; Wu, S-C; Hsu, C-C

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding behaviour between porcelain and metal. A three-point bending test was used to measure the fracture load of alloy after porcelain firing. A scanning electron microscope, accompanied by an energy dispersion spectrometer, was used to analyse the morphology and chemical composition of the fracture surface. An X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and glow discharge spectrometer were used to identify the structure and cross-sectional chemical composition, respectively, of oxide layers on Ni-Cr alloys after heat treatment at 990 degrees C for 5 min. Results showed that the oxide layers formed on all Ni-Cr alloys contained mainly Cr2O3, NiO, and trace MoO3. The Ni-Cr alloy with a higher Cr content had a thicker oxide layer, as well as a weaker bonding behaviour of porcelain/metal interface. The presence of Al (as Al2O3) and Be (as BeO) on the oxide layer suppressed the growth of the oxide layer, leading to a better porcelain/metal bonding behaviour. However, the presence of a small amount of Ti (as TiO2) on the oxide layer did not have any influence on the bonding behaviour. The fracture propagated along the interface between the opaque porcelain and metal, and exhibited an adhesive type of fracture morphology.

  8. The influence of chemical etching time on efficiency of radon detection using CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reway, Adriana P.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Narloch, Danielle C.; Del Claro, Flavia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.

    2015-01-01

    Natural radiation is the principal source of human exposure to ionizing radiation. Radon is noble radioactive gas that emanates from the soil and rocks entering the atmosphere of dwellings where it could be accumulated. The inhalation of 222 Rn represents a significant health risk. Solid-State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) represents an efficient method for alpha particle detection and measurements of the activity concentration of 222 Rn. The aim of present work was to study the etching time impact on CR-39 efficiency in radon activity measurements. The investigation was performed using 80 CR-39 detectors, which were exposed to a source of radon. After the exposition, alpha particle tracks development was achieved by chemical etching using 6.25M NaOH solution and ethanol (2%) at 70°C. Etching alpha particle tracks were identified and counted manually using the optical microscope with magnification of 100x and glass overlay mask. The etching time ranged from 7 to 14 hours. The results show that there is an increase in the number of visible tracks with increased etching time. The number of traces obtained for 7 hours and 8 hours of revelation was 1430 +/- 90 and 2090 +/- 160, respectively. However, for etching time of 13 and 14 hours was not observed statistical increase in the number of visible tracks. The number of tracks in this situation was 3630 +/- 180 and 3870 +/- 160 to 13 and 14 hours etching. Thus, for assumed etching parameters, the etching optimal time was observed 14 hours. (author)

  9. Adsorption of Cr(VI and Speciation of Cr(VI and Cr(III in Aqueous Solutions Using Chemically Modified Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChunYuan Tao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new type of grafting chitosan (CTS was synthesized using 2-hydroxyethyl- trimethyl ammonium chloride (HGCTS. The adsorption of Cr(VI on HGCTS was studied. The effect factors on adsorption and the adsorption mechanism were considered. The results indicated that the HGCTS could concentrate and separate Cr(VI at pH 4.0; the adsorption equilibrium time was 80 min; the maximum adsorption capacity was 205 mg/g. The adsorption isotherm and kinetics were investigated, equilibrium data agreed very well with the Langmuir model and the pseudo second-order model could describe the adsorption process better than the pseudo first-order model. A novel method for speciation of Cr(VI and Cr(III in environmental water samples has been developed using HGCTS as adsorbent and FAAS as determination means. The detection limit of this method was 20 ng/L, the relatively standard deviation was 1.2% and the recovery was 99%~105%.

  10. Characterization of Cr2O3 thin films obtained by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillis, M.F.; Galego, E.; Serna, M.M.; Correa, O.V.; Ramanathan, L.V.; Franco, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work was the synthesis and characterization of Cr 2 O 3 thin films, obtained by chemical vapor deposition, using chromium acetylacetonate as chromium precursor. The growth of the films was carried out in a conventional horizontal MOCVD equipment, under pressures varying from 2 to 10 mbar, and temperature of 600 deg C. It was observed that the growth of the films only occurs when oxygen is present in the atmosphere. Under growth pressures of 2 and 5 mbar the growth takes place but under 10 mbar of pressure the precursor is dragged and the growth does not occur. The characterization of the films was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The films presented a columnar structure, and thickness varying from 40 to 250 nm. The influence of some process parameters is discussed. (author)

  11. Development of the 5-HT2CR-Tango System Combined with an EGFP Reporter Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Aoki, Miku; Taguchi, Katsutoshi; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor implicated in emotion, feeding, reward, and cognition. 5-HT2CRs are pharmacological targets for mental disorders and metabolic and reward system abnormalities, as alterations in 5-HT2CR expression, RNA editing, and SNPs are involved in these disturbances. To date, 5-HT2CR activity has mainly been measured by quantifying inositol phosphate production and intracellular Ca(2+) release, but these assays are not suitable for in vivo analysis. Here, we developed a 5-HT2CR-Tango assay system, a novel analysis tool of 5-HT2CR activity based on the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-arrestin interaction. With desensitization of activated 5-HT2CR by arrestin, this system converts the 5-HT2CR-arrestin interaction into EGFP reporter gene signal via the LexA transcriptional activation system. For validation of our system, we measured activity of two 5-HT2CR RNA-editing isoforms (INI and VGV) in HEK293 cells transfected with EGFP reporter gene. The INI isoform displayed both higher basal- and 5-HT-stimulated activities than the VGV isoform. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of 5-HT2CR antagonist SB242084 was also detected by 5-HT2CR-Tango system. This novel tool is useful for in vitro high-throughput targeted 5-HT2CR drug screening and can be applied to future in vivo brain function studies associated with 5-HT2CRs in transgenic animal models.

  12. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This report marks the culmination of a 4-month review conducted to identify chemical safety vulnerabilities existing at DOE facilities. This review is an integral part of DOE's efforts to raise its commitment to chemical safety to the same level as that for nuclear safety.

  13. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J. F.; Johnson, W. E.; Reinker, P. H.; Warren, J. H.; McCullugh, R. W.; Harmon, M. K.; Gartin, W. J.; LaFollette, T. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Frank, W. S.; Grim, K. G.; Warren, J. H.

    1963-11-21

    This report, for October 1963 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and safety and security.

  14. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-07-22

    This report for June 1958, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  15. Chemical Processing Division monthly report, November 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, P.E.

    1966-12-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for November 1966, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee-relations, and waste management.

  16. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, March 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-04-21

    This report for March 1961, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  17. Chemical Processing Division monthly report, January 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, P.E.

    1966-02-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for January 1966, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  18. EPA Linked Open Data: Chemical Data Reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This resource consists of the Chemical Data Reporting database that supports the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976, which provides EPA with authority to...

  19. The influence of chemical etching time on efficiency of radon detection using CR-39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reway, Adriana P.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Narloch, Danielle C., E-mail: adrireway@hotmail.com, E-mail: jaquelinekappke@gmail.com, E-mail: daninarloch@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento Academico de Fisica; Del Claro, Flavia; Paschuk, Sergei A., E-mail: flaviadelclaro@gmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduaca em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial; Correa, Janine N., E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento Academico de Construcao Civil

    2015-07-01

    Natural radiation is the principal source of human exposure to ionizing radiation. Radon is noble radioactive gas that emanates from the soil and rocks entering the atmosphere of dwellings where it could be accumulated. The inhalation of {sup 222}Rn represents a significant health risk. Solid-State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) represents an efficient method for alpha particle detection and measurements of the activity concentration of {sup 222}Rn. The aim of present work was to study the etching time impact on CR-39 efficiency in radon activity measurements. The investigation was performed using 80 CR-39 detectors, which were exposed to a source of radon. After the exposition, alpha particle tracks development was achieved by chemical etching using 6.25M NaOH solution and ethanol (2%) at 70°C. Etching alpha particle tracks were identified and counted manually using the optical microscope with magnification of 100x and glass overlay mask. The etching time ranged from 7 to 14 hours. The results show that there is an increase in the number of visible tracks with increased etching time. The number of traces obtained for 7 hours and 8 hours of revelation was 1430 +/- 90 and 2090 +/- 160, respectively. However, for etching time of 13 and 14 hours was not observed statistical increase in the number of visible tracks. The number of tracks in this situation was 3630 +/- 180 and 3870 +/- 160 to 13 and 14 hours etching. Thus, for assumed etching parameters, the etching optimal time was observed 14 hours. (author)

  20. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences)

  1. Status Report on Irradiation Capsules Designed to Evaluate FeCrAl-UO2 Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-24

    This status report provides the background and current status of a series of irradiation capsules that were designed and are being built to test the interactions between candidate FeCrAl cladding for enhanced accident tolerant applications and prototypical enriched commercial UO2 fuel in a neutron radiation environment. These capsules will test the degree, if any, of fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between FeCrAl and UO2. The capsules are to be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory to burn-ups of 10, 30, and 50 GWd/MT with a nominal target temperature at the interfaces between the pellets and clad of 350°C.

  2. Chemical & Material Risk Management Initiatives: Reach & Cr6+ Strategies (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Definition Acquisition, Technology and Logistics 17 DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy Non‐ Chrome  Primer Acquisition, Technology and...Logistics 18 Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) - Some Facts • Cr6+ compounds are wonderful corrosion inhibitors • Cr6+ compounds are highly toxic – We’ve learned...and Logistics 21 DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Policy Acquisition, Technology and Logistics 22 Myth-busters • The DoD policy does not ban the

  3. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Reporting Manufactured Chemical Substances from Metal Mining and Related Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides guidance on the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule requirements related to the reporting of mined metals, intermediates, and byproducts manufactured during metal mining and related activities.

  4. Determination of chemical activities of Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn in stainless steel 316 by Knudsen effusion cell mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.; Kulkarni, S.G.; Subbanna, C.S.; Sood, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    Cold-worked austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 316 is being used as the cladding and wrapper materials in fast reactor fuel pins. Knowledge of the thermodynamic activities of the steel constituents is necessary to predict the possibility of fuel-cladding, coolant-cladding or fission product-cladding chemical reactions. The thermodynamic activities of Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn for stainless steel 316 were determined by measuring their partial pressures in the temperature range 1293-2120 K, using Knudsen effusion cell mass spectrometry. High purity Ag was used as an internal calibrant. The chemical activities of Fe (a Fe ), Cr (a Cr ), Ni (a Ni ) and Mn (a Mn ) were evaluated using literature data for the vapour pressures of pure metals. log a Fe ±0.18=-1.586+2074/T (T=1293-1872 K)log a Cr ±0.30=-2.350+2612/T (T=1293-2120 K)log a Ni ±0.20=-2.140+1794/T (T=1468-1974 K)log a Mn ±0.23=-2.041-5478/T (T=1302-1894 K) ((orig.))

  5. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  6. In-situ TEM visualization of vacancy injection and chemical partition during oxidation of Ni-Cr nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong-Min; Genc, Arda; Cheng, Huikai; Pullan, Lee; Baer, Donald R; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2014-01-14

    Oxidation of alloy often involves chemical partition and injection of vacancies. Chemical partition is the consequence of selective oxidation, while injection of vacancies is associated with the differences of diffusivity of cations and anions. It is far from clear as how the injected vacancies behave during oxidation of metal. Using in-situ transmission electron microscopy, we captured unprecedented details on the collective behavior of injected vacancies during oxidation of metal, featuring an initial multi-site oxide nucleation, vacancy supersaturation, nucleation of a single cavity, sinking of vacancies into the cavity and accelerated oxidation of the particle. High sensitive energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping reveals that Cr is preferentially oxidized even at the initial oxidation, leading to a structure that Cr oxide is sandwiched near the inner wall of the hollow particle. The work provides a general guidance on tailoring of nanostructured materials involving multi-ion exchange such as core-shell structured composite nanoparticles.

  7. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides guidance on classifying articles under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and determining the applicability of EPA’s articles exclusion policy for purposes of the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule. The primary goal of this document is to help the regulated community comply with the requirements of the CDR rule.

  8. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, May 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-06-21

    The May, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.(MB)

  9. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-10-22

    The September, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.

  10. Studies of biocompatibility of chemically etched CR-39 SSNTDs in view of their applications in alpha-particle radiobiological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.Y.; Chan, K.F.; Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F.; Yu, K.N.

    2006-01-01

    Alpha-particle radiobiological experiments involve irradiating cells with alpha particles and require thin biocompatible materials which can record alpha-particle traversals as substrates for cell cultures. The biocompatibilities of chemically etched CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) using aqueous NaOH or NaOH/ehtanol are studied through the abundance and morphology of the cultured HeLa cells. The wetting properties of these etched CR-39 SSNTDs are also studied. The moderately hydrophobic CR-39 SSNTDs as well as the hydrophobic NaOH/ethanol-etched CR-39 SSNTDs are more biocompatible than the hydrophilic aqueous-NaOH-etched SSNTDs. Too small water contact angles, too large surface energy (γ s ) or the polar component γ s p do not favor the cell culture. On the other hand, the dispersive component γ s d of the surface energy and the ratio γ s p /γ s d do not seem to significantly affect the biocompatibility

  11. Influence of the chemical composition of rapidly quenched amorphous alloys (Ni, Fe, Cr)-B-Si on its crystallization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmanov, G.; Dzhumaev, P.; Ivanitskaya, E.; Skrytnyi, V.; Ruslanov, A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results of research of the structure and phase transformations during the multistage crystallization of the metallic glasses with the compositions Ni71,5Cr6,8Fe2,7B11,9Si7,1 and Ni63,4Cr7,4Fe4,3Mn0,8B15,6Si8,5 labeled as AWS BNi-2 according to American Welding Society. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) were used as experimental research methods. The influence of the alloys chemical composition (boron, manganese and iron) on the temperatures and the exothermic heat effects of phase transformations, as well as on the phase composition of alloys at three stages of crystallization was analyzed. We present a thermodynamic explanation of the observed heat effects. It has been shown that manganese has the main influence on the phase transformations temperatures and heat effects in these two alloys. It is also assumed that at the final crystallization stage simultaneously with the formation of phases Ni3B and β1-Ni3Si should occur the nucleation of borides of CrB type with high Cr and low Si content.

  12. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  13. Chemical and structural effects of phosphorus on the corrosion behavior of ion beam mixed Fe-Cr-P alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaree, J.D.; Was, G.S.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to determine the mechanisms by which phosphorus affects the corrosion and passivation behavior of Fe-Cr-P alloys. To identify separately the effects of structure and chemistry on the corrosion behavior, thin films of Fe-10Cr-xP (0≤x≤35 at.%) were prepared by ion beam mixing. Films with a phosphorus content greater than approximately 20at.% were found to be entirely amorphous. Devitrification of the amorphous phase was accomplished by heating the samples to 450degC in an inert environment. Standard polarization tests of the sulfuric acid (with and without Cl - ) indicated that the films containing phosphorus were more corrosion resistant than Fe-10Cr, at both active and passive potentials. There was a monotonic relationship between the amount of phosphorus in the alloy and the corrosion resistance, with the open-circuit corrosion rate of Fe-10Cr-35P nearly four orders of magnitude lower than that of Fe-10Cr. Devitrification of the alloys had no significant effect on the corrosion rate, indicating that the primary effect of phosphorus is chemical in nature, and not structural. The passive oxides were depth-profiled using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated that phosphorus was a primary constituent, as phosphate. The presence of phosphate in the passive oxides reduced the overall corrosion rate directly, by suppressing anodic dissolution. The presence of phosphorus did enhance chromium enrichment in the oxide, but that was not thought to be the primary mechanism by which phosphorus increased the corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  14. Effects of high neutron doses and duration of the chemical etching on the optical properties of CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, G.S.; Tripathy, S.P.; Paul, S.; Sharma, S.C.; Joshi, D.S.; Gupta, A.K.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the duration of chemical etching on the transmittance, absorbance and optical band gap width of the CR-39 (Polyallyl diglycol carbonate) detectors irradiated to high neutron doses (12.7, 22.1, 36.0 and 43.5 Sv) were studied. The neutrons were produced by bombardment of a thick Be target with 12 MeV protons of different fluences. The unirradiated and neutron-irradiated CR-39 detectors were subjected to a stepwise chemical etching at 1 h intervals. After each step, the transmission spectra of the detectors were recorded in the range from 200 to 900 nm, and the absorbances and optical band gap widths were determined. The effect of the etching on the light transmittance of unirradiated detectors was insignificant, whereas it was very significant in the case of the irradiated detectors. The dependence of the optical absorbance on the neutron dose is linear at short etching periods, but exponential at longer ones. The optical band gap narrows with increasing etching time. It is more significant for the irradiated dosimeters than for the unirradiated ones. The rate of the narrowing of the optical band gap with increasing neutron dose increases with increasing duration of the etching. - Highlights: • The variation of optical properties of CR-39 at very high neutron dose is analyzed. Etching process is found to play a crucial role for change in optical properties of neutron-irradiated CR-39. • The optical absorbance varies linearly at lower dose, at very high dose absorbance saturation occurs. The dose at which saturation absorbance is observed shifts towards lower neutron dose with increase in etching time. • The rate of decrease in optical band gap with respect to neutron dose is found to be more at higher etching durations

  15. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Imported Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides guidance and sample reporting scenarios on the reporting exemption for the import of a chemical substance as part of an article, for purposes of the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule.

  16. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    particularly on Mn and Cr compounds (Ghatikar et al 1977;. Padalia and Nayak 1977; ... conventional X-ray sources and hence may lack reliability. 2. Experimental ..... with the result obtained by Hinge et al (2011) for Cu com- pounds and is ... Chem. 84 2200. Nietubyc R, Sobczak E and Attenkofer K E 2001 J. Alloys Compd.

  17. Corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. Chemical composition and metallurgical condition's effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadorozne, N.S.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2009-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys offer an outstanding corrosion resistance in a wide variety of highly-corrosive environments. This versatility is due to the excellent performance of nickel in hot alkaline solutions and the beneficial effect of chromium and molybdenum in oxidizing and reducing conditions, respectively. Alloy C-22 (22 % Cr-13 % Mo-3% W) is a well known versatile member of this family. Due to its excellent corrosion resistance in a wide variety of environments, Alloy C-22 has been selected for the fabrication of the corrosion-resistant outer shell of the high-level nuclear waste container. The increasing demand of the industry for corrosion resistant alloys with particular properties of corrosion and mechanical resistance has led to the development of new alloys. Alloy C-22HS (Ni-21 % Cr-17 % Mo) is a new high-strength corrosion resistant material recently developed and introduced into the market. This alloy provides a corrosion resistance comparable with that of other C-type alloys, and it can also be age hardened to effectively double its yield strength. HASTELLOY HYBRID-BC1 (Ni-22 % Mo-15 % Cr) is a new development intended for filling the gap between Ni-Mo and Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. This novel alloy is able to withstand HCl and H 2 SO 4 , even in the presence of dissolved oxygen and other oxidizing species. Its resistance to chloride-induced pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking is also remarkable. Thermal aging of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys leads to microstructure changes depending on the temperature range and exposure time at temperature. A Long Range Ordering (LRO) reaction can occur in the range of 350 C degrees to 600 C degrees, producing an ordered Ni 2 (Cr,Mo) phase. This ordering reaction does not seem to affect the corrosion resistance and produces only a slight loss in ductility. LRO transformation is homogeneous and has proven to be useful to fabricate the age-hard enable Alloy C22-HS. Tetrahedral Close Packed (TCP) phases, like μ, σ and

  18. Effect of chemical composition on irradiation embrittlement and annealing in Ni-Cr-Mo-V reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novosad, P [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    Results concerning copper and phosphorus influence on radiation-induced changes in the Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel mechanical properties, are presented. Correlations between different mechanical properties for steels with different chemical composition, are presented. A comparison of transition temperature shifts obtained for static and dynamic fracture toughness tests and Charpy impact tests, is discussed. Recovery of radiation hardening, measured by hardness test after isochronal annealing of steels with different compositions, is also shown. Copper content strongly affects irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties, but phosphorus content in connection with variable copper content has only a small effect. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Optimization of microwave-induced chemical etching for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, G.S.; Tripathy, S.P.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic investigation is carried out to optimize the recently established microwave-induced chemical etching (MICE) parameters for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors. Several combinations of all available microwave powers with different etching durations were analysed to determine the most suitable etching condition. The etching duration was found to reduce with increasing microwave power and the tracks were observed at about 18, 15, 12, and 6 min for 300, 450, 600 and 900 W of microwave powers respectively compared to a few hours in chemical etching (CE) method. However, for complete development of tracks the etching duration of 30, 40, 50 and 60 min were found to be suitable for the microwave powers of 900, 600, 450 and 300 W, respectively. Temperature profiles of the etchant for all the available microwave powers at different etching durations were generated to regulate the etching process in a controlled manner. The bulk etch rates at different microwave powers were determined by 2 methods, viz., gravimetric and removed thickness methods. A logarithmic expression was used to fit the variation of bulk etch rate with microwave power. Neutron detection efficiencies were obtained for all the cases and the results on track parameters obtained with MICE technique were compared with those obtained from another detector processed with chemical etching. - Highlights: • Microwave-induced chemical etching method is optimized for rapid development of recoil tracks due to neutrons in CR-39 detector. • Several combinations of microwave powers and etching durations are investigated to standardize the suitable etching condition. • Bulk-etch rates are determined for all microwave powers by two different methods, viz. gravimetric and removed thickness method. • The method is found to be simple, effective and much faster compared to conventional chemical etching

  20. Chemical Technology Division Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Gay, E. C.; Miller, J. F.; Einziger, R. E.; Green, D. W.

    2001-01-01

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base through developing industrial technology and transferring that technology to industry. The Chemical Technology Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by ANL's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to ANL and other organizations. The Division is multi-disciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia, urban planning, and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. In this annual report we present an overview of the technical programs together with representative highlights. The report is not intended to be comprehensive or encyclopedic, but to serve as an indication of the condition

  1. Comparison of Model Systems (M+n·[CrX63−] and M3CrX6 + 18MX Based on Quantum-Chemical Calculations (X: F, Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Kremenetsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of quantum-chemical calculations the most stable particle compositions are estimated in such model systems as (M+n·[CrCl6] and M3CrCl6 + 18MCl (M = Na, K, and Cs. In all systems these particles are positively charged. For systems (M+n·[CrCl6], (M+n·[CrF6], M3CrF6 + 18MCl, M3CrF6 + 18MF, and M3CrCl6 + 18MCl (M = Na, K, and Cs a number of energy parameters characterizing the state of the system before and after electron transfer are calculated. The results indicate the possibility of electron transfer from the cathode to the melt system, which is in the initial state. However, this possibility cannot be realized in systems where LUMOs (lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals have purely ligand character. In this case, the preliminary deformation of a cationic shell of electroactive species is required; it transforms the initial system to the transition state. However, in all considered systems the search of the transition state should be carried close to the initial state Pi. This greatly simplifies a problem and transforms it from a purely theoretical sphere to the field of practical tasks that do not require exceptional cost of computer time.

  2. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Chemical Substances which are the Subject of Certain TSCA Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides guidance for people who may be subject to the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule on how their requirements for reporting for 2016 may be affected when chemical substances are the subject of certain TSCA actions.

  3. Synthesis and magnetotransport studies of CrO2 films grown on TiO2 nanotube arrays by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Caiping; Wang, Lu; Lin, Tao; Wen, Gehui

    2018-04-01

    The CrO2 films have been prepared on the TiO2 nanotube array template via atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method. And the growth procedure was studied. In the beginning of the deposition process, the CrO2 grows on the cross section of the TiO2 nanotubes wall, forms a nanonet-like layer. And the grain size of CrO2 is very small. With the increase of the deposition time, the grain size of CrO2 also increases, and the nanonet-like layer changes into porous film. With the further increase of the deposition time, all the nanotubes are covered by CrO2 grains and the surface structure becomes polycrystalline film. The average grain size on the surface of the CrO2 films deposited for 1 h, 2 h and 5 h is about 190 nm, 300 nm and 470 nm. The X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that the rutile CrO2 film has been synthesized on the TiO2 nanotube array template. The CrO2 films show large magnetoresistance (MR) at low temperature, which should originate from spin-dependent tunneling through grain boundaries between CrO2 grains. And the tunneling mechanism of the CrO2 films can be well described by the fluctuation-induced tunneling (FIT) model. The CrO2 film deposited for 2 h shows insulator behavior from 5 k to 300 K, but the CrO2 film deposited for 5 h shows insulator-metal transition around 140 K. The reason is briefly discussed.

  4. Site-specific functionalization for chemical speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Priyanka; Varshney, Shilpa; Srivastava, Shalini

    2017-07-01

    Site-specific functionalizations are the emergent attention for the enhancement of sorption latent of heavy metals. Limited chemistry has been applied for the fabrication of diafunctionalized materials having potential to tether both environmentally stable oxidation states of chromium (Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite (PANI-NCC) has been fabricated using click chemistry and explored for the removal of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from hydrological environment. The structure, stability, morphology, particle size, surface area, hydrophilicity, and porosity of fabricated PANI-NCC were characterized comprehensively using analytical techniques and mathematical tools. The maximum sorption performance of PANI-NCC was procured for (Cr(III): 47.06 mg g-1; 94.12 %) and (Cr(VI): 48.92 mg g-1; 97.84 %) by equilibrating 0.5 g sorbent dose with 1000 mL of 25 mg L-1 chromium conc. at pH 6.5 and 2.5 for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively. The sorption data showed a best fit to the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative value of Δ G° (-8.59 and -11.16 kJ mol-1) and Δ H° (66.46 × 10-1 and 17.84 × 10-1 kJ mol-1), and positive value of Δ S° (26.66 and 31.46 J mol-1K-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, reflect the spontaneous, feasibility, and exothermic nature of the sorption process. The application of fabricated PANI-NCC for removing both the forms of chromium in the presence of other heavy metals was also tested at laboratory and industrial waste water regime. These findings open up new avenues in the row of high performance, scalable, and economic nanobiomaterial for the remediation of both forms of chromium from water streams.

  5. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H 2 , and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO 2 , potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures

  6. Management of denture-induced epulis fissuratum with Er,Cr:YSGG laser: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Dheeraj Kumar; Gupta, Manak; Verma, Mahesh; Lamba, Arundeep Kaur; Chawla, Kirti

    2012-01-01

    Epulis fissuratum refers to tissue growth into the oral cavity, located over the alveolar ridges or the soft tissues of the vestibular sulcus. Trauma and irritation are important aetiological factors for epulis fissuratum and lesions arise in areas of persistent mucosal injury. This report presents a case of a 68-year old male patient with two soft tissue hyperplastic growths seen in the buccal vestibule in the lower anterior region. These lesions were removed using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. The healing was uneventful and no suture or analgesic was required. The histopathological report confirmed the presurgical diagnosis. No relapse was observed till one year after surgery.

  7. Properties of Pt/C catalyst modified by chemical vapor deposition of Cr as a cathode of phosphoric acid fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Sang Joon; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Hyun Tae; Moon, Sang Heup

    2006-01-01

    Cr-modified Pt/C catalysts were prepared by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of Cr on Pt/C, and their performance as a cathode of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) was compared with the case of catalysts containing Cr added by impregnation (IMP). The catalyst prepared by CVD showed a higher activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than one prepared by IMP. There was an optimum amount of Cr that yielded the maximum mass activity of the catalyst because the gain in the intrinsic activity due to the promotional effect of Cr was counterbalanced by the loss of exposed Pt surface area as a result of the Cr introduction. Nevertheless, the activity increase at the optimum amount of Cr was greater for the CVD catalyst than for the IMP catalyst. Also, the optimum amount of Cr to yield the maximum activity was smaller for the former catalyst [Cr/Pt] CVD = 0.6, than for the latter, [Cr/Pt] IMP = 1.0. The enhancement of the Pt catalyst activity by Cr addition is attributed to two factors: changes in the surface Pt-Pt spacing and the electronic modification of the Pt surface. The formation of a Pt-Cr alloy, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction, decreased the lattice parameter of Pt, which was beneficial to the catalyst activity for ORR. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the binding energies of Pt electrons were shifted to higher energies due to Cr modification. Accordingly, the electron density of Pt was lowered and the Pt-O bond became weak on the Cr-modified catalysts, which was also beneficial to the catalyst activity for ORR. The promotion of oxygen reduction on Cr-modified catalysts was confirmed by measuring the cyclic voltammograms of the catalysts. All the above changes were made more effectively for catalysts prepared by CVD than for those prepared by IMP because the former method allowed Cr to interact more closely with the Pt surface than the latter, which was demonstrated by the characterization of catalysts in this study

  8. Chemical vapor deposition and electric characterization of perovskite oxides LaMO3 (M=Co, Fe, Cr and Mn) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngamou, Patrick Herve Tchoua; Bahlawane, Naoufal

    2009-01-01

    Oxides with a perovskite structure are important functional materials often used for the development of modern devices. In view of extending their applicability, it is necessary to efficiently control their growth as thin films using technologically relevant synthesis methods. Pulsed spray evaporation CVD was used to grow several perovskite-type oxides on planar silicon substrates at temperatures ranging from 500 to 700 deg. C. The optimization of the process control parameters allows the attainment of the perovskite structure as a single phase. The electrical characterization using the temperature-dependent conductivity and thermopower indicates the p-type conduction of the grown films and shows a decreasing concentration of the charge carrier, mobility and band gap energy in the sequence LaCoO 3 >LaMnO 3 >LaCrO 3 >LaFeO 3 . The investigation of the electric properties of the obtained perovskite thin films shows the versatility of CVD as a method for the development of innovative devices. - Graphical abstract: We report a single step deposition of perovskite thin films LaMO 3 (M: Co, Mn, Cr, Fe) using pulsed spray evaporation chemical vapor deposition. Electrical and thermopower properties, similar to these of bulk materials, could promote the development of modern thermoelectric devices based on thin films technology.

  9. Chemical reduction of rust on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel surface in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, N.; Shimoyashiki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Low-alloy Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been favored for the tube material of steam generators in fast breeder reactors (FBRs). However, this material rusts easily due to moisture condensation on its surface when left in air. Therefore, measures to prevent tube materials from rusting have been taken during manufacturing of the steam generators. When rust is present on tube surfaces, its oxygen and iron dissolve into liquid sodium. When the concentration of these impurities in the sodium increases rapidly, the cold traps can become choked locally and lose their removal ability. This work has been done, therefore, to clarify reduction processes of rust in sodium and to select optimum operating temperatures of steam generators in the initial operation

  10. Optical, structural, and chemical properties of CR-39 implanted with 5.2 MeV doubly charged carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Dilawar; Butt, M. Z.; Ishtiaq, Mohsin; Waqas Khaliq, M.; Bashir, Farooq

    2016-11-01

    Poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39) specimens were irradiated with 5.2 MeV doubly charged carbon ions using Pelletron accelerator. Ion dose was varied from 5 × 1013 to 5 × 1015 ions cm-2. Optical, structural, and chemical properties were investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, x-ray diffractometer, and FTIR/Raman spectroscopy, respectively. It was found that optical absorption increases with increasing ion dose. Absorption edge shifts from UV region to visible region. The measured opacity values of pristine and ion implanted CR-39 range from 0.0519 to 4.7959 mm-1 following an exponential growth (9141%) with the increase in ion dose. The values of direct and indirect band gap energy decrease exponentially with an increase in ion dose by 59% and 71%, respectively. However, average refractive index in the visible region increases from 1.443 to 2.864 with an increase in ion dose, by 98%. A linear relation between band gap energy and crystallite size was observed. Both the number of carbon atoms in conjugation length and the number of carbon atoms per cluster increase linearly with the increase in ion dose. FTIR spectra showed that on C+2 ions irradiation, the intensity of all bands decreases gradually without appearance of any new band, indicating degradation of polymer after irradiation. Raman spectra revealed that the density of -CH2- group decreases on C+2 ions irradiation. However, the structure of CR-39 is completely destroyed on irradiation with ion dose 1 × 1015 and 5 × 1015 ions cm-2.

  11. Sensitivity of chemically and electrochemically etched CR 39 polymers to the neutrons of AmBe source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turek, K.; Spurny, F.; Dajko, G.; Somogyi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Seven samples of polymers by different manufacturers were used in a study of the sensitivity of CR 39 polymers to Am-Be neutrons. In the polymer, proton tracks for a relatively broad energy range can also be recorded. The following characteristics were studied: the sample background for different etching methods, the dependence of sensitivity on the etched thickness and on neutron fluence, the effect of type and thickness of external proton emitters, and the effect of the choice of electric parameters on the resulting sensitivity in electrochemical etching. Good results were obtained when chemical and electrochemical etching was used in combination. It was found that with electrochemical etching, sensitivity decreases for neutron fluence exceeding 10 8 cm -2 . The sensitivity of the studied CR 39 polymer samples only little differed. When the most sensitive polymer was used, the minimum dose equivalent in the human body for Am-Be neutrons which could be determined using combination etching was 0.4 mSv (ie., 40 mrems). (B.S.)

  12. 40 CFR 716.50 - Reporting physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... chemical properties. Studies of physical and chemical properties must be reported under this subpart if... they investigated one or more of the following properties: (a) Water solubility. (b) Adsorption... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting physical and chemical...

  13. Chemical passivation as a method of improving the electrochemical corrosion resistance of Co-Cr-based dental alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylska, Dorota; Sokołowski, Grzegorz; Sokołowski, Jerzy; Łukomska-Szymańska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate corrosion resistance of Wirobond C® alloy after chemical passivation treatment. The alloy surface undergone chemical passivation treatment in four different media. Corrosion studies were carried out by means of electrochemical methods in saline solution. Corrosion effects were determined using SEM. The greatest increase in the alloy polarization resistance was observed for passive layer produced in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. The same layer caused the highest increase in corrosion current. Generally speaking, the alloy passivation in Na2SO4 solution with graphite caused a substantial improvement of the corrosion resistance. The sample after passivation in Na2SO4 solution without graphite, contrary to others, lost its protective properties along with successive anodic polarization cycles. The alloy passivation in Na3PO4 solution with graphite was the only one that caused a decrease in the alloy corrosion properties. The SEM studies of all samples after chemical passivation revealed no pit corrosion - in contrast to the sample without any modification. Every successive polarization cycle in anodic direction of pure Wirobond C® alloy enhances corrosion resistance shifting corrosion potential in the positive direction and decreasing corrosion current value. The chemical passivation in solutions with low pH values decreases susceptibility to electrochemical corrosion of Co-Cr dental alloy. The best protection against corrosion was obtained after chemical passivation of Wirobond C® in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. Passivation with Na2SO4 in solution of high pH does not cause an increase in corrosion resistance of WIROBOND C. Passivation process increases alloy resistance to pit corrosion.

  14. Chemical Data Reporting: Factors to Consider When Using the Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2012 Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) database provides non-confidential information on the manufacture, import, processing, and use of chemicals in commerce at national and regional levels. This fact sheet highlights factors to consider.

  15. 2003 Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Graziano, D.; Miller, J. F.; Vandegrift, G.

    2004-01-01

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of six divisions within the Engineering Research Directorate at Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, to promote national security, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training in chemistry; physics; materials science; and electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineering. They are specialists in electrochemistry, ceramics, metallurgy, catalysis, materials characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, repository science, and the nuclear fuel cycle. Our staff have experience working in and collaborating with university, industry and government research and development laboratories throughout the world. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy, national security, and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial organizations for advice and contributions to problem solving in areas that intersect present and past Division programs and activities. Currently, we are engaged in the development of several technologies of

  16. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  17. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee: progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    Studies of the basic nuclear data for commercial and industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC). Such data are defined on the basis of chemical methods of analysis, and include half-lives, decay parameters and fission yields. Work undertaken within this area is described in this document for information. (author)

  18. Status Report on the Fabrication of Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction Test Articles for ATR Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-28

    FeCrAl alloys are a promising new class of alloys for light water reactor (LWR) applications due to their superior oxidation and corrosion resistance in high temperature environments. The current R&D efforts have focused on the alloy composition and processing routes to generate nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys with optimized properties for enhanced accident tolerance while maintaining properties needed for normal operation conditions. Therefore, the composition and processing routes must be optimized to maintain the high temperature steam oxidation (typically achieved by increasing the Cr and Al content) while still exhibiting properties conducive to normal operation in a LWR (such as radiation tolerance where reducing Cr content is favorable). Within this balancing act is the addition of understanding the influence on composition and processing routes on the FeCrAl alloys for fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Currently, limited knowledge exists on FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system. To overcome the knowledge gaps on the FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system a series of fueled irradiation tests have been developed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) housed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first series of tests has already been reported. These tests used miniaturized 17x17 PWR fuel geometry rodlets of second-generation FeCrAl alloys fueled with industrial Westinghouse UO2 fuel. These rodlets were encapsulated within a stainless steel housing.To provide high fidelity experiments and more robust testing, a new series of rodlets have been developed deemed the Accident Tolerant Fuel Experiment #1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory FCCI test (ATF-1 ORNL FCCI). The main driving factor, which is discussed in detail, was to provide a radiation environment where prototypical fuel-clad interface temperatures are met while still maintaining constant contact between industrial fuel and the candidate cladding alloys

  19. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  20. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Hans-Joachim [Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Fritz-Haber-Inst.

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  2. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS ampersand D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species

  3. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  4. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH and Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations

  5. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE's environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous

  6. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  7. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  8. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  9. Examples and Case Studies for the 2012 Chemical Data Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents examples and case studies to help you in reporting for 2012 Chemical Data Reporting (CDR), formerly known as Inventory Update Reporting (IUR).EPA designed these examples to illustrate the new reporting requirements, which were published as part of the CDR Rule (published August 16, 2011), and to address general reporting issues from the 2006 IUR.

