WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical reduction invited

  1. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  2. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malpica Galassi, Riccardo; Valorani, Mauro; Najm, Habib N.; Safta, Cosmin; Khalil, Mohammad; Ciottoli, Pietro P.

    2017-01-01

    A general strategy for analysis and reduction of uncertain chemical kinetic models is presented, and its utility is illustrated in the context of ignition of hydrocarbon fuel–air mixtures. The strategy is based on a deterministic analysis

  3. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Habib; Galassi, R. Malpica; Valorani, M.

    2016-01-01

    We outline a strategy for chemical kinetic model reduction under uncertainty. We present highlights of our existing deterministic model reduction strategy, and describe the extension of the formulation to include parametric uncertainty in the detailed mechanism. We discuss the utility of this construction, as applied to hydrocarbon fuel-air kinetics, and the associated use of uncertainty-aware measures of error between predictions from detailed and simplified models.

  4. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Habib

    2016-01-05

    We outline a strategy for chemical kinetic model reduction under uncertainty. We present highlights of our existing deterministic model reduction strategy, and describe the extension of the formulation to include parametric uncertainty in the detailed mechanism. We discuss the utility of this construction, as applied to hydrocarbon fuel-air kinetics, and the associated use of uncertainty-aware measures of error between predictions from detailed and simplified models.

  5. Invitation

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Monday, 11 October Gala-Concert to celebrate 50 years of CERN Jack Liebeck (violin) and Katya Apekisheva (piano) Works by C. Debussy, S. Prokofiev, and L. van Beethoven CERN, Main Auditorium, 20:00 For CERN staff and their families With the assistance of PPARC (UK) Free tickets available at the CERN Press Office (50-1-048). Maximum four tickets per person. For more information on the performers, see: http://www.jackliebeck.com/CERN50/JL.htm http://www.jackliebeck.com/CERN50/KA.htm The "WIENER SCHUBERTBUND" celebrates CERN's 50th "DEUTSCHE MESSE" By Franz Schubert performed by the "WIENER SCHUBERTBUND" On the occasion of the Organization's Fiftieth Anniversary, Mr Hans-Walter Gérard Schober, Honorary Consul-General of Austria in Geneva, is pleased to invite all those working at CERN to a mass at which Franz Schubert's German Mass will be sung by the Vienna Schubert Choral Society. This renown men's choir, founded in 1863. Eminent composers, including Richard Strauss, Wilhelm Kinzel, a...

  6. Disaster Risk Reduction through Innovative Uses of Crowd Sourcing (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J.; Greene, M.

    2010-12-01

    Crowd sourcing can be described as a method of distributed problem-solving. It takes advantage of the power of the crowd, which can in some cases be a community of experts and in other cases the collective insight of a broader range of contributors with varying degrees of domain knowledge. The term crowd sourcing was first used by Jeff Howe in a June 2006 Wired magazine article “The Rise of Crowdsourcing,” and is a combination of the terms “crowd” and “outsourcing.” Some commonly known examples of crowd sourcing, in its broadest sense, include Wikepedia, distributed participatory design projects, and consumer websites such as Yelp and Angie’s List. The popularity and success of early large-scale crowd sourcing activities is made possible through leveraging Web 2.0 technologies that allow for mass participation from distributed individuals. The Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) in Oakland, California recently participated in two crowd sourcing projects. One was initiated and coordinated by EERI, while in the second case EERI was invited to contribute once the crowd sourcing activity was underway. In both projects there was: 1) the determination of a problem or set of tasks that could benefit immediately from the engagement of an informed volunteer group of professionals; 2) a segmenting of the problem into discrete pieces that could be completed in a short period of time (from ten minutes to four hours); 3) a call to action, where an interested community was made aware of the project; and 4) the collection, aggregation, vetting and ultimately distribution of the results in a relatively short period of time. The first EERI crowd sourcing example was the use of practicing engineers and engineering students in California to help estimate the number of pre-1980 concrete buildings in the high seismic risk counties in the state. This building type is known to perform poorly in earthquakes, and state officials were interested in understanding

  7. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malpica Galassi, Riccardo

    2017-03-06

    A general strategy for analysis and reduction of uncertain chemical kinetic models is presented, and its utility is illustrated in the context of ignition of hydrocarbon fuel–air mixtures. The strategy is based on a deterministic analysis and reduction method which employs computational singular perturbation analysis to generate simplified kinetic mechanisms, starting from a detailed reference mechanism. We model uncertain quantities in the reference mechanism, namely the Arrhenius rate parameters, as random variables with prescribed uncertainty factors. We propagate this uncertainty to obtain the probability of inclusion of each reaction in the simplified mechanism. We propose probabilistic error measures to compare predictions from the uncertain reference and simplified models, based on the comparison of the uncertain dynamics of the state variables, where the mixture entropy is chosen as progress variable. We employ the construction for the simplification of an uncertain mechanism in an n-butane–air mixture homogeneous ignition case, where a 176-species, 1111-reactions detailed kinetic model for the oxidation of n-butane is used with uncertainty factors assigned to each Arrhenius rate pre-exponential coefficient. This illustration is employed to highlight the utility of the construction, and the performance of a family of simplified models produced depending on chosen thresholds on importance and marginal probabilities of the reactions.

  8. Indian Chemical Engineering Congress 1995: 48th annual session of Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers: abstracts and invited lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The 48th Annual Session of Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers was held in Kalpakkam during December 27-30, 1995. The book contains the proceeding of the conference, both abstracts and invited lectures. The topics covered included various aspects pertaining to chemical engineering and technology along with the chemical and engineering processes relevant to nuclear fuel cycle like uranium ore processing, fuel fabrication, reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  9. Role reductants in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S. [Univ. of New Brunswick (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay, Mumbai (India). Water and Steam Chemistry Lab.; Raghavan, P.S. [Madras Christian Coll., Chennai (India); Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian Coll., Chennai (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-10-01

    Iron(III) oxides are the major corrosion products formed in boiling water reactors. The iron(III) oxides are of two types, namely hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The dissolution of these oxides is in no way simple because of the labile nature of the Fe(III)-O bond towards the chelants. The leaching of metal ions is partially controlled by reductive dissolution. In order to understand the role of the reductant, it is essential to study the dissolution behaviour of a system like Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which does not contain any Fe{sup 2+} in the crystal lattice. The present study was carried out with {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and dilute chemical decontamination (DCD) formulations containing ascorbic acid and citric acid with the addition of Fe(II)-L as a reductant. The chelants used for the dissolution process were nitrilotriacetic acid, 2,6-pyridinedicorboxylic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was chosen since the earlier studies revealed that the dissolution kinetics of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is slow and it is difficult to dissolve even by strong complexing agents, whereas {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} dissolution is comparatively easier. This is due to the structural difference between these two oxides. The studies also revealed that the dissolution was partly influenced by the nature of the chelating agents but mainly controlled by the power of the reductants used in the formulation. The dissolution behaviour of {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} under various experimental conditions is discussed and compared with that of magnetite in order to arrive at a suitable mechanism for the dissolution of iron oxides and emphasize the role of reductants in DCD formulations. (orig.)

  10. Chemical Reduction Synthesis of Iron Aluminum Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Méndez, N. N.; la Torre, G. Carbajal-De; Ballesteros-Almanza, L.; Villagómez-Galindo, M.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Espinosa-Medina, M. A.

    In this study, a chemical reduction synthesis method of iron aluminum (FeAl) nano-dimensional intermetallic powders is described. The process has two stages: a salt reduction and solvent evaporation by a heat treatment at 1100°C. The precursors of the synthesis are ferric chloride, aluminum foil chips, a mix of Toluene/THF in a 75/25 volume relationship, and concentrated hydrochloric acid as initiator of the reaction. The reaction time was 20 days, the product obtained was dried at 60 °C for 2 h and calcined at 400, 800, and 1100 °C for 4 h each. To characterize and confirm the obtained synthesis products, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques were used. The results of morphology and chemical characterization of nano-dimensional powders obtained showed a formation of agglomerated particles of a size range of approximately 150 nm to 1.0 μm. Composition of powders was identified as corundum (Al2O3), iron aluminide (FeAl3), and iron-aluminum oxides (Fe0. 53Al0. 47)2O3 phases. The oxide phases formation were associated with the reaction of atmospheric concentration-free oxygen during synthesis and sintering steps, reducing the concentration of the iron aluminum phase.

  11. CoPt nanoparticles by chemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.L.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Zeng, Q.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    CoPt nanoparticles with a size of 1-2 nm were synthesized by chemical reduction using the solvents of water and alcohol. A phase transformation from the originally disordered face centered cubic (FCC) structure to an ordered face centered tetragonal L1 0 structure occurred after annealing, which results in the coercivity up to 9 kOe because of the high anisotropy of the tetragonal phase (K∼2-4x10 7 erg/cm 3 ) (Philos. Mag. 13 (1966) 567; IEEE Trans. Magn. 20 (1984) 1625). HREM images of as-grow Co 48 Pt 52 shows the single-crystalline FCC structure with the shape of columnar and spherical

  12. Toxic chemicals: risk prevention through use reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higgins, Thomas E; Sachdev, Jayanti A; Engleman, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    "Catastrophic events such as the Bhopal, India tragedy and rising incidences of cancer in areas neighboring industrial facilities have heightened concern over the use of toxic chemicals in manufacturing and industry...

  13. Toxic chemicals: risk prevention through use reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higgins, Thomas E; Sachdev, Jayanti A; Engleman, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    ... on the actual toxicity of chemicals currently in use, discusses variables that contribute to the relative toxicity of a substance, compares alternate emphases in existing programs for reducing environmental...

  14. Chemical reduction of refractory oxides by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.; Balooch, M.; Olander, D.R.

    1978-11-01

    The chemical reduction of UO 2 and Al 2 O 3 by atomic hydrogen was studied. Results of the UO 2 /H investigation indicates that reduction of UO 2 by atomic hydrogen proceeds by the production of water vapor and hypostoichiometric urania. Water vapor and aluminum metal are formed in the Al 2 O 3 /H system. The relative ease which UO 2 is reduced by atomic hydrogen compared with Al 2 O 3 is due to two factors. The first is related to the thermochemistry of the reactions. The second factor which favors efficient reduction of UO 2 but not of Al 2 O 3 is the oxygen diffusivity

  15. The role of soil weathering and hydrology in regulating chemical fluxes from catchments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2010-12-01

    Catchment-scale chemical fluxes have been linked to a number of different parameters that describe the conditions at the Earth’s surface, including runoff, temperature, rock type, vegetation, and the rate of tectonic uplift. However, many of the relationships relating chemical denudation to surface processes and conditions, while based on established theoretical principles, are largely empirical and derived solely from modern observations. Thus, an enhanced mechanistic basis for linking global solute fluxes to both surface processes and climate may improve our confidence in extrapolating modern solute fluxes to past and future conditions. One approach is to link observations from detailed soil-based studies with catchment-scale properties. For example, a number of recent studies of chemical weathering at the soil-profile scale have reinforced the importance of hydrologic processes in controlling chemical weathering rates. An analysis of data from granitic soils shows that weathering rates decrease with increasing fluid residence times and decreasing flow rates—over moderate fluid residence times, from 5 days to 10 years, transport-controlled weathering explains the orders of magnitude variation in weathering rates to a better extent than soil age. However, the importance of transport-controlled weathering is difficult to discern at the catchment scale because of the range of flow rates and fluid residence times captured by a single discharge or solute flux measurement. To assess the importance of transport-controlled weathering on catchment scale chemical fluxes, we present a model that links the chemical flux to the extent of reaction between the soil waters and the solids, or the fluid residence time. Different approaches for describing the distribution of fluid residence times within a catchment are then compared with the observed Si fluxes for a limited number of catchments. This model predicts high solute fluxes in regions with high run-off, relief, and

  16. Micro-Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging of Individual Identified Marine Biogenic and Ambient Organic Ice Nuclei (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R. C.; Aller, J. Y.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation represents one of the least understood atmospheric processes with important implications for the hydrological cycle and climate. Current freezing descriptions assume that ice active sites on the particle surface initiate ice nucleation, however, the nature of these sites remains elusive. Here, we present a new experimental method that allows us to relate physical and chemical properties of individual particles with observed water uptake and ice nucleation ability using a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical techniques. We apply this method to field-collected particles and particles generated via bursting of bubbles produced by glass frit aeration and plunging water impingement jets in a mesocosm containing artificial sea water and bacteria and/or phytoplankton. The most efficient ice nuclei (IN) within a particle population are identified and characterized. Single particle characterization is achieved by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A vapor controlled cooling-stage coupled to an optical microscope is used to determine the onsets of water uptake, immersion freezing, and deposition ice nucleation of the individual particles as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. In addition, we perform CCSEM/EDX to obtain on a single particle level the elemental composition of the entire particle population. Thus, we can determine if the IN are exceptional in nature or belong to a major particle type class with respect to composition and size. We find that ambient and sea spray particles are coated by organic material and can induce ice formation under tropospheric relevant conditions. Micro-spectroscopic single particle analysis of the investigated particle samples invokes a potential

  17. CO2 emissions and reduction potential in China's chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Bing; Zhou, Wenji; Hu, Shanying; Li, Qiang; Griffy-Brown, Charla; Jin, Yong

    2010-01-01

    GHG (Increasing greenhouse gas) emissions in China imposes enormous pressure on China's government and society. The increasing GHG trend is primarily driven by the fast expansion of high energy-intensive sectors including the chemical industry. This study investigates energy consumption and CO 2 emissions in the processes of chemical production in China through calculating the amounts of CO 2 emissions and estimating the reduction potential in the near future. The research is based on a two-level perspective which treats the entire industry as Level one and six key sub-sectors as Level two, including coal-based ammonia, calcium carbide, caustic soda, coal-based methanol, sodium carbonate, and yellow phosphorus. These two levels are used in order to address the complexity caused by the fact that there are more than 40 thousand chemical products in this industry and the performance levels of the technologies employed are extremely uneven. Three scenarios with different technological improvements are defined to estimate the emissions of the six sub-sectors and analyze the implied reduction potential in the near future. The results highlight the pivotal role that regulation and policy administration could play in controlling the CO 2 emissions by promoting average technology performances in this industry.

  18. Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni on chicken wings by chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong; Doyle, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    Eight chemicals, including glycerol monolaurate, hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, lactic acid, sodium benzoate, sodium chlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium hydroxide, were tested individually or in combination for their ability to inactivate Campylobacter jejuni at 4 degrees C in suspension. Results showed that treatment for up to 20 min with 0.01% glycerol monolaurate, 0.1% sodium benzoate, 50 or 100 mM sodium chlorate, or 1% lactic acid did not substantially (5 log CFU/ml within 2 min. A combination of 0.5% acetic acid plus 0.05% potassium sorbate or 0.5% acetic acid plus 0.05% sodium benzoate reduced C. jejuni populations by >5 log CFU/ml within 1 min; however, substituting 0.5% lactic acid for 0.5% acetic acid was not effective, with a reduction of C. jejuni of 5 log CFU/ml within 1 min. All chemicals or chemical combinations for which there was a >5-log/ml reduction of C. jejuni in suspension were further evaluated for C. jejuni inactivation on chicken wings. Treatments at 4 degrees C of 2% acetic acid, 100 mM sodium carbonate, or 0.1 N sodium hydroxide for up to 45 s reduced C. jejuni populations by ca. 1.4, 1.6, or 3.5 log CFU/g, respectively. Treatment with ACS-LA at 4 degrees C for 15 s reduced C. jejuni by >5 log CFU/g to an undetectable level. The ACS-LA treatment was highly effective in chilled water at killing C. jejuni on chicken and, if recycled, may be a useful treatment in chill water tanks for poultry processors to reduce campylobacters on poultry skin after slaughter.

  19. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZAYAS Pérez Teresa; GEISSLER Gunther; HERNANDEZ Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculatio and advanced oxidation processes(AOP)had been studied.The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H202,UVO3 and UV/H-H202/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions.For each of these processes,different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater.Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand(COD)and low total suspended solids.The outcomes of coffee wastewater reeatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD,color,and turbidity.It was found that a reductiOn in COD of 67%could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculatlon witll lime and coagulant T-1.When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H202,a COD reduction of 86%was achieved,although only after prolonged UV irradiation.Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered,UV/H202,uv/03 and UV/H202/03,we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective,with an efficiency of color,turbidity and further COD removal of 87%,when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater.

  20. Less is Better. Laboratory Chemical Management for Waste Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    An objective of the American Chemical Society is to promote alternatives to landfilling for the disposal of laboratory chemical wastes. One method is to reduce the amount of chemicals that become wastes. This is the basis for the "less is better" philosophy. This bulletin discusses various techniques involved in purchasing control,…

  1. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in a whey fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moresi, M; Colicchio, A; Sansovini, F; Sebastiani, E

    1980-01-01

    The efficiency of COD reduction in the fermentation of whey by Kluyveromyces fragilis IMAT 1872 was studied at various temperatures, lactose concentrations, air dilution ratios, and stirring speeds. Two different optimal sets of these variables were found according to whether the objective was the production of cell mass or the reduction of COD. The 2 sets were then compared to establish a strategy for the industrial development of this fermentation process. The experimental efficiencies of COD removal were submitted to analysis in a composite design. Only the O2 transfer coefficient factor and the stripping factor were significant. Therefore, the observations were fitted with a quadratic expression by using only these factors: the mean std. error was <6%. The yield of cells varied in this fermentation, but this parameter may be particularly useful for analyzing and optimizing any fermentation process when the culture medium is a mixture of carbohydrates or the main substrate is fully utilized during the initial stages of fermentation.

  2. Design of High Quality Chemical XOR Gates with Noise Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mackenna L; Domanskyi, Sergii; Privman, Vladimir

    2017-07-05

    We describe a chemical XOR gate design that realizes gate-response function with filtering properties. Such gate-response function is flat (has small gradients) at and in the vicinity of all the four binary-input logic points, resulting in analog noise suppression. The gate functioning involves cross-reaction of the inputs represented by pairs of chemicals to produce a practically zero output when both are present and nearly equal. This cross-reaction processing step is also designed to result in filtering at low output intensities by canceling out the inputs if one of the latter has low intensity compared with the other. The remaining inputs, which were not reacted away, are processed to produce the output XOR signal by chemical steps that result in filtering at large output signal intensities. We analyze the tradeoff resulting from filtering, which involves loss of signal intensity. We also discuss practical aspects of realizations of such XOR gates. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  4. [INVITED] Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic chemical and biosensors utilizing bulk and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Banshi D.; Kant, Ravi

    2018-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance has established itself as an immensely acclaimed and influential optical sensing tool with quintessential applications in life sciences, environmental monitoring, clinical diagnostics, pharmaceutical developments and ensuring food safety. The implementation of sensing principle of surface plasmon resonance employing an optical fiber as a substrate has concomitantly resulted in the evolution of fiber optic surface plasmon resonance as an exceptionally lucrative scaffold for chemical and biosensing applications. This perspective article outlines the contemporary studies on fiber optic sensors founded on the sensing architecture of propagating as well as localized surface plasmon resonance. An in-depth review of the prevalent analytical and surface chemical tactics involved in configuring the sensing layer over an optical fiber for the detection of various chemical and biological entities is presented. The involvement of nanomaterials as a strategic approach to enhance the sensor sensitivity is furnished concurrently providing an insight into the diverse geometrical blueprints for designing fiber optic sensing probes. Representative examples from the literature are discussed to appreciate the latest advancements in this potentially valuable research avenue. The article concludes by identifying some of the key challenges and exploring the opportunities for expanding the scope and impact of surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensors.

  5. The Eco Logic gas-phase chemical reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallett, D.J.; Campbell, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1986, Eco Logic has conducted research with the aim of developing a new technology for destroying aqueous organic wastes, such as contaminated harbor sediments, landfill soil and leachates, and lagoon sludges. The goal was a commercially-viable chemical process that could deal with these watery wastes and also process stored wastes. The process described in this paper was developed with a view to avoiding the expense and technical drawbacks of incinerators, while still providing high destruction efficiencies and waste volume capabilities. A lab-scale process unit was constructed in 1988 and tested extensively. Based on the results of these tests, it was decided to construct a mobile pilot-scale unit that could be used for further testing and ultimately for small commercial waste processing operations. It was taken through a preliminary round of tests at Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, where the waste processed was coal-tar-contaminated harbor sediment. In 1992, the same unit was taken through a second round of tests in Bay City, Michigan. In this test program, the pilot-scale unit processed PCBs in aqueous, organic and soil matrices. This paper describes the process reactions and the pilot-scale process unit, and presents the results of pilot-scale testing thus far

  6. Application of nonliner reduction techniques in chemical process modeling: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhaimin, Z; Aziz, N.; Abd Shukor, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    Model reduction techniques have been used widely in engineering fields for electrical, mechanical as well as chemical engineering. The basic idea of reduction technique is to replace the original system by an approximating system with much smaller state-space dimension. A reduced order model is more beneficial to process and industrial field in terms of control purposes. This paper is to provide a review on application of nonlinear reduction techniques in chemical processes. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique reviewed are also highlighted

  7. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory--Chemical Management: A Method for Waste Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Stanley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods for reducing or eliminating waste disposal problems in the chemistry laboratory, considering both economic and environmental aspects of the problems. Proposes inventory control, shared use, solvent recycling, zero effluent, and various means of disposing of chemicals. (JM)

  8. Chemical Reduction of SIM MOX in Molten Lithium Chloride Using Lithium Metal Reductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Inoue, Tadashi; Sims, Howard E.; Jenkins, Jan A.

    2007-09-01

    A simulated spent oxide fuel in a sintered pellet form, which contained the twelve elements U, Pu, Am, Np, Cm, Ce, Nd, Sm, Ba, Zr,Mo, and Pd, was reduced with Li metal in a molten LiCl bath at 923 K. More than 90% of U and Pu were reduced to metal to form a porous alloy without significant change in the Pu/U ratio. Small fractions of Pu were also combined with Pd to form stable alloys. In the gap of the porous U-Pu alloy, the aggregation of the rare-earth (RE) oxide was observed. Some amount of the RE elements and the actinoides leached from the pellet. The leaching ratio of Am to the initially loaded amount was only several percent, which was far from about 80% obtained in the previous ones on simple MOX including U, Pu, and Am. The difference suggests that a large part of Am existed in the RE oxide rather than in the U-Pu alloy. The detection of the RE elements and actinoides in the molten LiCl bath seemed to indicate that they dissolved into the molten LiCl bath containing the oxide ion, which is the by-product of the reduction, as solubility of RE elements was measured in the molten LiCl-Li2O previously.

  9. Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Eisenberg, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Fujita, E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} represents a potentially useful approach to developing a sustainable source of carbon-based chemicals, fuels, and materials. In this report the present status of photochemical CO{sub 2} reduction is assessed, areas that need to be better understood for advancement are identified, and approaches to overcoming barriers are suggested. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this field, assessments of three closely interrelated areas are given including integrated photochemical systems for catalytic CO{sub 2} reduction, thermal catalytic CO{sub 2} reactions, and electrochemical CO{sub 2} reduction. The report concludes with a summary and assessment of potential impacts of this area on chemical and energy technologies.

  10. Evaluation and Development of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Biodiesel and Diesel Fuel Surrogates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the existing chemical kinetic mechanism reduction techniques. From here, an appropriate reduction scheme was developed to create compact yet comprehensive surrogate models for both diesel and biodiesel fuels for diesel engine applications. The reduction...... techniques applied here were Directed Relation Graph (DRG), DRG with Error Propagation, DRG-aided Sensitivity Analysis, and DRG with Error Propagation and Sensitivity Analysis. Nonetheless, the reduced mechanisms generated via these techniques were not sufficiently small for application in multi......-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study. A new reduction scheme was therefore formulated. A 68-species mechanism for biodiesel surrogate and a 49-species mechanism for diesel surrogate were successfully derived from the respective detailed mechanisms. An overall 97% reduction in species number...

  11. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  12. The use of quantum chemically derived descriptors for QSAR modelling of reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rorije E; Richter J; Peijnenburg WJGM; ECO; IHE Delft

    1994-01-01

    In this study, quantum-chemically derived parameters are developed for a limited number of halogenated aromatic compounds to model the anaerobic reductive dehalogenation reaction rate constants of these compounds. It is shown that due to the heterogeneity of the set of compounds used, no single

  13. Anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with chemical precipitation for treatment and toxicity reduction of industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohaprapanona, Sawanya; Marquesa, Marcia; Hogland, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the reduction of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) and the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), formaldehyde (FA) and nitrogen from highly polluted wastewater generated during cleaning procedures in wood floor manufacturing using a laboratory-scale biological anaerobic baffled reactor followed by chemical precipitation using MgCI2 .6H20 + Na2HPO4. By increasing the hydraulic retention time from 2.5 to 3.7 and 5 days, the reduction rates of FA, DOC and CODs of nearly 100%, 90% and 83%, respectively, were achieved. When the Mg:N:P molar ratio in the chemical treatment was changed from 1:1:1 to 1.3:1:1.3 at pH 8, the NH4+ removal rate increased from 80% to 98%. Biologically and chemically treated wastewater had no toxic effects on Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina whereas chemically treated wastewater inhibited germination of Lactuca sativa owing to a high salt content. Regardless of the high conductivity of the treated wastewater, combined biological and chemical treatment was found to be effective for the removal of the organic load and nitrogen, and to be simple to operate and to maintain. A combined process such as that investigated could be useful for on-site treatment of low volumes of highly polluted wastewater generated by the wood floor and wood furniture industries, for which there is no suitable on-site treatment option available today.

  14. Technology Roadmap: Energy and GHG reductions in the chemical industry via catalytic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The chemical industry is a large energy user; but chemical products and technologies also are used in a wide array of energy saving and/or renewable energy applications so the industry has also an energy saving role. The chemical and petrochemical sector is by far the largest industrial energy user, accounting for roughly 10% of total worldwide final energy demand and 7% of global GHG emissions. The International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) has partnered with the IEA and DECHEMA (Society for Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology) to describe the path toward further improvements in energy efficiency and GHG reductions in the chemical sector. The roadmap looks at measures needed from the chemical industry, policymakers, investors and academia to press on with catalysis technology and unleash its potential around the globe. The report uncovers findings and best practice opportunities that illustrate how continuous improvements and breakthrough technology options can cut energy use and bring down greenhouse gas (GHG) emission rates. Around 90% of chemical processes involve the use of catalysts – such as added substances that increase the rate of reaction without being consumed by it – and related processes to enhance production efficiency and reduce energy use, thereby curtailing GHG emission levels. This work shows an energy savings potential approaching 13 exajoules (EJ) by 2050 – equivalent to the current annual primary energy use of Germany.

  15. Nanostructured palladium tailored via carbonyl chemical route towards oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.; Mora-Hernández, J.M.; Estudillo-Wong, L.A.; Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Alonso-Vante, N.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical Abstract: Mass-depending morphologies of nanostructured Palladium obtained via the carbonyl chemical route. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Mass-depending morphology was observed in nanostructured palladium supported on carbon prepared by the carbonyl chemical route. •The Morphological effect of carbon supported Pd was investigated towards ORR. -- Abstract: Carbon supported palladium nanostructures were synthesized via the carbonyl chemical route. Compared with nanostructured platinum, prepared via carbonyl chemical route, Pd nanomaterials showed mass-loading morphology, whereas particle size and morphology of Pt nanostructures was constant. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on nanostructured Pd, with different morphology in both acid and alkaline medium was investigated. A relationship, based on X-ray diffraction structural analysis pattern, transmission electron microscope, with the Pd morphological effect on ORR activity was identified

  16. In-situ chemical reduction produced graphene paper for flexible supercapacitors with impressive capacitive performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xingke; Zhu, Yucan; Tang, Zhonghua; Wan, Zhongquan; Jia, Chunyang

    2017-08-01

    For practical applications of graphene-based materials in flexible supercapacitors, a technological breakthrough is currently required to fabricate high-performance graphene paper by a facile method. Herein, highly conductive (∼6900 S m-1) graphene paper with loose multilayered structure is produced by a high-efficiency in-situ chemical reduction process, which assembles graphite oxide suspensions into film and simultaneously conducts chemical reduction. Graphene papers with different parameters (including different types and doses of reductants, different thicknesses and areas of films) are successfully fabricated through this in-situ chemical reduction method. Meanwhile, the influences of the graphene papers with different parameters upon the supercapacitor performance are systematically investigated. Flexible supercapacitor based on the graphene paper exhibits high areal capacitance (152.4 mF cm-2 at current density of 2.0 mA cm-2 in aqueous electrolyte), and excellent rate performance (88.7% retention at 8.0 mA cm-2). Furthermore, bracelet-shaped all-solid supercapacitor with fascinating cycling stability (96.6% retention after 10 000 cycles) and electrochemical stability (an almost negligible capacity loss under different bending states and 99.6% retention after 4000 bending cycles) is established by employing the graphene paper electrode material and polymer electrolyte.

  17. Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

    2013-07-10

    This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

  18. Performance of two swine manure treatment systems on chemical composition and on the reduction of pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viancelli, A; Kunz, A; Steinmetz, R L R; Kich, J D; Souza, C K; Canal, C W; Coldebella, A; Esteves, P A; Barardi, C R M

    2013-01-01

    Swine effluents must be correctly handled to avoid negative environmental impacts. In this study, the profiles of two swine manure treatment systems were evaluated: a solid-liquid separation step, followed by an anaerobic reactor, and an aerobic step (System 1); and a biodigester followed by serial lagoons (System 2). Both systems were described by the assessment of chemical, bacterial and viral parameters. The results showed that in System 1, there was reduction of chemicals (COD, phosphorus, total Kjeldhal nitrogen - TKN - and NH(3)), total coliforms and Escherichia coli; however, the same reduction was not observed for Salmonella sp. Viral particles were significantly reduced but not totally eliminated from the effluent. In System 2, there was a reduction of chemicals, bacteria and viruses with no detection of Salmonella sp., circovirus, parvovirus, and torque teno virus in the effluent. The chemical results indicate that the treated effluent can be reused for cleaning swine facilities. However, the microbiological results show a need of additional treatment to achieve a complete inactivation for cases when direct contact with animals is required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fundamental limits on gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In the plasma, the electrons do not react directly with the NOx molecules. The electrons collide mainly with the background gas molecules like N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Electron impact on these molecules result partly in dissociation reactions that produce reactive species like N, O and OH. The NOx in the engine exhaust gas initially consist mostly of NO. The ground state nitrogen atom, N, is the only species that could lead to the chemical reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The O radical oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2} leaving the same amount of NOx. The OH radical converts NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. Acid products in the plasma can easily get adsorbed on surfaces in the plasma reactor and in the pipes. When undetected, the absence of these oxidation products can often be mistaken for chemical reduction of NOx. In this paper the authors will examine the gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx. They will show that under the best conditions, the plasma can chemically reduce 1.6 grams of NOx per brake-horsepower-hour [g(NOx)/bhp-hr] when 5% of the engine output energy is delivered to the plasma.

  20. Effect of chemical modification on reduction and sorptive properties of chars from hydropyrolysis of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanczyk, K.; Miga, K.; Fabis, G.; Jastrzab, K. [Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Gliwice (Poland)

    1998-01-01

    Hydropyrolysis of bituminous coal and lignite as way of synthesis of adsorbents has been applied. Chemical modification of chars based on simultaneous carbonization of coal and plastics containing sulfur and nitrogen has been carried out. It was stated that modified chars exhibit better reduction and sorptive properties than non-modified and that modified adsorbents made of lignite exceed commercial ones. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Re-establishing filtering capabilities of machined porous beryllium via chemical reduction and cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Porous beryllium is furnished in sheets of varying sizes and thickness; it is therefore necessary that it be machined into specified sizes. A chemical reduction and cleaning procedure was devised to remove the disrupted surface, open the sealed pores of the material, and clean entrapped contaminates from the internal structure. Dimensional stability can be closely controlled and material size is of no consequence. (U.S.)

  2. Ultralow Level Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping: Scoping Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected during the first stage of a Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Strategic Research and Development Project confirmed the efficacy of chemical reduction and air stripping/sparging as an ultralow level mercury treatment concept for waters containing Hg(II). The process consists of dosing the water with low levels of stannous chloride to convert the mercury to Hg. This form of mercury can easily be removed from the water by air stripping or sparging. Samples of Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater containing approximately 130 ng/L of total mercury (as Hg(II)) were used for the study. In undosed samples, sparging removed 0 percent of the initial mercury. In the dosed samples, all of the removals were greater than 94 percent, except in one water type at one dose. This sample, which was saturated with dissolved oxygen, showed a 63 percent reduction in mercury following treatment at the lowest dose. Following dosing at minimally effective levels and sparging, treated water contained less than 10 ng/L total mercury. In general, the data indicate that the reduction of mercury is highly favored and that stannous chloride reagent efficiently targets the Hg(II) contaminant in the presence of competing reactions. Based on the results, the authors estimated that the costs of implementing and operating an ultralow level mercury treatment process based on chemical reduction and stripping/sparging are 10 percent to 20 percent of traditional treatment technologies

  3. Tuning the nonlinear optical absorption of reduced graphene oxide by chemical reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongfei; Wang, Can; Sun, Zhipei; Zhou, Yueliang; Jin, Kuijuan; Redfern, Simon A T; Yang, Guozhen

    2014-08-11

    Reduced graphene oxides with varying degrees of reduction have been produced by hydrazine reduction of graphene oxide. The linear and nonlinear optical properties of both graphene oxide as well as the reduced graphene oxides have been measured by single beam Z-scan measurement in the picosecond region. The results reveal both saturable absorption and two-photon absorption, strongly dependent on the intensity of the pump pulse: saturable absorption occurs at lower pump pulse intensity (~1.5 GW/cm2 saturation intensity) whereas two-photon absorption dominates at higher intensities (≥5.7 GW/cm2). Intriguingly, we find that the two-photon absorption coefficient (from 1.5 cm/GW to 4.5cm/GW) and the saturation intensity (from 1 GW/cm2 to 2 GW/cm2) vary with chemical reduction, which is ascribed to the varying concentrations of sp2 domains and sp2 clusters in the reduced graphene oxides. Our results not only provide an insight into the evolution of the nonlinear optical coefficient in reduced graphene oxide, but also suggest that chemical engineering techniques may usefully be applied to tune the nonlinear optical properties of various nano-materials, including atomically thick graphene sheets.

  4. Synthesis of Nickel and Nickel Hydroxide Nano powders by Simplified Chemical Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tientong, J.; Garcia, S.; Thurber, C.R.; Golden, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nano powders were synthesized by a chemical reduction of nickel ions with hydrazine hydrate at ph ∼ 12.5. Sonication of the solutions created a temperature of 54-65 °C to activate the reduction reaction of nickel nanoparticles. The solution ph affected the composition of the resulting nanoparticles. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles were formed from an alkaline solution (ph ∼10) of nickel-hydrazine complexed by dropwise titration. X-ray diffraction of the powder and the analysis of the resulting Williamson-Hall plots revealed that the particle size of the powders ranged from 12 to 14 nm. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone into the synthesis decreased the nickel nanoparticle size to approximately 7 nm. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the particles were in the nanometer range. The structure of the synthesized nickel and nickel hydroxide nanoparticles was identified by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  5. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Vo Ke Thanh; Huynh, Trong Phat; Nguyen, Dang Giang; Nguyen, Hoang Phuong Uyen; Lam, Quang Vinh; Huynh, Thanh Dat

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO_3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found. (paper)

  6. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phat Huynh, Trong; Giang Nguyen, Dang; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-12-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found.

  7. Development and Validation of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Large-Scale Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2014-01-01

    This work is an extension to a previously reported work on chemical kinetic mechanism reduction scheme for large-scale mechanisms. Here, Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) was added as a criterion of data source for mechanism reduction instead of using only auto-ignition condition. As a result......) simulations were performed to study the spray combustion phenomena within a constant volume bomb. Both non-reacting and reacting conditions were applied in this study. Liquid and vapor penetration lengths were replicated for non-reacting diesel spray. For reacting diesel spray, both ignition delay and lift......-off length were simulated. The simulation results were then compared to the experimental data of Sandia National Laboratories and No. 2 Diesel Fuel (D2) was designated as the reference fuel. Both liquid and vapor penetrations for non-reacting condition were well-matched, while ignition delay was advanced...

  8. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  9. The Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Produced by Chemical Reduction of Silver Salt Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Budi Harmani; Dewi Sondari; Agus Haryono

    2008-01-01

    Described in this research are the synthesis of silver nanoparticle produced by chemical reduction of silver salt (silver nitrate AgNO 3 ) solution. As a reducer, sodium citrate (C 6 H 5 O 7 Na 3 ) was used. Preparation of silver colloid is done by using chemical reduction method. In typical experiment 150 ml of 1.10 -3 M AgNO 3 solution was heated with temperature variation such as 90, 100, 110 degree of Celsius. To this solution 15 ml of 1 % trisodium citrate was added into solution drop by drop during heating. During the process, solution was mixed vigorously. Solution was heated until colour's change is evident (pale yellow solution is formed). Then it was removed from the heating element and stirred until cooled to room temperature. Experimental result showed that diameter of silver nanoparticles in colloid solution is about 28.3 nm (Ag colloid, 90 o C); 19.9 nm (Ag colloid, 100 o C)and 26.4 nm (Ag colloid, 110 o C). Characterization of the silver nanoparticle colloid conducted by using UV-Vis Spectroscopy, Particles Size Analyzer (PSA) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) indicate the produced structures of silver nanoparticles. (author)

  10. Progress and Perspective of Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction for Renewable Carbonaceous Fuels and Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Hu, Yi; Ma, Lianbo; Zhu, Guoyin; Wang, Yanrong; Xue, Xiaolan; Chen, Renpeng; Yang, Songyuan; Jin, Zhong

    2018-01-01

    The worldwide unrestrained emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has caused serious environmental pollution and climate change issues. For the sustainable development of human civilization, it is very desirable to convert CO 2 to renewable fuels through clean and economical chemical processes. Recently, electrocatalytic CO 2 conversion is regarded as a prospective pathway for the recycling of carbon resource and the generation of sustainable fuels. In this review, recent research advances in electrocatalytic CO 2 reduction are summarized from both experimental and theoretical aspects. The referred electrocatalysts are divided into different classes, including metal-organic complexes, metals, metal alloys, inorganic metal compounds and carbon-based metal-free nanomaterials. Moreover, the selective formation processes of different reductive products, such as formic acid/formate (HCOOH/HCOO - ), monoxide carbon (CO), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane (CH 4 ), ethylene (C 2 H 4 ), methanol (CH 3 OH), ethanol (CH 3 CH 2 OH), etc. are introduced in detail, respectively. Owing to the limited energy efficiency, unmanageable selectivity, low stability, and indeterminate mechanisms of electrocatalytic CO 2 reduction, there are still many tough challenges need to be addressed. In view of this, the current research trends to overcome these obstacles in CO 2 electroreduction field are summarized. We expect that this review will provide new insights into the further technique development and practical applications of CO 2 electroreduction.

  11. Effect of different chemical modification of carbon nanotubes for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitru, Anca; Mamlouk, M.; Scott, K.

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of oxygen on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) electrodes in 1 M KOH solution has been studied using the rotating ring disc electrode (RDE). The surface modification of CNTs has been estimated by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of different oxygen functionalities on the surface of carbon nanotube for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is considered in terms of the number of electrons (n) involved. Electrochemical studies indicate that in the case of the modification of CNTs with citric acid and diazonium salts the n values were close to two in the measured potential range, and the electrochemical reduction is limited to the production of peroxide as the final product. In the case of the modification of carbon nanotubes with peroxymonosulphuric acid, in the measured potential range, the n value is close to 4 indicating the four-electron pathway for the ORR. By correlating ORR measurements with the XPS analysis, we propose that the increase in electrocatalytic activity towards the ORR, for CNT can be attributed to the increase in C-O groups on the surface of CNTs after modification with peroxymonosulphuric acid

  12. Model reduction of multiscale chemical langevin equations: a numerical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Vassilios; Contou-Carrere, Marie-Nathalie; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2009-01-01

    Two very important characteristics of biological reaction networks need to be considered carefully when modeling these systems. First, models must account for the inherent probabilistic nature of systems far from the thermodynamic limit. Often, biological systems cannot be modeled with traditional continuous-deterministic models. Second, models must take into consideration the disparate spectrum of time scales observed in biological phenomena, such as slow transcription events and fast dimerization reactions. In the last decade, significant efforts have been expended on the development of stochastic chemical kinetics models to capture the dynamics of biomolecular systems, and on the development of robust multiscale algorithms, able to handle stiffness. In this paper, the focus is on the dynamics of reaction sets governed by stiff chemical Langevin equations, i.e., stiff stochastic differential equations. These are particularly challenging systems to model, requiring prohibitively small integration step sizes. We describe and illustrate the application of a semianalytical reduction framework for chemical Langevin equations that results in significant gains in computational cost.

  13. Ni removal from aqueous solutions by chemical reduction: Impact of pH and pe in the presence of citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Park, Hyung-June; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The chemical precipitation of Ni ions from industrial wastewater at alkaline pH values creates waste chemical sludge (e.g., Ni(OH)_2). We herein focused on Ni removal via chemical reduction using dithionite, by converting Ni(II) to its elemental or other valuable forms. Without the presence of a chelator (e.g., citrate), the nickel reduction efficiency increased with increasing dithionite:Ni molar ratio, reaching 99% at ratios above 3:1. The effect of pH on Ni reduction was in agreement with the standard redox potentials (pe"0) of dithionite, which became more negative with an increase in pH leading to greater Ni reduction efficiencies. With the formation of Ni-citrate chelates, however, the Ni reduction deteriorated. Elevated pH and temperature improved nickel reduction, due to the greater reducing power of dithionite. The optimal pH value for Ni(II) reduction was found to be 8. Injecting Cu seed particles enhanced the rate and amount of Ni reduced. NiS and Ni_3S_2 were identified in the crystal of the resulting solids by X-ray crystallography, and the presence of elemental Ni was explained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical reduction of actual printed circuit board wastewater with the dithionite:Ni(II) molar ratio dose of 12:1 retrieved 99% nickel after 30-min reaction at 40 °C.

  14. Ni removal from aqueous solutions by chemical reduction: Impact of pH and pe in the presence of citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chi-Wang, E-mail: chiwang@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Department of Marine Leisure and Tourism, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, No. 150, Sec. 3, Binhai Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 251, Taiwan (China); Liang, Yang-Min; Chou, Yi-Hsuan [Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, No. 151 Yingzhuan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City, 25137, Taiwan (China); Park, Hyung-June [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu, 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Kwang-Ho, E-mail: chookh@knu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu, 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, Shiao-Shing [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Road, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-15

    The chemical precipitation of Ni ions from industrial wastewater at alkaline pH values creates waste chemical sludge (e.g., Ni(OH){sub 2}). We herein focused on Ni removal via chemical reduction using dithionite, by converting Ni(II) to its elemental or other valuable forms. Without the presence of a chelator (e.g., citrate), the nickel reduction efficiency increased with increasing dithionite:Ni molar ratio, reaching 99% at ratios above 3:1. The effect of pH on Ni reduction was in agreement with the standard redox potentials (pe{sup 0}) of dithionite, which became more negative with an increase in pH leading to greater Ni reduction efficiencies. With the formation of Ni-citrate chelates, however, the Ni reduction deteriorated. Elevated pH and temperature improved nickel reduction, due to the greater reducing power of dithionite. The optimal pH value for Ni(II) reduction was found to be 8. Injecting Cu seed particles enhanced the rate and amount of Ni reduced. NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} were identified in the crystal of the resulting solids by X-ray crystallography, and the presence of elemental Ni was explained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical reduction of actual printed circuit board wastewater with the dithionite:Ni(II) molar ratio dose of 12:1 retrieved 99% nickel after 30-min reaction at 40 °C.

