WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical reactors

  1. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  2. Operating Modes Of Chemical Reactors Of Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Meruyert Berdieva; Aiman Ospanova; Madina Koshkinbayeva; Tamara Zhukabayeva

    2012-01-01

    In the work the issues of stable technological modes of operation of main devices of producing polysterol reactors have been researched as well as modes of stable operation of a chemical reactor have been presented, which enables to create optimum mode parameters of polymerization process, to prevent emergency situations of chemical reactor operation in industrial conditions.

  3. Operating Modes Of Chemical Reactors Of Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meruyert Berdieva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the work the issues of stable technological modes of operation of main devices of producing polysterol reactors have been researched as well as modes of stable operation of a chemical reactor have been presented, which enables to create optimum mode parameters of polymerization process, to prevent emergency situations of chemical reactor operation in industrial conditions.

  4. Coacervates as prebiotic chemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Swanson, Mercedes; Menger, Fredric M.

    2012-10-01

    Coacervates are colloidal systems that are comprised of two immiscible aqueous layers, the colloid-rich layer, so-called coacervate, and the colloid-poor layer, so-called equilibrium liquid. Although immiscible, the two phases are both water-rich. Coacervates are important for prebiotic chemistry, but also have various practical applications, notably as transport vehicles of personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Our objectives are to explore the potential of coacervates as prebiotic chemical reactors. Since the reaction medium in coacervates is water, this creates a challenge, since most organic reactants are not water-soluble. To overcome this challenge we are utilizing recent Green Chemistry examples of the organic reactions in water, such as the Passerini reaction. We have investigated this reaction in two coacervate systems, and report here our preliminary results.

  5. Chemical reactor modeling multiphase reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Modeling closes the gap between Chemical Reaction Engineering and Fluid Mechanics.  The second edition consists of two volumes: Volume 1: Fundamentals. Volume 2: Chemical Engineering Applications In volume 1 most of the fundamental theory is presented. A few numerical model simulation application examples are given to elucidate the link between theory and applications. In volume 2 the chemical reactor equipment to be modeled are described. Several engineering models are introduced and discussed. A survey of the frequently used numerical methods, algorithms and schemes is provided. A few practical engineering applications of the modeling tools are presented and discussed. The working principles of several experimental techniques employed in order to get data for model validation are outlined. The monograph is based on lectures regularly taught in the fourth and fifth years graduate courses in transport phenomena and chemical reactor modeling, and in a post graduate course in modern reactor m...

  6. A Course in Chemical Reactor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1983-01-01

    Presents course outline, topics covered, and final project (doubling as a take home final exam) for a one-semester, interdisciplinary course on the design and behavior of chemical reactors. Interplay of chemical and physical rate processes is stressed in the course. (JM)

  7. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  8. Cars applications in chemical reactors, combustion and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, D. A.; Porter, F. M.

    1986-08-01

    This paper illustrates the use of the CARS technique in the fields of Chemical Reactor engineering, combustion and Heat Transfer. Examples of recent results from a catalytic chemical reactor, an operating production petrol engine and an oil spray furnace are given. The experimentally determined accuracy of CARS nitrogen thermometry for both mean and single pulse measurements is presented.

  9. Anisotropic Chemical Reactor with Correlation Spectroscopic Control of Nanoparticles Size

    OpenAIRE

    A.G. Lazarenko; A.N. Andreev; A.V. Kanaev; K. Chhor

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new kind of chemical reactor for nanoparticles synthesis with real-time control of size by correlation spectroscopy methods. The liquid pumping in the reactor is attained by a heater and / or cooler anisotropic placing in a reactor with a bath consisting of two communicating vessels connected by two tubes with transparent portion. When driving the fluid through the transparent area of the narrowed tube particle size is measured by a sensor or sensors. To increase the spe...

  10. Identification of Chemical Reactor Plant’s Mathematical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyakillya Boris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a solution of the identification problem of chemical reactor plant’s mathematical model. The main goal is to obtain a mathematical description of a chemical reactor plant from experimental data, which based on plant’s time response measurements. This data consists sequence of measurements for water jacket temperature and information about control input signal, which is used to govern plant’s behavior.

  11. Anisotropic Chemical Reactor with Correlation Spectroscopic Control of Nanoparticles Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Lazarenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new kind of chemical reactor for nanoparticles synthesis with real-time control of size by correlation spectroscopy methods. The liquid pumping in the reactor is attained by a heater and / or cooler anisotropic placing in a reactor with a bath consisting of two communicating vessels connected by two tubes with transparent portion. When driving the fluid through the transparent area of the narrowed tube particle size is measured by a sensor or sensors. To increase the speed of cyclic movement and mixing of liquid the chemical rector can be supplemented with a mechanical stirrer also anisotropic in shape.

  12. Semiconductor Chemical Reactor Engineering and Photovoltaic Unit Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, T. W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the nature of semiconductor chemical reactor engineering, illustrating the application of this engineering with research in physical vapor deposition of cadmium sulfide at both the laboratory and unit operations scale and chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon at the laboratory scale. (JN)

  13. Classification of toxic chemical-waste streams from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological and chemical constituents from light water reactors are identified, the methodology for comparing the hazards of various chemicals quantitatively with those of radioactive materials is presented, and the possible management basis of low-level waste (LLW) is considered

  14. Chemical reactor and method for chemically converting a first material into a second material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.

    2008-04-08

    A chemical reactor and method for converting a first material into a second material is disclosed and wherein the chemical reactor is provided with a feed stream of a first material which is to be converted into a second material; and wherein the first material is combusted in the chemical reactor to produce a combustion flame, and a resulting gas; and an electrical arc is provided which is passed through or superimposed upon the combustion flame and the resulting gas to facilitate the production of the second material.

  15. Antifoaming effect of chemical compounds in manure biogas reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan;

    2013-01-01

    A precise and efficient antifoaming control strategy in bioprocesses is a challenging task as foaming is a very complex phenomenon. Nevertheless, foam control is necessary, as foam is a major operational problem in biogas reactors. In the present study, the effect of 14 chemical compounds on foam...... more efficient in reducing foam when added directly into the liquid phase rather than added in the headspace of the reactor....

  16. Introduction to Chemical Engineering Reactor Analysis: A Web-Based Reactor Design Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbey, Nese; Clay, Molly; Russell, T.W. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    An approach to explain chemical engineering through a Web-based interactive game design was developed and used with college freshman and junior/senior high school students. The goal of this approach was to demonstrate how to model a lab-scale experiment, and use the results to design and operate a chemical reactor. The game incorporates both…

  17. Improving chemical synthesis using flow reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Charlotte; Watts, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Owing to the competitive nature of the pharmaceutical industry, researchers involved in lead compound generation are under continued pressure to identify and develop promising programmes of research in order to secure intellectual property. The potential of a compound for therapeutic development depends not only on structural complexity, but also on the identification of synthetic strategies that will enable the compound to be prepared on the desired scale. One approach that is of present interest to the pharmaceutical industry is the use of continuous flow reactors, with the flexible nature of the technology being particularly attractive as it bridges the changes in scale required between the initial identification of a target compound and its subsequent production. Based on these factors, a significant programme of research is presently underway into the development of flow reactors as tools for the synthetic chemist, with the transfer of many classes of reaction successfully reported to date. This article focuses on the application of continuous flow methodology to drug discovery and the subsequent production of pharmaceuticals. PMID:23484600

  18. Syngas production via methane steam reforming with oxygen: plasma reactors versus chemical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam reforming with oxygen (SRO) is a combination of non-catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane, industrially used for syngas production. There are several models of the chemical reactors used for this purpose but in the last decade a new direction has developed - plasma devices. The aim of the present paper is to make a comparative analysis between the autothermal reformers, including their improved variants, and the plasma reactors. The study is conceived in terms of advantages and disadvantages coming from the exploitation parameters, methane conversion, selectivity, energy efficiency and investment costs. Although SRO by means of chemical reactors may be the most efficient, plasma reactors represent an incisive approach by their simplicity, compactness and low price. (author)

  19. Portfolio Assessment on Chemical Reactor Analysis and Process Design Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alha, Katariina

    2004-01-01

    Assessment determines what students regard as important: if a teacher wants to change students' learning, he/she should change the methods of assessment. This article describes the use of portfolio assessment on five courses dealing with chemical reactor and process design during the years 1999-2001. Although the use of portfolio was a new…

  20. Controlling radiation fields in CANDU reactors using chemical decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dose to personnel during major maintenance and reactor refurbishment of CANDU reactors can be controlled using chemical decontamination technologies. Technologies that have, and can be applied in CANDU reactors include; sub- and full-system decontaminations of the heat transport system using the CAN-DECON, CAN-DEREM and CAN-DEREM Plus processes, and removal of Sb-122 and Sb-124 from the reactor core using hydrogen peroxide. CAN-DECON is a dilute chemical decontamination process that employs ion-exchange technology to continuously remove dissolved metals and radionuclides and regenerate the components of the CAN-DECON formulation. Qualification of the CAN-DECON process, equipment requirements, process effectiveness, recent process improvements and future directions are discussed. Radioantimony deposited on in-core surfaces can be released into the HTS coolant by air ingress during maintenance. At Gentilly-2, where large amounts of in-core antimony are present, these releases have resulted in increased radiation fields around the reactor, making outage dose planning difficult and contributing significantly to the radiation exposure of maintenance personnel. An antimony removal process developed by KWU for PWR's and adapted to meet CANDU specific conditions, has been successfully applied at Gentilly-2. Optimization of process conditions, and improvements in the in-core antimony removal process are described. (author)

  1. Controlling radiation fields in CANDU reactors using chemical decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dose to personnel during major maintenance and reactor refurbishment of CANDU reactors can be controlled using chemical decontamination technologies. Technologies that have, and can be applied in CANDU reactors include; sub- and full-system decontamination of the heat transport system using the CAN-DECON CAN-DEREM and CAN-DEREM Plus processes; and removal of Sb-122 and Sb-124 from the reactor core using hydrogen peroxide. CAN-DECON is a dilute chemical decontamination process that employs ion-exchange technology to continuously remove dissolved metals and radionuclides and regenerate the components of the CAN-DECON formulation. Qualification of the CAN-DECON process, equipment requirements, process effectiveness, recent process improvements and future directions are discussed. Radioantimony deposited on in-core surfaces can be released into the HTS coolant by air ingress during maintenance. At Gentilly-2, where large amounts of in-core antimony are present, these releases have resulted in increased radiation fields around the reactor, making outage dose planning difficult and contributing significantly to the radiation exposure of maintenance personnel. An antimony removal process developed by KWU for PWR's and adapted to meet CANDU specific conditions, has been successfully applied at Gentilly-2. Optimization of process conditions, and improvements in the in-core antimony removal process are described. (author)

  2. Chemistry research and chemical techniques based on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry has occupied an important position historically in the sciences associated with nuclear reactors and it continues to play a prominent role in reactor-based research investigations. This Panel of prominent scientists in the field was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess the present state of such chemistry research for the information of its Member States and others interested in the subject. There are two ways in which chemistry is associated with nuclear reactors: (a) general applications to many scientific fields in which chemical techniques are involved as essential service functions; and (b) specific applications of reactor facilities to the solution of chemical problems themselves. Twenty years of basic research with nuclear reactors have demonstrated a very widespread, and still increasing, demand for radioisotopes and isotopically-labelled molecules in all fields of the physical and biological sciences. Similarly, the determination of the elemental composition of a material through the analytical technique of activation analysis can be applied throughout experimental science. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. 77 FR 7613 - Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... COMMISSION Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108... Chemical Company (the licensee) to operate the Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor (DTRR) at a maximum... accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process...

  4. Analysis of the stochastic excitability in the flow chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina [Ural Federal University, Lenina, 51, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    A dynamic model of the thermochemical process in the flow reactor is considered. We study an influence of the random disturbances on the stationary regime of this model. A phenomenon of noise-induced excitability is demonstrated. For the analysis of this phenomenon, a constructive technique based on the stochastic sensitivity functions and confidence domains is applied. It is shown how elaborated technique can be used for the probabilistic analysis of the generation of mixed-mode stochastic oscillations in the flow chemical reactor.

  5. A chemical decontamination process for decontaminating and decommissioning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five chemical decontamination processes have been developed for nuclear reactor applications. One of these processes is the cerium decontamination process (CDP). This method uses a cerium acid reagent to rapidly decontaminate surfaces, obtaining decontamination factors in excess of 300 in 6 h on pressurized water reactor specimens. Sound volume reduction and waste management techniques have been demonstrated, and solidified waste volume fractions as low as 9% experimentally obtained. The CDP method represents the hybrid decontamination technique often sought for component replacement and decommissioning operations: high effectiveness, rapid kinetics, simple waste treatment, and a low solidified waste volume

  6. Systematic Staging in Chemical Reactor Design : Fischer-Tropsch

    OpenAIRE

    Foss, Martin Skjærvø

    2013-01-01

    Today, crude oil is the main resource for production of liquid fuels. As the demandincreases, utilization of alternative resources becomes more and more urgent. Thus,the development of new and continued research on established process technologies isimportant.The scope of this Master?s thesis has been the catalytic hydrogenation of CO for production of linear, long chained hydrocarbons, known as the Fischer-Tropsch process. The core of a chemical plant is the reactor, thus the ultimate goal i...

  7. Studies on modelling of bubble driven flows in chemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevskott, Sverre

    1997-12-31

    Multiphase reactors are widely used in the process industry, especially in the petrochemical industry. They very often are characterized by very good thermal control and high heat transfer coefficients against heating and cooling surfaces. This thesis first reviews recent advances in bubble column modelling, focusing on the fundamental flow equations, drag forces, transversal forces and added mass forces. The mathematical equations for the bubble column reactor are developed, using an Eulerian description for the continuous and dispersed phase in tensor notation. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy and chemical species are given, and the k-{epsilon} and Rice-Geary models for turbulence are described. The different algebraic solvers used in the model are described, as are relaxation procedures. Simulation results are presented and compared with experimental values. Attention is focused on the modelling of void fractions and gas velocities in the column. The energy conservation equation has been included in the bubble column model in order to model temperature distributions in a heated reactor. The conservation equation of chemical species has been included to simulate absorption of CO{sub 2}. Simulated axial and radial mass fraction profiles for CO{sub 2} in the gas phase are compared with measured values. Simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the column are also presented. 189 refs., 124 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Chemically-Modified Cellulose Paper as a Microstructured Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  9. Efficiency factor of a chemical nuclear reactor with gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemonuclear reactor is simulated in order to calculate the efficiency factor of molecular species in chemical reactions induced by gamma radiation, with the purpose to obtain information for its design and consider the electromagnetic energy as a possible solution to the present problem of energy. The research is based on a mathematical model of succesive Compton processes applied to spherical and cylindrical geometry and corroborated through the absorbed dose and the experimental date of the increase factor, for the radioisotopic sources Co-60 and Cs-137 relating the quantity of energy deposited into various cylinders with the G value, the relation radius/height of the reactor is optimized according to the molecular production. This is illustrated with the radiolysis of a solution of CH3OH/H2O which forms H2 and with the obtainment of C2H5Br that represents and industrial process induced radioactively. The results show a greater energy deposition with Cs-137 but a larger production of H2/hr with Co-60, and besides we can find high production values of C2H5Br. The cylinder with more advantages is that whose relation R/H is of 0.5. It can be concluded that the final selection of the reactor should be made after a more intense study of the used isotope and the source activity. The efficiency factor of H2 can be increased selecting the appropriate type and concentration of solute of the irradiated aqueous solutions

  10. Simplifying Chemical Reactor Design by using Molar Quantities Instead of Fractional Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee F.; Falconer, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Explains the advantages of using molar quantities in chemical reactor design. Advocates the use of differential versions of reactor mass balances rather than the integrated forms. Provides specific examples and cases to illustrate the principles. (ML)

  11. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  12. Enhancement of a semi-batch chemical reactor efficiency through its dimensions optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Macků, Lubomír; Novosad, David

    2015-01-01

    Efficiency of manufacturing processes is very important in today's competitive world with hard economic rules. In chemical engineering area the efficiency depends on the production heart, which is often a chemical reactor. In this paper authors describe process of optimal semi-batch exothermic reactor dimensions finding. The task is to find reactor dimensions which lead to process efficiency improving, i.e. to processing the greater chemicals amount in the same or shorter time. The optimizing...