  10. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports

  11. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

  12. Chemical reactions during sintering of Fe-Cr-Mn-Si-Ni-Mo-C-steels with special reference to processing in semi-closed containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cias A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintering of Cr, Mn and Si bearing steels has recently attracted both experimental and theoretical attention and processing in semiclosed containers has been reproposed. This paper brings together relevant thermodynamic data and considers the kinetics of some relevant chemical reactions. These involve iron and carbon, water vapour, carbon monoxide and dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen of the sintering atmospheres and the alloying elements Cr, Mn, Mo and Si. The paper concludes by presenting mechanical properties data for three steels sintered in local microatmosphere with nitrogen, hydrogen, nitrogen-5% hydrogen and air as the furnace gas.

  13. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site

  14. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

  15. Modification of chemical, optical and structural properties of Bayfol CR-6-2 using gamma and neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehata, Mohamed M.; Radwan, Samh I.; Hassan, Amin [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Centre; Waly, Sayed A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Second Research Reactor; Badawy, Zaynab M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Experimental Nuclear Physics Dept.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of gamma and neutron irradiations on the chemical, optical and structural properties of Bayfol CR-6-2 were investigated. The samples were irradiated by γ-rays from a {sup 60}Co source at various doses ranging between 16 and 900 kGy at room temperature in atmospheric air. For neutrons, an Am-Be neutron facility was used for the sample irradiation in thermal mode which had an activity of 185 GBq. Samples were irradiated with different doses of neutrons ranging from 15.7 to 564.2 mGy. The changes induced were analyzed using UV-Vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. The results demonstrated an occurrence of oxidative degradation, resulting in the formation of carbonyl groups at 1700 cm{sup -1}. Simultaneous thermo-gravimetric investigation (TGA) has been performed on the samples of 0.3 mm thickness. The results obtained indicate that cross-linking predominates at small neutron doses and main chain scission happens at higher doses.

  16. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-01-01

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH 3 BH 3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H 2 , and ammonia triborane NH 3 B 3 H 7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H 2 , were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H 2 -release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H 2 -release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H 2 -release, the tunability of both their H 2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These

  17. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also

  18. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Basic nuclear data requirements for industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC), covering half-lives, decay data, fission yields and the content of computerised data files. While the UKCNDC Request list was reviewed at the end of 1989 to reveal new and continued requirements, funding problems have increased during the year. Difficulties in the UK nuclear power industry are reflected in the decline in experimental studies, although evaluation efforts have been maintained. (author)

  19. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  20. Chemical diffusion on solid surfaces. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, J.B.

    1980-12-01

    The techniques of surface science have been applied to the problem of the measurement of the surface diffusion rate of an adsorbed species over the surface of a chemically dissimilar material. Studies were carried out for hydrogen and nitrogen adatoms on a Ni(100) surface and for silver adatoms on a sapphire surface. Positive results were obtained only for the case of nitrogen on Ni(100). In this system the diffusivity is characterized by the expression D = D 0 exp (/sup -ΔH//RT), with D 0 = 0.25 cm 2 /sec and ΔH = 28kcal/mol

  1. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W.; Chiang, P.N.; Liu, J.C.; Kuan, W.H.; Huang, J.H.; Hung, J.T.; Tzou, Y.M.; Chen, C.C.; Wang, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Low molecular weights (M w ) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. ► The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). ► Low M w of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. ► Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M w of HA. ► Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M w ): >100, 50–100, 10–50 and w HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M w of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H 2 O 2 through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  2. Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Webster, D.S.; Barney, D.L.; Cafasso, F.A.; Steindler, M.J.

    1981-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Engineering (CEN) Division's activities during 1980 are presented. In this period, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) rechargeable lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and other applications; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) energy-efficient industrial electrochemical processes; (4) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (5) coal technology, mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO 2 sorbent of limestone; (6) heat- and seed-recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (7) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (8) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (9) fuel cycle technology - management of nuclear wastes, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; and (10) magnetic fusion research - systems analysis and engineering experimentation, materials research, and neutron dosimetry and damage analysis. The CEN Division also has a basic energy sciences program, which includes experimental and theoretical research on (1) the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and methanol homologation, (2) the thermodynamic properties of a wide variety of inorganic and organic materials, (3) significant mechanisms for the formation of atmospheric sulfate and nitrogen-bearing aerosols, (4) processes occurring at electrodes and in electrolytes, and (5) the physical properties of salt vapors. In addition, the Division operated the Central Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Gay, E. C.; Miller, J. C.; Boparai, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  5. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  6. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  7. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99 Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1997 are presented

  9. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  10. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  11. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Divisions's activities during 1988 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries (mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide, sodium/metal chloride, and sodium/sulfur); (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous chemical water; (6) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing /sup 99/Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 53 figs., 16 tabs

  12. 2002 Chemical Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Graziano, D.; Miller, J. F.

    2003-01-01

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory; Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services; and Dosimetry and Radioprotection services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by

  13. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-11-22

    Record highs were set for Pu output in separations plants and for amount of U processed in Purex. UO{sub 3} production and shipments exceeded schedules. Fabrication of 200 and 250 Model assemblies is reported. Unfabricated Pu production was 8.5% short. Nitric acid recovery in Purex and Redox is reported. Prototype anion exchange system for Pu was tested in Purex. Hinged agitator arms with shear pin feature was installed in UO{sub 3} plant H calciner. Operation of continuous type Task I, II facility improved. DBBP is considered for Recuplex. Methods for Pu in product solutions agreed to within 0. 10%. Purex recycle dock shelter is complete. Other projects are reported.

  14. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Gay, E. C.; Miller, J. C.; Boparai, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature super-conductors. The Division's wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial

  15. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  16. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for July 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F. K.; Johnson, W. E.; MacCready, W. K.; Warren, J. H.; Schroeder, O. C.; Groswith, C. T.; Mobley, W. N.; LaFollette, T. G.; Grim, K. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Richards, R. B.; Roberts, D. S.

    1957-08-22

    This report, for July 1957 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following; Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  17. Chemical Weapons Improved Response Program. 2000 Summary Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this summary report is to inform members of the first responder and emergency management communities about the on-going activities, initiatives, and lessons learned from the Chemical...

  18. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions

  19. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for December 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-01-21

    This report for December 1958, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  20. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-03-21

    This report from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation, purex operation, redox operation, finished products operation, power and general maintenance operation, financial operation, facilities engineering operation, research and engineering operation, and employee relations operation.

  1. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for September 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-10-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for September 1963, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations, facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and power and crafts operation.

  2. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-03-20

    This report for February 1959, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1985 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (3) corrosion-protective coatings for high-strength steel; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) nuclear technology related to waste management, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and proof of breeding in a light water breeder reactor; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99 Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  5. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  6. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  7. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99 Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  9. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references

  10. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  11. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  12. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing 99 Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support

  13. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  14. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, P.N. [The Experimental Forest, National Taiwan University, Nantou, 55743 Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, J.C. [Agricultural Research Institute No. 189, Jhongjheng Rd., Wufong, Taichung County, 41301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuan, W.H. [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei, 24301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, J.H. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Hung, J.T. [Department of Horticulture, National Taitung Junior College, Taitung, 95045 Taiwan, ROC (China); Tzou, Y.M., E-mail: ymtzou@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.C. [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 116 Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, M.K. [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low molecular weights (M{sub w}) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low M{sub w} of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M{sub w} of HA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M{sub w}): >100, 50-100, 10-50 and <10 kDa. Each HA fraction was characterized by spectroscopic analyses followed by examining Cr(VI) removal on each fraction of HA at pH 1-5. Spectroscopic results indicated that low-M{sub w} HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M{sub w} of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  15. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  16. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO 2 recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs

  1. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy and chemical long-range order in epitaxial ferrimagnetic CrPt sub 3 films

    CERN Document Server

    Maret, M; Köhler, J; Poinsot, R; Ulhaq-Bouillet, C; Tonnerre, J M; Berar, J F; Bucher, E

    2000-01-01

    Thin films of CrPt sub 3 were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on both Al sub 2 O sub 3 (0 0 0 1) and MgO(0 0 1) substrates, either directly by co-deposition of Cr and Pt at high temperatures or after in situ annealing of superlattices [Cr(2 A)/Pt(7 A)]. In situ RHEED observations and X-ray diffraction measurements have allowed us to check the single-crystal quality of CrPt sub 3 films and to determine the degree of L1 sub 2 -type long-range order (LRO). In films co-deposited between 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C a nearly perfect LRO has been observed. As in bulk alloys, such ordering yields a ferrimagnetic order, while the disordered films are non-magnetic. In contrast with the ferromagnetic L1 sub 2 -type ordered CoPt sub 3 (1 1 1) films, the ferrimagnetic CrPt sub 3 (1 1 1) films exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with quality factors, K sub u /K sub d , as large as 5 and large coercivities around 450 kA/m. Such anisotropy could be related to the arrangement of Cr atoms, which owing to their large mag...

  3. Gas treatment of Cr(VI)-contaminated sediment samples from the North 60's pits of the chemical waste landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.C.; Amonette, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    Twenty sediment samples were collected at depths ranging from 5 to 100 ft (1.5 to 30 m) beneath a metal-contaminated plating-waste site and extensively characterized for Cr(VI) content and environmental availability. Three samples were selected for treatment with diluted gas mixtures with the objective of converting Cr(VI) to Cr(III), which is relatively nontoxic and immobile. These tests were designed to provide information needed to evaluate the potential application of gas injection as an in situ remediation technique. Gas treatment was performed in small columns (4.9-cm ID, 6.4- to 13.9-cm long) using 100 ppm (μL L -1 ) H 2 S or ethylene mixtures in N 2 . Treatment progress during the tests involving H 2 S was assessed by monitoring the breakthrough of H 2 S. Evaluation of H 2 S treatment efficacy included (1) water-leaching of treated and untreated columns for ten days, (2) repetitive extraction of treated and untreated subsamples by water, 0.01 M phosphate (pH 7) or 6 M HCl solutions, and (3) Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of treated and untreated subsamples. Results of the water-leaching studies showed that the H 2 S treatment decreased Cr(VI) levels in the column effluent by 90% to nearly 100%. Repetitive extractions by water and phosphate solutions echoed these results, and the extraction by HCl released only 35-40% as much Cr in the treated as in the untreated samples. Analysis by XANES spectroscopy showed that a substantial portion of the Cr in the samples remained as Cr(VI) after treatment, even though it was not available to the water and phosphate extracting solutions. These results suggest that this residual Cr(VI) is present in low solubility phases such as PbCrO 4 or sequestered in unreacted grain interiors under impermeable coatings formed during H 2 S treatment. However, this fraction is essentially immobile and thus unavailable to the environment

  4. Radiotracer study of the adsorption of Fe(III), Cr(III) and Cd(II) on natural and chemically modified Slovak zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foeldesova, M.; Dillinger, P.; Lukac, P.

    1998-01-01

    In order to minimize the contamination of environment with metals in ionic form the more types of natural and chemically modified zeolites were examined to their uptake of Fe(III), Cr(III) and Cd(II) from water solutions by batch radio-exchange equilibration method. In this study was used zeolitic tuff from deposit Nizny Hrabovec (content of clinoptilolite 50-70%) with the grain size from 1.2 to 2.2 mm. The granules of zeolite were modified with the following NaOH solutions: ).5, 1, 2 and 4 mol.l -1 at 80 grad C for 4 hours. The sorption of Fe, Cr and Cd ions on all types of zeolites was studied by radio-exchange method and the sorption of Fe and Cr also flame atomic absorption method. From sorption curves the sorption coefficients were calculated. The results obtained in this work show that zeolites modified with NaOH solution are suitable for adsorption of Fe(III), Cr(III) and Cd(II) from underwater, waste water, feed water and coolant water from nuclear plants. The adsorbed zeolites can be solidified by conventional way

  5. Corrosion fatigue investigation of a high nitrogen 12% Cr-steel and of a high strength martensitic PH 13-8 Mo steel under simulated steam turbine conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K.G.; Schweigart, H.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the corrosion fatigue investigations of two martensitic stainless steels (PH 13-8 Mo, X20 CrMoV 12 1; corrosion medium: 0,01 m NaCl or 22 wt% NaCl; pH value 3 or 7). The working programm includes electrochemical and corrosion fatigue tests. Also chemical analysis, mechanical-technological and metallographical as SEM investigations were performed. (orig.)

  6. Studies of radiation and chemical toxicity. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Annual report for the Studies of Radiation and Chemical Toxicity Program at the University of Rochester is presented. Progress is reported on four projects: Neurobehavorial Toxicity of Organometallic Fuel Additives, Mechanisms of Permanent and Delayed Pathologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Solid State Radiation Chemistry of the DNA Backbone, and Pulmonary Biochemistry

  7. The use of nitrogen to improve the corrosion resistance of FeCrNiMo alloys for the chemical process industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, J.R.; Deverell, H.E.

    1987-06-01

    The addition of 0.1 to 0.25 wt% nitrogen to austenitic alloys has been shown to enhance resistance to localized corrosion in oxidizing chloride and reducing acid solutions. Further tests of FeCrNiMo alloys assess the effects of nitrogen additions on: mechanical properties, chloride and caustic stress corrosion cracking resistance, passivation characteristics, and general corrosion rates in various acid, alkali, and salt solutions pertinent to the chemical process industries. The precipitation of chromium-rich secondary phases was retarded by solid solution additions of 0.1 to 0.25 wt% nitrogen. The corrosion resistance of FeCrNiMoN alloys in the welded condition was improved by using shield-gas mixtures of argon and 2.5 to 5.0 wt% nitrogen.

  8. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community

  9. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

  10. About oxide dispersion particles chemical compatibility with areas coherent dissipation/sub-grains of bcc-alloys in Fe - (Cr, V, Mo, W systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udovsky A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept of partial magnetic moments (PMM of the iron atoms located in the first ч four coordination spheres (1÷4 CS for bcc lattice have been introduced based on analysis of results obtained by quantum-mechanical calculations (QMC for volume dependence of the average magnetic moment ferromagnetic (FM Fe. The values of these moments have been calculated for pure bcc Fe and bcc - Fe-Cr alloys. This concept has been used to formulate a three sub-lattice model for binary FM alloys of the Fe-M systems (M is an alloying paramagnetic element. Physical reason for sign change dependence of the short-range order and mixing enthalpy obtained by QMCs for Fe-(Cr, V bcc phases has been found. Using this model it has been predicted that static displacements of Fe - atoms in alloy matrix increase with increasing the of CS number and result in reducing of the area of coherent dissipation (ACD size with growth of the dimension factor (DF in the Fe-(Cr, V, Mo, W systems in agreement with the X-ray experiments. It has been shown theoretically that anisotropy of spin- density in bcc lattice Fe and DF in binary Fe - (Cr, V, Mo, W systems is main factor for origins of segregations on small angle boundaries of ACD and sub-grains boundaries To prevent the coagulation of both ACD and sub-grains, and to increase the strength of alloys, it is advisable to add oxide dispersion particles into ferrite steel taking into account their chemical compatibility and coherent interfacing with the crystalline lattice of a ferrite matrix. Application of phase diagrams for binary and ternary the Fe-(Y, Zr-O systems to verify chemical compatibility of oxide dispersion particles with ferrite matrix have been discussed

  11. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, Steve D; McDowell, Rod S

    2001-01-01

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and (3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems

  12. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program

  13. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  14. RIGScan CR: RIGScan CR49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    RIGScan CR49, a 125I-labelled CR monoclonal antibody directed against the tumour-associated antigen TAG-72, is undergoing development with Neoprobe for the intraoperative detection of metastatic colorectal cancer. The Neoprobe's proprietary RIGS (radioimmunoguided surgery) technology combines an injectable radiolabelled cancer-targeting agent and hand-held radiation detection probe that emits an audible tone when located tissue has accumulated a significant amount of the radioactive agent. Neoprobe's RIGS technology also includes a patented surgical method providing surgeons with real-time information to locate tumour deposits that can not be detected by other conventional methods. The RIGS technology has been evaluated in late clinical studies for the detection of adenocarcinomas including primary colorectal, gastrointestinal, breast, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate and neuroendocrine/endocrine. Neoprobe signed an option agreement for its first-generation RIGScan compound, RIGScan CR, with OncoSurg Inc. (formerly NuRigs Ltd). The second-generation humanised RIGScan CR agent was also optionally licensed to OncoSurg Inc. In 1997, Neoprobe filed for approval with the US FDA and the EMEA for RIGScan CR for the intraoperative detection of metastatic colorectal cancer. Both regulatory agencies have requested additional clinical data. On 19 April 2004, Neoprobe announced that it had met with the US FDA to discuss its position on submitting additional clinical information in response to the FDA's questions regarding the Biologic Licence Application (BLA) for RIGScan CR49. The company provided the FDA with new information related to a survival differential for patients whose colorectal cancer was evaluated with RIGScan CR49. The information was not available at the time of the BLA's submission in 1997. The agency indicated that it would consider accepting survival data from one of the two phase III trials, NEO2-14, but not from another trial NEO2-13, as supportive data for a

  15. Using Electronic Health Records to Support Clinical Trials: A Report on Stakeholder Engagement for EHR4CR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Colin; Thomson, Elizabeth; Szmigielski, Cezary A; Kalra, Dipak; Sullivan, Frank M; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Ford, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The conduct of clinical trials is increasingly challenging due to greater complexity and governance requirements as well as difficulties with recruitment and retention. Electronic Health Records for Clinical Research (EHR4CR) aims at improving the conduct of trials by using existing routinely collected data, but little is known about stakeholder views on data availability, information governance, and acceptable working practices. Senior figures in healthcare organisations across Europe were provided with a description of the project and structured interviews were subsequently conducted to elicit their views. 37 structured interviewees in Germany, UK, Switzerland, and France indicated strong support for the proposed EHR4CR platform. All interviewees reported that using the platform for assessing feasibility would enhance the conduct of clinical trials and the majority also felt it would reduce workloads. Interviewees felt the platform could enhance trial recruitment and adverse event reporting but also felt it could raise either ethical or information governance concerns in their country. There was clear support for EHR4CR and a belief that it could reduce workloads and improve the conduct and quality of trials. However data security, privacy, and information governance issues would need to be carefully managed in the development of the platform.

  16. Using Electronic Health Records to Support Clinical Trials: A Report on Stakeholder Engagement for EHR4CR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin McCowan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The conduct of clinical trials is increasingly challenging due to greater complexity and governance requirements as well as difficulties with recruitment and retention. Electronic Health Records for Clinical Research (EHR4CR aims at improving the conduct of trials by using existing routinely collected data, but little is known about stakeholder views on data availability, information governance, and acceptable working practices. Methods. Senior figures in healthcare organisations across Europe were provided with a description of the project and structured interviews were subsequently conducted to elicit their views. Results. 37 structured interviewees in Germany, UK, Switzerland, and France indicated strong support for the proposed EHR4CR platform. All interviewees reported that using the platform for assessing feasibility would enhance the conduct of clinical trials and the majority also felt it would reduce workloads. Interviewees felt the platform could enhance trial recruitment and adverse event reporting but also felt it could raise either ethical or information governance concerns in their country. Conclusions. There was clear support for EHR4CR and a belief that it could reduce workloads and improve the conduct and quality of trials. However data security, privacy, and information governance issues would need to be carefully managed in the development of the platform.

  17. Improvement of corrosion resistance of carbon steel using chemical vapor deposition from Cr(CO)6 and Mo(CO)6 with an ArF-excimer laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Naotada; Katsumura, Yosuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi

    1995-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel has been improved by the deposition from the mixture of Mo(CO) 6 and Cr(CO) 6 as well as from each carbonyl alone with an ArF-excimer (193nm). The corrosion resistance evaluated by multi sweep cyclic voltammetry attained by coating with the films from the mixture is higher than from Mo(CO) 6 alone, while lower than from Cr(CO) 6 alone. While the corrosion resistance increases with beam intensity monotonically over the range 4-25 MWcm -2 for the deposition from Mo(CO) 6 alone, it tends to decrease slightly above 15 MWcm -2 for the deposition from Mo(CO) 6 alone and from the mixture. SEM photographs show that the films from each carbonyl and their mixture consist of small grains that are more densely packed at higher beam intensities. The comparison of the film thickness evaluated from sputtering time to remove the films with that from direct observation with SEM suggests that the density of the film increases with beam intensity. In the films deposited from the mixture, molybdenum is preferentially incorporated from the gas phase. In addition, a model of gas-phase processes including photolysis of Cr(CO) 6 , transportation of photofragments to the substrate surface, and elimination of photofragments through chemical reactions during transportation, is proposed and simulated. Applications of the model will be discussed. (author)

  18. Investigation on fuel-cladding chemical interaction in metal fuel for FBR. Reaction of rare earth elements with Fe-Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Kenta; Ogata, Takanari

    2010-01-01

    Rare-earth fission product (FP) elements generated in the metal fuel interact with cladding alloy and result in the wastage of the cladding (Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)). To evaluate FCCI quantitatively, several influential factors must be considered. They are temperature, temperature gradient, time, composition of the cladding and the behavior of rare-earth FP. In this research, the temperature and time dependencies are investigated with tests in the simplified system. Fe-12wt%Cr was used as stimulant material of cladding and rare-earth alloy 13La -24Ce -12Pr -39Nd -12Sm (RE) as a rare-earth FP. A diffusion couple Fe-Cr/RE was made and annealed at 923K, 853K, 773K or 693K. The structures of reaction layers were analyzed with Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and the details of the structures were clarified. The width of the reaction layer in the Fe-Cr alloy grew in proportion to the square root of time. The reaction rate constants K=(square of the width of reaction layer / time) were evaluated. It was confirmed that the relation between K and the inverse of the temperature showed linearity above 773 K. (author)

  19. Photocatalysis of Hg2+ y Cr6+ in waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Alexander; Ortiz, Natalia; Mejia, Gloria; Restrepo, Gloria; Penuela, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    This work was carried out to propose a treatment for the elimination of Hg 2 + and Cr 6 + ions that are present in wastewaters of the CIA and ISA laboratories. These ions are present in waste waters because in these laboratories analysis of chemical oxygen demand (COD), are performed in which HgSO 4 and K 2 Cr 2 O 7 are used. COD is a parameter very important to evaluate. In this paper water pollution results of chemical reduction of Hg 2 + and Cr 6 + ions using photo catalysis are reported and the elimination of both ions by using an adsorbent

  20. The ''C'' family of Ni-Cr-Mo allloys' partnership with the chemical process industry: the last 70 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, D.C.; Herda, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    The ''C'' family of alloys, the original being Hastelloy trademark alloy C (1930's) was an innovative optimization of Ni-Cr alloys having good resistance to oxidizing corrosive media and Ni-Mo alloys with superior resistance to reducing corrosive media. This combination resulted in the most versatile corrosion resistant alloy in the ''Ni-Cr-Mo'' alloy family, with exceptional corrosion resistance in a wide variety of severe corrosive environments typically encountered in CPI and other industries. The alloy also exhibited excellent resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion attack in low pH, high chloride oxidizing environments and had virtual immunity to chloride stress corrosion cracking. These properties allowed this alloy to serve the industrial needs for many years, although it had some limitations. The decades of the 1960's (alloy C-276), 1970's (alloy C-4), 1980's (alloy C-22 and 622) and 1990's (alloy 59, alloy 686 and alloy C-2000) saw newer alloy developments with improvements in corrosion resistance, which not only overcame the limitations of alloy C, but further expanded the horizons of applications as the needs of the CPI became more critical, severe and demanding. Today the originally alloy ''C'' of the 1930's is practically obsolete except for some usage in form of castings. This paper presents a chronology of the various corrosion resistant alloy developments during this century, with special emphasis on the last 70 years evolution in the ''C'' family of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys and their applications. (orig.)

  1. Identification of chemical composition and measurement of V, As, Cr and Fe in Yogyakarta ambient air particulate by neutron activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gede-Sutresna W; Sutjipto

    1996-01-01

    Activation neutron analysis can be used to identify chemical composition and measure V, As, Cr and Fe contents in Yogyakarta ambient particulate. The air sampling has been done around Yogyakarta city such as: Gg. Narada Gandok around North Ring road (A1 post), Mentri Supeno cross road (A2 post), Purbanegaran GK II (A3 post), Wirobrajan cross road (A4 post), Adisutjipto (A5 post), and in front of Sentul market on JI. Sultan Agung with low volume sampler equipped with AP millipore fiber glass filter. Other places used for air sampling were around PPNY, JI. Babarsari (B1) and Jl. Gejayan (B2) by using high volume sampler equipped with TF A 21133 series filter. The filter was irradiated at Kartini reactor at the average of 1.04 x 10 1 1 n.cm -2 .s -1 on January 10, 1995. The V, As, Cr and Fe content in air around Yogyakarta respectively was: 81.5 - 264.9 ng/m 3 air; 56.7 - 596.4 ng/m 3 air; 30.5 - 153.8 ng/m 3 air and 22.4 - 108μg/m 3 air. The accuracy of the analysis method was checked by comparing the analysis result to the certificate label of the reference material SRM 1633a. The accuracy was: 21.1%; 13.9%; 7.7% and 13.3% for V, As, Cr and Fe. The V, As, Cr and Fe content in air particulate around Yogyakarta is still the below permissible level of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1987

  2. Observations of a Cast Cu-Cr-Zr Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that Cu-Cr-Nb alloys have considerable advantages over the copper alloys currently used in regeneratively cooled rocket engine liners. Observations indicated that Zr and Nb have similar chemical properties and form very similar compounds. Glazov and Zakharov et al. reported the presence of Cr2Zr in Cu-Cr-Zr alloys with up to 3.5 wt% Cr and Zr though Zeng et al. calculated that Cr2Zr could not exist in a ternary Cu-Cr-Zr alloy. A cast Cu-6.15 wt% Cr-5.25 wt% Zr alloy was examined to determine if the microstructure developed would be similar to GRCop-84 (Cu-6.65 wt% Cr-5.85 wt% Nb). It was observed that the Cu-Cr-Zr system did not form any Cr2Zr even after a thermal exposure at 875 C for 176.5 h. Instead the alloy consisted of three phases: Cu, Cu5Zr, and Cr.

  3. Final report on in-reactor uniaxial tensile deformation of pure iron and Fe-Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Xiaoxu Huang; Taehtinen, S.; Moilamen, P.; Jacquet, P.; Dekeyser, J.

    2007-11-01

    Traditionally, the effect of irradiation on mechanical properties of metals and alloys is determined using post-irradiation tests carried out on pre-irradiated specimens and in the absence of irradiation environment. The results of these tests may not be representative of deformation behaviour of materials used in the structural components of a fission or fusion reactor where the materials will be exposed concurrently to displacement damage and external and/or internal stresses. In an effort to evaluate and understand the dynamic response of materials under these conditions, we have recently performed a series of uniaxial tensile tests on Fe-Cr and pure iron specimens in the BR-2 reactor at Mol (Belgium). The present report first provides a brief description of the test facilities and the procedure used for performing the in-reactor tests. The results on the mechanical response of materials during these tests are presented in the form of stress-displacement dose and the conventional stress-strain curves. For comparison, the results of post-irradiation tests and tests carried out on unirradiated specimens are also presented. Results of microstructural investigations on the unirradiated and deformed, irradiated and undeformed, post-irradiation deformed and the in-reactor deformed specimens are also described. During the in-reactor tests the specimens of both Fe-Cr alloy and pure iron deform in a homogeneous manner and do not exhibit the phenomenon of yield drop. An increase in the pre-yield dose increases the yield stress but not the level of maximum flow stress during the in-reactor deformation of Fe-Cr alloy. Neither the in-reactor nor the post-irradiation deformed specimens of Fe-Cr alloy and pure iron showed any evidence of cleared channel formation. Both in Fe-Cr and pure iron, the in-reactor deformation leads to accumulation of dislocations in a homogeneous fashion and only to a modest density. No dislocation cells are formed during the in-reactor or post

  4. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  5. Enhancement of Ce/Cr Codopant Solubility and Chemical Homogeneity in TiO2 Nanoparticles through Sol-Gel versus Pechini Syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Fan; Mofarah, Sajjad S; Hanaor, Dorian Amir Henry; Koshy, Pramod; Chen, Hsin-Kai; Jiang, Yue; Sorrell, Charles Christopher

    2018-06-18

    Ce/Cr codoped TiO 2 nanoparticles were synthesized using sol-gel and Pechini methods with heat treatment at 400 °C for 4 h. A conventional sol-gel process produced well-crystallized anatase, while Pechini synthesis yielded less-ordered mixed-phase anatase + rutile; this suggests that the latter method enhances Ce solubility and increases chemical homogeneity but destabilizes the TiO 2 lattice. Greater structural disruption from the decomposition of the Pechini precursor formed more open agglomerated morphologies, while the lower levels of structural disruption from pyrolysis of the dried sol-gel precursor resulted in denser agglomerates of lower surface areas. Codoping and associated destabilization of the lattice reduced the binding energies in both powders. Cr 4+ formation in sol-gel powders and Cr 6+ formation in Pechini powders suggest that these valence changes derive from synergistic electron exchange from intervalence and/or multivalence charge transfer. Since Ce is too large to allow either substitutional or interstitial solid solubility, the concept of integrated solubility is introduced, in which the Ti site and an adjacent interstice are occupied by the large Ce ion. The photocatalytic performance data show that codoping was detrimental owing to the effects of reduced crystallinity from lattice destabilization and surface area. Two regimes of mechanistic behavior are seen, which are attributed to the unsaturated solid solutions at lower codopant levels and supersaturated solid solutions at higher levels. The present work demonstrates that the Pechini method offers a processing technique that is superior to sol-gel because the former facilitates solid solubility and consequent chemical homogeneity.

  6. Chemical-cleaning process evaluation: Westinghouse steam generators. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, W.F.; Gockley, G.B.

    1983-04-01

    The Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG)/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Generator Secondary Side Chemical Cleaning Program, under develpment since 1978, has resulted in a generic process for the removal of accumulated corrosion products and tube deposits in the tube support plate crevices. The SGOG/EPRI Project S150-3 was established to obtain an evaluation of the generic process in regard to its applicability to Westinghouse steam generators. The results of the evaluation form the basis for recommendations for transferring the generic process to a plant specific application and identify chemical cleaning corrosion guidelines for the materials in Westinghouse Steam Generators. The results of the evaluation, recommendations for plant-specific applications and corrosion guidelines for chemical cleaning are presented in this report

  7. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult

  8. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult.

  9. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning, Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, S.

    1978-07-01

    United Nuclear Industries (UNI) entered into a subcontract with Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Ed) on August 8, 1977, for the purpose of developing methods to chemically clean the secondary side tube to tube support crevices of the steam generators of Indian Point Nos. 1 and 2 PWR plants. This document represents the first reporting on activities performed for Phase I of this effort. Specifically, this report contains the results of a literature search performed by UNI for the purpose of determining state-of-the-art chemical solvents and methods for decontaminating nuclear reactor steam generators. The results of the search sought to accomplish two objectives: (1) identify solvents beyond those proposed at present by UNI and Con Ed for the test program, and (2) confirm the appropriateness of solvents and methods of decontamination currently in use by UNI

  10. Descolamento Crônico da Placenta: Relato de Caso Chronic Placental Abruption: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Faria Couto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O descolamento crônico da placenta é um evento raro cujo diagnóstico pode ser feito precocemente utilizando-se a ultra-sonografia. Sangramento vaginal e hipertonia uterina são sinais clínicos encontrados de forma infreqüente. A fisiopatologia do descolamento crônico é pouco conhecida e a importância dos fatores de risco na sua gênese é controversa. O resultado perinatal é insatisfatório, com alta incidência de prematuridade e mortalidade fetal e neonatal. A conduta obstétrica baseia-se na idade gestacional, condições do feto e evolução do hematoma. Nós apresentamos o caso de uma gestação, complicada por descolamento crônico da placenta identificado na 14ª semana de gestação, que evoluiu com crescimento intra-uterino restrito, oligoidrâmnio e óbito neonatal.Chronic placental abruption is a rare condition that can be early detected by ultrasound. Vaginal bleeding and uterine excitability can be present in an infrequent way. Chronic placental abruption physiopathology is unknown and there are no consistent medical risks that predispose to this condition. The perinatal outcome is poor and is often associated with prematurity and fetal or perinatal death. The obstetric treatment depends on the gestational age, fetal conditions and the size of the clot. We present a case of a chronic placental abruption diagnosed in a 14-week gestation complicated by intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios and perinatal death.

  11. Chemical meningitis from a leaking craniopharyngioma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakizimana, David; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kåre

    2018-06-01

    Recurrent chemical meningitis from cyclic leakage of cyst content from a craniopharyngioma is a rare phenomenon. Here, we report a case of leaking cystic craniopharyngioma presenting with recurrent episodes of sterile meningitis, depression, and paranoia. The diagnosis after an initial craniotomy and exploration was hypophysitis. Signs and symptoms were not alleviated by puncture and biopsy of the tumour but they disappeared after complete resection with a final histological diagnosis of craniopharyngioma.

  12. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  13. Engineered Barrier System Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M and O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01

  14. Vacancy migration energy dependence on local chemical environment in Fe–Cr alloys: A Density Functional Theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, D., E-mail: davide.costa.ge@gmail.com [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR8207, Université de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cédex (France); EDF-R and D Département MMC, Les Renardières, F-77818 Moret sur Loing Cédex (France); Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Adjanor, G. [EDF-R and D Département MMC, Les Renardières, F-77818 Moret sur Loing Cédex (France); Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR8207, Université de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cédex (France); Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Olsson, P. [Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2014-09-15

    The first step towards the understanding and the modelling of the Fe–Cr alloy kinetic properties consists in estimating the migration energies related to the processes that drive the microstructure evolution. The vacancy’s migration barrier is expected to depend on the vacancy–migrating atom pair atomic environment as pointed out by Nguyen-Manh et al. or Bonny et al. In this paper, we address the issue of the dependence on the vacancy’s local atomic environment of both the vacancy migration energy and the configurational energy change ΔE that occurs when the vacancy jumps towards one of its nearest neighbour sites. A DFT approach is used to determine the ground state energy associated to a given configuration of the system. The results are interpreted in the light of the chromium–chromium and chromium–vacancy binding energies as well as the substitutional chromium atoms magnetic properties.

  15. Proposed minimum reporting standards for chemical analysis Chemical Analysis Working Group (CAWG) Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, Alexander; Barrett, Dave; Beale, Michael H.; Beger, Richard; Daykin, Clare A.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.; Fiehn, Oliver; Goodacre, Royston; Griffin, Julian L.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Hardy, Nigel; Harnly, James; Higashi, Richard; Kopka, Joachim; Lane, Andrew N.; Lindon, John C.; Marriott, Philip; Nicholls, Andrew W.; Reily, Michael D.; Thaden, John J.; Viant, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a general consensus that supports the need for standardized reporting of metadata or information describing large-scale metabolomics and other functional genomics data sets. Reporting of standard metadata provides a biological and empirical context for the data, facilitates experimental replication, and enables the re-interrogation and comparison of data by others. Accordingly, the Metabolomics Standards Initiative is building a general consensus concerning the minimum reporting standards for metabolomics experiments of which the Chemical Analysis Working Group (CAWG) is a member of this community effort. This article proposes the minimum reporting standards related to the chemical analysis aspects of metabolomics experiments including: sample preparation, experimental analysis, quality control, metabolite identification, and data pre-processing. These minimum standards currently focus mostly upon mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy due to the popularity of these techniques in metabolomics. However, additional input concerning other techniques is welcomed and can be provided via the CAWG on-line discussion forum at http://msi-workgroups.sourceforge.net/ or http://Msi-workgroups-feedback@lists.sourceforge.net. Further, community input related to this document can also be provided via this electronic forum. PMID:24039616

  16. Feasibility of correlating V-Cr-Ti alloy weld strength with weld chemistry. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Odom, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of refractory metals such as vanadium are determined to a large extent by the interstitial impurities in the alloy. In the case of welding, interstitial impurities are introduced in the welding process from the atmosphere and by dissolution of existing precipitates in the alloy itself. Because of the necessity of having an ultra-pure atmosphere, a vacuum chamber or a glove box is necessary. In the V-Cr-Ti system, the titanium serves as a getter to control the concentration of oxygen and nitrogen in solid solution in the alloy. In this project the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique was used to detect, measure, and map the spacial distribution of impurity elements in welds in the alloy V-4Cr-4Ti. An attempt was then made to correlate the concentrations and distributions of the impurities with mechanical properties of the welds. Mechanical integrity of the welds was determined by Charpy V-notch testing. Welds were prepared by the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) method. Charpy testing established a correlation between weld impurity concentration and the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Higher concentrations of oxygen resulted in a higher DBTT. An exception was noted in the case of a low-oxygen weld which had a high hydrogen concentration resulting in a brittle weld. The concentrations and distributions of the impurities determined by SIMS could not be correlated with the mechanical properties of the welds. This research supports efforts to develop fusion reactor first wall and blanket structural materials

  17. Seismic and source characteristics of large chemical explosions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adushkin, V.V.; Kostuchenko, V.N.; Pernik, L.M.; Sultanov, D.D.; Zcikanovsky, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    From the very beginning of its arrangement in 1947, the Institute for Dynamics of the Geospheres RAS (former Special Sector of the Institute for physics of the Earth, RAS) was providing scientific observations of effects of nuclear explosions, as well as large-scale detonations of HE, on environment. This report presents principal results of instrumental observations obtained from various large-scale chemical explosions conducted in the Former-Soviet Union in the period of time from 1957 to 1989. Considering principal aim of the work, tamped and equivalent chemical explosions have been selected with total weights from several hundreds to several thousands ton. In particular, the selected explosions were aimed to study scaling law from excavation explosions, seismic effect of tamped explosions, and for dam construction for hydropower stations and soil melioration. Instrumental data on surface explosions of total weight in the same range aimed to test military technics and special objects are not included.