  15. Dissolution of magnetite in a dilute chemical decontaminant formulation containing gallic acid as a reductant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Rajesh, Puspalata; Dey, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA) was tried as a reductant in place of ascorbic acid in dilute chemical decontaminant (DCD) formulations. Dissolution of magnetite in GA based DCD formulations was studied at 50 deg as well as 80 degC. It was found to be a good substitute for ascorbic acid in EDTA/ascorbic acid/citric acid i.e. EAC formulation. The efficiency of EDTA/GA/CA formulation was as good as that of EAC formulation. 2.8 was found to be the optimum pH for this formulation and dissolution decreased at lower as well as higher pHs. The ion-exchange behaviour of GA is also appropriate for using it in a regenerating type of formulation. Being an aromatic compound, gallic acid has inherent stability against radiation degradation. (author)

  16. A dilute chemical decontaminant formulation containing gallic acid as a reductant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, K.; Rajesh, P.; Kumbhar, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA) was tried as a reductant in place of ascorbic acid in dilute chemical decontaminant (DCD) formulations. Dissolution of magnetite in GA based DCD formulations was studied at 50 C as well as 80 C. It was found to be a good substitute for ascorbic acid in EDTA/ascorbic acid/citric acid, i.e., EAC formulation. The efficiency of EDTA/GA/CA formulation was as good as that of EAC formulation. 2.8 was found to be the optimum pH for this formulation and dissolution decreased at lower as well as higher pHs. The ion exchange behaviour of GA is also appropriate for using it in a regenerating type of formulation. Being an aromatic compound, Gallic acid has inherent stability against radiation degradation. (orig.)

  17. Ultrasonic-assisted chemical reduction synthesis and structural characterization of copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh-Nga, Nguyen T.; Tuan-Anh, Nguyen; Thanh-Quoc, Nguyen; Ha, Do Tuong

    2018-04-01

    Copper nanoparticles, due to their special properties, small dimensions and low-cost preparation, have many potential applications such as in optical, electronics, catalysis, sensors, antibacterial agents. In this study, copper nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction method with different conditions in order to investigate the optimum conditions which gave the smallest (particle diameter) dimensions. The synthesis step used copper (II) acetate salt as precursor, ascorbic acid as reducing agent, glycerin and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as protector and stabilizer. The assistance of ultrasonic was were considered as the significant factor affecting the size of the synthesized particles. The results showed that the copper nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized with the diameter as small as 20-40 nm and the conditions of ultrasonic waves were 48 kHz of frequency, 20 minutes of treated time and 65-70 °C of temperature. The synthesized copper nanoparticles were characterized by optical absorption spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry.

  18. Reduction-Triggered Transformation of Crosslinking Modules of Disulfide-Containing Micelles with Chemically Tunable Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhengyu; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Ronald X; Liang, Haojun; Liu, Shiyong

    2018-05-16

    A dilemma exists between the circulation stability and cargo release/mass diffusion at desired sites for designing delivery nanocarriers and in vivo nanoreactors. We herein report disulfide-crosslinked (DCL) micelles exhibiting reduction-triggered switching of crosslinking modules and synchronized hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition. Tumor cell-targeted DCL micelles undergo cytoplasmic milieu-triggered disulfide cleavage and cascade self-immolative decaging reactions at chemically adjustable rates, generating primary amine moieties. Extensive amidation reactions with neighboring ester moieties then occur due to high local concentrations and suppression of apparent amine pKa within hydrophobic cores, leading to the transformation of crosslinking modules and formation of tracelessly crosslinked (TCL) micelles with hydrophilic cores inside live cells. We further integrate this design principle with theranostic nanocarriers for selective intracellular drug transport guided by enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performance. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hydrogen reduction in GaAsN thin films by flow rate modulated chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Nishimura, K.; Suzuki, H.; Ohshita, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The amount of residual H in the GaAsN film grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) can be decreased by flow rate modulation growth. Many H atoms in the films grown by CBE exist as N-H or N-H 2 structures. Although a higher growth temperature was required for decreasing the H concentration ([H]), it caused a decrease in the N concentration ([N]). A reduction in [H] while keeping [N] constant was necessary. By providing an intermittent supply of Ga source while continuously supplying As and N sources, [H] effectively decreased in comparison with the [H] value in the film grown at the same temperature by conventional CBE without reducing [N

  20. Reduction and Uncertainty Analysis of Chemical Mechanisms Based on Local and Global Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gaetano

    Numerical simulations of critical reacting flow phenomena in hypersonic propulsion devices require accurate representation of finite-rate chemical kinetics. The chemical kinetic models available for hydrocarbon fuel combustion are rather large, involving hundreds of species and thousands of reactions. As a consequence, they cannot be used in multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamic calculations in the foreseeable future due to the prohibitive computational cost. In addition to the computational difficulties, it is also known that some fundamental chemical kinetic parameters of detailed models have significant level of uncertainty due to limited experimental data available and to poor understanding of interactions among kinetic parameters. In the present investigation, local and global sensitivity analysis techniques are employed to develop a systematic approach of reducing and analyzing detailed chemical kinetic models. Unlike previous studies in which skeletal model reduction was based on the separate analysis of simple cases, in this work a novel strategy based on Principal Component Analysis of local sensitivity values is presented. This new approach is capable of simultaneously taking into account all the relevant canonical combustion configurations over different composition, temperature and pressure conditions. Moreover, the procedure developed in this work represents the first documented inclusion of non-premixed extinction phenomena, which is of great relevance in hypersonic combustors, in an automated reduction algorithm. The application of the skeletal reduction to a detailed kinetic model consisting of 111 species in 784 reactions is demonstrated. The resulting reduced skeletal model of 37--38 species showed that the global ignition/propagation/extinction phenomena of ethylene-air mixtures can be predicted within an accuracy of 2% of the full detailed model. The problems of both understanding non-linear interactions between kinetic parameters and

  1. Occurrence of two-photon absorption saturation in Ag nanocolloids, prepared by chemical reduction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahulan, K. Mani, E-mail: krahul.au@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India); Ganesan, S. [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India); Aruna, P., E-mail: aruna@annauniv.edu [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2012-09-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag nanocolloids were synthesized via chemical reduction method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The molecules of PVP play an important role in growth and agglomeration of silver nanocolloids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Saturation behaviour followed by two photon absorption was responsible for good optical limiting characteristics in these nanocolloids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nonlinear optical parameters calculated from the data showed that these materials could be used as efficient optical limiters. - Abstract: Silver nanocolloids stabilized with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) have been prepared from (AgNO{sub 3}) by a chemical reduction method, involving the intermediate preparation of (Ag{sub 2}O) colloidal dispersions in the presence of sodium dodecycle sulfate as a surfactant and formaldehyde as reducing agent. The molecules of PVP play an important role in growth and agglomeration of silver nanocolloids. The formation of Ag nanocolloids was studied from the UV-vis absorption characteristics. An energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum and X-ray diffraction peak of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of silver structure. The particle size was found to be 40 nm as analyzed from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties of these nanoparticle dispersions were studied by using the Z-scan technique at 532 nm. Experimental results show that the Ag nanocolloids possess strong optical limiting effect, originated from absorption saturation followed by two-photon mechanism. The data show that Ag nanocolloids have great potential for nonlinear optical devices.

  2. Synthesis of Copper Nanoparticles in Ethylene Glycol by Chemical Reduction with Vanadium (+2 Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pietro Reverberi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Copper nanoparticles have been synthesized in ethylene glycol (EG using copper sulphate as a precursor and vanadium sulfate as an atypical reductant being active at room temperature. We have described a technique for a relatively simple preparation of such a reagent, which has been electrolytically produced without using standard procedures requiring an inert atmosphere and a mercury cathode. Several stabilizing agents have been tested and cationic capping agents have been discarded owing to the formation of complex compounds with copper ions leading to insoluble phases contaminating the metallic nanoparticles. The elemental copper nanoparticles, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, have been characterized for composition by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and for size by dynamic light scattering (DLS, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, giving a size distribution in the range of 40–50 nm for both stabilizing agents. From a methodological point of view, the process described here may represent an alternative to other wet-chemical techniques for metal nanoparticle synthesis in non-aqueous media based on conventional organic or inorganic reductants.

  3. Synthesis of Nickel and Nickel Hydroxide Nanopowders by Simplified Chemical Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeerapan Tientong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel nanopowders were synthesized by a chemical reduction of nickel ions with hydrazine hydrate at pH ~12.5. Sonication of the solutions created a temperature of 54–65°C to activate the reduction reaction of nickel nanoparticles. The solution pH affected the composition of the resulting nanoparticles. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles were formed from an alkaline solution (pH~10 of nickel-hydrazine complexed by dropwise titration. X-ray diffraction of the powder and the analysis of the resulting Williamson-Hall plots revealed that the particle size of the powders ranged from 12 to 14 nm. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone into the synthesis decreased the nickel nanoparticle size to approximately 7 nm. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the particles were in the nanometer range. The structure of the synthesized nickel and nickel hydroxide nanoparticles was identified by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  4. The Effect of Thickness and Chemical Reduction of Graphene Oxide on Nanoscale Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangku; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Hyunsoo; Koh, Sang Joon; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk; Park, Jeong Young

    2018-01-18

    The tribological properties of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are quite different from three-dimensional continuum materials because of the unique mechanical responses of 2D layers. It is known that friction on graphene shows a remarkable decreasing behavior as the number of layers increases, which is caused by the puckering effect. On other graphene derivatives, such as graphene oxide (GO) or reduced graphene oxide (rGO), the thickness dependence of friction is important because of the possibilities for technical applications. In this report, we demonstrate unexpected layer-dependent friction behavior on GO and rGO layers. Friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on GO does not depend on the number of layers; however, after reduction, friction on rGO shows an inverse thickness dependence compared with pristine graphene. We show that the friction on rGO is higher than that on SiO 2 at low load, and that an interesting crossover behavior at higher load occurs because of the lower friction coefficient and higher adhesion of the rGO. We provide a relevant interpretation that explains the effect of thickness and chemical reduction on nanoscale friction.

  5. Reduction of chemical formulas from the isotopic peak distributions of high-resolution mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussis, Stilianos G; Proulx, Richard

    2003-03-15

    A method has been developed for the reduction of the chemical formulas of compounds in complex mixtures from the isotopic peak distributions of high-resolution mass spectra. The method is based on the principle that the observed isotopic peak distribution of a mixture of compounds is a linear combination of the isotopic peak distributions of the individual compounds in the mixture. All possible chemical formulas that meet specific criteria (e.g., type and number of atoms in structure, limits of unsaturation, etc.) are enumerated, and theoretical isotopic peak distributions are generated for each formula. The relative amount of each formula is obtained from the accurately measured isotopic peak distribution and the calculated isotopic peak distributions of all candidate formulas. The formulas of compounds in simple spectra, where peak components are fully resolved, are rapidly determined by direct comparison of the calculated and experimental isotopic peak distributions. The singular value decomposition linear algebra method is used to determine the contributions of compounds in complex spectra containing unresolved peak components. The principles of the approach and typical application examples are presented. The method is most useful for the characterization of complex spectra containing partially resolved peaks and structures with multiisotopic elements.

  6. Facile Synthesis of Mono-Dispersed Polystyrene (PS/Ag Composite Microspheres via Modified Chemical Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A modified method based on in situ chemical reduction was developed to prepare mono-dispersed polystyrene/silver (PS/Ag composite microspheres. In this approach; mono-dispersed PS microspheres were synthesized through dispersion polymerization using poly-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a dispersant at first. Then, poly-dopamine (PDA was fabricated to functionally modify the surfaces of PS microspheres. With the addition of [Ag(NH32]+ to the PS dispersion, [Ag(NH32]+ complex ions were absorbed and reduced to silver nanoparticles on the surfaces of PS-PDA microspheres to form PS/Ag composite microspheres. PVP acted both as a solvent of the metallic precursor and as a reducing agent. PDA also acted both as a chemical protocol to immobilize the silver nanoparticles at the PS surface and as a reducing agent. Therefore, no additional reducing agents were needed. The resulting composite microspheres were characterized by TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, XRD, UV-Vis and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. The results showed that Ag nanoparticles (NPs were homogeneously immobilized onto the PS microspheres’ surface in the presence of PDA and PVP. PS/Ag composite microspheres were well formed with a uniform and compact shell layer and were adjustable in terms of their optical property.

  7. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. I. Chemical reduction and mitigation of mutagenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Flora, Silvio, E-mail: sdf@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Camoirano, Anna, E-mail: Anna.Fiorenza.Camoirano@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Micale, Rosanna T., E-mail: rosannamicale@yahoo.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); La Maestra, Sebastiano, E-mail: lamaestra78@yahoo.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Savarino, Vincenzo, E-mail: vsavarin@unige.it [Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Zentilin, Patrizia, E-mail: Patrizia.Zentilin@unige.it [Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Marabotto, Elisa, E-mail: emarabotto@libero.it [Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Suh, Mina, E-mail: msuh@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Mission Viejo, CA 92692 (United States); Proctor, Deborah M., E-mail: dproctor@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Mission Viejo, CA 92692 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the reducing capacity of human gastric fluid from healthy individuals, under fasted and fed conditions, is critical for assessing the cancer hazard posed by ingested hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and for developing quantitative physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models used in risk assessment. In the present study, the patterns of Cr(VI) reduction were evaluated in 16 paired pre- and post-meal gastric fluid samples collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Human gastric fluid was effective both in reducing Cr(VI), as measured by using the s-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method, and in attenuating mutagenicity in the Ames test. The mean (± SE) Cr(VI)-reducing ability of post-meal samples (20.4 ± 2.6 μg Cr(VI)/mL gastric fluid) was significantly higher than that of pre-meal samples (10.2 ± 2.3 μg Cr(VI)/mL gastric fluid). When using the mutagenicity assay, the decrease of mutagenicity produced by pre-meal and post-meal samples corresponded to reduction of 13.3 ± 1.9 and 25.6 ± 2.8 μg Cr(VI)/mL gastric fluid, respectively. These data are comparable to parallel results conducted by using speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Cr(VI) reduction was rapid, with > 70% of total reduction occurring within 1 min and 98% of reduction is achieved within 30 min with post-meal gastric fluid at pH 2.0. pH dependence was observed with decreasing Cr(VI) reducing capacity at higher pH. Attenuation of the mutagenic response is consistent with the lack of DNA damage observed in the gastrointestinal tract of rodents following administration of ≤ 180 ppm Cr(VI) for up to 90 days in drinking water. Quantifying Cr(VI) reduction kinetics in the human gastrointestinal tract is necessary for assessing the potential hazards posed by Cr(VI) in drinking water. - Highlights: • Cr(VI) reduction capacity was greater in post-meal than paired pre-meal samples. • Cr(VI) reduction was rapid, pH dependent, and due to heat stable components. • Gastric fluid attenuates

  8. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza, E-mail: moussavi@modares.ac.ir; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous advanced oxidation and reduction processes were explored in VUV system. • Complete reduction of nitrate to N{sub 2} was achieved at the presence of acetaminophen. • Complete degradation of acetaminophen was achieved at the presence of nitrate. • Over 95% of acetaminophen was mineralized in the VUV photoreactor. • VUV is a chemical-less advanced process for treating water emerging contaminants. - Abstract: This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO· while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity achieved at HRT of 80 min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80 min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  9. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Simultaneous advanced oxidation and reduction processes were explored in VUV system. • Complete reduction of nitrate to N_2 was achieved at the presence of acetaminophen. • Complete degradation of acetaminophen was achieved at the presence of nitrate. • Over 95% of acetaminophen was mineralized in the VUV photoreactor. • VUV is a chemical-less advanced process for treating water emerging contaminants. - Abstract: This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO· while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N_2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80 min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80 min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  10. Flow Alteration and Chemical Reduction: Air Stripping to Lessen Subsurface Discharges of Mercury to Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. C.; Bogle, M.; Liang, L.; Miller, C. L.; Peterson, M.; Southworth, G. R.; Spalding, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    process water. Greater than 90% of the mercury in that discharge was converted to the highly volatile dissolved Hg(0) by dechlorinating the streamflow with ascorbic acid and then treating it with a near stoichiometric concentration of the chemical reductant stannous chloride. Preliminary engineering evaluations indicate that once converted to Hg(0), mercury in the stream discharge could be removed by in-situ air stripping at the discharge point or perhaps within the enclosed stormdrain network upstream. If chemical reduction:air stripping was eventualy able to remove 80% or more of Hg from water, input to the stream from that source could be lowered from 6 - 8 g/d to 1 - 2 g/d. Together, these two strategies have the potential to eliminate much of the remaining dissolved Hg input to the creek.

  11. Ultrasound improves chemical reduction of natural contaminant microbiota and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica on strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rosário, Denes Kaic Alves; da Silva Mutz, Yhan; Peixoto, Jaqueline Moreira Curtis; Oliveira, Syllas Borburema Silva; de Carvalho, Raquel Vieira; Carneiro, Joel Camilo Souza; de São José, Jackline Freitas Brilhante; Bernardes, Patrícia Campos

    2017-01-16

    New sanitization methods have been evaluated to improve food safety and food quality and to replace chlorine compounds. However, these new methods can lead to physicochemical and sensory changes in fruits and vegetables. The present study evaluated the effects of acetic acid, peracetic acid, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate isolated or combined with 5min of ultrasound treatment (40kHz, 500W) on strawberry quality over 9days of storage at 8°C. The strawberry natural contaminant microbiota (molds and yeasts, mesophilic aerobic and lactic acid bacteria), physicochemical quality (pH, total titratable acidity, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and color), sensory quality (triangle test) and inactivation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica intentionally inoculated onto strawberries were analyzed. Ultrasound increased the effect of all chemical compounds in the reduction of aerobic mesophilic, molds and yeasts. The best treatment for those groups of microorganisms was ultrasound combined with peracetic acid (US+PA) that reduced 1.8 and 2.0logcfu/g during 9days of storage. Bactericidal effect of peracetic acid was also improved by ultrasound inactivation of S. enterica, reaching a decimal reduction of 2.1logcfu/g. Moreover, synergistic effects were observed in contaminant natural microbiota inactivation for all tested compounds during storage, without any major physicochemical or sensory alteration to the strawberries. Therefore, ultrasound treatment can improve the effect of sanitizers that are substitutes of chlorine compounds without altering the quality of strawberries during storage. Acetic acid (PubChem CID: 176); Peracetic acid (PubChem CID: 6585); Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (PubChem CID: 18372154). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemical modification of birch allergen extract leads to a reduction in allergenicity as well as immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtzen, Peter Adler; Lund, Lise; Lund, Gitte; Holm, Jens; Millner, Anders; Henmar, Helene

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, specific immunotherapy is currently conducted with vaccines containing allergen preparations based on intact extracts. In addition to this, chemically modified allergen extracts (allergoids) are used for specific allergy treatment. Reduced allergenicity and thereby reduced risk of side effects in combination with retained ability to activate T cells and induce protective allergen-specific antibody responses has been claimed for allergoids. In the current study, we compared intact allergen extracts and allergoids with respect to allergenicity and immunogenicity. The immunological response to birch allergen extract, alum-adsorbed extract, birch allergoid and alum-adsorbed allergoid was investigated in vitro in human basophil histamine release assay and by stimulation of human allergen-specific T cell lines. In vivo, Bet v 1-specific IgG titers in mice were determined after repetitive immunizations. In all patients tested (n = 8), allergoid stimulations led to reduced histamine release compared to the intact allergen extract. However, the allergoid preparations were not recognized by Bet v 1-specific T cell lines (n = 7), which responded strongly to the intact allergen extract. Mouse immunizations showed a clearly reduced IgG induction by allergoids and a strongly potentiating effect of the alum adjuvant. Optimal IgG titers were obtained after 3 immunizations with intact allergen extracts, while 5 immunizations were needed to obtain maximal response to the allergoid. The reduced histamine release observed for allergoid preparations may be at the expense of immunological efficacy because the chemical modifications lead to a clear reduction in T cell activation and the ability to induce allergen-specific IgG antibody responses. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Advanced Chemical Reduction of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Photocatalytic Activity in Degrading Reactive Black 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Pau Ping Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Textile industries consume large volumes of water for dye processing, leading to undesirable toxic dyes in water bodies. Dyestuffs are harmful to human health and aquatic life, and such illnesses as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and hinder the photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants. To overcome this environmental problem, the advanced oxidation process is a promising technique to mineralize a wide range of dyes in water systems. In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO was prepared via an advanced chemical reduction route, and its photocatalytic activity was tested by photodegrading Reactive Black 5 (RB5 dye in aqueous solution. rGO was synthesized by dispersing the graphite oxide into the water to form a graphene oxide (GO solution followed by the addition of hydrazine. Graphite oxide was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method by using potassium permanganate and concentrated sulphuric acid. The resulted rGO nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to further investigate their chemical properties. A characteristic peak of rGO-48 h (275 cm−1 was observed in the UV spectrum. Further, the appearance of a broad peak (002, centred at 2θ = 24.1°, in XRD showing that graphene oxide was reduced to rGO. Based on our results, it was found that the resulted rGO-48 h nanoparticles achieved 49% photodecolorization of RB5 under UV irradiation at pH 3 in 60 min. This was attributed to the high and efficient electron transport behaviors of rGO between aromatic regions of rGO and RB5 molecules.

  14. The association of the original OSHA chemical hazard communication standard with reductions in acute work injuries/illnesses in private industry and the industrial releases of chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    OSHA predicted the original chemical Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) would cumulatively reduce the lost workday acute injury/illness rate for exposure events by 20% over 20 years and reduce exposure to chemical carcinogens. JoinPoint trend software identified changes in the rate of change of BLS rates for days away from work for acute injuries/illnesses during 1992-2009 for manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries for both chemical, noxious or allergenic injury exposure events and All other exposure events. The annual percent change in the rates was used to adjust observed numbers of cases to estimate their association with the standard. A case-control study of EPA's Toxic Release Inventory 1988-2009 data compared carcinogen and non-carcinogens' releases. The study estimates that the HCS was associated with a reduction in the number of acute injuries/illnesses due to chemical injury exposure events over the background rate in the range 107,569-459,395 (Hudson method/modified BIC model) depending on whether the HCS is treated as a marginal or sole factor in the decrease. Carcinogen releases have declined at a substantially faster rate than control non-carcinogens. The previous HCS standard was associated with significant reductions in chemical event acute injuries/illnesses and chemical carcinogen exposures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chemical reduction process and their antimicrobial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, Adawiya J., E-mail: adawiyahaider@yahoo.com [Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Research Center, University of Technology, Baghdad, Republic of Iraq, 10066 (Iraq); Thamir, Amin D. [Production and Metallurgy department, University of Technology, University of Technology, Baghdad, Republic of Iraq, 10066 (Iraq); Ahmed, Duha S.; Mohammad, M. R. [Applied Physics department, University of Technology, University of Technology, Baghdad, Republic, of Iraq, 10066 (Iraq)

    2016-07-25

    In this paper, the functionalization of raw-MWCNTs involves oxidation reaction using concentrated acid mixture of HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1:3), via ultrasonic bath (170 W, 50 kHz) to obtain functional groups. Then Ag nanoparticles are decorated the outside over the surface of functionalized MWCNTs using a chemical reduction process resulting in the formation of(Ag/ MWCNTs) hybrid material. The results showed that outer diameter functionalized F-MWCNTs andAg nanoparticles size was about (11-80) nm and (10 to 25) nm, respectively using TEM and HRTEM. The crystallographic structure of MWCNTs using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved diffraction peaks at 38.1°, 44.3°, 64.7° and 77.4° degrees namely, Ag (111), Ag (200), Ag (220), and Ag (311) of the face-centered cubic lattice of Ag, respectively, excepting the peak at 2θ =25.6°, which correspond to the (0 0 2) reflection of the MWNTs are corresponding to Ag/MWNTs. The antimicrobial activities of Ag/MWCNTs hybrid using plate count method showed that decreasing a large number of bacteria colonies of E. coli and S. aureu with increasing the hybrid concentrations after incubation for 24 h in shaker incubator with percentage of inhibition approaching 100%.

  17. A path flux analysis method for the reduction of detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wenting; Ju, Yiguang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Chen, Zheng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gou, Xiaolong [School of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2010-07-15

    A direct path flux analysis (PFA) method for kinetic mechanism reduction is proposed and validated by using high temperature ignition, perfect stirred reactors, and steady and unsteady flame propagations of n-heptane and n-decane/air mixtures. The formation and consumption fluxes of each species at multiple reaction path generations are analyzed and used to identify the important reaction pathways and the associated species. The formation and consumption path fluxes used in this method retain flux conservation information and are used to define the path indexes for the first and the second generation reaction paths related to a targeted species. Based on the indexes of each reaction path for the first and second generations, different sized reduced chemical mechanisms which contain different number of species are generated. The reduced mechanisms of n-heptane and n-decane obtained by using the present method are compared to those generated by the direct relation graph (DRG) method. The reaction path analysis for n-decane is conducted to demonstrate the validity of the present method. The comparisons of the ignition delay times, flame propagation speeds, flame structures, and unsteady spherical flame propagation processes showed that with either the same or significantly less number of species, the reduced mechanisms generated by the present PFA are more accurate than that of DRG in a broad range of initial pressures and temperatures. The method is also integrated with the dynamic multi-timescale method and a further increase of computation efficiency is achieved. (author)

  18. ZnO nanostructures with tunable visible luminescence: Effects of kinetics of chemical reduction and annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Raji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Highly crystalline ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized using a co-precipitation method. The morphology and optical properties of these nanoparticles are found to be highly sensitive to the growth parameters such as the concentration of reducing agent and annealing temperature. Indeed, the concentration of the reducing agent can alter the morphology of nanoparticles from quasi-spherical to rod-like and then to flower-like structures. Attempts were made to tune the emission wavelength over the visible region by varying the kinetics of chemical reduction and annealing. The possibility of tuning the emission in a visible range from orange to red and then to green by changing the nature of defects by annealing is also reported. Analysis of the Raman spectrum, with its intensity observed at 580 cm−1 corresponding to E1 (LO mode, revealed that the kinetics and thermodynamics of formation and growth of these nanoparticles determined the nature and density of the probable defects such as oxygen vacancies, interstitial zinc atoms and their complexes.

  19. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chemical reduction process and their antimicrobial effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adawiya J.; Thamir, Amin D.; Ahmed, Duha S.; Mohammad, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the functionalization of raw-MWCNTs involves oxidation reaction using concentrated acid mixture of HNO3:H2SO4 (1:3), via ultrasonic bath (170 W, 50 kHz) to obtain functional groups. Then Ag nanoparticles are decorated the outside over the surface of functionalized MWCNTs using a chemical reduction process resulting in the formation of(Ag/ MWCNTs) hybrid material. The results showed that outer diameter functionalized F-MWCNTs andAg nanoparticles size was about (11-80) nm and (10 to 25) nm, respectively using TEM and HRTEM. The crystallographic structure of MWCNTs using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved diffraction peaks at 38.1°, 44.3°, 64.7° and 77.4° degrees namely, Ag (111), Ag (200), Ag (220), and Ag (311) of the face-centered cubic lattice of Ag, respectively, excepting the peak at 2θ =25.6°, which correspond to the (0 0 2) reflection of the MWNTs are corresponding to Ag/MWNTs. The antimicrobial activities of Ag/MWCNTs hybrid using plate count method showed that decreasing a large number of bacteria colonies of E. coli and S. aureu with increasing the hybrid concentrations after incubation for 24h in shaker incubator with percentage of inhibition approaching 100%.

  20. Chemical Separation of Fission Products in Uranium Metal Ingots from Electrolytic Reduction Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Heon; Kim, Min-Jae; Choi, Kwang-Soon; Jee, Kwang-Yong; Kim, Won-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Chemical characterization of various process materials is required for the optimization of the electrolytic reduction process in which uranium dioxide, a matrix of spent PWR fuels, is electrolytically reduced to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten at 650 .deg. C. In the uranium metal ingots of interest in this study, residual process materials and corrosion products as well as fission products are involved to some extent, which further adds difficulties to the determination of trace fission products. Besides it, direct inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) analysis of uranium bearing materials such as the uranium metal ingots is not possible because a severe spectral interference is found in the intensely complex atomic emission spectra of uranium. Thus an adequate separation procedure for the fission products should be employed prior to their determinations. In present study ion exchange and extraction chromatographic methods were adopted for selective separation of the fission products from residual process materials, corrosion products and uranium matrix. The sorption behaviour of anion and tri-nbutylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatographic resins for the metals in acidic solutions simulated for the uranium metal ingot solutions was investigated. Then the validity of the separation procedure for its reliability and applicability was evaluated by measuring recoveries of the metals added

  1. Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur coupled to chemical reduction of iron or manganese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler

    1993-01-01

    and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S + 4H(2)O --> SO(4) + 3H(2)S + 2H. Subsequent chemical reactions between...... reduction of MnO(2) to Mn. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO(2), the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO(4) and H(2)S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S. The observed microbial disproportionation of S only proceeds...... significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO(2) was high, > 10 cm in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic...

  2. Kinetics of low pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten silicide from dichlorocilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, D.; Raupp, G.B.; Hillman, J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on experiments to determine the intrinsic surface reaction rate dependences and film properties' dependence on local reactant partial pressures and wafer temperature in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten silicide from dichlorosilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Films were deposited in a commercial-scale Spectrum CVD cold wall single wafer reactor under near differential, gradientless conditions. Over the range of process conditions investigated, deposition rate was found to be first order in dichlorosillane and negative second order in tungsten hexafluoride partial pressure. The apparent activation energy in the surface reaction limited regime was found to be 70-120 kcal/mol. The silicon to tungsten ratio of as deposited silicide films ranged from 1.1 to 2.4, and increased with increasing temperature and dichlorosillane partial pressure, and decreased with increasing tungsten hexafluoride pressure. These results suggest that the apparent silicide deposition rate and composition are controlled by the relative rates of at least two competing reactions which deposit stoichiometric tungsten silicides and/or silicon

  3. SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS, BAY CITY, MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SITE Program funded a field demonstration to evaluate the Eco Logic Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Process developed by ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (ELI), Ontario, Canada. The Demonstration took place at the Middleground Landfill in Bay City, Michigan using landfill wa...

  4. A rapid room temperature chemical route for the synthesis of graphene: metal-mediated reduction of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Hajra, Saumen; Sahu, Ranjan K; Raj, C Retna; Panigrahi, M K

    2012-02-07

    A rapid and facile route for the synthesis of reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGOs) at room temperature by the chemical reduction of graphene oxide using Zn/acid in aqueous solution is demonstrated. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  5. Quantum chemical analysis of Со2+ aqua complexes electrochemical reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor F. Vargalyuk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of quantum chemical calculations results (GAMESS, density functional theory, B3LYP method as to [Co(H2On]z(H2O6–n clusters for z = 0, 1, 2 and n=1÷6, it has been demonstrated that electrochemical reduction of [Co(H2O6]2+ aqua complexes runs stage-wise. At the first stage, an electron injected into the [Co(H2O6]2+ complex is entirely located in the orbital of the central atom, as z(Co herewith changes from +1.714 е to +0.777 е. The weakening of Со–ОН2 bonds leads to decomposition of resulting [Co(H2O6]+ particles into two energetically related forms – [Co(H2O4]+ and [Co(H2O3]+. Further reduction of these intermediates runs differently. Electron injection into the [Co(H2O3]+ intermediate terminatesthe transition of Со2+-ions to Со0 z(Co= –0.264 е. This process is accompanied by rapid decomposition of [Co(H2O3]0 product into monohydrate atom of cobalt Со(Н2О. On the contrary, electron injection into the [Co(H2O4]+ intermediate leads to emergence of a specific structure – [Co+(H2O–(Н2О3]¹0, whereby the electron is located in the atoms of cobalt only by 28%, and by 72% in cobalt-coordinated water molecules, clearly focusing on one of the. In this molecule, z(H2O changes from +0.148 е to –0.347 е. There is an assumption that a non-equilibrium [Co+(H2O–(Н2О3]0¹ form transits to [Co(ОH(Н2О3]0 hydroxo-form, which further disproportionates turning into Co(ОH2 hydroxide. In order to reduce the impact of this unfavorable reaction pathway on the overall reaction rate Со2+ + 2ē = Со0, we suggest raising the temperature to ensure complete dissociation of [Co(H2O4]+ to [Co(H2O3]+.

  6. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  7. Synthesis and characterization of β-phase iron silicide nano-particles by chemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Gogurla, Narendar; Banerji, Pallab; Guha, Prasanta K.; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • β-FeSi 2 nano-particle was synthesized by reducing with Mg and by diluting with MgO. • XRD profile shows the iron di-silicide phase to be semiconducting β-FeSi 2 . • HRTEM and FESEM images indicate the β-FeSi 2 average particle size to be 60–70 nm. • Absorption, reflectance and PL spectroscopy show band gap to be direct 0.87 eV. • Nano-β-FeSi 2 is p-type with hole density of 4.38 × 10 18 cm −3 and mobility 8.9 cm 2 /V s. - Abstract: Nano-particles of β-FeSi 2 have been synthesized by chemical reduction of a glassy phase of [Fe 2 O 3 , 4SiO 2 ] by Mg-metal where MgO is used as diluent to prevent the agglomeration of nano crystallites into micro-particles and also act as a negative catalyst for the formation of other phases. The sample is characterized by XRD, FESEM, HRTEM, EDX, ultra-violet-visible-infrared and PL spectroscopy and electronic properties have been investigated by Hall measurement. XRD profile shows that the synthesized powder consists of purely β-FeSi 2 semiconducting phase. The average crystallite size of β-FeSi 2 is determined to be around 65.4 nm from XRD peaks as well as from FESEM also. The optical absorption and PL spectroscopy shows that synthesized β-FeSi 2 phase is a direct band gap semiconductor with a value of 0.87 eV. Hall measurements show that β-FeSi 2 nano-particles is p-type with hole concentration of 4.38 × 10 18 cm −3 and average hole mobility of 8.9 cm 2 /V s at 300 K

  8. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  9. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%–99% pure) neptunium metal.

  10. The chemical, microbial, sensory and technological effects of intermediate salt levels as a sodium reduction strategy in fresh pork sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluff, MacDonald; Steyn, Hannes; Charimba, George; Bothma, Carina; Hugo, Celia J; Hugo, Arno

    2016-09-01

    The reduction of sodium in processed meat products is synonymous with the use of salt replacers. Rarely has there been an assessment of the use of intermediate salt levels as a sodium reduction strategy in itself. In this study, 1 and 1.5% salt levels were compared with 0 and 2% controls in fresh pork sausages for effects on chemical, microbial, sensory and technological stability. Although significant (P sausages stored at 4 °C on days 6 and 9 and stored at -18 °C on days 90 and 180; taste, texture and overall liking during sensory evaluation; and % cooking loss, % total loss and % refrigeration loss. Consumers were able to differentiate between the 2 and 1% added NaCl treatments in terms of saltiness. This study indicated that salt reduction to intermediate levels can be considered a sodium reduction strategy in itself but that further research with regards to product safety is needed. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Reduction in Acidity by Chemical and Microbiological Methods and Their Effect on Moslavac Wine Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Herjavec, Stanka; Majdak, Ana; Tupajić, Pavica; Redžepović, Sulejman; Orlić, Sandi

    2003-01-01

    Changes in chemical composition and sensory properties caused by chemical and microbiological methods of deacidification in Moslavac (syn. Furmint) wines were investigated. Alcoholic fermentation of Moslavac musts was carried out with two different strains of the yeasts Saccharomyces paradoxus. There were no marked differences in chemical composition among the wines. Compared to the control microbiological deacidification of wines by Oenococcus oeni resulted in a complete decomposition of mal...

  12. A Data-Driven Sparse-Learning Approach to Model Reduction in Chemical Reaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Harirchi, Farshad; Khalil, Omar A.; Liu, Sijia; Elvati, Paolo; Violi, Angela; Hero, Alfred O.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an optimization-based sparse learning approach to identify the set of most influential reactions in a chemical reaction network. This reduced set of reactions is then employed to construct a reduced chemical reaction mechanism, which is relevant to chemical interaction network modeling. The problem of identifying influential reactions is first formulated as a mixed-integer quadratic program, and then a relaxation method is leveraged to reduce the computational comple...

  13. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction at various fraction of MSA and their structure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diantoro, Markus, E-mail: m-diantoror@yahoo.com; Fitrianingsih, Rina, E-mail: m-diantoror@yahoo.com; Mufti, Nandang, E-mail: m-diantoror@yahoo.com; Fuad, Abdulloh, E-mail: m-diantoror@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Negeri Malang (UM), Jl. Semarang No. 5 Malang 65145 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Nanosilver is currently one of the most common engineered nanomaterials and is used in many applications that lead to the release of silver nanoparticles and silver ions into aqueous systems. Nanosilver also possesses enhanced antimicrobial activity and bioavailability that may less environmental risk compared with other manufactured nanomaterials. Described in this research are the synthesis of silver nanoparticle produced by chemical reduction from silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) solution. As a reducing agent, Sodium Borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was used and mercaptosuccinic Acid (MSA) as stabilizer to prevent the nanoparticle from aglomerating. It was also used two kinds of solvent, they are water and methanol. In typical experiment MSA was dissolve in methanol with a number of variation of molarity i.e. 0,03 M, 0,06 M, 0,12 M, 0,15 M, and the mixture was kept under vigorous stirring in an ice bath. A solution of silver nitrate of 340 mg in 6,792 ml water was added. A freshly prepared aqueous solution of sodium borohydride (756,6 mL in 100 mL of water) was added drop wisely. The solution was kept for half an hour for stirring and were allowed to settle down in methanol. The obtained samples then characterized by means of x-ray diffractometer, and scanning electron microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy to obtain their structures of silver nanoparticles, morphology, and sizes. It is shown that diameter of silver nanoparticle sized about 24.3 nm (Ag@MSA 0.03 M), 20.4 nm (Ag@MSA 0.06 M), 16.8 nm (Ag@MSA 0.12 M), 16.9 nm (Ag@MSA 0.15 M) which was calculated by Scherrer formula by taking the FWHM from fitting to Gaussian. The phases and lattice parameter showed that there is no significant change in its volume by increasing molarity of stabilizer. In contrast, the size of particles is decreasing.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of CoPt nanoparticles prepared by room temperature chemical reduction with PAMAM dendrimer as template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Haiying; Shi, Shifan; Bai, Litao; Shamsuzzoha, Mohammad; Harrell, J W; Street, Shane C

    2010-08-01

    We describe an approach to synthesize monodisperse CoPt nanoparticles with dendrimer as template by a simple chemical reduction method in aqueous solution using NaBH4 as reducing agent at room temperature. The as-made CoPt nanoparticles buried in the dendrimer matrix have the chemically disordered fcc structure and can be transformed to the fct phase after annealing at 700 degrees C. This is the first report of dendrimer-mediated room temperature synthesis of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solution.

  15. Management of change: Lessons learned from staff reductions in the chemical process industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Gort, J.; Steijger, N.; Moonen, C.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing global competition and shareholder pressure are causing major changes in the chemical industry. Over the last decade companies have been continuously improving staff efficiency. As a result, most modern chemical plants can be regarded as lean. Plans to further reduce the number of staff

  16. Synthesis of carbide fuels from nano-structured precursors: impact on carbo-reduction and physico-chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravia, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The classical way classically used for manufacturing carbide fuels consists of carbo-reducing at high temperature (1600 C) and under primary vacuum a mixture of AnO 2 and graphite powders. These conditions are disadvantageous for the synthesis of mixed (U,Pu)C carbides on account of plutonium volatilization. Therefore, one of the main aims of these studies is to decrease the carbo-reduction temperature. The experiments focused mainly on the lowering of the uranium oxide temperature. This result has been obtained with the use of uranium oxide and carbon nano-structured precursors. To achieve this goal colloidal suspensions of uranium oxide have been prepared and stabilized by cellulosic ethers. Cellulosic ethers are both stabiliser for uranium oxide nanoparticles and carbon source for carbo-reduction. It has been shown that these precursors are more efficient for carbo-reduction than the standard precursors: a reduction of 300 C of carbo-reduction temperature has been obtained. The impact of these precursors on carbo-reduction and on physico-chemical properties as well as the structural and microstructural characterizations of the obtained carbides have been carried out. (author) [fr

  17. Preparation of TiC/W core–shell structured powders by one-step activation and chemical reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xiao-Yu; Luo, Lai-Ma; Huang, Li-Mei; Luo, Guang-Nan; Zhu, Xiao-Yong; Cheng, Ji-Gui; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel wet chemical method was used to prepare TiC/W core–shell structure powders. • TiC nanoparticles were well-encapsulated by W shells. • TiC phase was present in the interior of tungsten grains. - Abstract: In the present study, one-step activation and chemical reduction process as a novel wet-chemical route was performed for the preparation of TiC/W core–shell structured ultra-fine powders. The XRD, FE-SEM, TEM and EDS results demonstrated that the as-synthesized powders are of high purity and uniform with a diameter of approximately 500 nm. It is also found that the TiC nanoparticles were well-encapsulated by W shells. Such a unique process suggests a new method for preparing X/W (X refers the water-insoluble nanoparticles) core–shell nanoparticles with different cores

  18. Improvement of mutation rate and reduction of somatic effects by double treatment of chemical mutagens in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, B.C.; Maluszynski, M.

    1996-01-01

    Mutation techniques inducing more useful mutations and reducing somatic effects need to be improved for crop breeding. Seeds of barley varieties; Dema, Grosso were treated with two types of mutagens; 1) chemical treatment: single treatment or double treatment of two mutagens (N-nitroso-N-methylurea ; MNH, Sodium Azide; NaN 3 ) 2) gamma ray irradiation treatment. After treatment, half of seeds were used for germination test and half of seeds were sown to the field. With the higher dose of mutagen both chemical and gamma ray were plants treated, the higher rate of growth reduction rate was in M 1 seedling. In chemical treatment, germination rate of seeds, growth rate of coleoptile and root in double treatment of chemical mutagens were better than single treatments, especially in same dose. Growth inhibition rate of plant in double treatment of 1.0 mM MNH (0.5 mM MNH + 0.5 mM MNH), for example, were less than one of plants of single treatment of 1.0 mM MNH in pot and petri dish test. Growth reduction rate of culm and fertility rate in M 1 plants double treated in same dose of single treatment were also less than single one. With the higher dose of mutagen both chemical and gamma ray were plants treated, the higher frequency of chlorophyll mutants was in M 2 seedling. The rate of chlorophyll mutants in double treatment of chemical mutagens were higher than single treatment. Double treatment methods can be a improved method for induction of new good mutants, which were induced more useful mutations and reduced harmful somatic effects

  19. Reduction of Salmonella on chicken meat and chicken skin by combined or sequential application of lytic bacteriophage with chemical antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Anuraj T; Nannapaneni, Rama; Kiess, Aaron; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2015-08-17

    The effectiveness of recently approved Salmonella lytic bacteriophage preparation (SalmoFresh™) in reducing Salmonella in vitro and on chicken breast fillets was examined in combination with lauric arginate (LAE) or cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). In another experiment, a sequential spray application of this bacteriophage (phage) solution on Salmonella inoculated chicken skin after a 20s dip in chemical antimicrobials (LAE, CPC, peracetic acid, or chlorine) was also examined in reducing Salmonella counts on chicken skin. The application of phage in combination with CPC or LAE reduced S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg, and S. Enteritidis up to 5 log units in vitro at 4 °C. On chicken breast fillets, phage in combination with CPC or LAE resulted in significant (p<0.05) reductions of Salmonella ranging from 0.5 to 1.3 log CFU/g as compared to control up to 7 days of refrigerated storage. When phage was applied sequentially with chemical antimicrobials, all the treatments resulted in significant reductions of Salmonella. The application of chlorine (30 ppm) and PAA (400 ppm) followed by phage spray (10(9)PFU/ml) resulted in highest Salmonella reductions of 1.6-1.7 and 2.2-2.5l og CFU/cm(2), respectively. In conclusion, the surface applications of phage in combination with LAE or CPC significantly reduced Salmonella counts on chicken breast fillets. However, higher reductions in Salmonella counts were achieved on chicken skin by the sequential application of chemical antimicrobials followed by phage spray. The sequential application of chlorine, PAA, and phage can provide additional hurdles to reduce Salmonella on fresh poultry carcasses or cut up parts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An Invitation to Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dierk

    2011-01-01

    This "Invitation to Mathematics" consists of 14 contributions, many from the world's leading mathematicians, which introduce the readers to exciting aspects of current mathematical research. The contributions are as varied as the personalities of active mathematicians, but together they show mathematics as a rich and lively field of research. The contributions are written for interested students at the age of transition between high school and university who know high school mathematics and perhaps competition mathematics and who want to find out what current research mathematics is

  1. Modeling of Chemical Reactions in Afterburning for the Reduction of N2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Glarborg, Peter; Leckner, Bo

    1996-01-01

    Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions.......Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions....