  13. Coating particles by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to deposit a thin, adherent, uniformly dispersed coating onto the individual particles in a batch of granular or powdered material is described. We have been able to apply successfully a number of coatings to a variety of particulate materials using a fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. By means of this technique we used tri-isobutylaluminum to apply adherent coatings of aluminum on powdered mica and powdered nickel. The powdered mica was also coated with titanium in a fluidized bed reactor in which titanium precursors were generated in situ by the reaction between HCl and metallic titanium. Post treatment of the titanium coated mica with ammonia produced agglomerates coated with TiN. These systems demonstrate the potential utility of the fluidized bed reactor for depositing a variety of coatings onto metallic and non-metallic dispersed materials. Preparation of such coated powders is likely to be valuable in a variety of industrial applications, such as the manufacture of composite structures. (orig.)

  14. 78 FR 26811 - Dow Chemical Company, Dow TRIGA Research Reactor; License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ...) published a notice in the Federal Register on July 20, 2012 (77 FR 42771), ``License Renewal for the Dow... COMMISSION Dow Chemical Company, Dow TRIGA Research Reactor; License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA... Facility License No. R-108 for Dow Chemical Company which would authorize continued operation of the...

  15. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification

  16. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2009-01-01

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification.

  17. Catalytic hydrogenation reactors for the fine chemicals industries. Their design and operation.

    OpenAIRE

    Westerterp, K.R.; Molga, E.J.; Gelder, van, M.

    1997-01-01

    The design and operation of reactors for catalytic, hydrogenation in the fine chemical industries are discussed. The requirements for a good multiproduct catalytic hydrogenation unit as well as the choice of the reactor type are considered. Packed bed bubble column reactors operated without hydrogen recycle are recommended as the best choice to obtain a flexible reactor with good selectivities. The results of an experimental study of the catalytic hydrogenation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene in a mini...

  18. Process and Control Design for a Novel Chemical Heat Exchange Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Haugwitz, Staffan; Hagander, Per; Norén, Tommy

    2006-01-01

    A new chemical reactor, the Open Plate Reactor (OPR), is being developed by Alfa Laval AB. It has a very flexible configuration with distributed inlet ports, cooling zones and internal sensors. This gives the OPR improved control capabilities compared to standard chemical reactors in addition to better heat transfer capacity. In this paper, we address the relationship between the process design, the number of actuators used and how to use these actuators in feedback contro...

  19. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two-part series, a new rotary reactor concept for gas-fueled CLC is proposed and analyzed. In part 1, the detailed configuration of the rotary reactor is described. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet and exit. Two purging sectors are used to avoid the mixing between the fuel stream and the air stream. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of channels with copper oxide coated on the inner surface of the channels. The support material is boron nitride, which has high specific heat and thermal conductivity. Gas flows through the reactor at elevated pressure, and it is heated to a high temperature by fuel combustion. Typical design parameters for a thermal capacity of 1 MW have been proposed, and a simplified model is developed to predict the performances of the reactor. The potential drawbacks of the rotary reactor are also discussed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author)

  1. Technique of chemical cleaning for removing corrosion products in nuclear reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of chemical cleaning technique for removing corrosion products in PWR type plant and power reactor have been carried in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), Beijing. The report summarizes the in results of screening test and qualification test of chemical cleaning technique, and the results of chemical cleaning to remove corrosion products (Fe304) in primary side of PWR type power reactor which chemical cleaning process has been carried by CIAE. The chemical cleaning agent (EDTA + assistant agent + inhibitor ) is effective for removing magnetite (Fe304 ≤ 17.5g/l).The process of chemical cleaning includes cleaning, rinse, passivation. The corrosion rate of materials is acceptable. The chemical cleaning technique is effective and safe for PWR type reactor. (author)

  2. Chemical reactor for converting a first material into a second material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2012-10-16

    A chemical reactor and method for converting a first material into a second material is disclosed and wherein the chemical reactor is provided with a feed stream of a first material which is to be converted into a second material; and wherein the first material is combusted in the chemical reactor to produce a combustion flame, and a resulting gas; and an electrical arc is provided which is passed through or superimposed upon the combustion flame and the resulting gas to facilitate the production of the second material.

  3. Decommissioning of production reactors of Siberian chemical integrated plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of works on complex engineering examination of decommissioned production nuclear reactors are generalized. Results of conducted quantitative evaluation of the presence of fissionable materials in the masonry, enabling to make a conclusion about nuclear safety of core of I-1, Eh-2 and ADEh-3 reactors, are presented. Data on state of their graphite masonry and results of corrosion investigations are given

  4. Fuel reactor modelling in chemical-looping combustion of coal: 2. simulation and optimization

    OpenAIRE

    García Labiano, Francisco; Diego Poza, Luis F. de; Gayán Sanz, Pilar; Abad Secades, Alberto; Adánez Elorza, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Chemical-Looping Combustion of coal (CLCC) is a promising process to carry out coal combustion with carbon capture. The process should be optimized in order to maximize the carbon capture and the combustion efficiency in the fuel reactor, which will depend on the reactor design and the operational conditions. In this work, a mathematical model of the fuel reactor is used to make predictions about the performance of the CLCC process and simulate the behaviour of the system ...

  5. Computational Study of Fluid Flow in a Rotational Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sun; Jaluria, Yogesh

    2015-11-01

    In a typical Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactor, the flow of the reacting gases is one of the most important considerations that must be precisely controlled in order to obtain desired film quality. In general, the fluids enter the reactor chamber, travel over to the heated substrate area, where chemical reactions lead to deposition, and then exit the chamber. However, the flow inside the reactor chamber is not that simple. It would often develop recirculation at various locations inside the reactor due to reactor geometry, flow conditions, buoyancy effects from temperature differences and rotational effects cause by the rotating substrate. This recirculation causes hot spots and affects the overall performance of the reactor. A recirculation fluid packet experiences a longer residence time inside the reactor and, thus, it heats up to higher temperatures causing unwanted chemical reactions and decomposition. It decreases the grow rate and uniformity on the substrate. A mathematical and computational model has been developed to help identify these unwanted hot spots occurring inside the CVD reactor. The model can help identify the user parameters needed to reduce the recirculation effects and better control the flow. Flow rates, pressures, rotational speeds and temperatures can all affect the severity of the recirculation within the reactor. The model can also help assist future designs as the geometry plays a big role in controlling fluid flow. The model and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  6. Mechanical, chemical and radiological characterization of the graphite of the UNGG reactors type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of UNGG reactors type dismantling procedures, the characterization of the graphite, used as moderator, has to be realized. This paper presents the mechanical, chemical and radiological characterizations, the properties measured and gives some results in the case of the Bugey 1 reactor. (A.L.B.)

  7. Development of a Reactor Model for Chemical Conversion of Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar regolith will be used for a variety of purposes such as oxygen and propellant production and manufacture of various materials. The design and development of chemical conversion reactors for processing lunar regolith will require an understanding of the coupling among the chemical, mass and energy transport processes occurring at the length and time scales of the overall reactor with those occurring at the corresponding scales of the regolith particles. To this end, a coupled transport model is developed using, as an example, the reduction of ilmenite-containing regolith by a continuous flow of hydrogen in a flow-through reactor. The ilmenite conversion occurs on the surface and within the regolith particles. As the ilmenite reduction proceeds, the hydrogen in the reactor is consumed, and this, in turn, affects the conversion rate of the ilmenite in the particles. Several important quantities are identified as a result of the analysis. Reactor scale parameters include the void fraction (i.e., the fraction of the reactor volume not occupied by the regolith particles) and the residence time of hydrogen in the reactor. Particle scale quantities include the time for hydrogen to diffuse into the pores of the regolith particles and the chemical reaction time. The paper investigates the relationships between these quantities and their impact on the regolith conversion. Application of the model to various chemical reactor types, such as fluidized-bed, packed-bed, and rotary-bed configurations, are discussed.

  8. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  9. The production of zinc by thermal dissociation of zinc oxide - solar chemical reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haueter, P.; Moeller, S.; Palumbo, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Solar Process Technology; Steinfeld, A. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Mechanical and Process Engineering

    1999-07-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and preliminary test of a novel solar chemical reactor for conducting the thermal dissociation of ZnO into zinc and oxygen at above 2000 K. The reactor configuration features a windowed rotating cavity-receiver lined with ZnO particles that are held by centrifugal force. With this arrangement, ZnO is directly exposed to high-flux solar irradiation and serves simultaneously the functions of radiant absorber, thermal insulator, and chemical reactant. The reactor design respects the constraints imposed by both the chemistry of the decomposition reaction and the transitory nature of solar energy. A 10 kW prototype reactor, made from conventional reliable materials, was tested at PSI's high-flux solar furnace and exposed to peak solar radiation fluxes exceeding 3500 kW m{sup -2}. The reactor system proved to have low thermal inertia and resistance to thermal shocks. (author)

  10. The production of zinc by thermal dissociation of zinc oxide - solar chemical reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haueter, P.; Moeller, S.; Palumbo, R.; Steinfeld, A. [PSI and ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and preliminary test of a novel solar chemical reactor for conducting the thermal dissociation of ZnO into zinc and oxygen at above 2000 K. The reactor configuration features a windowed rotating cavity-receiver lined with ZnO particles that are held by centrifugal force. With this arrangement, ZnO is directly exposed to high-flux solar irradiation and serves simultaneously the functions of radiant absorber, thermal insulator, and chemical reactant. The reactor design respects the constraints imposed by both the chemistry of the decomposition reaction and the transitory nature of solar energy. A 10 kW prototype reactor, made from conventional reliable materials, was tested at PSI's high-flux solar furnace and exposed to peak solar radiation fluxes exceeding 3500 kWm{sup -2}. The reactor system proved to have low thermal inertia and resistance to thermal shocks. (authors)

  11. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B2O3) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  12. Simulation of Chemical Reactors using the Least-Squares Spectral Element method

    OpenAIRE

    Sporleder, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The least–squares spectral element method is a relatively novel method that can be used to solve any well–posed problem. It has been extensively used in computational fluid dynamics, and in recent years has been applied in the field of chemical engineering. This work focuses on the use of the least–squares spectral element method for the simulation of chemical reactors from a general point of view. The document presents an analysis on the common challenges that chemical reactor models pose an...

  13. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  14. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  15. Ozone decay in chemical reactor for ozone-dynamical disintegration of used tyres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ozone decay kinetics in the chemical reactor intended for used tyres disintegration is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Ozone was synthesized in barrierless ozonizers based on the streamer discharge. The chemical reactor for tyres disintegration in the ozone-air environment represents the cylindrical chamber, which feeds from the ozonizer by ozone-air mixture with the specified rate of volume flow, and with known ozone concentration. The output of the used mixture, which rate of volume flow is also known, is carried out through the ozone destructor. As a result of ozone decay in the volume and on the reactor walls, and output of the used mixture from the reactor, the ozone concentration in the reactor depends from time. In the paper, the analytical expression for dependence of ozone concentration in the reactor from time and from the parameters of a problem such as the volumetric feed rate, ozone concentration on the input in the reactor, volume flow rate of the used mixture, the volume of the reactor and the area of its internal surface is obtained. It is shown that experimental results coincide with good accuracy with analytical ones.

  16. On-line chemical sensors for applications in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen sensors are essential components of fast reactor sodium circuits. These sensors are needed in fast reactors for the immediate detection of any steam leak into sodium during reactor operation which can lead to failure of steam generator. Depending on the operating power of the reactor, sodium-water reaction results in either an increase in dissolved hydrogen level in sodium or an increase in hydrogen content of argon cover gas used above sodium coolant. Hence, on-line monitoring of hydrogen continuously in sodium and cover circuits helps in detection of any steam leak. In the event of accidental leak of high temperature sodium, it reacts with oxygen and moisture in air leading to sodium fires. These fires produce sodium aerosol containing oxides of sodium (Na2O and Na2O2) and NaOH. For early detection of sodium fires, sensor systems based on sodium ionization detector, pH measurement and modulation of conductivity of graphite films are known in the literature. This presentation deals with the development of on-line sensors for these two applications. A diffusion based sensor using a thin walled nickel coil at 773 K and a sensitive thermal conductivity detector (TCD) has been developed for monitoring hydrogen levels in argon cover gas. This sensor has a lower detection limit of 30 ppm of hydrogen in argon. To extend the detection limit of the sensor, a surface conductivity based sensor has been developed which makes use of a thin film of semi-conducting tin oxide. Integration of this sensor with the TCD, can extend the lower detection limit to 2 ppm of hydrogen in cover gas. Electrochemical sensor based on sodium-beta-alumina has been designed, fabricated and its performance in laboratory and industrial environment was evaluated. This paper presents the logical development of these sensors highlighting their merits and limitations

  17. Chemical reactor for a PUREX reprocessing plant of 200Kg U/day capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolution of spent reactor fuels in Purex process is studied. Design of a chemical reactor for PWR elements, 3% enriched uranium dioxide with zircaloy cladding, for a 200Kg/day uranium plant is the main objective. Chop-leach process is employed and 7.5M nitric acid is used. Non-criticality was obtained by safe geometry and checked by spectrum homogeneous calculus and diffusion codes. Fuel cycle is considered and decladding and dissolution are treated more accurately

  18. Chemical Looping Reactor System Design : Double Loop Circulating Fluidized Bed (DLCFB)

    OpenAIRE

    Bischi, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is continuously gaining more importance among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. It is an unmixed combustion process which takes place in two steps. An effective way to realize CLC is to use two interconnected fluidized beds and a metallic powder circulating among them, acting as oxygen carrier. The metallic powder oxidizes at high temperature in one of the two reactors, the air reactor (AR). It reacts in a highly exothermic reaction with the ...

  19. Fuel reactor modelling in chemical-looping combustion of coal: 1. model formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Abad Secades, Alberto; Gayán Sanz, Pilar; Diego Poza, Luis F. de; García Labiano, Francisco; Adánez Elorza, Juan

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental part of the reliability of the Chemical-Looping Combution system when a 13 solid fuel, such as coal, is fed to the reactor is based on the behaviour of the fuel reactor, which determines the conversion of the solid fuel. The objective of this work is to develop a model describing the fuel reactor in the Chemical–Looping Combustion with coal (CLCC) process. The model is used to simulate the performance of the 1 MWth CLCC rig built in the Technology University of Darmsta...