  18. BCTR: Biological and Chemical Technologies Research 1994 annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G.

    1995-02-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1994 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Although the OIT was reorganized in 1991 and AICD no longer exists, this document reports on efforts conducted under the former structure. The annual summary report for 1994 (ASR 94) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1994; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  19. Savannah River Site TIER TWO report 1992: Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Still, G.O.

    1993-03-01

    This report is a compilation of data on emergency and hazardous chemicals stored at the Savannah River Site. The report lists quantities of materials, general types of storage containment, types of storage conditions (pressure and temperature), and other information of relevance for particular materials

  20. Resolving surface chemical states in XPS analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesinger, Mark C., E-mail: biesingr@uwo.ca [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario Research Park, Room LL31, 999 Collip Circle, London, Ontario, N6G 0J3 (Canada); ACeSSS (Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Payne, Brad P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Grosvenor, Andrew P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Lau, Leo W.M. [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario Research Park, Room LL31, 999 Collip Circle, London, Ontario, N6G 0J3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Gerson, Andrea R.; Smart, Roger St.C. [ACeSSS (Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Chemical state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of first row transition metals and their oxides and hydroxides is challenging due to the complexity of their 2p spectra resulting from peak asymmetries, complex multiplet splitting, shake-up and plasmon loss structure, and uncertain, overlapping binding energies. Our previous paper [M.C. Biesinger et al., Appl. Surf. Sci. 257 (2010) 887-898.] in which we examined Sc, Ti, V, Cu and Zn species, has shown that all the values of the spectral fitting parameters for each specific species, i.e. binding energy (eV), full wide at half maximum (FWHM) value (eV) for each pass energy, spin-orbit splitting values and asymmetric peak shape fitting parameters, are not all normally provided in the literature and data bases, and are necessary for reproducible, quantitative chemical state analysis. A more consistent, practical and effective approach to curve fitting was developed based on a combination of (1) standard spectra from quality reference samples, (2) a survey of appropriate literature databases and/or a compilation of literature references and (3) specific literature references where fitting procedures are available. This paper extends this approach to the chemical states of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni metals, and various oxides and hydroxides where intense, complex multiplet splitting in many of the chemical states of these elements poses unique difficulties for chemical state analysis. The curve fitting procedures proposed use the same criteria as proposed previously but with the additional complexity of fitting of multiplet split spectra which has been done based on spectra of numerous reference materials and theoretical XPS modeling of these transition metal species. Binding energies, FWHM values, asymmetric peak shape fitting parameters, multiplet peak separation and peak area percentages are presented. The procedures developed can be utilized to remove uncertainties in the analysis of surface states in nano

  1. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  2. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  3. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  4. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  5. Report on fundamental modeling of irradiation-induced swelling and creep in FeCrAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dasgupta, Dwaipayan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-23

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, the material response must be demonstrated to provide suitable radiation stability, in order to ensure that there will not be significant dimensional changes (e.g., swelling), as well as quantifying the radiation hardening and radiation creep behavior. In this report, we describe the use of cluster dynamics modeling to evaluate the defect physics and damage accumulation behavior of FeCrAl alloys subjected to neutron irradiation, with a particular focus on irradiation-induced swelling and defect fluxes to dislocations that are required to model irradiation creep behavior.

  6. ICPP [Idaho Chemical Processing Plant] environmental monitoring report, CY-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, K.R.

    1989-08-01

    Summarized in this report are the data collected through Environmental Monitoring programs conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) by the Environmental Engineering (EE) Section of the Nuclear and Industrial Safety (N and IS) Department. The ICPP is responsible for complying with all applicable Federal, State, Local and DOE Rules, Regulations and Orders. Radiological effluent and emissions are regulated by the DOE. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates all nonradiological waste resulting from the ICPP operations including all airborne, liquid, and solid waste. The EE subsection completed a Quality Assurance (QA) Plan for Environmental Monitoring activities during the third quarter of 1986. QA activities have resulted in the ICPP's implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency rules and guidelines pertaining to the collection, analyses, and reporting of environmentally related samples. Where no approved methods for analyses existed for radionuclides, currently used methods were submitted for the EPA approval. 33 figs., 14 tabs

  7. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  8. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms

  9. Technology Evaluation Workshop Report for Tank Waste Chemical Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-04-01

    A Tank Waste Chemical Characterization Technology Evaluation Workshop was held August 24--26, 1993. The workshop was intended to identify and evaluate technologies appropriate for the in situ and hot cell characterization of the chemical composition of Hanford waste tank materials. The participants were asked to identify technologies that show applicability to the needs and good prospects for deployment in the hot cell or tanks. They were also asked to identify the tasks required to pursue the development of specific technologies to deployment readiness. This report describes the findings of the workshop. Three focus areas were identified for detailed discussion: (1) elemental analysis, (2) molecular analysis, and (3) gas analysis. The technologies were restricted to those which do not require sample preparation. Attachment 1 contains the final workshop agenda and a complete list of attendees. An information package (Attachment 2) was provided to all participants in advance to provide information about the Hanford tank environment, needs, current characterization practices, potential deployment approaches, and the evaluation procedure. The participants also received a summary of potential technologies (Attachment 3). The workshop opened with a plenary session, describing the background and issues in more detail. Copies of these presentations are contained in Attachments 4, 5 and 6. This session was followed by breakout sessions in each of the three focus areas. The workshop closed with a plenary session where each focus group presented its findings. This report summarizes the findings of each of the focus groups. The evaluation criteria and information about specific technologies are tabulated at the end of each section in the report. The detailed notes from each focus group are contained in Attachments 7, 8 and 9

  10. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  11. XXI symposium Modern chemical physics. Tuapse 2009. Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The materials of the XXI symposium Modern chemical physics, Tuapse 2009 (25 September - 6 October, 2009) are presented. Scientific program includes lectures, presentations and poster sessions on photochemistry and radiation chemistry, elementary processes, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. The problems of chemical reaction kinetics, quantum chemistry, chemical spectroscopy, macromolecular chemistry are discussed. Topics of chemical physics of surface, nanochemistry, nanophysics and nanotechnology are treated [ru

  12. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  13. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  14. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    As the Chemical and Laser Sciences Division concludes its first year, the Division personnel can be proud of their many scientific and technical accomplishments. Among the important milestones which the Division achieved were significant demonstrations of the process performance in the Special Isotope Separation program, of beam sensing techniques for the NPB program, and of optical angular multiplexing and energy extraction from the ICF KrF laser. In addition, the Los Alamos FTS was brought to operational status and the Bright Source attained intensities on the order of 10 17 W/cm 2 . A few highlights of these and other research and development activities are presented in the following sections of this report

  15. Isotope separation by chemical exchange process: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, A.

    1987-02-01

    The feasibility of a chemical exchange method for the separation of the isotopes of europium was demonstrated in the system EuCl 2 -EuCl 3 . The single stage separation factor, α, in this system is 1.001 or 1.0005 per mass unit. This value of α is comparable to the separation factors reported for the U 4+ - U 6 and U 3+ - Y 4+ systems. The separation of the ionic species was done by precipitation of the Eu 2+ ions or by extraction of the Eu 3+ ions with HDEHP. Conceptual schemes were developed for a countercurrent reflux cascades consisting of solvent extraction contractors. A regenerative electrocel, combining simultaneous europium reduction, europium oxidation with energy generation, and europium stripping from the organic phase is described. 32 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Final Technical Report for SISGR: Ultrafast Molecular Scale Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Guest, Jeffrey R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Guisinger, Nathan P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Hla, Saw Wai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Schatz, George C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Seideman, Tamar [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Van Duyne, Richard P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-10

    The Northwestern-Argonne SISGR program utilized newly developed instrumentation and techniques including integrated ultra-high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-TERS/STM) and surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS) to advance the spatial and temporal resolution of chemical imaging for the study of photoinduced dynamics of molecules on plasmonically active surfaces. An accompanying theory program addressed modeling of charge transfer processes using constrained density functional theory (DFT) in addition to modeling of SE-FSRS, thereby providing a detailed description of the excited state dynamics. This interdisciplinary and highly collaborative research resulted in 62 publications with ~ 48% of them being co-authored by multiple SISGR team members. A summary of the scientific accomplishments from this SISGR program is provided in this final technical report.

  17. Chemically stable and reusable nano zero-valent iron/graphite-like carbon nitride nanohybrid for efficient photocatalytic treatment of Cr(VI) and rhodamine B under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Zhiyu; Wen, Qingjuan; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Fuwei [Key Laboratory of Eco-materials Advanced Technology (Fuzhou University), Fujian Province University (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@fzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-materials Advanced Technology (Fuzhou University), Fujian Province University (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • NZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} efficiently photodegrades the organic/inorganic pollutants. • Fe{sup 0} improves the charge separation efficiency of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • A possible recover mechanism of nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was proposed. - Abstract: Graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) displays strong potential applications in visible-light photocatalytic for water treatment, but its applications are greatly restricted by high recombination probability of photo-generated electron-hole pairs, as well as a weak reduction ability toward the heavy metals. In this work, we reported the synthesis of nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nano-hybrid with highly efficiency toward the photodegradation of RhB and Cr(VI) under the visible light irradiation. The nZVI nanoparticles can well be immobilized and dispersed on the surface of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanosheets by a facile borohydride-reduction method. As-synthesized nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} has an improved photocatalytic activity much better than that of the pure g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, wherein over 92.9% of Cr(VI) and 99.9% of RhB can be removed by using nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The nZVI particles not only contributes to the reduction and immobilization of Cr(VI), but also accelerates the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of RhB due to a lower recombination rate of photoexcited holes and electrons. Moreover, nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} preserves superior photodegradation efficiency after five experimental cycles. It can be attributed that nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalyst is chemically stable, and part of nZVI can be recovered by g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. We believe that, the composite of nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} reported here could provide guidance for the design of efficient and reusable materials to remove both the organic compounds and heavy metal ions from waste waters.

  18. Influence of Powder Outgassing Conditions on the Chemical, Microstructural, and Mechanical Properties of a 14 wt% Cr Ferritic ODS Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornin, D.; Giroux, P.-F.; Rigal, E.; Fabregue, D.; Soulas, R.; Hamon, D.

    2017-11-01

    Oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic stainless steels are foreseen as fuel cladding tube materials for the new generation of sodium fast nuclear reactors. Those materials, which exhibit remarkable creep properties at high temperature, are reinforced by a dense precipitation of nanometric oxides. This precipitation is obtained by mechanical alloying of a powder and subsequent consolidation. Before consolidation, to obtain a fully dense material, the powder is vacuumed to outgas trapped gases and species adsorbed at the surface of the powder particles. This operation is commonly done at moderate to high temperature to evacuate as much as possible volatile species. This paper focuses on the influence of outgassing conditions on some properties of the further consolidated materials. Chemical composition and microstructural characterization of different materials obtained from various outgassing cycles are compared. Finally, impact toughness of those materials is evaluated by using Charpy testing. This study shows a significant influence of the outgassing conditions on the mechanical properties of the consolidated material. However, microstructure and oxygen contents seem poorly impacted by the various outgassing conditions.

  19. Heterogeneity of Cr in Mytilus edulis: Implications for the Cr isotope system as a paleo-redox proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggmann, Sylvie; Klaebe, Robert; Frei, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Changes in 53Cr/52Cr (δ53Cr) values recorded by biogenic carbonates are emerging as a proxy for variations in the redox state of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere (e.g. [1], [2]). We investigate the ability of modern carbonate shells (Mytilus edulis) to record the δ53Cr composition of ambient seawater in order to assess their utility as a paleo-redox proxy. Samples of cultivated M. edulis from the Kiel Fjord, Germany, were analyzed for their δ53Cr composition and Cr concentrations [Cr] using TIMS. To disentangle the pathway of Cr into the carbonate shell, a series of step-digestions of their organic outer sheaths (periostraca) and their intra-layer composition were performed. Bulk analyses of specimens with intact periostraca returned 16 to 34 ppb Cr with δ53Cr values ranging from 0.28 to 0.65 ± 0.1 (2SE) and thus fall within the range of surface seawater from the Baltic Sea (0.3 - 0.6 \\permil [3]). Partial removal of periostraca resulted in lower [Cr] (5 to 17 ppb) and δ53Cr values (-0.05 ± 0.15 \\permil). These results show a positive correlation between the amount of organic matter present in a sample and both [Cr] and δ53Cr (n = 9). With nearly complete removal of periostraca, the remaining [Cr] is significantly lower (less than 5 ppb) and can only be accessed by incineration of the carbonate shell. The correlation between [Cr], δ53Cr and the amount of periostracum present in bulk samples indicates that a significant proportion of preserved Cr may be associated with the organic outer sheath. The Cr endmember accessed after incineration is less likely associated with the carbonate crystal lattice. Instead, the δ53Cr values obtained after incineration are similar to those reported from terrestrial rocks, suggesting the influence of detrital particles. Alternatively, Cr may be reduced and subsequently re-oxidized during the mineralization of biogenic carbonates [4]. Seasonal changes in primary productivity in seawater may further influence the shell

  20. All-Russia conference on chemical analysis of substances and materials. Abstracts of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Collection contains abstracts of reports on chemical analysis of foods, drugs, environmental materials. Methods of chemical analysis used in such regions as chemical control in agriculture, criminology, art and archaeology, biotechnology, geology, chemistry and petrochemistry, metallurgy, metrology are presented. Theoretical, methodological and applied aspects of chemical analysis are considered [ru

  1. Chemical and electrochemical lithium insertion into ternary transition metal sulfides MMo[sub 2]S[sub 4] (M: V, Cr, Fe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffi, S.; Peraldo Bicelli, L. (Milan Polytechnic (Italy). Dept. of Applied Physical Chemistry CNR, Milan (Italy). Research Centre on Electrode Processes); Barriga, C.; Lavela, P.; Morales, J.; Tirado, J.L. (Cordoba Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica e Ingenieria Quimica)

    1992-08-01

    The effects of lithium insertion in MMo[sub 2]S[sub 4] (M: V, Cr, Fe) have been studied by means of chemical and electrochemical insertion methods. The reaction has a topotactic character and a higher degree of lithium insertion was found for the compound FeMo[sub 2]S[sub 4] which has a greater unit cell volume. For this compound the changes in lattice parameters with lithium content are also more pronounced. The voltage composition curves show a smooth voltage decrease with a quasi-plateau located at around 1.3 V. For discharge at lithium content higher than 0.8, the voltage decreases quickly followed by an extended plateau below 1 V, a region where electrolyte decomposition may occur. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the electrochemical lithiated compounds show that the original monoclinic structure is maintained up to 0.8 e[sup -] per mole, buth with a significant change in the intensity of the peaks, indicative of an alteration of cation distribution for this degree of insertion. For high lithium content, such disorder promotes the collapse of the structure, resulting in the loss of long-range order of the material. (orig.).

  2. Chemical analyses of rocks, minerals, and detritus, Yucca Mountain--Preliminary report, special report No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Livingston, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    This chemical analysis study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. This report is preliminary in the sense that more chemical analyses may be needed in the future and also in the sense that these chemical analyses should be considered as a small part of a much larger geological data base. The interpretations discussed herein may be modified as that larger data base is examined and established. All of the chemical analyses performed to date are shown in Table 1. There are three parts to this table: (1) trace element analyses on rocks (limestone and tuff) and minerals (calcite/opal), (2) rare earth analyses on rocks (tuff) and minerals (calcite/opal), and (3) major element analyses + CO 2 on rocks (tuff) and detritus sand. In this report, for each of the three parts of the table, the data and its possible significance will be discussed first, then some overall conclusions will be made, and finally some recommendations for future work will be offered

  3. Second Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Briggs, Samuel A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    The present report summarizes and discusses the current results and on-going activity towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program.

  4. Revised ANL-reported tensile data for V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    The tensile for all irradiated vanadium alloy samples and several unirradiated vanadium alloys tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been critically reviewed and revised, as necessary. The review and revision are based on re-analyzing the original load-displacement strip-chart recording using a methodology consistent with current ASTM standards. No significant difference has been found between the newly-revised and previously-reported values of yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). However, by correctly subtracting the non-gauge-length displacement and linear gauge-length displacement from the total cross-head displacement, the uniform elongation (UE) of the gauge length decreases by 4-9% strain and the total elongation (TE) of the gauge length decreases by 1-7% strain. These differences are more significant for lower-ductility irradiated alloys than for higher-ductility alloys

  5. Revised ANL-reported tensile data for V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The tensile for all irradiated vanadium alloy samples and several unirradiated vanadium alloys tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been critically reviewed and revised, as necessary. The review and revision are based on re-analyzing the original load-displacement strip-chart recording using a methodology consistent with current ASTM standards. No significant difference has been found between the newly-revised and previously-reported values of yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). However, by correctly subtracting the non-gauge-length displacement and linear gauge-length displacement from the total cross-head displacement, the uniform elongation (UE) of the gauge length decreases by 4-9% strain and the total elongation (TE) of the gauge length decreases by 1-7% strain. These differences are more significant for lower-ductility irradiated alloys than for higher-ductility alloys.

  6. Solid state sintering of silicon nitride ARL-CR-114. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangels, J.; Mikijelj, B. [Ceradyne, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the development of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}material compositions in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-Mo{sub 2}C system with good high temperature stress rupture properties which could be used in engine components. Two distinct processing routes were examined in the course of the program: SSN and SRBSN. SRBSN was chosen for material property optimization. After characterization of two optimized compositions in the above system, demonstration engine components (exhaust valve blanks) were manufactured using the established processing procedures. Dimensional tolerance capabilities of the process were established and material properties of the components were shown to be comparable to those established during material development.

  7. Cr(III) reactivity and foot dermatitis in Cr(VI) positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    Chromium allergy has become synonymous with Cr(VI) allergy. However, real exposure to chromium from leather products may include both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). In this study, we investigate the reactivity to both Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in consecutive patients to analyse the relation between foot eczema/leather...... to Cr(III). The increased risk was not due to a higher degree of sensitivity to Cr(VI). Leather was reported most frequently as the suspected cause of chromium dermatitis (54%). However, Cr(VI) allergics having foot eczema and positive or doubtful Cr(III) reactions often had positive reactions to other...

  8. 77 FR 71561 - Health and Safety Data Reporting; Addition of Certain Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ...). Manufacturers of basic organic chemical products (except aromatic petrochemicals, industrial gases, synthetic... Health and Safety Data Reporting; Addition of Certain Chemicals AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... EPA. The Interagency Testing Committee (ITC), established under section 4(e) of the Toxic Substances...

  9. Bulk and surface properties of liquid Al-Cr and Cr-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, R

    2011-01-01

    The energetics of mixing and structural arrangement in liquid Al-Cr and Cr-Ni alloys has been analysed through the study of surface properties (surface tension and surface segregation), dynamic properties (chemical diffusion) and microscopic functions (concentration fluctuations in the long-wavelength limit and chemical short-range order parameter) in the framework of statistical mechanical theory in conjunction with quasi-lattice theory. The Al-Cr phase diagram exhibits the existence of different intermetallic compounds in the solid state, while that of Cr-Ni is a simple eutectic-type phase diagram at high temperatures and includes the low-temperature peritectoid reaction in the range near a CrNi 2 composition. Accordingly, the mixing behaviour in Al-Cr and Cr-Ni alloy melts was studied using the complex formation model in the weak interaction approximation and by postulating Al 8 Cr 5 and CrNi 2 chemical complexes, respectively, as energetically favoured.

  10. Bulk and surface properties of liquid Al-Cr and Cr-Ni alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, R

    2011-06-15

    The energetics of mixing and structural arrangement in liquid Al-Cr and Cr-Ni alloys has been analysed through the study of surface properties (surface tension and surface segregation), dynamic properties (chemical diffusion) and microscopic functions (concentration fluctuations in the long-wavelength limit and chemical short-range order parameter) in the framework of statistical mechanical theory in conjunction with quasi-lattice theory. The Al-Cr phase diagram exhibits the existence of different intermetallic compounds in the solid state, while that of Cr-Ni is a simple eutectic-type phase diagram at high temperatures and includes the low-temperature peritectoid reaction in the range near a CrNi(2) composition. Accordingly, the mixing behaviour in Al-Cr and Cr-Ni alloy melts was studied using the complex formation model in the weak interaction approximation and by postulating Al(8)Cr(5) and CrNi(2) chemical complexes, respectively, as energetically favoured.

  11. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of ...

  12. XIII symposium. Modern chemical physics. Theses of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Materials of the thirteenth symposium on modern chemical physics are presented. They represent different directions of development of this field of knowledge, such as synthesis, structure, properties of metal-polymer compositions, radiation-chemical investigations in nanotechnology, problems of supercritical chemistry, calculations of kinetic parameters of catalytic systems [ru

  13. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) using silicon nanowire arrays under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellahi, Ouarda [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincaré—BP 70478, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l' Energétique-CRTSE 02, Bd Frantz Fanon, BP. 140, Alger 7 Merveilles (Algeria); Barras, Alexandre [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincaré—BP 70478, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Pan, Guo-Hui [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3888 Dong Nanhu Road, Changchun 130033 (China); Coffinier, Yannick [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincaré—BP 70478, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Hadjersi, Toufik [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l' Energétique-CRTSE 02, Bd Frantz Fanon, BP. 140, Alger 7 Merveilles (Algeria); Maamache, Mustapha [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Département de Physique, Université de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Szunerits, Sabine [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincaré—BP 70478, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); and others

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) using silicon nanowires decorated with Cu nanoparticles. • The reduction takes place at room temperature and neutral pH under visible light. • The photocatalytic reduction was enhanced by addition of adipic or citric acid. - Abstract: We report an efficient visible light-induced reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) to trivalent Cr(III) by direct illumination of an aqueous solution of potassium dichromate (K{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) in the presence of hydrogenated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) or silicon nanowires decorated with copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs-SiNWs) as photocatalyst. The SiNW arrays investigated in this study were prepared by chemical etching of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO{sub 3} aqueous solution. The Cu NPs were deposited on SiNW arrays via electroless deposition technique. Visible light irradiation of an aqueous solution of K{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (10{sup −4} M) in presence of H-SiNWs showed that these substrates were not efficient for Cr(VI) reduction. The reduction efficiency achieved was less than 10% after 120 min irradiation at λ > 420 nm. Addition of organic acids such as citric or adipic acid in the solution accelerated Cr(VI) reduction in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, Cu NPs-SiNWs was found to be a very efficient interface for the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in absence of organic acids. Almost a full reduction of Cr(VI) was achieved by direct visible light irradiation for 140 min using this photocatalyst.

  14. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  15. Evidences for the Formation of Chromium in the Unusual Oxidation State Cr(IV). I. Chemical Reactivity, Microhomogeneity, and Crystal Structures of the Nonstoichiometric Channel Compounds Tl xCr 5Se 8(0 ≤ x≤ 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, W.; Helmer, O.; Näther, C.

    1996-11-01

    The topotactic redox reaction between TlCr 5Se 8and bromine in acetonitrile leads to the formation of metastable samples with 0 ≤ xtransition metal chalcogenide crystallizing in the TlV 5S 8type structure with a Tl content xtopotactic redox reaction does not follow simple kinetics but is rather explained on the basis of the superposition of at least three different fundamental steps. EDAX investigations conducted on selected single crystals reveal that dependent on the deintercalation temperature, Tl is laterally inhomogeneous distributed along the needle axis which coincides with the crystallographic baxis. A pronounced maximum is observed at the middle of the crystals. In stoichiometric TlCr 5Se 8the detailed analysis of the anisotropic displacement parameters of the Tl atoms reveal that the Tl atoms are displaced from the central position by about 0.26 Å. As a consequence the Tl atoms are coordinated by seven Se atoms in an irregular coordination polyhedron. Since the positions x0 zare related by a center of symmetry they cannot be occupied simultaneously. Hence it must be assumed that TlCr 5Se 8has a domain structure with local symmetry Cm. In the Tl poorer phases the refinement of the Tl atoms at the central position leads to unusual high U22components. The observed microinhomogenity as well as an enhanced mobility and/or static disorder of the Tl atom within the channel may be responsible for this. The value for U11decreases with decreasing Tl content whereas U33is not affected. This observation is indicative for a different displacement of the Tl atoms from the central position. With respect to the possible reaction mechanisms, according to our structural investigations, the oxidation of monovalent Tl to trivalent Tl can be excluded. With decreasing Tl content the lattice parameters exhibit very anisotropic behavior, which is a direct consequence of the large changes of the interatomic Cr-Cr distances. The average as well as the nonbonding Se-Se distances

  16. A case of chemical assault in Hong Kong (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Leung

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The benefits of urgent reduction in chemical load is intuitively obvious, and by shaving tangentially to bleeding, vital tissue is preserved. Trying to prove benefit in terms of an RCT is however ethically challenging.

  17. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  18. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described

  19. Handbook of Basic Tables for Chemical Analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, T.J.; Svoronos, P.D.N.

    1988-04-01

    This work began as a slim booklet prepared by one of the authors (TJB) to accompany a course on chemical instrumentation presented at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder Laboratories. The booklet contained tables on chromatography, spectroscopy, and chemical (wet) methods, and was intended to provide the students with enough basic data to design their own analytical methods and procedures. Shortly thereafter, with the co-authorship of Prof. Paris D. N. Svoronos, it was expanded into a more-extensive compilation entitled Basic Tables for Chemical Analysis, published as National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 1096. That work has now been expanded and updated into the present body of tables. Although there have been considerable changes since the first version of these tables, the aim has remained essentially the same. The authors have tried to provide a single source of information for those practicing scientists and research students who must use various aspects of chemical analysis in their work. In this respect, it is geared less toward the researcher in analytical chemistry than to those practitioners in other chemical disciplines who must have routine use of chemical analysis

  20. 76 FR 7841 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collections; Toxic Chemical Release Reporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... agencies, and others to promote reductions in toxic chemical releases. Industrial facilities use the TRI... Activities; Proposed Collections; Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Request for Comments on Proposed Renewal... the individual listed in the preceding FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. Title: Toxic Chemical...

  1. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement of...

  2. Crystallization of pyroxene phases and physico-chemical properties of glass-ceramics based on Li{sub 2}O–Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} eutectic glass system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salman, S.M.; Salama, S.N.; Abo-Mosallam, H.A., E-mail: abomosallam@yahoo.com.au

    2015-01-15

    The crystallization characteristics, crystalline phase assemblages and solid solution phases developed due to thermally crystallized glasses based on the Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}–Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}–LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} (1028 ± 3 °C) eutectic glass system by replacing some trivalent oxides instead of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated. The microhardness and chemical durability of the glass-ceramics were also determined. Lithium meta and disilicate (Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), lithium gallium silicate (LiGaSiO{sub 4}), and varieties of pyroxene phases, including Cr-pyroxene phase, i.e. lithium-kosmochlor (LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), lithium indium silicate (LiInSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and pyroxene solid solution of Li-aegerine type [Li (Fe{sub 0.5}, Cr{sub 0.5}) Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}] were the main crystalline phases formed in the crystallized glasses. There is no evidence for the formation of solid solution or liquid immiscibility gaps between LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} or LiInSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} phases and LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. However, LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and LiFeSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} components were accommodated in the pyroxene structure under favorable conditions of crystallization to form monomineralic pyroxene solid solution phase of the probably formula [Li (Fe{sub 0.5}, Cr{sub 0.5}) Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}]. The type and compatibility of the crystallized phases are discussed in relation to the compositional variation of the glasses and heat-treatment applied. The microhardness values of the crystalline materials ranged between 5282 and 6419 MPa while, the results showed that the chemical stability of the glass-ceramics was better in alkaline than in acidic media. - Highlights: • Glass ceramics based on Li{sub 2}O–Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} eutectic (1028 ± 3 °C) glass were prepared. • LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and LiFeSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} phases form monomineralic pyroxene solid

  3. Toxics release inventory: List of toxic chemicals within the polychlorinated alkanes category and guidance for reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires certain facilities manufacturing, processing, or otherwise using listed toxic chemicals to report their environmental releases of such chemicals annually. On November 30, 1994 EPA added 286 chemicals and chemical categories. Six chemical categories (nicotine and salts, strychnine and salts, polycyclic aromatic compounds, water dissociable nitrate compounds, diisocyanates, and polychlorinated alkanes) are included in these additions. At the time of the addition, EPA indicated that the Agency would develop, as appropriate, interpretations and guidance that the Agency determines are necessary to facilitate accurate reporting for these categories. This document constitutes such guidance for the polychlorinated alkanes category.

  4. Determination of Cr2O3 in chrome-tanned leather by radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melich, M.; Palagyi, S.; Kern, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results on the determination of Cr 2 O 3 in chrome-tanned leather by measuring the content of Cr by means of radionuclide-excited XRF analysis are reported. For excitation a 3.7 GBq 238 Pu source was used and the characteristic K X-rays of Cr were detected with a planar Si(Li) detector. Both smooth and rough sides of the leather were analyzed directly or with a pair of V/Ti balanced filters. A fairly good correlation was found between Cr Kx counts of the rough side and the Cr 2 O 3 concentrations determined chemically in the range of 3.5 to 6.0% Cr 2 O 3 . The method renders possible a rapid and non-destructive determination of Cr 2 O 3 in various leather samples. (author)

  5. Comparison of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy multiplet splitting of Cr 2p peaks from chromium tris(β-diketonates) with chemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, R.; Conradie, J.; Erasmus, E., E-mail: erasmuse@ufs.ac.za

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Synopsis and pictogram for Table of contents The Cr 2p{sub 3/2} peaks obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of a series of chromium(III) β-diketonato complexes were fitted with calculated multiplet peaks. The ratio of the fac and mer isomers obtained from XPS compared very well with the Boltzmann calculated ratio. The electronegativity of the R-groups on the β-diketonato ligand influences the XPS peak positions. - Highlights: • β-diketonato complexes Cr(RCOCHCOR’){sub 3} • Cr 2p{sub 3/2} XPS peaks fitted with calculated multiplet peaks. • Different calculated multiplet peaks fit the Cr 2p{sub 3/2} peak for fac and mer isomers. • XPS peak positions influenced by the electronegativity of the R- and R'-group. - Abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) measurements of a series of chromium(III) β-diketonato complexes of the Cr 2p spectra was fitted with calculated multiplet peaks. The XPS of these Cr(III) complexes did not exhibit fine structure, however, well-defined line shapes could be fitted to the Cr 2p{sub 3/2} envelope. The splitting patterns obtained for the Cr(III) β-diketonato complexes compared well with the multiplet splitting predicted by Gupta and Sen for the free Cr(III) ion. The Cr(III) β-diketonato complexes containing unsymmetrically substituted β-diketonato ligands, which display both the fac and mer isomers, could be fitted with two sets of multiplets and were useful in determining the ratio between the fac and mer isomers, which was compared with the Boltzman calculated ratio obtained from density functional theory energies. The obtained binding energy of the first multiplet splitting peak of the Cr 2p{sub 3/2} envelope was found to be dependent on the combined Gordy group electronegativity of the R-groups substituted on the β-diketonato ligand (RCOCHCOR′){sup −}.

  6. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively

  7. 40 CFR 710.25 - Chemical substances for which information must be reported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS 2002 Inventory Update Reporting... the Master Inventory File at the beginning of a reporting period described in § 710.33, unless the...

  8. Brainstorming opportunities for postmarketing surveillance of chemicals : Workshop report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof ED; van Drongelen A; Graven C; Herremans J; de Kaste D; Ossendorp B; Piersma AH; GZB; V&Z

    2017-01-01

    On behalf of the Ministry of Health a survey was prepared of possibilities for setting up a 'post-marketing surveillance' (PMS)-system for chemical substances in consumer products, including food. With such a system, (long-term) health effects of substances which are already on the market may be

  9. 40 CFR 712.30 - Chemical lists and reporting periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shown in the table below. The substances are listed in Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number order... 67762-90-7 Dimethyl silicones and siloxane, reaction products with silica 10/12/93 2/28/94 67762-94-1...-29-4 Balsams, copaiba, sulfurized, vanadium salts 7/11/03 9/9/03 Voluntary HPV Challenge Program...

  10. Near miss reporting in the chemical process industry: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, van der T.W.

    1995-01-01

    The research programme described in this paper focuses on the human component of system failure in general, and more specifically on the design and implementation of information systems for registration and analysis of so called near misses (or: near accidents) in the chemical process industry. Its

  11. Final report on in-reactor creep-fatigue deformation behaviour of a CuCrZr alloy: COFAT 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Tähtinen, S.; Moilanen, P.

    CrZr(HT1) alloy exposed concurrently to flux of neutrons and creep-fatigue cyclic loading directly in a fission reactor. Special experimental facilities were designed and fabricated for this purpose. A number of in-reactor creep-fatigue experiments were successfully carried out in the BR-2 reactor at Mol...

  12. Final Report on in-reactor creep-fatigue deformation behaviour of a CuCrZr alloy: COFAT 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N. [Risoe National Lab. - DTU, Materials Research Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Taehtinen, S.; Moilanen, P. [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland); Jacquet, P.; Dekeyser, J. [SCK-CEN, Reactor Technology Design Dept., Mol (Belgium); Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Reactor Technology Design Dept., Richland (United States); Li, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Materials Science and Technology Div., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Stubbins, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, Urbane, Illinois (United States)

    2007-08-15

    At present, practically nothing is known about the deformation behaviour of materials subjected simultaneously to external cyclic force and neutron irradiation. The main objective of the present work is to determine experimentally the mechanical response and resulting microstructural changes in CuCrZr(HT1) alloy exposed concurrently to flux of neutrons and creep-fatigue cyclic loading directly in a fission reactor. Special experimental facilities were designed and fabricated for this purpose. A number of in-reactor creep-fatigue experiments were successfully carried out in the BR-2 reactor at Mol (Belgium). In the present report we first describe the experimental facilities and the details of the in-reactor creep-fatigue experiments carried out at 363 and 343K at a strain amplitude of 0.5% with hold-times of 10 and 100s, respectively. For comparison purposes, similar creep-fatigue tests were performed outside of the reactor. (i.e. in the absence of neutron irradiation). During in-reactor tests, the mechanical response was continuously registered throughout the whole test. The results are first presented in the form of hysteresis loops confirming that the nature of deformation during these tests was truly cyclic. The temporal evolution of the stress response in the specimens is presented in the form of the average maximum stress amplitude as a function of the number of cycles as well as a function of displacement dose accumulated during the tests. The results illustrate the nature and magnitude of cyclic hardening as well as softening as a function of the number of cycles and displacement dose. Details of the microstructure were investigated using TEM and STEM techniques. The fracture surface morphology was investigated using SEM technique. Both mechanical and microstructural results are briefly discussed. The main conclusion emerging from the limited amount of present results is that neither the irradiation nor the duration of the hold-time have any significant

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of nanostructure multilayer CrN/Cr coatings on titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiecinski, Piotr; Smolik, Jerzy; Garbacz, Halina; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J.

    2011-01-01

    Five different nanostructured, multilayer coatings (CrN/Cr)x8 with different thickness ratio of Cr and CrN layers were deposited by PAPVD (Plasma Assisted Physical Vapour Deposition) vacuum arc method on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition of the CrN and Cr sub-layers were characterized by SEM with EDX and Cs-corrected dedicated STEM on cross-sections prepared by focus ion beam. Besides, hardness and Young's modulus of the (Cr/CrN)x8 coatings has been measured. The adhesion has been tested by scratch test method. The obtained (CrN/Cr) multilayer coatings, 5-6 μm in thickness, have homogeneous and nanocrystalline structure, free of pores and cracks. The microstructures of Cr and CrN layers consist of columnar grains below 100 nm in diameter. The hardness and Young's modulus of these coatings depend linearly on thickness ratio of Cr and CrN layers. The decrease of the thickness ratio Cr/CrN 0.81 to 0.15 results in the increase of hardness from 1275 HV to 1710 HV and Young's modulus from 260 GPa to 271 GPa.

  14. Influence of the chemical composition and the fabrication process on the behaviour of high temperature oxidation of Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemendot, F.; Arnoldi, F.; Cerede, J.B.; Dionnet, B.; Nardou, F.; Duysen, J.C. van

    1993-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of four industrial Fe-Cr-Al alloys was studied. Two of them were Fe-Cr-Al alloys fabricated either by melting or by powder metallurgy. The two other ones were Fe-Cr-Al-Y alloys either produced by melting or by mechanical alloying. On these alloys, we determined oxidation kinetics and observed the morphology of the oxide layer after isothermal and cyclic exposures from 1000 C up to 1300 C. The beneficial effect of yttrium on the adherence of oxide layers was confirmed. The powder metallurgy fabrication route does not improve the oxidation resistance of yttrium-free alloys. On the other hand, the association of the powder metallurgy and the addition of yttrium allow the manufacturing of alloys which present an excellent behaviour to high temperature oxidation. (orig.)

  15. Chemical cleaning of Dresden Unit 1: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The introduction of NS-1 solvent into the full primary system of Dresden Unit-1 nuclear power reactor on September 12, 1984, represented the culmination of several years of development, testing, planning, and construction. The requirement was to dissolve the highly radioactive deposits of primarily nickel ferrite without any corrosion which might compromise the reactor systems. During the actual cleaning with the NS-1 solvent, the chemical condition of the circulating solvent was measured. Iron, nickel, and radioactive cobalt all dissolved smoothly. The amount of copper in solution decreased in concentration, verifying expectations that metallic copper would plate on to clean metal surfaces. A special rinse formulation was employed after the primary cleaning steps and the ''lost'' copper was thus redissolved and removed from the system. After the cleaning was complete and the reactor had been refilled with pure water, radiation levels were measured. The most accurate of these measurements gave decontamination factors ranging well above 100, which indicated a significant removal of the radioactive deposits, and demonstrated the success of this project. Treatment of the radioactive liquid wastes from this operation required volume reduction and water purification. The primary method of processing the spent cleaning solvent and rinse water was evaporation. The resulting concentrate has been stored as a liquid, awaiting solidification to allow burial at a designated site. Water which was separated during evaporation, along with the dilute rinses, was processed by various chemical means, reevaporated, treated with activated carbon, and/or demineralized before its radionuclide and chemical content was low enough to allow it to be returned to Dresden Station for treatment or disposal. 60 figs., 31 tabs

  16. Elaboration, characterization of CrN- based coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlili, B.; Nouveau, C.; Guillemot, G.