  2. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  3. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  4. Plasma for electrification of chemical industry : a case study on CO2 reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, G.J.; Akse, H.N.; Bongers, W.A.; Van De Sanden, M.C.M.

    2018-01-01

    Significant growth of the share of (intermittent) renewable power in the chemical industry is imperative to meet increasingly stricter limits on CO2 exhaust that are being implemented within Europe. This paper aims to evaluate the potential of a plasma process that converts input CO2 into a pure

  5. Plasma for Electrification of Chemical Industry: a Case Study on CO2 Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, G. J.; Akse, H.; Bongers, W.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Significantly increasing the share of (intermittent) renewable power in the chemical industry is imperative to meet increasingly stricter limits on CO2 exhaust that are being implemented within Europe. This paper aims to evaluate the potential of a plasma process that converts input CO2 into a pure

  6. Model Reduction in Chemical Engineering : Case studies applied to process analysis, design and operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorneanu, B.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, models have become widely used for supporting a broad range of chemical engineering activities, such as product and process design and development, process monitoring and control, real time optimization of plant operation or supply chain management. Although tremendous

  7. Moisture-induced solid state instabilities in α-chymotrypsin and their reduction through chemical glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solá Ricardo J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein instability remains the main factor limiting the development of protein therapeutics. The fragile nature (structurally and chemically of proteins makes them susceptible to detrimental events during processing, storage, and delivery. To overcome this, proteins are often formulated in the solid-state which combines superior stability properties with reduced operational costs. Nevertheless, solid protein pharmaceuticals can also suffer from instability problems due to moisture sorption. Chemical protein glycosylation has evolved into an important tool to overcome several instability issues associated with proteins. Herein, we employed chemical glycosylation to stabilize a solid-state protein formulation against moisture-induced deterioration in the lyophilized state. Results First, we investigated the consequences of moisture sorption on the stability and structural conformation of the model enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT under controlled humidity conditions. Results showed that α-CT aggregates and inactivates as a function of increased relative humidity (RH. Furthermore, α-CT loses its native secondary and tertiary structure rapidly at increasing RH. In addition, H/D exchange studies revealed that α-CT structural dynamics increased at increasing RH. The magnitude of the structural changes in tendency parallels the solid-state instability data (i.e., formation of buffer-insoluble aggregates, inactivation, and loss of native conformation upon reconstitution. To determine if these moisture-induced instability issues could be ameliorated by chemical glycosylation we proceeded to modify our model protein with chemically activated glycans of differing lengths (lactose and dextran (10 kDa. The various glycoconjugates showed a marked decrease in aggregation and an increase in residual activity after incubation. These stabilization effects were found to be independent of the glycan size. Conclusion Water sorption leads to

  8. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-21

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution ω[over dot]=-ω(2) along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)] this outcome will be naturally related to the

  9. Concurrent reduction and distillation: an improved technique for the recovery and chemical refinement of the isotopes of cadmium and zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudill, H.H.; McBride, L.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Isotope Separations Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been involved in the separation, chemical recovery, and refinement of the stable isotopes of cadmium and zinc since 1946. Traditionally, the chemical refinement procedures for these elements consisted of ion exchange separations using anion exchange resins followed by pH-controlled hydrogen sulfide precipitations. The procedures were quite time-consuming and made it difficult to remove trace quantities of sulfur which interferes in subsequent attempts to prepare rolled metal foils. As demands for 113 Cd and 68 Zn (a precursor for the production of the radiopharmaceutical 67 Ga) increased, it became evident that a quicker, more efficient refinement procedure was needed. Details of an improved method, which employs concurrent hydrogen reduction and distillation in the recovery and refinement of isotopically enriched zinc, are described. Modifications of the procedure suitable for the refinement of cadmium isotopes are also described. 3 figures, 1 table

  10. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by radiolysis, photolysis and chemical reduction of AgNO3 in Hibiscus sabdariffa infusion (karkade)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, Franco; Ursini, Ornella; Angelini, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles of different average diameters were synthesized by γ-radiolysis, UV-photolysis and chemical reduction of AgNO 3 solutions in Hibiscus sabdariffa infusion commonly known as 'karkade'. The UV-photolysis was performed either by using a conventional Hg low pressure lamp emitting at 254 nm and also by using a new compact UV-LED source emitting at 360 nm. The kinetics rate constant of silver nanoparticles synthesis produced by γ-radiolysis and UV photolysis were determined and the average diameter of the resulting nanoparticles was estimated. (author)

  11. By invitation only

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2011-01-01

    The Hôtel Métropole in Brussels is a legendary conference venue that will ring a bell to all physicists. 100 years after the first meeting of the Conseil de Physique Solvay, a representative group of the world’s most eminent physicists met again in October this year in the Excelsior Room to discuss “The Theory of the Quantum World”. Three members of CERN's Theory Group were invited to participate. Gian Giudice, one of them, shares with us his thoughts and impressions about this exclusive conference.   Attendees at the 25th Solvay Conference on Physics, Brussels. Photo provided by "International Solvay Institutes". “In the tradition of the Solvay Conferences, this is a discussion-oriented meeting with few talks by rapporteurs.” Thus reads the Introduction to the Scientific Programme of the Solvay Conference on Physics. In the Conference programme, the rapporteurs speak for only 30 minutes,...

  12. Chemical Fouling Reduction of a Submersible Steel Spectrophotometer in Estuarine Environments Using a Sacrificial Zinc Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Zachary S; Thompson, Megan; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-07-01

    The availability of in situ spectrophotometers, such as the S::CAN spectro::lyser, has expanded the possibilities for high-frequency water quality data collection. However, biological and chemical fouling can degrade the performance of in situ spectrophotometers, especially in saline environments with rapid flow rates. A complex freshwater washing system has been previously designed to reduce chemical fouling for the S::CAN spectro::lyser spectrophotometer. In the current study, we present a simpler, cheaper alternative: the attachment of a sacrificial zinc anode. Results are presented detailing the S::CAN spectro::lyser performance with and without the addition of the sacrificial anode. Attachment of the zinc anode provided efficient corrosion protection during 2-wk deployments in a highly dynamic (average tidal range, 2.5 m) saline tidal saltmarsh creek at Groves Creek, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. Eastern Sources of Invitational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryback, David

    1993-01-01

    Presents historical perspective suggesting that invitational theory shares many beliefs with ancient Eastern philosophies. Submits that teachers and other educators who embrace the invitational perspective may benefit from an understanding of Eastern principles. Briefly describes Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Zen Buddhism, and their relevance to…

  14. Sub-2 nm SnO2 nanocrystals: A reduction/oxidation chemical reaction synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Du Ning; Chen Bindi; Cui Tianfeng; Yang Deren

    2008-01-01

    A simple reduction/oxidation chemical solution approach at room temperature has been developed to synthesize ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals, in which NaBH 4 is used as a reducing agent instead of mineralizers such as sodium hydroxide, ammonia, and alcohol. The morphology, structure, and optical property of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is indicated that the uniform tetragonal ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals with the size below 2 nm have been fabricated at room temperature. The band gap of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals is about 4.1 eV, exhibiting 0.5 eV blue shift from that of the bulk SnO 2 (3.6 eV). Furthermore, the mechanism for the reduction/oxidation chemical reaction synthesis of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals has been preliminary presented

  15. Effect of experimental factors on magnetic properties of nickel nanoparticles produced by chemical reduction method using a statistical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaezi, M.R.; Barzgar Vishlaghi, M.; Farzalipour Tabriz, M.; Mohammad Moradi, O.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic nickel nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical reduction. • Effects of synthesis parameters on magnetic properties are studied. • Central composite experimental design is used for building an empirical model. • Solvents ratio was more influential than reactants mixing rate. - Abstract: Nickel nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction method in the absence of any surface capping agent. The effect of reactants mixing rate and the volume ratio of methanol/ethanol as solvent on the morphology and magnetic properties of nickel nanoparticles were studied by design of experiment using central composite design. X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were utilized to characterize the synthesized nanoparticles. Size distribution of particles was studied by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) technique and magnetic properties of produced nanoparticles were investigated by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) apparatus. The results showed that the magnetic properties of nickel nanoparticles were more influenced by volume ratio of methanol/ethanol than the reactants mixing rate. Super-paramagnetic nickel nanoparticles with size range between 20 and 50 nm were achieved when solvent was pure methanol and the reactants mixing rate was kept at 70 ml/h. But addition of more ethanol to precursor solvent leads to the formation of larger particles with broader size distribution and weak ferromagnetic or super-paramagnetic behavior

  16. Chemical reduction of rust on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel surface in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, N.; Shimoyashiki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Low-alloy Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been favored for the tube material of steam generators in fast breeder reactors (FBRs). However, this material rusts easily due to moisture condensation on its surface when left in air. Therefore, measures to prevent tube materials from rusting have been taken during manufacturing of the steam generators. When rust is present on tube surfaces, its oxygen and iron dissolve into liquid sodium. When the concentration of these impurities in the sodium increases rapidly, the cold traps can become choked locally and lose their removal ability. This work has been done, therefore, to clarify reduction processes of rust in sodium and to select optimum operating temperatures of steam generators in the initial operation

  17. Plasma for electrification of chemical industry: a case study on CO2 reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, G. J.; Akse, H. N.; Bongers, W. A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Significant growth of the share of (intermittent) renewable power in the chemical industry is imperative to meet increasingly stricter limits on CO2 exhaust that are being implemented within Europe. This paper aims to evaluate the potential of a plasma process that converts input CO2 into a pure stream of CO to aid in renewable energy penetration in this sector. A realistic process design is constructed to serve as a basis for an economical analysis. The manufacturing cost price of CO is estimated at 1.2 kUS ton-1 CO. A sensitivity analysis shows that separation is the dominant cost factor, so that improving conversion is currently more effective to lower the price than e.g. energy efficiency.

  18. Advancement in solar evaporation techniques for volume reduction of chemical effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parakasamurthy, K S [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad (India); Pande, D P [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    A typical example of advancement of a unit operation for the given requirement is described. The solar evaporation ponds (SEP) have technical and economic advantages compared to other evaporation methods for concentrating chemical effluents. The operation of SEP is strongly dependent on the environmental and site conditions. Tropical conditions with high solar incidence, good wind speed along with hot and dry weather provide suitable climate for efficient operation of solar evaporation ponds. The particular site selected for the ponds at Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has a rocky terrain with murrum over sheet with very low water table and small velocity of groundwater. During the past twenty five years extensive theoretical and experimental investigations have been carried out for advancement of solar evaporation technique. (author). 7 refs.

  19. Advancement in solar evaporation techniques for volume reduction of chemical effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parakasamurthy, K.S.; Pande, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    A typical example of advancement of a unit operation for the given requirement is described. The solar evaporation ponds (SEP) have technical and economic advantages compared to other evaporation methods for concentrating chemical effluents. The operation of SEP is strongly dependent on the environmental and site conditions. Tropical conditions with high solar incidence, good wind speed along with hot and dry weather provide suitable climate for efficient operation of solar evaporation ponds. The particular site selected for the ponds at Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has a rocky terrain with murrum over sheet with very low water table and small velocity of groundwater. During the past twenty five years extensive theoretical and experimental investigations have been carried out for advancement of solar evaporation technique. (author)

  20. Functional fixedness and functional reduction as common sense reasonings in chemical equilibrium and in geometry and polarity of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furió, C.; Calatayud, M. L.; Bárcenas, S. L.; Padilla, O. M.

    2000-09-01

    Many of the learning difficulties in the specific domain of chemistry are found not only in the ideas already possessed by students but in the strategic and procedural knowledge that is characteristic of everyday thinking. These defects in procedural knowledge have been described as functional fixedness and functional reduction. This article assesses the procedural difficulties of students (grade 12 and first and third year of university) based on common sense reasoning in two areas of chemistry: chemical equilibrium and geometry and polarity of molecules. In the first area, the theme of external factors affecting equilibria (temperature and concentration change) was selected because the explanations given by the students could be analyzed easily. The existence of a functional fixedness where Le Chatelier's principle was almost exclusively applied by rote could be observed, with this being the cause of the incorrect responses given to the proposed items. Functional fixedness of the Lewis structure also led to an incorrect prediction of molecular geometry. When molecular geometry was correctly determined by the students, it seemed that other methodological or procedural difficulties appeared when the task was to determine molecular polarity. The students showed a tendency, in many cases, to reduce the factors affecting molecular polarity in two possible ways: (a) assuming that polarity depends only on shape (geometric functional reduction) or (b) assuming that molecular polarity depends only on the polarity of bonds (bonding functional reduction).

  1. Influence of Chemical and Physical Properties of Activated Carbon Powders on Oxygen Reduction and Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2013-06-03

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders made from different precursor materials (coal, peat, coconut shell, hardwood, and phenolic resin) were electrochemically evaluated as oxygen reduction catalysts and tested as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). AC powders were characterized in terms of surface chemistry and porosity, and their kinetic activities were compared to carbon black and platinum catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) tests. Cathodes using the coal-derived AC had the highest power densities in MFCs (1620 ± 10 mW m-2). Peat-based AC performed similarly in MFC tests (1610 ± 100 mW m-2) and had the best catalyst performance, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.17 V, and n = 3.6 electrons used for oxygen reduction. Hardwood based AC had the highest number of acidic surface functional groups and the poorest performance in MFC and catalysis tests (630 ± 10 mW m-2, Eonset = -0.01 V, n = 2.1). There was an inverse relationship between onset potential and quantity of strong acid (pKa < 8) functional groups, and a larger fraction of microporosity was negatively correlated with power production in MFCs. Surface area alone was a poor predictor of catalyst performance, and a high quantity of acidic surface functional groups was determined to be detrimental to oxygen reduction and cathode performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Systematic reduction of complex tropospheric chemical mechanisms, Part II: Lumping using a time-scale based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Whitehouse

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a formal method of species lumping that can be applied automatically to intermediate compounds within detailed and complex tropospheric chemical reaction schemes. The method is based on grouping species with reference to their chemical lifetimes and reactivity structures. A method for determining the forward and reverse transformations between individual and lumped compounds is developed. Preliminary application to the Leeds Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv2.0 has led to the removal of 734 species and 1777 reactions from the scheme, with minimal degradation of accuracy across a wide range of test trajectories relevant to polluted tropospheric conditions. The lumped groups are seen to relate to groups of peroxy acyl nitrates, nitrates, carbonates, oxepins, substituted phenols, oxeacids and peracids with similar lifetimes and reaction rates with OH. In combination with other reduction techniques, such as sensitivity analysis and the application of the quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA, a reduced mechanism has been developed that contains 35% of the number of species and 40% of the number of reactions compared to the full mechanism. This has led to a speed up of a factor of 8 in terms of computer calculation time within box model simulations.

  3. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column

  4. Dry-plasma-free chemical etch technique for variability reduction in multi-patterning (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, Subhadeep; Mohanty, Nihar; Farrell, Richard A.; Franke, Elliott; Raley, Angelique; Thibaut, Sophie; Pereira, Cheryl; Pillai, Karthik; Ko, Akiteru; Mosden, Aelan; Biolsi, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Scaling beyond the 7nm technology node demands significant control over the variability down to a few angstroms, in order to achieve reasonable yield. For example, to meet the current scaling targets it is highly desirable to achieve sub 30nm pitch line/space features at back-end of the line (BEOL) or front end of line (FEOL); uniform and precise contact/hole patterning at middle of line (MOL). One of the quintessential requirements for such precise and possibly self-aligned patterning strategies is superior etch selectivity between the target films while other masks/films are exposed. The need to achieve high etch selectivity becomes more evident for unit process development at MOL and BEOL, as a result of low density films choices (compared to FEOL film choices) due to lower temperature budget. Low etch selectivity with conventional plasma and wet chemical etch techniques, causes significant gouging (un-intended etching of etch stop layer, as shown in Fig 1), high line edge roughness (LER)/line width roughness (LWR), non-uniformity, etc. In certain circumstances this may lead to added downstream process stochastics. Furthermore, conventional plasma etches may also have the added disadvantage of plasma VUV damage and corner rounding (Fig. 1). Finally, the above mentioned factors can potentially compromise edge placement error (EPE) and/or yield. Therefore a process flow enabled with extremely high selective etches inherent to film properties and/or etch chemistries is a significant advantage. To improve this etch selectivity for certain etch steps during a process flow, we have to implement alternate highly selective, plasma free techniques in conjunction with conventional plasma etches (Fig 2.). In this article, we will present our plasma free, chemical gas phase etch technique using chemistries that have high selectivity towards a spectrum of films owing to the reaction mechanism ( as shown Fig 1). Gas phase etches also help eliminate plasma damage to the

  5. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via chemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Alpana; Rangra, V. S.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Natural flake Graphite was used as the starting material for the graphene synthesis. In the first step flake graphite was treated with oxidizing agents under vigorous conditions to obtain graphite oxide. Layered graphite oxide decorated with oxygen has large inter-layer distance leading easy exfoliation into single sheets by ultrasonication giving graphene oxide. In the last step exfoliated graphene oxide sheets were reduced slowly with the help of reducing agent to obtain fine powder which is labeled as reduced graphene oxide (rGO). This rGO was further characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman Spectroscopy techniques. XRD pattern shows peaks corresponding to (002) graphitic lattice planes indicating the formation of network of sp 2 like carbon structure. SEM images show the ultrathin, wrinkled, paper-like morphology of graphene sheets. IR study shows that the graphite has been oxidized to graphite oxide with the presence of various absorption bands confirming the presence of oxidizing groups. The FTIR spectrum of rGO shows no sharp peaks confirming the efficient reduction of rGO. The Raman spectrum shows disorder in the graphene sheets

  6. INVITATION FROM THE UBS

    CERN Multimedia

    UBS SA

    2000-01-01

    Via its Web pages (http://www.ubs.com), the UBS offers you direct access to all its telebanking services, namely:information relating to accounts and custody accounts (balances, debits and credits);stock market information and placing of orders;domestic and foreign payment transactions.These supplementary and inexpensive banking services mean that you no longer have to go to the bank to obtain the information you require and are not therefore limited by bank opening times.The UBS will be holding two sessions on the CERN site to present this modern product on:25.4.2000 (in French),26.4.2000 (in English).The agenda will be as follows:12.00 to 12.40 p.m.Presentation of the product;12.40 to 13.10 p.m.Question-and-answer session;13.10 to 14.00 p.m.Buffet and discussions.To enable us to meet your requirements and to expedite matters, we invite you to register for one of these sessions by sending an e-mail or letter to:pierre.guyenon@ubs.com before 7.4.2000 indicating:your surname and first name, the account number(...

  7. Determination of decimal reduction time (D value) of chemical agents used in hospitals for disinfection purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni; da S Martins, Alzira M

    2003-01-01

    Background Prior to the selection of disinfectants for low, intermediate and high (sterilizing) levels, the decimal reduction time, D-value, for the most common and persistent bacteria identified at a health care facility should be determined. Methods The D-value was determined by inoculating 100 mL of disinfecting solution with 1 mL of a bacterial suspension (104 – 105 CFU/mL for vegetative and spore forms). At regular intervals, 1 mL aliquots of this mixture were transferred to 8 mL of growth media containing a neutralizing agent, and incubated at optimal conditions for the microorganism. Results The highest D-values for various bacteria were determined for the following solutions: (i) 0.1% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (pH 7.0) – E. coli and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.9 min); (ii) sodium hypochlorite (pH 7.0) at 0.025% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 24 min), E. coli and E. cloacae (D = 7.5 min); at 0.05% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.4 min) and E. coli (D = 6.1 min) and 0.1% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 3.5 min) and B. subtilis (D = 3.2 min); (iii) 2.0% glutaraldehyde (pH 7.4) – B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis (D = 25 min) and E. coli (D = 7.1 min); (iv) 0.5% formaldehyde (pH 6.5) – B. subtilis (D = 11.8 min), B. stearothermophilus (D = 10.9 min) and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.2 min); (v) 2.0% chlorhexidine (pH 6.2) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min), and at 0.4% for E. cloacae (D = 8.3 min); (vi) 1.0% Minncare® (peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, pH 2.3) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min) and E. coli (D = 6.7 min). Conclusions The suspension studies were an indication of the disinfectant efficacy on a surface. The data in this study reflect the formulations used and may vary from product to product. The expected effectiveness from the studied formulations showed that the tested agents can be recommended for surface disinfection as stated in present guidelines and emphasizes the importance and need to develop routine and novel programs to

  8. Determination of decimal reduction time (D value of chemical agents used in hospitals for disinfection purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da S Martins Alzira M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior to the selection of disinfectants for low, intermediate and high (sterilizing levels, the decimal reduction time, D-value, for the most common and persistent bacteria identified at a health care facility should be determined. Methods The D-value was determined by inoculating 100 mL of disinfecting solution with 1 mL of a bacterial suspension (104 – 105 CFU/mL for vegetative and spore forms. At regular intervals, 1 mL aliquots of this mixture were transferred to 8 mL of growth media containing a neutralizing agent, and incubated at optimal conditions for the microorganism. Results The highest D-values for various bacteria were determined for the following solutions: (i 0.1% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (pH 7.0 – E. coli and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.9 min; (ii sodium hypochlorite (pH 7.0 at 0.025% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 24 min, E. coli and E. cloacae (D = 7.5 min; at 0.05% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.4 min and E. coli (D = 6.1 min and 0.1% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 3.5 min and B. subtilis (D = 3.2 min; (iii 2.0% glutaraldehyde (pH 7.4 – B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis (D = 25 min and E. coli (D = 7.1 min; (iv 0.5% formaldehyde (pH 6.5 – B. subtilis (D = 11.8 min, B. stearothermophilus (D = 10.9 min and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.2 min; (v 2.0% chlorhexidine (pH 6.2 – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min, and at 0.4% for E. cloacae (D = 8.3 min; (vi 1.0% Minncare® (peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, pH 2.3 – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min and E. coli (D = 6.7 min. Conclusions The suspension studies were an indication of the disinfectant efficacy on a surface. The data in this study reflect the formulations used and may vary from product to product. The expected effectiveness from the studied formulations showed that the tested agents can be recommended for surface disinfection as stated in present guidelines and emphasizes the importance and need to develop routine and novel programs to

  9. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work

  10. Anisotropic electrical conduction and reduction in dangling-bond density for polycrystalline Si films prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Chisato; Masuda, Atsushi; Matsumura, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    Polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) films with high crystalline fraction and low dangling-bond density were prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD), often called hot-wire CVD. Directional anisotropy in electrical conduction, probably due to structural anisotropy, was observed for Cat-CVD poly-Si films. A novel method to separately characterize both crystalline and amorphous phases in poly-Si films using anisotropic electrical conduction was proposed. On the basis of results obtained by the proposed method and electron spin resonance measurements, reduction in dangling-bond density for Cat-CVD poly-Si films was achieved using the condition to make the quality of the included amorphous phase high. The properties of Cat-CVD poly-Si films are found to be promising in solar-cell applications.

  11. Effects of Ni content on nanocrystalline Fe–Co–Ni ternary alloys synthesized by a chemical reduction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chokprasombat, Komkrich, E-mail: komkrich28@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Thaksin University, Phatthalung 93210 Thailand (Thailand); Pinitsoontorn, Supree [Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 Thailand (Thailand); Maensiri, Santi [School of Physics, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 Thailand (Thailand)

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic properties of Fe–Co–Ni ternary alloys could be altered by changing of the particle size, elemental compositions, and crystalline structures. In this work, Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50−x}Ni{sub x} nanoparticles (x=10, 20, 40, and 50) were prepared by the novel chemical reduction process. Hydrazine monohydrate was used as a reducing agent under the concentrated basic condition with the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone). We found that the nanoparticles were composed of Fe, Co and Ni with compositions according to the molar ratio of the metal sources. Interestingly, the particles were well-crystalline at the as-prepared state without post-annealing at high temperature. Increasing Ni content resulted in phase transformation from body centered cubic (bcc) to face centered cubic (fcc). For the fcc phase, the average particle size decreased when increased the Ni content; the Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} nanoparticles had the smallest average size with the narrowest size distribution. In additions, the particles exhibited ferromagnetic properties at room temperature with the coercivities higher than 300 Oe, and the saturation magnetiation decreased with increasing Ni content. These results suggest that the structural and magnetic properties of Fe–Co–Ni alloys could be adjusted by varying the Ni content. - Highlights: • We prepared nanocrystalline Fe–Co–Ni alloys by a novel chemical reduction process. • Elemental compositions could be well controlled by the molar ratio of metal sources. • Particle size and magnetic properties clearly depended on the Ni contents. • Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 10}Ni{sub 40} exhibited high saturation magnetization of 126.3 emu/g.

  12. Bipyridine based metallogels: an unprecedented difference in photochemical and chemical reduction in the in situ nanoparticle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Rajendhraprasad; Bertula, Kia; Nonappa; Hietala, Sami; Rissanen, Kari; Haukka, Matti

    2017-02-28

    Metal co-ordination induced supramolecular gelation of low molecular weight organic ligands is a rapidly expanding area of research due to the potential in creating hierarchically self-assembled multi-stimuli responsive materials. In this context, structurally simple O-methylpyridine derivatives of 4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine ligands are reported. Upon complexation with Ag(i) ions in aqueous dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions the ligands spontaneously form metallosupramolecular gels at concentrations as low as 0.6 w/v%. The metal ions induce the self-assembly of three dimensional (3D) fibrillar networks followed by the spontaneous in situ reduction of the Ag-centers to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) when exposed to daylight. Significant size and morphological differences of the AgNP's was observed between the standard chemical and photochemical reduction of the metallogels. The gelation ability, the nanoparticle formation and rheological properties were found to be depend on the ligand structure, while the strength of the gels is affected by the water content of the gels.

  13. Reduction of uranyl carbonate and hydroxyl complexes and neptunyl carbonate complexes studied with chemical-electrochemical methods and rixs spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butorin, Sergei; Nordgren, Joseph; Ollila, Kaija; Albinsson, Yngve; Werme, Lars

    2003-10-01

    actinides have been mobilised through oxidation, they can migrate away from this potentially oxidising region and will encounter an oxygen free, reducing environment caused by the anaerobic corrosion of the cast iron insert. The actinyl species are no longer thermodynamically stable and reduction to the tetravalent state will be possible. There is, however, an open question whether the reduction kinetics will be sufficiently high to cause reduction in solution and if sorption onto the corroding iron surface will be accompanied by an electron transfer sufficiently rapid to reduce the actinide back to the tetravalent state. This report contains the results of experimental studies of uranium reduction-depletion from water solutions in the presence of corroding iron and spectroscopic studies of the oxidation state of uranium and neptunium sorbed/precipitated onto iron under oxygen free conditions using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopy. The RIXS measurements show that at least partial reduction of both uranyl carbonate complexes and neptunyl carbonate complexes take place on the corroding iron surface. The chemical/electrochemical measurements indicate that reduction of uranyl carbonate complexes also take place in solution in a system containing corroding iron, i.e. sorption onto the iron/iron oxide surface may not be necessary in order for reduction to take place. Reduction of uranyl hydroxyl complexes was also found to take place in solution, but at a rate that was noticeably lower than for the uranyl carbonate complexes

  14. Bid invitations for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijl, N.A. van.

    1975-01-01

    Types of bid invitations, basic requirements on bid invitation documents, basic content of a turnkey bid invitation (bid invitation letter, instructions to the bidders, terms and conditions of the draft contract, technical specifications, site data and information), nuclear fuel procurement, differences turnkey - non-turnkey, legal, commerical, and technical matters concerning the contract document. (HP) [de

  15. Organic reactions for the electrochemical and photochemical production of chemical fuels from CO2--The reduction chemistry of carboxylic acids and derivatives as bent CO2 surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Oana R; Fenwick, Aidan Q

    2015-11-01

    The present review covers organic transformations involved in the reduction of CO2 to chemical fuels. In particular, we focus on reactions of CO2 with organic molecules to yield carboxylic acid derivatives as a first step in CO2 reduction reaction sequences. These biomimetic initial steps create opportunities for tandem electrochemical/chemical reductions. We draw parallels between long-standing knowledge of CO2 reactivity from organic chemistry, organocatalysis, surface science and electrocatalysis. We point out some possible non-faradaic chemical reactions that may contribute to product distributions in the production of solar fuels from CO2. These reactions may be accelerated by thermal effects such as resistive heating and illumination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposites by chemical reduction method and their antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamyar Shameli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Shameli1, Mansor Bin Ahmad1, Mohsen Zargar3, Wan Md Zin Wan Yunus1, Nor Azowa Ibrahim1, Parvaneh Shabanzadeh2, Mansour Ghaffari Moghaddam41Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, 2Institute for Mathematical Research, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Qum, Iran; 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Zabol, Zabol, IranAbstract: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs of a small size were successfully synthesized using the wet chemical reduction method into the lamellar space layer of montmorillonite/chitosan (MMT/Cts as an organomodified mineral solid support in the absence of any heat treatment. AgNO3, MMT, Cts, and NaBH4 were used as the silver precursor, the solid support, the natural polymeric stabilizer, and the chemical reduction agent, respectively. MMT was suspended in aqueous AgNO3/Cts solution. The interlamellar space limits were changed (d-spacing = 1.24–1.54 nm; therefore, AgNPs formed on the interlayer and external surface of MMT/Cts with d-average = 6.28–9.84 nm diameter. Characterizations were done using different methods, ie, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposite (Ag/MMT/Cts BNC systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs in MMT/Cts was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria, ie, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the disc diffusion method using Mueller Hinton agar at different sizes of AgNPs. All of the synthesized Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were found to have high antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs can be useful in different biological research and biomedical

  17. Effect of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction on Quality of Life (SF-36) and Spirometry Parameters, in Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefnasab, Zahra; Ghanei, Mostafa; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Alipour, Ahmad; Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Salehi, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    Studies have shown that Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) has positive effect on physical and psychological dimensions of chronic illnesses. In this study for the first time we examine the effect of this new technique on quality of life and pulmonary function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans who have chronic pulmonary problem, psychological problems and low quality of life. Forty male pulmonary injured veterans were randomly replaced in two groups with 20 participants (MBSR and control Wait List (WL)). Then MBSR group received 8-weekly sessions intervention. We evaluate quality of life (used SF-36 questionnaire) and Spirometry parameters two times; before and after intervention in two group. We used "mixed factorial analyses of variance" test for analyzing data in each dependent variables. Then if we have significant interactional effect, we used -paired- sample t-test" for comparing before and after intervention data of each group, and "Independent-Sample t-test" for comparing after intervention data of two groups. The MBSR compare to WL group improved SF-36 total score, (F (1, 38) =12.09, P=0.001), "Role limitations due to physical problems"(F(1,38)= 6.92, P=0.01), "Role limitations due to emotional problems"(F(1,38)= 7.75, P=0.008), "Social functioning"(F(1,38)= 9.89, P=0.003), "Mental health"(F(1,38)= 15.93, P=0), "Vitality"(F(1,38)= 40.03, P≤0.001), and "Pain"(F(1,38)= 27.60, P≤0.001). MBSR had no significant effect on "FEV1" (F (1, 38) = 0.03, P=0.85),"FVC" (F (1, 38) = 0.16, P=0.69) and "FEV1/FVC" (F (1, 38) = 2.21, P=0.14). MBSR can improve individual's quality of life but not lung function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans.

  18. Improving subjective pattern recognition in chemical senses through reduction of nonlinear effects in evaluation of sparse data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, Amir H.; Rasouli, Firooz; Wrenn, Susan E.; Subbiah, M.

    2002-11-01

    Artificial neural network models are typically useful in pattern recognition and extraction of important features in large data sets. These models are implemented in a wide variety of contexts and with diverse type of input-output data. The underlying mathematics of supervised training of neural networks is ultimately tied to the ability to approximate the nonlinearities that are inherent in network"s generalization ability. The quality and availability of sufficient data points for training and validation play a key role in the generalization ability of the network. A potential domain of applications of neural networks is in analysis of subjective data, such as in consumer science, affective neuroscience and perception of chemical senses. In applications of ANN to subjective data, it is common to rely on knowledge of the science and context for data acquisition, for instance as a priori probabilities in the Bayesian framework. In this paper, we discuss the circumstances that create challenges for success of neural network models for subjective data analysis, such as sparseness of data and cost of acquisition of additional samples. In particular, in the case of affect and perception of chemical senses, we suggest that inherent ambiguity of subjective responses could be offset by a combination of human-machine expert. We propose a method of pre- and post-processing for blind analysis of data that that relies on heuristics from human performance in interpretation of data. In particular, we offer an information-theoretic smoothing (ITS) algorithm that optimizes that geometric visualization of multi-dimensional data and improves human interpretation of the input-output view of neural network implementations. The pre- and post-processing algorithms and ITS are unsupervised. Finally, we discuss the details of an example of blind data analysis from actual taste-smell subjective data, and demonstrate the usefulness of PCA in reduction of dimensionality, as well as ITS.

  19. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  20. Application of integrated ozone and granular activated carbon for decolorization and chemical oxygen demand reduction of vinasse from alcohol distilleries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavifar, Mojtaba; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar; Mahdad, Faezeh; Li, Qin; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the treatment of the distilleries vinasse using a hybrid process integrating ozone oxidation and granular activated carbons (GAC) in both batch and continuous operation mode. The batch-process studies have been carried out to optimize initial influent pH, GAC doses, the effect of the ozone (O3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal of the distilleries vinasse. The continuous process was carried out on GAC and ozone treatment alone as well as the hybrid process comb both methods to investigate the synergism effectiveness of the two methods for distilleries vinasse COD reduction and color removal. In a continuous process, the Yan model described the experimental data better than the Thomas model. The efficiency of ozonation of the distilleries vinasse was more effective for color removal (74.4%) than COD removal (25%). O3/H2O2 process was not considerably more effective on COD and color removal. Moreover, O3/GAC process affected negatively on the removal efficiency by reducing COD and color from distilleries vinasse. The negative effect decreased by increasing pH value of the influent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigating the Formation Process of Sn-Based Lead-Free Nanoparticles with a Chemical Reduction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Zhao, B.; Gao, Y.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, B.; Zou, Ch.; Zhai, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y.; Acquah, S.F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles of a promising lead-free solder alloy (Sn 3.5 Ag (wt.%, Sn Ag) and Sn 3.0 Ag 0.5 Cu (wt.%, SAC)) were synthesized through a chemical reduction method by using anhydrous ethanol and 1,10-phenanthroline as the solvent and surfactant, respectively. To illustrate the formation process of Sn-Ag alloy based nanoparticles during the reaction, X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the phases of the samples in relation to the reaction time. Different nucleation and growth mechanisms were compared on the formation process of the synthesized nanoparticles. The XRD results revealed different reaction process compared with other researchers. There were many contributing factors to the difference in the examples found in the literature, with the main focus on the formation mechanism of crystal nuclei, the solubility and ionizability of metal salts in the solvent, the solid solubility of Cu in Ag nuclei, and the role of surfactant on the growth process. This study will help define the parameters necessary for the control of both the composition and size of the nanoparticles

  2. Carbon emissions reduction potential in the US chemicals and pulp and paper industries by applying CHP technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.; Martin, N.; Einstein, D.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical and the pulp/paper industries combined provide 55% of CHP generation in the US industry. Yet, significant potential for new CHP capacities exists in both industries. From the present steam consumption data, the authors estimate about 50 GW of additional technical potential for CHP in both industries. The reduced carbon emissions will be equivalent to 44% of the present carbon emissions in these industries. They find that most of the carbon emissions reductions can be achieved at negative costs. Depending on the assumptions used in calculations, the economic potential of CHP in these industries can be significantly lower, and carbon emissions mitigation costs can be much higher. Using sensitivity analyses, they determine that the largest effect on the CHP estimate have the assumptions in the costs of CHP technology, in the assumed discount rates, in improvements in efficiency of CHP technologies, and in the CHP equipment depreciation periods. Changes in fuel and electricity prices and the growth in the industries' steam demand have less of an effect. They conclude that the lowest carbon mitigation costs are achieved with the CHP facility is operated by the utility and when industrial company that owns the CHP unit can sell extra electricity and steam to the open wholesale market. Based on the results of the analyses they discuss policy implications

  3. The efficacy of chemical sanitizers on the reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli affected by bacterial cell history and water quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banach, J.L.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Zouwen, van der P.S.; Fels, van der Ine; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2017-01-01

    Washing fresh produce with potable water helps to remove microorganisms, providing about a 1- to 2-log reduction, but this process can also pose an opportunity for cross-contamination of bacteria in the washing tank. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three chemical

  4. EDF feedback on recent EPRI SGOG SG chemical cleanings applications for TSP blockage reduction and heat transfer recover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijoux, M.; De Bouvier, O.; Mercier, S.; Pages, D.; Bretelle, J.-L.; Leclercq, P.; Mermillod, A.

    2010-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2008, six Steam Generators Chemical Cleanings (SGCC) with the inhibitor free high temperature process were applied on EDF PWR units. The main goal was to reduce the excessive Tube Support Plate blockages observed on several units of the EDF fleet and the consequences on wide range levels and the risk of tube cracks. The heat transfer recovery was the second objective. Despite the correct results obtained, the corrosion impact of the high temperature process on internal metallic surfaces, higher than expected, and the environmental issues led EDF to move to a new cleaning process. The low temperature process developed by EPRI SGOG and applied for many years was selected for the same purpose. Some qualification laboratory tests were performed by Dominion Engineering Inc (DEI) to demonstrate the innocuousness an the efficiency of the process to achieve these goals. The EPRI SGOG process was then applied seven times by Westinghouse on the EDF units Cruas 3, Cruas 2, Belleville 1, Cattenom 1, Cattenom 3, Chinon B3 and Cattenom 4 between 2008 and 2010. All these units operate from the initial start at low AVT pH 25 o C (9,2) in the secondary circuit. Due to copper presence in the deposits to remove, the cleaning sequence 'Copper - Iron - Copper steps' was performed each time. After a short description of the process, including the specific adaptation in France, lessons learned are reported in this paper in the following areas: process monitoring, corrosion, efficiency, liquid and gaseous wastes, chemical pollution during start-up. Based on the 3 first applications in 2008, some modifications of the process were implemented, particularly for the copper step. For the units cleaned, 1100 to 4500 kg of deposits per SG have been removed, including TS sludge lancing. The reduction of TSP blockages was satisfying. The effect on steam pressure improvement and the wide range level is then discussed. The paper concludes on EDF perspectives for soft

  5. Mechanochemical synthesis of Co and Ni decorated with chemically deposited Pt as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Rojas, E.; Cabañas-Moreno, J.G.; Pérez-Robles, J.F.; Solorza-Feria, O.

    2016-01-01

    High energy milling in combination with galvanic displacement were used for the preparation of bimetallic nanocatalysts. Co and Ni monometallic powders milled for 30 and 20 h, respectively were both produced in air atmosphere and used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) compounds. Nanosized monometallic powders were physically supported on Vulcan carbon, and covered with 20 wt%Pt through a Galvanic Displacement Reaction (GDR) to produce Co-20Pt/C and Ni-20Pt/C electrocatalysts. XRD was used for phase identification on milled powders and for demonstrating structural transformations of Co powders during milling. Results on unmilled metallic Co powder show a predominant HCP structure modifying to a FCC structure after milling. Ni powders maintain their same FCC structure. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectometry (EDX) was used for chemical composition analysis on milled powders at several milling times. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) show the formation of heterogeneous particle with ∼10 nm in size for both electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and steady state Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO_4. The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the cathodic reaction. - Highlights: • Monometallic powders of Co, and Ni were used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) electrocatalysts. • Nanosized monometallic powders were decorated with Pt by a Galvanic Displacement Reaction. • The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the ORR reaction.

  6. Mechanochemical synthesis of Co and Ni decorated with chemically deposited Pt as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Rojas, E.; Cabañas-Moreno, J.G. [Programa de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Pérez-Robles, J.F. [Programa de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales, CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000 Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, 76230, Queretaro (Mexico); Solorza-Feria, O., E-mail: osolorza@cinvestav.mx [Programa de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Depto. Química, CINVESTAV-IPN, 07360, México City (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    High energy milling in combination with galvanic displacement were used for the preparation of bimetallic nanocatalysts. Co and Ni monometallic powders milled for 30 and 20 h, respectively were both produced in air atmosphere and used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) compounds. Nanosized monometallic powders were physically supported on Vulcan carbon, and covered with 20 wt%Pt through a Galvanic Displacement Reaction (GDR) to produce Co-20Pt/C and Ni-20Pt/C electrocatalysts. XRD was used for phase identification on milled powders and for demonstrating structural transformations of Co powders during milling. Results on unmilled metallic Co powder show a predominant HCP structure modifying to a FCC structure after milling. Ni powders maintain their same FCC structure. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectometry (EDX) was used for chemical composition analysis on milled powders at several milling times. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) show the formation of heterogeneous particle with ∼10 nm in size for both electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and steady state Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4}. The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the cathodic reaction. - Highlights: • Monometallic powders of Co, and Ni were used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) electrocatalysts. • Nanosized monometallic powders were decorated with Pt by a Galvanic Displacement Reaction. • The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the ORR reaction.

  7. Science under Siege (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagosian, R. B.; Wheeler, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Our planet has changed significantly over the past few decades - physically, chemically, and biologically. The political landscape has also transformed - almost as dramatically - over this same time period. Although recently, it seems that legislative action has slowed to a geological pace. Recent tragedies stemming from natural disasters (tsunamis, oil spills, hurricanes, tornadoes, etc.) have raised the public's awareness of their tenuous relationship with nature. However, the political debate over climate change has raised questions about the integrity of the scientific endeavor and lowered the public's perception of research and trust in scientists. This politicization of science is particularly unfortunate at a time when science is needed to address the threats from rising seas, acidified waters, and intensified storms. The scientific process relies on critical analysis from colleagues, which ensures that theories are well founded, research can be replicated, and the entire process is overseen by scientific peers. It is much easier to disprove something than to definitively prove just about anything. Unfortunately, this truth has been exploited for political purposes. Policy decisions need to be informed by science and not the reverse. However, increasingly when science does not support a policy maker's agenda, they tend to impugn the scientist, the funding agency or even the peer-review system. This is new and hostile territory for science, and we must find a way to rise above the political fray. To do so, we need to improve how and when we communicate information to the public, to whom policy makers are accountable. We need to find new, clearer, and better methods to convey uncertainty and risk in terms meaningful to the public and policy makers. And finally, we need to defend the academic peer review process, which is the gold standard and envy of the world. During these times of fiscal constraints, the scientific community needs to explore new models for

  8. Invitational Education: Theory, Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Invitational Theory argues that learning is enhanced when learners are positively encouraged or "invited" into the educational experience. Arising from perceptual and self-concept theory, Invitational Pedagogy is constructed on four principles: respect for people, trust, optimism and intentionality, and upon five pillars: people, places, policies,…

  9. Detection and reduction of diffuse liquid and gas emissions in chemical and petrochemical industries; Ermittlung und Verminderung diffuser fluessiger und gasfoermiger Emissionen in der chemischen und petrochemischen Industrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeppke, K.E. [Witten-Herdecke Univ. gGmbH, Witten (Germany). Inst. fuer Umwelttechnik und Management; Cuhls, C. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Inst. fuer Umwelttechnik

    2002-09-01

    In order to improve environmental protection, VOC emissions from diffuse sources are of growing importance. For the first time in Germany the present research report gives a detailed presentation of: constructive measures for the avoidance and reduction of diffuse emissions, adequate assembling procedures for equipments and installations, technical possibilities of leak detection and, different methods for the estimation of total emissions from chemical and petrochemical production plants. On the basis of own investigations and monitoring measures taken at various plants of chemical and petrochemical industries different measuring techniques for leak detection as well as methods for the estimation of total emissions from diffuse sources are analysed and their limits are described. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic for Mathematics Model Reduction of Cadmium Reaction Rate, Constant and Reaction Orde in to Electrochemical Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was reduction of cadmium rate with electrochemical influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. The aim of the experiment was to know the influence, mathematic model reduction of cadmium the reaction rate, reaction rate constant and reaction orde influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. Result of research indicate the time processing if using plate of copper electrode is during 30 minutes and using plate of aluminium electrode is during 20 minutes. Condition of strong current that used in process of electrochemical is only 0.8 ampere and concentration effective is 5.23 mg/l. The most effective type Al of electrode plate for reduction from waste and the efficiency of reduction is 98 %. (author)

  11. Influence of Chemical and Physical Properties of Activated Carbon Powders on Oxygen Reduction and Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders made from different precursor materials (coal, peat, coconut shell, hardwood, and phenolic resin) were electrochemically evaluated as oxygen reduction catalysts and tested as cathode catalysts

  12. THE SECOND GENERATION OF THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    chemical process designers using simulation software generate alternative designs for one process. One criterion for evaluating these designs is their potential for adverse environmental impacts due to waste generated, energy consumed, and possibilities for fugitive emissions. Co...