  20. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  1. Design of an isopropanol–acetone–hydrogen chemical heat pump with exothermic reactors in series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isopropanol–acetone–hydrogen chemical heat pump system with a series of exothermic reactors in which the reaction temperatures decrease successively is proposed. This system shows the better energy performances as compared with the traditional system with a single exothermic reactor, especially when the higher upgraded temperature is need. At the same amounts of the heat released, the work input of the compressor and the heater are both reduced notably. The results indicate that the advantages of the IAH-CHP system with exothermic reactors in series are obvious. - Highlights: • We propose the IAH-CHP system with exothermic reactors in series. • The COP and exergy efficiency of the system increase by 7.6% and 10.3% respectively. • The work input of the system is reduced notably at the same quantity of heat released

  2. Process Modelling of Chemical Reactors: Zero- versus Multi-dimensional Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn H. Hjertager

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Trends in modelling of flow processes in the chemical reactors are presented. Particular emphasis is given to models that use the multi-dimensional multi-fluid techniques. Examples are given for both gas/liquid as well as gas/particle reators.

  3. Titanium-based coatings on copper by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium, TiN and TiOx coatings were deposited on copper and Cu-Ni alloys by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors. These coatings provide the copper with a tenfold increase in corrosion resistance in chloride aqueous environments, as determined by a.c. impedance studies. (orig.)

  4. Development of chemical sensors for Fast Breeder Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast breeder reactors use liquid sodium as heat transfer medium and generate high pressure steam at the steam generator to run the turbine. This high pressure steam is separated from sodium coolant by ferritic steel tubes of 4 to 5 mm wall thickness. Development of any material defect in these heat exchanger tubes during their service would result in the ingress of high pressure steam into the sodium circuit leading to sodium-water reactions. A high temperature electrochemical hydrogen sensor based on CaBr2-CaHBr solid electrolyte and capable of measuring ppb levels of dissolved hydrogen in sodium has been developed at the laboratory. A very sensitive system, using thermal conductivity detector and semiconducting oxide based sensor has also been developed for continuous monitoring of hydrogen levels in argon cover gas. An electrochemical carbon sensor using a molten carbonate electrolyte and an oxygen sensor based on yttria doped thoria oxide electrolyte are also under advanced stage of development for measuring carbon and oxygen levels in sodium. Materials chemistry issues involved in developing these sensors and their operational experience in sodium system are highlighted in this presentation

  5. Treatment of Copper Contaminated Municipal Wastewater by Using UASB Reactor and Sand-Chemically Carbonized Rubber Wood Sawdust Column

    OpenAIRE

    Swarup Biswas; Umesh Mishra

    2016-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and its posttreatment unit of sand-chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust (CCRWSD) column system for the treatment of a metal contaminated municipal wastewater was investigated. Copper ion contaminated municipal wastewater was introduced to a laboratory scale UASB reactor and the effluent from UASB reactor was then followed by treatment with sand-CCRWSD column system. The laboratory scale UASB reactor and ...

  6. Measurements at the RA Reactor related to the VISA-2 project - Part 4, Calorimetry and chemical dosimetry of the new partly filled RA reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of values of chemical and calorimetry measurements of absorbed doses in the experimental channels VK-5, VK-9, GF-34 and fuel channels (0706 and 0607) of the Ra reactor. Calorimetry measurements were during reactor operation at 900 kW or 1 MW power, dependent on the type of samples in the calorimeters. For the chemical measurements the power was kept at 500 kW

  7. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  8. Magnesium hydroxide – expanded graphite composite pellets for a packed bed reactor chemical heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical heat pump is a promising technology for the recovery of waste heat from industrial processes or cogeneration systems. It can be used for storing the surplus heat during low demand periods and release it for shaving the peaks of heat demand, with a benefit for the overall system efficiency. In this work, a packed bed reactor chemical heat pump based on the dehydration and hydration of magnesium hydroxide has been investigated. Due to its high thermal conductivity, expanded graphite was mixed with magnesium hydroxide to enhance heat transfer. The composite material, named EM, was developed and tested experimentally in order to understand the effects of expanded graphite on the chemical reactions occurring in the packed bed reactor. -- Highlights: • An expanded graphite/Mg(OH)2 composite was developed for a packed bed reactor chemical heat pump. • The expanded graphite/Mg(OH)2 composite (EM) was compressed in figure of pellets. • Higher reaction rates were observed for the dehydration and hydration of EM pellets. • EM pellets showed better performance in terms of heat storage and heat output. • EM pellets were able to withstand repetitive cyclic reactions without significant failures

  9. Assessment of impacts at the advanced test reactor as a result of chemical releases at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an assessment of potential impacts at the Advanced Test Reactor Facility (ATR) resulting from accidental chemical spill at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Spills postulated to occur at the Lincoln Blvd turnoff to ICPP were also evaluated. Peak and time weighted average concentrations were calculated for receptors at the ATR facility and the Test Reactor Area guard station at a height above ground level of 1.0 m. Calculated concentrations were then compared to the 15 minute averaged Threshold Limit Value - Short Term Exposure Limit (TLV-STEL) and the 30 minute averaged Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) limit. Several different methodologies were used to estimate source strength and dispersion. Fifteen minute time weighted averaged concentrations of hydrofluoric acid and anhydrous ammonia exceeded TLV-STEL values for the cases considered. The IDLH value for these chemicals was not exceeded. Calculated concentrations of ammonium hydroxide, hexone, nitric acid, propane, gasoline, chlorine and liquid nitrogen were all below the TLV-STEL value

  10. Chemical engineering challenges in driving thermochemical hydrogen processes with the tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tandem Mirror Reactor is described and compared with Tokamaks, both from a basic physics viewpoint and from the suitability of the respective reactor for synfuel production. Differences and similarities between the TMR as an electricity producer or a synfuel producer are also cited. The Thermochemical cycle chosen to link with the fusion energy source is the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle, which is a purely thermal-driven process with no electrochemical steps. There are real chemical engineering challenges of getting this high quality heat into the large thermochemical plant in an efficient manner. We illustrate with some of our approaches to providing process heat via liquid sodium to drive a 1050 K, highly-endothermic, catalytic and fluidized-bed SO3 Decomposition Reactor. The technical, economic, and safety tradeoffs that arise are discussed

  11. Chemical compatibility issues associated with use of SiC/SiC in advanced reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites are of interest for components that will experience high radiation fields in the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR), the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR), or the Fluoride-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR). In all of the reactor systems considered, reactions of SiC/SiC composites with the constituents of the coolant determine suitability of materials of construction. The material of interest is nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites, which consist of a SiC matrix [high-purity, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC or liquid phase-sintered SiC that is crystalline beta-phase SiC containing small amounts of alumina-yttria impurity], a pyrolytic carbon interphase, and somewhat impure yet crystalline beta-phase SiC fibers. The interphase and fiber components may or may not be exposed, at least initially, to the reactor coolant. The chemical compatibility of SiC/SiC composites in the three reactor environments is highly dependent on thermodynamic stability with the pure coolant, and on reactions with impurities present in the environment including any ingress of oxygen and moisture. In general, there is a dearth of information on the performance of SiC in these environments. While there is little to no excess Si present in the new SiC/SiC composites, the reaction of Si with O2 cannot be ignored, especially for the FHR, in which environment the product, SiO2, can be readily removed by the fluoride salt. In all systems, reaction of the carbon interphase layer with oxygen is possible especially under abnormal conditions such as loss of coolant (resulting in increased temperature), and air and/ or steam ingress. A global outline of an approach to resolving SiC/SiC chemical compatibility concerns with the environments of the three reactors is presented along with ideas to quickly determine the baseline compatibility performance of SiC/SiC.

  12. Water-chemical process in reactor units of nuclear icebreakers and floating power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design specific features and operational experience of the reactor plants used at Russian nuclear ships and icebreakers are discussed. The role of different factors affecting the primary coolant circuit water-chemical characteristics is considered. The primary circuit of the ship propulsion reactors has closed and relatively small volume. The coolant after washing and first filling is exchanged not more than 3-4 times for the whole operating period. The general approach to water chemistry for the primary coolant circuits of the ship propulsion reactor plants is suggested basing on the generalizing of the large information volume gained during laboratory investigations into the water-chemical processes, benchmark tests and in the course of long-time operation which is the most important source of information. It is shown that the ammonium water chemistry applied in ship propulsion plants is stable, easily organized and maintained, the volume of liquid radioactive wastes produced is not great. Use of these conditions in reactor plants of new small-power NPP and floating power unit projects is considered to be reasonable and sufficiently supported by data. The operational experience shows that improvements may be directed to changes in the regime of cleaning system utilization and increasing the ion-exchange slim service lifetime

  13. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is the application of numerical methods to solve systems of partial differential equations related to fluid dynamics. The continuity and the momentum equations are the most commonly applied equations within CFD, and together they can be used to calculate the...... velocity and pressure distributions in a fluid. CFD also enables the modelling of several fluids simultaneously, e.g. gas bubbles in a liquid, as well as the presence of turbulence and dissolved chemicals in a fluid, and many other phenomena. This makes CFD an appreciated tool for studying flow structures......, mixing, and other mass transfer phenomena in chemical and biochemical reactor systems. In this project, four selected case studies are investigated in order to explore the capabilities of CFD. The selected cases are a 1 ml stirred microbioreactor, an 8 ml magnetically stirred reactor, a Rushton impeller...

  14. Simulation of Thermal and Chemical Relaxation in a Post-Discharge Air Corona Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Meziane, M.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Yousfi, M

    2016-01-01

    In a DC point-to-plane corona discharge reactor, the mono filamentary streamers cross the inter electrode gap with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The discharge phase (including the primary and the secondary streamers development) lasts only some hundred of nanoseconds while the post-discharge phases occurring between two successive discharge phases last some tens of microseconds. From the point of view of chemical activation, the discharge phases create radical and excite...

  15. Fluidized bed as a solid precursor delivery system in a chemical vapor deposition reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Vahlas, Constantin; Caussat, Brigitte; Senocq, François; Gladfelter, Wayne L.; Sarantopoulos, Christos; Toro, David; Moersch, Tyler

    2005-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using precursors that are solids at operating temperatures and pressures, presents challenges due to their relatively low vapor pressures. In addition, the sublimation rates of solid state precursors in fixed bed reactors vary with particle and bed morphology. In a recent patent application, the use of fluidized bed (FB) technology has been proposed to provide high, reliable, and reproducible flux of such precursors in CVD processes. In the present contribution...

  16. CFD simulation of a chemical-looping fuel reactor utilizing solid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalatkar, K.; Kuhlman, J.; Huckaby, E.D.; O' Brien, T. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2011-08-15

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been carried out for the fuel reactor for a new type of combustion technology called chemical-looping combustion (CLC). CLC involves combustion of fuels by heterogeneous chemical reactions with an oxygen carrier, usually a granular metal oxide, exchanged between two reactors. There have been extensive experimental studies on CLC, however CFD simulations of this concept are quite limited. In the present paper we have developed a CFD model for the fuel reactor of a chemical-looping combustor described in the literature, which utilized a Fe-based carrier (ilmenite) and coal. An Eulerian multiphase continuum model was used to describe both the gas and solid phases, with detailed sub-models to account for fluid-particle and particle-particle interaction forces. Global reaction models of fuel and carrier chemistry were utilized. The transient results obtained from the simulations were compared with detailed experimental time-varying outlet species concentrations (Leion et al., 2008) and provided a reasonable match with the reported experimental data.

  17. Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Chemical Reactors with Micro-Scale Features for In-Situ Resource Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed to develop compact and lightweight ceramic heat exchangers and chemical reactors suitable for high temperature processes. These devices will have...

  18. Chemical Engineering Division reactor fuels and materials chemistry research: July 1976--September 1977. [LMFBR; GCFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-07-01

    Reactor safety studies were directed primarily toward obtaining high-temperature physical property data for use in reactor safety analyses. Spectroscopic data and an oxygen-potential model were used to calculate thermodynamic properties applicable to the equations of state of (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/. Work was continued on the compilation of standard sets of property data on reactor fuels and materials. The viscosity of molten alumina and the thermal diffusivity of molten UO/sub 2/ were measured as functions of temperature. Modeling and chemical-interaction studies related to post-accident heat removal were conducted. The efforts in sodium technology supported the LMFBR program. Studies were conducted to explore the feasibility of upgrading the quality of commercial-grade sodium and sodium from decommissioned reactors to provide new sources of reactor-grade sodium. Work was started on the development of methods for disposal of contaminated alkali--metal wastes. In work related to tritium, a model was developed to describe the behavior of tritium in an LMFBR, tritium permeation through steam-generator materials was measured, and an in-sodium tritium meter was developed and tested in reactor environments. Work in the area of fuels and materials chemistry was conducted in support of the GCFR program. Portions of the cesium--uranium--oxygen phase diagram were investigated to aid in understanding the reaction of fission-product cesium with urania blanket material, particularly in relation to axial gas flow in vented GCFR fuel pins. Data on the oxidation of vanadium, niobium, and titanium were assessed to determine the suitability of these materials for use in controlling oxidative attack of stainless steel cladding.

  19. Destruction of chemical agent simulants in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new design of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench-scale reactor has been developed to handle high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization. The reactor consists of a concentric vertical double wall in which SCWO reaction takes place inside an inner tube (titanium grade 2, non-porous) whereas pressure resistance is ensured by a Hastelloy C-276 external vessel. The performances of this reactor were investigated with two different kinds of chemical warfare agent simulants: OPA (a mixture of isopropyl amine and isopropyl alcohol) as the binary precursor for nerve agent of sarin and thiodiglycol [TDG (HOC2H4)2S] as the model organic sulfur heteroatom. High destruction rates based on total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved (>99.99%) without production of chars or undesired gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. The carbon-containing product was carbon dioxide whereas the nitrogen-containing products were nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Sulfur was totally recovered in the aqueous effluent as sulfuric acid. No corrosion was noticed in the reactor after a cumulative operation time of more than 250 h. The titanium tube shielded successfully the pressure vessel from corrosion

  20. Design of a rotary reactor for chemical-looping combustion. Part 1: Fundamentals and design methodology

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2014-04-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising option for several applications including carbon capture (CC), fuel reforming, H 2 generation, etc. Previous studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing CLC in a novel rotary design with micro-channel structures. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet, and depleted air and product streams at exit. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of micro-channels with oxygen carriers (OC) coated on the inner surface of the channel walls. In the CC application, the OC oxidizes the fuel while the channel is in the fuel zone to generate undiluted CO2, and is regenerated while the channel is in the air zone. In this two-part series, the effect of the reactor design parameters is evaluated and its performance with different OCs is compared. In Part 1, the design objectives and criteria are specified and the key parameters controlling the reactor performance are identified. The fundamental effects of the OC characteristics, the design parameters, and the operating conditions are studied. The design procedures are presented on the basis of the relative importance of each parameter, enabling a systematic methodology of selecting the design parameters and the operating conditions with different OCs. Part 2 presents the application of the methodology to the designs with the three commonly used OCs, i.e., nickel, copper, and iron, and compares the simulated performances of the designs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Problems related with the power regulation of reactors by physico-chemical methods, and the behaviour of water and heavy water in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of the behaviour of water and heavy water in working reactors contributes to their safe running and provides information useful in studies relating to reactivity control techniques using soluble poisons. The use of nuclear poisons dissolved in the water of a reactor leads to its chemical pollution. The conditions under which they can be used without causing the undesirable effects of this pollution are studied. Problems of analysis, although important, are not tackled in this paper. Behaviour of heavy water in working reactors. Isotopic pollution of heavy water: The rate at which this pollution occurs depends on the type of reactor and on certain characteristic incidents. The use of a re-concentration column is an efficient way of maintaining the heavy water isotopic concentration in a reactor which cannot be considered exempt from slow isotopic pollution. Heavy water leak detection: The instantaneous rates of small leaks can be measured, the leak localised, and the atmospheric contamination in the reactor building checked. Isotopic analysis for deuterium or tritium determination, is carried out on samples. Chemical pollution and purification of heavy water Chemical pollution of heavy water is one of the most complex problems in reactor chemistry Corrosion of the materials which make up the core and the heavy water circuits varies extensively with the state of purity of the heavy water, as may be appreciated from the performances of the purification circuits and from direct measurements From the knowledge acquired it has been possible to work out standards of purity which, if observed will guarantee satisfactory running of the reactor. Radiolytic decomposition of heavy water : A better knowledge of its quantitative aspects in reactors is necessary in order to foresee the amounts of explosive gas mixture given off in power reactors. The radiolysis rate develops with the chemical purity of the water and the instantaneous power of the reactor