    2011-01-01

    Cr, CrN and CrAlN monolayers were synthesized by RF dual magnetron sputtering on AISI4140 steel and silicon substrates at 200 deg. C. Multilayers coatings based on the three mono-layers such as CrN/CrAlN and Cr/CrN/CrAlN were also synthesized only on Si. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties of the layers were determined by AFM, SEM+WDS, stress, roughness and nanoindentation measurements. The influence of the thickness on the mechanical properties of the monolayers stresses has been studied and as a consequence we compared the mono and multilayers stress state.

  17. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.H. Jr.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    These Appendices describe various technologies that may be applicable to the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (MWTP) Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). These technologies were identified by the CPTS Technical Support Group (TSG) as potentially applicable to a variety of separation, volume reduction, and decontamination requirements. The purpose was to identify all available and developing technologies, and their characteristics, for subsequent evaluation for specific requirements identified for the CPTS. However, the technologies described herein are not necessarily all inclusive, nor are they necessarily all applicable

  18. Land use planning and chemical sites. Summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Carsten D.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology for land-use planning involving chemical sites has been developed for making decisions in local and regional administrations. The methodology treats land-use planning as a multi criteria decision and structures the planning process in sevensteps, where one can loop through the steps...... several times. Essential for the methodology is the specification of objectives setting the frame in which the alternatives are assessed and compared. The complete list of objectives includes the followingitems: safety and accidents, public distortion and health, environmental impact, cultural and natural...

  19. Chemical Profiles of Microalgae with Emphasis on Lipids: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J. R.; Tillett, D. M.; Suen, Y.; Hubbard, J.; Tornabene, T. G.

    1986-02-01

    This final report details progress during the third year of this subcontract. The overall objective of this subcontract was two fold: to provide the analytical capability required for selecting microalgae strains with high energy contents and to develop fundamental knowledge required for optimizing the energy yield from microalgae cultures. The progress made towards these objectives during this year is detailed in this report.

  20. Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

  1. Final report on in-reactor uniaxial tensile deformation of pure iron and Fe-Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Huang, X.; Tähtinen, S.

    , the in-reactor deformation leads to accumulation of dislocations in a homogeneous fashion and only to a modest density. No dislocation cells are formed during the in-reactor or post-irradiation deformation of Fe-Cr and pure iron. Furthermore, in both cases, the slip systems even in the planes with Schmid...... factor value of almost zero get activated during the in-reactor as well as post-irradiation deformation. The main implications of these results are briefly discussed....

  2. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  3. Destruction and waste treatment methods used in a chemical agent disposal project. Memorandum report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAndless, J.; Fedor, V.; Kinderwater, T.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the equipment and methods used to thermally decontaminate scrap metal and destroy stockpiles of nerve agents, mustard and lewisite chemical warfare agents. Mustard was destroyed by direct incineration whereas the nerve agents and lewisite were chemically neutralized. The arsenic waste from the lewisite neutralization process was chemically-fixated in concrete for final disposal by landfilling. The scrap metal was incinerated and rendered suitable for recycling into metal feedstock.

  4. Chemical Cellulitis due to Peanut Oil Administration. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Turiño Muro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical cellulitis is the reaction of the integuments in response to the administration of toxic substances, leading to an acute inflammatory reaction that develops into an abscess or necrosis. This disease is not frequently treated in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology of the Joaquin Albarrán Clinical-Surgical Hospital. We present the case of a patient who attended our institution because of increased volume in both upper limbs at the biceps and triceps areas, and marked skin necrosis accompanied by lesions of axillary adenopathy, one as an abscess. Antibiotics were prescribed prior to the completion of cultures, antibiogram and dressing under anesthesia, at present the lesions are in the healing phase.

  5. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.H. Jr.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs and activities throughout the DOE Complex. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to develop, deploy, and complete appropriate technologies for the treatment of an DOE low-level mixed waste (LLMW). The MWIP mission includes development of strategies related to enhanced waste form production, improvements to and testing of the EM-30 baseline flowsheet for mixed waste treatment, programmatic oversight for ongoing technical projects, and specific technical tasks related to the site specific Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) based on primary functional areas of the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant) identified by EM-30. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Chemical/Physical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. The focus of this document is the Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). The CPTS performs the required pretreatment and/or separations on the waste streams passing through the system for discharge to the environment or efficient downstream processing. Downstream processing can include all system components except Front-End Waste Handling. The primary separations to be considered by the CPTS are: (1) removal of suspended and dissolved solids from aqueous and liquid organic streams, (2) separation of water from organic liquids, (3) treatment of wet and dry solids, including separation into constituents as required, for subsequent thermal treatment and final form processing, (4) mercury removal and control, and (5) decontamination of equipment and waste classified as debris

  6. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  7. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report. Applying chemical innovation to environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented

  8. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation

  9. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  10. Chemical Technology Division annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for several of the sections reporting work on the fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, coal conversion, isotope separation, fusion energy, separation processes, reactor safety, biomedical studies, and chemical engineering.

  11. Oxygen-induced immediate onset of the antiferromagnetic stacking in thin Cr films on Fe(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Giulia, E-mail: giulia.berti@polimi.it; Brambilla, Alberto; Calloni, Alberto; Bussetti, Gianlorenzo; Finazzi, Marco; Duò, Lamberto; Ciccacci, Franco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-04-20

    We investigated the magnetic coupling of ultra-thin Cr films grown at 600 K on a Fe(001)-p(1 × 1)O substrate by means of spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy. Our findings show that the expected antiferromagnetic stacking of the magnetization in Cr(001) layers occurs right from the first atomic layer at the Cr/Fe interface. This is at variance with all previous observations in similar systems, prepared in oxygen-free conditions, which always reported on a delayed onset of the magnetic oscillations due to the occurrence of significant chemical alloying at the interface, which is substantially absent in our preparation.

  12. Idaho chemical programs annual technical report, fiscal year 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The operating experience in fuel processing, waste calcining, and other waste management activities for FY 1974 is summarized. A new zirconium fuel dissolver has performed well, and the first-cycle extraction system shows near-zero losses. Technical support activities include: a flowsheet to reduce acid consumption and volume of liquid wastes in the electrolytic process; a new dissolution process for ternary oxide PWR fuel using zirconium-fluoride-nitric acid dissolvent; a study and recommendation for treatment of fuel storage basin water; progress in design and development of processes for Rover and HTGR fuels, corrosion evaluation of bins containing calcined wastes showing corrosion rates indicative of a safe 500-year or greater storage life; demonstration on a pilot-plant scale of conditions for calcination of stainless steel and Rover fuel wastes as well as commercial wastes; evaluation of equipment alternatives for a new waste calcining facility; studies related to improvements in rare gas recovery and process off-gas treatment; demonstration of stability when various high-level waste solutions are mixed; progress on postcalcination treatment of calcined waste solids (ceramic formation, incorporation in metals, and calcine-concretes); studies on removal of actinides from ICPP wastes; a conceptual design for a proposed radioactive solid-waste repackaging facility for the INEL. Significant progress is reported on the program for determination of burnup for fast breeder reactor fuels. (U.S.)

  13. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide; Correction. SUMMARY: The... Administrative Stay of the reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide. The Office of the Federal Register...

  14. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  15. Quantitative Survey and Structural Classification of Fracking Chemicals Reported in Unconventional Gas Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Martin; Schreglmann, Kathrin

    2015-04-01

    Few technologies are being discussed in such controversial terms as hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") in the recovery of unconventional gas. Particular concern regards the chemicals that may return to the surface as a result of hydraulic fracturing. These are either "fracking chemicals" - chemicals that are injected together with the fracking fluid to optimize the fracturing performance or geogenic substances which may turn up during gas production, in the so-called produced water originating from the target formation. Knowledge about them is warranted for several reasons. (1) Monitoring. Air emissions are reported to arise from well drilling, the gas itself or condensate tanks. In addition, potential spills and accidents bear the danger of surface and shallow groundwater contaminations. Monitoring strategies are therefore warranted to screen for "indicator" substances of potential impacts. (2) Chemical Analysis. To meet these analytical demands, target substances must be defined so that adequate sampling approaches and analytical methods can be developed. (3) Transformation in the Subsurface. Identification and classification of fracking chemicals (aromatics vs. alcohols vs. acids, esters, etc.) is further important to assess the possibility of subsurface reactions which may potentially generate new, as yet unidentified transformation products. (4) Wastewater Treatment. For the same reason chemical knowledge is important for optimized wastewater treatment strategies. (5) Human and Ecosystem Health. Knowledge of the most frequent fracking chemicals is further essential for risk assessment (environmental behavior, toxicity) (6) Public Discussions. Finally, an overview of reported fracking chemicals can provide unbiased scientific into current public debates and enable critical reviews of Green Chemistry approaches. Presently, however, such information is not readily available. We aim to close this knowledge gap by providing a quantitative overview of chemical

  16. Cr3+ and Cr4+ luminescence in glass ceramic silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martines, Marco A.U.; Davolos, Marian R.; Jafelicci, Miguel Junior; Souza, Dione F. de; Nunes, Luiz A.O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of glass ceramic silica matrix on [CrO 4 ] 4- and Cr 2 O 3 NIR and visible luminescence. Chromium-containing silica was obtained by precipitation from water-glass and chromium nitrate acid solution with thermal treatment at 1000 deg. C. From XRD results silica and silica-chromium samples are crystalline. The chromium emission spectrum presents two main broad bands: one in the NIR region (1.1-1.7μm) and other in the visible region (0.6-0.7μm) assigned to Cr 4+ and to Cr 3+ , respectively. This thermal treated glass ceramic silica-chromium sample stabilizes the [CrO 4 ] 4- where Cr 4+ substitutes for Si 4+ and also hexacoordinated Cr 3+ group probably as segregated phase in the system. It can be pointed out that luminescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool for detecting the two chromium optical centers in the glass ceramic silica

  17. Chemical speciation of Pb, Ni Cr, Cu, Co and V in two natural soils and in an antropic agricultural soil contaminated by irrigation with the polluted Rio Bogota waters in its High Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matamoros, Adriana; Vargas, O; Mejia, L

    1999-01-01

    Traditional and continuous irrigation with the highly polluted waters of Rio Bogota in its upper basin has induced in soils, grasses and crops grown next to the river, a gradually increasing accumulation of highly toxic elements like Pb, Ni, Cr, Cu, Cd, Co, V and some others, which represents a real and very high risk for public health whenever grasses and edible crops growing on them absorb these elements above critical or permissible limits. To evaluate the magnitude of this problem three different soils of the Sabana were subjected to the chemical speciation procedure proposed by Tessier (1979) in order to determine: 1) the total content of essential and/or structural elements like Al, Fe, Ca, K, P, Mn and Ti, and the trace elements Pb, Ni, Cr, Cu, Cd, Co and V accumulated through time in the soils; 2) the relative proportion on which each one of them are linked to the different components or fractions of soils (ex. exchangeable, CO 3 , Fe/Mn oxides, O.M. and sulfides, and residual fraction) and 3) the bioavailability or amount of each that could be really absorbed by plants or able to go down to the underground water. Results showed in general for all soils normal values for the essential and/or structural elements and high to very high levels of Pb, Ni, Cu, Cd, Cr, Co y V, higher in Jardines de Colombia and Las Parcelas farms soils than in el Recreo farm soils. This situation is aggravated by the relatively high mobility and high concentration and bioavailability of some of these elements, which increase the risk for public health and the possibility of its migration down to the underground waters

  18. Use of Bentonite in residual waters of tanneries for the removal of Cr(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarria Isaza, Adriana; Moreno Casaf, Monica; Ramirez Ochoa, Claudia; Tamayo Martinez, Claudia; Saldarriaga Molina, Carlos

    1998-01-01

    An efficient procedure is reported for Cr(III) removal from tannery waste waters by means of natural and chemically treated bentonites. The best result was obtained using 20 mL of effluent with 7.5 grams of Bentonite. With this quantity it was removed the total amount of chromium III present in the sample

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy substantially reduces symptom severity and social disability associated with multiple chemical sensitivity: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Jesper; Gulmann, Nils; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic nonallergic, multisymptom disorder triggered by common environmental chemicals in concentrations considered nontoxic for most individuals. The condition may lead to loss of occupation and social isolation, and no effective treatment has been reported...

  20. Report: EPA Should Assess Needs and Implement Management Controls to Ensure Effective Incorporation of Chemical Safety Research Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #17-P-0294, June 23, 2017. With management controls that ensure the collaborative development of research products and prioritize chemical safety research needs, the EPA would be better able to conduct faster chemical risk assessments.

  1. Progress report on SYVAC chemical speciation modelling studies during 1983/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.; Smith, G.L.; Williams, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarises progress made on the SYVAC (System Variability Analysis program) chemical speciation project during 1983-4. Chemical speciation is defined and its importance in the SYVAC approach to Radioactive Waste Management is discussed. Computer modelling of chemical equilibria is described and the two programs presently operational at UWIST - SOLMNQ and MINEQL - are compared and discussed in detail. In view of the shortcomings of the databases supplied with these programs, a new database of equilibrium constants has been compiled containing 483 aqueous species and 329 solid phases, including data for the radionuclides uranium, plutonium, americium, neptunium and thorium. The collaborative work with AERE, Harwell, is reported. A leaching experiment carried out at Harwell has been modelled using the chemical speciation programs. The results for uranium, plutonium, americium and neptunium, are presented. However, the experimental data provided by AERE is insufficient for accurate simulations. Chemical speciation studies relating to specific sites require accurate characterisation of the groundwater, i.e. chemical composition, Eh and pH. In the absence of such information, preliminary studies have been made using an average granite groundwater. The results of these studies are presented and include solubility and speciation plots for uranium, plutonium, thorium and neptunium. The future aims of the project are discussed. (author)

  2. Final report on in-reactor creep-fatigue deformation behaviour of a CuCrZr alloy: COFAT 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Johansen, B.S.; Taehtinen, S.; Moilanen, P.; Saarela, S.; Jacquet, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Stubbins, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to determine experimentally the mechanical response and resulting microstructural changes in CuCrZr (HT1) alloy exposed concurrently to flux of neutrons and creep-fatigue cyclic loading directly in a fission reactor. Using specially designed test facilities for this purpose, in-reactor creep-fatigue tests have been performed at strain amplitudes of 0.25 and 0.35 % with a holdtime of 10s in the BR-2 reactor at Mol (Belgium). These tests were performed at the ambient temperatures of 326K and 323K. For comparison purposes corresponding out-of-reactor creep-fatigue tests were also carried out. In the following we first describe the details of the creep-fatigue experiments. We then present the main results on the mechanical response of the material in the form of hysteresis loops and the maximum stress amplitude as a function of the number of creep-fatigue cycles during the out-of-reactor and the in-reactor tests carried out at different strain amplitudes. Finally, the dependence of the number of cycles to failure (i.e. creep-fatigue lifetime) on the strain amplitudes is shown. The details of microstructure of the specimens tested out-of-reactor as well as in the reactor were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The main results on the mechanical response as well as changes in the microstructure are briefly discussed. The main conclusion emerging from the present work is that the lifetime of the in-reactor tested specimens is by a factor of about two longer than in the case of corresponding out-of-reactor tests. (au)

  3. Tratamiento ortodóntico en paciente con periodontits crónica avanzada generalizada: reporte de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Enrique Porto Cortés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento de ortodoncia es un procedimiento que busca corregir la maloclusión y mejorar la estética dental a través de fuerzas leves por periodos de tiempos largos o medianos, dicho tratamiento en pacientes periodontalmente comprometidos genera polémica debido a que la colocación de la aparatología puede incrementar la formacion de biopelicula y por ende agravar la periodontitis; también las fuerzas ejercidas podrían aumentar la reabsorción ósea. Sin embargo, en la actualidad se pueden encontrar estudios que confirman que el tratamiento de ortodoncia ayuda al periodonto enfermo gracias a los diferentes movimientos dentales que se producen durante éste; siempre y cuando el ortodoncista y periodoncista trabajen en conjunto, eduquen y motiven al paciente a cambiar sus hábitos de higiene bucal y sigan unos parámetros determinados. El objetivo principal del artículo es la presentación de un caso clínico en el que se realizó un tratamiento de ortodoncia a un paciente con periodontitis crónica avanzada generalizada y con relación canina clase III para de detener el avance de esta enfermedad, además para corregir la maloclusión y lograr una buena estética facial y dental. En conjunto con este tratamiento se realizaron procedimientos de mantenimiento periodontal tales como profilaxis dental, fase higiénica y enseñanza en higiene bucal. Los resultados del tratamiento se consideraron satisfactorios, se culminó sin pérdida dentaria, con oclusión en clase 1 de Angle, una buena estética facial y dental, un periodonto sano y un paciente educado en higiene bucal.

  4. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwas, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  5. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  6. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were...... calcium phosphate transfection method, this method has the advantage of being more feasible, as the assay can be scaled down to the microtiter plate format. Furthermore, the transfection reagent is noncytotoxic, allowing its addition together with the test compounds thereby reducing the hands...

  7. Cr-Ni ALLOY ELECTRODEPOSITION AND COMPARISON WITH CONVENTIONAL PURE Cr COATING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moniruzzaman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cr coating is widely used as the outer surface of precision parts due to its attractive appearance and superior corrosion resistance properties. It is obtained by electrodeposition via a conventional bath with hexavalent Cr ions. This manufacturing technique has many drawbacks, such as very low efficiency and high operating temperature and it is hazardous to health. In this work, we studied a Cr-Ni alloy deposition technique and compared the alloy coating properties to those with conventional Cr coating. Sequential two-step alloy electrodeposition was also compared. We took varying concentrations of Cr, Ni and complexing agents for the electrodeposition of Cr-Ni alloy and sequential Cr-Ni alloy coating on mild steel. Operating parameters, i.e. current density and temperature, were varied to examine their effects on the coating properties. The coatings thus obtained were characterized by visual observation, corrosion test, microhardness measurement, morphology and chemical analysis. The Cr-Ni alloy coating was found to be more corrosion resistant in 5% NaCl solution and harder than the pure Cr coating obtained by conventional electrodeposition. Toxic gas was produced in a much lower extent in the alloy coating than the conventional Cr coating technique. Again, the two-step Cr-Ni alloy coating was found better in terms of corrosion resistance as well as hardness compared to the Cr-Ni alloy coating. The process was also found to be much more environmentally friendly.

  8. Cr(VI) occurrence and geochemistry in water from public-supply wells in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John; Wright, Michael; Seymour, Whitney A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in 918 wells sampled throughout California between 2004 and 2012 by the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment-Priority Basin Project (GAMA-PBP) ranged from less than the study reporting limit of 1 microgram per liter (μg/L) to 32 μg/L. Statewide, Cr(VI) was reported in 31 percent of wells and equaled or exceeded the recently established (2014) California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for Cr(VI) of 10 μg/L in 4 percent of wells. Cr(VI) data collected for regulatory purposes overestimated Cr(VI) occurrence compared to spatially-distributed GAMA-PBP data. Ninety percent of chromium was present as Cr(VI), which was detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in alkaline (pH ≥ 8), oxic water; and more frequently in agricultural and urban land uses compared to native land uses. Chemical, isotopic (tritium and carbon-14), and noble-gas data show high Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers in the southern California deserts result from long groundwater-residence times and geochemical reactions such as silicate weathering that increase pH, while oxic conditions persist. High Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers along the west-side of the Central Valley results from high-chromium in source rock eroded to form those aquifers, and areal recharge processes (including irrigation return) that can mobilize chromium from the unsaturated zone. Cr(VI) co-occurred with oxyanions having similar chemistry, including vanadium, selenium, and uranium. Cr(VI) was positively correlated with nitrate, consistent with increased concentrations in areas of agricultural land use and mobilization of chromium from the unsaturated zone by irrigation return.

  9. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for

  10. Safe reading of chemical pathology reports: the RCPAQAP Report Assessment Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetsier, Sabrina; Jones, Graham Ross Dallas; Badrick, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Pathology reports are a vital component of the request-test-report cycle communicating pathology results to doctors to support clinical decision making. This should be done in a comprehensive, safe and time-efficient manner. As doctors may receive reports from different laboratories these goals can be achieved more readily if reports are formatted in the same way. This study evaluates the formatting of paper reports produced by Australian laboratories for numerical biochemistry results. As part of the RCPAQAP Liquid Serum Chemistry program in 2015, laboratories were invited to supply a routine paper report displaying the results. A total of 37 reports were received for analysis. These reports were assessed for variation in a range of components and, where possible, against relevant Australian standards and guidelines. In summary, there was a wide variation in most of the report components assessed including test names, result alignment, result flagging, sequence of data elements on the page, date formatting and patient name formatting. In most components there was also variation from the Standards. In order to ensure safe result transmission by printed reports there is a need to promote the adoption of current reporting standards and monitor compliance with similar external quality assurance programs. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of D-3He proton yield with CR-39 as a diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Final report, 7 January 1983-30 September 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue, T.E.; Wehring, B.W.

    1985-04-01

    The first phase of our research project has as its main goal the development of an image analysis system for Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) readout. Section I, of this report is an introduction to SSNTDs and image analysis systems for automatic track counting. The development of the image analysis system is described in Section II. The development of our foil holder system is described in Section III. The performance of an image analysis system can only be judged with respect to a particular type of image which is to be analyzed. In order to insure the workability of our image analysis system in analyzing CR-39 SSNTDs, we have made an effort to improve our etching system and our etch procedure. The development of our etching system and our etch procedure is outlined in Section IV. Also included in Section IV are images of protons and alpha particle tracks for our etch procedure. The performance of our image analysis system is reported in Section V for the proton and alpha particle tracks which are reported in Section IV. Also, the performance of the image analysis system is reported for some test images

  12. Chemical Technology Division annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    The status is reported for various research programs including waste management, transuranium-element processing, isotopic separations, preparation of 233 UO 2 , separations chemistry, biomedical technology, environmental studies, coal technology program, actinide oxides and nitrides and carbides, chemical engineering, controlled thermonuclear program, iodine studies, reactor safety, NRC programs, and diffusion of adsorbed species in porous media. Details of these programs are given in topical reports and journal articles

  13. Chemical Technology Division annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    The status is reported for various research programs including waste management, transuranium-element processing, isotopic separations, preparation of /sup 233/UO/sub 2/, separations chemistry, biomedical technology, environmental studies, coal technology program, actinide oxides and nitrides and carbides, chemical engineering, controlled thermonuclear program, iodine studies, reactor safety, NRC programs, and diffusion of adsorbed species in porous media. Details of these programs are given in topical reports and journal articles. (JSR)

  14. 75 FR 52355 - Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group Reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group Reports; Opportunity for Public Comment AGENCY.../nationalconversation/work_groups.html . For additional information on the National Conversation on Public Health and...

  15. Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs

  16. Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs.

  17. Strategies Reported Used by Instructors to Address Student Alternate Conceptions in Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquette, Jeff S.; Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores general-chemistry instructors' awareness of and ability to identify and address common student learning obstacles in chemical equilibrium. Reported instructor strategies directed at remediating student alternate conceptions were investigated and compared with successful, literature-based conceptual change methods. Fifty-two…

  18. CO2 Sparging Proof of Concept Test Report, Revision 1, LCP Chemicals Site, Brunswick, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    April 2013 report to evaluate the feasibility of CO2 sparging to remediate a sub-surface caustic brine pool (CBP) at the LCP Chemicals Superfund Site, GA. Region ID : 04, DocID: 10940639 , DocDate: 2013-04-01

  19. Fired products of Cr-smectite clays in nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Volzone

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The products of Cr-smectite clays heated to 1350 ° C in nitrogen were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. Cr-smectite clays were prepared at room temperature by contact between smectite clays and Cr species contained in OH-Cr solutions. The Cr species were prepared using chromium nitrate solution by addition of NaOH solution with OH/Cr = 2. Products of firing in nitrogen at the high temperature were different (magnesia chromite, donathite, iron chromium oxide and picrochromite depending on the type of isomorphous substitution of the smectite structure and the amount of retained chromium.

  20. Fired products of Cr-smectite clays in nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    C. Volzone; A. M. Cesio

    2004-01-01

    The products of Cr-smectite clays heated to 1350 ° C in nitrogen were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. Cr-smectite clays were prepared at room temperature by contact between smectite clays and Cr species contained in OH-Cr solutions. The Cr species were prepared using chromium nitrate solution by addition of NaOH solution with OH/Cr = 2. Products of firing in nitrogen at the high temperature were different (magnesia chromite, donathite, iron chromium oxide and picrochromi...

  1. Synthesis of Poly(Ortho-Phenylenediamine) Fluffy Microspheres and Application for the Removal of Cr(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Liao, F.

    2012-01-01

    We reported the synthesis of fluffy poly(o-phenylenediamine) (PoPD) microspheres via chemical polymerization of PoPD monomers by ammonium persulfate (APS) at room temperature. The SEM images showed that PoPD microspheres with an average diameter of 1.5 μm and their surfaces consist of highly oriented nano fibers. Furthermore, PoPD microspheres were used as adsorbent materials for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The Cr(VI) adsorption behavior on the prepared PoPD microspheres was studied at different adsorption contact times, solution ph values, and amount of the adsorbent. Experimental isotherms of Cr(VI) ions were successfully fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. The results indicate that the PoPD fluffy microspheres are an effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions, and they could be useful in treatment of Cr(VI)-polluted wastewaters.

  2. Chemical and geochemical studies off the coast of Washington. Progress report, September 1980-July 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, R.

    1981-07-01

    This report summarizes progress from September 1980 through July 1981 on a series of marine chemical and geochemical investigations involving both laboratory studies and field studies off the coast of Washington. Most of the field work has been on the Washington continental shelf, slope, and the submarine canyons indenting the shelf north of the Columbia River. The aim is to provide basic data required to characterize underlying chemical and physical processes and their rates which control the distributions, concentrations, and ultimate fate of some of the potentially hazardous agents associated with fossil fuel and/or nuclear power production or transportation. We are concentrating on several processes which we feel are of special importance in the sea, and developing methodologies and expertise to study them. Laboratory and field experiments and theories derived from them are being used iteratively to investigate: (1) vertical transfer of trace chemicals from surface seawaters to underlying waters and sediments; (2) processes which may transfer certain chemicals from sediments back into the overlying water column; (3) redox processes which besides changing valence states of certain chemicals may alter their precipitation/dissolution tendencies, their biological availability and/or toxicity; and (4) accumulation histories of potentially hazardous chemicals in sediments during the past 100 years

  3. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy investigation of the early stages of the oxygen aided Cr growth on Fe(0 0 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, A., E-mail: alberto.brambilla@polimi.it [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Calloni, A.; Picone, A.; Finazzi, M.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F. [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    We report on an X-ray photoemission spectroscopy investigation of the early stages of growth of ultra-thin Cr films on the oxygen-passivated Fe(0 0 1)–p(1 × 1)O surface. The Cr coverages ranged from sub-monolayer up to a few atomic layers. Cr has been grown either at 380 K or at 570 K. Our investigation reveals that during the Cr film growth oxygen floats toward the free surface. The presence of a metallic Cr signal from the very beginning of film growth is discussed in relation to Cr–Fe intermixing and alloy formation at the interface. Our findings are independent from the growth temperature, indicating that it has a very little influence on the chemical interactions at the interface, at variance with the oxygen-free Cr/Fe interface.

  4. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy investigation of the early stages of the oxygen aided Cr growth on Fe(0 0 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, A.; Calloni, A.; Picone, A.; Finazzi, M.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F.

    2013-01-01

    We report on an X-ray photoemission spectroscopy investigation of the early stages of growth of ultra-thin Cr films on the oxygen-passivated Fe(0 0 1)–p(1 × 1)O surface. The Cr coverages ranged from sub-monolayer up to a few atomic layers. Cr has been grown either at 380 K or at 570 K. Our investigation reveals that during the Cr film growth oxygen floats toward the free surface. The presence of a metallic Cr signal from the very beginning of film growth is discussed in relation to Cr–Fe intermixing and alloy formation at the interface. Our findings are independent from the growth temperature, indicating that it has a very little influence on the chemical interactions at the interface, at variance with the oxygen-free Cr/Fe interface.

  5. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-01-01

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr (<10 at. %) were selected in order to inhibit the complete conversion of the Fe-oxide shell to Cr2O3 and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (rv25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of r-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect,1,2 where an antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling exists between two ferromagnetic (FM) layers separated by a certain type of magnetic or non-magnetic spacer,3 has significant potential for application in the magnetic recording industry. Soon after the discovery of the GMR, the magnetic properties of multilayer systems (FeCr) became a subject of intensive study. The application of bulk iron-chromium (Fe-Cr) alloys has been of great interest, as these alloys exhibit favorable prop- erties including corrosion resistance, high strength, hardness, low oxidation rate, and strength retention at elevated temper- ature. However, the structural and magnetic properties of Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters (NCs) have not been investigated in-depth. Of all NCs, Fe-based clusters have unique magnetic properties as well as favorable catalytic characteristics in reactivity, selectivity, and durability.4 The incorporation of dopant of varied type and concentration in Fe can modify its chemical ordering, thereby optimizing its electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and opening up many new applications. The substitution of an Fe atom (1.24 A°) by a Cr atom (1.25 A° ) can easily modify the magnetic properties, since (i) the curie temperature (Tc ) of Fe is 1043 K, while Cr is an itinerant AFM with a bulk Neel temperature TN =311 K, and (ii) Fe

  6. Annual report of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, for fiscal 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This annual report describes the abstracts of researches and oral presentations and papers reported as the results for fiscal 1998 in each laboratory of RIKEN (the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research). Moreover, the themes of special project funding for basic science, grant research, contract research, industrial properties, research subjects of special postdoctoral researchers and junior research associate and technology research subjects of technology research fellow are inserted. The abstract of researches, oral presentations and publications reported by Frontier Research Program, Brain Science Institute, Riken and Riken Genomic Science Center are contained. Riken Symposia and Symposia Sponsored by Riken are explained. (S.Y.)

  7. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  8. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  9. Chemical Technology Division progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genung, R.K.; Hightower, J.R.; Bell, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period July 1, 1991, through December 31, 1992. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Special programmatic activities conducted by the division are identified and described. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included

  10. Contents of chemical elements in tissues of European badger (Meles meles affected by ovarian tumour – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Bukovjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher concentrations of chemical elements in animal tissues may be associated with tumours and may explain cancerogenity. In this study, selected chemical elements were measured in the liver, kidneys, muscles and tissues affected by tumour in a dead female European badger (Meles meles with a metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used for the assessment of concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc. AMA 254 analyser was used for the assessment of mercury concentration. Concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, and total Hg amounted to 0.031, 0.16, 7.74, 44.54, 0.67, 0.67, and 0.36 mg·kg-1 in the tumour tissue. This is the first detection of ovarian tumour in a European badger (Meles meles which was systematically examined for the presence of chemical elements.

  11. 15 CFR 745.1 - Advance notification and annual report of all exports of Schedule 1 chemicals to other States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 745.1 Advance notification and annual report of all exports of Schedule 1 chemicals to other States... Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) not less than 30 days in advance of every export of a Schedule 1...: “Advance Notification of Schedule 1 Chemical Export”. (3) Upon receipt of the notification, BIS will inform...

  12. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 Precipitation: Implications for Cr Sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Bo; Hu, Yandi

    2016-02-16

    The formation of (Fe, Cr)(OH)3 nanoparticles determines the fate of aqueous Cr in many aquatic environments. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, precipitation rates of (Fe, Cr)(OH)3 nanoparticles in solution and on quartz were quantified from 0.1 mM Fe(III) solutions containing 0-0.25 mM Cr(III) at pH = 3.7 ± 0.2. Concentration ratio of aqueous Cr(III)/Fe(III) controlled the chemical composition (x) of (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 precipitates, solutions' supersaturation with respect to precipitates, and the surface charge of quartz. Therefore, the aqueous Cr(III)/Fe(III) ratio affected homogeneous (in solution) and heterogeneous (on quartz) precipitation rates of (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 through different mechanisms. The sequestration mechanisms of Cr(III) in precipitates were also investigated. In solutions with high aqueous Cr(III)/Fe(III) ratios, surface enrichment of Cr(III) on the precipitates occurred, resulting in slower particle growth in solutions. From solutions with 0-0.1 mM Cr(III), the particles on quartz grew from 2 to 4 nm within 1 h. Interestingly, from solution with 0.25 mM Cr(III), particles of two distinct sizes (2 and 6 nm) formed on quartz, and their sizes remained unchanged throughout the reaction. Our study provided new insights on homogeneous and heterogeneous precipitation of (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 nanoparticles, which can help determine the fate of Cr in aquatic environments.

  13. Photofunctional Co-Cr Alloy Generating Reactive Oxygen Species for Photodynamic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Kyun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of photofunctional Co-Cr alloy plate that is prepared by a simple modification process for photodynamic application. Photoinduced functionality is provided by the photosensitizer of hematoporphyrin (Hp that initially generates reactive oxygen species (ROS such as superoxide anion radical and singlet oxygen. The photosensitizer with carboxyl group was chemically bonded to the surface of the Co-Cr alloy plate by esterification reaction. Microstructure and elemental composition of the Co-Cr alloy plate were checked with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS. Fabrication of the photofunctionality of the Co-Cr alloy plate was confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, reflectance UV-Vis absorption, and emission spectroscopy. Reactive oxygen generation from the photofunctional Co-Cr alloy plate was confirmed by using the decomposition reaction of 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF. The results suggest that the immobilized photosensitizer molecules on the surface of Co-Cr alloy plate still possess their optical and functional properties including reactive oxygen generation. To open the possibility for its application as a photodynamic material to biological system, the fabricated photofunctional Co-Cr alloy is applied to the decomposition of smooth muscle cells.

  14. Oxidation of Cr(III)-Fe(III) Mixed-phase Hydroxides by Chlorine: Implications on the Control of Hexavalent Chromium in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebeir, Michelle; Liu, Haizhou

    2018-05-17

    The occurrence of chromium (Cr) as an inorganic contaminant in drinking water is widely reported. One source of Cr is its accumulation in iron-containing corrosion scales of drinking water distribution systems as Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxide, i.e., FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s), where x represents the Fe(III) molar content and typically varies between 0.25 and 0.75. This study investigated the kinetics of inadvertent hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) formation via the oxidation of FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s) by chlorine as a residual disinfectant in drinking water, and examined the impacts of Fe(III) content and drinking water chemical parameters including pH, bromide and bicarbonate on the rate of Cr(VI) formation. Data showed that an increase in Fe(III) molar content resulted in a significant decrease in the stoichiometric Cr(VI) yield and the rate of Cr(VI) formation, mainly due to chlorine decay induced by Fe(III) surface sites. An increase in bicarbonate enhanced the rate of Cr(VI) formation, likely due to the formation of Fe(III)-carbonato surface complexes that slowed down the scavenging reaction with chlorine. The presence of bromide significantly accelerated the oxidation of FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s) by chlorine, resulting from the catalytic effect of bromide acting as an electron shuttle. A higher solution pH between 6 and 8.5 slowed down the oxidation of Cr(III) by chlorine. These findings suggested that the oxidative conversion of chromium-containing iron corrosion products in drinking water distribution systems can lead to the occurrence of Cr(VI) at the tap, and the abundance of iron, and a careful control of pH, bicarbonate and bromide levels can assist the control of Cr(VI) formation.

  15. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  16. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs

  17. Diamond-like carbon coatings on a CoCrMo implant alloy: A detailed XPS analysis of the chemical states at the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.; Falub, C.V.; Thorwarth, G.; Voisard, C.; Hauert, R.

    2011-01-01

    Low friction and wear resistant coatings have a long history of successful applications in industry. It has long been hoped that these coatings, especially diamond-like carbon (DLC), could also be used successfully in load-bearing joint implants, extending implant life time considerably. However, despite several medical studies carried out so far, no regular DLC-coated implants are available on the market. In most cases, failure was due to insufficient long-term stability of the adhesion of such coatings on implants in vivo. That is because introducing a coated implant not only brings the coating into contact with the body environment but also the interface that controls the adhesion. This usually reactively formed interface must be considered to be at least one additional material which must be not only biocompatible, but also unsusceptible to corrosive attack. The aim of this paper is to analyze in detail the interface, i.e., the transition region between the substrate and the coating. This knowledge is necessary in order to find the right measures to ensure the long-term stability of the adhesion. Results for DLC coatings on a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy are presented. It is shown that a very thin interface layer is formed, with the alloy on one side and the carbon film on the other side. This layer consists of a mixture of carbides from all the metals of the base material. This result is obtained by means of measuring depth profiles using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy because these spectra yield not only the chemical composition of the interface but a detailed analysis provides information on the chemical states across the interface.

  18. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period July 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, the Waste Management Technology Center, radiochemical and isotope programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Electric Power Research Institute severe accident research programs, the Office of Safety and Operational Readiness, and administrative resources and facilities.

  19. 2007 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its fourth annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from April through September 2007. During this time, 21 PNNL scientists hosted 23 participants from 20 different universities. Of the 23 participants, 20 were graduate students, 1 was a postdoctoral fellow, and 2 were university faculty members. This report covers the essense of the program and the research the participants performed.

  20. 75 FR 19319 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment Period... reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical Abstracts Service Number (CAS No.) 7783-06-4) (75 FR... may be potentially affected by this action if you manufacture, process, or otherwise use hydrogen...