  13. Inviting In the Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    private sector . After all, corruption does not just involve government. Business people and lawyers and citizens pay the bribes, even as they condemn bribery. They should be invited to become part of the solution. But how? The first point to note is that business people and citizens know where corruption exists and how corrupt systems work. Citizens understand how bribery shapes the services they receive or don’t receive. Accountants know the illicit games played with audits and taxes. Lawyers understand corrupt legal practices. Business people know all about corrupt

  14. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W.; Chiang, P.N.; Liu, J.C.; Kuan, W.H.; Huang, J.H.; Hung, J.T.; Tzou, Y.M.; Chen, C.C.; Wang, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Low molecular weights (M w ) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. ► The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). ► Low M w of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. ► Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M w of HA. ► Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M w ): >100, 50–100, 10–50 and w HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M w of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H 2 O 2 through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  15. Unlocking the Electrocatalytic Activity of Chemically Inert Amorphous Carbon-Nitrogen for Oxygen Reduction: Discerning and Refactoring Chaotic Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Caihong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Mild annealing enables inactive nitrogen (N)-doped amorphous carbon (a-C) films abundant with chaotic bonds prepared by magnetron sputtering to become effective for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by virtue of generating pyridinic N. The rhythmic variation of ORR activity elaborates well...... on the subtle evolution of the amorphous C−N bonds conferred by spectroscopic analysis....

  16. Structure-activity relations for Ni-containing zeolites during NO reduction. II. Role of the chemical state of Ni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosqueda Jimenez, B.I.; Jentys, A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lercher, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the metal in Ni-containing zeolites used as catalysts for the reduction of NO with propane and propene was studied. In the fresh catalysts, Ni is located in ion exchange positions for Ni/MOR, Ni/ZSM-5, and Ni/MCM-22. The formation of carbonaceous deposits, the removal of Al from

  17. Three-dimensional assemblies of graphene prepared by a novel chemical reduction-induced self-assembly method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin; Chen, Guoying; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Zhang, Hongnan; Wang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) graphene assemblies are prepared from graphene oxide (GO) by a facile in situ reduction-assembly method, using a novel, low-cost, and environment-friendly reducing medium which is a combination of oxalic acid

  18. Functional Fixedness and Functional Reduction as Common Sense Reasonings in Chemical Equilibrium and in Geometry and Polarity of Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furio, C.; Calatayud, M. L.; Barcenas, S. L.; Padilla, O. M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on learning difficulties in procedural knowledge, and assesses the procedural difficulties of grade 12 and first- and third-year university students based on common sense reasoning in two areas of chemistry--chemical equilibrium and geometry, and polarity of molecules. (Contains 55 references.) (Author/YDS)

  19. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, P.N. [The Experimental Forest, National Taiwan University, Nantou, 55743 Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, J.C. [Agricultural Research Institute No. 189, Jhongjheng Rd., Wufong, Taichung County, 41301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuan, W.H. [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei, 24301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, J.H. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Hung, J.T. [Department of Horticulture, National Taitung Junior College, Taitung, 95045 Taiwan, ROC (China); Tzou, Y.M., E-mail: ymtzou@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.C. [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 116 Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, M.K. [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low molecular weights (M{sub w}) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low M{sub w} of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M{sub w} of HA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M{sub w}): >100, 50-100, 10-50 and <10 kDa. Each HA fraction was characterized by spectroscopic analyses followed by examining Cr(VI) removal on each fraction of HA at pH 1-5. Spectroscopic results indicated that low-M{sub w} HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M{sub w} of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  20. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  1. An invitation to critical mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsmose, Ole

    An Invitation to Critical Mathematics Education deals with a range of crucial topics. Among these are students’ foreground, landscapes of investigation, and mathematics in action. The book is intended for a broad audience: educators, students, teachers, policy makers, anybody interested...... in the further development of mathematics education. The book discusses concerns and preoccupation. This way it provides an invitation into critical mathematics education....

  2. Durability of the earth mortar: Physico-chemical and mineralogical characterization for the reduction of the capillary rise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammari A.

    2018-01-01

    the standards in force, allows strong results of strength and durability. The chemical and mineralogical elements play an important role, in the presence of an 'optimum' cement dosage, to strengthen the ties between the clays and the grains of the earth.. This approach targets the search for better performances in the use of natural materials resource in an eco-responsible habitat. This study presents the experimental results of the four techniques of mineralogical and chemical analysis on mortar specimens obtained from earth of the city of Fez. The results of the uni-axial compressive tests of the cylindrical specimens for this earth, associated by various percentages 0%, 4%, 7% and 10% by weight of cement, make it possible to analyze the effect of the mineralogical and chemical elements on the mechanical properties, namely Young's modulus, compressive strength and limiting deformation. However, we determine the water absorption coefficient of the mortar for different cement dosages in order to optimize the durability of the mortar against bad weather, rain and / or very wet climates. In the earth mortar of Fez, the strong presence of calcite (CaCO3, quartz SiO2 and dolomite CaMg (CO32 amplifies the improvement of the behavior of the material by the addition of cement. In fact, this strong presence of calcite stabilized the clay by cementing quartz and the cement matrix to strengthen the ties between the grains of the earth. In addition, with respect to the capillary rise, the water absorption decreases with the addition of cement. We also note that the evolution of the mechanical properties is of no importance except in the interval [4 to 7%] which represents the zone of effect for cement stabilization and which houses the optimum technicoeconomic cement dosing.

  3. Three-dimensional assemblies of graphene prepared by a novel chemical reduction-induced self-assembly method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) graphene assemblies are prepared from graphene oxide (GO) by a facile in situ reduction-assembly method, using a novel, low-cost, and environment-friendly reducing medium which is a combination of oxalic acid (OA) and sodium iodide (NaI). It is demonstrated that the combination of a reducing acid, OA, and NaI is indispensable for effective reduction of GO in the current study and this unique combination (1) allows for tunable control over the volume of the thus-prepared graphene assemblies and (2) enables 3D graphene assemblies to be prepared from the GO suspension with a wide range of concentrations (0.1 to 4.5 mg mL-1). To the best of our knowledge, the GO concentration of 0.1 mg mL-1 is the lowest GO concentration ever reported for preparation of 3D graphene assemblies. The thus-prepared 3D graphene assemblies exhibit low density, highly porous structures, and electrically conducting properties. As a proof of concept, we show that by infiltrating a responsive polymer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into the as-resulted 3D conducting network of graphene, a conducting composite is obtained, which can be used as a sensing device for differentiating organic solvents with different polarity. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Alternative substrates of bacterial sulphate reduction suitable for the biological-chemical treatment of acid mine drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Luptakova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of AMD pollution on biological systems are mostly severe and the problem may persist from many decadesto thousands of years. Consequently AMD prior to being released into the environment must be treated to meet government standardsfor the amount of metal and non-metal ions contained in the water. One of the best available technologies for the removal of metals fromAMD is precipitation as metal sulphides. SRB applications for AMD treatment involve a few principal stages. The first stageis the cultivation of SRB i.e. the bacterial sulphate reduction. At the laboratory conditions the sodium lactate is the energetic substratefor the growth of bacteria. Its price is not economic for the application in the practice and is needed investigate the alternativesubstitutes. The aim of this work was the cultivation of SRB using the selected energetic substrates such as: calcium lactate, ethanol,saccharose, glucose and whey. Experimental studies confirm that in the regard to the amount of reduced sulphates the calcium lactateand ethanol are the best alternative substrates for the bacterial sulphate-reduction.

  5. Martian Chemical and Isotopic Reference Standards in Earth-based Laboratories — An Invitation for Geochemical, Astrobiological, and Engineering Dialog on Considering a Weathered Chondrite for Mars Sample Return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, J. W.; Tait, A. W.; Velbel, M. A.; Boston, P. J.; Carrier, B. L.; Cohen, B. A.; Schröder, C.; Bland, P.

    2017-12-01

    Exogenic rocks (meteorites) found on Mars 1) have unweathered counterparts on Earth; 2) weather differently than indigenous rocks; and 3) may be ideal habitats for putative microorganisms and subsequent biosignature preservation. These attributes show the potential of meteorites for addressing hypothesis-driven science. They raise the question of whether chondritic meteorites, of sufficient weathering intensity, might be considered as candidates for sample return in a potential future mission. Pursuant to this discussion are the following questions. A) Is there anything to be learned from the laboratory study of a martian chondrite that cannot be learned from indigenous materials; and if so, B) is the science value high enough to justify recovery? If both A and B answer affirmatively, then C) what are the engineering constraints for sample collection for Mars 2020 and potential follow-on missions; and finally D) what is the likelihood of finding a favorable sample? Observations relevant to these questions include: i) Since 2005, 24 candidate and confirmed meteorites have been identified on Mars at three rover landing sites, demonstrating their ubiquity and setting expectations for future finds. All have been heavily altered by a variety of physical and chemical processes. While the majority of these are irons (not suitable for recovery), several are weathered stony meteorites. ii) Exogenic reference materials provide the only chemical/isotope standards on Mars, permitting quantification of alteration rates if residence ages can be attained; and possibly enabling the removal of Late Amazonian weathering overprints from other returned samples. iii) Recent studies have established the habitability of chondritic meteorites with terrestrial microorganisms, recommending their consideration when exploring astrobiological questions. High reactivity, organic content, and permeability show stony meteorites to be more attractive for colonization and subsequent biosignature

  6. Flexible graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid papers chemical-reduction-tailored by gallic acid for high-performance electrochemical capacitive energy storages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Zhou, Chao; Hu, Nantao; Hu, Jing; Hong, Min; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Yafei

    2018-03-01

    Mechanically robust graphene papers with both high gravimetric and volumetric capacitances are desired for high-performance energy storages. However, it's still a challenge to tailor the structure of graphene papers in order to meet this requirement. In this work, a kind of chemical-reduction-tailored mechanically-robust reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrid paper has been reported for high-performance electrochemical capacitive energy storages. Gallic acid (GA), as an excellent reducing agent, was used to reduce graphene oxide. Through vacuum filtration of gallic acid reduced graphene oxide (GA-rGO) and carboxylic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) aqueous suspensions, mechanically robust GA-rGO/MWCNTs hybrid papers were obtained. The resultant hybrid papers showed high gravimetric capacitance of 337.6 F g-1 (0.5 A g-1) and volumetric capacitance of 151.2 F cm-3 (0.25 A cm-3). In addition, the assembled symmetric device based on the hybrid papers exhibited high gravimetric capacitance of 291.6 F g-1 (0.5 A g-1) and volumetric capacitance of 136.6 F cm-3 (0.25 A cm-3). Meanwhile, it exhibited excellent rate capability and cycling stability. Above all, this chemical reduction tailoring technique and the resultant high-performance GA-rGO/MWCNTs hybrid papers give an insight for designing high-performance electrodes and hold a great potential in the field of energy storages.

  7. Photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 into chemicals using Pt-modified reduced graphene oxide combined with Pt-modified TiO2 nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Meng; Wu, Gai; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2014-06-17

    The photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) reduction of CO2 into high-value chemicals is beneficial in alleviating global warming and advancing a low-carbon economy. In this work, Pt-modified reduced graphene oxide (Pt-RGO) and Pt-modified TiO2 nanotubes (Pt-TNT) were combined as cathode and photoanode catalysts, respectively, to form a PEC reactor for converting CO2 into valuable chemicals. XRD, XPS, TEM, AFM, and SEM were employed to characterize the microstructures of the Pt-RGO and Pt-TNT catalysts. Reduction products, such as C2H5OH and CH3COOH, were obtained from CO2 under band gap illumination and biased voltage. A combined liquid product generation rate (CH3OH, C2H5OH, HCOOH, and CH3COOH) of approximately 600 nmol/(h·cm(2)) was observed. Carbon atom conversion rate reached 1,130 nmol/(h·cm(2)), which were much higher than those achieved using Pt-modified carbon nanotubes and platinum carbon as cathode catalysts.

  8. Functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with iron phthalocyanine via a liquid chemical reaction for oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaomei; Xu, Xiao; Liu, Qin; Guo, Jia; Kang, Longtian; Yao, Jiannian

    2018-06-01

    Iron single-atom catalyst in form of iron-nitrogen-carbon structure possesses the excellent catalytic activity in various chemical reactions. However, exploring a sustainable and stable single-atom metal catalyst still faces a great challenge due to low yield and complicated synthesis. Here, we report a functional multi-wall carbon nanotubes modified with iron phthalocyanine molecules via a liquid chemical reaction and realize the performance of similar single-atom catalysis for oxygen reduction reaction. A serial of characterizations strongly imply the structure change of iron phthalocyanine molecule and its close recombination with multi-wall carbon nanotubes, which are in favor of ORR catalysis. Compared to commercial platinum-carbon catalyst, composites exhibit superior activity for oxygen reduction reaction with higher half-wave potential (0.86 V), lower Tafel slope (38 mV dec-1), higher limiting current density and excellent electrochemical stability. The corresponding Zinc-air battery also presents higher maximum power density and discharge stability. Therefore, these findings provide a facile route to synthesize a highly efficient non-precious metal carbon-based catalyst.

  9. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, Basudev, E-mail: swain@iae.re.kr [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Mishra, Chinmayee [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hyun Seon [Sungshin University, Dept. of Interdisciplinary ECO Science, Seoul, 142-732 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Soo [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11 kg/m{sup 3} of copper and 1.35 kg/m{sup 3} of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100–500 nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. - Highlights: • From the Indium-Tin-Oxide etching

  10. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11 kg/m 3 of copper and 1.35 kg/m 3 of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100–500 nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. - Highlights: • From the Indium-Tin-Oxide etching wastewater

  11. Influence of hydrogen reduction on photoelectro-chemical behavior of anodic oxidized n-TiO2 layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartig, K J; Getoff, N

    1983-07-01

    The behavior of polycrystalline n-TiO2 photoanodes produced by anodic oxidation of Ti metal foils and subsequently reduced in hydrogen atmosphere at various temperatures and different times was investigated. The employed methods for their characterization were: scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thickness determination, open-circuit voltage and capacitance/voltage studies as well as photoelectrochemical measurements. The reduction process results in an increase of oxygen deficiencies and a decrease of the amount of recombination centers and of grain-boundary energy barriers between the crystallites. All these parameters lead to a significant increase of the photoefficiency. The best photoanodes were obtained when the anodically oxidized samples were reduced under hydrogen at 800-850 C for 15 min (conversion of anatase to rutile crystal structures). 17 references.

  12. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  13. Preparation of a Carbon-Based Solid Acid Catalyst by Sulfonating Activated Carbon in a Chemical Reduction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonated (SO3H-bearing activated carbon (AC-SO3H was synthesized by an aryl diazonium salt reduction process. The obtained material had a SO3H density of 0.64 mmol·g-1 and a specific surface area of 602 m2·g-1. The catalytic properties of AC-SO3H were compared with that of two commercial solid acid catalysts, Nafion NR50 and Amberlyst-15. In a 10-h esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol, the acid conversion with AC-SO3H (78% was lower than that of Amberlyst-15 (86%, which could be attributed to the fact that the SO3H density of the sulfonated carbon was lower than that of Amberlyst-15 (4.60 mmol·g-1. However, AC-SO3H exhibited comparable and even much higher catalytic activities than the commercial catalysts in the esterification of aliphatic acids with longer carbon chains such as hexanoic acid and decanoic acid, which may be due to the large specific surface area and mesoporous structures of the activated carbon. The disadvantage of AC-SO3H is the leaching of SO3H group during the reactions.

  14. Chemical exposure reduction: Factors impacting on South African herbicide sprayers' personal protective equipment compliance and high risk work practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Rivas, Federico; Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The high exposure risks of workers to herbicides in low- and middle-income countries is an important public health concern because of the potential resulting negative impacts on workers' health. This study investigated workers' personal protective equipment (PPE) compliance as a risk mitigation measure; particularly workers who apply herbicides for Working for Water (WfW) - a South African invasive alien vegetation control programme. The study aim was to understand workers' low PPE compliance by analysing their risk perceptions of herbicide use, working conditions and socio-cultural context. Research methods included ethnographic observations, informal interviews, visual media, questionnaires and a focus group. Study results indicated that low PPE compliance persists despite workers' awareness of herbicide exposure risks and as a result of the influence from workers' socio-cultural context (i.e. gender dynamics and social status), herbicide risk perceptions and working conditions (i.e. environmental and logistical). Interestingly, teams comprised of mostly women had the highest compliance rate. These findings highlighted that given the complexity of PPE compliance, especially in countries with several economic and social constraints, exposure reduction interventions should not rely solely on PPE use promotion. Instead, other control strategies requiring less worker input for effectiveness should be implemented, such as elimination and substitution of highly hazardous pesticides, and altering application methods. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of the reduction methods used to develop chemical schemes: building of a new chemical scheme for VOC oxidation suited to three-dimensional multiscale HOx-NOx-VOC chemistry simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szopa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop and assess an automatic procedure to generate reduced chemical schemes for the atmospheric photooxidation of volatile organic carbon (VOC compounds. The procedure is based on (i the development of a tool for writing the fully explicit schemes for VOC oxidation (see companion paper Aumont et al., 2005, (ii the application of several commonly used reduction methods to the fully explicit scheme, and (iii the assessment of resulting errors based on direct comparison between the reduced and full schemes. The reference scheme included seventy emitted VOCs chosen to be representative of both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and their atmospheric degradation chemistry required more than two million reactions among 350000 species. Three methods were applied to reduce the size of the reference chemical scheme: (i use of operators, based on the redundancy of the reaction sequences involved in the VOC oxidation, (ii grouping of primary species having similar reactivities into surrogate species and (iii grouping of some secondary products into surrogate species. The number of species in the final reduced scheme is 147, this being small enough for practical inclusion in current three-dimensional models. Comparisons between the fully explicit and reduced schemes, carried out with a box model for several typical tropospheric conditions, showed that the reduced chemical scheme accurately predicts ozone concentrations and some other aspects of oxidant chemistry for both polluted and clean tropospheric conditions.

  16. Eliciting Information on Sensitive Matters Without Inviting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eliciting Information on Sensitive Matters. Without Inviting Respondents' ... methods based on Randomized Response tech- niques. ... while collecting data on some sensitive issues are well ..... Suppose there is an association of professionals.

  17. Chemical stability of conductive ceramic anodes in LiCl–Li{sub 2}O molten salt for electrolytic reduction in pyroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Min Ku; Lee, Sang Kwon; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Woo Shin; Hong, Sun Seok; Oh, Seung Chul; Hur, Jin Mok [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Conductive ceramics are being developed to replace current Pt anodes in the electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuels in pyroprocessing. While several conductive ceramics have shown promising electrochemical properties in small-scale experiments, their long-term stabilities have not yet been investigated. In this study, the chemical stability of conductive La{sub 0.33}Sr{sub 0.67}MnO{sub 3} in LiCl–Li{sub 2}O molten salt at 650°C was investigated to examine its feasibility as an anode material. Dissolution of Sr at the anode surface led to structural collapse, thereby indicating that the lifetime of the La{sub 0.33}Sr{sub 0.67}MnO{sub 3} anode is limited. The dissolution rate of Sr is likely to be influenced by the local environment around Sr in the perovskite framework.

  18. Design and Synthesis of novel CuxGeOy/Cu/C nanowires by in situ chemical reduction process with highly reversible capacity for Lithium Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Peng, Xia; Tang, Kaibin

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and use of ternary metal oxides/metal particles/carbon hybrids, especially 1D naowires composed of MGeO 3 /M/C hybrids for energy storage, remains very few reports. In this work, 1D Cu x GeO y /Cu/C NWs (x < 1, y < 3) were successfully prepared by a simple method involving chemical reduction process and simultaneous carbon coating. It was found that through the polydopamine(PDA)-assisted chemical reduction process performed on the CuGeO 3 NWs, the phase partially transformed to a mixture of crystalline Cu (∼70 nm) and amorphous Cu x GeO y NWs with carbon coating, but the nanowire-shaped morphology was maintained. Electrochemical measurements showed that the Cu x GeO y /Cu/C NWs exhibited a stable reversible capacity of ∼900 mA h g −1 after 100 cycles. Even at 800 mA g −1 , it also exhibited excellent high rate capacity of 350 mA h g −1 . The newly generated Cu x GeO y @Cu@CNWs exhibit enhanced cycle stability with high lithium-storage capability compared to that of the as-preparedCuGeO 3 NWs. (*) The in situ-synthesized Cu nanoparticles, amorphous state and carbon coating might play an important role in activating and enhancing the reversibility of the conversion reaction of Cu x GeO y . In addition, this effective synthetic method might provide the methodology for the development of other ternary metal oxides/metal particles/carbon hybrids materials for energy storage.

  19. Gradual growth of gold nanoseeds on silica for SiO2-gold homogeneous nano core/shell applications by the chemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezvani Nikabadi, H; Shahtahmasebi, N; Rezaee Rokn-Abadi, M; Bagheri Mohagheghi, M M; Goharshadi, E K

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a facile method for the synthesis of gold nanoseeds on the functionalized surface of silica nanoparticles has been investigated. Mono-dispersed silica particles and gold nanoparticles were prepared by the chemical reduction method. The thickness of the Au shell was well controlled by repeating the reduction time of HAuCl 4 on silica/3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)/initial gold nanoparticles. The prepared SiO 2 -gold core/shell nanoparticles were studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The TEM images indicated that the silica nanoparticles were spherical in shape with 100 nm diameters and functionalizing silica nanoparticles with a layer of bi-functional APTES molecules and tetrakis hydroxy methyl phosphonium chloride. The gold nanoparticles show a narrow size of up to 5 nm and by growing gold nanoseeds over the silica cores a red shift in the maximum absorbance of UV-Vis spectroscopy from 524 to 637 nm was observed.

  20. Kinetics of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by methane (CH{sub 4}) during chemical looping combustion: A global mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Carpenter, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as a promising technology for fossil fuel combustion which produces a sequestration ready concentrated CO{sub 2} stream in power production. A CLC system is composed with two reactors, an air and a fuel reactor. An oxygen carrier such as hematite (94%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) circulates between the reactors, which transfers the oxygen necessary for the fuel combustion from the air to the fuel. An important issue for the CLC process is the selection of metal oxide as oxygen carrier, since it must retain its reactivity through many cycles. The primary objective of this work is to develop a global mechanism with respective kinetics rate parameters such that CFD simulations can be performed for large systems. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in a continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (15, 20, and 35%) was conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825{degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at the early stage of reaction and H{sub 2} and CO at the final stage of reactions. A kinetic model based on two parallel reactions, 1) first-order irreversible rate kinetics and 2) Avrami equation describing nucleation and growth processes, was applied to the reduction data. It was found, that the reaction rates for both reactions increase with, both, temperature and the methane concentration in inlet gas.

  1. 11 CFR 100.137 - Invitations, food, and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Invitations, food, and beverages. 100.137...) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.137 Invitations, food, and beverages. The cost of invitations, food, and... invitations, food and beverages provided by the individual on behalf of the candidate does not exceed $1,000...

  2. 11 CFR 100.77 - Invitations, food, and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Invitations, food, and beverages. 100.77...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.77 Invitations, food, and beverages. The cost of invitations, food and... invitations, food and beverages provided by the individual on behalf of the candidate does not exceed $1,000...

  3. Evidence of chemical stimulation of hepatic metabolism by an experimental acetanilide (FOE 5043) indirectly mediating reductions in circulating thyroid hormone levels in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, W R; Becker, B D; Wahle, B S; Moore, K D; Dass, P D; Lake, S G; Van Goethem, D L; Stuart, B P; Sangha, G K; Thyssen, J H

    1996-02-01

    N-(4-Fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl]oxy]acetamide (FOE 5043) is a new acetanilide-type herbicide undergoing regulatory testing. Previous work in this laboratory suggested that FOE 5043-induced reductions in serum thyroxine (T4) levels were mediated via an extrathyroidal site of action. The possibility that the alterations in circulating T4 levels were due to chemical induction of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism was investigated. Treatment with FOE 5043 at a rate of 1000 ppm as a dietary admixture was found to significantly increase the clearance of [125I]T4 from the serum, suggesting an enhanced excretion of the hormone. In the liver, the activity of hepatic uridine glucuronosyl transferase, a major pathway of thyroid hormone biotransformation in the rat, increased in a statistically significant and dose-dependent manner; conversely, hepatic 5'-monodeiodinase activity trended downward with dose. Bile flow as well as the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of [125I]T4 were increased following exposure to FOE 5043. Thyroidal function, as measured by the discharge of iodide ion in response to perchlorate, and pituitary function, as measured by the capacity of the pituitary to secrete thyrotropin in response to an exogenous challenge by hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone, were both unchanged from the controlled response. These data suggest that the functional status of the thyroid and pituitary glands has not been altered by treatment with FOE 5043 and that reductions in circulating levels of T4 are being mediated indirectly through an increase in the biotransformation and excretion of thyroid hormone in the liver.

  4. Oxidation and Reduction of Iron-Titanium Oxides in Chemical Looping Combustion: A Phase-Chemical Description Oxydation et réduction des minerais de fer-titane dans la combustion en boucle chimique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Hoed P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ilmenite (FeTiO3 is being explored as an oxygen carrier in chemical looping processes. Its reduction and oxidation are described by the system Fe-Fe2O3-TiO2-Ti2O3. The phase diagram at 1 000°C, presented here, offers a useful tool for predicting reactions and their products. We see that Fe2TiO5 (pseudobrookite and TiO2 (rutile form a stable phase assemblage following the oxidation of FeTiO3 (ilmenite in air. The subsequent reduction of Fe2TiO5 at oxygen partial pressures of 10-15.5atm stabilizes Fe1.02Ti0.98O3, a solid solution of ilmenite. Further reduction will produce metallic iron, which compromises the integrity of the oxygen carrier for chemical looping processes. We speculate that the reduction of Fe-Ti oxides in several practical instances does not reach completion (and equilibrium under the imposed atmospheres operating in fuel reactors. L’ilménite (FeTiO3 est considéré comme un transporteur d’oxygène potentiel pour les procédés en boucle chimique. Ses mécanismes de réduction et d’oxydation sont décrits à travers le système Fe-Fe2O3-TiO2-TiO3. Le diagramme de phase à 1 000°C, présenté ici, est un outil utile pour prédire les réactions et les produits. Nous constatons que Fe2TiO5 (pseudobrookite et TiO2 (rutile forment un assemblage de phase stable après oxydation de l’ilménite (FeTiO3 dans l’air. La réduction subséquente de Fe2TiO5 à la pression partielle de 10−15,5atm stabilise vers Fe1.02Ti0.98O3, une solution solide d’ilménite. Une réduction plus poussée va produire du fer métallique et compromettre l’intégrité du transporteur d’oxygène dans la boucle chimique. Il est probable que la réduction des oxydes Fe-Ti ne soit pas, en pratique, complète et n’atteigne pas l’équilibre dans les conditions rencontrées en opération dans les réacteurs de réduction.

  5. Characterization and study of reduction and sulfurization processing in phase transition from molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2}) to molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) chalcogenide semiconductor nanoparticles prepared by one-stage chemical reduction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomalian, K.; Bagheri-Mohagheghi, M.M.; Ardyanian, M. [Damghan University, School of Physics, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    In this research, molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction method using MoO{sub 3} and thiourea as a precursor. The physical properties of the synthesized MoO{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles annealed at different temperatures of 200, 300, 750 C have been investigated, before and after exposure to sulfur vapor. The nanostructure of nanoparticles has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) analyses and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of MoS{sub 2} single phase at annealing temperature of 750 C in the presence of sulfur vapor. The Raman spectrum of the nanoparticles revealed that the formation of MoS{sub 2} at 750 C after annealing in sulfur vapor. The values of band gap were obtained in the range of 3.64-3.17 eV and 3.47-1.95 eV for MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles before and after exposure to sulfur vapor, respectively. According to SEM images, the grain size decreases with increasing annealing temperature up to 750 C. Also, nanoplate-nanoparticles of MoS{sub 2} are formed at annealing temperature of 200-750 C. The TEM images of MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles at T{sub a} = 750 C confirm that the nanoparticles have a homogeneous distribution with a hexagonal structure. The FTIR spectra of the MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles showed the peaks at about 467 cm {sup -1} belong to the characteristic bands of Mo-S. (orig.)

  6. Two dechlorinated chlordecone derivatives formed by in situ chemical reduction are devoid of genotoxicity and mutagenicity and have lower proangiogenic properties compared to the parent compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeay, Samuel; Billat, Pierre-André; Clere, Nicolas; Nesslany, Fabrice; Bristeau, Sébastien; Faure, Sébastien; Mouvet, Christophe

    2018-05-01

    Chlordecone (CLD) is a chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide, now classified as a persistent organic pollutant. Several studies have previously reported that chronic exposure to CLD leads to hepatotoxicity, neurotoxicity, raises early child development and pregnancy complications, and increases the risk of liver and prostate cancer. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) has been identified as a possible way for the remediation of soils contaminated by CLD. In the present study, the objectives were (i) to evaluate the genotoxicity and the mutagenicity of two CLD metabolites formed by ISCR, CLD-5a-hydro, or CLD-5-hydro (5a- or 5- according to CAS nomenclature; CLD-1Cl) and tri-hydroCLD (CLD-3Cl), and (ii) to explore the angiogenic properties of these molecules. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity were investigated using the Ames's technique on Salmonella typhimurium and the in vitro micronucleus micromethod with TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells. The proangiogenic properties were evaluated on the in vitro capillary network formation of human primary endothelial cells. Like CLD, the dechlorinated derivatives of CLD studied were devoid of genotoxic and mutagenic activity. In the assay targeting angiogenic properties, significantly lower microvessel lengths formed by endothelial cells were observed for the CLD-3Cl-treated cells compared to the CLD-treated cells for two of the three tested concentrations. These results suggest that dechlorinated CLD derivatives are devoid of mutagenicity and genotoxicity and have lower proangiogenic properties than CLD.

  7. Chemical Safety – Introduction

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    A course of "Chemical Safety – Introduction" will be held in English on 29 May 2009, 9:30-12:00. There are some places left. If you are interested in participating, please register on the Training Catalogue. You will then receive an invitation by email.

  8. COUNTER-INTERVENTION, INVITATION, BOTH, OR NEITHER ?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    2 See Testimony by David H. Shinn, Somalia: U.S. Govrenemnt Policy and Challenges, ... a state of relative peace—one that can be best described as cold peace. ... denied sending its troops to Somalia until it formally declared war on 24 ...... Lebanese government, the invitation of the USSR by the dubious government of.

  9. Quantum theory without reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cini, Marcello; Levy-Leblond, J.-M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantum theory offers a strange, and perhaps unique, case in the history of science. Although research into its roots has provided important results in recent years, the debate goes on. Some theorists argue that quantum theory is weakened by the inclusion of the so called 'reduction of the state vector' in its foundations. Quantum Theory without Reduction presents arguments in favour of quantum theory as a consistent and complete theory without this reduction, and which is capable of explaining all known features of the measurement problem. This collection of invited contributions defines and explores different aspects of this issue, bringing an old debate into a new perspective, and leading to a more satisfying consensus about quantum theory. (author)

  10. Challenge, Confrontation, and Exhortation as Intentional Invitations by Professional Helpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Examines intentional invitations that challenge, confront, exhort, and persuade people to change their behaviors. Assumes that the sender controls the "intention" and that the receiver determines the degree of "inviting." Suggests that elements of the invitational model serve as a framework to create acceptable inducements in…

  11. Berger Peter L., Invitation à la sociologie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Marquis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available L’invitation à la sociologie de Peter Berger est la réédition d’un ouvrage initiale­ment paru en 1963. Né en 1929, P. Berger est un des grands noms de la sociologie amé­ricaine actuelle, notamment connu chez nous pour un ouvrage coécrit avec Th. Luck­­mann et paru trois ans après la première édition de Invitation à la sociologie : The Social Construction of Reality, qui constitue une étape importante dans l’approche dite du constructivisme social en réactivant la tradition phénoménologique en...

  12. Invited presentations. College on soil physics 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriels, D.M.; Ghirardi, G.; Nielsen, D.R.; Pla Sentis, I.; Skidmore, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    The present book is a partial compilation of contributions from selected former participants of the College on Soil Physics invited to make presentations related to their achievements as a result of attending the College. It also serves as a testimony of the existing links between soil physicists throughout the world strengthened by the support and programs of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics originally envisioned by Abdus Salam to foster the growth of advanced studies and physics research in developing countries

  13. Invited presentations. College on soil physics 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriels, D M [Univ. Ghent (Belgium); Ghirardi, G [Univ. Trieste (Italy); Nielsen, D R [Univ. California (United States); Pla Sentis, I [Univ. Lleida (Spain); Skidmore, E L [Kansas State Univ. (United States)

    2004-05-15

    The present book is a partial compilation of contributions from selected former participants of the College on Soil Physics invited to make presentations related to their achievements as a result of attending the College. It also serves as a testimony of the existing links between soil physicists throughout the world strengthened by the support and programs of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics originally envisioned by Abdus Salam to foster the growth of advanced studies and physics research in developing countries.

  14. An Invitation to Open Innovation in Malaria Drug Discovery: 47 Quality Starting Points from the TCAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Félix; Barros, David; Bueno, José María; Coterón, José Miguel; Fernández, Esther; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lavandera, José Luís; León, María Luisa; Macdonald, Simon J F; Mallo, Araceli; Manzano, Pilar; Porras, Esther; Fiandor, José María; Castro, Julia

    2011-10-13

    In 2010, GlaxoSmithKline published the structures of 13533 chemical starting points for antimalarial lead identification. By using an agglomerative structural clustering technique followed by computational filters such as antimalarial activity, physicochemical properties, and dissimilarity to known antimalarial structures, we have identified 47 starting points for lead optimization. Their structures are provided. We invite potential collaborators to work with us to discover new clinical candidates.

  15. L'invisible invité

    OpenAIRE

    Frémy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Tiré du site Internet de Onestar Press: ""They’re a kind of cabin or hut, very basic and awkwardly assembled, wedged into the space of the balcony between the guardrail and the wall of the building.The vertical sides are made of plywood, canvas or tarp, and are topped by a vegetal roofing that is more or less dry, more or less green, threaded with palm wattle. These huts are opaque and seem to communicate with apartments…" Excerpt from L’Invisible invité by Anne Frémy, english by Bruce Bender...

  16. Catalogue of methods of calculation, interpolation, smoothing, and reduction for the physical, chemical, and biological parameters of deep hydrology (CATMETH) (NODC Accession 7700442)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The document presents the methods, formulas and citations used by the BNDO to process physical, chemical, and biological data for deep hydrology including...

  17. Use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry for detection of formazan in in vitro Reconstructed human Tissue (RhT)-based test methods employing the MTT-reduction assay to expand their applicability to strongly coloured test chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alépée, N; Barroso, J; De Smedt, A; De Wever, B; Hibatallah, J; Klaric, M; Mewes, K R; Millet, M; Pfannenbecker, U; Tailhardat, M; Templier, M; McNamee, P

    2015-06-01

    A number of in vitro test methods using Reconstructed human Tissues (RhT) are regulatory accepted for evaluation of skin corrosion/irritation. In such methods, test chemical corrosion/irritation potential is determined by measuring tissue viability using the photometric MTT-reduction assay. A known limitation of this assay is possible interference of strongly coloured test chemicals with measurement of formazan by absorbance (OD). To address this, Cosmetics Europe evaluated use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry as an alternative formazan measurement system. Using the approach recommended by the FDA guidance for validation of bio-analytical methods, three independent laboratories established and qualified their HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry systems to reproducibly measure formazan from tissue extracts. Up to 26 chemicals were then tested in RhT test systems for eye/skin irritation and skin corrosion. Results support that: (1) HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry formazan measurement is highly reproducible; (2) formazan measurement by HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry and OD gave almost identical tissue viabilities for test chemicals not exhibiting colour interference nor direct MTT reduction; (3) independent of the test system used, HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry can measure formazan for strongly coloured test chemicals when this is not possible by absorbance only. It is therefore recommended that HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry to measure formazan be included in the procedures of in vitro RhT-based test methods, irrespective of the test system used and the toxicity endpoint evaluated to extend the applicability of these test methods to strongly coloured chemicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Student Theological Research as an Invitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Badke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seminary students, despite having graduated from bachelors programs, struggle to make sense of the goals, processes, skills, and resources of research as graduate students. Beyond brief introductions to research, a scattered number of seminaries have developed either a separate theological information literacy course or have taken a through-the-curriculum approach to enhancing the information abilities of students. The former, however, separates information literacy from the curriculum, while the latter is difficult to implement and maintain. Living in a world of information glut, seminary professors are finding that traditional information dissemination models of education are becoming less viable. What is more, such models tend to teach students about a discipline rather than inviting them into it. These problems present a unique opportunity to place the teaching of information literacy at the foundation of theological education. With such an approach, students may be invited into the disciplines of their professors and enabled to practice these disciplines, thus becoming equipped to turn knowledge into praxis.

  19. Effect of natural Bayah zeolite particle size reduction to physico-chemical properties and absortion against potassium permanganate (KMnO4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widayanti, Siti Mariana; Syamsu, Khaswar; Warsiki, Endang; Yuliani, Sri

    2016-02-01

    Recently, researches on nanotechnology have been developed very rapid, as well as the utilization of nano-zeolites. Nano-sized material has several advantages which are expanding absorptive surfaces so it will enhance the material absorption and shorten the absorption time. Zeolite as a KMnO4 binder, has been widely recognized for its ability to extend the shelf life of vegetables and fruits. This study was conducted to determine zeolites physico-chemical characters from different particle size and the effect on KMnO4 absorption. Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) is a strong oxidizer for reducing the quantity of ethylene in storage process of fresh horticultural products. The treatment consisted of (1) different length of milling time (10, 20, 30, 40, and 60 minutes) and (2) the duration of chemical activation with 1 N KOH solution. Physical and chemical characters of zeolite were analyzed using BET, PSA, XRD and SEM. The research design was randomized design. The result implied that milling time was significantly affecting the zeolite particle size, material surface area, and the size of pore diameter and volume. Milling treatment for 40 minutes produced higher zeolite surface area and pore volume than other treatments. While the duration of chemical activation using 1 N KOH solution gives different effect on zeolite absorption to KMnO4 solution. Milling time for 60 minutes and activated for 48 hours has higher initial adsorption than other treatments.

  20. Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and oil use by DME (di-methyl ether) and FT (Fischer-Tropsch) diesel production in chemical pulp mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joelsson, Jonas M.; Gustavsson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Using energy systems analysis, we examine the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions and oil use by integrating motor biofuel production with pulp mills. BLG-DME (black liquor gasification with di-methyl ether production) is compared with solid biomass gasification with BIG-FT (solid biomass gasification with Fischer-Tropsch fuel production). The studied systems are expanded with stand-alone production of biomass-based electricity and motor fuel so that they yield the same functional unit in terms of motor fuel and electricity as well as pulp or paper product, in order to facilitate comparison. More motor biofuel can be produced in integration with the studied mills with BLG-DME than with BIG-FT because the black liquor flow is large compared with other fuel streams in the mill and the integration potential for BIG-FT is limited by the mill’s heat demand. When both systems are required to produce the same functional unit, the BLG-DME system achieves higher system efficiency and larger reductions in CO 2 emissions and oil use per unit of biomass consumed. In general, integration of motor biofuel production with a pulp mill is more efficient than stand-alone motor biofuel production. Larger reductions in CO 2 emissions or oil use can, however, be achieved if biomass replaces coal or oil in stationary applications. -- Highlights: ► CO 2 emission and oil use reductions quantified for pulp mill-based biorefineries. ► Black liquor gasification gives larger reductions than solid biomass gasification. ► Lower mill steam demand increases the black liquor gasification advantage. ► Biomass directly replacing coal or oil in stationary plants gives larger reductions.

  1. Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and oil use by DME (di-methyl ether) and FT (Fischer-Tropsch) diesel production in chemical pulp mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joelsson, Jonas M., E-mail: joelsson.jonas@hotmail.com [Ecotechnology and Environmental Science, Mid Sweden University, SE-831 25 Oestersund (Sweden); Gustavsson, Leif [Linnaeus University, SE- 351 95 Vaexjoe (Sweden)

    2012-03-15

    Using energy systems analysis, we examine the potential to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and oil use by integrating motor biofuel production with pulp mills. BLG-DME (black liquor gasification with di-methyl ether production) is compared with solid biomass gasification with BIG-FT (solid biomass gasification with Fischer-Tropsch fuel production). The studied systems are expanded with stand-alone production of biomass-based electricity and motor fuel so that they yield the same functional unit in terms of motor fuel and electricity as well as pulp or paper product, in order to facilitate comparison. More motor biofuel can be produced in integration with the studied mills with BLG-DME than with BIG-FT because the black liquor flow is large compared with other fuel streams in the mill and the integration potential for BIG-FT is limited by the mill's heat demand. When both systems are required to produce the same functional unit, the BLG-DME system achieves higher system efficiency and larger reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions and oil use per unit of biomass consumed. In general, integration of motor biofuel production with a pulp mill is more efficient than stand-alone motor biofuel production. Larger reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions or oil use can, however, be achieved if biomass replaces coal or oil in stationary applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emission and oil use reductions quantified for pulp mill-based biorefineries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Black liquor gasification gives larger reductions than solid biomass gasification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower mill steam demand increases the black liquor gasification advantage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biomass directly replacing coal or oil in stationary plants gives larger reductions.

  2. Plateau's problem an invitation to varifold geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Frederick J Almgren, Jr

    2001-01-01

    There have been many wonderful developments in the theory of minimal surfaces and geometric measure theory in the past 25 to 30 years. Many of the researchers who have produced these excellent results were inspired by this little book--or by Fred Almgren himself. The book is indeed a delightful invitation to the world of variational geometry. A central topic is Plateau's Problem, which is concerned with surfaces that model the behavior of soap films. When trying to resolve the problem, however, one soon finds that smooth surfaces are insufficient: Varifolds are needed. With varifolds, one can obtain geometrically meaningful solutions without having to know in advance all their possible singularities. This new tool makes possible much exciting new analysis and many new results. Plateau's problem and varifolds live in the world of geometric measure theory, where differential geometry and measure theory combine to solve problems which have variational aspects. The author's hope in writing this book was to encour...