  2. Physical and chemical feasibility of fueling molten salt reactors with TRU's trifluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V.; Feinberg, O.; Konakov, S.; Subbotine, S.; Surenkov, A.; Zakirov, R. [Kurchatov Institute, RRC, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The molten salt reactor (MSR) concept is very important for consideration as an element of future nuclear energy systems. These reactor systems are unique in many ways. Particularly, the MSRs appear to have substantial promise not only as advanced TRU free system operating in U-Th cycle, but also as transmuter of TRU. Physical and chemical feasibility of fueling MSR with TRU trifluorides is examined. Solvent compositions with and without U-Th as fissile / fertile addition are considered. The principle reactor and fuel cycle variables available for optimizing the performance of MSR as TRU transmuting system are discussed. These efforts led to the definition in minimal TRU mass flow rate, reduced total losses to waste and maximum possible burn up rate for the molten salt transmuter. The current status of technology and prospects for revisited interest are summarized. Significant chemical problems are remain to be resolved at the end of prior MSRs programs, notably, graphite life durability, tritium control, fate of noble metal fission products. Questions arising from plutonium and minor actinide fueling include: corrosion and container chemistry, new redox buffer for systems without uranium, analytical chemistry instrumentation, adequate constituent solubilities, suitable fuel processing and waste form development. However these problems appear to be soluble. (author)

  3. Biomass characteristics in three sequencing batch reactors treating a wastewater containing synthetic organic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Z.Q.; Ferraina, R.A.; Ericson, J.F.;

    2005-01-01

    The physical and biochemical characteristics of the biomass in three lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBR) treating a synthetic wastewater at a 20-day target solids retention time (SRT) were investigated. The synthetic wastewater feed contained biogenic compounds and 22 organic priming...... compounds, chosen to represent a wide variety of chemical structures with different N, P and S functional groups. At a two-day hydraulic retention time (HRT), the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) cycled between -100 (anoxic) and 100mV (aerobic) in the anoxic/aerobic SBR, while it remained in a range of...... all reactors. In contrast, effluent 3-nitrobenzoate was recorded when its influent concentration was increased to 5 mg L-1 and dropped only to below 1 mg L-1 after 300 days of operation. The competent (active) biomass fractions for these compounds were between 0.04% and 5.52% of the total biomass...

  4. Low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater treatment by biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilm configured system with sequencing/periodic discontinuous batch mode operation was evaluated for the treatment of low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater (low BOD/COD ratio ∼0.3, high sulfate content: 1.75 g/l) in aerobic metabolic function. Reactor was operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment conditions with a total cycle period of 24 h [fill: 15 min; reaction: 23 h (aeration along with recirculation); settle: 30 min; decant: 15 min] and the performance of the system was studied at organic loading rates (OLR) of 0.92, 1.50, 3.07 and 4.76 kg COD/cum-day. Substrate utilization showed a steady increase with increase in OLR and system performance sustained at higher loading rates. Maximum non-cumulative substrate utilization was observed after 4 h of the cycle operation. Sulfate removal efficiency of 20% was observed due to the induced anoxic conditions prevailing during the sequence phase operation of the reactor and the existing internal anoxic zones in the biofilm matrix. Biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBR) showed comparatively higher efficiency to the corresponding suspended growth and granular activated carbon (GAC) configured systems studied with same wastewater. Periodic discontinuous batch mode operation of the biofilm reactors results in a more even distribution of the biomass throughout the reactor and was able to treat large shock loads than the continuous flow process. Biofilm configured system coupled with periodic discontinuous batch mode operation imposes regular variations in the substrate concentration on biofilm organisms. As a result, organisms throughout the film achieve maximum growth rates resulting in improved reaction potential leading to stable and robust system which is well suited for treating highly variable wastes

  5. Micro structural evaluation of fuel clad chemical interaction for metallic fuels for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutronic performance of metal fuel based on binary U-Pu alloy or ternary U-Pu-Zr alloys are better than conventional uranium plutonium mixed oxide or high density carbide ceramic fuel. The growing energy demand in India needs faster growth of nuclear power and warrants introduction of fast reactors based on metallic fuels because of higher breeding ratio and lower doubling time. Two design concepts have been proposed: one based on sodium bonded ternary alloy fuel of U-Pu-Zr ( 2-10 wt%) in modified T91 cladding material and the other is U-Pu binary alloy mechanically bonded to modified T91 cladding material with 'Zircaloy', as a liner between the fuel alloy and the clad. The Zircaloy liner act as a barrier in reducing the fuel clad chemical interaction. It also helps in transfer of heat from the fuel to the clad. Fuel clad chemical interaction is a serious issue limiting the life of a fuel pin as a result of formation of low temperature eutectic between the fuel and components of the cladding material. The eutectic reaction temperature between T91 and Uranium were estimated by dilatometry, differential thermal analysis and high temperature microscopy. Diffusion couple experiments were also carried out between U/Zr/T91 and U/T91 by isothermal annealing of the couples between 550 deg C to 750 deg C for times up to 1500 hrs. to find out the extent of chemical interaction. These studies were supported by metallographic examination, micro hardness measurement, XRD, SEM/EDAX and EPMA. The eutectic temperature was found to be higher than the estimated fuel clad interface temperature under the reactor operating condition. The paper highlights the results of these studies and attempts to analyze them in the light of performance. The outcome of these studies has been useful to the fuel designer in optimizing the design features and predicting the in-reactor fuel behavior. (author)

  6. Physico-chemical investigations in relation with the tritium circuit in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium flow diagram within a fusion reactor may be splitted in a series of chemical engineering units. For them, the E.E.C. has launched a review program as well as experimental work. In this framework the CEA has carried out conceptual studies on fuel clean-up process, on gaseous waste treatment and on atmosphere detritiation systems. Moreover measurements with experimental loops are running to determine data necessary to assess unit dimensions; among others: hydrogen permeation rate through Pd-Ag membranes and tritium oxidation catalyst performances

  7. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe—reactor design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Peter V.; Kee, Robert J.; Raja, Laxminarayan; Wolden, Colin A.; Aire, Michael

    1999-03-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of polycrystalline thin-film CdTe appears to offer several practical advantages over state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques. APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry utilized to produce 16% efficient CdTe cells (i.e., same reaction chemistry as Close Spaced Sublimation), avoids use of vacuum equipment, allows for physical separation of the source and substrate, and employs forced convection to ensure uniform delivery of source material over large-area substrates. Reactor design considerations and preliminary numerical simulations of mass transport are presented.

  8. Model analysis of influences of the high-temperature reactor on location shifting in chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis is presented of the influences of High-Temperature Reactor on probable location shifting of big chemical plants, in the future. This is done by a spatial location model, that includes an investigation on 116 industrial locations within the first six countries of Common Market. The results of a computerized program show differences in location qualities when furnished either with traditional or with nuclear energy systems. In addition to location factor energy some other important factors, as subventions, taxes, labour, and transport costs are analysed, and their influence on industrial location is quantified. (orig.)

  9. Design criteria of a chemical reactor based on a chaotic flow

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, X. Z.; Boozer, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the design criteria of a chemical mixing device based on a chaotic flow, with an emphasis on the steady-state devices. The merit of a reactor, defined as the $Q$-factor, is related to the physical dimension of the device and the molecular diffusivity of the reactants through the local Lyapunov exponents of the flow. The local Lyapunov exponent can be calculated for any given flow field and it can also be measured in experimental situations. Easy-to-compute formulae are provided to...

  10. Chemical conditions in the repository for low- and intermediate-level reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical conditions in the proposed repositories for low- and intermediate-level reactor waste at Haestholmen (IVO) and Olkiluoto (TVO) have been discussed with respect to materials introduced into the repository, their possible long-term changes and interaction with groundwater flowing into the repository. The main possible groundwater-rock interactions have been discussed, as well as the role of micro-organisms, organic acids and colloids in the estimation of the barrier integrity. Experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the basis of the natural groundwater compositions expected at the repository sites. Main emphasis is put on the chemical parameters which might influence the integrity of the different barriers in the repository as well as on the parameters which might effect the release and transport of radionuclides from the repository

  11. Problem Based Learning (PBL: Analysis of Continuous Stirred Tank Chemical Reactors with a Process Control Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regalado-Méndez Alejandro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on a project that integrates the curriculum such as thermodynamic, chemical reactorengineering, linear algebra, differential equations and computer programming. The purpose is thatstudents implement the most knowledge and tools to analyse the stirred tank chemical reactor as a simpledynamic system. When the students finished this practice they should have learned about analysis ofdynamic system through bifurcation analysis, hysteresis phenomena, find equilibrium points, stabilitytype, and phase portrait. Once the steps were accomplished, we concluded that the purpose wassatisfactorily reached with an increment in creative ability. The student showed a bigger interesting inthis practice, since they worked in group. The most important fact is that the percentage of failure amongstudents was 10%. Finally, using alternative teaching-learning process improves the Mexican systemeducation.

  12. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  13. A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL INHIBITION IN A PERFECTLY STIRRED REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nancy J.; Schefer, Robert W.

    1980-05-01

    This paper reports a set of modeling studies that were undertaken to acquire a more detailed knowledge of combustion inhibition mechanisms. Mixtures of H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/Ar reacting in the idealized perfectly stirred reactor were investigated. Three H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} kinetic mechanisms were considered, differing from one another by the number of HO{sub 2} reactions included. Two physical inhibitors, Ar and N{sub 2}, and one chemical inhibitor, HBr, were investigated. Additional parameters considered were pressure, equivalence ratio, inhibitor concentration and rate coefficient variation. The most effective inhibitor was HBr which acted chemically and caused substantial reduction in radical concentrations in the mixtures considered. The molecules Ar and N{sub 2} acted as physical diluents with N{sub 2}, the more effective of the two due to its larger heat capacity.

  14. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion-fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies.

  15. Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity in a packed bed reactor of a chemical heat pump for high-temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal performance of a chemical heat pump that uses a calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reaction system was discussed as a heat storage system for utilizing heat output from high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity for the heat pump was measured using a packed bed reactor containing 1.0 kg of reactant. The reactor was capable of storing heat at 900 deg. C by decarbonation of calcium carbonate and generating up to 997 deg. C by carbonation of calcium oxide. The amount of stored heat in the reactor was 800-900 kJ kg-1. The output temperature of the reactor could be controlled by regulating the carbonation pressure. The thermal storage performance of the reactor was superior to that of conventional sensible heat storage systems. A heat pump using this CaO/CO2 reactor is expected to contribute to thermal load leveling and to realize highly efficient utilization of HTGR output due to the high heat storage density and high-quality temperature output of the heat pump

  16. Current activities of chemical applications of Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) is a swiming pool type research reactor operated and maintained by the University. The functions of THOR are two folds, i.e. (1) teaching and training of nuclear scientists and engineers, and (2) promotion of peaceful uses of atomic energy in Taiwan. Thus, besides the educational program THOR has been offering neutron irradiation service on regular schedule (30 hrs. per week full power operation at 1 MW with neutron flux of ca. 2 x 1012 n cm-2 sec.-1 since 1963). Among many other projects chemical application of THOR has been one of the important program implimented in early days. Following two projects have been set up with rather limited budget: (1) Production and supply of short-lived radioisotopes (both general purpose and medical use) for domestic use. (2) Application of neutron activation analysis in the fields of environmental, geological, biological and material science. It turned out that quite fruitful results have been obtained. It is the purpose of this paper to describe in detail some of the characteristic aspects on the utilization of THOR in the field of chemical application. (author)

  17. Dilute chemical decontamination process for pressurized and boiling water reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC) has developed five chemical processes for nuclear decontamination, based on extensive experimental testing using radioactive pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) samples. The dilute chemical decontamination process offers the best combination of effectiveness, low corrosion, low waste volume, and fast field implementation time. This is an alternating multistep process. For PWRs, an oxidation treatment is necessary. Projected contact decontamination factors (DFs) are about 50 on plant Inconel surfaces, with comparable results on stainless steel. Actual test DFs have exceeded 500 in the process test loop. For BWRs, an oxidation step is unnecessary, but very beneficial. DFs of 10 to 20 are achieved without an oxidation treatment. Full process DFs exceed 500 when the oxidation treatment is included. Low corrosion rates are observed, without any adverse effects. Only solid waste is produced by the process. WEC has fabricated a trailer-mounted application system for this process, and is offering it as a decontamination service to commercial customers

  18. Simulation of Thermal and Chemical Relaxation in a Post-Discharge Air Corona Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Meziane, M; Ducasse, O; Yousfi, M

    2016-01-01

    In a DC point-to-plane corona discharge reactor, the mono filamentary streamers cross the inter electrode gap with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The discharge phase (including the primary and the secondary streamers development) lasts only some hundred of nanoseconds while the post-discharge phases occurring between two successive discharge phases last some tens of microseconds. From the point of view of chemical activation, the discharge phases create radical and excited species located inside the very thin discharge filaments while during the post-discharge phases these radical and excited species induce a chemical kinetics that diffuse in a part of the reactor volume. From the point of view of hydrodynamics activation, the discharge phases induce thermal shock waves and the storage of vibrational energy which relaxes into thermal form only during the post-discharge phase. Furthermore, the glow corona discharges that persist during the post-discharge phases induce the so called electri...