  1. Estimating the human exposure to chemical substances and radiation. Definition report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeire, T.G.; Van Veen, M.P.

    1995-06-01

    This report aims at boosting the human exposure assessment activities of the RIVM with regard to chemical substances and radiation. It is the result of thorough discussions with RIVM-experts. The report starts with an overview of past developments in the area of human exposure assessment at the RIVM and continues describing recent projects. Major developments outside the Institute are also discussed. An attempt is made to harmonize definitions which are relevant for exposure assessment, i.e. definitions on exposure, intake, uptake and dose. Important gaps in the human exposure assessment work at the RIVM are identified, leading to proposals for future work. 2 figs., 31 refs., 3 appendices

  2. A rare chemical burn due to Ranunculus arvensis: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Abdullah O; Saritemur, Murat; Atac, Kenan; Guclu, Sibel; Ozlu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Ranunculus arvensis, a plant that is a member of Ranunculaceae family, generally used for local treatment of joint pain, muscle pain, burns, lacerations, edema, abscess drainage, hemorrhoids, and warts among the population. In this case report, we presented three patients who developed chemical skin burns after using R. arvensis plant locally for knee pain. The destructive effect of the plant has been reported previously to be more in fresh plants and less in dried plants. Although protoanemonin, which is considered as the main toxic substance, was reported to be absent in dried or boiled plants, the plant was boiled, cooled, and wrapped over the region with pain in our cases. Therefore, we thought that protoanemonin may be considered to be heat resistant. Also, the burn management proceeded up to surgery by using the flap technique in one of our patients in contrast to the cases found in published reports who were treated by antibiotics and dressings.

  3. Searching for “LiCrIIPO4”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosymow, E.; Glaum, R.; Kremer, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    The two new phosphates LiCr II 4 (PO 4 ) 3 and Li 5 Cr II 2 Cr III (PO 4 ) 4 are discovered as equilibrium phases (ϑ=800 °C) in the quarternary system Li/Cr/P/O. Their crystal structures have been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (LiCr II 4 (PO 4 ) 3 : violet-blue, Pnma (no. 62), Z=4, a=6.175(1) Å, b=14.316(3) Å, c=10.277(2) Å, 100 parameters, R 1 =0.028, wR 2 =0.08, 2060 unique reflections with F o >4σ(F o ); Li 5 Cr II 2 Cr III (PO 4 ) 4 : greyish-green, P1 ¯ (no. 2), Z=1, a=4.9379(7) Å, b=7.917(2) Å, c=8.426(2) Å, α=109.98(2)°, β=90.71(1)°, γ=104.91(1)°, 131 parameters, R 1 =0.022, wR 2 =0.067, 1594 unique reflections with F o >4σ(F o )). Li 5 Cr II 2 Cr III (PO 4 ) 4 adopts an hitherto unknown structure type. The crystal structure of LiCr II 4 (PO 4 ) 3 is isotypic to that of NaCd II 4 (PO 4 ) 3 and related to that of the mineral silicocarnotite Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 2 (SiO 4 ). Significant disorder between Li + and Cr 2+ is observed for both crystal structures. The oxidation states assigned to chromium in these two phosphates are in agreement with UV/vis/NIR absorption spectra and magnetic susceptibility data recorded for both compounds. Instead of “LiCr II PO 4 ” mixtures of LiCr II 4 (PO 4 ) 3 , Li 5 Cr II 2 Cr III (PO 4 ) 4 , Cr 2 O 3 , and CrP are observed at equilibrium. Instead of “Li 2 Cr II P 2 O 7 ” four-phase mixtures consisting of Li 9 Cr III 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , Li 3 Cr III 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , LiCrP 2 O 7 , and CrP were obtained. - Graphical abstract: Investigations on the equilibrium relations in the system Li/Cr/P/O revealed the two hitherto unknown phosphates Li 5 Cr II 2 Cr III (PO 4 ) 4 and LiCr II 4 (PO 4 ) 3 . They form instead of “LiCr II PO 4 ”. The crystal structures, magnetic behavior and optical spectra of these phosphates are reported. - Highlights: • The two new phosphates Li 5 Cr II 2 Cr III (PO 4 ) 4 and LiCr II 4 (PO 4 ) 3 have been characterized. • Optical spectra and paramagnetism of

  4. Enhancement strategies for Cu(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) remediation by a variety of seaweed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, V; Hughes, H; McLoughlin, P

    2009-07-15

    Various chemical treatments have been applied to six brown, red and green seaweed species with a view to enhancing their metal removal for Cu(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Treatment with acetone resulted in the greatest enhancement for both cationic and anionic species with relatively low mass losses (15-35%), indicating its low risk to biomass operational stability. Cation binding was increased by 69%, while the total Cr removal was augmented by 15%. Cr(VI) binding was shown to be an adsorption-coupled reduction, whereby Cr(VI) was bound to the biomass surface at pH 2 and subsequently reduced to Cr(III). Acetone treatment also resulted in biomasses that were capable of converting up to 83% of Cr(VI) in solution to Cr(III). Blocking of carboxyl and amino functionalities had significant negative effects both on total Cr removal as well as percentage conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Results therefore indicated the significant role played by these moieties in metal binding to these seaweeds. Potentiometric titrations displayed agreement between the degree of esterification and the decrease in Cu(II) removal for Ulva spp. and Polysiphonia lanosa. FTIR analysis identified changes in biomass functionality and availability after chemical modification, the results of which were in agreement with metal removal studies. In conclusion, these biosorbents represent suitable candidates to replace conventional removal technologies for metal bearing wastewaters, in particular for the detoxification of hazardous Cr(VI) waste streams.

  5. Progress report on SYVAC chemical modelling studies during 1984/85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.E.; Read, D.; Smith, G.L.; Williams, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarises progress made from April 1984 to May 1985 on chemical modelling within the DOE SYVAC project. Three new computer programs; the reaction path codes, PHREEQE and EQ3/6, and the chemical transport simulator CHEMTRN, have been acquired. Their applicability, overall capabilities, ease of use and database requirements are assessed. Coupled approaches to geochemical - hydrological modelling and the use of CHEMTRN is discussed. Modelling has been performed in connection with the ''Dry Run Assessment''. Speciation and solubilities of the actinides were simulated, assuming the vault to be a concrete solution and the geosphere to be represented by Harwell site groundwater analyses. Model verification and validation by collaboration with experimentalists and other modellers is discussed. (author)

  6. Chemical and geochemical studies off the coast of Washington. Report of progress, May 1974--May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, R.

    1975-05-01

    Results are reported from studies on the chemical, geological, and geochemical effects of the Columbia River in the northeast Pacific Ocean from May 1974 to May 1975. The studies followed three main lines of investigation: surface chemical studies of the scavenging of various species dissolved in sea water, especially lead-210, by well characterized natural particulates; studies of uptake and transfer of several isotopes, starting with polonium-210, by particularly well defined parts of the marine food web; and studies of the behavior of lead-210 and polonium-210 in sediments off the Washington coast and the application of lead-210 dating to determine sediment accumulation rates over the past 100 years in the coastal zone

  7. [Studies of chemical reactions in solid matrices]. Final report, December 1,, 1979-November 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, J.E.

    1984-12-01

    This program, which has been supported for 35 years by the Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, has produced significant advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of: (1) chemical activation by nuclear processes; (2) radiation chemistry; and (3) photochemistry. It has advanced knowledge of the reactions of electrons, hydrogen atoms and small free radicals, particularly in solids at cryogenic temperatures. It has applied radioisotopes as a tool in the solution of a number of chemical problems, has developed useful new techniques, and has contributed to the training of approximately 150 scientists at various levels. This final report includes a review of the evolution of areas of research emphasized, tabulations of the publications (chronologically and by research area) and Ph.D. theses resulting from the program, and tabulations of the research personnel (by academic category, by dates in the program and by subsequent employment)

  8. Revised ANL-reported tensile data for unirradiated and irradiated (FFTF, HFIR) V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    The tensile data for all unirradiated and irradiated vanadium alloys samples tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been critically reviewed and, when necessary, revised. The review and revision are based on reanalyzing the original load-displacement strip chart recordings by a methodology consistent with current ASTM standards. For unirradiated alloys (162 samples), the revised values differ from the previous values as follows: -11±19 MPa (-4±6%) for yield strength (YS), -3±15 MPa (-1±3%) for ultimate tensile strength (UTS), -5±2% strain for uniform elongation (UE), and -4±2% strain for total elongation (TE). Of these changes, the decrease in -1±6 MPa (0±1%) for UTS, -5±2% for UE, and -4±2% for TE. Of these changes, the decrease in UE values for alloys irradiated and tested at 400--435 C is the most significant. This decrease results from the proper subtraction of nongauge-length deformation from measured crosshead deformation. In previous analysis of the tensile curves, the nongauge-length deformation was not correctly determined and subtracted from the crosshead displacement. The previously reported and revised tensile values for unirradiated alloys (20--700 C) are tabulated in Appendix A. The revised tensile values for the FFTF-irradiated (400--600 C) and HFIR-irradiated (400 C) alloys are tabulated in Appendix B, along with the neutron damage and helium levels. Appendix C compares the revised values to the previously reported values for irradiated alloys. Appendix D contains previous and revised values for the tensile properties of unirradiated V-5Cr-5Ti (BL-63) alloy exposed to oxygen

  9. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Progress report, June 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    There has been significant progress on the project to measure the neutron-capture cross sections of reactor produced radionuclides, in particular, centering on the problems with nuclides such as 22 Na which may have a resonance for thermal-neutron capture. The thermal capture cross section of less than 40 b has been verified for 54 Mn, and cadmium ratios have been determined for 184 Re in the V-11 and V-14 positions in the HFBR. Lutetium has been used as a neutron temperature monitor for the Brookhaven reactors. Preliminary results on the project to determine the effect of chemical state on the branching ratio in 58 Co are reported. Procedures for aerosol collection and analysis by proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are reported. A program to analyze aerosols for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has been initiated. Progress is reported on the experimental verification of the proposed acid-base hypothesis

  10. Precipitation strengthened high strength, high conductivity Cu-Cr-Nb alloys produced by chill block melt spinning. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary M.

    1989-01-01

    A series of Cu-based alloys containing 2 to 10 a/o Cr and 1 to 5 a/o Nb were produced by chill block melt spinning (CBMS). The melt spun ribbons were consolidated and hot rolled to sheet to produce a supersaturated Cu-Cr-Nb solid solution from which the high melting point intermetallic compound Cr2Nb could be precipitated to strengthen the Cu matrix. The results show that the materials possess electrical conductivities in excess of 90 percent that of pure Cu at 200 C and above. The strengths of the Cu-Cr-Nb alloys were much greater than Cu, Cu-0.6 Cr, NARloy-A, and NARloy-Z in the as-melt spun condition. The strengths of the consolidated materials were less than Cu-Cr and Cu-Cr-Zr below 500 C and 600 C respectively, but were significantly better above these temperatures. The strengths of the consolidated materials were greater than NARloy-Z, at all temperatures. The GLIDCOP possessed similar strength levels up to 750 C when the strength of the Cu-Cr-Nb alloys begins to degrade. The long term stability of the Cu-Cr-Nb alloys was measured by the microhardness of aged samples and the growth of precipitates. The microhardness measurements indicate that the alloys overage rapidly, but do not suffer much loss in strength between 10 and 100 hours which confirms the results of the electrical resistivity measurements taken during the aging of the alloys at 500 C. The loss in strength from peak strength levels is significant, but the strength remains exceptionally good. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the as-melt spun samples revealed that Cr2Nb precipitates formed in the liquid Cu during the chill block melt spinning, indicating a very strong driving force for the formation of the precipitates. The TEM of the aged and consolidated materials indicates that the precipitates coarsen considerably, but remain in the submicron range.

  11. Distribution of chromium species in a Cr-polluted soil: presence of Cr(III) in glomalin related protein fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cardeza, María L; Ferri, Alejandro; Cornejo, Pablo; Gomez, Elena

    2014-09-15

    The accumulation of Cr in soil could be highly toxic to human health; therefore Cr soil distribution was studied in rhizosphere soils from Ricinus communis and Conium maculatum and bare soil (BS) from an industrial and urban area in Argentina. Total Cr, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) concentrations were determined in 3 soil fractions: total, extractable and associated to total-glomalin-related protein (T-GRSP). BS had the highest total Cr and total Cr(VI) concentrations. Total Cr(VI) concentration from both rhizosphere soils did not differ from the allowed value for residential area in Argentina (8 μg Cr(VI) g(-1) soil), while total Cr(VI) in BS was 1.8 times higher. Total Cr concentration in all the soils was higher than the allowed value (250 μg Cr g(-1) soil). Extractable and associated to T-GRSP Cr(VI) concentrations were below the detection limit. Cr(III) bound to T-GRSP was the highest in the BS. These findings are in agreement with a long term effect of glomalin in sequestrating Cr. In both plant species, total Cr was higher in root than in shoot and both species presented arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). As far as we know, this is the first study that reports the presence of Cr in T-GRSP fraction of soil organic matter. These findings suggest that Cr mycorrhizostabilization could be a predominant mechanism used by R. communis and C. maculatum to diminish Cr soil concentration. Nevertheless, further research is needed to clarify the contribution of native AMF isolated from R. communis and C. maculatum rhizosphere to the Cr phytoremediation process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Agrice 1994-2000 - Activity report. Agriculture for chemicals and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of new energy, chemicals and materials markets for agricultural products calls for an ongoing commitment to significant and stable funding for research. Even more importantly, these new markets also necessitate better coordination between the actors across the field, ranging from multidisciplinary research teams and agro-industrial companies to users in the petrochemicals, chemicals and materials sectors, and agricultural production. The need for this coordination is even greater today, in light of the key role that 'non-food' supply chains play in environmental protection: efforts to mitigate the greenhouse effect, reduction of VOC emissions, product safety and biodegradability, rational farming practices, etc. With these ends in mind the scientific interest group AGRICE- Agriculture for Chemicals and Energy- was created in France in 1994 by government bodies and eight partners. Today AGRICE includes the following members: the Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), the Institut National de Recherche Agronomique (INRA), the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maitrise de l'Energie (ADEME), professional organisations in oilseeds (ONIDOL), grains (AGPB) and beets (CGB), AVENTIS, TOTAL FINA ELF, LIMAGRAIN and EDF, the French ministries of Agriculture, Industry, Research, and Environment. AGRICE was founded for a six-year renewable term, and its management entrusted to ADEME. The group has worked to develop significant collaborative efforts across Europe, notably through the European Renewable Resources and Materials Association (ERRMA). AGRICE is due to be renewed with a broader base of partners in 2001. This report presents: 1 - the AGRICE profile, scope of activity (Biofuels vehicles (Ester/Oils, Ethanol/Ether) and non-vehicles (Energy crops, Processes), Biomolecules (Lubricants, Surfactants, Solvents, Other biomolecules), Biomaterials (Biopolymers, Agro-materials)), Financial report 1994

  13. Effects of highway deicing chemicals on shallow unconsolidated aquifers in Ohio, interim report, 1988-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A.L.; Sroka, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of the application of highway deicing chemicals during winter months on ground- water quality are being studied by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration. Eight sites throughout the State were selected along major undivided highways where drainage is by open ditches and ground-water flow is approximately perpendicular to the highway. At these sites, records of deicer application rates are being kept and apparent movement of deicing chemicals through shallow, unconsolidated aquifers is being monitored by means of periodic measurements of specific con ductance and concentrations of dissolved sodium, calcium, and chloride. The counties and corre sponding sections of state routes being monitored are the following: State Route (SR) 3 in Ashland County, SR 84 in Ashtabula County, SR 29 in Champaign County, SR 4 in Clark County, SR 2 in Lucas County, SR 104 in Pickaway County, SR 14 in Portage County, and SR 97 in Richland County. The study began in January 1988 with background data collection, extensive literature review, and site selection. This process, including drilling of wells at the eight selected sites, lasted 3 years. Routine ground-water sampling at 4- to 6-week intervals began in January 1991. A relatively new type of multilevel, passive flow ground-water sampling device was constructed and used. Other conditions monitored on a regular basis included ground-water level (monitored con tinuously), specific conductance, air and soil temperature, precipitation, chloride concentration in soil samples, ground conductivity, and deicing chemical application times and rates. For the interim reporting period, water samples were collected from January 1991 through September 1993. Evidence from water analysis, specific conductance measurements, and surface geophysical measurements indicates that four of the eight sites (Ashtabula County, Lucas County, Portage County, and Richland

  14. Assessment of uncertainties in risk analysis of chemical establishments. The ASSURANCE project. Final summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, K.; Kozine, Igor; Markert, Frank

    2002-01-01

    and led the comparison of results in order to reveal the causes for differences between the partners' results. The results of the project point to an increased awareness of the potential uncertainties in riskanalyses and highlight a number of important sources of such uncertainties. In the hazard......This report summarises the results obtained in the ASSURANCE project (EU contract number ENV4-CT97-0627). Seven teams have performed risk analyses for the same chemical facility, an ammonia storage. The EC's Joint Research Centre at Ispra and RisøNational Laboratory co-ordinated the exercise...

  15. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  16. Contribution of chemical and isotopic tools to the knowledge of the Carboniferous limestone aquifer - final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourcy, L.; Crastes de Paulet, F.

    2012-05-01

    Based on two sampling, analysis and interpretation campaigns, this study aimed at revealing hydro-chemical phenomena occurring within the Carboniferous and interactions between water and rock (ionic exchanges, oxido-reduction, dissolution, precipitation...), at characterizing underground flows (origins, circulation timing, mixing of different waters...), at identifying sources and at understanding phenomena related to the occurrence of high contents of sulphates (SO 4 ) in some drilling in the Carboniferous. The report presents the adopted methodology (analysis of underground and ground waters, selection of sampling points) and comments the obtained results

  17. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  18. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included

  19. Associations Between the Self-Reported Frequency of Hearing Chemical Alarms in Theater and Visuospatial Function in Gulf War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Linda L

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the self-reported frequencies of hearing chemical alarms during deployment and visuospatial function in Gulf War (GW) veterans. The relationship between the self-reported frequency of hearing chemical alarms, neurobehavioral, and volumetric brain imaging data was examined with correlational, regression, and mediation analyses. The self-reported frequency of hearing chemical alarms was inversely associated with and significantly predicted performance on a visuospatial task (ie, Block Design) over and above potentially confounding variables, including concurrent, correlated GW-related exposures. This effect was partially mediated by the relationship between hearing chemical alarms and lateral occipital cortex volume. Exposure to substances that triggered chemical alarms during GW deployment likely had adverse effects on veterans' brain structure and function, warranting further investigation of whether these GW veterans are at an increased risk for dementia.

  20. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J. [eds.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  1. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods. Tenth quarterly report, January--March 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    This report concerns our research on base-catalyzed coal solubilization and a new approach for hydrogen addition. The work on base-catalyzed, chemical solubilization is continuing. this report is focused on the hydrogenation research. Specifically it deals with the use of arene chromium carbonyl complexes as reagents for the addition of dideuterium to coal molecules. In one phase of the work, he has established that the aromatic hydrocarbons in a representative coal liquid can be converted in very good yield to arene chromium carbonyl compounds. In a second phase of the work directly related to our objective of improved methods for catalytic hydrogenation, he has established that the aromatic constituents of the same coal liquid add dideuterium in the presence of added napththalene chromium carbonyl.

  2. Biological and Chemical Technologies Research at OIT: Annual Summary Report, FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1 997 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1997 (ASR 97) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization; selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1 997; detailed descriptions of individual projects; and a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by the program.

  3. Method for the recovery of Cr and Co species from effluents using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method for the recovery of Cr and Co species from effluents using agricultural adsorbent ... International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences ... recovery of Cr and Co species in microbial-treated industrial wastewater using agricultural ...

  4. Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries: Main Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-10-01

    This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical, and petroleum refining industries, and estimates the potential for energy savings from implementation of steam system performance and efficiency improvements.

  5. Steam system opportunity assessment for the pulp and paper, chemical manufacturing, and petroleum refining industries: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-10-01

    This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical, and petroleum refining industries, and estimates the potential for energy savings from implementation of steam system performance and efficiency improvements.

  6. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Daniel C [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  7. Annual report of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, for fiscal 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In this annual report, the summary of the researches carried out in the Institute in 1979, and the reports of the researches published as the achievements of the Institute are described, being classified into every laboratory. In addition, the summary of specific researches, special researches and the researches made with subsidies, entrusted researches and the list of patents acquired in 1979 are written. The gists of the lectures given in international conferences and the symposia in the Institute held in 1979 are also included at the end. The laboratories are divided into those concerned with atomic nuclei, material science, applied physics, fundamental technologies, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry and agricultural chemicals, the research group on laser science, and eight other facilities. The specific researches are related to laser science, solar light energy, mathematical formula treating system and biology. The special researches are integrated researches, important researches, industrialization researches, and the researches on cosmic ray, agricultural chemicals and atomic energy. 31 subjects from 20 companies were entrusted, and 70 researchers were accepted from 48 companies, in 1979. The eight facilities are those of organic microanalysis, inorganic analysis, electronic computer, helium liquefaction, beam analysis, animal test, safety control and workmanship. (Kako, I.)

  8. Dual stimuli responsive self-reporting material for chemical reservoir coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hee; Song, Young Kyu; Park, Sun Hee; Park, Young Il; Noh, Seung Man; Kim, Jin Chul

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we introduce a novel dual stimuli responsive self-reporting thiol-epoxy thermoset (DSRTET) coatings which can detect both crack occurrence and pH variation. For crack detection, microcapsule containing tetraphenylethylene (TPE) which exhibits aggregation induced emission (AIE) effect was prepared via multi-step emulsion polymerization and dispersed in DSRTET coatings. For pH variation detection, commercial thymol blue as a pH indicator was added into the polymer matrix. The effect of microcapsule contents in DSRTET on their curing behavior, material properties, and crack sensitivity was characterized using an oscillatory rheology, rigid body pendulum test (RPT), nano-indentation test (NST), universal test machine (UTM) and scratch tester. It was revealed that crack sensitivity of DSRTET coatings was greatly influenced by material properties as well as microcapsule content. The color transition of DSRTET coatings in response to acid or base solution were quantitatively investigated using a multi-angle spectrophotometer after simple acid and base solution drop tests. The color of DSRTET coatings changed from a pale green to red for acidic solution and to blue for basic solution. Finally, The DSRTET used in this study was applied to laboratory scale chemical reservoirs in order to verify the potential as a dual stimuli response self-reporting coating which can detect both crack in coating material and chemical spill caused by the leakage or breakage of the reservoir part.

  9. Infrared study of the electronic phase diagram of Cr{sub 1-x}V{sub x}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meggle, Fabian; Kuntscher, Christine [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Ebad-Allah, Jihaan [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Tanta, 31527 Tanta (Egypt); Rivadulla, Francisco [Center for Research in Biological Chemistry and Molecular Materials, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    Transition-metal nitrides have attracted great interest due to their mechanical and physical properties, which are useful for improving technological applications. Several studies suggested that doping CrN with vanadium could lead to thermoelectric materials, which have optimal mechanical and chemical properties. CrN is a narrow gap, correlation-induced, semiconductor. Increasing vanadium doping in Cr{sub 1-x}V{sub x}N leads to a gradual suppression of the resistivity and a transition to itinerant-electron behavior through several phases including superconductivity in VN. Here we report the results of a study on the electronic and vibrational properties of Cr{sub 1-x}V{sub x}N powder pellets by reflection measurements in the infrared and visible frequency ranges at ambient conditions. Furthermore, we carried out resistivity measurements to confirm the behaviour of the optical conductivity at low energy.

  10. Application of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo as a structural material in saturated steam cycle LMFBR systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licina, G.J.; Busboom, H.J.; Ring, P.J.; Roy, P.; Schmidt, C.G.; Spalaris, C.N.

    1982-02-01

    The suitability and incentives were examined for using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel as a structural material for the entire primary and secondary sodium systems in a 1000 MWe pool-type Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor. The critical properties, advantages and disadvantages of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo, and data needed for design were described for each major component in the reactor. The relative importance of alloy properties to the successful use of ferritics in LMFBR was identified. Licensing issues, likely to surface if ferritic alloys were to be used for critical reactor components, were discussed

  11. Magnetic and electrical properties of zincblende CrAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peng; Takamura, K

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that 9 nm zincblende CrAs is grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on InAs buffer layer. The zb-CrAs shows ferromagnetism at room temperature and the total magnetic moment 3.09 ± 0.15 μ B per CrAs unit. The temperature dependence of zb-CrAs resistance R shows metallic behaviour

  12. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo/sub 2/C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium.

  13. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo 2 C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium

  14. Espironolactona vía oral en coriorretinopatía serosa central crónica: reporte de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Othón García Pérez

    2016-09-01

    En este caso con coriorretinopatía serosa central crónica la terapia antimineralocorticoide con espironolactona vía oral demuestra buenos resultados anatómicos y visuales, al disminuir de manera significativa la cantidad de líquido subfoveal y el grosor macular central, mejorando la agudeza visual mejor corregida sin efectos colaterales.

  15. Cr/alpha-Cr2O3 monodispersed spherical core-shell particles based solar absorbers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khamlich, S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available as reported. The coated Cr/alpha-Cr2O3 spherical particles on rough copper substrates by a simple self-assembly-like method were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance UV...

  16. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  17. Studies of the action of chemical agents on the heart. Annual report, February 1985-February 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassler, G.R.; Moutvic, R.R.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes initial studies to determine the subchronic effect of Soman and Sarin, on the electrical, mechanical, and neurochemical properties of the heart. Two different animal models are under development. The electrophysiologic and hemodynamic aspects of survival doses of chemical agent are begin studied in the dog. Two chronically instrumented dog models have been developed. The first is a hemodynamic dog model in which long-term measurements of left and right heart pressures, aortic flow, coronary flow as well as epicardial electrocardiograms, are monitored. The animals will be monitored at baseline and for one month following exposure in survival of a chemical-warfare-agent insult. These animals are stressed via treadmill exercise. The electrophysiology dog model consists of chronically implanted electrodes for performance of repetitive ventricular response stimulation, His bundle recording, and ECG analysis. Measurements are made prior to, and for one month following, exposure to survivable doses of CW agent. This dog model is further probed by sequential administration of various pharmacologic agents designed to study the autonomic status of the heart. All dogs and a limited number of the guinea pigs will be continuously monitored for occurrence of arrhythmic events utilizing Holter monitoring technology. The guinea pig neurochemical studies will include acetylcholines, choline acetyltransferase activity, QNB binding, choline uptake, norepinephrine levels and turnover, and norepinephrine uptake experiments.

  18. Annual report of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, for fiscal 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The research activities in the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) for the fiscal year 1999 were briefly described in this report. In addition, the research papers published in the year from the laboratories in RIKEN Wako Main Campus, RIKEN Tsukuba Research Center of Life Science and RIKEN Harima Institute were presented. Moreover, ten special research projects for basic science are now progressing on the following themes: photosynthetic science (artificial photosynthesis and the mechanism of photosynthesis), biodesign research (cellular function system, membranous function system), coherent science research (coherent control for free electron, quantum processing, structural control and coherent molecular interaction), research on multi-bioprobes (development of multi-functional bioactive compounds), research on essential reaction (stereo-control and energy control), atomic-scale sciengineering (phase 2 study), MR science research (phase 2 study), slow quantum beam production of ultra slow highly charged ions and ecomolecular science research (material conversion and biological/chemical conversion for environmental compounds). The research activities of RIKEN Brain Science Institute were also outlined and RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center were also outlined. In the year, RIKEN symposium was held 38 times by various laboratories. Here, the themes of these symposia were listed as well as those of international symposia sponsored by RIKEN Institute. (M.N.)

  19. Alternate fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas: Vinyl acetate monomer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Colberg; Nick A. Collins; Edwin F. Holcombe; Gerald C. Tustin; Joseph R. Zoeller

    1999-01-01

    There has been a long-standing desire on the part of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy to replace the existing ethylene-based vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) process with an entirely synthesis gas-based process. Although there are a large number of process options for the conversion of synthesis gas to VAM, Eastman Chemical Company undertook an analytical approach, based on known chemical and economic principles, to reduce the potential candidate processes to a select group of eight processes. The critical technologies that would be required for these routes were: (1) the esterification of acetaldehyde (AcH) with ketene to generate VAM, (2) the hydrogenation of ketene to acetaldehyde, (3) the hydrogenation of acetic acid to acetaldehyde, and (4) the reductive carbonylation of methanol to acetaldehyde. This report describes the selection process for the candidate processes, the successful development of the key technologies, and the economic assessments for the preferred routes. In addition, improvements in the conversion of acetic anhydride and acetaldehyde to VAM are discussed. The conclusion from this study is that, with the technology developed in this study, VAM may be produced from synthesis gas, but the cost of production is about 15% higher than the conventional oxidative acetoxylation of ethylene, primarily due to higher capital associated with the synthesis gas-based processes.

  20. Grout to meet physical and chemical requirements for closure at Hanford grout vaults. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout based on portland cement, Class F fly ash, and bentonite clay, for the Hanford Grout Vault Program. The purpose of this grout was to fill the void between a wasteform containing 106-AN waste and the vault cover blocks. Following a successful grout development program, heat output, volume change, and compressive strength were monitored with time in simulated repository conditions and in full-depth physical models. This research indicated that the cold-cap grout could achieve and maintain adequate volume stability and other required physical properties in the internal environment of a sealed vault. To determine if contact with 106-AN liquid waste would cause chemical deterioration of the cold-cap grout, cured specimens were immersed in simulated waste. Over a period of 21 days at 150 F, specimens increased in mass without significant changes in volume. X-ray diffraction of reacted specimens revealed crystallization of sodium aluminum silicate hydrate. Scanning electron microscopy used with X-ray fluorescence showed that clusters if this phase had formed in grout pores, increasing grout density and decreasing its effective porosity. Physical and chemical tests collectively indicate a sealing component. However, the Hanford Grout Vault Program was cancelled before completion of this research. This report summarizes close-out Waterways Experiment Station when the Program was cancelled

  1. properties of Cr(C,N) hard coatings deposited in Ar-C2H2-N2 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, M.; Cekada, M.; Kek, D.; Panjan, P.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical properties, microstructure and the average chemical composition of Cr(C,N) hard coatings deposited in Ar-C 2 H 2 -N 2 plasma strongly depends on the partial pressure of the reactive gases (N 2 , C 2 H 2 ) and on the type of the deposition equipment. In this study we report on the properties of Cr(C,N) hard coatings deposited by means of the triode ion plating in the BAI 730 apparatus and those prepared by sputter deposition in Balzers Sputron in the pressure range from 0.12 Pa (pure Ar) up to 0.35 Pa with different ratios (0-100%) between C 2 H 2 and N 2 . At first mechanical properties (microhardness and adhesion) of coatings were analyzed on the common way. Internal stress was measured by the radius of substrate curvature. Chemical composition of coatings was analyzed by means of AES while the Raman and XPS spectroscopy was used to determined the nature of carbon bonding in the Cr(C,N) films. Microstructure was determined by XRD as well as by means of TEM and TED. Chemical state of various elements in the coating has been studied by XPS. The ratio of the carbide bond (C-Cr) against the C-C and C-H bonds was calculated. The existence of the graphite phase in some Cr(C,N) coatings was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. (Authors)

  2. crRNA biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charpentier, E.; Oost, van der J.; White, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mature crRNAs are key elements in CRISPR-Cas defense against genome invaders. These short RNAs are composed of unique repeat/spacer sequences that guide the Cas protein(s) to the cognate invading nucleic acids for their destruction. The biogenesis of mature crRNAs involves highly precise processing

  3. Annual report on the services for chemical analysis and scientific glassblowing in the fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Mitsuo; Obara, Kazuhiro; Toida, Yukio; Suzuki, Daisuke; Gunji, Katsubumi; Kato, Kaneharu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    A variety of analytical service and glassblowing service was carried out on requests from research laboratories and R and D programs within JAERI. In the field of analytical service, various samples such as nuclear fuels, nuclear materials and radioactive wastes, were analyzed using mainly Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), Electron Probe X-ray Microanalyzer (EPMA), etc., and mostly in combination with various chemical separation methods. In the glassblowing service, various experimental instruments and vessels made of Pyrex glass or quartz glass were produced and repaired. Thirty-three requests for the analytical service and 132 requests for the glassblowing service have been received and treated in the fiscal year 2000. This report describes the activity of the analytical service and the glassblowing service performed in the fiscal year 2000. (author)

  4. Chemical conversion of natural gas. Final report; Kjemisk konvertering av naturgass. Sluttrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonsen, Haavard

    2000-07-01

    This report presents examples of gas research of a high international class. This research has strengthened the technological position of Norwegian industry in the field of gas utilization, which will be of great importance for Norwegian industry, nationally and internationally. The competence of the research and development institutions has been further developed within the subjects of catalysis, reactor technology and chemical engineering. These subjects are of central importance irrespective of whether or not the gas is to be utilized with or without CO{sub 2} deposition, for synthetic diesel, for methanol, for olefins, for proteins, for hydrogen or other purposes. The main purpose of the programme discussed was to educate PhDs and to develop skill of strategic importance for Norwegian industry. There are sections on synthesis gas, direct conversion, methanol to olefins, fluidized bed reactors and system technology.

  5. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  6. Technology assessment for the determination of chemical agent vapors in demilitarization facilities: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Wise, M.B.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of analytical methods for the determination of chemical agents GB, VX, and HD was made. HD, or mustard, is bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, and is classified as a blishtering agent. GB, or Sarin, is isopropyl methyl phosphonofluoridate. VX is O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)methylphosphonothioate. Both GB and VX are nerve agents. Included were methods capable of providing for monitoring requirements at the time weighted average (TWA) and allowable stack concentration (ASC) levels in near real time. A review of the currently used automatic continuous air monitoring system (ACAMS) was made as well as a review of the recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (APIMS). This report recommends a strategy for research and development for near term and medium term improvement of the overall monitoring program. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Petrogenetic importance of Cr - spinel metaperidotite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snarska, B.

    2010-01-01

    The research is ultramafic body Komarovce the site, which represents the spinel metaperidotit. In recent works dealing with the problems of genesis and tectonic ultramafic rocks placement consideration, Cr - spinel, which is considered an important petrogenetic indicator. Based on its chemical composition can further characterize the origin of peridotite.

  8. An automatic micro-sequential injection bead injection lab-on-valve (muSI-BI-LOV) assembly for speciation analysis of ultra trace levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) incorporating on-line chemical reduction and employing detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2005-01-01

    and determination of trace levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental samples. The method was validated by determination of chromium species in CRM and NIST standard reference materials, and by spike recoveries of surface waters. Statistical comparison of means between experimental results and the total chromium...... certified values for the CRM and NIST materials revealed the non-existence of significant differences at a 95% confidence level....

  9. Quick Look Report for Chemical Reactivity Modeling of Various Multi-Canister Overpack Breaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratton, Robert Lawrence

    2002-04-01

    This report makes observations or shows trends in the response and does not specifically provide conclusions or predict the onset of bulk uranium oxidation safety margins based on hole size. Comprehensive analysis will be provided in the future. The report should animate discussions about the results and what should be analyzed further in the final analysis. This report intends only to show the response of the breached multi-canister overpack (MCO) as a function of event time using the GOTH_SNF computer code. The response will be limited to physical quantities available on the exterior of the MCO. The GOTH_SNF model is approximate, because not all physical phenomenon was included in the model. Error estimates in the response are not possible at this time, because errors in the actual physical data are not known. Sensitivities in the results from variations in the physical data have not been pursued at this time, either. This effort was undertaken by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program to evaluate potential chemical reactivity issues of a degraded uranium metal spent nuclear fuel using the MCO fully loaded with Mark IV N-reactor fuel as the evaluation model. This configuration is proposed for handling in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) surface facility. Hanford is loading N-reactor fuel elements into the MCO for interim storage at the Hanford site with permanent disposal proposed at YMP. A portion of the N-reactor fuel inventory has suffered corrosion, exposing the uranium metal under the zircaloy cladding. Because of the sealed MCO, the local radiation field, and decay heat of the fuel, hydrogen production cannot be ruled out from the metal hydrates on the surface of the zircaloy cladding and exposed fuel. Because of the much greater surface area, the oxyhydroxide composition, and water of hydration in the uranium metal corrosion product, the corrosion product will be a significant water source that may equal the absorbed water on the zircaloy cladding. A

  10. Quick Look Report for Chemical Reactivity Modeling of Various Multi-Canister Overpack Breaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratton, Robert Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    This report makes observations or shows trends in the response and does not specifically provide conclusions or predict the onset of bulk uranium oxidation safety margins based on hole size. Comprehensive analysis will be provided in the future. The report should animate discussions about the results and what should be analyzed further in the final analysis. This report intends only to show the response of the breached multi-canister overpack (MCO) as a function of event time using the GOTH( ) SNF computer code. The response will be limited to physical quantities available on the exterior of the MCO. The GOTH( ) SNF model is approximate, because not all physical phenomenon was included in the model. Error estimates in the response are not possible at this time, because errors in the actual physical data are not known. Sensitivities in the results from variations in the physical data have not been pursued at this time, either. This effort was undertaken by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program to evaluate potential chemical reactivity issues of a degraded uranium metal spent nuclear fuel using the MCO fully loaded with Mark IV N-reactor fuel as the evaluation model. This configuration is proposed for handling in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) surface facility. Hanford is loading N-reactor fuel elements into the MCO for interim storage at the Hanford site with permanent disposal proposed at YMP. A portion of the N-reactor fuel inventory has suffered corrosion, exposing the uranium metal under the zircaloy cladding. Because of the sealed MCO, the local radiation field, and decay heat of the fuel, hydrogen production cannot be ruled out from the metal hydrates on the surface of the zircaloy cladding and exposed fuel. Because of the much greater surface area, the oxyhydroxide composition, and water of hydration in the uranium metal corrosion product, the corrosion product will be a significant water source that may equal the absorbed water on the zircaloy cladding

  11. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Dai, Qilin; Tang, Jinke; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Wu, Yaqiao

    2013-01-01

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr ( 2 O 3 and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (∼25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of σ-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs

  12. Oxidation study of Cr-Ru hard coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yung-I, E-mail: yichen@mail.ntou.edu.tw; Kuo, Yu-Chu; Chen, Sin-Min

    2012-01-01

    Cr-Ru alloy coatings with Cr content ranging from 47 to 83 at.% were deposited at 400 Degree-Sign C by direct current magnetron co-sputtering with a Ti interlayer on silicon substrates. With a total input power of 300 W, the Cr content in the Cr-Ru coatings increased linearly with the increasing input power of Cr. The intermetallic compound phase Cr{sub 2}Ru with columnar structure was identified for the as-deposited Cr{sub 56}Ru{sub 44} and Cr{sub 65}Ru{sub 35} coatings, resulting in an increase of hardness up to 15-16 GPa. To evaluate the performance of Cr-Ru coatings as a protective coating on glass molding dies, the annealing treatment was conducted at 600 Degree-Sign C in a 50 ppm O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere. The outward diffusion and preferential oxidization of Cr in the Cr-Ru coatings resulted in the variations of the crystalline structure, chemical composition distribution, and surface hardness after annealing. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) proved that an oxide scale consisting of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on the free surface. Scanning electron microscopy and TEM observed the surface morphology and structural variation. The chemical composition depth profiles were analyzed by Auger electron microscopy, verifying the presence of a Cr-depleted zone beneath the oxide scale. The hardness of Cr{sub 56}Ru{sub 44} and Cr{sub 65}Ru{sub 35} coatings decreased to 11-12 GPa after annealing, accompanied by the replacement of the Cr{sub 2}Ru phase by the Ru phase. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared crystalline Cr-Ru alloy coatings by direct current magnetron sputtering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr-Ru coatings were annealed at 600 Degree-Sign C for 2 h in a 50 ppm O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr diffused outwardly and oxidized to form a stable and protective oxide scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The original columnar grains recrystallized to polycrystalline grains.