  3. INVITATION to CERN pensioners and personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    The Swiss Foundation for Research into Ageing, AETAS, will be holding its research award ceremony at CERN on Wednesday 10 June 2009. You are cordially invited to attend the ceremony and, in particular, a lecture given by Professor Osman RATIB Professor of Medicine, Head of the Department of Medical Imaging and Medical Informatics and Head of the Division of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital of Geneva "Progress in medical imaging" WEDNESDAY 10 JUNE 2009 AT 5:00 P.M. CERN MAIN AUDITORIUM (Bldg.500) The lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Jean-Pierre Michel, President of the AETAS Foundation. Refreshments will be offered by the Foundation

  4. INVITATION to CERN pensioners and personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Swiss Foundation for Research into Ageing, AETAS, will be holding its research award ceremony at CERN on Wednesday 10 June 2009. You are cordially invited to attend the ceremony and, in particular, a lecture given by Professor Osman RATIB Professor of Medicine, Head of the Department of Medical Imaging and Medical Informatics and Head of the Division of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital of Geneva "Progress in medical imaging" WEDNESDAY 10 JUNE 2009 AT 5.00 P.M. CERN MAIN AUDITORIUM, (Bldg.500) The lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Jean-Pierre Michel, President of the AETAS Foundation. Drinks will be offered by the Foundation

  5. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  6. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite; Estudo de filme de grafeno/oxido de grafeno obtido por reducao quimica parcial do oxido de grafite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H., E-mail: juliagascho@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  7. Chemical and Electrochemical Properties of La0.58Sr0.4Fe0.8Co0.2O3-δ (LSCF) Thin Films upon Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitscheider, Simon; Machala, Michael; Guan, Zixuan

    2017-01-01

    The Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions (OER/ORR), occurring at the oxygen electrode of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) in the two possible ways of operation, require substantial overpotentials, therefore lowering the operating efficiency of the cells. The reaction mechanisms occurring...... at these electrodes are still not completely understood due to their complexity and localized character at the interfaces between different materials or between the gas atmosphere and the electrocatalyst, and need in situ techniques with very high chemical sensitivity, with the additional difficulty of probing...... the materials as close as possible to their realistic operating conditions. In addition, the properties of LSCF are, despite numerous studies, still unclear in many aspects, despite LSCF being one of the state-of-the-art electrocatalysts used for SOCs. It is understood that the surface chemical composition...

  8. Impact of reduction dose, time and method of application of chemical fertilizer on mung bean under old alluvial soil, West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted with mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek consecutively for three years (2009, 2010, and 2011 in the Crop Research and Seed Multiplication Farm, Burdwan University, West Bengal, India. In the first two years, varietals screening of mung bean under recommended dose of chemical fertilizer (20:40:20 were performed with five varieties with a local variety of mung bean during February to May of 2009. In the second year, one experiment was conducted with six different reduced dose of chemical fertilizer. In the third year, five different method and time of application of biofertilizer were applied to study the effects on agronomic traits and growth attributes of mung bean. The variety PDM-54 a significant higher seed yield along with other yield contributing factors, which was found to be superior to other varieties. In 2010, seed yield was found to be the best for 30% less nitrogenous and 25% less phosphate fertilizer along with recommended dose of chemical fertilizer. In 2011, the best yield was given by the treatment of basal @ 0.75 kg ha-1 + 1.5 kg ha-1 soil application after 21 days + 0.75 kg ha-1 as soil application + best dose of previous year.

  9.   Personal invitations for population-based breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalasti-Koskinen, Ulla; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Saarenmaa, Irma

    2010-01-01

    participation free of charge and the benefits of detecting breast cancer early. Harm associated with screening was seldom mentioned; no unit mentioned the possibility of false-negative results or overtreatment. CONCLUSION: The screening units provided very variable information, which often was biased toward......RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Women who are invited for breast cancer screening should get enough information about the benefits and harms of screening to make an informed decision on participation. Personal invitations are an important source of information, because all invited women receive them....... The objective of this study was to evaluate the information breast cancer screening units send to women invited for screening in Finland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all breast cancer screening units in Finland in 2005 and 2008, and the information (eg, invitations, results letters...

  10. Reductive de-polymerization of kraft lignin for chemicals and fuels using formic acid as an in-situ hydrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shanhua; Mahmood, Nubla; Tymchyshyn, Matthew; Yuan, Zhongshun; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    2014-11-01

    In this study, formic acid (FA) was employed as an in-situ hydrogen donor for the reductive de-polymerization of kraft lignin (KL). Under the optimum operating conditions, i.e., 300 °C, 1 h, 18.6 wt.% substrate concentration, 50/50 (v/v) water-ethanol medium with FA at a FA-to-lignin mass ratio of 0.7, KL (Mw∼10,000 g/mol) was effectively de-polymerized, producing de-polymerized lignin (DL, Mw 1270 g/mol) at a yield of ∼90 wt.% and polymerization of KL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A two-cavity reactor for solar chemical processes: heat transfer model and application to carbothermic reduction of ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieckert, Christian; Palumbo, Robert; Frommherz, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    A 5 kW two-cavity beam down reactor for the solar thermal decomposition of ZnO with solid carbon has been developed and tested in a solar furnace. Initial exploratory experiments show that it operates with a solar to chemical energy conversion efficiency of about 15% when the solar flux entering the reactor is 1300 kW/m 2 , resulting in a reaction chamber temperature of about 1500 K. The solid products have a purity of nearly 100% Zn. Furthermore, the reactor has been described by a numerical model that combines radiant and conduction heat transfer with the decomposition kinetics of the ZnO-carbon reaction. The model is based on the radiosity exchange method. For a given solar input, the model estimates cavity temperatures, Zn production rates, and the solar to chemical energy conversion efficiency. The model currently makes use of two parameters which are determined from the experimental results: conduction heat transfer through the reactor walls enters the model as a lumped term that reflects the conduction loss during the experiments, and the rate of the chemical reaction includes an experimentally determined term that reflects the effective amount of ZnO and CO participating in the reactor. The model output matches well the experimentally determined cavity temperatures. It suggests that reactors built with this two-cavity concept already on this small scale can reach efficiencies exceeding 25%, if operated with a higher solar flux or if one can reduce conduction heat losses through better insulation and if one can maintain or improve the effective amount of ZnO and CO that participates in the reaction

  12. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis – chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min{sup −1} and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values. - Highlights: • Sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation. • Thiourea can enhance the generation efficiency and eliminate the interference of copper. • Arsenic in soil Sample can be directly determined without sample pretreatment.

  13. Development and Application of Computational/In Vitro Toxicological Methods for Chemical Hazard Risk Reduction of New Materials for Advanced Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, John M.; Mattie, D. R.; Hussain, Saber; Pachter, Ruth; Boatz, Jerry; Hawkins, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is essential for reducing the chemical hazards of new weapon systems. The current collaboration between HEST (toxicology research and testing), MLPJ (computational chemistry) and PRS (computational chemistry, new propellant synthesis) is focusing R&D efforts on basic research goals that will rapidly transition to useful products for propellant development. Computational methods are being investigated that will assist in forecasting cellular toxicological end-points. Models developed from these chemical structure-toxicity relationships are useful for the prediction of the toxicological endpoints of new related compounds. Research is focusing on the evaluation tools to be used for the discovery of such relationships and the development of models of the mechanisms of action. Combinations of computational chemistry techniques, in vitro toxicity methods, and statistical correlations, will be employed to develop and explore potential predictive relationships; results for series of molecular systems that demonstrate the viability of this approach are reported. A number of hydrazine salts have been synthesized for evaluation. Computational chemistry methods are being used to elucidate the mechanism of action of these salts. Toxicity endpoints such as viability (LDH) and changes in enzyme activity (glutahoione peroxidase and catalase) are being experimentally measured as indicators of cellular damage. Extrapolation from computational/in vitro studies to human toxicity, is the ultimate goal. The product of this program will be a predictive tool to assist in the development of new, less toxic propellants.

  14. Creating intentionally inviting schools through professional development: an appreciative inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Steyn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The professional development (PD of teachers plays an important role in schools; it is indispensable for continuous school development. When schools are exposed to new approaches to learning and teaching, teachers are granted the opportunities to change their thinking and behaviour. In 2009, two South African schools with specific inviting characteristics were nominated for the inviting school award given by the International Alliance for Invitational Education (IAIE. However, the inviting characteristics of these schools were not explicitly intentional according to the IE philosophy, therefore they had to follow a professional development programme aimed at raising teachers’ awareness of invitational education (IE. Workshops were held to equip staff members with IE knowledge and skills, and to increase their understanding of their current practices with a view of making them more intentionally inviting. The study focused on the following two questions: What are the positive experiences of teaching staff concerning the current approach to teaching and learning in schools?; and What strategies may be introduced to assist teachers and their schools in becoming intentionally inviting? These two questions are based on appreciative inquiry (AI and IE. A qualitative research design was most appropriate for the purpose of this study. An analysis of the data revealed two categories (the discovery phase: discovering the best of what exists in the school and the dreaming phase: creating a new future on which AI is based.

  15. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  16. Highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridisation by coupling the chemical reduction of a redox label to the electrode reaction of a solution phase mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoensawat, Umphan; Rijiravanich, Patsamon; Somasundrum, Mithran; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2014-11-21

    We have described a highly sensitive method for detecting DNA hybridisation using a redox-labeled stem loop probe. The redox labels were poly(styrene-co-acrylic) (PSA) spheres of 454 nm diameter, modified by methylene blue (MB) deposited alternatively with poly(sodium 4-styrene sulphonate) (PSS) in a layer-by-layer process. Each PSA sphere carried approx. 3.7 × 10(5) molecules of MB, as determined optically. DIG-tagged stem loop probes were immobilised on screen printed electrodes bearing anti-DIG antibodies. Binding with the target enabled straightening of the stem loop, which made attachment to the MB-coated PSA spheres possible. For measuring the current from the direct reduction of MB by differential pulse voltammetry, a 30 mer DNA target common to 70 strains of Escherichia coli was calibrated across the range 1.0 fM to 100 pM (gradient = 3.2 × 10(-8) A (log fM)(-1), r(2) = 0.95, n = 60), with an LOD of ∼58 fM. By using Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a solution phase mediator for the MB reduction, we were able to lower the LOD to ∼39 aM (gradient = 5.95 × 10(-8) A (log aM)(-1), r(2) = 0.96, n = 30), which corresponds to the detection of 0.76 ag (∼50 molecules) in the 2 μL analyte sample. We hypothesise that the lowering of the LOD was due to the fact that not all the MB labels were able to contact the electrode surface.

  17. Effect of chemical functionalization on the electrochemical properties of conducting polymers. Modification of polyaniline by diazonium ion coupling and subsequent reductive degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Diego F.; Rivarola, Claudia R.; Miras, Maria C. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Ruta Nacional 8, Km 601, X5804ZAB, Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Barbero, Cesar A., E-mail: cbarbero@exa.unrc.edu.a [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Ruta Nacional 8, Km 601, X5804ZAB, Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-04-01

    The electrochemical properties of polyaniline (PANI) can be altered by coupling the polymer with aryldiazonium ions. The ions are synthesized by diazotization of aromatic primary amines (1-aminoanthraquinone, sulphadiazine and 4-cyanoaniline) bearing functional groups which are then linked to the polyaniline backbone. All materials produced are electroactive, suggesting that the reaction involves coupling of the diazonium ion with the aromatic rings and not nucleophilic substitution by the aminic nitrogen of PANI on the aryl cations. The electrochemical properties of the modified polymers are different to those of PANI, likely due to electronic and steric effects of the attached groups. Reductive degradation of the azo linkages, using dithionite ion, removes the attached moieties leaving primary amino groups attached to the polyaniline backbone. In that way, the effect of the attached groups on the electrochemical properties of PANI is eliminated. FTIR spectroscopy measurement of the different polymers supports the proposed mechanism. Using the method a polymer containing redox (anthraquinone) groups, which could be used for charge storage, is obtained. Additionally a material containing sulphadiazine moieties, which can be released in vivo by bacterial activity, is also produced. The molecule is a well-known sulfa drug with bacteriostatic activity. The reaction sequence seems to be of general application to modify polyanilines, by attaching functional groups, and then to produce a PANI backbone bearing primary amino groups. Evidence is presented on the kinetic control of attached group removal.

  18. Effect of chemical functionalization on the electrochemical properties of conducting polymers. Modification of polyaniline by diazonium ion coupling and subsequent reductive degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo, Diego F.; Rivarola, Claudia R.; Miras, Maria C.; Barbero, Cesar A.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of polyaniline (PANI) can be altered by coupling the polymer with aryldiazonium ions. The ions are synthesized by diazotization of aromatic primary amines (1-aminoanthraquinone, sulphadiazine and 4-cyanoaniline) bearing functional groups which are then linked to the polyaniline backbone. All materials produced are electroactive, suggesting that the reaction involves coupling of the diazonium ion with the aromatic rings and not nucleophilic substitution by the aminic nitrogen of PANI on the aryl cations. The electrochemical properties of the modified polymers are different to those of PANI, likely due to electronic and steric effects of the attached groups. Reductive degradation of the azo linkages, using dithionite ion, removes the attached moieties leaving primary amino groups attached to the polyaniline backbone. In that way, the effect of the attached groups on the electrochemical properties of PANI is eliminated. FTIR spectroscopy measurement of the different polymers supports the proposed mechanism. Using the method a polymer containing redox (anthraquinone) groups, which could be used for charge storage, is obtained. Additionally a material containing sulphadiazine moieties, which can be released in vivo by bacterial activity, is also produced. The molecule is a well-known sulfa drug with bacteriostatic activity. The reaction sequence seems to be of general application to modify polyanilines, by attaching functional groups, and then to produce a PANI backbone bearing primary amino groups. Evidence is presented on the kinetic control of attached group removal.

  19. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiNx films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiN x ) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH 3 molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiN x /P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiN x passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiN x films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiN x /P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  20. Reduction redux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lawrence

    2018-04-01

    Putnam's criticisms of the identity theory attack a straw man. Fodor's criticisms of reduction attack a straw man. Properly interpreted, Nagel offered a conception of reduction that captures everything a physicalist could want. I update Nagel, introducing the idea of overlap, and show why multiple realization poses no challenge to reduction so construed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical and photoelectrochemical properties of Sb-doped SnO2 thin films deposited by chemical vapor deposition: application to chromate reduction under solar light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outemzabet, R.; Doulache, M.; Trari, M.

    2015-05-01

    Sb-doped SnO2 thin films (Sb-SnO2) are prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The X-ray diffraction indicates a rutile phase, and the SEM analysis shows pyramidal grains whose size extends up to 200 nm. The variation of the film thickness shows that the elaboration technique needs to be optimized to give reproducible layers. The films are transparent over the visible region. The dispersion of the optical indices is evaluated by fitting the diffuse reflectance data with the Drude-Lorentz model. The refractive index ( n) and absorption coefficient ( k) depend on both the conditions of preparation and of the doping concentration and vary between 1.4 and 2.0 and 0.2 and 0.01, respectively. Tin oxide is nominally non-stoichiometric, and the conduction is dominated by thermally electrons jump with an electron mobility of 12 cm2 V-1 s-1 for Sb-SnO2 (1 %). The ( C 2- V) characteristic in aqueous electrolyte exhibits a linear behavior from which an electrons density of 4.15 × 1018 cm-3 and a flat-band potential of -0.83 V SCE are determined. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows a semicircle attributed to a capacitive behavior with a low density of surface states. The center lies below the real axis with a depletion angle (12°), due to a constant phase element, i.e., a deviation from a pure capacitive behavior, presumably attributed to the roughness and porosity of the film. The straight line at low frequencies is attributed to the Warburg diffusion. The energy diagram reveals the photocatalytic feasibility of Sb-SnO2. As application, 90 % of the chromate concentration (20 mg L-1, pH ~3) disappears after 6 h of exposure to solar light.

  2. Responsive, Flexible and Scalable Broader Impacts (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decharon, A.; Companion, C.; Steinman, M.

    2010-12-01

    In many educator professional development workshops, scientists present content in a slideshow-type format and field questions afterwards. Drawbacks of this approach include: inability to begin the lecture with content that is responsive to audience needs; lack of flexible access to specific material within the linear presentation; and “Q&A” sessions are not easily scalable to broader audiences. Often this type of traditional interaction provides little direct benefit to the scientists. The Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence - Ocean Systems (COSEE-OS) applies the technique of concept mapping with demonstrated effectiveness in helping scientists and educators “get on the same page” (deCharon et al., 2009). A key aspect is scientist professional development geared towards improving face-to-face and online communication with non-scientists. COSEE-OS promotes scientist-educator collaboration, tests the application of scientist-educator maps in new contexts through webinars, and is piloting the expansion of maps as long-lived resources for the broader community. Collaboration - COSEE-OS has developed and tested a workshop model bringing scientists and educators together in a peer-oriented process, often clarifying common misconceptions. Scientist-educator teams develop online concept maps that are hyperlinked to “assets” (i.e., images, videos, news) and are responsive to the needs of non-scientist audiences. In workshop evaluations, 91% of educators said that the process of concept mapping helped them think through science topics and 89% said that concept mapping helped build a bridge of communication with scientists (n=53). Application - After developing a concept map, with COSEE-OS staff assistance, scientists are invited to give webinar presentations that include live “Q&A” sessions. The webinars extend the reach of scientist-created concept maps to new contexts, both geographically and topically (e.g., oil spill), with a relatively small

  3. Global Solar UV Index (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repacholi, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    Excessive solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure produces a significant burden of disease to the skin, eyes and immune system. Effective programmes for the reduction of UV exposure are needed to reduce this disease burden and the associated health care costs. The UV index is seen as an effective tool for communicating important protection information to the public through its use in media news and weather information. The index is described and it is suggested that universally common messages should be associated with its ranges. (author)

  4. New developments in photoconductive detectors (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S.

    1997-01-01

    Nearly ideal for detecting ionizing radiation, wide band-gap semiconductors present a possibility of having outstanding radiation hardness, fast charge collection, and low leakage current that will allow them to be used in high radiation, high temperature, and chemically aggressive environments. Over the past few years, the improvements in the electrical quality of wide band-gap semiconductors have progressed enormously. One particular wide band-gap semiconductor, diamond, has properties that may be ideal for radiation detection. Since the discovery of low pressure and low temperature deposition of diamond, the possibility of large area diamond films has become a reality. Over the past few years, great progress has been made in advancing the electrical quality of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond. Presently, unprecedented diamond wafer size of 7 in. diam is possible. Due to both the present electrical quality and the available size, the utilization of diamond in radiation detection applications is not just a dream but a reality. The progression of CVD diamond close-quote s electrical properties in the last few years will be presented along with what is currently possible. Applications of CVD diamond for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostics will be reviewed. In addition, a brief review concerning other possible wide band-gap semiconductors for ICF diagnostics will be presented. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Invitation and Evaluation of Bids for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication emphasizes the integrity and interdependence of various activities related to the bid invitation, technical and economic evaluation and contracting, it updates information included in the existing IAEA documents in order to better reflect the developments in the nuclear and energy industry, compiles a more compact and user friendly guidebook integrating the existing IAEA documents on the subject. It provides the necessary information to organize, guide and realize the activities related to the invitation, the technical and economic evaluation of bids, and contracting as an integrated process. Furthermore, this publication indicates how and to what degree the activities preceding the preparation of the bid invitation specification, the evaluation of bids and contracting could influence the process.

  6. Invitation to View Method with Advantages and Disadvantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk BUYRUKOĞLU

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxpayers and tax administrators sometimes may experience tax dispute. These disputes may arise from the taxpayers as well as from the tax administrators. In resolving tax disputes, tax administrators and tax payers are the first, usually administratively, solution. Because while the tax revenues of the state are possible entered into the state treasury, the taxpayers will benefit from the advantages of administrative solutions. The state and taxpayer herein will be the winner. Invitation to view is one of the administrative remedies for tax disputes. With this practice taxpayers who have caused tax evasion penalty are invited by tax administrators to make a declaration on the condition that the tax examination of the tax disputes is not started and the dispatch process has not been done to the discretion comission. In this study, advantages and disadvantages will be addressed after the definition, legal support, purpose, scope and mechanism of Invitation to view.

  7. Special issue on Chemical Crystallography Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Virtually, every invitation that we extended has translated into an article. We sincerely believe and wish that the collection of articles in this issue sufficiently showcases the panorama of chemical science involving X-ray crystallography in India. We note with pride that Prof. Gautam R. Desiraju, an eminent scientist who has.

  8. Receptivity to sexual invitations from strangers of the opposite gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Hogh-Olesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the primary conclusion from Clark and Hatfield's often cited field experiment ``Consent to Sex with a Stranger'' that men agree to sexual invitations from moderately attractive strangers of the opposite gender more readily than women do. In addition, this study investigated...... whether rates of consent are influenced by a subject's age, relationship status, rating of confederate attractiveness, and type of sexual invitation. A number of moderately attractive confederates of the opposite gender individually approached 173 men and 216 women. After a standard introduction...

  9. Chemical Reductive Transformations of Synthetic Organic Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peyton, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) can be used to selectively remove DNT (2,4-dinitrotoluene) from a complex waste stream by adding a precursor compound such as ethanol which forms a reducing radical upon reaction with hydroxyl radical...

  10. Chemical Reductive Transformations of Synthetic Organic Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peyton, Gary

    2001-01-01

    .... A kinetic model that was previously developed to describe the results of batch AOP treatment by H2O2/UV did not give satisfactory predictive results obtained when extended to describe flow experiments...

  11. Vulnerability studies and integrated assessments for hazard risk reduction in Pittsburgh, PA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, K.

    2013-12-01

    Today's environmental problems stretch beyond the bounds of most academic disciplines, and thus solutions require an interdisciplinary approach. For instance, the scientific consensus is changes in the frequency and severity of many types of extreme weather events are increasing (IPCC 2012). Yet despite our efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, we continue to experience severe weather events such as Superstorm Sandy, record heat and blizzards, and droughts. These natural hazards, combined with increased vulnerability and exposure, result in longer-lasting disruptions to critical infrastructure and business continuity throughout the world. In order to protect both our lives and the economy, we must think beyond the bounds of any one discipline to include an integrated assessment of relevant work. In the wake of recent events, New York City, Washington, DC, Chicago, and a myriad of other cities have turned to their academic powerhouses for assistance in better understanding their vulnerabilities. This talk will share a case study of the state of integrated assessments and vulnerability studies of energy, transportation, water, real estate, and other main sectors in Pittsburgh, PA. Then the talk will use integrated assessment models and other vulnerability studies to create coordinated sets of climate projections for use by the many public agencies and private-sector organizations in the region.

  12. Studies in Chemical Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabitz, Herschel; Ho, Tak-San

    2003-01-01

    This final report draws together the research carried from February, 1986 through January, 2003 concerning a series of topics in chemical dynamics. The specific areas of study include molecular collisions, chemical kinetics, data inversion to extract potential energy surfaces, and model reduction of complex kinetic systems

  13. A Life in Science - Book release programme invite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MY OF. CE EDUCA. ВРЕМЕ. STION AND. SCIENCE. OF SCIEN. CES. RESEARC,. AN INSTIT она не. A LIFE IN SCIENCE. Penguin Books India. Indian Academy of Sciences and. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhopal cordially invite you for the release of book. A LIFE IN SCIENCE by C.N.R. Rao.

  14. Textbook Images: How Do They Invite Students into Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungum, Berit

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of images in Norwegian physics textbooks for upper secondary school, and how they invite students into physics by means of visual communication. The concept of "framing" is used to investigate how the perspective in the image provides a sense of participation. It is found that older textbooks, where objects…

  15. The Intimate Correlation of Invitational Education and Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riner, Phillip S.

    2003-01-01

    Critics of Invitational Education and other self-concept approaches to learning have long argued that there is a lack of empirical data to support the claims that approaches to student instruction based on self-concept theory are central to effective learning. Ellis (2001) examines a number of these analyses where self-concept, self-esteem, and…

  16. Inviting Dialogue: An Alternative to Teaching in the Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patricia Shelley

    1998-01-01

    Uses illustrations from a graduate seminar in the teaching of writing, a high school classroom, and a seventh-grade classroom to show the value of teacher-student dialog over teacher monologue, and to show teacher responses that resist the impulse to launch into the teacher's monologue, and instead invite dialog and turn the work of meaning-making…

  17. Adhering to the assumptions of invitational education: a case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African schools are constantly faced with evolving needs and challenges characterised by change. As in other countries, schools in South Africa encounter pressure to 'produce more for less' and at the same time to achiev e c ertain goals and standards. Transforming schools into inviting institutions requires a ...

  18. Invitation Refusals in Cameroon French and Hexagonal French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenkia, Bernard Mulo

    2015-01-01

    Descriptions of regional pragmatic variation in French are lacking to date the focus has been on a limited range of speech acts, including apologies, requests, compliments and responses to compliments. The present paper, a systematic analysis of invitation refusals across regional varieties of French, is designed to add to the research on…

  19. Fewer invited talks by women in evolutionary biology symposia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, J.; Dugdale, H.L.; Radersma, R.; Hinsch, M.; Buehler, D.M.; Saul, J.; Porter, L.; Liker, A.; De Cauwer, I.; Johnson, P. J.; Santure, A. W.; Griffin, A. S.; Bolund, E.; Ross, L.; Webb, T. J.; Feulner, P. G. D.; Winney, I.; Szulkin, M.; Komdeur, J.; Versteegh, M. A.; Hemelrijk, C. K.; Svensson, E. I.; Edwards, H.; Karlsson, M.; West, S. A.; Barrett, E. L. B.; Richardson, D. S.; van den Brink, V.; Wimpenny, J. H.; Ellwood, S. A.; Rees, M.; Matson, K.D.; Charmantier, A.; dos Remedios, N.; Schneider, N. A.; Teplitsky, C.; Laurance, W. F.; Butlin, R. K.; Horrocks, Nicholas

    Lower visibility of female scientists, compared to male scientists, is a potential reason for the under-representation of women among senior academic ranks. Visibility in the scientific community stems partly from presenting research as an invited speaker at organized meetings. We analysed the sex

  20. The Future of Climate Science (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R.

    2010-12-01

    High Performance Computing is currently deployed in several centers for climate research, but not at the levels needed to achieve substantial success on a global basis, given the complexity of the problem. A quantum leap in capabilities will be necessary to handle next-generation climate models that integrate newly emerging sciences, high-resolution grids, and voluminous observational data from satellites and sophisticated ground devices. Dr. Bishop will discuss efforts to build an International Centre for Earth Simulation (ICES) based in Switzerland that takes an holistic systems approach, and that has the competence and resources to achieve new insights in this new decade, and is capable to globally influence public policy with respect to weather, climate, environment, disaster risk reduction and socio-economic development. On this progressively crowded and fragile planet, such a capability will be invaluable, Bishop believes, if not imperative, for our long-term survival. ICES could serve as a test-bed for large scale public and private development planning. Decision makers could ask ‘what if’ questions for major construction projects (such as China’s Three Gorges Dam), and then interactively evaluate alternative scenarios. Likewise, ICES could help uncover the possible unintended consequences of climate remediation and adaptation strategies, geo-engineering ideas, CO2 sequestration, deep sea drilling, etc. ICES would be a resource for building more resilient societies in an era of rapid climate change and frequent natural disasters (such as flooding, extreme weather events and volcanic ash clouds), and therefore of great consequence to our future well-being. It would ultimately play a major role in the education and training of policy-makers, the public, and future Earth Scientists - in conjunction with the current national and regional centers.

  1. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  2. Career Paths for Geosciences Students (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, T. S.; Flewelling, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Current and future drivers of hiring in the geosciences include climate, environment, energy, georisk and litigation areas. Although climate is closely linked to the atmospheric sciences, hiring needs in the geosciences exist as well, in understanding potential impacts of climate change on coastal erosion and water resources. Where and how to consider carbon sequestration as a climate mitigation policy will also require geosciences expertise. The environmental sciences have long been a source of geosciences hiring, and have ongoing needs in the areas of investigation of contamination, and in fluid and chemical transport. The recent expansion of the energy sector in the U.S. is providing opportunities for the geosciences in oil and gas production, hydraulic fracturing, and in geothermal development. In georisk, expertise in earthquake and volcanic hazard prediction are increasingly important, particularly in population centers. Induced seismicity is a relatively new area of georisk that will also require geosciences skills. The skills needed in the future geosciences workforce are increasingly interdisciplinary, and include those that are both observational and quantitative. Field observations and their interpretation must be focused forward as well as backwards and include the ability to recognize change as it occurs. Areas of demand for quantitative skills include hydrological, geophysical, and geochemical modeling, math and statistics, with specialties such as rock mechanics becoming an increasingly important area. Characteristics that students should have to become successful employees in these sectors include strong communication skills, both oral and written, the ability to know when to stop "studying" and identify next steps, and the ability to turn research areas into solutions to problems.

  3. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Chemical peels Overview Chemical peels: Overview Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do ... Overview Chemical peels: FAQs Chemical peels: Preparation FAQs Chemical peels: FAQs To help you decide whether this ...

  4. Exploring Hydrofluorocarbons as Groundwater Age Tracers (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, K. B.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L. N.; Casile, G.; Sanford, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater dating tracers are an essential tool for analyzing hydrologic conditions in groundwater systems. Commonly used tracers for dating post-1940's groundwater include sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 3H-3He, and other isotopic tracers (85Kr, δ2H and δ18O isotopes, etc.). Each tracer carries a corresponding set of advantages and limitations imposed by field, analytical, and interpretive methods. Increasing the number available tracers is appealing, particularly if they possess inert chemical properties and unique temporal emission histories from other tracers. Atmospherically derived halogenated trace gases continue to hold untapped potential for new tracers, as they are generally inert and their emission histories are well documented. SF5CF3, and CFC-13 were previously shown to have application as dating tracers, though their low mixing ratios and low solubility require large amounts of water to be degassed for their quantification. Two related groups of compounds, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are hypothesized to be potential age tracers, having similar mixing ratios to the CFCs and relatively high solubility. However, these compounds yield gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) responses that are 10-2 -10-5 less than CFC-12, making purge and trap or field stripping GC-ECD approaches impractical. Therefore, in order to use dissolved HCFCs and HFCs as age tracers, different approaches are needed. To solve this problem, we developed an analytical method that uses an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) in place of an ECD to detect fluorinated compounds. In contrast to the ECD, the AED is a universally sensitive, highly linear, elementally specific detector. The new GC-AED system is being used to measure chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and other fluorinated compounds in one liter water samples to study their potential as age dating tracers. HCFC-22 is a

  5. Reduction corporoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakky, Tariq S; Martinez, Daniel; Yang, Christopher; Carrion, Rafael E

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first video demonstration of reduction corporoplasty in the management of phallic disfigurement in a 17 year old man with a history sickle cell disease and priapism. Surgical management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora has yet to be defined in the literature. We preformed bilateral elliptical incisions over the lateral corpora as management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora to correct phallic disfigurement. The patient tolerated the procedure well and has resolution of his corporal disfigurement. Reduction corporoplasty using bilateral lateral elliptical incisions in the management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora is a safe an feasible operation in the management of phallic disfigurement.

  6. Energy Implications of Seawater Desalination (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, H.; Heberger, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    rise during droughts, when runoff, and thus power production, is constrained and electricity demands are high. Additionally, electricity prices are projected to rise in many regions to maintain and replace aging transmission and distribution infrastructure, install advanced metering infrastructure, comply with once-through cooling regulations, meet new demand growth , and increase renewable energy production. While rising electricity prices will affect the price of all water sources, they will have a greater impact on those that are the most energy intensive, like desalination. The high energy requirements of seawater desalination also raise concerns about greenhouse gas emissions. In 2006, California lawmakers passed the Global Warming Solutions Act, or Assembly Bill 32, which requires the state to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Thus, the state has committed itself to a program of steadily reducing its greenhouse gas emissions in both the short- and long-term, which includes cutting current emissions and preventing future emissions associated with growth. Desalination - through increased energy use - can cause an increase in greenhouse gas emissions, further contributing to the root cause of climate change and running counter to the state's greenhouse gas reduction goals.

  7. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima

  8. 14 CFR 11.75 - Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for rulemaking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does FAA invite public comment on petitions... Rulemaking and for Exemption § 11.75 Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for rulemaking? Generally, FAA does not invite public comment on petitions for rulemaking. ...

  9. 48 CFR 52.232-31 - Invitation To Propose Financing Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Financing Terms. 52.232-31 Section 52.232-31 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Clauses 52.232-31 Invitation To Propose Financing Terms. As prescribed in 32.205(b) and 32.206, insert the following provision: Invitation To Propose Financing Terms (OCT 1995) (a) The offeror is invited to propose...

  10. Efficacy studies of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion, M291 Skin Decontamination Kit, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents, part 2: guinea pigs challenged with soman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braue, Ernest H; Smith, Kelly H; Doxzon, Bryce F; Lumpkin, Horace L; Clarkson, Edward D

    2011-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of five, directly compares the efficacy of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), the M291 Skin Decontamination Kit (SDK), 0.5% bleach (sodium or calcium hypochlorite solution), 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents (SERPACWA) in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to soman (GD). In all experiments, guinea pigs were close-clipped and given anesthesia. In the decontamination experiments, the animals were challenged with GD and decontaminated after a 2-minute delay for the standard procedure or at longer times for the delayed-decontamination experiments. Positive control animals were challenged with GD in the same manner as the treated animals, except that they received no treatment. All animals were observed during the first 4 hours and again at 24 hours after exposure for signs of toxicity and death. The protective ratio (PR, defined as the median lethal dose [LD(50)] of the treatment group divided by the LD(50) of the untreated positive control animals) was calculated from the derived probit dose-response curves established for each treatment group and nontreated control animals. SERPACWA was applied as a thin coating (0.1 mm thick), allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and challenged with GD. After a 2-hour challenge, any remaining GD was blotted off the animal, but no additional decontamination was done. Significance in this report is defined as p decontamination experiments, the calculated PRs for RSDL, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and M291 SDK were 14, 2.7, 2.2, and 2.6, respectively. RSDL was by far the most effective decontamination product tested and significantly better than any of the other products. Bleach, soapy water, and the M291 SDK provided equivalent and modest protection. Since only RSDL provided at least good protection (PR > 5), it was the only decontamination product evaluated for delayed decontamination. In the GD delayed-decontamination experiments

  11. Efficacy studies of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion, M291 Skin Decontamination Kit, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents, part 1: guinea pigs challenged with VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braue, Ernest H; Smith, Kelly H; Doxzon, Bryce F; Lumpkin, Horace L; Clarkson, Edward D

    2011-03-01

    This report, first in a series of five, directly compares the efficacy of 4 decontamination products and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents (SERPACWA) in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to VX. In all experiments, guinea pigs were close-clipped and given anesthesia. In the decontamination experiments, the animals were challenged with VX and decontaminated after a 2-minute delay for the standard procedure or at longer times for the delayed-decontamination experiments. Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents was applied as a thin coating (0.1 mm thick), allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and challenged with VX. After a 2-hour challenge, any remaining VX was blotted off the animal, but no additional decontamination was done. Positive control animals were challenged with VX in the same manner as the treated animals, except that they received no treatment. In addition, the positive control animals were always challenged with 5% VX in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) solution, whereas the treatment animals received either neat (undiluted) VX or 5% VX in IPA solution. All animals were observed during the first 4 hours and again at 24 hours after exposure for signs of toxicity and death. The protective ratio (PR, defined as the median lethal dose [LD(50)] of the treatment group divided by the LD(50) of the untreated positive control animals) was calculated from the probit dose-response curves established for each treatment group and nontreated control animals. Significance in this report was defined as p decontamination experiments, the calculated PRs for Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and the M291 Skin Decontamination Kit (SDK) were 66, 17, 16, and 1.1, respectively. Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion was by far the most effective decontamination product tested and was significantly better than any of the other products. Bleach and soapy water provided equivalent and good (PR

  12. Reduction Corporoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. Hakky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Here we present the first video demonstration of reduction corporoplasty in the management of phallic disfigurement in a 17 year old man with a history sickle cell disease and priapism. Introduction Surgical management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora has yet to be defined in the literature. Materials and Methods: We preformed bilateral elliptical incisions over the lateral corpora as management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora to correct phallic disfigurement. Results The patient tolerated the procedure well and has resolution of his corporal disfigurement. Conclusions Reduction corporoplasty using bilateral lateral elliptical incisions in the management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora is a safe an feasible operation in the management of phallic disfigurement.

  13. Hexavalent Chromium reduction by Trichoderma inhamatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] is a useful and attractive process for remediation of ecosystems and industrial effluents contaminated with Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(II) can be achieved by both chemical and biological methods; however, the biological reduction is more convenient than the chemical one since costs are lower, and sludge is generated in smaller amounts. (Author)

  14. Enabling narrative pedagogy: inviting, waiting, and letting be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironside, Pamela M

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how teachers enable Narrative Pedagogy in their courses by explicating the Concernful Practice Inviting: Waiting and Letting Be. Narrative Pedagogy, a research-based, phenomenological approach to teaching and learning, extends conventional pedagogies and offers nursing faculty an alternative way of transforming their schools and courses. Using hermeneutic phenomenology, interview data collected over a 10-year period were analyzed by coding practical examples of teachers' efforts to enact Narrative Pedagogy. When Narrative Pedagogy is enacted, teachers and students focus on thinking and learning together about nursing phenomena and seek new understandings about how they may provide care in the myriad situations they encounter. Although the Concernful Practices co-occur, explicating inviting experiences can assist new teachers, and those seeking to extend their pedagogical literacy, by providing new understandings of how Narrative Pedagogy can be enacted.

  15. Influence of rurality, deprivation and distance from clinic on uptake in men invited for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, M A; Mundie, A; Bachoo, P; Nimmo, F

    2015-07-01

    Effective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening requires high uptake. The aim was to assess the independent association of screening uptake with rurality, social deprivation, clinic type, distance to clinic and season. Screening across Grampian was undertaken by trained nurses in six community and three hospital clinics. Men aged 65 years were invited for screening by post (with 2 further reminders for non-responders). AAA screening data are stored on a national call-recall database. The Scottish postcode directory was used to allocate to all invited men a deprivation index (Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation), a Scottish urban/rural category and distance to clinic. Multivariable analysis was undertaken. The cohort included 5645 men invited for screening over 12 months (October 2012 to October 2013); 42·6 per cent lived in urban areas, 38·9 per cent in rural areas and 18·5 per cent in small towns (uptake 87·0, 89·3 and 90·8 per cent respectively). Overall uptake was 88·6 per cent with 76 new AAAs detected: 15·2 (95 per cent c.i. 11·8 to 18·6) per 1000 men screened. Aberdeen city (large urban area) had the lowest uptake (86·1 per cent). Uptake declined with increasing deprivation, with the steepest decline in urban areas. On multivariable analysis, a 1-point increase in deprivation deciles was associated with a 0·08 (95 per cent c.i. 0·06 to 0·11) reduction in the odds of being screened (P < 0·001). Clinic type (community versus hospital), distance to clinic and season were not associated independently with uptake. Both urban residence and social deprivation were associated independently with uptake among men invited for AAA screening. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  17. Snubber reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.E.; Singh, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Many safety-related piping systems in nuclear power plants have been oversupported. Since snubbers make up a large percentage of the pipe supports or restraints used in a plant, a plant's snubber population is much larger than required to adequately restrain the piping. This has resulted in operating problems and unnecessary expenses for maintenance and inservice inspections (ISIs) of snubbers. This paper presents an overview of snubber reduction, including: the incentives for removing snubbers, a historical perspective on how piping became oversupported, why it is possible to remove snubbers, and the costs and benefits of doing so

  18. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Changes and Impacts (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    The extent of springtime Arctic perennial sea ice, important to preconditioning summer melt and to polar sunrise photochemistry, continues its precipitous reduction in the last decade marked by a record low in 2012, as the Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) was conducted around Barrow, Alaska, to investigate impacts of sea ice reduction on photochemical processes, transport, and distribution in the polar environment. In spring 2013, there was further loss of perennial sea ice, as it was not observed in the ocean region adjacent to the Alaskan north coast, where there was a stretch of perennial sea ice in 2012 in the Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea. In contrast to the rapid and extensive loss of sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice has a trend of a slight increase in the past three decades. Given the significant variability in time and in space together with uncertainties in satellite observations, the increasing trend of Antarctic sea ice may arguably be considered as having a low confidence level; however, there was no overall reduction of Antarctic sea ice extent anywhere close to the decreasing rate of Arctic sea ice. There exist publications presenting various factors driving changes in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. After a short review of these published factors, new observations and atmospheric, oceanic, hydrological, and geological mechanisms contributed to different behaviors of sea ice changes in the Arctic and Antarctic are presented. The contribution from of hydrologic factors may provide a linkage to and enhance thermal impacts from lower latitudes. While geological factors may affect the sensitivity of sea ice response to climate change, these factors can serve as the long-term memory in the system that should be exploited to improve future projections or predictions of sea ice changes. Furthermore, similarities and differences in chemical impacts of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice changes are discussed. Understanding sea ice changes and

  19. Advancing Consumer Product Composition and Chemical ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes EPA efforts to collect, model, and measure publically available consumer product data for use in exposure assessment. The development of the ORD Chemicals and Products database will be described, as will machine-learning based models for predicting chemical function. Finally, the talk describes new mass spectrometry-based methods for measuring chemicals in formulation and articles. This presentation is an invited talk to the ICCA-LRI workshop "Fit-For-Purpose Exposure Assessments For Risk-Based Decision Making". The talk will share EPA efforts to characterize the components of consumer products for use in exposure assessment with the international exposure science community.

  20. Opportunities for the Chemical Engineering of the XXI Century. Reduction in the source and treatment centralized of residues - National priority for the Colombian Pyme in the prevention of the contamination (PC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca S, Jose Joaquin

    1999-01-01

    The present article has the mission of proposing action lines that allow the chemical engineers to participate actively in the arduous work of reactivation of the manufacturer industry and of the necessary industrial reconversion to be to tone with the globalization in aspects of cleaner production and competitiveness. It is the result of more than 20 years of professional exercise in classes of chemical processes and of the knowledge acquired in their incursion like micro-impresario of the chemical industry

  1. Radon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials

  2. Reduced Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for JP-8 Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montgomery, Christopher J; Cannon, S. M; Mawid, M. A; Sekar, B

    2002-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, six different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for JP-8 combustion have been generated...

  3. Flux Decoupling and Chemical Diffusion in Redox Dynamics in Aluminosilicate Melts and Glasses (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of redox dynamics in silicate melts and glasses suggest that, for many compositions and for many external environments, the reaction proceeds and is rate-limited by the diffusive flux of divalent-cation network modifiers. Application of ion-backscattering spectrometry either (i) on oxidized or reduced melts (subsequently quenched before analysis) or (ii) on similarly reacted glasses, both of basalt-composition polymerization, demonstrates that the network modifiers move relative to the (first-order-rigid) aluminosilicate network. Thus, the textures associated with such reactions are often surprising, and frequently include metastable or unstable phases and/or spatial compositional differences. This response is only possible if the motion of cations can be decoupled from that of anions. In many cases, decoupling is accomplished by the presence in the melt/glass of transition-metal cations, whose heterovalency creates distortions in the electronic band structure resulting in electronic defects: electron “holes” in the valence band or electrons in the conduction band. (The prevalence of holes or electrons being a function of bulk chemistry and oxygen activity.) These electronic species make the melt/glass a “defect semiconductor.” Because (a) the critical issue in reaction dynamics is the transport coefficient (the product of species mobility and species concentration) and (b) the electronic species are many orders of magnitude more mobile than are the ions, very low concentrations of transition-metal ions are required for flux decoupling. For example, 0.04 at% Fe keeps a magnesium aluminosilicate melt/glass a defect semiconductor down to 800°C [Cook & Cooper, 2000]. Depending on composition, high-temperature melts can see ion species having a high-enough transport coefficient to allow decoupling, e.g., alkali cations in a basaltic melt [e.g., Pommier et al., 2010]. In this presentation, these ideas will be illustrated by examining redox dynamics in basaltic melts [e.g., Burgess et al., 2010; Cooper et al., 2010] and the reaction of magnesium aluminosilicate melts (transition-metal-ion-free and -doped) with liquid bronze (Cu-Sn alloy) [Pettersen et al., 2008], the latter demonstrating the importance of heterovalency in silicon [e.g., Borman et al., 1991] in effecting the reaction dynamics and resultant texture. Borman, V.D. et al. (1991) Phys. Rev. Lett. 67:2387-2390. Burgess, K. et al. (2010) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 11:in press. Cook, G.B., and R.F. Cooper (2000) Am. Mineral. 85:397-406. Cooper, R.F. et al. (2010) Am. Mineral. 95:810-824. Pettersen, C., and R.F. Cooper (2008) J. Non-Crys. Solids 354:3194-3206. Pommier, A. et al. (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74:1653-1671.