  19. Water chemical control of the TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 reactor located at CDTN/CNEN has been in operation and contributed to research and with services to society since 1960. Is has been used in several activities such as nuclear power plant operation, graduate and post-graduate training courses, isotope production, and as an analytical irradiation tool of different types of samples. Among the several structural and operational safety requirements is the chemical quality control of the primary circuit cooling water. The aim of this work was to check the cooling water quality from the pool reactor. A water sampling plan was proposed (May, 2011 - June, 2012) and presents the results obtained in this period. The natural radioactivity level as gross alpha and gross beta activity and other chemical parameters (pH and electric conductivity) of the samples were analyzed. Some instrumental techniques were used: potentiometric methods (pH), conductometric methods (electrical conductivity, EC) and gross α and gross β proportional counting system). (author)

  20. Chemical looping reactor system design double loop circulating fluidized bed (DLCFB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischi, Aldo

    2012-05-15

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is continuously gaining more importance among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. It is an unmixed combustion process which takes place in two steps. An effective way to realize CLC is to use two interconnected fluidized beds and a metallic powder circulating among them, acting as oxygen carrier. The metallic powder oxidizes at high temperature in one of the two reactors, the air reactor (AR). It reacts in a highly exothermic reaction with the oxygen of the injected fluidising air. Afterwards the particles are sent to the other reactor where the fuel is injected, the fuel reactor (FR). There, they transport heat and oxygen necessary for the reaction with the injected fuel to take place. At high temperatures, the particle's oxygen reacts with the fuel producing Co2 and steam, and the particles are ready to start the loop again. The overall reaction, the sum of the enthalpy changes of the oxygen carrier oxidation and reduction reactions, is the same as for the conventional combustion. Two are the key features, which make CLC promising both for costs and capture efficiency. First, the high inherent irreversibility of the conventional combustion is avoided because the energy is utilized stepwise. Second, the Co2 is intrinsically separated within the process; so there is in principle no need either of extra carbon capture devices or of expensive air separation units to produce oxygen for oxy-combustion. A lot of effort is taking place worldwide on the development of new chemical looping oxygen carrier particles, reactor systems and processes. The current work is focused on the reactor system: a new design is presented, for the construction of an atmospheric 150kWth prototype working with gaseous fuel and possibly with inexpensive oxygen carriers derived from industrial by-products or natural minerals. It consists of two circulating fluidized beds capable to operate in fast fluidization regime; this will increase the

  1. Incorporation of statistical distribution of particle properties in chemical reactor design and operation: the cooled tubular reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Wijngaarden, R.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Pellet heat and mass transfer coefficients inside packed beds do not have definite deterministic values, but are stochastic quantities with a certain distribution. Here, a method is presented to incorporate the stochastic distribution of pellet properties in reactor design and operation models. The theory presented is illustrated with a number of examples. It is shown that pellet-scale statistics have an impact on cooled tubular reactor design and operation. Cooled tubular reactor design is d...

  2. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for c...

  3. An investigation of sulfate production in clouds using a flow-through chemical reactor model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, M. S.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    A flow-through chemical reactor model is developed to describe the mass transfer and chemical processes that atmospheric gases undergo in clouds. The model includes the simultaneous absorption of SO2, NH3, O3, NO(x), HNO3, CO2 and H2O2, the accompanying dissociation and oxidation reactions in cloud water, considers electrical neutrality, and includes qualitative parameterization of cloud microphysics. The model is used to assess the importance of the oxidation reactions H2O2-S(IV), O3-S(IV), and S(IV)-Mn(2+) catalysis, and the effects of cloud parameters such as drop size, rain intensity, liquid water content, and updraft velocity. Both precipitating and nonprecipitating clouds are studied. Model results predict sulfate production rates varying from 3 percent/hr to 230 percent/hr. The actual rate is highly dependent on the chemical composition of the uptake air and the physical conditions of the cloud. Model results also show that both the H2O2 and the O3 oxidation reactions can be significant.

  4. Hydrodynamic analysis of a three-fluidized bed reactor cold flow model for chemical looping hydrogen generation. Pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhipeng; Xiang, Wenguo; Chen, Shiyi; Wang, Dong [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG system consists of three reactors: a fuel reactor (FR), a steam reactor (SR) and an air reactor (AR). In the FR, the fuel gases react with iron oxides (hematite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, wuestite FeO), generating reduced iron oxides (FeO or even Fe), and with full conversion of gaseous fuels, pure CO{sub 2} can be obtained after cooling the flue gas from the fuel reactor; in the SR, FeO and Fe reacts with steam to generate magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and H{sub 2}, the latter representing the final target product of the process; in the AR, the magnetite is oxidized back to hematite which is used in another cycle. A cold flow model of three-fluidized bed for CLHG corresponding to 50 KW hot units has been built. A major novelty of this facility is the compact fuel reactor, which integrates a bubble and a fast fluidized bed to avoid the incomplete conversion of the fuel gas caused by the thermodynamics equilibrium. In order to study the pressure characteristics and the solids concentration of the system, especially in the fuel reactor, the gas velocity of three reactors, gas flow of L-type value, total solids inventory (TSI) and the secondary air of fuel reactor were varied. Results show that the pressure and the solids concentration are strongly influenced by the fluidizing-gas velocity of three reactors. Moreover, the entrainment of the upper part of fuel reactor increases as the total solids inventory increases, and the operating range of the FR can be changed by introducing secondary air or increasing the total solids inventory.

  5. Physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical compatibility of aluminum nitride insulator coatings for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blanket system is one of the most important components in a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of various concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water, and helium. Based on the requirements for an electrically insulating coating on the first-wall structural material to minimize the MHD pressure drop during the flow of liquid metal in a magnetic field, AlN was selected as a candidate coating material for the Li self-cooled blanket concept. This report discusses the results from an ongoing study of physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical compatibility of AlN electrical insulator coatings in a liquid Li environment. Details are presented on the AlN coating fabrication methods, and experimental data are reported for microstructures, chemistry of coatings, pretreatment of substrate, heat treatment of coatings, hardness data for coatings, coating/lithium interactions, and electrical resistance before and after exposure to lithium. Thermodynamic calculations are presented to establish regions of stability for AlN coatings in an Li environment as a function of O concentration and temperature, which can aid in-situ development of AlN coatings in Li

  6. Influence of Chemical Oxygen Demand Concentrations on Anaerobi Ammonium Oxidation by Granular Sludge From EGSB Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING KANG; JIAN-LONG WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations on the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX). Methods An Expanded Granular Sludge Bed (EGSB) reactor was used to cultivate the granular sludge and to perform the ANAMMOX reaction in the bench scale experiment. NH4+-N and NO2--N were measured by usingcolorimetric method. NO3--N was analyzed by using the UV spectrophotometric method. COD measurement was based on digestion with potassium dichromate in concentrated sulphuric acid. Results When the COD concentrations in the reactors were 0 mg/L, 200 mg/L, 350 mg/L, and 550 mg/L, respectively, the NH4+-N removal efficiency was 12.5%, 14.2%, 14.3%, and 23.7%; the removal amount of NO2--N was almost the same; the nitrate removal efficiency was 16.8%, 94.5%, 86.6%, and 84.2% and TN removal efficiency was 16.3%, 50.7%, 46.9%, and 50.4%, moreover, the COD removal efficiency concentrations have a significant influence on anaerobic ammonium oxidation by granular sludge.

  7. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS) reactor primary coolant leakage incident, which occurred in Tsuruga-2 (4-loop PWR, 3,423 MWt, 1,160 MWe) on July 12, 1999, it took about 14 hours before the leakage isolation. The delayed leakage isolation and a large amount of leakage have become a social concern. Effective procedure modification was studied. Three betterments were proposed based on a qualitative analysis to reduce the pressure and temperature of the primary loop as fast as possible by the current plant facilities while maintaining enough subcooling of the primary loop. I analyzed the incident with RETRAN code in order to quantitatively evaluate the leakage reduction when these betterments are adopted. This paper is very new because it created a typical analysis method for PWR plant behavior during plant shutdown procedure which conventional RETRAN transient analyses rarely dealt with. Also the event time is very long. To carry out this analysis successfully, I devised new models such as an Residual Heat Removal System (RHR) model etc. and simplified parts of the conventional model. Based on the analysis results, I confirmed that leakage can be reduced by about 30% by adopting these betterments. Then the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) modified the operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events adopting these betterments. (author)

  8. Experimental study of flow and heat transfer in a rotating chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sun

    An experimental model was set up to study the rotating vertical impinging chemical vapor deposition reactor. Deposition occurs only when the system has enough thermal energy. Therefore, understanding the fluid characteristic and heat transfer of the system will provide a good basis to understand the full model. Growth rate and the uniformity of the film are the two most important factors in CVD process and it is depended on the flow and thermal characteristic within the system. Optimizing the operating parameters will result in better growth rate and uniformity. Operating parameters such as inflow velocity, inflow diameter and rotational speed are used to create different design simulations. Fluid velocities and various temperatures are recorded to see the effects of the different operating parameters. Velocities are recorded by using flow meter and hot wire anemometer. Temperatures are recorded by using various thermocouples and infrared thermometer. The result should provide a quantitative basis for the prediction, design and optimization of the system and process for design and fabrication of future CVD reactors. Further assessment of the system results will be discuss in detail such as effects of buoyancy and effects of rotation. The experimental study also coupled with a numerical study for further validation of both model. Comparisons between the two models are also presented.

  9. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volokitin, Oleg, E-mail: volokitin-oleg@mail.ru; Volokitin, Gennady, E-mail: vgg-tomsk@mail.ru; Skripnikova, Nelli, E-mail: nks2003@mai.ru; Shekhovtsov, Valentin, E-mail: shehovcov2010@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Vlasov, Viktor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ r{sub p} ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ r{sub p} ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature.

  10. Chemical aspects of fission product transport in the primary circuit of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport and fission products in the primary circuit of a light water reactor are of fundamental importance in assessing the consequences of severe accidents. Recent experimental studies have concentrated upon the behaviour of simulant fission product species such as caesium iodide, caesium hydroxide and tellurium, in terms of their vapour deposition characteristics onto metals representative of primary circuit materials. An induction furnace has been used to generate high-density/structural materials aerosols for subsequent analysis, and similar equipment has been incorporated into a glove-box to study lightly-irradiated UO/sub 2/ clad in Zircaloy. Analytical techniques are being developed to assist in the identification of fission product chemical species released from the fuel at temperatures from 1000 to 25000C. Matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify species in the vapour phase, and specific data using this technique are reported

  11. Mechanical properties of chemical vapor deposited coatings for fusion reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical vapor deposited coatings of TiB2, TiC and boron on graphite substrates are being developed for application as limiter materials in magnetic confinement fusion reactors. In this application severe thermal shock conditions exist and to do effective thermo-mechanical modelling of the material response it is necessary to acquire elastic moduli, fracture strength and strain to fracture data for the coatings. Four point flexure tests have been conducted from room temperature to 20000C on TiB2 and boron coated graphite with coatings in tension and compression and the mechanical properties extracted from the load-deflection data. In addition, stress relaxation tests from 500 to 11500C were performed on TiB2 and TiC coated graphite beams to assess the low levels of plastic deformation which occur in these coatings. Significant differences have been observed between the effective mechanical properties of the coatings and literature values of the bulk properties

  12. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, Oleg; Vlasov, Viktor; Volokitin, Gennady; Skripnikova, Nelli; Shekhovtsov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ rp ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ rp ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature.

  13. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ rp ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ rp ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature

  14. Design criteria of a chemical reactor based on a chaotic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, X Z

    1998-01-01

    We consider the design criteria of a chemical mixing device based on a chaotic flow, with an emphasis on the steady-state devices. The merit of a reactor, defined as the $Q$-factor, is related to the physical dimension of the device and the molecular diffusivity of the reactants through the local Lyapunov exponents of the flow. The local Lyapunov exponent can be calculated for any given flow field and it can also be measured in experimental situations. Easy-to-compute formulae are provided to estimate the $Q$-factor given either the exact spatial dependence of the local Lyapunov exponent or its probability distribution function. The requirements for optimization are made precise in the context of local Lyapunov exponents.

  15. Chemical Effects of CO2 Concentration on Soot Formation in Jet-stirred/Plug-flow Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张引弟; 娄春; 刘德华; 李勇; 阮龙飞

    2013-01-01

    Soot formation was investigated numerically with CO2 addition in a jet-stirred/plug-flow reactor (JSR/PFR) C2H4/O2/N2 reactor (C/O ratio of 2.2) at atmospheric pressure. An updated Kazakov mechanism empha-sizes the effect of the O2/CO2 atmosphere instead of an O2/N2 one in the premixed flame. The soot formation was taken into account in the JSR/PFR for C2H4/O2/N2. The effects of CO2 addition on soot formation in different C2H4/O2/CO2/N2 atmospheres were studied, with special emphasis on the chemical effect. The simulation shows that the endothermic reaction CO2+H CO+OH is responsible of the reduction of hydrocarbon intermediates in the CO2 added combustion through the supplementary formation of hydroxyl radicals. The competition of CO2 for H radical through the above forward reaction with the single most important chain branching reaction H+O2 O+OH reduces significantly the fuel burning rate. The chemical effects of CO2 cause a significant increase in residence time and mole fractions of CO and OH, significant decreases in some intermediates (H, C2H2), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, C6H6 and C16H10, etc.) and soot volume fraction. The CO2 addition will leads to a decrease by only about 5%to 20%of the maximum mole fractions of some C3 to C10 hydrocarbon intermediates. The sensitivity analysis and reaction-path analysis results show that C2H4 reaction path and products are altered due to the CO2 addition.

  16. Proposed chemical plant initiated accident scenarios in a sulphur-iodine cycle plant coupled to a pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the sulphur-iodine (S-I) cycle nuclear hydrogen generation scheme the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). Thus, any accident which occurs in the chemical plant must feedback to the nuclear reactor. There are many different types of accidents which can occur in a chemical plant. These accidents include intra-reactor piping failure, inter-reactor piping failure, reaction chamber failure and heat exchanger failure. Since the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the nuclear reactor, any of these accidents induce a loss-of-heat-sink accident in the nuclear reactor. In this paper, several chemical plant initiated accident scenarios are presented. The following accident scenarios are proposed: i) failure of the Bunsen chemical reactor; ii) product flow failure from either the H2SO4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iii) reactant flow failure from either the H2SO4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iv) rupture of a reaction chamber. Qualitative analysis of these accident scenarios indicates that each result in either partial or total loss of heat sink accidents for the nuclear reactor. These scenarios are reduced to two types: i) discharge rate limited accidents; ii) discontinuous reaction chamber accidents. A discharge rate limited rupture of the SO3 decomposition section of the SI cycle is proposed and modelled. Since SO3 decomposition occurs in the gaseous phase, critical flow out of the rupture is calculated assuming ideal gas behaviour. The accident scenario is modelled using a fully transient control volume model of the S-I cycle coupled to a THERMIX model of a 268 MW pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR-268) and a point kinetics model. The Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot source model for choked gas flows from a pressurised chamber was utilised as a discharge rate model. A discharge coefficient of 0.62 was assumed. Feedback due to the rupture is observed in the nuclear reactor

  17. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research it has been studied the effects of chemical admixtures in the cementation process of radioactive wastes. These additives are used to improve the properties of waste cementation process, both of the paste and of the solidified product. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. Then it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their effects. The tests were carried out with a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste coming from PWR nuclear reactors. It was cemented using two formulations, A and B, incorporating higher or lower amount of waste, respectively. It was added chemical admixtures from two manufacturers (S and H), which were: accelerators, set retarders and superplasticizers. The experiments were organized by a factorial design 23. The measured parameters were: the viscosity, the setting time, the paste and product density and the compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  18. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5 h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD5 and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  19. Conventional and dynamic safety analysis: Comparison on a chemical batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic safety analysis methodologies are an attractive approach to tackle systems with complex dynamics (i.e. with behavior highly dependent on the values of the process parameters): this is often the case in various areas of the chemical industry. The present paper compares analyses with Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA)/Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) methods with those from a dynamic methodology (Monte Carlo simulation). The results of a case study for a chemical batch reactor from the literature, overall risk figure and main contributors, are examined. The comparison has shown that, provided that the event success criteria are appropriately defined, consistent results can be obtained; otherwise important accident scenarios, identifiable by the dynamic Monte Carlo simulation, are possibly missed in the application of conventional methods. Defining such criteria was quite resource-intensive: for the analysis of this small system, the success criteria definitions required many system simulation runs (about 1000). Such large numbers of runs may not be practical in industrial-scale applications. It is shown that success criteria obtained with fewer simulation runs could have led to different quantitative PSA results and to the omission of important accident scenario variants.