  13. Cr 3d surface and bulk states in Sn1-xCrxTe/Cr crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guziewicz, E.; Szamota-Sadowska, K.; Kowalski, B.J.; Grodzicka, E.; Story, T.; Orlowski, B.A.; Johnson, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    We report a new approach to investigate metal-semiconductor interface formation. Photoemission spectroscopy was applied in order to investigate the clean surface of a Sn 0.97 Cr 0.03 Te crystal and to observe its changes under sequential deposition of small amounts of Cr atoms. In order to analyse the Cr 3d contribution to the valence band, the Fano-type resonance tuned to the Cr 3p-3d transmission was used. The experiment was designed to follow the Sn 0.97 Cr 0.03 Te/Cr interface formation process. At the clean Sn 0.97 Cr 0.03 Te surface, the Cr 3d states contribution to the valence band was found to be positioned 0.8 eV below Fermi level. After the Cr deposition processes the contribution shifted to a higher binding energy and another contribution 5.8 eV below the Fermi level also observed. (author)

  14. AI AND SAR APPROACHES FOR PREDICTING CHEMICAL CARCINOGENICITY: SURVEY AND STATUS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide variety of artificial intelligence (AI) and structure-activity relationship (SAR approaches have been applied to tackling the general problem of predicting rodent chemical carcinogenicity. Given the diversity of chemical structures and mechanisms relative to this endpoin...

  15. Microstructural and tribological investigations of CrN coated, wet-stripped and recoated functional substrates used for cutting and forming tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebole, R.; Martinez, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Fuentes, G.G.; Spain, E.; Watson, N.; Avelar-Batista, J.C.; Housden, J.; Montala, F.; Carreras, L.J.; Tate, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in wet-stripping Physical Vapour Deposited (PVD) CrN coatings on standard high speed and stainless steels and on hard metal substrates are reported in this work. Validation of the stripping process was evaluated in terms of substrate damage after exposure to the chemical agents and also in terms of the tribological properties of the PVD CrN layers before (Pristine) and after stripping and re-coating (Recoated). The investigation was focussed on the influence of the stripping processes on the hardness, roughness, adherence and wear resistance of the Recoated CrN coatings deposited by electron beam PVD (e-beam) after stripping. Analysis of the chemically stripped and Recoated steel substrates showed that: (a) hardness and elastic modulus of the Recoated e-beam CrN did not change significantly compared to Pristine e-beam CrN, and (b) surface roughness of the Recoated e-beam CrN layers was greater by a factor of 50-60% than the initial. For hard-metal substrates, the surface damage and its effect on the re-deposited coating performance in terms of the chemical reactions during the stripping process were discussed. It was observed that wet-stripping in a basic solution led to depletion of tungsten and carbon at the surface of the stripped WC-Co specimens

  16. XV International conference on chemical thermodynamics in Russia. RCCT-2005. Summary of reports. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Proceedings of the XV International conference on chemical thermodynamics are performed. The release covers wide frame on physical chemistry and chemical thermodynamics, and present-day conception on properties as individual substances, so their mixtures on phase and chemical equilibriums, surface effects in different systems is demonstrated. Solutions and melts, complex fluid systems (polymer solutions, liquid crystals, micellar solutions), new materials are part of concerned problems. Theoretical and experimental methods of chemical thermodynamics, automated experimental databases are among discussed problems [ru

  17. Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

    1994-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

  18. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DIVISION BURNUP, CROSS SECTIONS, AND DOSIMETRY SEMIANNUAL REPORT, JANUARY--JUNE 1972.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R P; Dudey, N D; Crouthamel, C E; Tevebaugh, A D; Levenson, M; Vogel, R C

    1972-09-01

    Research and development efforts of the burnup, cross sections and dosimetry programs in the Chemical Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory are reported for the period January to June 1972. Work is reported in the following areas: (1) development of an X-ray spectrometric method for the determination of the rare-earth fission products and application of this method to the determinations of burnup in nuclear fuels; (2) determination of fast ·fission yields of bum up monitors and other fission products; (3) a search for a spon~aneously fissioning isomer of {sup 241}Pu; (4) measurements of the tritium and alpha particle yields in fast-neutron fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; (5) evaluations of available data on the differential cross sections for the {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn and {sup 32}S(n,p){sup 32}P reactions; and (6) measurements of both fission rates by solid-state track recorders and reaction rates by foil activation, in the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility.

  19. Report: Information Meeting / Awareness of Actors on the Chemical Information Exchange Network (CIEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senghor, Cheikh

    2015-01-01

    As part of the implementation of the Stockholm Convention, Senegal has established a Chemical Information Exchange Network. The overall objective of this meeting was to identify the various actors involved in the management of chemicals information and to study the modalities for the implementation of the chemical information exchange network in Senegal.

  20. Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

    1993-06-01

    This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

  1. Characterization of CR 39 nuclear track detector for use as a radon/thoron dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandaiya, S.

    1988-02-01

    For the estimation of radon, thoron and their short-lived daughter products in air radon diffusion chambers with passive α-track etch detectors have been used. The report describes the properties of CR 39 track etch detectors in particular with respect to the spectrometric detection of α-particles in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV using chemical and a combination of chemical-electrochemical etching technique. In order to optimize the etching conditions for an α-energy discrimination in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV, the ECE track size diameter and the track density have been investigated as a function of the chemical pre-etching time using three electrical field strengths. In a mixed α-spectrum the contributions of various α-particles with energies between 4.6 to 8.77 MeV have been determined experimentally in CR 39 and compared with the spectral measurement using a surface barrier detector and the same irradiation geometry. Beside CR 39 detectors etched chemically and electrochemically, in addition surface barrier detectors and a Monte Carlo calculation have been used to evaluate the α-energy spectrum for thoron and its daughter products emitted by α-decays in the air volume and the plate-out of daughters at the inner surface on the diffusion chamber. (orig./HP) [de

  2. LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Rak-Hyun; Shin, Dong Ryul [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Dokiya, Masayuki [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In the planar SOFC, the interconnect materials plays two roles as an electrical connection and as a gas separation plate in a cell stack. The interconnect materials must be chemically stable in reducing and oxidizing environments, and have high electronic conductivity, high thermal conductivity, matching thermal expansion with an electrolyte, high mechanical strength, good fabricability, and gas tightness. Lanthanum chromite so far has been mainly used as interconnect materials in planar SOFC. However, the ceramic materials are very weak in mechanical strength and have poor machining property as compared with metal. Also the metallic materials have high electronic conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Recently some researchers have studied metallic interconnects such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Inconel 600 cermet, Ni-20Cr coated with (LaSr)CoO{sub 3}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3-} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed Cr alloy. These alloys have still some problems because Ni-based alloys have high thermal expansion, the added Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} to metals have no electronic conductivity, and the oxide formed on the surface of Cr alloy has high volatility. To solve these problems, in this study, LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC was investigated. The LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr can be one candidate of metallic interconnect because LaCrO{sub 3} possesses electronic conductivity and Cr metal has relatively low thermal expansion. The content of 25 vol.% LaCrO{sub 3} Was selected on the basis of a theoretically calculated thermal expansion. The thermal expansion, electrical and oxidation properties were examined and the results were discussed as related to SOFC requirements.

  3. Final status report in preparation for the chemical cleaning of Dresden-1, DNS-D1-034

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report discusses the status of all of the activities conducted in preparation for the chemical cleaning of the Dresden-1 Nuclear Power Plant of Commonwealth Edison of Illinois. The metallurgical testing of a solvent and its ability to remove radioactivity are reviewed. Included are all engineering details relating to the modifications to the primary system to be able to perform the chemical cleaning and to rinse the cleaning solvent out of the equipment. A facility to store and process spent cleaning solutions is described in detail. Construction activities and preoperational activities are recounted. Licensing activities, quality assurance, safety, and radiation protection are discussed. The report includes recommendations for future actions for restarting the project when approval is received. All of the efforts discussed in this Final Status Report led to the conclusion that the chemical cleaning, as planned, was feasible. All of the necessary modifications and new equipment are in place and are operational

  4. Quantum-chemical study of the geometric and electronic structure of the chromate anion CrO42- and a chromate group on the surface of finely divided silica by the CNDO/2 method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyuto, I.V.; Shpak, A.P.; Plyuto, Yu.V.; Chuiko, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study of the geometric and electronic structure of the chromate anion CrO 4 2- and a chromate group on the surface of finely divided silica (≡Si-O) 2 - CrO 2 , which was simulated by a CrO 9 Si 6 H 12 cluster, has been carried out by the SCF-MO-LCAO method in the all-valence-electron CNDO/2 approximation. The data obtained on the equilibrium geometry of the chromate group attest to the formation of a double bond between the Cr atom and each O atom (which is not bonded to Si). It has been shown that the support has a significant stabilizing in fluence on the energy of the MO's of the chromate group. The chromate group on an SiO 2 surface is characterized by partial delocalization of the frontier MO's among the skeletal bonds; however, the dominant contribution to the HOMO is made by the 2p AO of the oxygen atoms in the coordination shell of the Cr atom (∼70%), and the dominant contribution to the LUMO is made by the 3d AO of the chromium atom (∼50%). The positions and composition of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals point out the possibility of the display of electron-acceptor properties by a chromate group of an SiO 2 surface

  5. Evaluation of biomonitoring data from the CDC National Exposure Report in a risk assessment context: perspectives across chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Lesa L; Kirman, Christopher R; Schoeny, Rita; Portier, Christopher J; Hays, Sean M

    2013-03-01

    Biomonitoring data reported in the National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals [NER; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012)] provide information on the presence and concentrations of > 400 chemicals in human blood and urine. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) and other risk assessment-based values now allow interpretation of these biomonitoring data in a public health risk context. We compared the measured biomarker concentrations in the NER with BEs and similar risk assessment values to provide an across-chemical risk assessment perspective on the measured levels for approximately 130 analytes in the NER. We identified available risk assessment-based biomarker screening values, including BEs and Human Biomonitoring-I (HBM-I) values from the German Human Biomonitoring Commission. Geometric mean and 95th percentile population biomarker concentrations from the NER were compared to the available screening values to generate chemical-specific hazard quotients (HQs) or cancer risk estimates. Most analytes in the NER show HQ values of chemicals, benzene, xylene, several metals, di-2(ethylhexyl)phthalate, and some legacy organochlorine pesticides) approach or exceed HQ values of 1 or cancer risks of > 1 × 10-4 at the geometric mean or 95th percentile, suggesting exposure levels may exceed published human health benchmarks. This analysis provides for the first time a means for examining population biomonitoring data for multiple environmental chemicals in the context of the risk assessments for those chemicals. The results of these comparisons can be used to focus more detailed chemical-specific examination of the data and inform priorities for chemical risk management and research.

  6. Accident investigation board report on the May 14, 1997, chemical explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility, Hanford Site,Richland, Washington - summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerton, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report is a summary of the Accident Investigation Board Report on the May 14, 1997, Chemical Explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (DOE/RL-97-59). The referenced report provides a greater level of detail and includes a complete discussion of the facts identified, analysis of those facts, conclusions derived from the analysis, identification of the accident's causal factors, and recommendations that should be addressed through follow-up action by the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. This companion document provides a concise summary of that report, with emphasis on management issues. Evaluation of emergency and occupational health response to, and radiological and chemical releases from, this accident was not within the scope of this investigation, but is the subject of a separate investigation and report (see DOE/RL-97-62)

  7. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site

  8. Sickness-related dysfunction in persons with self-reported multiple chemical sensitivity at four levels of severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Pamela Reed; Vogel, Valerie M

    2009-01-01

    To examine quality of life outcome for persons who self-report chemical sensitivity, often referred to as multiple chemical sensitivity. Multiple chemical sensitivity is poorly understood with few providers specialising in its treatment. This lack of treatment and the ubiquity of chemicals engender severe life impacts such as job loss, financial loss, social isolation and even homelessness for persons who experience these sensitivities. Survey. We examined chemical incitants, symptoms and sickness-related behavioural dysfunction as measured by the Sickness Impact Profile in 254 persons self-identified with multiple chemical sensitivity. Chemicals rated as causing the most symptomatology in respondents were pesticide, formaldehyde, fresh paint, new carpet, diesel exhaust, perfume and air fresheners. The five highest rated symptoms in this sample were tiredness/lethargy, difficulty concentrating, muscle aches, memory difficulties and long-term fatigue. Overall mean Sickness Impact Profile score was 25.25%, showing serious impairment, with the most serious dysfunction in the categories of work (55.36%), alertness behaviour (53.45%) and recreation and pastimes (45.20%). Multiple chemical sensitivity is an important health care issue because it often includes serious dysfunction, is poorly understood by providers and poses extensive financial and treatment obstacles for those who experience it. Persons with multiple chemical sensitivity seek medical treatment in a variety of contexts and informed providers can both avoid iatrogenic harm due to medical exposures and provide any possible treatment for the chemical sensitivities. Understanding the impact of the health condition is crucial to communicate with and treat persons who experience the sensitivities.

  9. Pilot-scale incineration of comtaminated soils from the drake chemical superfund site. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.; Lee, J.W.; Waterland, L.R.

    1993-03-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests were performed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the potential of incineration as an option to treat contaminated soils from the Drake Chemical Superfund site in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. The soils at the Drake site are reported to be contaminated to varying degrees with various organic constituents and several hazardous constituent trace metals. The purpose of the test program was to evaluate the incinerability of selected site soils in terms of the destruction of contaminant organic constituents and the fate of contaminant trace metals. All tests were conducted in the rotary kiln incineration system at the IRF. Test results show that greater than 99.995 percent principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC) destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE) can be achieved at kiln exit gas temperatures of nominally 816 C (1,500 F) and 538 C (1,000 F). Complete soil decontamination of semivolatile organics was achieved; however, kiln ash levels of three volatile organic constituents remained comparable to soil levels

  10. Terminal alkenes as versatile chemical reporter groups for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späte, Anne-Katrin; Schart, Verena F; Schöllkopf, Sophie; Niederwieser, Andrea; Wittmann, Valentin

    2014-12-08

    The Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand (DAinv reaction) of 1,2,4,5-tetrazines with electron rich or strained alkenes was proven to be a bioorthogonal ligation reaction that proceeds fast and with high yields. An important application of the DAinv reaction is metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE) which allows the visualization of glycoconjugates in living cells. In this approach, a sugar derivative bearing a chemical reporter group is metabolically incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and subsequently derivatized with a probe by means of a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. Here, we investigated a series of new mannosamine and glucosamine derivatives with carbamate-linked side chains of varying length terminated by alkene groups and their suitability for labeling cell-surface glycans. Kinetic investigations showed that the reactivity of the alkenes in DAinv reactions increases with growing chain length. When applied to MOE, one of the compounds, peracetylated N-butenyloxycarbonylmannosamine, was especially well suited for labeling cell-surface glycans. Obviously, the length of its side chain represents the optimal balance between incorporation efficiency and speed of the labeling reaction. Sialidase treatment of the cells before the bioorthogonal labeling reaction showed that this sugar derivative is attached to the glycans in form of the corresponding sialic acid derivative and not epimerized to another hexosamine derivative to a considerable extent. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Wear resistance of nano- and micro-crystalline diamond coatings onto WC-Co with Cr/CrN interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy); Barletta, Massimiliano, E-mail: barletta@ing.uniroma2.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy); Cristofanilli, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Cr/CrN bi-layers have been used recently to promote the growth of high quality Hot Filament Chemical Vapour Deposition (HFCVD) diamond coatings onto Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-6 wt.%Co) substrates. In the present investigation, the influence of the crystalline size of the diamond coatings on their wear endurance is looked into. Nano- (NDC) and micro-crystalline Diamond Coatings (MDC) were deposited by HFCVD onto untreated and Fluidized Bed (FB) treated Cr/CrN interlayers. NDCs, characterized by a cauliflower-like morphology, showed improved wear resistance. However, the superimposition of NDCs onto Cr/CrN interlayers micro-corrugated by FB treatment was found to be the most promising choice, leading to the formation of highly adherent and wear resistant coatings.

  12. Audit Report. Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System Preparation for Year 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... The overall audit objective was to determine whether the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System was adequately preparing its information technology systems to resolve date-processing issues...

  13. Book of abstracts Chemical Engineering: IV All-Russian Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian Youth Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian school on chemical engineering for young scientists and specialists. Plenary reports. Engineering of inorganic substances and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhodyaeva, Yu.A.; Belova, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    In the given volume of abstracts of the IV All-Russian Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian Youth Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian school on chemical engineering for young scientists and specialists (Moscow, March 18-23, 2012) there are the abstracts of the reports concerning chemical engineering of inorganic substances and materials. The abstracts deal with state-of-the-art and future development of theoretical and experimental investigations as well as with experience in practical realization of development works in the field of chemical engineering and relative areas [ru

  14. Femtosecond Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers pumped by tapered diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbas, Umit; Schmalz, Michael; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Petrich, Gale S; Kolodziejski, Leslie A; Fujimoto, James G; Kärtner, Franz X; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2011-10-10

    We report compact, low-cost and efficient Cr:Colquiriite lasers that are pumped by high brightness tapered laser diodes. The tapered laser diodes provided 1 to 1.2 W of output power around 675 nm, at an electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of about 30%. Using a single tapered diode laser as the pump source, we have demonstrated output powers of 500 mW and 410 mW together with slope efficiencies of 47% and 41% from continuous wave (cw) Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers, respectively. In cw mode-locked operation, sub-100-fs pulse trains with average power between 200 mW and 250 mW were obtained at repetition rates around 100 MHz. Upon pumping the Cr:Colquiriite lasers with two tapered laser diodes (one from each side of the crystal), we have observed scaling of cw powers to 850 mW in Cr:LiSAF and to 650 mW in Cr:LiCAF. From the double side pumped Cr:LiCAF laser, we have also obtained ~220 fs long pulses with 5.4 nJ of pulse energy at 77 MHz repetition rate. These are the highest energy levels reported from Cr:Colquiriite so far at these repetition rates. Our findings indicate that tapered diodes in the red spectral region are likely to become the standard pump source for Cr:Colquiriite lasers in the near future. Moreover, the simplified pumping scheme might facilitate efficient commercialization of Cr:Colquiriite systems, bearing the potential to significantly boost applications of cw and femtosecond lasers in this spectral region (750-1000 nm).

  15. Microstructure, mechanical and tribological characterization of CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer coating with improved adhesive wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xudong; Liu, Jinyu; Zhang, Shuaituo; Yang, Jun; Hao, Junying

    2018-05-01

    Adhesive wear is one of the major reasons for the failure of components during various tribological application, especially for rubbing with viscous materials. This study presents CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer composite coatings prepared on a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) device with the close field unbalanced magnetron sputtering ion plating (CFUBMSIP) technique. SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the structure of multilayer coatings. It was found that the multilayer coatings are composed by the alternating CrN and DLC layers. Compared with the single CrN coatings, the friction coefficient of the CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer coating decreases about more than seven times after sliding a distance of 500 m. This helps to reduce the adhesive wear of multilayer coatings. Compared with the single CrN and DLC coating, the wear rate of the CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer coating is reduced by an order of magnitude to 7.10 × 10-17 (sliding with AISI 440C) and 2.64 × 10-17 (sliding with TC4) m3/(N m). The improved tribological performance of multilayer coatings mainly attributes to the introduction of lubricant DLC and hard support CrN layers, the enhancement of crack propagation inhibition, and the increment of elastic recovery value We (71.49%) by multilayer design method.

  16. In silico CrNF, a half-metallic ferromagnetic nitride–fluoride mimicking CrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, Samir F.

    2014-01-01

    Isoelectronic with CrO 2 , CrNF is proposed in silico based on rutile derived structures with DFT computations. The ground state structure defined from cohesive energies is of MgUO 4 -type, characterized by short covalent Cr–N and long ionic Cr–F distances. Like CrO 2 it is a half-metallic ferromagnet with M=2 μ B /FU integer magnetization with reduced band gap at minority spins. Major difference of magnetic response to pressure characterizes CrNF as a soft ferromagnet versus hard magnetic CrO 2 . The chemical bonding properties point to prevailing covalent Cr–N versus ionic Cr–F bonding. Different synthesis routes are examined. - Highlights: • DFT identification of CrNF is based on isoelectronicity and rutile derivatives. • Similarly to CrO 2 , CrNF is a half-metallic ferromagnet with reduced band gap. • Strong pressure dependence of magnetization of CrNF oppositely to CrO 2 . • Covalent Cr–N bonding prevails in spite of the presence of ionic Cr–F. • Cohesive energies favor the synthesis for which protocols are proposed

  17. Manufacture of semifinished items of alloys V-4Ti-4Cr and V-10Ti-5Cr for use as a structural material in fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapenko, M.M.; Drobishev, V.A.; Filkin, V.Y.; Gubkin, I.N.; Myasnikov, V.V.; Nikulin, A.D.; Shingarev, E.N.; Vedernikov, G.P.; Votinov, S.N.; Zurabov, V.S.; Zolotarev, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    Vanadium-titanium-chromium alloys are considered as structural materials with the most appropriate properties for fusion applications. However, the final ratio V-Ti-Cr in an alloy is not yet determined. On the one hand, it is offered to optimize structure on the basis of an alloy V-4Ti-4Cr. On the other hand, it is proposed that the optimum of total Ti and Cr content should be near 15%, and the Ti to Cr ratio should be 2:1. Melting, casting and processing by pressure of ingots of vanadium alloys V-4Ti-4Cr and V-10Ti-5Cr weighing as much as 50 kg are considered in the report. The ingots in diameters up to 130 mm were obtained by melting in vacuum-arc furnaces. Results on chemical uniformity and structure of the ingots are presented. A basic scheme of semifinished items manufacture is submitted. Rod and tube hot extrusion conditions are presented. A new technology for protection of ingot and billet surface from gases during hot processing is used to discard application of protective stainless steel and to lower temperature of processing. Sheet and tube products were made from extruded billets by cold rolling with intermediate heat treatment. The list of obtained products, including sheets 0.5-5 mm thick, rods 10-18 mm in diameter and tubes from 50 mm up to 6.0 mm in diameter is presented. The availability of large-scale ingots processing with weight above 300 kg is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Epidemiological findings of major chemical attacks in the Syrian war are consistent with civilian targeting: a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M; Guha-Sapir, Debarati; Schlüter, Benjamin-Samuel; Hicks, Madelyn Hsiao-Rei

    2018-01-01

    Evidence of use of toxic gas chemical weapons in the Syrian war has been reported by governmental and non-governmental international organizations since the war started in March 2011. To date, the profiles of victims of the largest chemical attacks in Syria remain unknown. In this study, we used descriptive epidemiological analysis to describe demographic characteristics of victims of the largest chemical weapons attacks in the Syrian war. We analysed conflict-related, direct deaths from chemical weapons recorded in non-government-controlled areas by the Violation Documentation Center, occurring from March 18, 2011 to April 10, 2017, with complete information on the victim's date and place of death, cause and demographic group. 'Major' chemical weapons events were defined as events causing ten or more direct deaths. As of April 10, 2017, a total of 1206 direct deaths meeting inclusion criteria were recorded in the dataset from all chemical weapons attacks regardless of size. Five major chemical weapons attacks caused 1084 of these documented deaths. Civilians comprised the majority ( n  = 1058, 97.6%) of direct deaths from major chemical weapons attacks in Syria and combatants comprised a minority of 2.4% ( n  = 26). In the first three major chemical weapons attacks, which occurred in 2013, children comprised 13%-14% of direct deaths, ranging in numbers from 2 deaths among 14 to 117 deaths among 923. Children comprised higher proportions of direct deaths in later major chemical weapons attacks, forming 21% ( n  = 7) of 33 deaths in the 2016 major attack and 34.8% ( n  = 32) of 92 deaths in the 2017 major attack. Our finding of an extreme disparity in direct deaths from major chemical weapons attacks in Syria, with 97.6% of victims being civilians and only 2.4% being combatants provides evidence that major chemical weapons attacks were indiscriminate or targeted civilians directly; both violations of International Humanitarian Law (IHL). Identifying and

  19. Post-marketing surveillance of chemicals: organisations and databases : Workshop report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester M; van Drongelen A; Graven C; Hernandez L; Herremans J; de Kaste D; Razenberg L; Vandebriel R; Piersma A; VTS; GZB

    2018-01-01

    The safety evaluation of chemicals is in general performed by the government, importer or manufacturer before marketing, and is based on (inter)national legislation. Less is known about the exact products in which chemicals are processed. Even though multiple institutions in the Netherlands are

  20. Semi-annual report of Chemical Division of CDTN - July to December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The main activities developed by the Chemical Division of CDTN are described, including 1) the characterization of rare earths and yttrium; 2) the specification of Cu ++ selective electrode; 3) chemical characterization of UO 2 sintering pellets; 4) determination of graphitic carbon in cement; 5) determination of lead in blood and urine; and 6) analytical determinations. (C.G.C.) [pt

  1. Effects of processing parameters on the morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of Cu{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized with chemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivantsov, R.D. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Edelman, I.S., E-mail: ise@iph.krasn.ru [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Zharkov, S.M.; Velikanov, D.A. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Petrov, D.A. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikov, S.G. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Lin, Chun-Rong [National Pingtung University, Pingtung City, Pingtung County, 90003, Taiwan (China); Li, Oksana [Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); National Pingtung University, Pingtung City, Pingtung County, 90003, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Yaw-Teng [National Pingtung University, Pingtung City, Pingtung County, 90003, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-25

    Cu{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} nanoparticles with x = 0, 0.2, and 0.4 were synthesized via thermal decomposition of metal nitrate or chloride salts and selenium powder using different precursor compositions and processing details. Single crystalline nano-belts or nano-rods coexist in the synthesized powder samples with hexagon-shaped plates in dependence on the precursor composition. The belts gathered into conglomerates forming “hierarchical” particles. Visible magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of Cu{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} nanoparticles embedded into a transparent matrix was investigated for the first time. The similarity of the MCD spectra of all samples showed the similarity of the nanoparticles electronic structure independent of their morphology. Basing on the MCD spectral maxima characteristics, electron transitions from the ground to the excited states were identified with the help of the conventional band theory and the multi-electron approach. - Highlights: • Single crystalline Cu{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} nanoparticles with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4 were synthesized. • Correlation between synthesis conditions and nanoparticles morphology were obtained. • The nanoparticles magnetization behavior was studied. • Visible MCD of the Cu{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} nanoparticles were studied for the first time.

  2. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells. Progress report, February 15, 1982-February 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in studies investigating the chemical mechanisms involved in radiation-induced cellular damage is reported. Three organisms currently being tested are Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli, silver and mercury have been used as radiosensitizers, and their interaction with DNA studied

  3. Chemical effects of ionizing radiation on the individual amino acids within intact and pure protein molecules. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidberg, F.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: gamma radiation induced chemical and molecular weight changes in proteins; the free radical pattern for the irradiated protein; similarities in the mechanism of action of ionizing and of uv radiation; and spin trapping in the study of gamma radiolysis

  4. Electronic structure of Cr doped Fe3O4 thin films by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Liang; Dong, Chung-Li; Asokan, Kandasami; Chern, G.; Chang, C. L.

    2018-04-01

    Present study reports the electronic structures of Cr doped Fe3O4 (Fe3-xCrxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) grown on MgO (100) substrates in the form of thin films fabricated by a plasma-oxygen assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra at Cr & Fe L-, and O K-edges were used to understand the electronic structure: changes in the bonding nature, valence states, and site occupancies. Cr doping in Fe3O4 results in the change of charge transfer, crystal structure, and selective occupation of ions in octahedral and tetrahedral sites. Such change modifies the electrical and magnetic properties due to the covalency of Cr ions. The physical and chemical properties of ferrites are strongly dependent on the lattice site, ion size of dopant, and magnetic nature present at different structural symmetry of the spinel structure.

  5. Promising Cu-Ni-Cr-Si alloy for first wall ITER applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.; Abramov, V.; Rodin, M.

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation-hardened Cu-Ni-Cr-Si alloy, a promising material for ITER applications, is considered. Available commercial products, chemical composition, physical and mechanical properties are presented. Embrittlement of Cu-Ni-Cr-Si alloy at 250-300 C is observed. Mechanical properties of Cu-Ni-Cr-Si alloy neutron irradiated to a dose of ∝0.2 dpa at 293 C are investigated. Embrittlement of Cu-Ni-Cr-Si alloy can be avoided by annealing. (orig.)

  6. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Progress report, January--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1979-04-01

    Fuel cycle studies reported for this period include studies of advanced solvent extraction techniques focussed on the development of centrifugal contactors for use in Purex processes. Miniature single-stage and eight-stage centrifugal contactors are being employed in studies of contactor performance and the kinetics of extraction. A 9-cm-ID centrifugal contactor has been completed, and fabrication drawings are being prepared for a plant-scale contactor. In other work, tricaprylmethyl-ammonium nitrate and di-n-amyl n-amylphosphonate are being evaluated as extractants in the Thorex process. Literature on the dispersion of liquids by explosions is being reviewed. A process was developed for extracting TBP degradation products from TBP-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub solutions while the actinides remain with the raffinate. In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing of nuclear fuel, the literature is being reviewed for acceptable materials for containment vessels, decladding methods are being evaluated, salt transport processes are being studied, a candidate flow sheet (based upon the Dow Aluminum Pyrometallurgical process) for reprocessing spent uranium metal fuel was prepared, work was begun on the use of molten salts for reprocessing actinide oxides, and the reprocessing of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in a KCl-LiCl salt containing ThCl/sub 4/ and thorium chips was studied. Work on the encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in a metal matrix includes study of (1) chemical interactions between simulated waste forms and matrix metals, (2) the leach rates of simulated encapsulated waste forms, and (3) the corrosion of candidate matrix metals and canister materials in brine solutions.Work to establish criteria for the handling of waste cladding hulls is continuing. The transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media are being studied to estimate leaching of radionuclides from deep repositories by groundwater.

  7. Global changes and the air-sea exchange of chemicals. Reports and studies. No. 48

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GESAMP-IMO/FAO/UNESCO/WMO/WHO/IAEA/UN/UNEP Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Pollution

    1992-12-31

    Present and future changes to global environment have implications for marine pollution and for air-sea exchange of both anthropogenic and natural substances. This report addresses 3 issues related to potential impact of global change on air-sea exchange of chemicals: Global change and air-sea transfer of nutrients nitrogen and iron. Global change and air-sea exchange of gases. Oceanic responses to radiative and oxidative changes in atmosphere. Deposition of atmospheric anthropogenic nitrogen has probably increased bio- productivity in coastal regions along continental margins. Atmospheric deposition of new nitrogen may also have increased productivity somewhat in mid-ocean regions. Projected future increases of N oxide emissions from Asia, Africa and South America will increase the rate of deposition of oxidized nitrogen to central North Pacific, equatorial Atlantic, and equatorial and central South Indian Oceans. Atmospheric iron may be an important nutrient in certain open regions. Future changes will likely occur from changed aridity and wind speed as a result of climate change. The most important future effects on surface ocean p{sub CO2} will likely be caused by changes in ocean circulation. The pH of ocean would decrease by {approx}0.3 units for a doubling of p{sub CO2}, reducing the capacity of the ocean to take up CO{sub 2}. There is evidence that dimethyl sulfide from ocean is a source of cloud condensation nuclei and thus a factor controlling cloud albedo. By 2060 in the southern hemisphere reduction in total column stratospheric ozone from recent levels could reach 2 to 5% in the tropics, 10% at mid latitudes, and over 20% at 60 deg C. S. Increases in ground-level effective UV-B radiation could also reach 5%, 26% and 66%, at low, mid, and high latitudes in southern hemisphere. Changes in photochemical processes in the surface waters of the ocean could also happen.

  8. Low-frequency electromagnetic measurements as a zero-time discriminant of nuclear and chemical explosions - OSI research final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report on a series of investigations of low frequency (1-40 Hz) electromagnetic signals produced by above ground and underground chemical explosions and their use for confidence building under the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty. I conclude that low frequency electromagnetic measurements can be a very powerful tool for zero-time discrimination of chemical and nuclear explosions for yields of 1 Kt or greater, provided that sensors can be placed within 1-2 km of the suspected detonation point in a tamper-proof, low noise environment. The report includes descriptions and analyses of low frequency electromagnetic measurements associated with chemical explosions carried out in a variety of settings (shallow borehole, open pit mining, underground mining). I examine cavity pressure data from the Non-Proliferation Experiment (underground chemical explosion) and present the hypothesis that electromagnetic signals produced by underground chemical explosions could be produced during rock fracturing. I also review low frequency electromagnetic data from underground nuclear explosions acquired by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during the late 1980s. (author)

  9. Fast neutron dosimetry using CR-39 track detectors with polyethylene as radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, F.; Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Osorio, D.; Rangel, J.; Reyes, P.G.; Herrera, J.J.E.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical etching parameters (etching time, temperature, normality of etchant, etc.) for the use of CR-39 (allyl diglycol carbonate – Lantrack ® ) as a fast neutron dosimeter have been optimized. The CR-39 chips, placed under a 1.5 mm polyethylene radiator, were exposed for calibration to an 241 Am-Be source at different time intervals for a given neutron fluence. After several chemical etching processes of the detectors with different conditions, the optimum characteristics for the chemical etching were found at 6N KOH solution, 60 ± 1 °C, for 12 h. An accurate relationship between the dose and fluence calculations was obtained as a function of the track density. - Highlights: ► Optimum etching time for fast neutron irradiated CR-39 track detectors is found. ► Relationship between dose and fluence obtained as a function of the track density. ► Results are consistent with those reported elsewhere, and extend the dose range

  10. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  11. Research in chemical kinetics: Progress report, January 1, 1978-September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    Research was conducted on the following topics: stratospheric chemistry of chlorinated molecules, atmospheric chemistry of methane, atmospheric chemistry of cosmogenic tritium, reactions of energetic and thermal radioactive atoms, methylene chemistry, and laboratory simulation of chemical reactions in Jupiter atmosphere

  12. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Non Line of Sight Chemical Detection Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    aircraft system that is used to perform point detection of chemical warfare agents and collection of vapor, liquid, and solid samples. A modular payload...their goals to better protect the Warfighter. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization members have divided detection distances into the following three...materials for onboard analysis or transporting chemical samples for analysis to a mobile laboratory. An innovative proposed solution to non-line-of

  13. In Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Potassium Permanganate. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The In Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Potassium Permanganate [KMnO4] treats soils or groundwater contaminated with a range of organic chemicals, including trichlorethylene. Potential application to metal and radionuclide contaminants, including oxidation/immobilization of uranium, is being investigated. This technology is designed for use with efficient delivery systems, such as the Multi-Point Injection System and Deep Soil Mixing, to treat contaminants in low permeability soils

  14. Radon: Chemical and physical states of radon progeny. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The evolving chemical and physical form of radon progeny influence their transport to the bioreceptor and the extent to which that receptor can take up these species into various tissues. When first born following radioactive decay processes, the potentially deleterious radon progeny undergo various physical and chemical transformations as they transcend from a highly charged to a neutral state, and interact with various constituents of the environment. These transformations impact on the extent to which the radon progeny become associated with aerosol particles on the one hand, and their ultimate chemical form that is available for uptake in the biosystem, on the other. The program, which originally commenced in 1987, dealt with the basic chemistry and physics of radon progeny and hence impacted on several themes of importance to the DOE/OHER radon program. One of these is dose response, which is governed by the physical forms of the radon progeny, their transport to the bioreceptor and the chemical forms that govern their uptake. The second theme had to do with cellular responses, one of the major issues motivating the work. It is well known that various sizes of ions and molecules are selectively transported across cell membrane to differing degrees. This ultimately has to do with their chemical and physical forms, charge and size. The overall objective of the work was threefold: (1) quantifying the mechanisms and rates of the chemical and physical transformation; (2) ascertaining the ultimate chemical forms, and (3) determining the potential interactions of these chemical species with biological functional groups to ascertain their ultimate transport and incorporation within cells

  15. Temperature effects on chemical structure and motion in coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project was to apply recently developed, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine in situ changes in the chemical structure and molecular/macromolecular motion in coal as the temperature is increased above room temperature. Although alterations in the chemical structure of coal have been studied previously by {sup 13}C NMR, using quenched samples, the goal of this project was to examine these chemical structural changes, and changes in molecular/macromolecular mobility that may precede or accompany the chemical changes, at elevated temperatures, using modern {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR techniques, especially {sup 1}H dipolar-dephasing techniques and related experiments pioneered in the laboratory for examining pyridine-saturated coals. This project consisted of the following four primary segments and related efforts on matters relevant to the first four tasks. (1) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure and mobility as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (2) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure, mobility and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (3) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure/mobility as a function of temperature over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (4) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure, dynamics and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (5) Related matters relevant to the first four tasks: (a) {sup 1}H CRAMPS NMR characterization of oil shales and their kerogen concentrates; and (b) improved quantitation in {sup 13}C MAS characterization of coals.