  4. Maintenance of nuclear chemical and fuel fabrication plants [Invited talk no. IT-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Though the objective of the maintenance practices followed in nuclear facilities is to optimise production as in other conventional production plants, the radioactivity associated with nuclear materials is a major constraint in all maintenance jobs on equipment of the nuclear facility. Often non-routine maintenance have to be adopted. Maintenance aspect has to be taken into consideration at the design stage of the nuclear facility. The maintenance concept adopted in a nuclear facility depends on the type of plant and varies from full indirect remote maintenance to direct contact maintenance. This is illustrated by discussing maintenance practices followed in a fuel reprocessing plant, a high level radioactive waste management facility, a fuel fabrication plant, and a heavy water plant. Exposure of maintenance staff to radiation has to be kept within limits governed by safety regulations. Along with planning and scheduling of maintenance, training of manpower with mock-up facilities assumes importance and the maintenance jobs must be carried out under strict supervision. (M.G.B.)

  5. Invitation strategies and coverage in the population-based cancer screening programmes in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Diama B; Anttila, Ahti; Ponti, Antonio; Senore, Carlo; Sankaranaryanan, Rengaswamy; Ronco, Guglielmo; Segnan, Nereo; Tomatis, Mariano; Žakelj, Maja P; Elfström, Klara M; Lönnberg, Stefan; Dillner, Joakim; Basu, Partha

    2018-03-21

    The aim of this study was to describe the compliance of the population-based cancer screening programmes in the European Union Member States to the invitation strategies enumerated in the European Guidelines and the impact of such strategies on the invitational coverage. Experts in screening programme monitoring from the respective countries provided data. Coverage by invitation was calculated as the proportion of individuals in the target age range receiving a screening invitation over the total number of annualized eligible population. The invitation strategies of 30 breasts, 25 cervical and 27 colorectal national or regional population-based screening programmes are described. Individual mail invitations are sent by 28 breasts, 20 cervical and 25 colorectal screening programmes. Faecal occult blood test kits are sent by post in 17 of the colorectal cancer screening programmes. The majority of programmes claimed to have a population registry, although some use health insurance data as the database for sending invitations. At least 95% invitation coverage was reached by 16 breast, six cervical and five colorectal screening programmes. Majority of the programmes comply with the invitation strategies enumerated in the European guidelines, although there is still scope for improvements. Coverage by invitation is below the desirable level in many population-based cancer screening programmes in European Union.

  6. Cyclic voltammetry and reduction mechanistic studies of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    styrylpyrylium perchlorates have been evaluated using cyclic voltammetry, in comparison to their non-methylated derivatives values. The reduction peak of all studied compounds remained chemically irreversible. The presence of the ...

  7. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  8. Preliminary comparison of different reduction methods of graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is a promising route to bulk produce graphene-based sheets. Different reduction processes result in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with different properties. In this paper three reduction methods, chemical, thermal and electrochemical reduction, were compared on three aspects ...

  9. Fast Emission Estimates in China Constrained by Satellite Observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R.

    2013-12-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for an emerging economy such as China, where rapid economic growth changes emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. Constraining emissions from concentration measurements is, however, computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project of the European Space Agency (ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China, using the CHIMERE model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e.g. shipping emissions). The new emission estimates result in a better

  10. Effect of high-temperature treatment on Fe/ZSM-5 prepared by chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3. II. Nitrous oxide decomposition, selective oxidation of benzene to phenol, and selective reduction of nitric oxide by isobutane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q.; Teeffelen, van R.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic performance (nitrous oxide decomposition, hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with nitrous oxide, and selective reduction of nitric oxide by i-butane) was evaluated for a set of HZSM-5 and sublimed Fe/ZSM-5 catalysts, which have been extensively characterized in an earlier contribution

  11. Sterol synthesis. A novel reductive rearrangement of an alpha,beta-unsaturated steroidal epoxide; a new chemical synthesis of 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta, 15alpha-diol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, E J; Schroepfer, G J

    1977-04-01

    Reduction of 3beta-benzoyloxy-14alpha,15alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholest-7-ene with either lithium triethylboro-hydride or lithium aluminum hydride (4 molar excess) gave 5-alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol in high yield. Reduction of the epoxy ester with lithium triethylborodeuteride or lithium aluminum deuteride (4 molar excess) gave [7alpha-2-H]-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol. Reduction of 2beta-benzoyloxy-14alpha,15alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholest-7-ene with a large excess (24 molar excess) of lithium aluminum hydride gave, in addition to the expected 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol, a significant yield (33%) of 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-o1. Reduction of the epoxy ester with a large excess (24 molar excess) of lithium aluminum deuteride gave [7alpha-2H]-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol and 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-o1 which contained two atoms of stably bound deuterium.

  12. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone. Reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Kuniki; Katsumura, Yosuke; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–1000 μmol dm -3 ) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. (author)

  13. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10-1000 μmol dm(-3)) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  14. 14 CFR 11.85 - Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for exemption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does FAA invite public comment on petitions... Rulemaking and for Exemption § 11.85 Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for exemption? Yes, FAA... the reasons for requesting it; and (e) A request for comments to assist FAA in evaluating the petition. ...

  15. Do invitations for cervical screening provide sufficient information to enable informed choice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolthoff, Sie Karen; Hestbech, Mie Sara; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2016-01-01

    or unmentioned. The same applied to other important harms, such as false-positive results and the psychological consequences from an abnormal test result. The majority of invitations took a paternalistic approach. While only two invitations (17%) included a pre-assigned appointment date, eight (70...

  16. 48 CFR 14.203-2 - Dissemination of information concerning invitations for bids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 14.203-2 Dissemination of information concerning invitations for bids. Procedures concerning display... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dissemination of information concerning invitations for bids. 14.203-2 Section 14.203-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  17. 76 FR 53693 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application COC-74911, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ...] Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application COC-74911, Colorado AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920... America in lands located in Delta County, Colorado. DATES: This notice of invitation was published in the...

  18. Invitations and excuses that are not invitations and excuses: Gossip in Luke 14:18–20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest van Eck

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In modern Western culture, gossip is seen as a malicious activity that should be avoided. In ancient oral-cultures, gossip as a cultural form did not have this negative connotation. Gossip was a necessary social game that enabled the flow of information. This information was used in the gossip network of communities to clarify, maintain and enforce group values, facilitate group formation and boundary maintenance and assess the morality of individuals. Gossip was a natural and spontaneous recurring form of social organisation. This understanding of gossip is used to interpret the two invitations and three excuses in the parable of the Feast (Lk 14:16a–23. The conclusion reached is that gossip, when understood as a social game, can be a useful tool to curb anachronistic and ethnocentristic readings of texts produced by cultures different from that of modern interpreters analysing these texts.

  19. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Chemical Peels Uses for Chemical Peels Learn more ...

  20. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IMTECH),. Chandigarh. Praveen Kumar is pursuing his PhD in chemical dynamics at. Panjab University,. Chandigarh. Keywords. Chemical oscillations, autoca-. talYSis, Lotka-Volterra model, bistability, hysteresis, Briggs-. Rauscher reaction.

  1. Chemical ecotoxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasivirta, J.

    1991-01-01

    This book discusses risk assessment, chemical cycles, structure-activity relations, organohalogens, oil residues, mercury, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals, and emissions from the forestry industry. Topics include: Cycles of chemicals in the environment. Rick assessment and management, strucuture and toxicity, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals in environment, interpretation of the environmental analysis results, mercury in the environment, organohalogen compounds in the environment, emissions from forestry industry, oil residues in the environment: oil spills in the marine environment

  2. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  3. Plasma-chemical production of metal-polypyrrole-catalysts for the reduction of oxygen in fuel cells. Precious-metal-free catalysts for fuel cells.; Plasmachemische Erzeugung von Metall-Polypyrrol-Katalysatoren fuer die Sauerstoffreduktion in Brennstoffzellen. Edelmetallfreie Katalysatoren fuer Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Christian

    2013-07-01

    This thesis is about the production of non noble metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Therefore, a novel dual plasma process is developed, constructed and the so-produced films are analysed by various electrochemical (CV, RDE and RRDE) and structural methods (SEM, EDX, IR, XPS, conductivity, XRD, NEXAFS, EXAFS and TEM). It is shown, that by doing this, non noble metal catalysts could be produced without the need of a high temperature treatment. Furthermore, the catalytic activity obtained is superior to that of chemically produced metal-polypyrrole films.

  4. "First Convention of Lunar Explorers" - Invitation to the media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    The first LUNEX Convention will bring together lunar explorers from all backgrounds, including professionals, amateur space enthusiasts and interested visitors from the public. During the Convention numerous oral presentations will prompt detailed discussions on all aspects of future lunar exploration: the Moon as a geology laboratory or an astronomical platform; the knowledge of lunar geography needed to land and move on the surface; the implications of finding water-ice on the Moon and whether this might be detected by forthcoming missions; the architecture of lunar habitats; what would be needed in the future for the Moon to support life; cultural and social aspects; and the scientific motivation for returning to the Moon. The Convention will also be the main public event in 2001 at which SMART-1 is presented. SMART-1, due to be launched in 2002 will test solar electric propulsion and other innovative approaches for future deep space probes. It is the first European satellite to be sent towards the Moon. Visitors to the Palais de la Découverte will be able to view a model of SMART-1. On 9 March, at 09:00, the media is invited to hear about the LUNEX objectives and activities and to learn about the European Space Agency’s SMART-1 mission within the broader context of ESA’s Planetary Exploration Programme. Background information on LUNEX The Lunar Explorers Society (LUNEX) is an international organization created by 200 founder members in July 2000. LUNEX was founded at the end of the 4th Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon (ICEUM4), organised by ESA and the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG). Its aim is to promote the exploration of the Moon for the benefit of humanity, bridging the gap between space agencies and the general public to promote planetary exploration and space. The Lunar Explorers Society invites all interested individuals to become members. Background information on SMART-1 SMART-1 is the first of ESA

  5. The renewable chemicals industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Rass-Hansen, J.; Marsden, Charlotte Clare

    2008-01-01

    per kilogram of desired product to illustrate in which processes the use of renewable resources lead to the most substantial reduction of CO2 emissions. The steps towards a renewable chemicals industry will most likely involve intimate integration of biocatalytic and conventional catalytic processes......The possibilities for establishing a renewable chemicals industry featuring renewable resources as the dominant feedstock rather than fossil resources are discussed in this Concept. Such use of biomass can potentially be interesting from both an economical and ecological perspective. Simple...

  6. Thermodynamics of lunar ilmenite reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenberg, B. H.; Franklin, H. A.; Jones, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    With the prospect of returning to the moon, the development of a lunar occupation would fulfill one of the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of the late 1980's. Processing lunar resources into useful products, such as liquid oxygen for fuel and life support, would be one of many aspects of an active lunar base. ilmenite (FeTiO3) is found on the lunar surface and can be used as a feed stock to produce oxygen. Understanding the various ilmenite-reduction reactions elucidates many processing options. Defining the thermodynamic chemical behavior at equilibrium under various conditions of temperature and pressures can be helpful in specifying optimal operating conditions. Differences between a previous theoretical analysis and experimentally determined results has sparked interest in trying to understand the effect of operating pressure on the hydrogen-reduction-of-ilmenite reaction. Various aspects of this reduction reaction are discussed.

  7. Inviting parents to take part in paediatric palliative care research: A mixed-methods examination of selection bias

    OpenAIRE

    Crocker, Joanna C; Beecham, Emma; Kelly, Paula; Dinsdale, Andrew P; Hemsley, June; Jones, Louise; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recruitment to paediatric palliative care research is challenging, with high rates of non-invitation of eligible families by clinicians. The impact on sample characteristics is unknown. Aim: To investigate, using mixed methods, non-invitation of eligible families and ensuing selection bias in an interview study about parents? experiences of advance care planning (ACP). Design: We examined differences between eligible families invited and not invited to participate by clinicians us...

  8. Nitrogen cycling in Hot Spring Sediments and Biofilms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M. S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past several decades, gene-targeted analyses have revealed that microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse. However, we know shockingly little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling or community shifts over time, or environmental parameters such as growth criteria. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that multiple autotrophic carbon fixation pathways are functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Further, sequencing of metagenomes from multiple locations at “Bison Pool” has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [2]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [3-5]. The role of individual microbes in nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions vary over space and time is the focus of this study. Here, we explore the diversity of nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. Environmental nucleic acids were extracted, and the presence/absence of Bacteria and Archaea determined by PCR. In addition, PCR-directed screens reveal the presence or absence of the aforementioned functional genes, indicating genetic capacity for nitrogen cycling. We have examined the transition of genetic diversity and genetic capacity within sediments and biofilms at the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone in several hot springs spanning ranges of pH and geochemical conditions. By sampling across this ecotone, changes in the genetic

  9. Impact of second reminder invitation on uptake of screening and cancer detection in BreastCheck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, P

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to quantify the impact of reminder invitations on uptake and cancer detection in Ireland. Examination of BreastCheck\\'s clinical database (2000-2010) to determine number of women screened following first invitation and after reminder; comparison by age group and screening phase with outcomes of recall rate, cancer detection and true positive rates. Of 819,182 first invitations sent 448,974 (54.8%) women attended. 245,157 (66.2%) women attended after reminder invitations, increasing uptake by 29.9% to 694,131 (84.7%) and cancers detected by 1,550 (35%). Women awaiting a reminder were less likely recalled for assessment 9,555 (3.9%) than respondents to first invitation 2,887 (4.04%) (p=0.004). Younger, mainly initial women were more likely recalled for assessment after first invitation. There was no difference between cohorts for cancer detection rate or true positive rate. Reminders increased uptake, supporting international evidence. For programme efficiency attendance at first invitation is optimal. For maximum programme effectiveness attendance must be encouraged with reminders.

  10. An Advanced Private Social Activity Invitation Framework with Friendship Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitian Tong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the popularity of social networks and human-carried/human-affiliated devices with sensing abilities, like smartphones and smart wearable devices, a novel application was necessitated recently to organize group activities by learning historical data gathered from smart devices and choosing invitees carefully based on their personal interests. We proposed a private and efficient social activity invitation framework. Our main contributions are (1 defining a novel friendship to reduce the communication/update cost within the social network and enhance the privacy guarantee at the same time; (2 designing a strong privacy-preserving algorithm for graph publication, which addresses an open concern proposed recently; (3 presenting an efficient invitee-selection algorithm, which outperforms the existing ones. Our simulation results show that the proposed framework has good performance. In our framework, the server is assumed to be untrustworthy but can nonetheless help users organize group activities intelligently and efficiently. Moreover, the new definition of the friendship allows the social network to be described by a directed graph. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first work to publish a directed graph in a differentially private manner with an untrustworthy server.

  11. CERN is celebrating its anniversary - invite your neighbours!

    CERN Document Server

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2014-01-01

    On 24 and 25 May 2014, CERN will be organising a weekend of discovery to celebrate its 60th anniversary with its (our) neighbours. Come and help us to welcome them as a volunteer!   CERN is celebrating 60 years since its establishment - 60 years during which the region and the Laboratory have developed strong links. To celebrate this collaboration, two days of visits and activities for everyone living in the region are being organised. Underground visits to the CMS detector in Cessy, the LHCb detector in Ferney-Voltaire and the LHC machine in Échenevex will be held throughout the weekend. Some 6,000 visitors are expected to make the most of one of the last chances to visit the underground installations before the LHC is restarted next year. These visits are open only to people aged 12 years and over and are by reservation only. Members of the public are also invited to take part in fun activities at the site of the CMS experiment in Cessy. The programme includes demonstrations an...

  12. Invitational Rhetoric and the Case for Service Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Hicks-Goldston

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research argues for repositioning Service Learning as a necessary part of public education, with the transformative goal of empowered communities operating in a social-collaborative framework from communities dependent on overburdened state and local government programs and services. Such repositioning depends on recognition of Service Learning as a means of providing that preparation. To “mainstream” Service Learning, this research proposes two initiatives: (a Foster the idea of the Service Learning experience as citizenship/community building by associating the experience with embedded cultural values and (b apply Invitational Rhetoric in persuading students and parents to view Service Learning as something other than imposed servitude or social consciousness for a grade. Service Learning has proven to be successful in changing students’ attitudes about their place in society. If Service Learning were a part of the common educational core, the potential for repositioning its value to citizenry would be highly expanded. Because many communities lack access to education and training for the citizenry, Service Learning could supply that link to empowerment.

  13. Microwave Interferometric Radiometry in Remote Sensing: an Invited Historical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Neira, M.; LeVine, D. M.; Kerr, Y.; Skou, N.; Peichl, M.; Camps, A.; Corbella, I.; Hallikainen, M.; Font, J.; Wu, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The launch of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission on 2 November 2009 marked a milestone in remote sensing for it was the first time a radiometer capable of acquiring wide field of view images at every single snapshot, a unique feature of the synthetic aperture technique, made it to space. The technology behind such an achievement was developed, thanks to the effort of a community of researchers and engineers in different groups around the world. It was only because of their joint work that SMOS finally became a reality. The fact that the European Space Agency, together with CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and CDTI (Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnológico e Industrial), managed to get the project through should be considered a merit and a reward for that entire community. This paper is an invited historical review that, within a very limited number of pages, tries to provide insight into some of the developments which, one way or another, are imprinted in the name of SMOS.

  14. Invited review, recent developments in brachytherapy source dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Application of radioactive isotopes is the treatment of choice around the globe for many cancer sites. In this technique, the accuracy of the radiation delivery is highly dependent on the accuracy of radiation dosimetry around individual brachytherapy sources. Moreover, in order to have compatible clinical results, an identical method of source dosimetry must be employed across the world. This problem has been recently addressed by task group 43 from the American Association of Medical Physics with a protocol for dosimetric characterization of brachytherapy sources. This new protocol has been further updated using published data from international sources, by a new Task Group from the American Association of Medical Physics. This has resulted in an updated protocol known as TG43U1 that has been published in March 2004 issue of Medical Physics. The goal of this presentation is to review the original Task Group 43 protocol and associated algorithms for brachytherapy source dosimetry. In addition, the shortcomings of the original protocol that has been resolved in the updated recommendation will be highlighted. I am sure that this is not the end of the line and more work is needed to complete this task. I invite the scientists to join this task and complete the project, with the hope of much better clinical results for cancer patients

  15. Finding optimal exact reducts

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of attribute reduction is an important problem related to feature selection and knowledge discovery. The problem of finding reducts with minimum cardinality is NP-hard. This paper suggests a new algorithm for finding exact reducts

  16. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  17. Development of Flow Accelerated Corrosion Reduction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Min Bum; Choi, Won Yeol; Lee, Jong Chan; Lim, Dong Seok; Kwon, Byung Il; Ku, Hee Kwon; Kim, Jong Uk [FNC Tech, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology is necessary for prevent this kind of accidents. This study deals with development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology through platinum injection and developed of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology by imitating water chemical condition in PWR secondary system in practice. In addition, in order to get reliability of water chemical simulator in PWR secondary system, analyzed and compared with test result through CFD analysis. This study composed test device that can simulate water chemical environment in PWR secondary system, in order to develop flow accelerated corrosion reduction , and evaluated the ratio of corrosion in water chemical environment in PWR secondary system. In conclusion, corrosion ratio of low alloy steel material that includes more Cr and Mo was lower. And the results were confirmed to be the maximum corrosion rate in the case that replicate the 90 elbow. Additionally, inserted Pt nano particle for developing flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction technology, the test results, it was confirmed for about 80% of the flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction than before input.

  18. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction surgery entails — including possible risks and complications — as ...

  19. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.

  20. Alarms, Chemical

    Science.gov (United States)

    cited in applicable qualitative materiel requirements, small development requirements, technical characteristics, and other requirements and documentation that pertain to automatic chemical agent alarms.

  1. Chemical oceanography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millero, F.J

    1996-01-01

    Chemical Oceanography presents a comprehensive examination of the chemistry of oceans through discussions of such topics as descriptive physical oceanography, the composition of seawater and the major...

  2. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  3. Invite your representative to work. Change the world. Here's how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montell, Denise J

    2018-02-15

    Today's political climate can seem hostile to science. Alternative facts, climate change denial, and relabeling of actual news as fake news are discouraging phenomena for sure. But these trends make it more important than ever to engage our politicians. Take heart! There is something you can do. You can show your representatives firsthand the amazing things you do, evidence of the economic engine that your activities generate, and the real people behind the discoveries. I did, and it was fun. We invited our congressman to the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), and he accepted! For 2 hours, we explained and demonstrated efforts to cure blindness using stem cells, the medical implications of the discovery that cells can recover from the brink of death, a mosquito lab striving to eliminate insect-borne disease, and an Alzheimer's disease laboratory. Salud Carbajal peered through a microscope and met real scientists. Before his visit, he did not know what a postdoctoral fellow was, much less what stem cells look like. When he left he knew our names, how much money we bring into his district, and how important National Institutes of Health funding and international mobility are to our enterprise. Although I live in the United States, this approach should also apply to other democratic countries. If each of us converts one representative into a science champion, we can change the world. © 2018 Montell. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. 77 FR 58213 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel ISLAND WATERS; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2012 0095] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel ISLAND WATERS; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... ISLAND WATERS is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Charter to individuals in coastal waters...

  5. 78 FR 8698 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel COOL BEANS; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013 0005] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel COOL BEANS; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... BEANS is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: Sightseeing and sunset cruises. Geographic Region: Florida...

  6. Fast reactor safety and related physics. Volume I. Invited papers; panels; summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the twenty invited papers included. The papers covered sessions on licensing aspects of safety design bases, safety of demonstration plants, safety aspects of large commercial fast breeders, and safety test facilities.

  7. 77 FR 31432 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel PASSION; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2012 0062] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel PASSION; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... PASSION is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Bareboat chartering, sailing classes.'' Geographic Region...

  8. 76 FR 79764 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel DREAM CATCHER; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2011-0156] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel DREAM CATCHER; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... DREAM CATCHER is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Passenger charter.'' GEOGRAPHIC REGION: ``Georgia...

  9. Department of Energy's regional solar updates 1979. Volume two. Invited papers and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-six invited papers for the regional meetings at Dearborn, Michigan; Orlando, Florida; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Los Angeles, California are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for each paper. (MHR)

  10. Blood donor show behaviour after an invitation to donate : The influence of collection site factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, E.-M.; Zijlstra, B.J.H.; de Kort, W.L.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Show behaviour after invitation to donate varies considerably across donors. More insight into this variation is important for blood banks in achieving stable stocks. This study examined individual factors determining intended show behaviour. Most importantly, however, this

  11. 78 FR 19066 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MI CASA; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013 0035] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MI CASA; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... CASA is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: Passenger charters. Geographic Region: Massachusetts, New...

  12. 78 FR 39061 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MISTRESS MALLIKA; Invitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013 0076] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MISTRESS MALLIKA; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... MISTRESS MALLIKA is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Pleasure Charters''. Geographic Region: Rhode...

  13. Blood donor show behavior after an invitation to donate: The influence of collection site factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, E.M.; Zijlstra, Bonne; De Kort, Wim L.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Show behaviour after invitation to donate varies considerably across donors. More insight into this variation is important for blood banks in achieving stable stocks. This study examined individual factors determining intended show behaviour. Most importantly, however, this

  14. 77 FR 35743 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND CHANCE; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2012 0067] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND CHANCE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... SECOND CHANCE is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Small group charters.'' Geographic Region...

  15. 77 FR 20100 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel NORDIC STAR; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2012 0039] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel NORDIC STAR; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... NORDIC STAR is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Sailing excursions and extended charters...

  16. 76 FR 75948 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel CHRYSALIS; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2011 0149] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel CHRYSALIS; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... CHRYSALIS is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Weekly charter vessel.'' Geographic Region: ``Florida...

  17. Invited and contributed papers presented at the 22. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    In this report one invited and fifteen contributed papers by researchers of the `Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasmas`, Lausanne, to the 22. EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics are assembled. figs., tabs., refs.

  18. 78 FR 77200 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel AFFAIR; Invitation for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013-0151] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel AFFAIR; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime... AFFAIR is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Charter Fishing (sport) & sightseeing tours.'' Geographic...

  19. 76 FR 70216 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws; Vessel REEL ATTITUDE; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2011 0146] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws; Vessel REEL ATTITUDE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... ATTITUDE is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Fishing Charter passenger less than 6.'' Geographic...

  20. Invitation to Speak at a Conference: The Tempting Technique Adopted by Predatory Conferences' Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Amin

    2018-03-08

    In recent years, predatory journals, conferences, and publishers have turned to an inevitable threat in scientific publishing. Researchers, regardless of their disciplines, should be aware of these predators and have to be able to recognize them. The main aim of the present paper is to raise awareness about the growing menace of fake invitations to speak at a scientific conference organized by predatory organizers and publishers. Some subtle signs to identify the fake invitations from the authentic ones have been introduced and discussed.

  1. Infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems: Normalising Reduction Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketema, J.; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2010-01-01

    We study normalising reduction strategies for infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems (iCRSs). We prove that all fair, outermost-fair, and needed-fair strategies are normalising for orthogonal, fully-extended iCRSs. These facts properly generalise a number of results on normalising strategies in

  2. Chemical Emergencies - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chemical Emergencies - bosanski (Bosnian) PDF Chemical Emergencies - English MP3 Chemical Emergencies - bosanski (Bosnian) MP3 Chemical Emergencies - English MP4 Chemical Emergencies - bosanski (Bosnian) ...

  3. A Mechanically Proved and an Incremental Development of the Session Initiation Protocol INVITE Transaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa Filali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP is an application layer signaling protocol used to create, manage, and terminate sessions in an IP based network. SIP is considered as a transactional protocol. There are two main SIP transactions, the INVITE transaction and the non-INVITE transaction. The SIP INVITE transaction specification is described in an informal way in Request for Comments (RFC 3261 and modified in RFC 6026. In this paper we focus on the INVITE transaction of SIP, over reliable and unreliable transport mediums, which is used to initiate a session. In order to ensure the correctness of SIP, the INVITE transaction is modeled and verified using event-B method and its Rodin platform. The Event-B refinement concept allows an incremental development by defining the studied system at different levels of abstraction, and Rodin discharges almost all proof obligations at each level. This interaction between modeling and proving reduces the complexity and helps in assuring that the INVITE transaction SIP specification is correct, unambiguous, and easy to understand.

  4. Invitation Choice Structure Has No Impact on Attendance in a Female Business Training Program in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Faizan; Makana, Grace; McKenzie, David; Paruzzolo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Business training programs are a common form of support to small businesses, but organizations providing this training often struggle to get business owners to attend. We evaluate the role of invitation choice structure in determining agreement to participate and actual attendance. A field experiment randomly assigned female small business owners in Kenya (N = 1172) to one of three invitation types: a standard opt-in invitation; an active choice invitation where business owners had to explicitly say yes or no to the invitation; and an enhanced active choice invitation which highlighted the costs of saying no. We find no statistically significant effect of these alternative choice structures on willingness to participate in training, attending at least one day, and completing the course. The 95 percent confidence interval for the active treatment effect on attendance is [−1.9%, +9.5%], while for the enhanced active choice treatment it is [−4.1%, +7.7%]. The effect sizes consistent with our data are smaller than impacts measured in health and retirement savings studies in the United States. We examine several potential explanations for the lack of effect in a developing country setting. We find evidence consistent with two potential reasons being limited decision-making power amongst some women, and lower levels of cognition making the enhanced active choice wording less effective. PMID:25299647

  5. Invitation choice structure has no impact on attendance in a female business training program in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Faizan; Makana, Grace; McKenzie, David; Paruzzolo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Business training programs are a common form of support to small businesses, but organizations providing this training often struggle to get business owners to attend. We evaluate the role of invitation choice structure in determining agreement to participate and actual attendance. A field experiment randomly assigned female small business owners in Kenya (N = 1172) to one of three invitation types: a standard opt-in invitation; an active choice invitation where business owners had to explicitly say yes or no to the invitation; and an enhanced active choice invitation which highlighted the costs of saying no. We find no statistically significant effect of these alternative choice structures on willingness to participate in training, attending at least one day, and completing the course. The 95 percent confidence interval for the active treatment effect on attendance is [-1.9%, +9.5%], while for the enhanced active choice treatment it is [-4.1%, +7.7%]. The effect sizes consistent with our data are smaller than impacts measured in health and retirement savings studies in the United States. We examine several potential explanations for the lack of effect in a developing country setting. We find evidence consistent with two potential reasons being limited decision-making power amongst some women, and lower levels of cognition making the enhanced active choice wording less effective.

  6. Topological Principles of Borosilicate Glass Chemistry - An Invited Talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauro, J.C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Youngman, R. E.

    Borosilicate glasses display a rich complexity of chemical behavior depending on the details of their composition and thermal history. We investigate the topological principles of borosilicate glass chemistry covering the extremes from pure borate to pure silicate end members. Based on NMR...

  7. Chemical modification of carbon powders with aminophenyl and aryl-aliphatic amine groups by reduction of in situ generated diazonium cations: Applicability of the grafted powder towards CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurelie Grondein; Daniel Belanger [Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Departement de Chimie

    2011-08-15

    Aminophenyl, p-aminobenzyl and p-aminoethylphenyl groups were grafted at the surface of carbon Vulcan XC72R by spontaneous reduction of the in situ generated diazonium cations from the corresponding amine. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elemental analysis confirmed an amine loading of about 1 mmol/g. The grafting of amine functionalities leads to a decrease of specific surface area from 223 to about 110 m{sup 2}/g with a drastic loss of microporosity. Acid-base properties of the surface are also affected by the modification. Aminophenyl grafted groups make the surface more acidic while aryl-aliphatic amines groups tends to render it more basic. The grafted layer shows in each case a good thermal stability up to 250{sup o}C. The affinity of the modified powder towards CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} has been evaluated by thermal swing adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity of CO{sub 2} of modified carbons is lower than the unmodified carbon but the presence of the amine functionalities involves a better selectivity of the material towards CO{sub 2} adsorption in comparison of N{sub 2} adsorption. 53 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Reduction reaction of chlorine gas in an Al-Cl2 chemical cell composed of molten chloride salts; Enkabutsu yoyuenkei Al-Cl2 kagaku denchi ni okeru enso gas no kangen hanno kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konda, S.; Sasaki, T.; Ishikawa, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-05

    The molten salt system electrochemical cycle was proposed to reproduce pure Al from scrap Al. The cycle is composed of production of rough AlCl3 by chlorination of scrap Al, refining of rough AlCl3 mainly by sublimation, and electrolytic reproduction of pure Al from refined AlCl3. In production of AlCl3, the Al-Cl2 molten salt system cell composed of anode dissolution reaction of Al and cathode reduction reaction of chlorine gas can generate electric power for the electrolytic reproduction. Chlorine gas can be recycled as anode product. Various experiments were carried out to improve molten salt system cells. In analysis of cell output, voltage drop from open circuit voltage was divided into that due to electrolytic bath resistance, and that due to reaction resistance. The electrolytic bath resistance could be determined from transient characteristics of voltage change just after cutoff of output current. The product of the obtained reaction resistance and a meniscus length was constant regardless of a meniscus length, and useful to predict scale-up cell performance. Output characteristics dependent on meniscus position were also obtained. 16 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  10. Particulate Matter Concentration Levels in South Central Richmond, California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, B.; Byias, C.; Cuff, K. E.; Diaz, J.; Love, K.; Marks-Block, T.; McLane, F.; Mollique, Z.; Montes, E.; Ross, R.; Washington, B.

    2009-12-01

    South Central Richmond, California is the home of one of the nation’s most innovative green workforce training centers, Richmond BUILD - Green Jobs Training facility. A near constant stream of young people engaged in training activities, instructors, invited guests, and journalists of various ages can be seen moving in and out of the facility nearly every day of the week throughout a given year. Additionally, the comings and goings of young children and adults associated with a mid-sized elementary school just north of the facility contributes to the general area’s substantial human traffic. Unfortunately, however, a major highway, Interstate 580, a major thoroughfare, 23rd Street and a railway line operated by Burlington Northern Santa Fe, Union Pacific, and the Richmond Pacific Railroad frame the triangular area within which these two sites are situated. In addition, a major petrochemical complex and several shipping facilities are located less than three kilometers away north and west of this area. As part of a general assessment of air quality in this heavily human traveled area, we conducted a study of particulate matter (PM) concentrations over a five-month period beginning in August of 2009. Measurements were made at a variety of locations, and results were used to map the spatial distribution of PM of various sizes. Regions of high concentration levels were identified, and these particular areas then were monitored over time. Preliminary results of our study indicate that regions with high concentrations are consistent across the range of particle sizes measured, which suggests a common source for PM found in the study area. As these regions are located close to a major thoroughfare and railway line, we believe that diesel-burning vehicles are major contributors to the PM levels found in the study area. Time series results suggest a fairly strong correlation between higher than average PM concentrations and abnormally high wind gusts. On days when wind

  11. Strain-Compensated InGaAsP Superlattices for Defect Reduction of InP Grown on Exact-Oriented (001 Patterned Si Substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Megalini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of InGaAsP strain-compensated superlattices (SC-SLs as a technique to reduce the defect density of Indium Phosphide (InP grown on silicon (InP-on-Si by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD. Initially, a 2 μm thick gallium arsenide (GaAs layer was grown with very high uniformity on exact oriented (001 300 mm Si wafers; which had been patterned in 90 nm V-grooved trenches separated by silicon dioxide (SiO2 stripes and oriented along the [110] direction. Undercut at the Si/SiO2 interface was used to reduce the propagation of defects into the III–V layers. Following wafer dicing; 2.6 μm of indium phosphide (InP was grown on such GaAs-on-Si templates. InGaAsP SC-SLs and thermal annealing were used to achieve a high-quality and smooth InP pseudo-substrate with a reduced defect density. Both the GaAs-on-Si and the subsequently grown InP layers were characterized using a variety of techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD; atomic force microscopy (AFM; transmission electron microscopy (TEM; and electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI; which indicate high-quality of the epitaxial films. The threading dislocation density and RMS surface roughness of the final InP layer were 5 × 108/cm2 and 1.2 nm; respectively and 7.8 × 107/cm2 and 10.8 nm for the GaAs-on-Si layer.

  12. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  13. Chemical Peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your expectations. Talk with your doctor about your motivations and expectations, as well as the potential risks. ... the sun permanently to prevent changes in skin color. Keep in mind that chemical peel results might ...

  14. Chemical carcinogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Searle, Charles E

    1976-01-01

    Cancer causing agents are now known to exist throughout the environment-in polluted air and tobacco smoke, in various plants and foods, and in many chemicals that are used in industry and laboratories...

  15. Reduction in language testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimova, Slobodanka; Jensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    /video recorded speech samples and written reports produced by two experienced raters after testing. Our findings suggest that reduction or reduction-like pronunciation features are found in tested L2 speech, but whenever raters identify and comment on such reductions, they tend to assess reductions negatively......This study represents an initial exploration of raters' comments and actual realisations of form reductions in L2 test speech performances. Performances of three L2 speakers were selected as case studies and illustrations of how reductions are evaluated by the raters. The analysis is based on audio...

  16. Mapping spatial patterns of denitrifiers at large scales (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippot, L.; Ramette, A.; Saby, N.; Bru, D.; Dequiedt, S.; Ranjard, L.; Jolivet, C.; Arrouays, D.

    2010-12-01

    Little information is available regarding the landscape-scale distribution of microbial communities and its environmental determinants. Here we combined molecular approaches and geostatistical modeling to explore spatial patterns of the denitrifying community at large scales. The distribution of denitrifrying community was investigated over 107 sites in Burgundy, a 31 500 km2 region of France, using a 16 X 16 km sampling grid. At each sampling site, the abundances of denitrifiers and 42 soil physico-chemical properties were measured. The relative contributions of land use, spatial distance, climatic conditions, time and soil physico-chemical properties to the denitrifier spatial distribution were analyzed by canonical variation partitioning. Our results indicate that 43% to 85% of the spatial variation in community abundances could be explained by the measured environmental parameters, with soil chemical properties (mostly pH) being the main driver. We found spatial autocorrelation up to 739 km and used geostatistical modelling to generate predictive maps of the distribution of denitrifiers at the landscape scale. Studying the distribution of the denitrifiers at large scale can help closing the artificial gap between the investigation of microbial processes and microbial community ecology, therefore facilitating our understanding of the relationships between the ecology of denitrifiers and N-fluxes by denitrification.

  17. MCNP variance reduction overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Booth, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The MCNP code is rich in variance reduction features. Standard variance reduction methods found in most Monte Carlo codes are available as well as a number of methods unique to MCNP. We discuss the variance reduction features presently in MCNP as well as new ones under study for possible inclusion in future versions of the code

  18. Modern Reduction Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Pher G

    2008-01-01

    With its comprehensive overview of modern reduction methods, this book features high quality contributions allowing readers to find reliable solutions quickly and easily. The monograph treats the reduction of carbonyles, alkenes, imines and alkynes, as well as reductive aminations and cross and heck couplings, before finishing off with sections on kinetic resolutions and hydrogenolysis. An indispensable lab companion for every chemist.

  19. Optical wireless links with enhanced linearity and selectivity [Invited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Roger J.; Sweet, C.; Idrus, S.

    2005-10-01

    Optical wireless is an attractive medium as an alternative to optical fiber communications, and also to RF, because of its high bandwidth and relative ease of use, especially when it comes to deployment in new physical situations. We describe an optical wireless link approach that offers a performance that gives analog transmission with significantly reduced distortion levels and enhanced reception sensitivity by combining a novel hybrid detector-amplifier technique. Reduction of distortion by 40 dB and improvement in sensitivity of 20-30 dB is possible, using the techniques described.

  20. Chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section

  1. Enhanced invitation methods to increase uptake of NHS health checks: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Alice S; Burgess, Caroline; McDermott, Lisa; Wright, Alison J; Dodhia, Hiten; Conner, Mark; Miller, Jane; Rudisill, Caroline; Cornelius, Victoria; Gulliford, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Background NHS Health Checks is a new program for primary prevention of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and vascular dementia in adults aged 40 to 74 years in England. Individuals without existing cardiovascular disease or diabetes are invited for a Health Check every 5 years. Uptake among those invited is lower than anticipated. Method The project is a three-arm randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that enhanced invitation methods, using the Question-Be...

  2. Collaborating for Multi-Scale Chemical Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William H. Green

    2006-07-14

    Advanced model reduction methods were developed and integrated into the CMCS multiscale chemical science simulation software. The new technologies were used to simulate HCCI engines and burner flames with exceptional fidelity.

  3. Understanding the Impact of Exposure Patterns on Risks from Combined Exposures to Multiple Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The talk was invited so there is no formal abstract. However, the focus of the talk is on the use of exposure information in the evaluation of risks from combined exposures to chemicals. The talk presents a bit of history and several case studies. All empirical data presented hav...

  4. Preventive home visits to older home-dwelling people in Denmark: are invitational procedures of importance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, A; Vass, M; Avlund, K

    2010-01-01

    Since 1998 all municipalities in Denmark have been required by law to offer two annual preventive home visits to all home-dwelling citizens aged 75 or over. The influence of invitational procedures on acceptance rates has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate...... whether different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. The study was based on secondary analyses of data from the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits. Data were collected from 1998 to 2002. Of the 4060 participants in the main study......, 3245 reported receiving an offer for an identifiable preventive home visit, of whom 2399 (73.9%) provided complete data for the main analyses in the present study. Invitational procedures were categorised as: (1) a letter with a proposed date and time for the visit, (2) a visitor telephone call, and (3...

  5. Chemical pneumonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cleaning materials such as chlorine bleach, during industrial accidents, or near swimming pools) Grain and fertilizer dust ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Chemical Emergencies ... about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A.M. is ...

  6. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil

  7. Risk literacy for scientists. Invitation to regulatory science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a regulatory science, which fills a gap between scientific knowledge and regulatory actions. The author provides examples of the regulatory science employed in chemical risk assessment, such as the linear non-threshold theory. In the regulatory science, scientific data as well as scientific reasoning based on scientific knowledge - or regulatory rules - should play an important role. It is important to recognize that the rules facilitate transparent decision making under conditions of uncertainty and time constraints. Furthermore, the development of traditional or pure science results in the validation of regulatory rules, and subsequently, the regulatory science procedure develops more systematically. The concept of this science should be understood by those engaged in governmental decision making. (author)

  8. Orthogonal trapping and sensing with long working distance optics [invited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a next generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials. The workstation......Photonics Workstation that allows the user to directly control and simultaneously measure a portfolio of important chemical and biological processes. We arc currently able to generate up to 100 powerful optical traps using well-separated objectives, which eliminates the need for high numerical aperture oil or water...... immersion objectives required in conventional optical tweezers. This generates a large field of view and leaves vital space for integrating other enabling tools for probing the trapped particles, such as linear and nonlinear microscopy or micro-spectroscopy. Together with chcmists at another Danish...

  9. Preventive home visits to older home-dwelling people in Denmark: are invitational procedures of importance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmann, A; Vass, M; Avlund, K

    2010-11-01

    Since 1998 all municipalities in Denmark have been required by law to offer two annual preventive home visits to all home-dwelling citizens aged 75 or over. The influence of invitational procedures on acceptance rates has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate whether different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. The study was based on secondary analyses of data from the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits. Data were collected from 1998 to 2002. Of the 4060 participants in the main study, 3245 reported receiving an offer for an identifiable preventive home visit, of whom 2399 (73.9%) provided complete data for the main analyses in the present study. Invitational procedures were categorised as: (1) a letter with a proposed date and time for the visit, (2) a visitor telephone call, and (3) a letter with encouragement to phone the visitor for appointment (letter without a proposed date). Covariates included sex, age, experience with preventive interventions, functional ability, self rated health, social relations and psychosocial characteristics. Statistical analyses included chi-square tests, and bi- and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. Significantly more men (75.1%) than women (62.8%) declined the first preventive home visit regardless of the invitational procedure. Compared to 'letter with a proposed date', men had an odds ratio of 1.78 (95% CI: 1.16-2.74) for declining visits when 'telephone call' was used and an odds ratio 2.81 (95% CI: 1.79-4.40) when 'letter without a proposed date' was used as the invitational procedure. In women the odds ratios were 1.23 (95% CI: 0.91-1.68) and 1.87 (95% CI: 1.37-2.55), respectively. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Invited series of talks and lectures at Yale University (USA) on Rolf Nordahl's research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    in several topics. The lectures will address his innovative experiments on using methods from Film and Filmsound to inform research in Computer Games and Virtual Reality applications with real-life examples from the Natural Interactive Walking (NIW) project - a EU-funded project headed at Aalborg University......Rolf Nordahl , Medialogy in Copenhagen, will be giving an invited series of lectures at Yale University, Connecticut, USA in the last week of March, 2010. Rolf has been invited to give talks to Professors, research fellows, Ph.D.'s and graduate students of Yale University (USA), on his research...

  11. Invitation to Speak at a Conference: The Tempting Technique Adopted by Predatory Conferences’ Organizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asadi, Amin

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, predatory journals, conferences, and publishers have turned to an inevitable threat in scientific publishing. Researchers, regardless of their disciplines, should be aware of these predators and have to be able to recognize them. The main aim of the present paper is to raise awar...... awareness about the growing menace of fake invitations to speak at a scientific conference organized by predatory organizers and publishers. Some subtle signs to identify the fake invitations from the authentic ones have been introduced and discussed....