  20. Model experiments on simulation of the WWER water-chemical conditions at loop facilities of the MIR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments on simulation of the WWER type reactors water-chemical conditions have been started at the State Scientific Center RIAR. These experiments are being conducted at the multi-loop research MIR reactor at the PVK-2 loop facility. The dosage stand was created. It allows introduction of boric acid, potassium and lithium hydroxides, ammonia solutions and gaseous hydrogen. Corrosion tests of the Russian E-635 and E-110 alloys are being conducted at the PVK-2 loop under the WWER water-chemical conditions. If necessary, fuel elements are periodically extracted from the reactor to perform visual examination, to measure their length, diameter, to remove the deposits from the claddings, to measure the burnup and to distribute the fission products over the fuel element by gamma-spectrometry. The chemical analytical 'on line' equipment produced by the ORBISPHERE Laboratory (Switzerland) will be commissioned in the nearest future to measure concentration of the dissolved hydrogen and oxygen as well as pH and specific conductivity. The objective of the report is to familiarize the participants of the IAEA Technical Committee with the capabilities of performing the model water-chemical experiments under the MIR reactor loop facility conditions. (author)

  1. Further Advances Toward The Development Of A Direct Heating Solar Thermal Chemical Reactor For The Thermal Dissociation Of ZnO(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R.; Haeberling, P.; Palumbo, R.D.

    2005-03-01

    A solar thermal chemical reactor for producing Zn from ZnO(s) was built and experimentally tested. We describe the salient features of the reactor concept, the design process itself, and initial experimental results from testing the reactor for both the thermal reduction of ZnO(s) and the carbothermal reduction of the oxide. The reactor operated reliably for more than 100 hours. Reactor cavity temperatures reached 2000 K. For the carbothermal reduction of ZnO(s), the solid product was Zn with a purity exceeding 95 mole %. For this reaction, we report reactor and process efficiencies vs. cavity temperature, average values were 14 and 12% respectively. (author)

  2. Effect of water losses by evaporation and chemical reaction in an industrial slaker reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andreola

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of the slaker reactor was developed and validated for Klabin Paraná Papéis causticizing system, responsable for white liquor generation used by the plant. The model considered water losses by evaporation and chemical reaction. The model showed a good agreement with the industrial plant measures of active alkali, total titratable alkali and temperature, without the need of adjustment of any parameter. The simulated results showed that the water consumption by the slaking reaction and evaporation exerted significant influence on the volumetric flow rate of limed liquor, which imposed a decrease of 4.6% in the amount of water in reactor outlet.Foi desenvolvido e testado um modelo dinâmico do reator de apagamento do sistema de caustificação da Klabin Paraná Papéis, responsável pela geração do licor branco utilizado na planta. O modelo contempla perdas de água por evaporação e por reação química e apresentou boa concordância com dados industriais de álcali ativo, álcali total titulável e temperatura, sem a necessidade de ajuste de nenhum parâmetro. Os resultados obtidos a partir de simulações revelam que o consumo de água pela reação de apagamento, bem como pela evaporação, exercem uma influência significativa sobre a vazão volumétrica na saída do reator, impondo uma diminuição de 4,6% sobre o teor de água na corrente de saída do reator em relação à alimentação.

  3. Application of phase equilibria and chemical thermodynamics to the preparation, farbiration, and performance of advanced fast reactor fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are some phase equilibria and chemical thermodynamics of systems relevant to the production and operation of the so-called ''advanced'' fast breeder reactor fuels. The systems discussed include UPu carbides, nitrides, oxycarbides and carbonitrides. Some examples of the application of these phase equilibria to the preparation, fabrication and behaviour of the materials in temperature gradients appropriate to reactor conditions are presented. Finally, aspects of the complex four and five component, U-C-O-N and U-Pu-C-O-N systems are discussed, a detailed knowledge of which is required for an analysis of advanced fuel behaviour

  4. Interactions of multiphase hydrodynamics, droplet evaporation, and chemical kinetics in FCC riser reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-02-17

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code, ICRKFLO, has been developed for flow simulation of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactors, which convert crude oil into gasoline and other valuable products. The FCC flow, especially in the entry region, is a three-phase reacting flow including hot catalyst particles, inert lift gas, and feed oil droplets. The impact of the hydrodynamics processes of heat transfer, droplet evaporation, and mixing on the chemical kinetics or riser performance can be significant. ICRKFLO was used to evaluate the impact of these processes on the performance of an advanced FCC unit. The code solves for major flow properties of all three phases in an FCC riser, with models governing the transport of catalyst particles and feed oil droplet, the vaporization of the feed oil droplets, the cracking of the oil vapor, and the formation and deposition of coke on particles. First, the code was validated against available test data of a pilot-scale FCC unit. Then, flow calculations for the FCC unit were performed. Computational results indicate that the heat transfer and droplet vaporization processes have a significant impact on the performance of a pilot-scale FCC unit. The impact is expected to be even greater on commercial scale units.

  5. In-line silicon epitaxy for photovoltaics using a continous chemical vapour deposition reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martin; Reber, Stefan; Schillinger, Norbert; Pocza, David; Arnold, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Thin film solar cell techniques can effectively reduce the costs for photovoltaic solar power. However, most of these techniques still have the disadvantage of a comparatively low efficiency. One way to realize a thin film solar cell concept with high efficiency potential is the crystalline silicon thin-film (cSiTF) concept. Following the high-temperature approach, this concept is based on a silicon epitaxy process. This paper reports the current status of the development of a high throughput epitaxy tool at Fraunhofer ISE and presents first results. Also presented is the development of a simulation tool which is a virtual image of the real setup in order to forecast save deposition conditions. The presented epitaxy tool is the ConCVD (Continuous Chemical Vapour Deposition), in which an improved reactor setup has been installed, based on the experience gained so far. To provide insight into upcoming further advances, the industrial scale epitaxy tool ProConCVD is presented as well. PMID:22097523

  6. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  7. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H2 Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  8. Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a spray cooling structure wherein the steam phase in a bwr reactor vessel can sufficiently be cooled and the upper cap and flanges in the vessel can be cooled rapidly which kept from direct contaction with cold water. Constitution: An apertured shielding is provided in parallel spaced apart from the inner wall surface at the upper portion of a reactor vessel equipped with a spray nozzle, and the lower end of the shielding and the inner wall of the vessel are closed to each other so as to store the cooling water. Upon spray cooling, cooling water jetting out from the nozzle cools the vapor phase in the vessel and then hits against the shielding. Then the cooling water mostly falls as it is, while partially enters through the apertures to the back of the shielding plate, abuts against stoppers and falls down. The stoppers are formed in an inverted L shape so that the spray water may not in direct contaction with the inner wall of the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. The role of pellet thermal stability in reactor design for heterogeneously catalysed chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Wijngaarden, R.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    For exothermic fluid-phase reactions, a reactor which is cooled at the wall can exhibit multiplicity or parametric sensitivity. Moreover, for heterogeneously catalysed exothermic fluid-phase reactions, each of the catalytically active pellets in the reactor can exhibit multiplicity. Both forms of multiplicity can lead to thermal instability and as such have to be taken into account in reactor design. Here the effect of both instabilities is quantified. To this end, simple first-order kinetics...

  10. Characterization of segregation in a tubular polymerization reactor by a new chemical method

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, T; Renken, A.

    1990-01-01

    Micromixing in a tubular polymn. reactor is characterized by the mol. wt. of polystyrene obtained in the presence of a chain transfer agent. Monomer and the transfer agent are fed sep. into the reactor. For const. overall inlet concns., the mean mol. wt. produced is strongly dependent on mixing intensity. Expts. were carried out in a pilot plant loop tubular reactor of different configurations and monomer conversions ?80%. The degree of segregation as a function of energy dissipation and the ...

  11. Construction of an experimental simplified model for determining of flow parameters in chemical reactors, using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a simplified experimental model for investigation of nuclear techniques to determine the solid phase parameters in gas-solid flows is presented. A method for the measurement of the solid phase residence time inside a chemical reactor of the type utilised in the cracking process of catalytic fluids is described. An appropriate radioactive labelling technique of the solid phase and the construction of an eletronic timing circuit were the principal stages in the definition of measurement technique. (Author)

  12. Influence of Chemical Kinetics on Postcolumn Reaction in a Capillary Taylor Reactor with Catechol Analytes and Photoluminescence Following Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Moon Chul; Weber, Stephen G.

    2005-01-01

    Postcolumn derivatization reactions can enhance detector sensitivity and selectivity, but their successful combination with capillary liquid chromatography has been limited because of the small peak volumes in capillary chromatography. A capillary Taylor reactor (CTR), developed in our laboratory, provides simple and effective mixing and reaction in a 25-μm-radius postcolumn capillary. Homogenization of reactant streams occurs by radial diffusion, and a chemical reaction follows. Three charac...

  13. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons; Antimutagenesis de moduladores quimicos contra el dano inducido por neutrones termicos de reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamentos de Materiales Radiactivos, de Biologia, del Reactor y Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  14. An analytical assessment of the chemical form of fission products during postulated severe accidents in SRS production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis has been performed to determine the principal chemical forms for the structural and fission product elements during a postulated severe core damage accident in a tritium-producing core in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. These reactors are powered with UAlx fuel. Six core elements, cesium, iodine, tellurium, strontium, barium, and lithium, were emphasized in this analysis. Other elements also included were aluminum, hydrogen, oxygen, uranium, molybdenum, silicon, zirconium, magnesium, iron, chromium, nickel, cadmium, zinc, copper, manganese, nitrogen, and argon. The masses of each of the constituents used in the analysis were based on end-of-core-life masses for the fuel, structural, and fission product elements and on core gas volume, temperature, and pressure for steam nitrogen and argon. A chemical equilibrium analysis was performed using the Facility for Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics (FACT) computer code at three temperatures (800, 1,100, and 1,400 K) and two pressures (1 and 10 atm). These temperatures and pressures are typical for postulated severe core accidents in the Advanced Test Reactor

  15. Catalytic reactor for promoting a chemical reaction on a fluid passing therethrough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Pfefferle, William C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic reactor with an auxiliary heating structure for raising the temperature of a fluid passing therethrough whereby the catalytic reaction is promoted. The invention is a apparatus employing multiple electrical heating elements electrically isolated from one another by insulators that are an integral part of the flow path. The invention provides step heating of a fluid as the fluid passes through the reactor.

  16. Materials chemical compatibility for the fabrication of small inherently safe nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous nuclear fuels offer a unique set of characteristics for homogeneous reactor nuclear applications. Their advantages include high nuclear stability and inherent safety, high power density, high burn-up, simple preparation and reprocessing, easy fuel handling, high neutron economy, and simple control system leading to simple mechanical designs. The major disadvantages are corrosion, limited uranium concentration, and radiation decomposition of water. Likewise, organic coolants offer certain properties that are conducive for small reactor applications. These include reduced corrosion and activation, and low vapour pressures with good heat-transfer capabilities. Their major disadvantages are decomposition, fouling and flammability. A particular organic coolant, HB-40, has been extensively studied in Canada and was used for nineteen years in the 60-MWt organic-cooled WR-1 reactor at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE) of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Proper attention to design and coolant chemistry in the nineteen years of operation in the WR-1 reactor kept the coolant aspects related to decomposition, fouling and flammability to acceptable levels. For small reactor applications, organic coolants are potentially superior to heavy water in terms of overall cost. The purpose of this thesis work was, through a literature review, to select the most suitable aqueous fuel and materials of construction for two proposed small inherently safe reactors, the QH-1 reactor and the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor under design at the Royal Military College of Canada.

  17. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources; Rendimiento de un reactor quimico-nuclear con fuentes radioisotopicas gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguis T, C

    1975-07-01

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  18. Hydrogen production by enhanced-sorption chemical looping steam reforming of glycerol in moving-bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New approach on continuous high-purity H2 produced auto-thermally with long time. • Low-cost NiO/NiAl2O4 exhibited high redox performance to H2 from glycerol. • Oxidation, steam reforming, WSG and CO2 capture were combined into a reactor. • H2 purity of above 90% was produced without heating at 1.5–3.0 S/C and 500–600 °C. • Sorbent regeneration and catalyst oxidization achieved simultaneously in a reactor. - Abstract: The continuous high-purity hydrogen production by the enhanced-sorption chemical looping steam reforming of glycerol based on redox reactions integrated with in situ CO2 removal has been experimentally studied. The process was carried out by a flow of catalyst and sorbent mixture using two moving-bed reactors. Various unit operations including oxidation, steam reforming, water gas shrift reaction and CO2 removal were combined into a single reactor for hydrogen production in an overall economic and efficient process. The low-cost NiO/NiAl2O4 catalyst efficiently converted glycerol and steam to H2 by redox reactions and the CO2 produced in the process was simultaneously removed by CaO sorbent. The best results with an enriched hydrogen product of above 90% in auto-thermal operation for reforming reactor were achieved at initial temperatures of 500–600 °C and ratios of steam to carbon (S/C) of 1.5–3.0. The results indicated also that not all of NiO in the catalyst can be reduced to Ni by the reaction with glycerol, and the reduced Ni can be oxidized to NiO by air at 900 °C. The catalyst oxidization and sorbent regeneration were achieved under the same conditions in air reactor

  19. Purification and Chemical Control of Molten Li2BeF 4 for a Fluoride Salt Cooled Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Brian Christopher

    Out of the many proposed generation IV, high-temperature reactors, the molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising. The first large scale MSR, the molten salt reactor experiment (MSRE), operated from 1965 to 1969 using Li2BeF4, or flibe, as a coolant and solvent for uranium fluoride fuel, at maximum temperatures of 654°C, for over 15000 hours. The MSRE experienced no concept breaking surprises and was considered a success. Newly proposed designs of molten salt reactors use solid fuels, making them less exotic compared to the MSRE. However, any molten salt reactor will require a great deal of research pertaining to the chemical and mechanical mastery of molten salts in order to prepare it for commercialization. To supplement the development of new molten salt reactors, approximately 100 kg of flibe was purified using the standard hydrofluorination process. Roughly half of the purified salt was lithium-7 enriched salt from the secondary loop of the MSRE. Purification rids the salt of impurities and reduces its capacity for corrosion, also known as the redox potential. The redox potential of flibe was measured at various stages of purification for the first time using a dynamic beryllium reference electrode. These redox measurements have been superimposed with metal impurities measurements found by neutron activation analysis. Lastly, reductions of flibe with beryllium metal have been investigated. Over reductions have been performed, which have shown to decrease redox potential while seemingly creating a beryllium-beryllium halide system. Recommendations of the lowest advisable redox potential for corrosion tests are included along with suggestions for future work.

  20. Analysis of enhanced mixing by natural and forced convection with application to chemical reactor design

    OpenAIRE

    González Hidalgo, Clara Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Se buscaron nuevos diseños que aumentaran el mezclado en reactores catalíticos. Dos modelos fueron propuestos. El primero, usó convección forzada como el impulsor del mezclado y consistía de una pila de discos corotatorios con el catalizador en sus superficies y los cuales se encontraban dentro de una cavidad cilíndrica. Dos modos de operación fueron estudiados para este tipo de reactor, discontinuo y semicontinuo. En el modo semicontinuo se alimentó un flujo al reactor mediante la pared exte...