  16. Improving the Database for Physical and Chemical Sputtering. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    Seven experts and IAEA staff convened in Vienna to review the existing database for physical and chemical sputtering of fusion wall materials and to make recommendations about priorities for further work. Recommendations were made about database needs for pure and mixed Be, C and W wall material for the processes of physical and chemical sputtering, reflection, penetration and trapping and also for effects of surface and material microstructure. The proceedings and recommendations of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  17. 15 CFR 712.6 - Advance notification and annual report of all exports and imports of Schedule 1 chemicals to, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.6 Advance notification and annual report of all exports and imports of...: Advance Notification of Schedule 1 Chemical [Export] [Import].” (3) Upon receipt of the advance... under the advance notification procedure. To export a Schedule 1 chemical subject to an export license...

  18. Characterization of the effect of Cr(VI) on humoral innate immunity using Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragya, P; Shukla, A K; Murthy, R C; Abdin, M Z; Kar Chowdhuri, D

    2015-11-01

    With the advancement of human race, different anthropogenic activities have heaped the environment with chemicals that can cause alteration in the immune system of exposed organism. As a first line of barrier, the evolutionary conserved innate immunity is crucial for the health of an organism. However, there is paucity of information regarding in vivo assessment of the effect of environmental chemicals on innate immunity. Therefore, we examined the effect of a widely used environmental chemical, Cr(VI), on humoral innate immune response using Drosophila melanogaster. The adverse effect of Cr(VI) on host humoral response was characterized by decreased gene expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the exposed organism. Concurrently, a significantly decreased transcription of humoral pathway receptors (Toll and PGRP) and triglyceride level along with inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities were observed in exposed organism. This in turn weakened the immune response of exposed organism that was manifested by their reduced resistance against bacterial infection. In addition, overexpression of the components of humoral immunity particularly Diptericin benefits Drosophila from Cr(VI)-induced humoral immune-suppressive effect. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding negative impact of an environmental chemical on humoral innate immune response of Drosophila along with subsequent protection by AMPs, which may provide novel insight into host-chemical interactions. Also, our data validate the utility and sensitivity of Drosophila as a model that could be used for screening the possible risk of environmental chemicals on innate immunity with minimum ethical concern that can be further extrapolated to higher organisms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Photo(electro)chemical oxidation of water by the persulfate ion over aqueous suspensions of strontium titanate SrTiO3 containing lanthanum chromite LaCrO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thewissen, D.H.M.W.; Timmer, K.; Eeuwhorst‐Reinten, M.; Tinnemans, A.H.A.; Mackor, A.

    1982-01-01

    The photodecomposition of the S2O2‐ 8 ion to the SO2‐ 4 ion with concomitant oxidation of water to molecular oxygen over n‐type SrTiO3 powders mixed with LaCrO3 (mole fraction x = 0–1), using UV light (λ > 300 nm), is considerably faster than the photochemical (UV) decomposition of S2O2‐ 8 in water

  20. The Phase Transformations in Hypoeutectoid Steels Mn-Cr-Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RoŻniata E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of a microstructure and hardness investigations of the hypoeutectoid steels Mn-Cr-Ni, imitating by its chemical composition toughening steels, are presented in the paper. The analysis of the kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite of steels containing different amounts of alloying elements in their chemical composition, constitutes the aim of investigations.

  1. Subseabed Disposal Project chemical response studies. Annual report, October 1982-September 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brush, L.H.

    1985-10-01

    Studies of the chemical response of deep-sea sediments to a subseabed repository for high-level radioactive waste continued during Fiscal Year 1983. Chemical Response Studies comprise Waste Package, Near-Field, and Far-Field Studies. This year, as in the past, investigators in the US Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) carried out most of these chemical response experiments with red clay from the MPG 1 study location 1500 km north of Hawaii. The results of all studies carried out to date imply that oxidized red clay would form a highly effective barrier to radionuclides that form cationic species, but that anionic radionuclides would begin to escape from the sediment to the overlying water column on the order of thousands of years after emplacement. In Fiscal Year 1984, investigators in the US SDP will initiate chemical response studies with mildly reduced Atlantic clay- and carbonate-rich sediments in cooperation with the Sediment Barrier Task Group of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency Coordinated Program on the Assessment of the Subseabed Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Seabed Working Group). The objective of these US studies will be to quantify the chemical response of Atlantic sediments to a subseabed repository with a level of confidence similar to that for Pacific red clay

  2. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    'This report summarizes the results of work done during the first 1.3 years of a three year project. During the first nine months effort focussed on the design, construction and testing of a closed recirculating system that can be used to study photochemistry in supercritical carbon dioxide at pressures up to 5,000 psi and temperatures up to about 50 C. This was followed by a period of work in which the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene and acetone in supercritical, liquid, and gaseous carbon dioxide containing dissolved oxygen was demonstrated. The photocatalyst was titanium dioxide supported on glass spheres. This was the first time it was possible to observe photocatalytic oxidation in a supercritical fluid and to compare reaction in the three fluid phases of a solvent. This also demonstrated that it is possible to purify supercritical and liquid carbon dioxide using photochemical oxidation with no chemical additions other than oxygen. The oxidation of benzene produced no intermediates detectable using on line spectroscopic analysis or by gas chromatographic analysis of samples taken from the flow system. The catalyst surface did darken as the reaction proceeded indicating that oxidation products were accumulating on the surface. This is analogous to the behavior of aromatic compounds in air phase photocatalytic oxidation. The reaction of acetone under similar conditions resulted in the formation of low levels of by-products. Two were identified as products of the reaction of acetone with itself (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one and 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone) using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer detector. Two other by-products also appear to be from the self-reaction of acetone. By-products of this type had not been observed in prior studies of the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of acetone. The by-products that have been observed can also be oxidized under the treatment conditions. The above results establish that photocatalytic oxidation of

  3. Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M. (comps.)

    1981-12-01

    Data from almost 1600 of the 3800 body-burden documents collected to date have been entered in the data base as of October 1981. The emphasis on including recent literature and significant research documents has resulted in a chronological mix of articles from 1974 to the present. When body-burden articles are identified, data are extracted and entered in the data base by chemical and tissue/body fluid. Each data entry comprises a single record (or line entry) and is assigned a record number. If a particular document deals with more than one chemical and/or tissue, there will be multiple records for that document. For example, a study of 5 chemicals in each of 3 tissues has 15 different records (or 15 line entries) in the data base with 15 record numbers. Record numbers are assigned consecutively throughout the entire data base and appear in the upper left corner of the first column for each record.

  4. Project Swiftsure final report: Destruction of chemical agent waste at Defence Research Establishment Suffield. Special publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAndless, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    Project Swiftsure describes a three-year project at the Defence Research Establishment Suffield to safely destroy stockpiles of mustard lewisite, nerve agents and decontaminate scrap material which was stored on the DRES Experimental Proving Ground. Using both in-house and contracted resources, the agent waste was destroyed by chemical neutralization or incineration. With the exception of the arsenic byproducts from the lewisite neutralization process, all secondary waste generated by chemical neutralization was incinerated. Mustard in different forms was thermally destroyed using a transportable incinerator of commercial design. Extensive environmental monitoring and public consultation programs were conducted during the project. Results of the monitoring programs verified that the chemical warfare agents were destroyed in a safe, environmentally-responsible manner. jg p.329.

  5. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1987-03-01

    The career of Dr. E.L. Powers, a pioneer in the development of radiobiology, is reviewed. His initial research involved the effects of radiation and certain chemicals on Paramecium, associated ultrastructural studies on protozoan cells, responses of Rickettsia and bacteriophage to irradiation, and the development of techniques for studying bacterial spores. These efforts established the basic radiation biology of the spore and its importance in understanding the effects of free radicals, oxygen, and water. His recent research extended work on the dry spore to the very wet spore and to other selected chemical systems in aqueous suspension. 126 refs., 2 figs

  6. Thermodynamic Assessment of the La-Cr-O System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povoden, E.; Chen, Ming; Grundy, A.N.

    2009-01-01

    of oxygen partial pressure. In the La-Cr system reported solubility of lanthanum in bcc chromium is considered in the modeling. In the La-Cr-O system the Gibbs energy functions of La2CrO6, La-2(CrO4)(3), and perovskite-structured LaCrO3 are presented, and oxygen solubilities in bcc and fcc metals......The La-Cr and the La-Cr-O systems are assessed using the Calphad approach. The calculated La-Cr phase diagram as well as LaO1.5-CrO1.5 phase diagrams in pure oxygen, air, and under reducing conditions are presented. Phase equilibria of the La-Cr-O system are calculated at 1273 K as a function...... are modeled. Emphasis is placed on a detailed description of the perovskite phase: the orthorhombic to rhombohedral transformation and the contribution to the Gibbs energy due to a magnetic order-disorder transition are considered in the model. The following standard data of stoichiometric perovskite...

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of the Ti-Al-Cr ternary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Leyi; Qiu Aitao; Liu Lanjie; Jiang Ming; Lu Xionggang; Li Chonghe

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The full experimental results of the Ti-Al-Cr ternary system and its sub-binary systems are reviewed and analysed in detail. → Based on the latest thermodynamic assessments of the Ti-Al, Ti-Cr and Al-Cr systems and the ternary experimental data in literature, the thermodynamic parameters of the Ti-Al-Cr ternary system are fully assessed by the Calphad method. → The transformation of disorder to order (bcc a 2 to B2) and the new ternary compound L 12T i 25 Cr 8 Al 67 are considered in this work. - Abstract: The Ti-Al-Cr ternary system is one of the most important systems to studying the titanium alloys. Some experimental data of this ternary system are available and a few partial thermodynamic assessments are reported. However, no full thermodynamic descriptions were published. In this study, the previous work on the Ti-Al-Cr system and its related binary systems are reviewed. Based on the thermodynamic descriptions of the Ti-Al, Ti-Cr and Al-Cr systems and the ternary experimental data in literature, the Ti-Al-Cr ternary system is assessed by means of the Calphad method. Several isothermal sections from 1073 K to 1573 K and some invariant reactions are calculated, which are in good agreement with the most of the experimental results.

  8. Quantifying Cr(VI) Production and Export from Serpentine Soil of the California Coast Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Cynthia N; Fendorf, Scott; Webb, Samuel M; Maher, Kate

    2017-01-03

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is generated in serpentine soils and exported to surface and groundwaters at levels above health-based drinking water standards. Although Cr(VI) concentrations are elevated in serpentine soil pore water, few studies have reported field evidence documenting Cr(VI) production rates and fluxes that govern Cr(VI) transport from soil to water sources. We report Cr speciation (i) in four serpentine soil depth profiles derived from the California Coast Range serpentinite belt and (ii) in local surface waters. Within soils, we detected Cr(VI) in the same horizons where Cr(III)-minerals are colocated with biogenic Mn(III/IV)-oxides, suggesting Cr(VI) generation through oxidation by Mn-oxides. Water-extractable Cr(VI) concentrations increase with depth constituting a 7.8 to 12 kg/km 2 reservoir of Cr(VI) in soil. Here, Cr(VI) is produced at a rate of 0.3 to 4.8 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr and subsequently flushed from soil during water infiltration, exporting 0.01 to 3.9 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr at concentrations ranging from 25 to 172 μg/L. Although soil-derived Cr(VI) is leached from soil at concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L, due to reduction and dilution during transport to streams, Cr(VI) levels measured in local surface waters largely remain below California's drinking water limit.

  9. High energy charged particle registration in CR-39 polycarbonated detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.S.; El Enany, N.; El Fiki, S.; Eissa, H.M.; El-Adl, E.H.; El-Feky, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Track etch rate characteristics of CR-39 plastic detector exposed to 28 Si ions of 670 MeV energy have been investigated. Experimental results were obtained in terms of frequency distribution of the track diameter, track density and bulk etching rate. A dependence of the mean track diameter on energy was found. The application of the radiation effect of heavy ions on CR-39 in the field of radiation detection and dosimetry are discussed. Results indicated that it is possible to produce etchable tracks of 28 Si in this energy range in CR-39. We also report the etching characteristics of these tracks in the CR-39 detector. (orig.) [de

  10. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  11. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  12. Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program. Volume I: Annual Report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    nerve agents. * Identified specific gene products that are either enhanced or depressed in the brain following low-level chemical warfare nerve agent...with ample time to properly treat for injury. This model was used to determine that N- acetylcysteine given intraperitoneally increased survival rates in

  13. Chemical restraint in routine clinical practice: a report from a general hospital psychiatric ward in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papamichael Georgios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of studies regarding chemical restraint in routine clinical psychiatric practice. There may be wide variations between different settings and countries. Methods A retrospective study on chemical restraint was performed in the 11-bed psychiatric ward of the General Hospital of Arta, in northwestern Greece. All admissions over a 2-year-period (from March 2008 to March 2010 were examined. Results Chemical restraint was applied in 33 cases (10.5% of total admissions. From a total of 82 injections, 22 involved a benzodiazepine and/or levomepromazine, whereas 60 injections involved an antipsychotic agent, almost exclusively haloperidol (96.7% of cases, usually in combination with a benzodiazepine (61.7% of cases. In 36.4% of cases the patient was further subjected to restraint or seclusion. Conclusions In our unit, clinicians prefer the combined antipsychotic/benzodiazepine regimen for the management of patients' acute agitation and violent behaviour. Conventional antipsychotics are administrated almost exclusively and in a significant proportion of cases further coercive measures are applied. Studies on the practice of chemical restraint should be regularly performed in clinical settings.

  14. Semi-annual report of the chemical process division of CDTN - July to December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Soares, M.L. de.

    1989-01-01

    The main activities developed by the Chemical Process Division of CDTN are described, including the reconversion of UF 6 to UO 2 , the separation and purification of rare earths and the solvent extraction with pulse column. (C.G.C.) [pt

  15. Mechanisms of chemical generation of volatile hydrides for trace element determination (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    D'Ulivo, A.; Dědina, Jiří; Mester, Z.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Wang, Q.; Welz, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 6 (2011), s. 1283-1340 ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : borane complexes * chemical generation of volatile hydrides (CHG) * volatile hydrides Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.789, year: 2011

  16. 2005 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2005-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its second annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2005. During this period, sixteen PNNL scientists hosted fourteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the fourteen participants, twelve were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and one was a university faculty member.

  17. CrN thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering for symmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Binbin; Liang, Hanfeng; Zhang, Dongfang; Wu, Zhengtao; Qi, Zhengbing; Wang, Zhoucheng

    2016-01-01

    stability are promising candidates as supercapacitor electrode materials. In this work, we report the fabrication of CrN thin films using reactive DC magnetron sputtering and further their applications for symmetric supercapacitors for the first time. The Cr

  18. Cr(VI) and Cr(III) removal from aqueous solution by raw and modified lignocellulosic materials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miretzky, P; Cirelli, A Fernandez

    2010-08-15

    In aqueous systems, chromium usually exists in both trivalent and hexavalent oxidation states, being Cr(VI) of particular importance and concern due to its great toxicity. Industrial sources of Cr(VI) are leather tanning, mining of chrome ore, production of steel and alloys, etc. The most common conventional method for Cr(VI) removal is reduction to Cr(III) at pH 2.0 and precipitation of Cr (OH)(3) with lime at pH 9-10. The disadvantage of precipitation is the disposal of the solid waste. Adsorption of Cr by different low cost materials seems to be a suitable choice for wastewater treatment. Many by-products of agriculture have proved to be suitable low cost adsorbents for Cr(VI) and Cr(III) removal from water. Lignocellulosic residues, which include both wood residues and agricultural residues, have adsorption capacity comparable to other natural sorbents, but they have the advantage of very low or no cost, great availability and simple operational process. This study is a review of the recent literature on the use of natural and modified lignocellulosic residues for Cr adsorption. The Cr maximum adsorption capacity and the adsorption mechanism under different experimental conditions are reported when possibly. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry of thin NiCr layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anklam, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The possibilities and problems of characterizing thin films of NiCr by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) are demonstrated. Thin resistor films of NiCr (10 to 30 nm thick) are deposited on SiO 2 by sputtering in air or oxygen. The electrical properties depend both on integral chemical composition of films and on local distribution of elements. The determination of composition (Ni-Cr ratio, oxygen content) and of depth profiles of elements by the aid of RBS is described. For solving special analytical problems different substrates as amorphous SiO 2 , Si monocrystals, and glassy carbon are used

  20. Oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy as SOFC interconnect in dry/wet air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Fu-Shen; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A special thermodynamic description corresponding to the kinetics was applied. •We reported the relationships of degradation time with temperature and moisture. •”Turning time” in the Fe–16Cr alloy oxidation kinetic model was given. •The oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy in the wet air was discussed. -- Abstract: Experimental study on the oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was carried out at 800–1100 °C under dry/wet air conditions. Faster oxidation rate was observed at higher temperature and water vapor content. The degradation time t d between two stages in oxidation process showed an exponential relationship with elevating corrosion temperature in dry air, and a linear relationship with the water content in the case of water vapor introduced to the system. The mechanism of oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was suggested by the Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. It was found that the break-away oxidation in stage II was controlled by diffusion at initial both in dry and wet air, then became linear with the exposure time, which implied that the oxidation rate was then controlled by chemical reaction of the interface between the metal and the oxidized scale. Moreover, the effect of water in the oxidation process is not only to supply more oxygen into system, but also to modify the structures of oxide scale due to the existence of hydrogen atom, which results in the accelerated corrosions

  1. Lesión de paladar duro por uso crónico de cocaína. Reporte de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis D’Addino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue presentar una lesión inusual de gran tamaño comprometiendo paladar duro. Se describe su diagnóstico, manejo terapéutico y evolución. El paciente de raza blanca de 37 años, desde hace 12 meses presentaba lesión ulcerada con perforación de paladar duro. Dentro de los antecedentes personales se resalta el uso de cocaína desde hace 20 años, tabaquista desde hace 23 años. Como antecedentes familiares de importancia cabe citarse 2 casos de Hipertermia Maligna en familiares consanguíneos operados anteriormente. La biopsia de la lesión fue lesión benigna. Se intervino quirúrgicamente efectuándose un colgajo tipo Randal para el cierre del defecto y Rintala para la cobertura de la cara nasal del orificio. Se reforzó con malla de colágeno entre los dos colgajos. El último control a los 6 meses de seguimiento, mostraba buena evolución post quirúrgica aunque recayó en el consumo de cocaína y no regresó a la consulta. En conclusión, el uso crónico de cocaína suele destruir el tabique nasal y el paladar. La reparación resulta un desafió por lo dificultoso de la obtención de tejidos sumado a la escasa adhesión de los enfermos al abandono de la droga.

  2. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Robin [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Apel, William A. [Idaho National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. In addition, there are numerous sites around the world that are contaminated with a mixture of organic and inorganic contaminants. In most sites, over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals, radionuclides and other contaminants causing transport into the surrounding environment. We investigated the role of fermentative microorganisms in such sites that may control metal, radionuclide and organics migration from source zones. The project was initiated based on the following overarching hypothesis: Metals, radionuclides and other contaminants can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic acids and alcohols can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms. We demonstrated that fermentative organisms capable of affecting the fate of Cr6+, U6+ and trinitrotoluene can be isolated from organic-rich low level waste sites as well as from less organic rich subsurface environments. The mechanisms, pathways and extent of contaminant transformation depend on a variety of factors related to the type of organisms present, the aqueous chemistry as well as the geochemistry and mineralogy. This work provides observations and quantitative data across multiple scales that identify and predict the coupled effects of fermentative carbon and electron flow on the transport of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic contaminants in

  3. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. In addition, there are numerous sites around the world that are contaminated with a mixture of organic and inorganic contaminants. In most sites, over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals, radionuclides and other contaminants causing transport into the surrounding environment. We investigated the role of fermentative microorganisms in such sites that may control metal, radionuclide and organics migration from source zones. The project was initiated based on the following overarching hypothesis: Metals, radionuclides and other contaminants can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic acids and alcohols can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms. We demonstrated that fermentative organisms capable of affecting the fate of Cr6+, U6+ and trinitrotoluene can be isolated from organic-rich low level waste sites as well as from less organic rich subsurface environments. The mechanisms, pathways and extent of contaminant transformation depend on a variety of factors related to the type of organisms present, the aqueous chemistry as well as the geochemistry and mineralogy. This work provides observations and quantitative data across multiple scales that identify and predict the coupled effects of fermentative carbon and electron flow on the transport of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic contaminants in

  4. Chemical cleaning specification: few tube test model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampton, L.V.; Simpson, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    The specification is for the waterside chemical cleaning of the 2 1/4 Cr - 1 Mo steel steam generator tubes. It describes the reagents and conditions for post-chemical cleaning passivation of the evaporator tubes

  5. CR-39 as induced track detector in reactor: irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylberberg, H.

    1989-07-01

    A systematic study about reactor's neutrons radiation effect and gamma radiation effect on the properties of CR-39 that are significant for its use as induced fission track detector is showed. The following studies deserved attention: kinetics of the fission track chemical development; efficiency to register and to develop fission track; losses of developable tracks; variation in the number of developable tracks and variation in the visible and ultraviolet radiation spectrum. The dissertation is organized in seven specific chapters: solid state nuclear tracks (SSNT); CR-39 as SSNT; objectives and problems presentation; preparation and characterization of CR-39 as SSNT; gamma irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT; reactor neutron irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT and, results discussions and conclusions. The main work contributions are the use of CR-39 in the determination of fissionable nuclide as thorium and uranium in solid and liquid samples; gamma radiation damage on CR-39 as well as the reactor's neutron damage on CR-39. (B.C.A.) 62 refs, 53 figs, 21 tabs

  6. Development of an apparatus to study chemical reactions at high temperature - a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturzenegger, M; Schelling, Th; Steiner, E; Wuillemin, D [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    TREMPER is an apparatus that was devised to study kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature reactions under concentrated solar irradiation. The design allows investigations on solid or liquid samples under inert or reactive atmospheres. The working temperature is adjustable; the upper limit that has yet been reached is about 1900 K. TREMPER will facilitate chemical reactivity studies on a temperature level that is difficult to access by other means. First experiments were conducted to study the decomposition of manganese oxide MnO{sub 2}. Chemical analysis of exposed samples confirmed that the parent MnO{sub 2} was decomposed to mixtures of Mn O and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The amount of Mn O ranged from 60 mol-% in air to 86 mol-% under inert atmosphere. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  7. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase I: Final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Two chemical cleaning solvent systems and two application methods were developed to remove the sludge in nuclear steam generators and to remove the corrosion products in the annuli between the steam generator tubes and the support plates. Laboratory testing plus subsequent pilot testing has demonstrated that, in a reasonable length of time, both solvents are capable of dissolving significant amounts of sludge, and of dissolving tightly packed magnetite in tube/support plate crevices. Further, tests have demonstrated that surface losses of the materials of construction in steam generators can be controlled to acceptable limits for the duration of the required cleaning period. Areas requiring further study and test have been identified, and a preliminary procedure for chemical cleaning nuclear steam generators has been chosen subject to quantification based on additional tests prior to actual in-plant demonstration

  8. 2006 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Nikki B.; Barlow, Stephan E.

    2006-11-10

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its third annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2006. During this period, twenty PNNL scientists hosted twenty-seven scientists from twenty-five different universities. Of the twenty-seven participants, one was a graduating senior; twenty-one were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and four were university faculty members.

  9. UK chemical nuclear data committee progress report: data studies during 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Basic nuclear data requirements for industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC), covering half-lives, decay data, fission yields and the content of computerised data files. While the UKCNDC Request List was reviewed at the end of 1989 to reveal new and continued requirements, funding problems have increased during the year. Difficulties in the UK nuclear power industry are reflected in the decline in experimental studies, although evaluation efforts have been maintained. (author)

  10. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes & cellulosics. Final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.; Okos, M.; Burgos, N. [and others

    1997-06-15

    High strength food wastes of about 15-20 billion pounds solids are produced annually by US food producers. Low strength food wastes of 5-10 billion pounds/yr. are produced. Estimates of the various components of these waste streams are shown in Table 1. Waste paper/lignocellulosic crops could produce 2 to 5 billion gallons of ethanol per year or other valuable chemicals. Current oil imports cost the US about $60 billion dollars/yr. in out-going balance of trade costs. Many organic chemicals that are currently derived from petroleum can be produced through fermentation processes. Petroleum based processes have been preferred over biotechnology processes because they were typically cheaper, easier, and more efficient. The technologies developed during the course of this project are designed to allow fermentation based chemicals and fuels to compete favorably with petroleum based chemicals. Our goals in this project have been to: (1) develop continuous fermentation processes as compared to batch operations; (2) combine separation of the product with the fermentation, thus accomplishing the twin goals of achieving a purified product from a fermentation broth and speeding the conversion of substrate to product in the fermentation broth; (3) utilize food or cellulosic waste streams which pose a current cost or disposal problem as compared to high cost grains or sugar substrates; (4) develop low energy recovery methods for fermentation products; and finally (5) demonstrate successful lab scale technologies on a pilot/production scale and try to commercialize the processes. The scale of the wastes force consideration of {open_quotes}bulk commodity{close_quotes} type products if a high fraction of the wastes are to be utilized.

  11. Chemical Warfare Agent Operational Exposure Hazard Assessment Research: FY07 Report and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    agent migration rates. As stated by Armour and Sturgeon (1992), the extent of the contact hazard depends on the initial degree of contamination, the...with a contaminated surface. 2.1.5 Literature Cited 1. Armour , S.J; Sturgeon, W.R. Liquid Hazard from Chemical Warfare Agents for Pilots of High...the neck area was clipped and prepped with betadine, and the animal covered with a sterile surgical drape . The planned incision areas in the

  12. Final report on the sampling and analysis of sediment cores from the L-Area oil and chemical basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-08-01

    Nine vibracores were collected in the L-Area oil and chemical basin (904-83G) during late March and early April 1985. These cores were collected for analysis of the sludge on the basin floor and the underlying sediment. Several different field and laboratory analyses were performed on each three inch segment of all the cores. These included: (1) Sediment characterization; (2) Percent moisture; (3) Dry weight; (4) Spectral gamma analysis; (5) Gross alpha and beta analysis. Detailed chemical analysis were measured on selected intervals of 2 cores (LBC-5 and 6) for complete chemical characterization of the sediments. This sampling program was conducted to provide information so that a closure plan for the basin could be developed. This report describes the methods employed during the project and provide a hard copy of the analytical results from the sample analyses. Included in the appendices are copies of all field and laboratory notes taken during the project and copies of the gas chromatograms for the petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. All chemical results were also submitted on a 5-inch floppy disk.

  13. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  14. Preparation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles for superthermites by the detonation of an explosive nanocomposite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, Marc, E-mail: marc.comet@isl.eu; Pichot, Vincent; Siegert, Benny; Fousson, Eric [NS3E, UMR 3208 ISL/CNRS, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) (France); Mory, Julien; Moitrier, Florence [French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) (France); Spitzer, Denis [NS3E, UMR 3208 ISL/CNRS, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) (France)

    2011-05-15

    This article reports on the preparation of chromium(III) oxide nanoparticles by detonation. For this purpose, a high explosive-hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)-has been solidified from a solution infiltrated into the macro- and mesoporosity of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder obtained by the combustion of ammonium dichromate. The resulting Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RDX nanocomposite material was embedded in a cylindrical charge of pure explosive and detonated in order to fragment the metallic oxide into nanoparticles. The resulting soot contains Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles, nanodiamonds, amorphous carbon species and inorganic particles resulting from the erosion by the blast of the detonation tank wall. The purification process consists in (i) removing the carbonaceous species by an oxidative treatment at 500 Degree-Sign C and (ii) dissolving the mineral particles by a chemical treatment with hydrofluoric acid. Contrary to what could be expected, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles formed during the detonation are twice larger than those of initial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The detonation causes the fragmentation of the porous oxide and the melting of resulting particles. Nanometric droplets of molten Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} are ejected and quenched by the water in which the charge is fired. Despite their larger size, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles prepared by detonation were found to be less aggregated than those of the initial oxide used as precursor. Finally, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} synthesized by detonation was used to prepare a superthermite with aluminium nanoparticles. This material possesses a lower sensitivity and a more regular combustion compared to the one made of initial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  15. Characterization of plasma sprayed NiCrAlY-Yttria stabilized zirconia coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhave, V.S.; Rakhasia, R.H.; Tripathy, P.K.; Hubli, R.C.; Sengupta, P.; Bhanumurthy; Satpute, R.U.; Sreekumar, K.P.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma sprayed coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia are used in many advanced technologies for thermal and chemical barrier applications. Development and characterization of NiCrAlY-yttria stabilized zirconia duplex coatings on Inconel substrates is reported in this paper. Plasma spraying was carried out using the 40 kW atmospheric plasma spray facility at the Laser and Plasma Technology Division, BARC. A bond coat of NiCrAlY was deposited on Inconel substrates and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was deposited over the bond coat. The coatings have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and EPMA. It is observed that the coating characteristics are affected by the input power to the torch. (author)

  16. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-01

    The research in the Laboratory of Chemical Biodynamics is almost entirely fundamental research. The biological research component is strongly dominated by a long term interest in two main themes which make up our Structural Biology Program. The first interest has to do with understanding the molecular dynamics of photosynthesis. The Laboratory's investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences work in the Laboratory, our investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy.

  17. Measurements and models for hazardous chemical and mixed wastes. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, C.; Louie, B.; Mullins, M.E.; Outcalt, S.L.; Rogers, T.N.; Watts, L.

    1998-01-01

    'Aqueous waste of various chemical compositions constitutes a significant fraction of the total waste produced by industry in the US. A large quantity of the waste generated by the US chemical process industry is waste water. In addition, the majority of the waste inventory at DoE sites previously used for nuclear weapons production is aqueous waste. Large quantities of additional aqueous waste are expected to be generated during the clean-up of those sites. In order to effectively treat, safely handle, and properly dispose of these wastes, accurate and comprehensive knowledge of basic thermophysical property information is paramount. This knowledge will lead to huge savings by aiding in the design and optimization of treatment and disposal processes. The main objectives of this project are: Develop and validate models that accurately predict the phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of hazardous aqueous systems necessary for the safe handling and successful design of separation and treatment processes for hazardous chemical and mixed wastes. Accurately measure the phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of a representative system (water + acetone + isopropyl alcohol + sodium nitrate) over the applicable ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition to provide the pure component, binary, ternary, and quaternary experimental data required for model development. As of May, 1998, nine months into the first year of a three year project, the authors have made significant progress in the database development, have begun testing the models, and have been performance testing the apparatus on the pure components.'

  18. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The research in the Laboratory of Chemical Biodynamics is almost entirely fundamental research. The biological research component is strongly dominated by a long term interest in two main themes which make up our Structural Biology Program. The first interest has to do with understanding the molecular dynamics of photosynthesis. The Laboratory's investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences work in the Laboratory, our investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy

  19. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  20. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  1. Investigations of chemical reactions between U-Zr alloy and FBR cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2005-07-01

    U-Pu-Zr alloys are candidate materials for commercial FBR fuel. However, informations about chemical reactions with cladding materials developed by JNC for commercial FBR have not been well obtained. In this work, the reaction zones formed in four diffusion couples U-10wt.%Zr/PNC-FMS, U-10wt.%Zr/9Cr-ODS, U-10wt.%Zr/12Cr-ODS, and U-10wt.%Zr/Fe at about 1013K have been examined and following results were obtained. 1) At about 1013K, in the U-10wt.%Zr/Fe couple, the liquid phase zones were obtained. In the other couples U-10wt.%Zr/PNC-FMS, U-10wt.%Zr/9Cr-ODS and U-10wt.%Zr/12Cr-ODS, no liquid phase zones were obtained. The obtained chemical reaction zones in the later 3 couples were similar to the reported ones obtained in U-Zr/Fe couples without liquid phase formation. In comparison with the reaction zones obtained in the U-10wt.%Zr/Fe couple, the reaction zones inside cladding materials obtained in the PNC-FMS, 9Cr-ODS, and 12Cr-ODS couples were thin. 2) From the investigations of relationship between the obtained depths of the chemical reaction zones inside cladding materials and composition of the cladding materials, it was considered that the depth of chemical reaction zone would depend on the Cr content of the cladding materials and the depth would decrease with increasing Cr content, resulting in prevention of liquid phase formation. 3) From the investigations of the mechanisms of chemical reactions between U-Pu-Zr/cladding materials, it was considered that the same effect of Cr obtained in the U-Zr/cladding materials would be expected in U-Pu-Zr/cladding materials. Those seemed to indicate that the threshold temperatures of liquid phase formation for U-Pu-Zr/PNC-FMS, U-Pu-Zr/9Cr-ODS, and U-Pu-Zr/12Cr-ODS might be higher than that for U-Pu-Zr/Fe. (author)

  2. Intoxicação por carambola em paciente com insuficiência renal crônica: relato de caso Star fruit intoxication in a chronic renal failure patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Gonzaga Moreira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A insuficiência renal crônica é doença de elevada morbidade e mortalidade e sua incidência e prevalência em estágio terminal têm aumentado progressivamente a cada ano. Segundo a Sociedade Brasileira de Nefrologia, as principais causas de insuficiência renal crônica são hipertensão arterial, glomerulonefrite e diabetes mellitus. Diversos fatores elevam o risco de mortalidade em pacientes com nefropatia crônica, principalmente idade, presença de diabetes e número de comorbidades associadas. Para pacientes com menos de 50 anos de idade a taxa de sobrevida em 5 anos é de 62% e para aqueles acima desta idade e com diagnóstico de diabetes mellitus a sobrevida é de apenas 23%. A carambola, fruta originária da Ásia e muito difundida na maioria dos países tropicais, tem sido reportada como contendo uma neurotoxina capaz de provocar graves alterações neurológicas em pacientes com histórico de nefropatia crônica. Dentre estas alterações podemos observar desde quadros leves, como soluços e confusão mental, até quadros mais sérios, como convulsões e morte. Essa neurotoxina parece apresentar especificamente inibição sobre o sistema de condução GABAérgico. Descrevemos o caso de um paciente nefropata crônico que, após ingestão de carambola, inicia quadro de mal-estar, náuseas e vômitos, seguidos de episódios convulsivos reentrantes e vai a óbito mesmo com o tratamento hemodialítico convencional.Chronic renal failure is a high morbidity and mortality condition, with its terminal phase incidence and prevalence steadily growing year after year. According to the Sociedade Brasileira de Nefrologia [Brazilian Society of Nephrology], the main causes of renal failure are arterial hypertension, glomerulonephritis and diabetes mellitus. Several factors are implied on chronic renal failure patients' risk of mortality, particularly age, diabetes and associated co-morbidities. For patients below 50 years old, the 5 years

  3. Synthesis of Poly(Ortho-Phenylenediamine Fluffy Microspheres and Application for the Removal of Cr(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhoufeng Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported the synthesis of fluffy poly(o-phenylenediamine (PoPD microspheres via chemical polymerization of oPD monomers by ammonium persulfate (APS at room temperature. The SEM images showed that PoPD microspheres with an average diameter of 1.5 μm and their surfaces consist of highly oriented nanofibers. Furthermore, PoPD microspheres were used as adsorbent materials for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions. The Cr(VI adsorption behavior on the prepared PoPD microspheres was studied at different adsorption contact times, solution pH values, and amount of the adsorbent. Experimental isotherms of Cr(VI ions were successfully fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. The results indicate that the PoPD fluffy microspheres are an effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI ions from aqueous solutions, and they could be useful in treatment of Cr(VI-polluted wastewaters.