  12. Should breast cancer survivors be excluded from, or invited to, organised mammography screening programmes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucchi Lauro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of breast cancer in developed countries has steadily risen over recent decades. Immediate and long-term health needs of patients, including preventive care and screening services, are receiving increasing attention. A question still unresolved is whether breast cancer survivors should receive mammographic surveillance in the clinical or screening setting and, thus, whether they should be excluded from, or invited to, organised mammography screening programmes. The objective of this article is to discuss the many contradictory aspects of this matter. Discussion Problems with mammographic surveillance of breast cancer survivors include: weak evidence of a reduction in mortality; lack of evidence in favour of one setting or the other; lack of evidence-based guidelines for the frequency and duration of surveillance; disproportionate emphasis placed on the first few years post-treatment, probably dictated by surgical and oncological priorities; a variety of screening policies, as these women are permanently or temporarily or partially excluded from many - but not all - organised screening programmes worldwide; an even greater disparity in follow-up protocols used in the clinical setting; a paucity of data on compliance to mammographic surveillance in both settings; and a difficulty in coordinating the roles of health care providers. In the future, the use of mammography in breast cancer survivors will be influenced by the inclusion of women aged > 69 years in organised screening programmes and the implementation of multidisciplinary breast units, and will probably be investigated by research activities on individual risk assessment and risk-tailored screening. In the interim, current problems can be partially alleviated with some technical solutions in screening data recording, patient flows, and care coordination. Summary Mammographic surveillance of breast cancer survivors is situated at the crossroads of numerous

  13. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  14. 75 FR 30002 - Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... management; c. Nuclear deterrence transformation; d. Weapons effects; and e. Other Office of the Under... Reduction Agency on the following: a. Reducing the threat posed by nuclear, biological, chemical...

  15. Reduction - competitive tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, L.; Bargerstock, S.

    1995-01-01

    Inventory reduction is one of the few initiatives that represent significant cost-reduction potential that does not result in personnel reduction. Centerior Energy's Perry nuclear power plant has embarked on an aggressive program to reduce inventory while maintaining plant material availability. Material availability to the plant was above 98%, but at an unacceptable 1994 inventory book value of $47 million with inventory carrying costs calculated at 30% annually

  16. Information-Based Analysis of Data Assimilation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, G. S.; Gupta, H. V.; Crow, W. T.; Gong, W.

    2013-12-01

    Data assimilation is defined as the Bayesian conditioning of uncertain model simulations on observations for the purpose of reducing uncertainty about model states. Practical data assimilation methods make the application of Bayes' law tractable either by employing assumptions about the prior, posterior and likelihood distributions (e.g., the Kalman family of filters) or by using resampling methods (e.g., bootstrap filter). We propose to quantify the efficiency of these approximations in an OSSE setting using information theory and, in an OSSE or real-world validation setting, to measure the amount - and more importantly, the quality - of information extracted from observations during data assimilation. To analyze DA assumptions, uncertainty is quantified as the Shannon-type entropy of a discretized probability distribution. The maximum amount of information that can be extracted from observations about model states is the mutual information between states and observations, which is equal to the reduction in entropy in our estimate of the state due to Bayesian filtering. The difference between this potential and the actual reduction in entropy due to Kalman (or other type of) filtering measures the inefficiency of the filter assumptions. Residual uncertainty in DA posterior state estimates can be attributed to three sources: (i) non-injectivity of the observation operator, (ii) noise in the observations, and (iii) filter approximations. The contribution of each of these sources is measurable in an OSSE setting. The amount of information extracted from observations by data assimilation (or system identification, including parameter estimation) can also be measured by Shannon's theory. Since practical filters are approximations of Bayes' law, it is important to know whether the information that is extracted form observations by a filter is reliable. We define information as either good or bad, and propose to measure these two types of information using partial

  17. Process energy reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowthian, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    Process Energy Reduction (PER) is a demand-side energy reduction approach which complements and often supplants other traditional energy reduction methods such as conservation and heat recovery. Because the application of PER is less obvious than the traditional methods, it takes some time to learn the steps as well as practice to become proficient in its use. However, the benefit is significant, often far outweighing the traditional energy reduction approaches. Furthermore, the method usually results in a better process having less waste and pollution along with improved yields, increased capacity, and lower operating costs

  18. Finding optimal exact reducts

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of attribute reduction is an important problem related to feature selection and knowledge discovery. The problem of finding reducts with minimum cardinality is NP-hard. This paper suggests a new algorithm for finding exact reducts with minimum cardinality. This algorithm transforms the initial table to a decision table of a special kind, apply a set of simplification steps to this table, and use a dynamic programming algorithm to finish the construction of an optimal reduct. I present results of computer experiments for a collection of decision tables from UCIML Repository. For many of the experimented tables, the simplification steps solved the problem.

  19. Metallothermic reduction of molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, T.K.; Bose, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper gives a brief account of the investigations conducted so far on metallothermic reduction of high grade molybdenite with particular emphasis on the work carried out in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Based on thermochemical considerations, the paper first introduces a number of metallic reductants suitable for use in metallothermic reduction of molybdenite. Aluminium, sodium and tin are found to be suitable reducing agents and very rightly they have found most applications in the research and development efforts on metallothermic reduction of molybdenite. The reduction with tin was conducted on fairly large scale both in vacuum and hydrogen atmosphere. The reaction was reported to be invariant depending mainly on the reduction temperature and a temperature of the order of 1250deg to 1300degC was required for good metal recovery. In comparison to tin, aluminothermic reduction of molybdenite was studied more extensively and it was conducted in closed bomb, vacuum and also in open atmosphere. In aluminothermic reduction, the influence of amount of reducing agent, amount of heat booster, preheating temperature and charging procedure on these metal yield was studied in detail. The reduction generally yielded massive molybdenum metal contaminated with aluminium as the major impurity element. Efforts were made to purify the reduced metal by arc melting, electron beam melting and molten salt electrorefining. 9 refs. (author)

  20. Chemical radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.

    1979-01-01

    A reivew of the problems and progress in the field of chemical radioprotection is given. After defining the field of research, the practical significance of radioprotective substances and the requirements for a utilizable radioprotective preparation are presented. Trends of development of this field of research, the state of the art, and resulting conclusions for the future development of radioprotective substances of practical value are discussed. (author)

  1. A Ground-Up Model for Gun Violence Reduction: A Community-Based Public Health Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdsong, T Rashad; Devan, Angela; Yamatani, Hide

    2016-01-01

    The suggested strategy for the reduction of violence is to collaboratively address the problem, based on an intervention system focused on prevention, rehabilitation, and development. This strategy is capable of engaging community residents in positive ways, and it empowers them to take ownership and sustain much-needed resident commitments to achieve long-term public safety. The community residents largely insist that over-reliance on law enforcement to control violence invites further affliction among Black youth and adults.

  2. Science to Policy: Many Roads to Travel (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; McCaughey, J.

    2013-12-01

    Transferring scientific discoveries to policies and their implementation is not a narrow, one-way road. The complexities of policy-making are not normally within the purview of either scientists or science educators and communicators. Politics, bureaucracy, economics, culture, religion, and local knowledge are a few areas that help determine how policies are made. These factors are compounded by differences in cultures among scientists, educators/communicators, and governments. To complicate this further, bodies of knowledge which could be brought to bear upon improved policies and implementation lie within different disciplines, e.g. natural sciences, disaster risk reduction, development, psychology, social science, communications, education and more. In a scientific research institution, we have found many potential paths to help transfer knowledge back and forth between scientists and decision-makers. Some of these paths are short with an end in sight. Others are longer, and the destination can't be seen. Some of these paths include a) education and discussion with various government agencies, b) educating students who will return to various agencies and educational institutions in their home countries, c) sharing scientific knowledge with research colleagues, d) consulting, e) working with NGOs, and media, f) working with colleagues in other fields, e.g. development, risk, regional consortia. Recognizing and transferring knowledge among different disciplines, learning the needs of various players, finding the most productive paths, and thinking about varying time frames are important in prioritizing the transference of science into action.

  3. Water, Society and the future of water resources research (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The subject of water and society is broad, but at heart is the study of water as a resource, essential to human activities, a vital input to food and energy production, the sustaining medium for ecosystems and yet also a destructive hazard. Society demands, withdraws, competes, uses and wastes the resource in dynamic counterpart. The science of water management emerges from this interface, a field at the nexus of engineering and geoscience, with substantial influence from economics and other social sciences. Within this purview are some of the most pressing environmental questions of our time, such as adaptation to climate change, direct and indirect connections between water and energy policy, the continuing dependence of agriculture on depletion of the world's aquifers, the conservation or preservation of ecosystems within increasingly human-influenced river systems, and food security and poverty reduction for the earth's poorest inhabitants. This presentation will present and support the hypothesis that water resources research is a scientific enterprise separate from, yet closely interrelated to, hydrologic science. We will explore the scientific basis of water resources research, review pressing research questions and opportunities, and propose an action plan for the advancement of the science of water management. Finally, the presentation will propose a Chapman Conference on Water and Society: The Future of Water Resources Research in the spring of 2015.

  4. Molecular modeling: An open invitation for applied mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2013-10-01

    Molecular modeling methods provide a very wide range of challenges for innovative mathematical and computational techniques, where often high dimensionality, large sets of data, and complicated interrelations imply a multitude of iterative approximations. The physical and chemical basis of these methodologies involves quantum mechanics with several non-intuitive aspects, where classical interpretation and classical analogies are often misleading or outright wrong. Hence, instead of the everyday, common sense approaches which work so well in engineering, in molecular modeling one often needs to rely on rather abstract mathematical constraints and conditions, again emphasizing the high level of reliance on applied mathematics. Yet, the interdisciplinary aspects of the field of molecular modeling also generates some inertia and perhaps too conservative reliance on tried and tested methodologies, that is at least partially caused by the less than up-to-date involvement in the newest developments in applied mathematics. It is expected that as more applied mathematicians take up the challenge of employing the latest advances of their field in molecular modeling, important breakthroughs may follow. In this presentation some of the current challenges of molecular modeling are discussed.

  5. Assessment of Patient Exposure in Nuclear Medicine (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Lassmann, M.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation exposure of a patient in diagnostic nuclear medicine is influenced by different factors, which may be separated into direct and indirect determinants of exposure. The radiation burden is directly related to the radionuclide used (beta, gamma radiation, energy of radiation, physical half-life) and the activity used. In addition, the radiation exposure is strongly influenced by the type of radiolabelled compound (radiopharmaceutical) and its metabolic behaviour. The metabolism of a radio-pharmaceutical, however, depends not only on the general principles of its biodistribution but also on individual parameters of its biokinetics (i.e. patient's age, sex, weight, organ uptake and excretion). Optimisation in radiation protection requires a careful selection of activity, radionuclide and radiopharmaceutical compound for a patient. The radiation exposure of a patient may be influenced considerably by disturbance factors which can be controlled by means of quality assurance measures. Concerning the radiopharmaceutical, radiochemical and chemical impurities have to be ruled out before administration. Activity meters and gamma cameras must be checked by appropriate quality control procedures. The check of the gamma cameras includes background, efficiency, uniformity, linearity and resolution and has to be an integral part of a routine quality control programme in a nuclear medicine department. (author)

  6. Global chemical pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.; Hester, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    Over the past decade, public and governmental awareness of environmental problems has grown steadily, with an accompanying increase in the regulation of point sources of pollution. As a result, great strides have been made in cleaning polluted rivers and decreasing air pollution near factories. However, traditional regulatory approaches to environmental pollution have focused primarily on protecting the maximally exposed individual located in the immediate vicinity of the pollution source. Little attention has been given to the global implications of human production and use of synthetic chemicals. A consensus is emerging that even trace levels of environmental contamination can have potentially devastating environmental consequences. The authors maintain that ambient levels of pollution have risen to the point where human health is being affected on a global scale. Atmospheric transport is recognized as the primary mode of global distribution and entry into the food chain for organic chemicals. The following are examples of global chemical pollutants that result in human exposure of significant proportions: PCBs, dioxins, benzene, mercury and lead. Current regulatory approaches for environmental pollution do not incorporate ways of dealing with global pollution. Instead the major focus has been on protecting the maximally exposed individual. If we do not want to change our standard of living, the only way to reduce global chemical pollution is to make production and consumption processes more efficient and to lower the levels of production of these toxic chemicals. Thus the only reasonable solution to global pollution is not increased regulation of isolated point sources, but rather an increased emphasis on waste reduction and materials recycling. Until we focus on these issues, we will continue to experience background cancer risk in the 10 -3 range

  7. Increasingly strong reduction in breast cancer mortality due to screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoor, G; Moss, S M; Otten, J D M; Donders, R; Paap, E; den Heeten, G J; Holland, R; Broeders, M J M; Verbeek, A L M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Favourable outcomes of breast cancer screening trials in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in the launch of population-based service screening programmes in many Western countries. We investigated whether improvements in mammography and treatment modalities have had an influence on the effectiveness of breast cancer screening from 1975 to 2008. Methods: In Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 55 529 women received an invitation for screening between 1975 and 2008. We designed a case–referent study to evaluate the impact of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality over time from 1975 to 2008. A total number of 282 breast cancer deaths were identified, and 1410 referents aged 50–69 were sampled from the population invited for screening. We estimated the effectiveness by calculating the odds ratio (OR) indicating the breast cancer death rate for screened vs unscreened women. Results: The breast cancer death rate in the screened group over the complete period was 35% lower than in the unscreened group (OR=0.65; 95% CI=0.49–0.87). Analysis by calendar year showed an increasing effectiveness from a 28% reduction in breast cancer mortality in the period 1975–1991 (OR=0.72; 95% CI=0.47–1.09) to 65% in the period 1992–2008 (OR=0.35; 95% CI=0.19–0.64). Conclusion: Our results show an increasingly strong reduction in breast cancer mortality over time because of mammographic screening. PMID:21343930

  8. Reduction of radiation effects by chemical protector (WR-2721)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Yun, T.K.; Koh, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    As a part studies on effect of radiation, the present report was carried out to evaluate the changes of leukocytes, lymphocytes percent of leukocytes and several organs in swiss webster (NIH-GP) mice by radiation protective agents prior to γ-ray exposure. The whole body irradiation after administration of a radiation protective agents was done in dose level of 25,50,100 and 300 rads by a single exposure of γ-ray delivered from 60 Co, source tele-irradiation unit at a dose rate of 100 rad/min. Mice of each experimental group were whole body γ-irradiated in plastic cage with special producted rotating machine. The radiation protective agent was employed WR-2721 and the amounts injected intraperitoneally were 400mg/kg of body weight. The leukocytes were counted with hemocytometer. Differential count of leukocytes was done with 200 cells every smear and lymphocyte percent of leukocyte were determined in relative proportion only. All major organ were examined grossly and weighted. After fixation with formalin solution, histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. (Author)

  9. Ultralow Level Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to develop a reasonable and cost-effective approach to meet the emerging mercury standards, especially for high volume outfalls with concentrations below the drinking water standard

  10. In Situ Chemical Reduction for Organic Explosives in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    DARAMEND®  Implementation  Results  Degradation and Toxicity  Summary Presentation Outline www.AdventusGroup.com March 2008 © Copyright Adventus...2008 © Copyright Adventus Intellectual Property Inc. 9 DARAMEND ® Technology Applications Cycled Anaerobic/Aerobic • chlorinated pesticides and...Consistency • Fungus www.AdventusGroup.com March 2008 © Copyright Adventus Intellectual Property Inc. 17 Implementation - Full Scale • Conducted inside

  11. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxide into metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claux, Benoit [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Universite de Grenoble, LEPMI-ENSEEG, 1130 rue de la Piscine, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Serp, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.serp@cea.f [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Fouletier, Jacques [Universite de Grenoble, LEPMI-ENSEEG, 1130 rue de la Piscine, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2011-02-28

    The Fray Farthing and Chen (FFC) and Ono and Suzuki (OS) processes were developed for the reduction of titanium oxide to titanium metal by electrolysis in high temperature molten alkali chloride salts. The possible transposition to CeO{sub 2} reduction is considered in this study. Present work clarifies, by electro-analytical techniques, the reduction pathway leading to the metal. The reduction of CeO{sub 2} into metal was feasible via an indirect mechanism. Electrolyses on 10 g of CeO{sub 2} were carried out to evaluate the electrochemical process efficiency. Ca metal is electrodeposited at the cathode from CaCl{sub 2}-KCl solvent and reacts chemically with ceria to form not only metallic cerium, but also cerium oxychloride.

  12. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and..., Division of Nursing, will host an invitational summit that focuses on Nursing Workforce Diversity (NWD..., thought leaders, and key workforce diversity stakeholders to identify the full range of academic and...

  13. Household Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Home Be Informed Household Chemical Emergencies Household Chemical Emergencies Although the risk of a chemical accident ... reduce the risk of injury. Before a Household Chemical Emergency It is critical to store household chemicals ...

  14. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic communities that catalyze reductive dehalogenation appear to differ in many respects. A large number of pure cultures which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic compounds are known, in contrast to only a few organisms which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds. Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1 is an anaerobe which dehalogenates aromatic compounds and is physiologically and morphologically unusual in a number of respects, including the ability to exploit reductive dehalogenation for energy metabolism. When possible, we use D. tiedjei as a model to understand dehalogenating organisms in the above-mentioned undefined systems. Aerobes use reductive dehalogenation for substrates which are resistant to known mechanisms of oxidative attack. Reductive dehalogenation, especially of aliphatic compounds, has recently been found in cell-free systems. These systems give us an insight into how and why microorganisms catalyze this activity. In some cases transition metal complexes serve as catalysts, whereas in other cases, particularly with aromatic substrates, the catalysts appear to be enzymes. Images PMID:1406492

  15. 78 FR 33149 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel CATTITUDE; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel CATTITUDE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. You may also send comments electronically via the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov . All comments will become part of this docket and...

  16. 78 FR 25530 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BLUE DOLPHIN; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013-0049] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BLUE DOLPHIN; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... DOLPHIN is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Skippered daysailing in Puget Sound and San Juan Islands...

  17. 76 FR 76812 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BARBARY GHOST; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2011 0148] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BARBARY GHOST; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... BARBARY GHOST is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Sightseeing tours in the San Francisco Bay for a...

  18. 76 FR 66698 - Postsecondary Educational Institutions Invited To Participate in Experiments Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... typically need their student aid funds early to meet obligations for travel to the site of their upcoming... Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Federal Student Financial Assistance Programs under Title... invites postsecondary educational institutions (institutions) that participate in the student assistance...

  19. 78 FR 23893 - Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... inviting proposals for the 2014 Market Access Program (MAP). The intended effect of this notice is to... strategy and a program effectiveness time line against which results can be measured at specific intervals... allocation strategy to fund applicants who can demonstrate performance and address the objectives of the GPRA...

  20. 78 FR 42153 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel COMPASS ROSE; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013-0081] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel COMPASS ROSE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... COMPASS ROSE is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Sailboat charters six passengers or less...

  1. "Just Don't": The Suppression and Invitation of Dialogue in the Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth

    2008-01-01

    Responding to concerns raised by grade 11 mathematics students, we examined a broad set of mathematics classroom transcripts from multiple teachers to examine how the word "just" was and could be used to suppress and invite dialogue. We used corpus linguistics tools to process and quantify the large body of text, not to describe the nature of the…

  2. Do Worlds Have Corners? When Children's Picture Books Invite Philosophical Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maagero, Eva; Ostbye, Guri Lorentzen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we want to present and analyse the picture book "The World has no Corners" (2006/1999) by the Norwegian author and illustrator Svein Nyhus. The book represents a new trend in Norwegian picture books for children by inviting the readers into a world of thinking and wondering about existential topics such as life and death, growing…

  3. 76 FR 75949 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel PANGAEA; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2011 0150] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel PANGAEA; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... PANGAEA is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``We would like to offer Pangaea for day [[Page 75950...

  4. 78 FR 13752 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SPIRIT; Invitation for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013 0013] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SPIRIT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel SPIRIT is: Intended...

  5. 77 FR 26818 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel FREE SPIRIT; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2012-0058] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel FREE SPIRIT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... SPIRIT is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Day/overnight passenger passage. Depart and return same...

  6. 77 FR 22631 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SPIRIT; Invitation for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2012 0049] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SPIRIT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel SPIRIT is: Intended...

  7. 77 FR 26819 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BLUE PLANET; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2012-0054] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BLUE PLANET; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... PLANET is: Intended Commercial use of Vessel: ``Charter to Boy Scouts of America Florida Sea Base...

  8. 78 FR 35091 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BAD INFLUENCE; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013 0072] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BAD INFLUENCE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel BAD...

  9. 78 FR 46410 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel IMPOSSIBLE DREAM; Invitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013 0084] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel IMPOSSIBLE DREAM; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... of the vessel IMPOSSIBLE DREAM is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Day, Multiple Day, Week...

  10. 78 FR 35092 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BEAR BOAT; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013-0069] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BEAR BOAT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel BEAR...

  11. 78 FR 53004 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND WIND; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND WIND; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... SECOND WIND is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Breakfast, lunch, and dinner cruises featuring... to the docket number of this notice and the vessel name in order for MARAD to properly consider the...

  12. 78 FR 35093 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel EYE DOC; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel EYE DOC; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... DOC is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Charter fishing on Lake Erie'' GEOGRAPHIC REGION: ``Ohio..., Maritime Administration. [FR Doc. 2013-13836 Filed 6-10-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910-81-P ...

  13. More playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfaces – interfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing

  14. Youth Voices on Global Citizenship: Deliberating across Canada in an Online Invited Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Lynette; Pashby, Karen; Godwaldt, Terry

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the processes of youth engagement in an "invited space" for Canadian secondary school students. The organizers created a participatory citizenship education space in which Canadian students discussed their views and visions and developed their policy position on global citizenship and global citizenship education.…

  15. 78 FR 18674 - Invitation for Public Comment on Draft DOT Research, Development and Technology Strategic Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... and strategic process to cover the years 2013-2018, and responds to feedback from the National... administrations. Two cross-modal bodies participated in the process: the RD&T Planning Team Council (composed of...-0002] Invitation for Public Comment on Draft DOT Research, Development and Technology Strategic Plan...

  16. 76 FR 67255 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KIWI CAT; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2011 0135] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KIWI CAT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... CAT is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Small vessel 12 person chartering service for the San...

  17. 77 FR 16582 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KAMI KAY; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2012-0033] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KAMI KAY; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel KAMI...

  18. 78 FR 30961 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel LITTLE DUTCH; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013-0057] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel LITTLE DUTCH; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... LITTLE DUTCH is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Carrying up to six passengers for day trips, sunset...

  19. Education as Invitation to Speak: On the Teacher Who Does Not Speak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansieleghem, Nancy; Masschelein, Jan

    2012-01-01

    As a response to "Le Fils," a film directed by the Dardenne brothers, we explore the idea of speaking as an invitation and juxtapose it against ideas of speaking as a transactional, calculative, calibrated, activity. Speaking tends to be understood as a relatively straightforward matter: as a means of communication structured by such values as the…

  20. 76 FR 67253 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel THE GIFT; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2011 0131] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel THE GIFT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... GIFT is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Passenger carrying.'' GEOGRAPHIC REGION: ``ME, NH, MA, RI...

  1. A Suggestion for Restoring Public Support for Public Schools: Learn to Invite Patrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, Flora N.; Russell, Gene; Wedel, Mack

    1998-01-01

    Proposes that the increasing disavowal of public schools results from experience with day-by-day disinviting behaviors. The suggested remedy is for educators to evaluate their on-the-job responses to their patrons. Wherever subminimal interpersonal conditions are identified, participants should learn to invite people to education. Presents a case…

  2. 78 FR 70097 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BEE; Invitation for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BEE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime... entered into this docket is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel BEE...

  3. Effects of Personalization and Invitation Email Length on Web-Based Survey Response Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trespalacios, Jesús H.; Perkins, Ross A.

    2016-01-01

    Individual strategies to increase response rate and survey completion have been extensively researched. Recently, efforts have been made to investigate a combination of interventions to yield better response rates for web-based surveys. This study examined the effects of four different survey invitation conditions on response rate. From a large…

  4. Invited Colloquium on Negotiating the Complexities of Multilingual Assessment, AAAL Conference 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menken, Kate; Shohamy, Elana

    2015-01-01

    The invited colloquium on New Directions in Language Assessment held at the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) annual meeting in Portland, Oregon on March 22, 2014 brought together an international panel of scholars to together explore the possibilities and challenges of translanguaging and bi/multilingual approaches in…

  5. The Report of the National Invitational Conference on Consumer Protection in Postsecondary Education. Report No. 53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This report covers the background, major issues, major recommendations, and agencies and associations represented at the National Invitational Conference on Consumer Protection in Postsecondary Education held at Denver, Colorado in June 1974. Major recommendations of the conference suggest that: (1) The states should provide by legislation or by…

  6. 78 FR 14413 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel LUCKY DUCK; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel LUCKY DUCK; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... should refer to docket number MARAD-2013-0019. Written comments may be submitted by hand or by mail to... LUCKY DUCK is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``The vessel is to be operated as a sailing...

  7. 77 FR 5628 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BIG GAME; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BIG GAME; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As described by the applicant the intended service of the vessel BIG GAME is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Fishing charter boat.'' Geographic Region: ``Rhode Island...

  8. 77 FR 37948 - Free Trade Agreements; Invitation for Applications for Inclusion on Dispute Settlement Lists for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ..., Colombia, Korea, Morocco, and Singapore AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative (``USTR...-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (``USSFTA''). USTR is inviting interested persons to apply to be on one or...-9483 to arrange for an alternative method of transmission. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For...

  9. Audit Programmes in a Diagnostic Radiological Facility (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B.M.; Connolly, P.A.; Cole, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The effective implementation of optimisation strategies for radiation protection in diagnostic radiology including nuclear medicine requires mechanisms for ongoing audit of all relevant factors. The Quality Criteria of the Commission of European Communities highlights clearly the three aspects of a radiological examination which needed to be considered, which are: (i) radiographic technique, (ii) patient dose, and (iii) image quality. Therefore, it is important that the choice of a known and acceptable radiographic technique provides a known outcome in terms of patient dose and image quality. This requirement should be capable of being achieved throughout Europe and capable of being updated as new radiological strategies are developed. Audit programmes aimed at monitoring that this situation exists may be considered at three levels: Level 1 involves routine, periodic, assessment of patient doses on a representative sample of patients undergoing a particular type of examination. Results from this audit are then compared with acceptable and clearly defined diagnostic reference levels or reference dose values which provides a framework for guidance on acceptable practice. A summary of such level 1 programmes which are being pursued in Europe is presented. Level 2 audit programmes, beside patient dose assessment, will also involve an assessment of all those parameters relevant to an X ray examination which may have a bearing on the actual dose delivered to the patient. Such level 2 audit programmes provide the basis for implementation of optimisation strategies for radiation protection in terms of risk reduction, one of the fundamental tenets of radiation protection philosophy. Level 3 audit programmes also include assessment and verification of image quality requirements for particular examinations. This latter aspect is a necessary basis for overall optimisation of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  10. Changing Global Risk Landscape - Challenges for Risk Management (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, F.

    2009-12-01

    The exponentially growing losses related to natural disasters on a global scale reflect a changing risk landscape that is characterized by the influence of climate change and a growing population, particularly in urban agglomerations and coastal zones. In consequence of these trends we witness (a) new hazards such as landslides due to dwindling permafrost, new patterns of strong precipitation and related floods, potential for tropical cyclones in the Mediterranean, sea level rise and others; (b) new risks related to large numbers of people in very dense urban areas, and risks related to the vulnerability of infrastructure such as energy supply, water supply, transportation, communication, etc. (c) extreme events with unprecedented size and implications. An appropriate answer to these challenges goes beyond classical views of risk assessment and protection. It must include an understanding of risk as changing with time so that risk assessment needs to be supplemented by risk monitoring. It requires decision making under high uncertainty. The risks (i.e. potentials for future losses) of extreme events are not only high but also very difficult to quantify, as they are characterized by high levels of uncertainty. Uncertainties relate to frequency, time of occurrence, strength and impact of extreme events but also to the coping capacities of society in response to them. The characterization, quantification, reduction in the extent possible of the uncertainties is an inherent topic of extreme event research. However, they will not disappear, so a rational approach to extreme events must include more than reducing uncertainties. It requires us to assess and rate the irreducible uncertainties, to evaluate options for mitigation under large uncertainties, and their communication to societal sectors. Thus scientist need to develop methodologies that aim at a rational approach to extreme events associated with high levels of uncertainty.

  11. Photosynthetic Microbial Mats are Exemplary Sources of Diverse Biosignatures (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.

    2013-12-01

    Marine cyanobacterial microbial mats are widespread, compact, self-contained ecosystems that create diverse biosignatures and have an ancient fossil record. Within the mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides organic substrates and O2 to the community. Both the absorption and scattering of light change the intensity and spectral composition of incident radiation as it penetrates a mat. Some phototrophs utilize infrared light near the base of the photic zone. A mat's upper layers can become highly reduced and sulfidic at night. Counteracting gradients of O2 and sulfide shape the chemical environment and provide daily-contrasting microenvironments separated on a scale of a few mm. Radiation hazards (UV, etc.), O2 and sulfide toxicity elicit motility and other physiological responses. This combination of benefits and hazards of light, O2 and sulfide promotes the allocation of various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Associated nonphotosynthetic communities, including anaerobes, strongly influence many of the ecosystem's overall characteristics, and their processes affect any biosignatures that enter the fossil record. A biosignature is an object, substance and/or pattern whose origin specifically requires a biological agent. The value of a biosignature depends not only on the probability of life creating it, but also on the improbability of nonbiological processes producing it. Microbial mats create biosignatures that identify particular groups of organisms and also reveal attributes of the mat ecosystem. For example, branched hydrocarbons and pigments can be diagnostic of cyanobacteria and other phototrophic bacteria, and isoprenoids can indicate particular groups of archea. Assemblages of lipid biosignatures change with depth due to changes in microbial populations and diagenetic transformations of organic matter. The 13C/12C values of organic matter and carbonates reflect isotopic discrimination by particular

  12. New Developments and Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron Computed Microtomography (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, M. L.; Wang, Y.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S. R.; Yu, T.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2013-12-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution below one micron. - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element. - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa. - High speed radiography and tomography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution. - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x-ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Studies of the evolution of the early solar system from 3-D textures in meteorites - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The location and chemical speciation of toxic

  13. Sustainable Software Decisions for Long-term Projects (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, A.; Groman, R. C.; Chandler, C. L.; Gaylord, D.; Sun, M.

    2013-12-01

    Adopting new, emerging technologies can be difficult for established projects that are positioned to exist for years to come. In some cases the challenge lies in the pre-existing software architecture. In others, the challenge lies in the fluctuation of resources like people, time and funding. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was created in late 2006 by combining the data management offices for the U.S. GLOBEC and U.S. JGOFS programs to publish data for researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Since its inception, BCO-DMO has been supporting access and discovery of these data through web-accessible software systems, and the office has worked through many of the challenges of incorporating new technologies into its software systems. From migrating human readable, flat file metadata storage into a relational database, and now, into a content management system (Drupal) to incorporating controlled vocabularies, new technologies can radically affect the existing software architecture. However, through the use of science-driven use cases, effective resource management, and loosely coupled software components, BCO-DMO has been able to adapt its existing software architecture to adopt new technologies. One of the latest efforts at BCO-DMO revolves around applying metadata semantics for publishing linked data in support of data discovery. This effort primarily affects the metadata web interface software at http://bco-dmo.org and the geospatial interface software at http://mapservice.bco-dmo.org/. With guidance from science-driven use cases and consideration of our resources, implementation decisions are made using a strategy to loosely couple the existing software systems to the new technologies. The results of this process led to the use of REST web services and a combination of contributed and custom Drupal modules for publishing BCO-DMO's content using the Resource Description Framework (RDF) via an instance of

  14. Thermodynamic basis for evolution of apatite in calcified tissues (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotsky, A.; Drouet, C.; Rollin-Martinet, S.; Champion, E.; Grossin, D.

    2013-12-01

    Bone remodeling and tooth enamel maturation are biological processes which alter the physico-chemical features of biominerals with time. However, although the ubiquity of bone remodeling is clear, why is well crystallized bone mineral systematically replaced by immature nanocrystalline inorganic material? In enamel, a clear evolution is also seen from the first mineral formed during the secretory stage to its mature well crystalline form, which then changes little in the adult tooth. This contribution provides the thermodynamic basis underlying these biological processes. We determined the energetics of biomimetic apatites corresponding to an increasing degree of maturation. Our data point out the progressive evolution of the enthalpy (ΔHf°) and free energy (ΔGf°) of formation toward more negative values upon maturation. Entropy contributions to ΔGf° values are small compared to enthalpy contributions. ΔHf° varies from -12058.9 × 12.2 to -12771.0 × 21.4 kJ/mol for maturation times increasing from 20 min to 3 weeks, approaching the value for stoichiometric hydroxyapatite, -13431.0 × 22.7 kJ/mol. Apatite thermodynamic stability increases as its composition moved toward stoichiometry. These findings imply diminishing aqueous solubility of calcium and phosphate ions as well as decreased surface reactivity. Such thermodynamically-driven maturation is favorable for enamel maturation since this biomineral must resist external aggressions such as contact with acids. In contrast, maintaining a metastable highly reactive and soluble form of apatite is essential to the effective participation of bone as a source of calcium and phosphate for homeostasis. Therefore our data strongly suggest that, far from being trivial, the intrinsic thermodynamic properties of apatite represent a critical driving force for continuous bone remodeling, in contrast to current views favoring a purely biologically driven cycle. These thermodynamic data may prove helpful in other domains

  15. INCORPORATING ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS INTO PROCESS DESIGN: THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    A general theory known as the WAste Reduction (WASR) algorithm has been developed to describe the flow and the generation of potential environmental impact through a chemical process. This theory integrates environmental impact assessment into chemical process design Potential en...

  16. Active3 noise reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-01-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. The Invitational Drought Tournament: What is it and why is it a useful tool for drought preparedness and adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Hill

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Proactive drought preparedness is a challenge for a variety of physical, institutional, and social reasons. Significant progress has been made in monitoring and forecasting water deficits, both temporally and spatially. However, less progress has been made in translating this information into proactive decision-making frameworks to support drought preparedness. The Invitational Drought Tournament (IDT, a simulation adaptation framework developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, is a recent innovation that supports drought preparedness efforts. The IDT provides a mechanism for presenting physical science information to decision makers across a variety of educational levels and professional backgrounds, in a way that allows for peer-to-peer education and synthesis. Second, the game simulation environment allows players to integrate this information into economic, policy and institutional frameworks in a non-threatening manner. Third, it maintains realism by constraining players׳ risk management options via a budget, the physical realities of the drought presented, and the technical expertise of the ‘referees’. Post-game follow-up allows players to explore lessons learned and to identify topics that warrant further in-depth exploration of policy options and subsequent implementation. The game provides an interim step between recognition of the risk posed by drought hazards and the actual implementation of vulnerability-reduction actions. This allows for a broad discussion within a sports-themed process that provides room for reflection and a richer understanding of the issues that must be addressed to ensure drought preparedness actions are effective.

  18. Gender parity trends for invited speakers at four prominent virology conference series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejta, Robert F; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2017-06-07

    Scientific conferences are most beneficial to participants when they showcase significant new experimental developments, accurately summarize the current state of the field, and provide strong opportunities for collaborative networking. A top-notch slate of invited speakers, assembled by conference organizers or committees, is key to achieving these goals. The perceived underrepresentation of female speakers at prominent scientific meetings is currently a popular topic for discussion, but one that often lacks supportive data. We compiled the full rosters of invited speakers over the last 35 years for four prominent international virology conferences, the American Society for Virology Annual Meeting (ASV), the International Herpesvirus Workshop (IHW), the Positive-Strand RNA Virus Symposium (PSR), and the Gordon Research Conference on Viruses & Cells (GRC). The rosters were cross-indexed by unique names, gender, year, and repeat invitations. When plotted as gender-dependent trends over time, all four conferences showed a clear proclivity for male-dominated invited speaker lists. Encouragingly, shifts toward parity are emerging within all units, but at different rates. Not surprisingly, both selection of a larger percentage of first time participants and the presence of a woman on the speaker selection committee correlated with improved parity. Session chair information was also collected for the IHW and GRC. These visible positions also displayed a strong male dominance over time that is eroding slowly. We offer our personal interpretation of these data to aid future organizers achieve improved equity among the limited number of available positions for session moderators and invited speakers. IMPORTANCE Politicians and media members have a tendency to cite anecdotes as conclusions without any supporting data. This happens so frequently now, that a name for it has emerged: fake news. Good science proceeds otherwise. The under representation of women as invited

  19. Chemical properties of mendelevium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1980-01-01

    The isotope 256 Md is nearly always employed for chemical studies of this element. This nuclide can be made by bombardment of fractions of a microgram of 254 Es with intense alpha-particle beams which will produce about 10 6 atoms of 256 Md with a half-life of 77 minutes. Even with the most intense ion beams and the largest available quantities of target isotope, about 10 6 atoms at a time is all the Md that can be produced for chemical studies. This lack of sufficient sample size coupled with the very short lifetimes of the few atoms produced has severly restricted the gathering and broadening of our knowledge concerning the properties of Md and the heavier elements. To illustrate, the literature contains a mere eleven references to the chemical studies of Md, and none of these deal with bulk properties associated with element found in solid phases. Some of these findings are: Md was found to be more volatile than other actinide metals which lead to the belief that it is divalent in the metallic state; separation of Md from the other actinides can be accomplished either by reduction of Md to the divalent state or by chromatographic separations with Md remaining in the tripositive state; extraction of Md with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid is much poorer than the extraction of the neighboring tripositive actinides; attempts to oxidize Md wih sodium bismuthate failed to show any evidence of Md 4+ ; standard reduction potential of Md 3+ was found to be close to -0.1 volt; Md 3+ can be reduced to Md(Hg) by sodium amalgams and by electrolysis; the electrochemical behavior of Md is very similar to that of Fm and can be summarized in the equation, Md 2+ + 2e - = Md(Hg), and E 0 = 1.5 V

  20. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  1. Highly efficient catalytic reductive degradation of various organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aDepartment of Applied Sciences (Chemical Science Division), GUIST, Gauhati University, ... Highly improved catalytic reductive degradation of different organic dyes, in the ... was prepared by a facile co-precipitation method using ultra-high dilute aqueous solutions. ...... face chemical-modification for engineering the intrin-.

  2. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  3. Citizen Science - What's policy got to do with it? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, L.

    2013-12-01

    practices. They also must address the Paperwork Reduction Act, receiving Office of Management and Budget approval before beginning information collection. This presentation will examine many of these legal and policy issues, and provide lessons learned so that others may apply them to their unique missions. The opportunity for large-scale public contributions is great. With planning and support, citizen science could improve our scientific enterprise, facilitate greater public awareness and understanding of scientific issues, and change how the public interacts with government and the scientific community.

  4. Adaptation to Impacts of Greenhouse Gases on the Ocean (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, K.

    2010-12-01

    Greenhouse gases are producing changes in ocean temperature and circulation, and these changes are already adversely affecting marine biota. Furthermore, carbon dioxide is absorbed by the oceans from the atmosphere, and this too is already adversely affecting some marine ecosystems. And, of course, sea-level rise affects both what is above and below the waterline. Clearly, the most effective approach to limit the negative impacts of climate change and acidification on the marine environment is to greatly diminish the rate of greenhouse gas emissions. However, there are other measures that can be taken to limit some of the negative effects of these stresses in the marine environment. Marine ecosystems are subject to multiple stresses, including overfishing, pollution, and loss of coastal wetlands that often serve as nurseries for the open ocean. The adaptive capacity of marine environments can be improved by limiting these other stresses. If current carbon dioxide emission trends continue, for some cases (e.g., coral reefs), it is possible that no amount of reduction in other stresses can offset the increase in stresses posed by warming and acidification. For other cases (e.g., blue-water top-predator fisheries), better fisheries management might yield improved population health despite continued warming and acidification. In addition to reducing stresses so as to improve the adaptive capacity of marine ecosystems, there is also the issue of adaptation in human communities that depend on this changing marine environment. For example, communities that depend on services provided by coral reefs may need to locate alternative foundations for their economies. The fishery industry will need to adapt to changes in fish abundance, timing and location. Most of the things we would like to do to increase the adaptive capacity of marine ecosystems (e.g., reduce fishing pressure, reduce coastal pollution, preserve coastal wetlands) are things that would make sense to do even in

  5. Invited review: Essential oils as modifiers of rumen microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calsamiglia, S; Busquet, M; Cardozo, P W; Castillejos, L; Ferret, A

    2007-06-01

    Microorganisms in the rumen degrade nutrients to produce volatile fatty acids and synthesize microbial protein as an energy and protein supply for the ruminant, respectively. However, this fermentation process has energy (losses of methane) and protein (losses of ammonia N) inefficiencies that may limit production performance and contribute to the release of pollutants to the environment. Antibiotic ionophores have been very successful in reducing these energy and protein losses in the rumen, but the use of antibiotics in animal feeds is facing reduced social acceptance, and their use has been banned in the European Union since January 2006. For this reason, scientists have become interested in evaluating other alternatives to control specific microbial populations to modulate rumen fermentation. Essential oils can interact with microbial cell membranes and inhibit the growth of some gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. As a result of such inhibition, the addition of some plant extracts to the rumen results in an inhibition of deamination and methanogenesis, resulting in lower ammonia N, methane, and acetate, and in higher propionate and butyrate concentrations. Results have indicated that garlic oil, cinnamaldehyde (the main active component of cinnamon oil), eugenol (the main active component of the clove bud), capsaicin (the active component of hot peppers), and anise oil, among others, may increase propionate production, reduce acetate or methane production, and modify proteolysis, peptidolysis, or deamination in the rumen. However, the effects of some of these essential oils are pH and diet dependent, and their use may be beneficial only under specific conditions and production systems. For example, capsaicin appears to have small effects in high-forage diets, whereas the changes observed in high-concentrate diets (increases in dry matter intake and total VFA, and reduction in the acetateto-propionate ratio and ammonia N concentration) may be beneficial

  6. Changing the Ecology of Climate Communication in Your Organization (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, L.; Lewenstein, B.

    2013-12-01

    have become more climate literate and engaged. Having a central entity that brings together the talents of scientists from multiple disciplines is a huge boost to understanding and responding to the changing communication landscape. We will discuss direct ways the scientific community can engage their organization and the public (or more targeted stakeholders) in an integrated and circular pattern of science information delivery. We will also look at indirect methods for raising general awareness of climate change and increasing organizational buy-in, such as harnessing the multi-disciplinary motivation to be energy efficient (nearly all businesses and NGOs) or meet public climate/carbon-reduction commitments (Universities.)

  7. Biogenic hardparts: Difficult archives of the geological past (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Schone, B. R.; Hoffmann, R.; Niedermayr, A.

    2013-12-01

    endocytosis and vesicle transport, precursor mineralogies etc.) is surprisingly incomplete and in many cases based on descriptive rather than mechanistic approaches; (2) in analogy to all metazoans, biomineralization processes of mollusks and brachiopods are complex and involve different mechanisms for different elements. The combined uptake of specific elements both from inorganic and metabolic sources represents a major problem. Despite all of these problems, field experiments document that these biominerals respond to the aquatic geochemistry and the physical properties (temperature, salinity, pH etc.) of their environment, albeit in a more complex manner than conventionally assumed. Significant advances in multi-proxy research, however, require a more holistic view of the physico-chemical and biological processes involved. The present contribution represents a first tentative step towards this goal.

  8. Photochemical Transformation Processes in Sunlit Surface Waters (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vione, D.