  1. Renovation of CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) for Development of Advanced Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) was constructed at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) in 1980 as a basic research field where spent fuel pins from fast reactor (FR) and high level liquid waste can be dealt with. The renovation consists of remodeling of the CA-3 cell and the laboratory A, installation of globe boxes, hoods and analytical equipments to the laboratory C and the analytical laboratory. Also maintenance equipments in the CA-5 cell which had been out of order were repaired. The CA-3 cell is the main cell in which important equipments such as a dissolver, a clarifier and extractors are installed for carrying out the hot test using the irradiated FR fuel. Since the CPF had specialized originally in the research function for the Purex process, it was desired to execute the research and development of such new, various reprocessing processes. Formerly, equipments were arranged in wide space and connected with not only each other but also with utility supply system mainly by fixed stainless steel pipes. It caused shortage of operation space in flexibility for basic experimental study. Old equipments in the CA-3 cell including vessels and pipes were removed after successful decontamination, and new equipments were installed conformably to the new design. For the purpose of easy installation and rearranging the experimental equipments, equipments are basically connected by flexible pipes. Since dissolver is able to be easily replaced, various dissolution experiments is conducted. Insoluble residue generated by dissolution of spent fuel is clarified by centrifugal. This small apparatus is effective to space-saving. Mini mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors are put on to the prescribed limited space in front of the backside wall. Fresh reagents such as solvent, scrubbing and stripping solution are continuously fed from the laboratory A to the extractor by the reagent supply system with semi-automatic observation

  2. Chemical composition and activity of a biofilm during the start-up of an airlift reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, F. A.; Vieira, M. J.; Melo, L. F.

    2000-01-01

    For the successful operation of a biofilm reactor, it is important to characterise the fixed biomass, its activity and composition. The purpose of this research is to monitor the biofilm characteristics of an airlift reactor, namely its composition in terms of exopolymers (polysaccharides and proteins), attached biomass, thickness, total proteins, as well as its activity in terms of substrate consumption rates. During the early phases of biofilm development, a high exopolymer production was o...

  3. Reactor operating procedures for startup of continuously-operated chemical plants

    OpenAIRE

    Verwijs, J.W.; Kösters, P.H.; Berg, van den, S.J.P.L.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    Rules are presented for the startup of an adiabatic tubular reactor, based on a qualitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of continuously-operated vapor- and liquid-phase processes. The relationships between the process dynamics, operating criteria, and operating constraints are investigated, since a reactor startup cannot be isolated from an entire plant startup. Composition control of the process material is critical to speed up plant startup operations and to minimize the amount of offg...

  4. Experiments of char particle segregation effect on the gas conversion behavior in the fuel reactor for chemical looping combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This work verified the existence of char particle segregation in the fuel reactor during CLC. • The char particle segregation has detrimental effect on the conversion of the char gasification product CO. • Larger/heavier char particles located near the reactor bottom have a higher CO conversion than the smaller/lighter char. • Larger fluidizing gas velocity can reduce the effect of char segregation on CO conversion. • Oxygen carriers of high reactivity can convert CO completely although segregation effect exists. - Abstract: In solid fuel (such as lignite) chemical looping combustion, solid fuels undergo pyrolysis and gasification. The volatiles from pyrolysis and the gasification product (CO/H2) react with oxygen carriers. The gas conversion (to CO2/H2O) in the fuel reactor is a key point. However, char particles of different sizes and conversion ratios cause segregation in the fuel reactor, which influences the contact time between fuel gases and the carrier, thereby changing the gas conversion behavior. In order to gain information on obtaining a high gas conversion in the fuel reactor, this work focused on the effect of the char particle segregation on gas conversion. Different factors – the char particle size, the fluidizing gas velocity, and the oxygen carrier reactivity – were taken into account. Smaller char particles with low density would float on top of the fluidized bed, corresponding to a low gas conversion (mf in the Fe63Al bed) can reduce the segregation effect, resulting in a higher CO conversion. High reactivity carriers can convert CO completely although segregation exists, whereas low reactivity carriers exhibit the segregation effect and thus corresponds to a low CO conversion

  5. General principles for selection of chemical process for its conducting under nuclear reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : Selection of temperature regime the initial chemicals and its radiation chemical conversation products have to be the stable at the temperatures 300-500 degrees Celsium. The presence of high intensity slow neutrons restrict the number of chemical compounds, that must be irradiated due to its radioactive capture and formation the radioactive isotopes

  6. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAPC purchased RETRAN, a program for transient thermal hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow system, from the U.S. Electric Power Research Institute in 1992. Since then, JAPC has been utilizing RETRAN to evaluate safety margins of actual plant operation, in coping with troubles (investigating trouble causes and establishing countermeasures), and supporting reactor operation (reviewing operational procedures etc.). In this paper, a result of plant analysis performed on a CVCS reactor primary coolant leakage incident which occurred at JAPC's Tsuruga-2 plant (4-loop PWR, 3423 MWt, 1160 MW) on July 12 of 1999 and, based on the result, we made a plan to modify our operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events in order to make earlier plant shutdown and this reduced primary coolant leakage. (author)

  7. Experience Gained during the Adaptation of Classical ChE Subjects to the Bologna Plan in Europe: The Case of Chemical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsa, Sergio; Sanchez, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    At present, due to the overall adaptation to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA), a new concept regarding the teaching methodology was thought to be essential for engineering subjects. In this paper we describe our experience teaching the altered content of the courses on two classical subjects; Chemical Reactors (Chemical Engineering) and…

  8. Modeling the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor process heat plant: a nuclear to chemical conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-temperature heat available from the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) makes it suitable for many process applications. One of these applications is a large-scale energy production plant where nuclear energy is converted into chemical energy and stored for industrial or utility applications. This concept combines presently available nuclear HTGR technology and energy conversion chemical technology. The design of this complex plant involves questions of interacting plant dynamics and overall plant control. This paper discusses how these questions were answered with the aid of a hybrid computer model that was developed within the time-frame of the conceptual design studies. A brief discussion is given of the generally good operability shown for the plant and of the specific potential problems and their anticipated solution. The paper stresses the advantages of providing this information in the earliest conceptual phases of the design

  9. Carbon coated (carbonous) catalyst in ebullated bed reactor for production of oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R and D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2 efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates

  10. Helium chemistry in high temperature gas cooled reactors - chemical impurity behaviour in the secondary helium coolant of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) constructed High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in order to establish and upgrade the technology basis for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) and to develop the technology for high-temperature heat applications. The HTTR attained its maximum reactor-outlet coolant temperature of 950 Degrees C in 2004. The intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), which is a helium-helium heat exchanger and installed to the HTTR primary cooling system, is planned to be utilized for the hydrogen production system in the near future. Secondary coolant helium receives heat from primary helium at the heat exchanger pipes made by high-temperature super alloy Hastelloy XR. The secondary pressurized water cooler, which is a helium-water heat exchanger and installed to the secondary cooling system, will replace to the hydrogen production system. The thermochemical water-splitting IS process is a progressive candidate for the hydrogen production system. Chemistry control is necessary in order to avoid oxidation of core graphite and corrosions of high-temperature material of Hastelloy XR, e.g. carbon deposits, carburising and decarburising. The chemical impurity is reduced and monitored by helium purification system and helium sampling system installed primary and secondary helium cooling system, respectively. This report describes impurity behaviour of secondary coolant during the initial 950 operation of the HTTR

  11. Simulation of the Two-Dimensional Gasdynamic, Temperature, and Concentration Fields in an Injection Reactor of Chemical Vapor Deposition for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futko, S. I.; Chornyi, A. D.; Shulitskii, B. G.; Labunov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional axisymmetric gasdynamic, concentration, and heat fields arising in an injection reactor of chemical vapor deposition in the process of synthesis of arrays of carbon nanotubes in it from hydrocarbons and organometallic compounds were numerically simulated for the purpose of investigating the features of these fields. It was established that, even in the case of laminar flow of a gas mixture over the surface of a substrate positioned in this reactor, in it there arise vortices introducing a significant heterogeneity into the gas flow. The influence of changes in the gasdynamic and temperature fields in the indicated reactor on the characteristics of an array of carbon nanotubes grown on the surface of the substrate was analyzed. Parametric calculations of the dependences of the velocity of the gas flow, the gas temperature, and the concentration of reagents in the reactor on the hydrocarbon flow rate, the temperature of the process, and the length of the injection needle have been performed. These calculations have shown that the regimes of heating and mixing of reagents in an injection reactor of chemical vapor deposition correspond to those of an ideal-mixing reactor. The results obtained can be used for determining the conditions necessary for the growth of homogeneous arrays of carbon nanotubes with a high rate on the surface of a substrate in a reactor of chemical vapor deposition.

  12. Application of noble metal chemical addition technology to an operating BWR to mitigate IGSCC of reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) has been successfully employed to mitigate the IGSCC of BWR internals over the past decade. However, the use of elevated levels of feed water hydrogen in the BWR results in high operating dose rates due to N16 partitioning into the main steam. Recent studies have shown that the presence of noble metals on reactor internal surfaces, by alloying or by various spray techniques could significantly reduce the hydrogen demand necessary to achieve the IGSCC protection potential of -230 mV(SHE) without the operating dose rate increase. A simpler method of applying noble metal on to reactor internals involve the addition of a noble metal compound into reactor water to cause deposition of noble metal from solution onto surfaces. This noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) technology has been successfully used in numerous laboratory tests to produce a ''noble metal like'' surface on three of the major structural materials, Type 304 SS, Inconel 600 and Alloy 182, used in the nuclear industry. The success of this technology has been tested using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests, crack growth rate (CGR) tests and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) response tests. The NMCA technology has successfully decreased the ECP of surfaces below -230 mVSHE, prevented crack initiation and mitigated crack growth rates in stoichiometric excess hydrogen in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. The NMCA treatment of surfaces has drastically lowered the hydrogen demand necessary for IGSCC protection of the materials tested, with no identified side effects including no adverse effects on zircaloy fuel cladding materials. This paper describes the performance of the first NMCA treated BWR over a 12 month period. The paper will also describe the application of NMCA technology to internal components of the BWR by employing the reactor coolant water as the medium of transport for depositing noble metal on in-reactor surfaces. The paper will

  13. Reactor choices for chemical looping combustion (CLC) dependencies on materials characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Lambert, A.; Fossdal, A.; Leenman, R.N.; Comte, E.; Bos, W.A.P. van den; Blom, R.

    2013-01-01

    The physio-chemical stability of the oxygen carrier material during chemical looping combustion (CLC) operation is crucial. In the present paper we discuss the challenges connected to operating a metal oxide base material in a cyclic manner between oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. Especially, foc

  14. Chemical elimination of alumina in suspension in nuclear reactors heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of aluminium in contact with moderating water in nuclear reactor leads to the formation of an alumina hydrosol which can have an adverse effect on the operation of the reactor. Several physical methods have been used in an attempt to counteract this effect. The method proposed here consists in the elimination of the aluminium by dissolution and subsequent fixation in the ionic form on mixed-bed ion-exchange resin. In order to do this, the parameters and the values of these parameters most favorable to the dissolution process have been determined. If the moderator is heavy water, the deuterated acid can be prepared by converting a solution in heavy water to a salt of the acid using a deuterated cationic resin. (author)

  15. Fission product and chemical energy releases during core melt events in U-Al research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission product releases data from heated uranium-aluminum reactor fuels are analyzed. Extensive library of correlations was developed for predicting releases which may vary with time, burnup ambient, fuel-type subject to certain assumptions. Correlations were developed in various forms for U-Al. (dispersed/alloy), U308-Al (dispersed) and dispersed U3Si2-AL, and U3Si-Al Fuels. Overall statistics is quite favorable. Unresolved issues and data needs demand best estimate analyses of reactors using U3Si2-Al fuel. Importance of capturing fragment size distribution was demonstrated. Results agree with Nelson's observations for onset ignition. The need to develop an appropriate fragmentation model was evident

  16. Radionuclide characterization of graphite stacks from plutonium production reactors of the Siberian group of chemical enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The residual radionuclide concentrations and distributions in graphite from moderator stack of plutonium production reactors at Tomsk-7 have been investigated. It was found that the dominant activity of graphite is 14C. To gain information on surface and volume contamination of graphite blocks from the moderator stack, the special sets of samples were collected and assayed. The schemes are proposed for evaluation of individual radionuclide inventories together with results of the evaluations performed. (author)

  17. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran[reg]), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran[reg]) are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub

  18. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, N. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)]. E-mail: ncsn@fct.unl.pt; Barbosa, R. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Lopes, M.H. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Mendes, B. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Abelha, P. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Gulyurtlu, I. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos Oliveira, J. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2007-08-17

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran[reg]), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran[reg]) are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub

  19. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  20. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  1. Effect of water-chemical regimes and exploitation parameters on the fuel can corrosion and light-water reactor fuel elements security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physico-chemical model of nodal and uniform corrosion of zirconium fuel cans in reactors is proposed. The model takes account of the following physical parameters: values of neutron and thermal fluxes, burnup, temperature, as well as of the water chemistry parameters. The model developed is based on a correlation between zirconium oxide solubility in the coolant and measured values of fuel can corrosion in reactors. Based on the reliability theory, a mathematical model is proposed, connecting the rate of the can corrosion with the fuel element failure intensity at NPPs with RBMK and WWER type reactors

  2. Chemical processes induced in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Člupek, Martin; Šunka, Pavel; Locke, B.R.

    Slovensko, 2005 - (Hensel, K.; Matějčík, Š.; Skalný, J.; Mason, N.), s. 89-90 ISBN 80-223-2018-8. [Symposium On Applications of Plasma Processes and 3rd EU-Japan Joint Symposium on Plasma Processing/15th./. Podbanské (SK), 15.01.2005-20.01.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/1026 Grant ostatní: GA-(US) US: NSF DGE-0312048 Keywords : Pulsed corona discharge * hybrid reactor * ozone * hydroxyl radical * water treatment Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  3. The Arctic seasonal snow pack as a transfer mechanism and a reactor for lower atmosphere chemical compounds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Polar Regions are snow covered for two thirds of the year (or longer) and in many locations there are few melt events during the winter. As a consequence, the late winter snow pack presents a spatial and temporal archive of the previous winter's precipitation, snow-atmosphere exchange, and within snow pack physical and chemical processes. However, to use the snow pack as a 'sensor' we have to understand the physical and chemical exchange processes between atmospheric compounds and snow and ice surfaces. Of equal importance is knowledge of the reactions that occur in and on snow and ice particle surfaces. Recent research has provided insights on the pathways individual compounds take from the lower atmosphere to snow and on the physical and chemical processes occurring within the snow pack at a variety of scales. Snow on or near sea ice has markedly higher major ion concentrations than snow on the terrestrial snow pack, most notably for chloride and bromide. This difference in chemical composition can be dramatic even in coastal regions where the land is only hundreds of meters away. As a consequence, we have to treat chemical cycling processes in/on snow on sea ice and snow on land differently. Since these halogens, particularly bromine, play critical roles in the spring time photochemical reactions that oxidize ozone and mercury their presence and fate on the sea ice snow pack is of particular interest. A future Arctic is expected to have a thinner, more dynamic sea ice cover that will arrive later and melt earlier. The areal extent of young ice production will likely increase markedly. This would lead to a different snow depositional and chemical regime on sea ice with potential ramifications for chemical exchange with the lower atmosphere. The roles of clear sky precipitation ('diamond dust') and surface hoar deposition in providing a unique lower atmospheric 'reactor' and potential source of water equivalence have been largely overlooked. This despite the

  4. KAERI's technology development program of chemical decontamination for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activated corrosion products formed on the internal surface of primary coolant system of nuclear power plants can be removed by chemical decontamination. Dilute chemical decontamination method is widely used in consideration of keeping base metal integrity and producing relatively small amount of resulting radwastes. The application of chemical decontamination to PWRs is limited at present mainly to the channel heads of steam generators, but a growing necessity of entire NSSS decontamination is expected to accelerate the development and demonstration of the technology so that the commercial application of the technology will be realized in early 1990s. In Korea, nine nuclear power plants of PWR type except one will be available by 1989. The first chemical decontamination of the steam generator channel head of this nuclear power plant was done in 1984 by a foreign technology. KAERI's chemical decontamination technology development program funded by the Ministry of Science and Technology was started in 1983 to establish the technical guidelines and criteria and to obtain the technical self reliance. It is described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Automated system for neutron activation analysis determination of short lived isotopes at The DOW Chemical Company's TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieman, J. J.; Rigot, W. L.; Romick, J. D.; Quinn, T. J.; Kocher, C. W.