  4. III Scientific-technical conference. Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005). Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Summaries of reports of the III Scientific-technical conference: Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005) are presented. The conference performed 20-22 September, 2005, in Sosnovyj Bor. Problems of methodical, instrumental and metrological supply of chemical, radiochemical and radiometric control at active NPP and NPU, modern concepts of construction of automated systems of chemical and radiometric control in the atomic energetics, directions for the decision of questions in organization and conducting of chemical and radiochemical control of water-chemical regimes of NPP and NPU are discussed [ru

  5. Cr-39 fast neutron dosemeter based on A (n, α) converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widayati, S.; Budiantari, T.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to obtained the response of Cr-39 as fast neutron dosemeter based on an (n, α) converter. Cr-39 was irradiated to AmBe fast neutron flux from 0.10 mSv to 2.5 mSv. Cr-39 processed by chemical etching with NaOH 20 % at temperature of 60 oC in six hours. The results of experiment showed that the response of Cr-39 based on an (n, α) converter is 6 times bigger than the response of Cr-39 without (n, α) converter. (author)

  6. Fabrication and characterization of reference 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS low activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muroga, T., E-mail: muroga@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Li, Y.; Abe, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ukai, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Okuda, T. [Kobelco Research Institute, 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    For the purpose of arranging reference alloys available for various characterization efforts by Japanese fusion research groups, fabrication of reference 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS steels have been carried out with similar manufacturing processes followed by various characterizations. The fabrication proceeded with powder mixing, MA, encapsulation into mild steel cases, hot extrusion and hot forging, followed by final heat treatments. Each alloy was extruded into three bars. The characterization included chemical composition analysis, SEM and TEM microstructural observations, hardness tests, tensile tests at RT and 973 K, and relatively short-term thermal creep tests at 973 K. Room temperature hardness for 9Cr-ODS was larger than 12Cr-ODS, the former showing large increase when annealing temperature exceeded 1200 K and the latter showing no significant change with annealing temperature. Tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS was significantly larger than that of 12Cr-ODS at RT but comparable at 973 K. 9Cr-ODS showed longer and shorter creep rupture time than 12Cr-ODS at high and low stress levels, respectively. The mechanism of the difference in creep properties of the two alloys was discussed.

  7. Radiation and chemical effects on viral transformation and tumor antigen expression. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978--May 1, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Studies aimed at the biological, biochemical, and immunologic characterization of fetal antigens (EA) in hamsters and mice and locating and determining the distribution of fetal antigens in tumor tissues and in developing fetuses have been underway for several months. Progress has been made in isolating embryonic or fetal antigens from fetuses and from tumor cells. We have developed and reported a reliable lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) which meets our needs in routinely assaying cell free tumor associated antigen (TAA) preparations from fetal and tumor cells. The assay correlated with transplantation resistance assays and has appropriate specificity. We have also developed the staph-A protein binding assay utilizing anti-serum derived against embryonic antigens present on SV40 tumor cells. In other studies, we have reported increases and perturbations in thymocytes during viral and chemical oncogenesis in hamsters, have developed a simple technique for preserving functional lymphocytes sensitized against TAA by freezing for use in our model system work, have reported the cross-reactivity of tranplantation resistance antigen on a spectrum of chemically induced tumors previously believed to only contain individually specific TSTAs and have recently reported the cross-reactivity of papovavirus induced transplantation resistance antigen in sarcoma cells induced by different viruses. We have concluded our studies of glycosyltransferases in the membranes of developing fetuses and noted no differences in their levels with advancing days of gestation using whold embryo cell populations

  8. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pueblo Depot Activity, Colorado. Final, Phase 1: Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.W.; Blasing, T.J.; Ensminger, J.T.; Johnson, R.O.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Shor, J.T.; Staub, W.P.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1995-04-01

    Under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the US Army proposes to dispose of lethal chemical agents and munitions stored at eight existing Army installations in the continental United States. In 1988, the US Army issued the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP. The FPEIS and the subsequent Record of Decision (ROD) identified an on-site disposal process as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. That is, the FPEIS determined the environmentally preferred alternative to be on-site disposal in high-temperature incinerators, while the ROD selected this alternative for implementation as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. In this Phase I report, the overall CSDP decision regarding disposal of the PUDA Stockpile is subjected to further analyses, and its validity at PUDA is reviewed with newer, more detailed data than those providing the basis for the conclusions in the FPEIS. The findings of this Phase I report will be factored into the scope of a site-specific environmental impact statement to be prepared for the destruction of the PUDA stockpile. The focus of this Phase I report is on those data identified as having the potential to alter the Army`s previous decision regarding disposal of the PUDA stockpile; however, several other factors beyond the scope of this Phase I report must also be acknowledged to have the potential to change or modify the Army`s decisions regarding PUDA.

  9. Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well with Errata Sheet and Certification, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10

    The closure report for CAU 91 has no Use Restriction Form or drawing/map included in the document to describe the use restricted area, however, Section 3.3.3 states that the site will be fenced and signage placed indicating the area as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit. The drawing that was placed in the FFACO indicating the use restricted area lists the coordinates for the RCRA Unit in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the RCRA Unit with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

  10. Porous CrN thin films by selectively etching CrCuN for symmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Binbin

    2018-03-18

    Transition metal nitrides are regarded as a new class of excellent electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors due to their superior chemical stability and excellent electrical conductivity. We synthesize successfully the porous CrN thin films for binder-free supercapacitor electrodes by reactive magnetron co-sputtering and selective chemical etching. The porous CrN thin film electrodes exhibit high-capacitance performance (31.3 mF cm−2 at 1.0 mA cm−2) and reasonable cycling stability (94% retention after 20000 cycles). Moreover, the specific capacitance is more than two-fold higher than that of the CrN thin film electrodes in previous work. In addition, a symmetric supercapacitor device with a maximum energy density of 14.4 mWh cm−3 and a maximum power density of 6.6 W cm−3 is achieved. These findings demonstrate that the porous CrN thin films will have potential applications in supercapacitors.

  11. Porous CrN thin films by selectively etching CrCuN for symmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Binbin; Mei, Gui; Liang, Hanfeng; Qi, Zhengbing; Zhang, Dongfang; Shen, Hao; Wang, Zhoucheng

    2018-05-01

    Transition metal nitrides are regarded as a new class of excellent electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors due to their superior chemical stability and excellent electrical conductivity. We synthesize successfully the porous CrN thin films for binder-free supercapacitor electrodes by reactive magnetron co-sputtering and selective chemical etching. The porous CrN thin film electrodes exhibit high-capacitance performance (31.3 mF cm-2 at 1.0 mA cm-2) and reasonable cycling stability (94% retention after 20000 cycles). Moreover, the specific capacitance is more than two-fold higher than that of the CrN thin film electrodes in previous work. In addition, a symmetric supercapacitor device with a maximum energy density of 14.4 mWh cm-3 and a maximum power density of 6.6 W cm-3 is achieved. These findings demonstrate that the porous CrN thin films will have potential applications in supercapacitors.

  12. Physical-chemical studies of transuranium elements: Progress report for the period April 1, 1985-March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    New knowledge is being accumulated in the role of the 5f electrons in the bonding in actinide elements and compounds, the relationships of metallic structures to metallic valence and radius, the extent and magnitude of the actinide contraction, the magnetic, thermodynamic, spectroscopic, and crystallographic properties of these materials as related to general theories, the effect of self-irradiation on chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical consequences of radioactive decay in the bulk-phase solid state, and in general, the range of validity of the actinide hypothesis. Separate reports are given on: spectrophotometric studies of Cf(III) ions in lanthanide trihalide hosts, new ternary transplutonium chalcogenide halides, Raman spectrometric studies of lanthanide trihalides as function of T or P, and solution calorimetry of californium halides

  13. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  14. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-level waste grout stabilization development program FY-96 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.

    1996-09-01

    The general purpose of the Grout Stabilization Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-level wastes (LLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LLW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste; (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines; (3) facility decontamination processes; and (4) process equipment waste. The main tasks completed this fiscal year as part of the program were chromium stabilization study for sodium-bearing waste and stabilization and solidification of LLW from aluminum and zirconium calcines. The projected LLW will be highly acidic and contain high amounts of nitrates. Both of these are detrimental to Portland cement chemistry; thus, methods to precondition the LLW and to cure the grout were explored. A thermal calcination process, called denitration, was developed to solidify the waste and destroy the nitrates. A three-way blend of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash was successfully tested. Grout cubes were prepared at various waste loadings to maximize loading while meeting compressive strength and leach resistance requirements. For the sodium LLW, a 25% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 3.5 and a compressive strength of 2,500 pounds per square inch while meeting leach, mix, and flow requirements. It was found that the sulfur in the slag reduces the chromium leach rate below regulatory limits. For the aluminum LLW, a 15% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.5 and a compressive strength of 4,350 pounds per square inch while meeting leach requirements. Likewise for zirconium LLW, a 30% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.3 and a compressive strength of 3,570 pounds per square inch

  15. Thermochemical Conversion of Woody Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendse, Hemant P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Maine and its industries identified more efficient utilization of biomass as a critical economic development issue. In Phase I of this implementation project, a research team was assembled, research equipment was implemented and expertise was demonstrated in pyrolysis, hydrodeoxygenation of pyrolysis oils, catalyst synthesis and characterization, and reaction engineering. Phase II built upon the infrastructure to innovate reaction pathways and process engineering, and integrate new approaches for fuels and chemical production within pulp and paper and other industries within the state. This research cluster brought together chemists, engineers, physicists and students from the University of Maine, Bates College, and Bowdoin College. The project developed collaborations with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The specific research projects within this proposal were of critical interest to the DoE - in particular the biomass program within EERE and the catalysis/chemical transformations program within BES. Scientific and Technical Merit highlights of this project included: (1) synthesis and physical characterization of novel size-selective catalyst/supports using engineered mesoporous (1-10 nm diameter pores) materials, (2) advances in fundamental knowledge of novel support/ metal catalyst systems tailored for pyrolysis oil upgrading, (3) a microcalorimetric sensing technique, (4) improved methods for pyrolysis oil characterization, (5) production and characterization of woody biomass-derived pyrolysis oils, (6) development of two new patented bio oil pathways: thermal deoxygenation (TDO) and formate assisted pyrolysis (FASP), and (7) technoeconomics of pyrolysis of Maine forest biomass. This research cluster has provided fundamental knowledge to enable and assess pathways to thermally convert biomass to hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.

  16. Quantum chemical studies on the some inorganic corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayin, Koray; Karakaş, Duran

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Some quantum chemical parameters are important to determine inhibition efficiency. •Quantum chemical calculations were performed on six inorganic inhibitors. •Five experimental reports were used to explain the theoretical results. •Atomic charges and %contributions were used to determine the atom at protonation process. •For inorganic inhibitors, the best method and basis set were investigated. -- Abstract: Some quantum chemical parameters were calculated by using Hartree–Fock (HF) approximation, Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) and Møller Plesset perturbation theory (MP3) methods at LANL2DZ, LANL2MB and SDD levels in gas phase and water for dichromate (Cr 2 O 7 2- ), chromate (CrO 4 2- ), tungstate (WO 4 2- ), molybdate (MoO 4 2- ), nitrite (NO 2 - ) and nitrate (NO 3 - ) which are used as inorganic corrosion inhibitors. All theoretical results and experimental inhibition efficiencies of inhibitors were subjected to correlation analyses. In a summary, MP3/SDD level in water was found as the best level. In this level, the inhibition efficiency ranking was found as CrO 4 2- >WO 4 2- >MoO 4 2- >Cr 2 O 7 2- >NO 2 - ≈NO 3 -

  17. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Progress report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1975-01-01

    Progress on the project to determine the neutron-absorption cross section of 22 Na is described. Upper limits for the thermal-neutron cross sections of 88 Y and 139 Ce have been set at 100 barns. The experiment to search for a change in the ratio of electron capture to positron emission due to difference in chemical environment is underway. The mechanical aspects of the system for analysis by proton-induced x-ray emission are described. Recent results on solvent extraction of mercury by pure solvents and propylene carbonate are described. Recent measurements in a study of an acid-base hypothesis are described. (U.S.)

  18. The chemical stability of TRISO-coated HTGR fuel. Pt. 1. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, P.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Konings, R.J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The US fuel seemed to be more difficult to produce than the German fuel. Also the chemical stability of this fuel must be investigated. The conditions are more severe in the US concept than in the German concept. Oxidation of the graphite seems to be no problem, according to US HTGR concept. A ZrC coating seems to have a number of advantages with regard to the SiC coating: (1) Better retention, (2) no reaction with Pd, (3) no thermal dissociation. Only the oxidation resistance is worse than SiC. Also the maximum stress must be determined that the ZrC coating can have. (orig./HP)

  19. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.H. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    These Appendices describe various technologies that may be applicable to the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (MWTP) Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). These technologies were identified by the CPTS Technical Support Group (TSG) as potentially applicable to a variety of separation, volume reduction, and decontamination requirements. The purpose was to identify all available and developing technologies, and their characteristics, for subsequent evaluation for specific requirements identified for the CPTS. However, the technologies described herein are not necessarily all inclusive, nor are they necessarily all applicable.

  20. Recent Canadian experience in chemical warfare agent destruction: An overview. Suffield report No. 626

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAndless, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews a project in which stockpiles of aged mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide), lewisite (2-chlorovinyl-dichloro arsine), nerve agents, and contaminated scrap metal were incinerated or chemically neutralized in a safe, environmentally responsible manner. Sections of the paper describe the public consultation program conducted prior to destruction operations, the environmental assessment of the destruction projects, the environmental protection plan implemented to eliminate or mitigate risks with respect to the installation and operation of the destruction equipment, the environmental monitoring procedures, the agent destruction operations, and the destruction process performance, including incinerator emissions.

  1. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You, E-mail: youqiang@uidaho.edu [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Dai, Qilin; Tang, Jinke [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States); Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Wu, Yaqiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr (<10 at. %) were selected in order to inhibit the complete conversion of the Fe-oxide shell to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (∼25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of σ-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs.

  2. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program: Review and comment on the Phase 1 environmental report for the Pueblo Depot Activity, Pueblo, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshansky, S.J.; Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1994-03-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at the Pueblo Depot Activity (PUDA) in Pueblo, Colorado. The Phase I report addresses new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). These concerns are addressed by examining site-specific data for the PUDA. On the basis of our review of the Phase I report, we concluded that on-site meteorological data from December 1988 to June 1992 appear to be of insufficient quality to have been used instead of the off-site Pueblo airport data. No additional meteorological data have been collected since June 1992. The Phase I report briefly mentions problems with the air pollution control system. These problems will likely require the systems to be upgraded at the Johnston Atoll site and at each of the other depots in the continental United States. Without such improvements, the probability of accidents during start-up and shutdown would likely increase. The Army has a lessons-learned program to incorporate improvements into the design of future facilities. The Phase I report does not make any design change commitments. These issues need to be fully evaluated and resolved before any final conclusion concerning the adequacy of the decision in the FPEIS can be made with respect to the PUDA. With the exception of this issue, the inclusion of other more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at the PUDA). We recommend that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process

  3. The corrosion and mechanical behaviour of Al, FeCrAlY, and CoCrAlY coatings in aggressive environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; Geerdink, Bert; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical and chemical behaviours of aluminide coatings applied by pack cementation, FeCrAlY coatings applied by plasma spraying and CoCrAlY coatings applied by electrodeposition were studied. The coatings were pretreated for 0.5 h in argon at 1373 K to improve the adhesion and structural

  4. Chemical and ceramic methods for the safe storage of actinides using monazite. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    'Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Rockwell Science Center of Thousand Oaks, California, are carrying out a joint investigation of the chemical, physical, thermal, and radiation-resistance properties of the lanthanide orthophosphates (monazites) in both ceramic and single-crystal form with the objective of developing the scientific and technical base required for the application of these materials to the storage or disposal of actinide elements, including plutonium. An additional major objective of the research effort is to investigate the technical and scientific problems associated with the formation of both phase-pure monazite ceramics and multiphase monazite-ceramic composites for waste disposal or waste storage applications. These latter investigations encompass the development of low-temperature chemical synthesis routes for the formation of monoclinic monazite phases and the study of the densification properties of lanthanide orthophosphate powders to produce stable, high-density ceramics. Research Statement This research effort addresses several basic issues associated with the characteristics of lanthanide orthophosphates that make this class of materials extremely attractive candidates for application to the storage of actinide elements in general and plutonium in particular. Additionally, these materials are potentially important refractory ceramics in their own right, and many of the scientific issues addressed in this project are applicable to the development of what will constitute a new, highly stable family of ceramics for applications in a number of energy-related areas.'

  5. Chemical and geochemical studies off the coast of Washington. Progress report, September 1978-August 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, R.

    1979-08-01

    Progress on a series of marine chemical and geochemical investigations involving both laboratory studies and field studies off the coast of Washington are summarized. Most of the field work has been on the Washington continental shelf, slope, and the submarine canyons indenting the shelf north of the Columbia River. The aim is to provide basic data required to characterize underlying chemical and physical processes and their rates which control the distributions, concentrations, and ultimate fate of some of the potentially hazardous agents associated with fossil fuel and nuclear power production or transportation. The studies have followed several main lines of investigation which are in various stages of completion: (1) field studies of the uptake and transport by zooplankton fecal pellets of 210 Po, 210 Pb, and other trace inorganic and organic constituents in a well-studied part of Puget Sound; (2) studies of the behavior of 210 Po and 210 Pb in sediments off the coast of Washington and the application of the 210 Pb determinations in sediment cores to determine sediment accumulation rates for the past 100 years, the depth of the surface mixed layer, and a mixing coefficient for the surface sediments; and (3) investigations of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in some of the same samples of organisms and sediment cores whose accumulation histories for the past 100 years we have determined with the 210 Pb technique

  6. 2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

    2008-11-01

    For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

  7. FY98 Final Report Initial Interfacial Chemical Control for Enhancement of Composite Material Strength; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GE Fryxell; KL Alford; KL Simmons; RD Voise; WD Samuels

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) sponsored this research project to support the development of new self-assembled monolayer fiber coatings. These coatings can greatly increase the bond strength between the fiber and the resin matrix of a composite material. Composite ammunition components molded from such materials will exhibit higher strength than current materials, and will provide a major improvement in the performance of composites in military applications. Use of composite materials in military applications is desirable because of the lighter weight of the materials and their high strengths. The FY97 project investigated initial interfacial chemical control for enhancement of composite material strength. The core of the project was to modify the covalent interface of glass fibers (or other reinforcing fibers) to induce strong, uniform, defect-free adhesion between the fibers' surfaces and the polymer matrix. Installing a self-assembled monolayer tailored to the specific matrix resin accomplished this. Simply, the self-assembled monolayer modifies the fiber to make it appear to have the same chemical composition as the resin matrix. The self-assembled monolayer creates a receptive, hydrophobic interface that the thermoset resin (or polymer precursors) would wet more effectively, leading to a higher contact surface area and more efficient adhesion. The FY97 work phase demonstrated that it is possible to increase the adhesive strength, as well as increase the heat deflection temperature through the use of self-assembled monolayer

  8. Preservation of potatoes and onions by irradiation and chemical treatments. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekhavat, A.; Zare, Z.; Kudva, M.G.; Chopra, K.L.; Shariat Panahi, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Preservation of potatoes and onions is an urgent need in Iran, and an attempt has been made to gain experience in this field by applying ionizing radiation and chemicals. 60 Co gamma radiation doses of 5, 10, 12 and 15krad for three local varieties of potatoes and of 3, 6 and 9krad for one variety of onions, salicylic acid concentrations of 500, 1500 and 2500ppm, and combinations of different doses of radiation and salicylic acid were tried. Upon irradiation with doses of 12-15krad a significant reduction in the losses due to sprouting, rotting and dehydration was observed for all three varieties of potatoes after a storage period of nine months. Chemical treatment alone proved ineffective. Some doses of a combined treatment with salicylic acid plus irradiation yielded good results, but they need confirmation by further investigation. Organoleptic tests were carried out on two varieties of potatoes. Due to a delay in starting the treatment of onions after harvest, a high percentage had already begun to sprout and so the results obtained are only approximate values. (author)

  9. Ultralow Level Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping: Scoping Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected during the first stage of a Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Strategic Research and Development Project confirmed the efficacy of chemical reduction and air stripping/sparging as an ultralow level mercury treatment concept for waters containing Hg(II). The process consists of dosing the water with low levels of stannous chloride to convert the mercury to Hg. This form of mercury can easily be removed from the water by air stripping or sparging. Samples of Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater containing approximately 130 ng/L of total mercury (as Hg(II)) were used for the study. In undosed samples, sparging removed 0 percent of the initial mercury. In the dosed samples, all of the removals were greater than 94 percent, except in one water type at one dose. This sample, which was saturated with dissolved oxygen, showed a 63 percent reduction in mercury following treatment at the lowest dose. Following dosing at minimally effective levels and sparging, treated water contained less than 10 ng/L total mercury. In general, the data indicate that the reduction of mercury is highly favored and that stannous chloride reagent efficiently targets the Hg(II) contaminant in the presence of competing reactions. Based on the results, the authors estimated that the costs of implementing and operating an ultralow level mercury treatment process based on chemical reduction and stripping/sparging are 10 percent to 20 percent of traditional treatment technologies

  10. Preservation of Potatoes and Onions by Irradiation and Chemical Treatments. A Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekhavat, A.; Zare, Z.; Kudva, M. G.; Chopra, K. L.; Shariat Panahi, J. M. [Center for Research and for Application Of Radioisotopes, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    1978-04-15

    Preservation of potatoes and onions is an urgent need in Iran, and an attempt has been made to gain experience in this field by applying ionizing radiation and chemicals. {sup 60}Co gamma radiation doses of 5, 10, 12 and 15 krad for three local varieties of potatoes and of 3, 6 and 9 krad for one variety of onions, salicylic acid concentrations of 500, 1500 and 2500 ppm, and combinations of different doses of radiation and salicylic acid were tried. Upon irradiation with doses of 12-15 krad a significant reduction in the losses due to sprouting, rotting and dehydration was observed for all three varieties of potatoes after a storage period of nine months. Chemical treatment alone proved ineffective. Some doses of a combined treatment with salicylic acid plus irradiation yielded good results, but they need confirmation by further investigation. Organoleptic tests were carried out on two varieties of potatoes. Due to a delay in starting the treatment of onions after harvest, a high percentage had already begun to sprout and so the results obtained are only approximate values. (author)

  11. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    Investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy substantially reduces symptom severity and social disability associated with multiple chemical sensitivity: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberling, Jesper; Gulmann, Nils; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-09-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic nonallergic, multisymptom disorder triggered by common environmental chemicals in concentrations considered nontoxic for most individuals. The condition may lead to loss of occupation and social isolation, and no effective treatment has been reported. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a safe and effective treatment of severe depression and medical conditions such as chronic pain disorders. We report a case of a 45-year-old man with a 5-year history of MCS who had to quit his job to live a solitary life without his wife and children because of the condition. The patient had no history of psychiatric illness and no signs of clinical depression at treatment start. Over a 3-week period, he underwent a course of 8 ECTs, giving a remarkable effect on symptom severity and social functional level. After a partial symptom relapse, maintenance treatment was started with 1 ECT every second week. No memory impairment or other complications of ECT were reported at the 4-month follow-up. In this case, a substantial, positive effect on symptom severity and social disability related to MCS was obtained by an initial ECT course and maintenance treatment. Electroconvulsive therapy should be considered an option in severe and socially disabling MCS, but more studies are needed to evaluate if ECT can be recommended as a treatment in MCS.

  13. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1981-March 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for eight sections of the report: nuclear waste management; fossil energy; basic science and technology; biotechnology and environmental programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Three Mile Island support studies; and miscellaneous programs

  14. 78 FR 14241 - Acetonitrile; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... dysfunctions, (II) neurological disorders, (III) heritable genetic mutations, or (IV) other chronic health... attributed to metabolism of acetonitrile to cyanide (Ref. 8). Several cases were reported in which children...

  15. Audit Report. Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System Preparation for Year 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    This is one in a series of reports being issued by the Inspector General, DoD, in accordance with an informal partnership with the Chief Information Officer, DoD, to monitor DoD efforts in addressing...

  16. Audit Report. Tooele Chemical Agent Disposal Facility Preparation for Year 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    This is one in a series of reports being issued by the Inspector General, DoD, in accordance with an informal partnership with the Chief Information Officer, DoD, to monitor DoD efforts in addressing...

  17. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Report Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    This Engineering Test report outlines the results obtained from testing polyurea on its decon factor, tank waste compatibility, and adhesion strength when subjected to a high level of gamma radiation. This report is used in conjunction with RPP-7187 Project W-314 Pit Coatings Repair Requirements Analysis, to document the fact polyurea meets the project W-314 requirements contained in HNF-SD-W314-PDS-005 and is therefore an acceptable SPC for use in W-314 pit refurbishments

  18. Environmental issues and financial reporting trends: A survey in the chemical and oil & gas industries

    OpenAIRE

    Salomone, Roberta; Galluccio, Giulia

    2001-01-01

    As environmental performance is increasingly seen to have an influence over financial performance and financial risk assessment, disclosure of environmental issues in the Annual Reports is a fundamental requirement for a company in order to satisfy the information needs of its stakeholders. Given this pressure there is a definite trend among leading companies to report their environmental performances within the financial statements, but the way companies disclose environmental-related inform...

  19. Biomass-derived Syngas Utilization for Fuels and Chemicals - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayton, David C

    2010-03-24

    . Task 3: Chemical Synthesis: Promising process routes will be identified for synthesis of selected chemicals from biomass-derived syngas. A project milestone was to select promising mixed alcohol catalysts and screen productivity and performance in a fixed bed micro-reactor using bottled syngas. This milestone was successfully completed in collaboration withour catalyst development partner. Task 4: Modeling, Engineering Evaluation, and Commercial Assessment: Mass and energy balances of conceptual commercial embodiment for FT and chemical synthesis were completed.

  20. Compilation of contract research for the Chemical Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering Technology. Annual report for FY 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    This compilation of annual research reports by the contractors to the Chemical Engineering Branch, DET, is published to disseminate information from ongoing programs and covers research conducted during fiscal year 1985. The programs covered in this document include research on: (1) engineered safety feature (ESF) system effectiveness in terms of fission product retention under severe accident conditions; (2) effectiveness and safety aspects of selected decontamination methods; (3) decontamination impacts on solidification and waste disposal; (4) evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects and concepts, and (5) operational schemes to prevent or mitigate the effects of hydrogen combustion during LWR accidents

  1. Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M. (comps.)

    1981-12-01

    Part 2 contains the data base in tabular format. There are two sections, the first with records on nondrug substances, and the second with records on drugs. Chemicals in each section are arranged alphabetically by CAS preferred name, CAS registry number, formula, atomic weight, melting point, boiling point, and vapor pressure. Tissues are listed alphabetically with exposure route, analytical method, number of cases, range, and mean - when available in the source document. A variety of information may also be included that is pertinent to the range and mean as well as experimental design, demography, health effects, pathology, morphology, and toxicity. Review articles are included in the data base; however, no data have been extracted from such documents because the original research articles are included.

  2. Effects of radiation and chemicals on SV40 oncogenesis. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    This project is directed toward developing rapid, quantitative methods and immunologic markers which will permit the early detection of newly forming tumors induced or enhanced by x-irradiation, chemical carcinogens, viruses or combinations of the three. The projects under study in our ongoing collaborative program seek to develop the detailed understanding and precise methodology required for the early detection of embryonic antigens in transformed cells induced by the co-carcinogenic effects of viruses and low-level radiation. A new technique for assaying the earliest transformed cells appearing in a carcinogen treated population affords a unique tool for this study. Present plans involve efforts to purify embryonic determinants from fetal and transformed cells of hamsters and mice in order to define their role in the transformation process and in tumor development

  3. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals, Final Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curl, Robert F.; Glass, Graham P.

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  4. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100 0 C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced

  5. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100{sup 0}C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced.

  6. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockton, M.

    2003-01-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R

  7. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group (ENV-EAQ)

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  8. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.

  9. Physical--chemical studies of transuranium elements. Progress report, April 1, 1977--March 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Major advances in our continuing program to determine, interpret, and correlate the basic chemical and physical properties of the transuranium elements are summarized for the period April 1, 1977, through March 31, 1978. CfCl 2 , EsCl 2 , EsBr 2 , and EsI 2 were synthesized and characterized spectrophotometrically, as were several mixed-valence lanthanide-actinide halides (e.g., GdCf 4 Cl 11 ) and CmF 4 , CfF 4 , and EsF 3 . All samples not containing einsteinium were also examined by X rays. Studies of the chemical consequences of the radioactive decay series 253 Es alpha decaying to 249 Bk beta decaying to 249 Cf have continued and expanded. Elemental Cm-248 has been prepared on the one-half milligram scale and used to synthesize CmP and CmSb. Single crystals of AmTe 2 and AmSe 2 have been grown from a Te melt and by iodine transport, respectively. Our SQUID magnetometer was tested successfully in a preliminary configuration, and the expected sensitivity of the device was confirmed. A new design for the flux sensing coils was incorporated prior to an apparatus calibration experiment with lead. A porous vitreous carbon material was found to make a useful optically transparent electrode for simultaneous electrochemical and absorption spectroscopic investigations. Cyclic voltammograms of UO 2 2+ were obtained prior to a spectroelectrochemical study of the radiation of UO 2 2+ . The major obstacle in our solution microcalorimetry program was overcome by the realization of a leak-free sample container. Calorimeter performance now warrants experiments with transuranium element samples. The electrochemical reductions of Cf(III) and Es(III) have been studied by polarography and/or cyclic voltammetry. The results suggest that both are reduced to the divalent state before being reduced to the amalgam

  10. Endocrine disruptive effects of chemicals eluted from nitrile-butadiene rubber gloves using reporter gene assay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kanako; Nonaka, Ryouichi; Ohyama, Ken-ichi; Nagai, Fumiko; Ogata, Akio; Iida, Mitsuru

    2008-03-01

    Disposable gloves made of nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) are used for contact with foodstuffs rather than polyvinyl chloride gloves containing di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), because endocrine-disruptive effects are suspected for phthalate diesters including DEHP. However, 4,4'-butylidenebis(6-t-butyl-m-cresol) (BBBC), 2,4-di-t-butylphenol, and 2,2,4-trimetyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate can be eluted from NBR gloves, and possibly also detected in food. In this study, we examined the endocrine-disrupting effects of these chemicals via androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated pathways using stably transfected reporter gene cell lines expressing AR (AR-EcoScreen system) and ER (MVLN cells), respectively. We also examined the binding activities of these chemicals to AR and ER. The IC50 value of BBBC for antagonistic androgen was in the range of 10(-6)M. The strength of inhibition was about 5 times that of a known androgen antagonist, 1,1'-(2,2-dichloroethylidene)bis[4-chlorobenzene] (p,p'-DDE), and similar to that of bisphenol A. The IC50 value of BBBC for antagonistic estrogen was in the range of 10(-6)M. These results suggest that BBBC and its structural homologue, 4,4'-thiobis(6-t-butyl-m-cresol) are androgen and estrogen antagonists. It is therefore necessary to study these chemicals in vivo, and clarify their effect on the endocrine system.

  11. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  12. Psicosis inducida ("foliex a deux" e intoxicación crónica por plomo.: Reporte de un caso y discusión.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Arias

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of two brothers suffering the same paranoia psychosis. The older one presented an altered consciousness and needed hospitalization. During hospitalization, he was considered as having lead chronic intoxication. The lead serum level was 65 ug/dl (N:<30 ug/dl and the lead hair was 25 pg/gr-tiss (N:<10 pg/gr-tiss. He also presented clinically with encephalopathy, disorder of the autonomic dysfunction. He leaded his body for eleven years because of delutional ideas, and induced these ideas and behavior to his brother (folie a deux. The coincidence between these disorders in extremely rare so we believe this case report is of clinical interesting. (Rev Med Hered 1996; 7: 101-104.

  13. Strain dependent microstructural modifications of BiCrO{sub 3} epitaxial thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Vijayanandhini, E-mail: kvnandhini@gmail.com [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); CNRS, University of Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Arredondo, Miryam; Johann, Florian; Hesse, Dietrich [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Labrugere, Christine [CNRS, University of Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); CeCaMA, University of Bordeaux, ICMCB, F-33600 Pessac (France); Maglione, Mario [CNRS, University of Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Vrejoiu, Ionela [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-10-31

    Strain-dependent microstructural modifications were observed in epitaxial BiCrO{sub 3} (BCO) thin films fabricated on single crystalline substrates, utilizing pulsed laser deposition. The following conditions were employed to modify the epitaxial-strain: (i) in-plane tensile strain, BCO{sub STO} [BCO grown on buffered SrTiO{sub 3} (001)] and in-plane compressive strain, BCO{sub NGO} [BCO grown on buffered NdGaO{sub 3} (110)] and (ii) varying BCO film thickness. A combination of techniques like X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to analyse the epitaxial growth quality and the microstructure of BCO. Our studies revealed that in the case of BCO{sub STO}, a coherent interface with homogeneous orthorhombic phase is obtained only for BCO film with thicknesses, d < 50 nm. All the BCO{sub STO} films with d ≥ 50 nm were found to be strain-relaxed with an orthorhombic phase showing 1/2 <100> and 1/4 <101> satellite reflections, the latter oriented at 45° from orthorhombic diffraction spots. High angle annular dark field scanning TEM of these films strongly suggested that the satellite reflections, 1/2 <100> and 1/4 <101>, originate from the atomic stacking sequence changes (or “modulated structure”) as reported for polytypes, without altering the chemical composition. The unaltered stoichiometry was confirmed by estimating both valency of Bi and Cr cations by surface and in-depth XPS analysis as well as the stoichiometric ratio (1 Bi:1 Cr) using scanning TEM–energy dispersive X-ray analysis. In contrast, compressively strained BCO{sub NGO} films exhibited monoclinic symmetry without any structural modulations or interfacial defects, up to d ∼ 200 nm. Our results indicate that both the substrate-induced in-plane epitaxial strain and the BCO film thickness are the crucial parameters to stabilise a homogeneous BCO phase in an epitaxially grown film. - Highlights: • Phase pure

  14. Environmental Application of Reporter-Genes Based Biosensors for Chemical Contamination Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matejczyk Marzena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research concerning possibilities of applications of reporter-genes based microorganisms, including the selective presentation of defects and advantages of different new scientific achievements of methodical solutions in genetic system constructions of biosensing elements for environmental research. The most robust and popular genetic fusion and new trends in reporter genes technology – such as LacZ (β-galactosidase, xylE (catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, gfp (green fluorescent proteins and its mutated forms, lux (prokaryotic luciferase, luc (eukaryotic luciferase, phoA (alkaline phosphatase, gusA and gurA (β-glucuronidase, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance are described. Reporter-genes based biosensors with use of genetically modified bacteria and yeast successfully work for genotoxicity, bioavailability and oxidative stress assessment for detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and different environmental samples, surface water, soil, sediments.

  15. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management: A Comprehensive Information System (ASSET 2). Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Randy C. [Shell Global Solutions, Houston, TX (United States); Young, Arthur L. [Humberside Solutions, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pelton, Arthur D. [CRCT, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Thompson, William T. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada); Wright, Ian G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-10-10

    The research sponsored by this project has greatly expanded the ASSET corrosion prediction software system to produce a world-class technology to assess and predict engineering corrosion of metals and alloys corroding by exposure to hot gases. The effort included corrosion data compilation from numerous industrial sources and data generation at Shell Oak Ridge National Laboratory and several other companies for selected conditions. These data were organized into groupings representing various combinations of commercially available alloys and corrosion by various mechanisms after acceptance via a critical screening process to ensure the data were for alloys and conditions, which were adequately well defined, and of sufficient repeatability. ASSET is the largest and most capable, publicly-available technology in the field of corrosion assessment and prediction for alloys corroding by high temperature processes in chemical plants, hydrogen production, energy conversion processes, petroleum refining, power generation, fuels production and pulp/paper processes. The problems addressed by ASSET are: determination of the likely dominant corrosion mechanism based upon information available to the chemical engineers designing and/or operating various processes and prediction of engineering metal losses and lifetimes of commercial alloys used to build structural components. These assessments consider exposure conditions (metal temperatures, gas compositions and pressures), alloy compositions and exposure times. Results of the assessments are determination of the likely dominant corrosion mechanism and prediction of the loss of metal/alloy thickness as a function of time, temperature, gas composition and gas pressure. The uses of these corrosion mechanism assessments and metal loss predictions are that the degradation of processing equipment can be managed for the first time in a way which supports efforts to reduce energy consumption, ensure structural integrity of equipment

  16. Enhanced magnetization at the Cr/MgO(001) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, M.-A. [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, IRAMIS, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, 54500 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Bataille, A. M., E-mail: alexandre.bataille@cea.fr; Ott, F. [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, IRAMIS, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Wang, Q.; Fitzsimmons, M. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Vlad, A.; Coati, A. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des merisiers, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Garreau, Y. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des merisiers, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Matériaux et phénomènes quantiques (MPQ), Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7, Sorbonne-Paris-Cité, CNRS, UMR 7162, 10, rue A. Domon et L. Duquet 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Hauet, T.; Andrieu, S. [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, 54500 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Gatel, C. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2015-12-21

    We report on the magnetization at the Cr/MgO interface, which we studied through two complementary techniques: angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and polarized neutron reflectivity. We experimentally observe an enhanced interface magnetization at the interface, yet with values much smaller than the ones reported so far by theoretical and experimental studies on Cr(001) surfaces. Our findings cast some doubts on the interpretations on previous works and could be useful in antiferromagnetic spin torque studies.

  17. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  18. Repair of DNA treated with lambda-irradiation and chemical carcinogens. Progress report, 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldthwait, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) DNA repair in HeLa cells; (2) a search for human transposable elements; (3) the effect of radiation and carcinogens on the activation of LTR sequences; and (4) studies on oncogenes of central nervous system tumors

  19. Comparative study of radiation, chemical, and aging effects on viral transformation. Annual progress report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: evaluation of isotopic antiglobulin test (IAT) to detect tumor associated antigens using antisera induced by x-irradiated tumor cells; development of cytotoxic antibody for embryonic antigens (EA); acrylamide gel cell culture assay for transformation; and evaluation of 3-MCA induced sarcomas for TSTA and cross-reacting antigens

  20. Comparative study of radiation, chemical, and aging effects on viral transformation. Annual progress report, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1976-03-31

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: evaluation of isotopic antiglobulin test (IAT) to detect tumor associated antigens using antisera induced by x-irradiated tumor cells; development of cytotoxic antibody for embryonic antigens (EA); acrylamide gel cell culture assay for transformation; and evaluation of 3-MCA induced sarcomas for TSTA and cross-reacting antigens. (HLW)