    2013-12-01

    -° 1O2 and 3CDOM*, as a function of sunlight irradiance, water chemical composition (also affecting absorption) and column depth. Some examples of model application to real cases will be presented [6-8]. [1] Halladja et al., Environ Sci Technol 41, 6066 (2007) [2] Canonica et al., Environ Sci Technol 39, 9182 (2005) [3] De Laurentiis et al., Chemosphere 88, 1208 (2012) [4] Latch & McNeill, Science 311, 1743 (2006) [5] Minella et al., Chemosphere 90, 881 (2013) [6] Vione et al., Wat Res 45, 6725 (2011) [7] Sur et al., Sci Total Environ 426, 296 (2012) [8] De Laurentiis et al., Environ Sci Technol 46, 8164 (2012)

  9. Invitations received from potential predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences: a 12-month early-career researcher experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Eric; Tardif, Pier-Alexandre; Moore, Lynne; Le Sage, Natalie; Cameron, Peter A

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to describe all unsolicited electronic invitations received from potential predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences over a 12-month period following the first publication as a corresponding author of a junior academician. Unsolicited invitations received at an institutional email address and perceived to be sent by predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences were collected. A total of 502 invitations were included of which 177 (35.3%) had subject matter relevant to the recipient's research interests and previous work. Two hundred and thirty-seven were invitations to publish a manuscript. Few disclosed the publication fees (32, 13.5%) but they frequently reported accepting all types of manuscripts (167, 70.5%) or emphasised on a deadline to submit (165, 69.6%). Invitations came from 39 publishers (range 1 to 87 invitations per publisher). Two hundred and ten invitations from a potential fraudulent conference were received. These meetings were held in Europe (97, 46.2%), North America (65, 31.0%), Asia (20.4%) or other continents (5, 2.4%) and came from 18 meeting organisation groups (range 1 to 137 invitations per organisation). Becoming an editorial board member (30), the editor-in-chief (1), a guest editor for journal special issue (6) and write a book chapter (11) were some of the roles offered in the other invitations included while no invitation to review a manuscript was received. Young researchers are commonly exposed to predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences following a single publication as a corresponding author. Academic institutions worldwide need to educate and inform young researchers of this emerging problem. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Carbothermic reduction of refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.N.; Parlee, N.A.D.

    1976-01-01

    The reduction of stable refractory metal oxides by carbon is generally unacceptable since the product is usually contaminated with carbides. The carbide formation may be avoided by selecting a solvent metal to dissolve the reactive metal as it is produced and reduce its chemical activity below that required for carbide formation. This approach has been successfully applied to the oxides of Si, Zr, Ti, Al, Mg, and U. In the case where a volatile suboxide, a carbonyl reaction, or a volatile metal occur, the use of the solvent metal appears satisfactory to limit the loss of material at low pressures. In several solute--solvent systems, vacuum evaporation is used to strip the solvent metal from the alloy to give the pure metal

  11. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  12. Potential for waste reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The author focuses on wastes considered hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This chapter discusses wastes that are of interest as well as the factors affecting the quantity of waste considered available for waste reduction. Estimates are provided of the quantities of wastes generated. Estimates of the potential for waste reduction are meaningful only to the extent that one can understand the amount of waste actually being generated. Estimates of waste reduction potential are summarized from a variety of government and nongovernment sources

  13. Improving open access to the results of USGS research (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, S.

    2013-12-01

    Since its establishment under the Organic Act of March 3, 1879, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been committed to classifying and characterizing 'the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain.' Over time, the pursuit of this mission and understanding the products of the national domain has involved a broad scientific pursuit to understand complex Earth system processes and includes topographic, geologic, biogeographic, and other types of mapping; chemical, physical, hydrological, and biological research; and the application of computer and data science. As science and technology have evolved, classification and characterization of the Nation's natural resources has come to be embodied in digital data of various structure and form. Fundamentally, scientific publications and data produced through research and monitoring form the core of the USGS mission. They are an organizational and national treasure held and provided in trust for the American people and for the global scientific community. The recent memo from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on 'Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research' is part of an overall initiative toward open digital government that dovetails well with the USGS mission. The objectives outlined in the memo correspond directly to goals and objectives of the 2007 USGS Science Strategy ('Facing Tomorrow's Challenges--U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017') and the recently released Science Strategy Plans across all USGS Mission Areas. The USGS response to the OSTP memo involves reinforcing aspects of the USGS commitment to open and free access to scholarly publications and data along with improvements to some of the underlying technological systems that facilitate search and discovery. These actions also align with the USGS response to the Executive Order on May 9, 2013, entitled 'Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for

  14. Chemically modified graphene based supercapacitors for flexible and miniature devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debasis; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-09-01

    Rapid progress in the portable and flexible electronic devises has stimulated supercapacitor research towards the design and fabrication of high performance flexible devices. Recent research efforts for flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are highly focusing on graphene and chemically modified graphene owing to the unique properties, including large surface area, high electrical and thermal conductivity, excellent mechanical flexibility, and outstanding chemical stability. This invited review article highlights current status of the flexible electrode material research based on chemically modified graphene for supercapacitor application. A variety of electrode architectures prepared from chemically modified graphene are summarized in terms of their structural dimensions. Novel prototypes for the supercapacitor aiming at flexible miniature devices, i.e. microsupercapacitor with high energy and power density are highlighted. Future challenges relevant to graphene-based flexible supercapacitors are also suggested. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Method for producing chemical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2004-09-21

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles having a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer are prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  16. Breast reduction (mammoplasty) - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100189.htm Breast reduction (mammoplasty) - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Lickstein, MD, FACS, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Review provided by ...

  17. Medical Errors Reduction Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mutter, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The Valley Hospital of Ridgewood, New Jersey, is proposing to extend a limited but highly successful specimen management and medication administration medical errors reduction initiative on a hospital-wide basis...

  18. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic commun...

  19. Air Layer Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccio, Steven; Elbing, Brian; Winkel, Eric; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc

    2008-11-01

    A set of experiments have been conducted at the US Navy's Large Cavitation Channel to investigate skin-friction drag reduction with the injection of air into a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. Testing was performed on a 12.9 m long flat-plate test model with the surface hydraulically smooth and fully rough at downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers to 220 million and at speeds to 20 m/s. Local skin-friction, near-wall bulk void fraction, and near-wall bubble imaging were monitored along the length of the model. The instrument suite was used to access the requirements necessary to achieve air layer drag reduction (ALDR). Injection of air over a wide range of air fluxes showed that three drag reduction regimes exist when injecting air; (1) bubble drag reduction that has poor downstream persistence, (2) a transitional regime with a steep rise in drag reduction, and (3) ALDR regime where the drag reduction plateaus at 90% ± 10% over the entire model length with large void fractions in the near-wall region. These investigations revealed several requirements for ALDR including; sufficient volumetric air fluxes that increase approximately with the square of the free-stream speed, slightly higher air fluxes are needed when the surface tension is reduced, higher air fluxes are required for rough surfaces, and the formation of ALDR is sensitive to the inlet condition.

  20. Equilibrium calculation for the electrolytic reduction process of the ACP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Heung; Seo, Chung Seok; Yoon, Ji Sup

    2006-01-01

    The electrolytic reduction process is the most critical process of the advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) since most of the chemical reactions take place during this reduction process in a molten salt bath. However, it is very difficult to observe the behavior of all the spent fuel elements by experiments. Therefore, a perspective calculation is required to predict how much the chemicals are distributed between the phases and which forms are stable in each phase. Chemical equilibria take place during the electrolytic reduction process. The reduction process uses a porous magnesia filter and the materials to be reduced are loaded into the filter, which means the filter, the cathode of the electrolytic reduction cell, acts as a packed-bed reactor. Lithium metal is produced by an electrolytic reaction in a molten Li 2 O-LiCl cell and the reaction is denoted as Eq. In this work, attention has been paid to the chemical reactions of Eq. since an electrochemical reaction is controlled easily by the supplied current and the extents of the chemical reactions are determined by considering many candidates species. Uranium oxides, for example, can be reduced to U 4 O 9 , UO 2 , and/or U when U 3 O 8 is fed to the electrolytic reduction process

  1. Inviting parents to take part in paediatric palliative care research: a mixed-methods examination of selection bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Joanna C; Beecham, Emma; Kelly, Paula; Dinsdale, Andrew P; Hemsley, June; Jones, Louise; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2015-03-01

    Recruitment to paediatric palliative care research is challenging, with high rates of non-invitation of eligible families by clinicians. The impact on sample characteristics is unknown. To investigate, using mixed methods, non-invitation of eligible families and ensuing selection bias in an interview study about parents' experiences of advance care planning (ACP). We examined differences between eligible families invited and not invited to participate by clinicians using (1) field notes of discussions with clinicians during the invitation phase and (2) anonymised information from the service's clinical database. Families were eligible for the ACP study if their child was receiving care from a UK-based tertiary palliative care service (Group A; N = 519) or had died 6-10 months previously having received care from the service (Group B; N = 73). Rates of non-invitation to the ACP study were high. A total of 28 (5.4%) Group A families and 21 (28.8%) Group B families (p research findings. Non-invitation and selection bias should be considered, assessed and reported in palliative care studies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Catalytic reduction of NO by methane using a Pt/C/polybenzimidazole/Pt/C fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Refshauge, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    with participation of H+ or electrochemically produced hydrogen. When added, methane partially suppresses the electrochemical reduction of NO. Methane outlet concentration monitoring has shown the CH4 participation in the chemical catalytic reduction, i.e., methane co-adsorption with NO inhibited the electrochemical...... NO reduction and introduced a dominant chemical path of the NO reduction. The products of the NO reduction with methane were N2, C2H4, and water. The catalytic NO reduction by methane was promoted when the catalyst was negatively polarized (−0.2 V). Repeated negative polarization of the catalyst increased...

  3. Simulation of emergency response operations for a static chemical spill within a building using an opportunistic resource utilization network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lilien, L.T.; Elbes, M.W.; Ben Othmane, L.; Salih, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate supporting emergency response operations with opportunistic resource utilization networks ("oppnets"), based on a network paradigm for inviting and integrating diverse devices and systems available in the environment. We simulate chemical spill on a single floor of a building and

  4. Reducing Future International Chemical and Biological Dangers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddal, Chad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez, Patricia Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foley, John T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Biological and Chemical Threat Reduction Program at Sandia National Laboratories is developing a 15 - year technology road map in support the United States Government efforts to reduce international chemical and biological dangers . In 2017, the program leadership chartered an analysis team to explore dangers in the future international chemical and biological landscape through engagements with national security experts within and beyond Sandia to gain a multidisciplinary perspective on the future . This report offers a hi gh level landscape of future chemical and biological dangers based upon analysis of those engagements and provides support for further technology road map development.

  5. Chemical decontamination: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.; Wood, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The source of radioactive contamination in various types of power reactors is discussed. The methods of chemical decontamination vary with the manner in which the radioactive contaminants are deposited on the surface. Two types of dilute decontamination systems are available. One system uses organic acids and chelating agents, which are mildly reducing in nature. In this process, the oxide contaminants are removed by simple acidic dissolution and reductive dissolution. The second type of decontamination process is based on low oxidation state metal ions, which are more strongly reducing and do not require a corrosion inhibitor. All processes commercially available for decontamination of power reactors are not detailed here, but a few key issues to be considered in the selection of a process are highlighted. 2 figures, 2 tables

  6. CAMEO Chemicals Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAMEO Chemicals is an extensive chemical database, available for download, with critical response information for thousands of chemicals, and a tool that tells you what reactions might occur if chemicals were mixed together.

  7. Nuclear Structure: Dubna Symposium 1968. Invited Papers from the International Symposium on Nuclear Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Invited papers of a Symposium organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, supported by IUPAP and IAEA, and held in Dubna from 4 to 11 July 1968. The meeting was attended by about 450 scientists from 30 countries. The volume contains the invited papers, all by distinguished scientists, and the discussions and short contributions that followed the presentation of these papers. Contents: I. Nuclear structure at low excitations (15 papers) ; II. Nuclear structure at high excitations (6 papers): III. Open problems in nuclear physics (3 papers); IV. Equilibrium deformations (6 papers); V. General properties of nuclei (6 papers); VI. Closing remarks; List of contributions; List of seminar papers; List of participants; Author index. All papers, discussions and short contributions are in English; the abstracts are in English and Russian, which were the working languages of the Symposium. (author)

  8. Chemical properties of mendelevium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1980-11-01

    Even with the most intense ion beams and the largest available quantities of target isotope, about 10 6 atoms at a time is all the Md that can be produced for chemical studies. This lack of sufficient sample size coupled with the very short lifetimes of the few atoms produced has severely restricted the gathering and the broadness of our knowledge concerning the properties of Md and the heavier elements. To illustrate, the literature contains a mere eleven references to the chemical studies of Md, and none of these deal with bulk properties associated with the element bound in solid phases. Some of these findings are: Md was found to be more volatile than other actinide metals which lead to the belief that it is divalent in the metallic state; separation of Md from the other actinides can be accomplished either by reduction of Md 3+ to the divalent state or by chromatographic separations with Md remaining in the tripositive state; extraction of Md 2+ with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid is much poorer than the extraction of the neighboring tripositive actinides; attempts to oxidize Md 3+ with sodium bismuthate failed to show any evidence for Md 4+ ; reduction potential of Md 3+ was found to be close to -0.1 volt; Md 3+ can be reduced to Md(Hg) by sodium amalgams and by electrolysis; the electrochemical behavior of Md is very similar to that of Fm and can be summarized in the equation, Md 2+ + 2e - = Md(Hg) and E 0 = -1.50 V.; and Md cannot be reduced to a monovalent ion with Sm 2+

  9. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  10. De-Virtualizing Social Events: Understanding the Gap between Online and Offline Participation for Event Invitations

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ai-Ju; Wang, Hao-Chuan; Yuan, Chien Wen

    2013-01-01

    One growing use of computer-based communication media is for gathering people to initiate or sustain social events. Although the use of computer-mediated communication and social network sites such as Facebook for event promotion is becoming popular, online participation in an event does not always translate to offline attendance. In this paper, we report on an interview study of 31 participants that examines how people handle online event invitations and what influences their online and offl...

  11. Green reduction of graphene oxide using alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiabin; Salihi, Elif Caliskan; Šiller, Lidija

    2017-01-01

    There remains a real need for the easy, eco-friendly and scalable preparation method of graphene due to various potential applications. Chemical reduction is the most versatile method for the large scale production of graphene. Here we report the operating conditions for a one-step, economical and green synthesis method for the reduction of graphene oxide using a biomolecule (alanine). Graphene oxide was produced by the oxidation and exfoliation of natural graphite flake with strong oxidants using Hummers method (Hummers and Offeman, 1958), but the method was revised in our laboratory to set up a safe and environmentally friendly route. The reduction of graphene oxide was investigated using alanine at various operating conditions in order to set up optimum conditions (treatment time, temperature and concentration of the reagent). Samples have been characterized by using UV–Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • An environmentally friendly route was reported for the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO). • Alanine could reduce GO to rGO (reduced graphene oxide) without using any stabilizer or alcaline medium. • Characterization studies confirmed the successful deoxygenation of GO.

  12. Green reduction of graphene oxide using alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiabin [Newcastle University, School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Salihi, Elif Caliskan, E-mail: caliskanelif@gmail.com [Newcastle University, School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Marmara University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, 34668 Istanbul (Turkey); Šiller, Lidija [Newcastle University, School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-01

    There remains a real need for the easy, eco-friendly and scalable preparation method of graphene due to various potential applications. Chemical reduction is the most versatile method for the large scale production of graphene. Here we report the operating conditions for a one-step, economical and green synthesis method for the reduction of graphene oxide using a biomolecule (alanine). Graphene oxide was produced by the oxidation and exfoliation of natural graphite flake with strong oxidants using Hummers method (Hummers and Offeman, 1958), but the method was revised in our laboratory to set up a safe and environmentally friendly route. The reduction of graphene oxide was investigated using alanine at various operating conditions in order to set up optimum conditions (treatment time, temperature and concentration of the reagent). Samples have been characterized by using UV–Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • An environmentally friendly route was reported for the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO). • Alanine could reduce GO to rGO (reduced graphene oxide) without using any stabilizer or alcaline medium. • Characterization studies confirmed the successful deoxygenation of GO.

  13. Measuring mandibular ridge reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, W.H.A.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis investigates the mandibular reduction in height of complete denture wearers and overdenture wearers. To follow this reduction in the anterior region as well as in the lateral sections of the mandible, an accurate and reproducible measuring method is a prerequisite. A radiologic technique offers the best chance. A survey is given of the literature concerning the resorption process after the extraction of teeth. An oblique cephalometric radiographic technique is introduced as a promising method to measure mandibular ridge reduction. The reproducibility and the accuracy of the technique are determined. The reproducibility in the positioning of the mandible is improved by the introduction of a mandibular support which permits a precise repositioning of the edentulous jaw, even after long periods of investigation. (Auth.)

  14. Strabismus and discrimination in children: are children with strabismus invited to fewer birthday parties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojon-Azzi, Stefania Margherita; Kunz, Andrea; Mojon, Daniel Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    To determine the social acceptance of children with strabismus by their peers and to determine the age at which the negative impact of strabismus on psychosocial interactions emerges. Photographs of six children were digitally altered in order to create pictures of identical twins except for the position of the eyes (orthotropic, exotropic and exotropic) and the colour of the shirt. One hundred and eighteen children aged 3-12 years were asked to select, for each of the six twin pairs, one of the twins to invite to their birthday party. The grouping of the pictures and the composition of the twin pairs were determined by Latin squares. Children younger than 6 years old did not make any significant distinctions between orthotropic children and children with strabismus. Respondents aged 6 years or older invited children with a squint to their birthday parties significantly less often than orthotropic children. The authors found no impact (p>0.1) of gender, of the colour of the shirt or of the type of strabismus, but did find a highly significant impact of age on the number of invited children with strabismus. Children aged 6 years or older with a visible squint seem to be less likely to be accepted by their peers. Because this negative attitude towards strabismus appears to emerge at approximately the age of 6 years, corrective surgery for strabismus without prospects for binocular vision should be performed before this age.

  15. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  16. Model reduction of detailed-balanced reaction networks by clustering linkage classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; van der Schaft, Abraham; Findeisen, Rolf; Bullinger, Eric; Balsa-Canto, Eva; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model reduction method that involves sequential application of clustering of linkage classes and Kron reduction. This approach is specifically useful for chemical reaction networks with each linkage class having less number of reactions. In case of detailed balanced chemical reaction

  17. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  18. Reduction of dinitrogen ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Processes of dinitrogen ligand reduction in complexes of transition metals are considered. The basic character of the dinitrogen ligand is underlined. Data on X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and intensities of bands ν (N 2 ) in IR-spectra of nitrogen complexes are given. The mechanism of protonation of an edge dinitrogen ligand is discussed. Model systems and mechanism of nitrogenogenase are compared

  19. Infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketema, Jeroen; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2011-01-01

    We define infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems (iCRSs), thus providing the first notion of infinitary higher-order rewriting. The systems defined are sufficiently general that ordinary infinitary term rewriting and infinitary ¿-calculus are special cases. Furthermore,we generalise a number...

  20. Galactorrhea after reduction mammaplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A. H.; Assies, J.; van der Horst, C. M.; Bos, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A case of extremely painful swelling of the breasts following a reduction mammaplasty is presented. There were no signs of an abscess or hematoma. A milky white fluid due to galactorrhea was evacuated at operation, and further galactorrhea was inhibited by medication. The pathogenesis of

  1. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  2. Streaming Reduction Circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, Marco Egbertus Theodorus; Kuper, Jan; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Molenkamp, Egbert

    2009-01-01

    Reduction circuits are used to reduce rows of floating point values to single values. Binary floating point operators often have deep pipelines, which may cause hazards when many consecutive rows have to be reduced. We present an algorithm by which any number of consecutive rows of arbitrary lengths

  3. Improvement of Expansive Soils Using Chemical Stabilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikizler, S. B.; Senol, A.; Khosrowshahi, S. K.; Hatipoğlu, M.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of two chemical stabilizers on the swelling potential of expansive soil. A high plasticity sodium bentonite was used as the expansive soil. The additive materials including fly ash (FA) and lime (L) were evaluated as potential stabilizers to decrease the swelling pressure of bentonite. Depending on the type of additive materials, they were blended with bentonite in different percentages to assess the optimum state and approch the maximum swell pressure reduction. According to the results of swell pressure test, both fly ash and lime reduce the swelling potential of bentonite but the maximum improvement occurs using bentonite-lime mixture while the swelling pressure reduction approaches to 49%. The results reveal a significant reduction of swelling potential of expansive soil using chemical stabilizers. Keywords: Expansive soil; swell pressure; chemical stabilization; fly ash; lime

  4. Comparison of mailed invitation strategies to improve fecal occult blood test participation in men: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Amy; Zajac, Ian; Flight, Ingrid; Stewart, Benjamin J R; Wilson, Carlene; Turnbull, Deborah

    2013-07-31

    Men have a significantly increased risk of being diagnosed with, and dying from, colorectal cancer (CRC) than women. Men also participate in fecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening at a lower rate than women. This study will determine whether strategies that target men's attitudes toward screening, and matched to stage of readiness to screen, increase men's FOBT participation compared to a standard approach. Eligible trial participants will be a national sample of 9,200 men aged 50 to 74 years, living in urban Australia and randomly selected from the Australian electoral roll. Trial participants will be mailed an advance notification letter, followed 2 weeks later by an invitation letter and a free fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit. The intervention is a factorial design, randomized controlled trial (RCT) with four trial arms, including a control. The content of the advance notification and invitation letters will differ by trial arm as follows: 1) standard advance notification and standard invitation (control arm); 2) targeted advance notification and standard invitation; 3) standard advance notification and targeted invitation; and 4) targeted advance notification and targeted invitation. The standard letters will replicate as closely as possible the letters included in the Australian National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP). Modified advance notification and invitation letters will incorporate additional messages to target men in the precontemplation (advance notification) and contemplation stages (invitation). The primary outcome is return of the completed FIT within 12 weeks of invitation. Analysts will be blinded to trial assignment and participants will be blinded to the use of varying invitational materials. Subsamples from each trial arm will complete baseline and endpoint surveys to measure the psychological impact of the intervention, and qualitative interviews will be conducted to evaluate attitudes toward the intervention. The outcomes of

  5. Study of the reduction in detection limits of track detectors used for {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction rate measure through annealing and chemical etching experiments; Estudo da reducao nos limites de deteccao de detectores de tracos utilizados na medida de taxa de reacao {sup 10}B(n, α){sup 7}Li atraves de experimentos de annealing e ataque quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Herminiane L.; Smilgys, Barbara; Guedes, Sandro, E-mail: hluizav@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Castro, Vinicius A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-08-15

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiotherapy for cancer treatment. It is based on {sup 10}B(n, α){sup 7}Li reaction, which can be measured by track detectors capable of recording events that strike them. With this recording, it is possible to determine the number of alpha particles and recoiling Lithium-7 nucleus, reaction products, and from this information, which amount of radiation dose a patient is exposed to. In this work, PADC detectors were characterized, irradiated at the IEA-R1 IPEN/CNEN reactor to assess the contribution of the{sup 10}B(n, α){sup 7}Li reaction and protons from fast neutron scattering with the elements that compounds the tissue. With the aim of reducing the proton background, the detectors were subjected to heating experiments at 80°C for periods in the range 0-100 hours. This was done in order to restore partially modified structure of the detector, causing a reduction in the size and density of tracks. This effect is known as annealing. For the visualization of tracks at microscope, detectors were made three chemical attacks with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) for 30, 60 and 90 minutes at 70°C. It was observed a reduction in the track density achieving a plateau heating time of 50 hours. For detectors that have not undergone annealing and were etched with another etchant, PEW solution, a reduction of 87% in track density was obtained. (author)

  6. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Chemical Transport in Melasomatic Processes

    CERN Document Server

    1987-01-01

    As indicated on the title page, this book is an outgrowth of the NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) on Chemical Transport in Metasomatic Processes, which was held in Greece, June 3-16, 1985. The ASI consisted of five days of invited lectures, poster sessions, and discussion at the Club Poseidon near Loutraki, Corinthia, followed by a two-day field trip in Corinthia and Attica. The second week of the ASI consisted of an excursion aboard M/S Zeus, M/Y Dimitrios II, and the M/S Irini to four of the Cycladic Islands to visit, study, and sample outstanding exposures of metasomatic activity on Syros, Siphnos, Seriphos, and Naxos. Nine­ teen invited lectures and 10 session chairmen/discussion leaders participated in the ASI, which was attended by a total of 92 professional scientists and graduate stu­ dents from 15 countries. Seventeen of the invited lectures and the Field Excursion Guide are included in this volume, together with 10 papers and six abstracts representing contributed poster sessions. Although more...

  7. A Survey of Phenomena in Ionized Gases. Invited Papers. A Collection of Invited Papers Presented at the Eighth International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Invited review papers from the Proceedings of the Eighth Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, which was organized by the Technische Hochschule Wien and the Österreichische Studiengesellschaft für Atomenergie, and held in Vienna, 27 August - 2 September 1967. The IAEA and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics supported the organizers. Contents: Introductory papers (3 papers); Collision processes (4 papers); Waves and beams in plasmas (6 papers); Surface phenomena (3 papers); Lasers (3 papers); Low pressure discharges (1 paper); Selected topics in plasma physics (2 papers); High pressure discharges (3 papers); Probe techniques and theory (4 papers); Basic data and fundamental plasma processes (4 papers); Summary (1 paper). Each paper is in its original language (20 English, 3 French, 9 Russian and 2 German) and is preceded by an abstract in English, with a second one in the original language if this is not English. (author)

  8. Invited review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild, Per Torp; Thymann, Thomas; Schmidt, Mette

    2013-01-01

    with NEC may require resection of the necrotic parts of the intestine, leading to short bowel syndrome (SBS), characterised by reduced digestive capacity, fluid loss, and dependency on parenteral nutrition. This review presents the preterm pig as a translational model in pediatric gastroenterology that has...

  9. Invited commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn

    2012-01-01

    Mothers and fathers influence the risk of obesity in their children through genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Unique to the mother, however, is the intrauterine environment in which the fetus develops, and it is during this time in the uterus that the risk of later obesity...... in the child may develop. In this issue of the Journal, Fleten et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(2):83-92) investigate whether the intrauterine environment plays a role in the development of adiposity by comparing the association between maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI; measured as weight...... in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and offspring BMI at 3 years of age with the paternal-offspring association at the same age in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. In that large study of stable, relatively healthy and well-educated families, significant differences in maternal...

  10. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  11. Bacterial chromate reduction and product characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, R.J.; Buchanan, B.B.; Leighton, T.

    1992-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis reduced hexavalent chromate to trivalent chromium under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Reduction of CR(VI) and appearance of extracellular Cr(III) were demonstrated by electron spin resonance and spectrophotometry. Chromate reduction was stimulated more than five-fold by freeze-thawing, indicating that intracellular reductases or chemical reductants reduce chromate more rapidly than do intact cells. Moderately concentrated cells (10% pellet volume after centrifugation) reduced approximately 40 μM chromate/min (2 mg Cr/1-min) when exposed to 100 μM chromate (5 mg Cr/1). Highly concentrated cells (70% pellet volume) reduced more than 99.8% of 2 mM chromate (100 mg Cr/1) within 15 min. This rate of chromate reduction was of the same order of magnitude as the rate of respiration in aerobic cells. A substantial fraction of the reduction product (ca. 75%) was extracellular Cr(M), which could readily be separated from the cells by centrifugation. At high chromate concentrations, some fraction of reduced CR(VI) appeared to be taken up by cells, consistent with a detection of intracellular paramagnetic products. At low chromate concentrations, undefined growth medium alone reduced Cr(VI), but at a slow rate, relative to cells. Under appropriate conditions, B. subtilis appears to be an organism of choice for detoxifying chromate-contaminated soil and water

  12. THE CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGIES OF SOIL’S DECONTAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana – Gabriela POPA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical soil degradation technologies are based on the pollutant conversion and immobilisation, or the mobilization, extraction and washing of pollutants. They use chemical agents that oxidize or reduce pollutants to less toxic or non-toxic forms and immobilize them in the underground environment in order to diminish their migration and the extent of pollution. Classification of chemical methods of depollution is based on the dominant reaction criterion: oxidation, reduction, neutralization, precipitation, chemical extraction, hydrolysis, dehalogenation, precipitation.

  13. Spontaneous wave packet reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    There are taken into account the main conceptual difficulties met by standard quantum mechanics in dealing with physical processes involving macroscopic system. It is stressed how J.A.Wheeler's remarks and lucid analysis have been relevant to pinpoint and to bring to its extreme consequences the puzzling aspects of quantum phenomena. It is shown how the recently proposed models of spontaneous dynamical reduction represent a consistent way to overcome the conceptual difficulties of the standard theory. Obviously, many nontrivial problems remain open, the first and more relevant one being that of generalizing the model theories considered to the relativistic case. This is the challenge of the dynamical reduction program. 43 refs, 2 figs

  14. Chemical Function Predictions for Tox21 Chemicals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Random forest chemical function predictions for Tox21 chemicals in personal care products uses and "other" uses. This dataset is associated with the following...

  15. BP volume reduction equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Yoshinori; Muroo, Yoji; Hamanaka, Isao

    2003-01-01

    A new type of burnable poison (BP) volume reduction system is currently being developed. Many BP rods, a subcomponent of spent fuel assemblies are discharged from nuclear power reactors. This new system reduces the overall volume of BP rods. The main system consists of BP rod cutting equipment, equipment for the recovery of BP cut pieces, and special transport equipment for the cut rods. The equipment is all operated by hydraulic press cylinders in water to reduce operator exposure to radioactivity. (author)

  16. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, van der, F.P.

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also because many azo dyes and their breakdown products are toxic and/or mutagenic to life. To remove azo dyes from wastewater, a biological treatment strategy based on anaerobic reduction of the azo dye...

  17. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with ∼3 wt% NO 3 - solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200 degrees C to 350 degrees C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia ∼ methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics

  18. Gender Differences and Similarities in Receptivity to Sexual Invitations: Effects of Location and Risk Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Andreas M; Hecht, Heiko

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the seminal paper by Clark and Hatfield (1989), there has been an ongoing discussion about their finding that men accept sexual invitations from females more willingly than vice versa. We focused on two questions that have not yet been answered: First, what happens when the same request for casual sex is made in a different setting where social pressure is lower and such a request more common? To address this issue, 6 male and 8 female average looking confederates approached 162 men and 119 women either at a university campus or in a nightclub and asked for a date or for casual sex. The gender difference remained, with significantly more men than women consenting to a sexual invitation. The second issue concerned the perceived risk for women of accepting such an offer. We made up an elaborate cover story and invited 60 male and female participants into our laboratory. They were shown 10 pictures of persons of the opposite sex and led to believe that these people either consented to date or to have sex with them. The participants then could choose from the pictures who they wanted to meet to engage in a date or sex. In this subjectively safer environment, the gender difference disappeared, with the same proportion of men and women consenting to a date or sex. However, men were more liberal in their choice in either condition, compared to the female subjects. We conclude that while gender differences remained in both experiments, women were more liberal in a subjectively safer situation.

  19. Vietnam; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This paper assesses the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper of Vietnam, known as the Comprehensive Poverty Reduction and Growth Strategy (CPRGS). It is an action program to achieve economic growth and poverty reduction objectives. This paper reviews the objectives and tasks of socio-economic development and poverty reduction. The government of Vietnam takes poverty reduction as a cutting-through objective in the process of country socio-economic development and declares its commitment to impleme...

  20. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Hormones and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. ...

  1. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  2. Chemical Emergencies Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Chemical Emergencies Overview Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... themselves during and after such an event. What chemical emergencies are A chemical emergency occurs when a ...

  3. An Invitation to Collaborate: The SPIRIT Open Source Health Care Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Brian; Molin, Joseph Dal

    2001-01-01

    The SPIRIT portal is a web site resulting from a joint project of the European Commission 5th Framework Research Programme for Information Society Technologies, Minoru Development (France), Conecta srl (Italy), and Sistema Information Systems (Italy). The portal indexes and disseminates free software, serves as a meeting point for health care informatics researchers, and provides collaboration services to health care innovators. This poster session describes the services of the portal and invites researchers to join a worldwide collaborative community developing evidence based health care solutions.

  4. Relative Over Population and the “New Social Question”: an Invitation to Marxian Categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednéia Alves de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the mystified concept that poverty has acquired in the current stage of capitalist accumulation. It relates the growth of overpopulation to a critical perspective in which the conflict between labor and capital is an essential condition for the emergence and permanence of this overpopulation. It looks at the relationship of the general law of capitalist accumulation and at transformations in the order of capital, and then at the naturalized approach that the social question has acquired in this context, inviting a review of Marxian categories.

  5. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B 4 C by carbothermic reduction of B 2 O 3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B 4 C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author) [pt

  6. LCA of Chemicals and Chemical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Ernstoff, Alexi

    2018-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental performance of chemicals as well as of products and processes where chemicals play a key role. The life cycle stages of chemical products, such as pharmaceuticals drugs or plant protection products......, are discussed and differentiated into extraction of abiotic and biotic raw materials, chemical synthesis and processing, material processing, product manufacturing, professional or consumer product use, and finally end-of-life . LCA is discussed in relation to other chemicals management frameworks and concepts...... including risk assessment , green and sustainable chemistry , and chemical alternatives assessment. A large number of LCA studies focus on contrasting different feedstocks or chemical synthesis processes, thereby often conducting a cradle to (factory) gate assessment. While typically a large share...

  7. Discrete Routh reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalnapurkar, Sameer M; Leok, Melvin; Marsden, Jerrold E; West, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of Abelian Routh reduction for discrete mechanical systems and applies it to the variational integration of mechanical systems with Abelian symmetry. The reduction of variational Runge-Kutta discretizations is considered, as well as the extent to which symmetry reduction and discretization commute. These reduced methods allow the direct simulation of dynamical features such as relative equilibria and relative periodic orbits that can be obscured or difficult to identify in the unreduced dynamics. The methods are demonstrated for the dynamics of an Earth orbiting satellite with a non-spherical J 2 correction, as well as the double spherical pendulum. The J 2 problem is interesting because in the unreduced picture, geometric phases inherent in the model and those due to numerical discretization can be hard to distinguish, but this issue does not appear in the reduced algorithm, where one can directly observe interesting dynamical structures in the reduced phase space (the cotangent bundle of shape space), in which the geometric phases have been removed. The main feature of the double spherical pendulum example is that it has a non-trivial magnetic term in its reduced symplectic form. Our method is still efficient as it can directly handle the essential non-canonical nature of the symplectic structure. In contrast, a traditional symplectic method for canonical systems could require repeated coordinate changes if one is evoking Darboux' theorem to transform the symplectic structure into canonical form, thereby incurring additional computational cost. Our method allows one to design reduced symplectic integrators in a natural way, despite the non-canonical nature of the symplectic structure

  8. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  9. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  10. Testing and evaluation of eight decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report covers experimental work comparing eight different decontamination chemicals. Seven of these chemicals have some novelty, or are not currently in use at the ICPP. The eighth is a common ICPP decontamination reagent used as a baseline for effective comparison. Decontamination factors, waste generation values, and corrosion rates are tabulated for these chemicals. Recommendations are given for effective methods of non-sodium or low-sodium decontamination chemicals. The two most effective chemical for decontamination found in these test were a dilute hydrofluoric and nitric acid (HF/HNO 3 ) mixture and a fluoroboric acid solution. The fluoroboric acid solution (1 molar) was by far the most effective decontamination reagent, but suffered the problem of generating significant final calcine volume. The HF/HNO 3 solution performed a very good decontamination of the SIMCON coupons while generating only small amounts of calcine volume. Concentration variables were also tested, and optimized for these two solutions. Several oxidation/reduction decon chemical systems were also tested. These systems were similar to the TURCO 4502 and TURCO 4521 solutions used for general decontamination at the ICPP. A low sodium alternative, nitric acid/potassium permanganate, to the ''high sodium'' TURCO 4502 was tested extensively, optimized and recommended for general ICPP use. A reductive chemical solution, oxalic acid/nitric acid was also shown to have significant advantages

  11. Green reduction of graphene oxide by ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosroshahi, Zahra; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Allafchian, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Graphene, a single layer of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms in a hexagonal (two-dimensional honey-comb) lattice, has attracted strong scientific and technological interest due to its novel and excellent optical, chemical, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. The solution-processable chemical reduction of Graphene oxide (GO is considered as the most favorable method regarding mass production of graphene. Generally, the reduction of GO is carried out by chemical approaches using different reductants such as hydrazine and sodium borohydride. These components are corrosive, combustible and highly toxic which may be dangerous for personnel health and the environment. Hence, these reducing agents are not promising choice for reducing of graphene oxide (GO). As a consequence, it is necessary for further development and optimization of eco-friendly, natural reducing agent for clean and effective reduction of GO. Ascorbic acid, an eco-friendly and natural reducing agents, having a mild reductive ability and nontoxic property. So, the aim of this research was to green synthesis of GO with ascorbic acid. For this purpose, the required amount of NaOH and ascorbic acid were added to GO solution (0.5 mg/ml) and were heated at 95 °C for 1 hour. According to the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemical results, GO were reduced with ascorbic acid like hydrazine with better electrochemical properties and ascorbic acid is an ideal substitute for hydrazine in the reduction of graphene oxide process.

  12. Economical benzene emission reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetz, R.

    1999-01-01

    Benzene has been classified as a toxic compound under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. This has prompted the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (AEUB) to introduce specific reporting and monitoring guidelines for the oil and gas industry regarding excessive benzene emissions. Glycol dehydration units have been determined to be the major single source of benzene emissions causing air and soil pollution. DualTank Corp. has designed a condensation and storage tank unit to enhance emission reduction, odour elimination and liquid recovery from dehydration units. Their newly designed combined tank unit consists of a large, uninsulated surface area for cooling, and an excessive internal volume for increased retention time. The first prototype was installed in December 1998 at an Enerplus Resources Site. The system provides excellent benzene emission reduction and the elimination of odours and visual plumes. Effective January 1, 1999, the petroleum and natural gas industry must either clean up excessive emissions voluntarily or face government imposed regulations, facility shutdowns and/or fines. 1 fig

  13. LOFT data reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, N.L.

    1975-08-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is an experimental facility built around a ''scaled'' version of a large pressurized water reactor (LPWR). LOFT will be used to run loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs) and to acquire the necessary data required ''to evaluate the adequacy and improve the analytical methods currently used to predict the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) response of LPWRs'' and ''to identify and investigate any unexpected event(s) or threshold(s) in the response of either the plant or the engineered safety features and develop analytical techniques that adequately describe and account for the unexpected behavior(s)''. During the LOCE this required data will be acquired and recorded in both analog and digital modes. Subsequent to the test the analog data will also be converted to the raw digital mode. This raw digital data will be converted to the desired engineering units using the LOFT Data Reduction System. This system is implemented on the IBM 360/75 and is a part of a commercially available data processing program called MAC/RAN III. The theory of reducing LOFT data to engineering units and the application of the MAC/ RAN III system to accomplish this reduction is given. (auth)

  14. Islam and harm reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, A; Saifuddeen, S M

    2010-03-01

    Although drugs are haram and therefore prohibited in Islam, illicit drug use is widespread in many Islamic countries throughout the world. In the last several years increased prevalence of this problem has been observed in many of these countries which has in turn led to increasing injecting drug use driven HIV/AIDS epidemic across the Islamic world. Whilst some countries have recently responded to the threat through the implementation of harm reduction programmes, many others have been slow to respond. In Islam, The Quran and the Prophetic traditions or the Sunnah are the central sources of references for the laws and principles that guide the Muslims' way of life and by which policies and guidelines for responses including that of contemporary social and health problems can be derived. The preservation and protection of the dignity of man, and steering mankind away from harm and destruction are central to the teachings of Islam. When viewed through the Islamic principles of the preservation and protection of the faith, life, intellect, progeny and wealth, harm reduction programmes are permissible and in fact provide a practical solution to a problem that could result in far greater damage to the society at large if left unaddressed. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Emergency planning zone reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the process used by a large industrial Department of Energy (DOE) site to communicate changing hazards to its stakeholders and install the confidence necessary to implement the resulting emergency planning changes. Over the last decade as the sites missions have shifted from full-scale production to a greater emphasis on environmental restoration and waste management, the off-site threat from its operations has substantially decreased. The challenge was to clearly communicate the reduced hazards, install confidence in the technical analysis that documented the hazard reduction, and obtain stakeholder buy-in on the path forward to change the emergency management program. The most significant change to the emergency management program was the proposed reduction of the sites Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). As the EPZ is defined as an area for which planning is needed to protect the public in the event of an accident, the process became politically challenging. An overview of how the site initially approached this problem and then learned to more substantially involve the state and local emergency preparedness agencies and the local Citizens Advisory Board will be presented. (author)

  16. Electrochemical reduction of sulfur dioxide in sulfolane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorob' ev, A.S.; Gavrilova, A.A.; Kolosnitsyn, V.S.; Nikitin, Yu.E.

    1985-09-01

    Solutions of sulfur dioxide in aproptic media are promising electrolyte oxidizing agents for chemical current sources with anodes of active metals. This work describes the electrochemical reduction of sulfur dioxide in sulfolane in a lithium halide supporting electrolyte which was investigated by the methods of voltamperometry and chronopotentiometry. The dependence of the current of the cathodic peak on the concentration of the supporting electrolyte salts, sulfur dioxide and water, was studied. On the basis of the data obtained, a hypothesis was advanced on the nature of the limiting step. The investigation showed that at low polarizing current densities, a substantial influence on the reduction of sulfur dioxide in sulfolane in a lithium halide supporting electrolyte is exerted by blockage of the electrode surface by sparingly soluble reaction products.

  17. Reduction operators of Burgers equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A; Popovych, Roman O

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special "no-go" case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf-Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation.

  18. Invited by God onto the worship stage: Developing missional communities through participation in Theo-drama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A. Nell

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available When the front of the church begins to resemble a stage and the preacher, musicians and other leaders act like performers whilst the congregation takes on the role of an audience, then something is wrong with worship. But not only with worship: something is wrong with the church. A church longing to be missional � that is, a church in which all Christians are participants in the mission of God � needs to express that participation in its worship. Theological dramatic theory shows us how the Trinity acts out a grand narrative in creation, redemption and glorification, and invites us to participate in the Story being performed. This same narrative can be present in worship and can invite our immediate participation. But this cannot happen if either God or the congregation is relegated to the role of mere audience. However, when the Story is told and performed in worship and when the worshipping community is able to participate alongside the Trinity in the Theo-drama of worship, then worship takes on the ability to form that community missionally. Worship is a habit repeated week after week; therefore, its power to transform a community into a missonal congregation is immense.

  19. 2008 Program for Invitation of Foreign Research Institutes to Jeonbuk Province and Enhancement of Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, J. W.; Yang, S. T.; Kim, S. W.; Song, B. S.; Cho, S. W.; Han, C. S.; Lee, G. J.

    2009-08-01

    This project was carried out to establish long-term tactical partnership with foreign research institutions for technology exchanges and facilities, and to develop cooperation projects for the core technology. Technical bases for inviting foreign R and D centers to Jeonbuk province has been established through consulting discussion and signing arrangement on cooperation between ARTI and the partner institute. Discussion in-depth on an R and D center of Russian IBMP in Jeonbuk has been made and an agendum for the R and D center was submitted to the 13th Korea-Russian Federation Joint Committee on Nuclear Cooperation. Based on consensus that technology exchange and enhanced collaboration would be reciprocally beneficial, the second ARTI-TARRI joint seminar is scheduled at Jeongeup in September 2009, when further discussion will be made on the subsidiary arrangement to KAERI-JAEA MOU. An consultant meeting was done in order to strengthen international cooperation and to get advice on attracting foreign R and D centers at the Provincial Office in May 2009. A fact finding visit to iThemba LABS in south Africa was made to conclude a Letter of Understanding (LOU) for cooperation in R and D of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. The established collaborative relationship with world-leading research institutes such as IBMP, TARRI and iThemba LABS can make a role for inviting in the near future foreign R and D centers to Jeonbuk Province, and surely give a tactical influence on radiation industries in the Jeonbuk Province

  20. CinéGlobe invites you to participate in a poster design competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Neal David Hartman

    2013-01-01

    For its 2014 publicity campaign, CinéGlobe invites CERN people to participate in a poster design competition.  The entries are now on display on the Pas Perdus in the main building, and the CERNois are invited to vote for their favourites.    CinéGlobe is the international festival of short films inspired by science that takes place every two years at CERN, in the Globe of Science and Innovation. From 18 to 23 March 2014, CERN will host the fourth edition of the festival. The mission of the CinéGlobe Film Festival is to challenge the commonly perceived divisions between science and art by demonstrating that they are both essential to interpreting our world. Open to short film creators from around the world, the CinéGlobe festival is truly international, the first three editions having attracted more than 4,000 entries from more than 100 countries around the globe.  In addition to screening...