    1994-12-01

    An automated neutron activation analysis (NAA) system for the determination of short lived isotopes was constructed at The DOW Chemical Company's TRIGA Research Reactor in 1993. The NAA group of the Analytical Sciences Laboratory uses the reactor for thousands of analyses each year and therefore automation is important to achieve and maintain high throughput and precision (productivity). This project is complementary to automation of the long-lived counting facilities (see Romick et al., these Proceedings). Canberra/Nuclear Data Systems DEC-based software and electronics modules and an I/O mounting board are the basic commercial components. A Fortran program on a VAX computer controls I/O via ethernet to an Acquisition Interface Module (AIM). The AIM controls the γ spectrometer modules and is interfaced to a Remote Parallel Interface (RPI) module which controls the pneumatic transfer apparatus with TTL signals to the I/O mounting board. Near-infrared sensors are used to monitor key points in the transfer system. Spectra are acquired by a single HPGe detector mounted on a sliding rail to allow flexible and more reproducible counting geometries than with manual sample handling. The maximum sample size is 8 ml in a heat-sealed two dram vial. The sample vial is nested into a "rabbit" vial for irradiation which can be automatically removed prior to spectrum collection. The system was designed to be used by the reactor operator at the control console without the aid of an additional experimenter. Applications include the determination of selenium and silver in coal and water, fluorine in tetra-fluoro ethylene (TFE) coated membranes, aluminum and titanium in composite materials and trace fluorine in non-chlorinated cleaning solvents. Variable dead time software allows analysis for 77mSe despite high dead times from 16N encountered in samples.

  6. Automated system for neutron activation analysis determination of short lived isotopes at The DOW Chemical Company's TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated neutron activation analysis (NAA) system for the determination of short lived isotopes was constructed at The DOW Chemical Company's TRIGA Research Reactor in 1993. The NAA group of the Analytical Sciences Laboratory uses the reactor for thousands of analyses each year and therefore automation is important to achieve and maintain high throughput and precision (productivity). This project is complementary to automation of the long-lived counting facilities (see Romick et al., these Proceedings). Canberra/Nuclear Data Systems DEC-based software and electronics modules and an I/O mounting board are the basic commercial components. A Fortran program on a VAX computer controls I/O via ethernet to an Acquisition Interface Module (AIM). The AIM controls the γ spectrometer modules and is interfaced to a Remote Parallel Interface (RPI) module which controls the pneumatic transfer apparatus with TTL signals to the I/O mounting board. Near-infrared sensors are used to monitor key points in the transfer system. Spectra are acquired by a single HPGe detector mounted on a sliding rail to allow flexible and more reproducible counting geometries than with manual sample handling. The maximum sample size is 8 ml in a heat-sealed two dram vial. The sample vial is nested into a 'rabbit' vial for irradiation which can be automatically removed prior to spectrum collection. The system was designed to be used by the reactor operator at the control console without the aid of an additional experimenter. Applications include the determination of selenium and silver in coal and water, fluorine in tetra-fluoro ethylene (TFE) coated membranes, aluminum and titanium in composite materials and trace fluorine in non-chlorinated cleaning solvents. Variable dead time software allows analysis for 77mSe despite high dead times from 16N encountered in samples. ((orig.))

  7. Out-of-pile fuel-clad chemical compatibility studies for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel-clad mechanical and chemical interaction lead to clad corrosion, loss of ductility, embitterment and clad breach limiting the life of a fuel pin. The chemical nature and extent of clad attack depend upon the type of fuel, fuel-clad gap, type of bond between fuel and clad. For FBTR at Kalpakkam, fuel is (U0.3Pu0.7)Cl +x (MKI) and (U0.45Pu0.55)Cl +x (MKII) and the clad is AISI SS316 (20% CW). Extensive work on out-of-pile fuel-clad and fuel-clad-coolant chemical compatibility experiments has been carried out in Radiometallurgy Division. The paper highlights the results of the tests carried out and substantiate it on the basis of the available thermodynamic data. (author)

  8. Study on the chemical compatibility of SiC/SiC composites as core materials for Sodium Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fibers combined with a SiC matrix constitute an advanced solution for Fast Neutron Reactors (SFR, GFR…) as core materials for their stability at high temperature and their neutron transparency. However, the compatibility with the reactor's fuel and coolant has to be studied within a wide range of temperatures: moderated in normal operation (close-circuit at 550°C) and elevated (open-middle) in accidental conditions. Concerning the compatibility of SiC/SiC with the fuel and, considering in a first step uranium oxide, the stoichiometry of uranium dioxide remains one of the important parameters to be studied. Experimental results on the chemical compatibility between UO2.15 and SiC were obtained using high temperature mass spectrometry. The reaction for 6 hours at 1773 K produces the release of mainly COg, CO2(g) and SiO(g) and Si(g) and leads to the formation of uranium silicide compounds. The uranium oxide was fully consumed. Thermodynamic calculations were performed to prepare and interpret the experiments. (author). (author)

  9. An integrated mathematical model for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) including predation and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Marta; Galán, Berta; Viguri, Javier R

    2016-07-01

    An integrated mathematical model is proposed for modelling a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) under aerobic conditions. The composite model combines the following: (i) a one-dimensional biofilm model, (ii) a bulk liquid model, and (iii) biological processes in the bulk liquid and biofilm considering the interactions among autotrophic, heterotrophic and predator microorganisms. Depending on the values for the soluble biodegradable COD loading rate (SCLR), the model takes into account a) the hydrolysis of slowly biodegradable compounds in the bulk liquid, and b) the growth of predator microorganisms in the bulk liquid and in the biofilm. The integration of the model and the SCLR allows a general description of the behaviour of COD removal by the MBBR under various conditions. The model is applied for two in-series MBBR wastewater plant from an integrated cellulose and viscose production and accurately describes the experimental concentrations of COD, total suspended solids (TSS), nitrogen and phosphorous obtained during 14 months working at different SCLRs and nutrient dosages. The representation of the microorganism group distribution in the biofilm and in the bulk liquid allow for verification of the presence of predator microorganisms in the second reactor under some operational conditions. PMID:27085154

  10. Evaluation of improved chemical waste disposal and recovery methods for N reactor fuel fabrication operations: 1984 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory personnel identified and evaluated alternative methods for recovery, recycle, and disposal of waste acids produced during N Reactor fuel operations. This work was conducted under a program sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc.; the program goals were to reduce the volume of liquid waste by rejuvenating and recycling acid solutions and to generate a residual waste low in nitrates, fluorides, and metals. Disposal methods under consideration included nitric acid reclamation, grout encapsulation of final residual waste, nitrogen fertilizer production, biodenitrifaction, chemical or thermal destruction of NO3, and short-term impoundment of liquid NO3/SO4 wastes. Preliminary testing indicated that the most feasible and practicable of these alternatives were (1) nitric acid reclamation followed by grouting of residual waste and (2) nitrogen fertilizer production. This report summarizes the investigations, findings, and recommendations for the 1984 fiscal year

  11. Fluidized-bed and fixed-bed reactor testing of methane chemical looping combustion with MgO-promoted hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mg-promoted hematite showed better performance than hematite for methane CLC. • Stable reaction performance was observed during cyclic CH4 CLC fluidized bed tests. • Attrition resistance was better than that with standard FCC catalysts. • 5 wt% MgO increased both the oxygen capacity and reaction rates for CH4 CLC. • Possible mechanisms for the CH4 CLC OC performance enhancement are presented. - Abstract: In this study MgO-promoted Fe2O3 hematite oxygen carriers were synthesized from various Mg sources and evaluated for methane chemical looping combustion. Particles suitable for fluidized bed flow reactor studies were prepared in the lab. Cyclic CLC tests conducted in the fluidized bed with MgO promoted hematite showed better performance than that with hematite. Attrition resistance of laboratory prepared MgO promoted hematite was excellent. Reactivity and stability of the oxygen carrier materials were also tested in the thermogravimetric analyzer and bench-scale reactors. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were used to study the morphology and elemental compositions present in the hematite and promoted hematite oxygen carriers prior to and following the multi-cycle chemical looping reaction. The incorporation of 5 wt% MgO led to an increased reaction rate and an increase in oxygen utilized as compared to the pure hematite oxygen carrier. Possible reasons for the promotion effect by MgO were evaluated. These studies reveal that the best performing oxygen carrier was the 5 wt% MgO/Fe2O3 which exhibited no observed degradation in the kinetics and conversion performance in the methane step over 15 reduction and oxidation cycles. The Mg promoted oxygen carrier also showed reduced coke formation as compared to the pure hematite carrier

  12. Comparison of biological and chemical phosphorus removals in continuous and sequencing batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchum, L.H.; Irvine, R.L. Jr.; Breyfogle, R.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A full-scale study of phosphorus removal has been conducted at Culver using continuous-flow operation, SBR operation, and several different chemical treatment schemes. A full-scale demonstration of SBR biological phosphorus removal also has been shown to be effective. Four contributing groups of organisms and their roles in biological SBR phosphorus removal have been described: denitrifying organisms, fermentation product-manufacturing organisms, phosphorus- accumulating organisms, and aerobic autotrophs and heterotrophs. The SBR can provide the proper balance of anoxic, anaerobic, and aerobic conditions to allow these group of organisms to successfully remove phosphorus biologically, without chemical addition. Treatment results using various chemicals for phosphorus removal, both during conventional, continuous-flow operation and after the plant was converted for SBR operation, have also been provided for comparison. Effluent phosphorus concentrations were almost identical for each period, except for the period when phosphorus was removed biologically and without any chemical addition when effluent phosphorus concentrations were the lowest. These removals were made as a result of settling alone; no tertiary rapid stand filter was used or required.

  13. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  14. Interdisciplinary Learning for Chemical Engineering Students from Organic Chemistry Synthesis Lab to Reactor Design to Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Matt; Comitz, Richard L.; Biaglow, Andrew; Lachance, Russ; Sloop, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to the Chemical Engineering curriculum sequence of courses at West Point enabled our students to experience a much more realistic design process, which more closely replicated a real world scenario. Students conduct the synthesis in the organic chemistry lab, then conduct computer modeling of the reaction with ChemCad and…

  15. Chemical problems on the gas side of CO2-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper surveys some actual and potential problems on the gas-side of CO2-coled, graphite moderated reactors. The radiolytic corrosion of the graphite core by gas phase species and its suppression by methane addition is discussed as is the parallel problem of carbon deposition on fuel cans which may also result from methane addition. The difficulties caused by the kinetics of steel oxidation in hot carbon dioxide, which can lead to a linear oxide growth rate, and its prevention are discussed. Other possible causes of concern, such as comparatively high sulphur compound concentration in the gas-coolant and the vapour phase transport of nickel, are also mentioned. The paper ends with a brief summary of problems which might arise from credible fault conditions such as fuel channel blockage and air or water ingress. (orig.)

  16. Microbiological and chemical approaches to degradation of mecoprop in a Moving-Bed Biofilm-Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica; Tue Kjærgaard Nielsen, Tue; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg;

    Micro-pollutants are ubiquitous in wastewater effluents. Therefore, in-situ treatments of highly polluted water or polishing treatments after classical wastewater treatment have been proposed as a solution. Moving Bed Biofilm-Reactors (MBBRs) are a recent-developed biofilm technology for wastewater...... degradation and biofilm communities. This study wanted to answer howfocussed on the response of the microbial communities respond to the presence of micro-pollutants in different concentrations. To do this, MBBR chips, grown and used for wastewater effluent polishing, were exposed to the same real wastewater...... recalcitrant compounds. For all these reasonsThus, MBBRs are pointed as a valuable tool for the elimination of micro-pollutants. Several studies have focused in on describing degradation processes in biofilm by quantifying the loss of micro-pollutants over time. This can be helpful foraid optimizing...

  17. Assessment of iodine behaviour in reactor containment buildings from a chemical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic parameters for aqueous and gaseous iodine species at 250C have been obtained from the literature and a data base has been constructed that is consistent with CODATA values. Using the 250C data base, Gibbs energies for the iodine species have been calculated as a function of temperature to 1500C. Results are presented in terms of potential-pH diagrams, species distribution diagrams, and liquid-gas partition-coefficient plots. Iodine chemistry in the fuel, in the primary coolant system, and in the containment building atmosphere is also discussed. This assessment of iodine behaviour clearly shows that there is considerable scope for limiting the concentration of airborne iodine in reactor containment buildings following a loss-of-coolant accident in which fuel failure occurs. (author)

  18. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L-1; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of aerobic, iron-reducing and denitrifying bacteria, as determined after 244 and 285 days of operation time. Furthermore, aerobic CB-degrading bacteria were detected in all reactor zones. Comparative sequence analysis of16S rDNA gene clone libraries suggest the dominance of Proteobacteria (Comamonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Gallionella group, Acidithiobacillus) and members of the class of low G+C gram-positive bacteria in the reactor sediments. In the inflowing ground water, sequences with phylogenetic affiliation to sulfate-reducing bacteria and sequences not affiliated with the known phyla of Bacteria, were found

  19. Chemical interactions of reactor core materials up to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes which chemical interactions may occur in a LWR fuel rod bundle containing (Ag, In, Cd) absorber rods or (Al2O3/B4C) burnable poison rods with increasing temperature up to the complete melting of the components and the formed reaction products. The kinetics of the most important chemical interactions has been investigated and the results are described. In most cases the reaction products have lower melting points or ranges than the original components. This results in a relocation of liquefied components often far below their melting points. There exist three distinct temperature regimes in which liquid phases can form in the core in differently large quantities. These temperature regimes are described in detail. The phase relations in the important ternary (U, Zr, O) system have been extensively studied. The effect of steel constituents on the phase relations is given in addition. All the considerations are focused on PWR conditions only. (orig.)

  20. Physical and chemical properties and compositions of liquid effluents of a nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behaviours of the released radioactive materials from a nuclear power plant to the marine environment depend largely on their physical and chemical properties. It is therefore important to grasp the compositions of the liquid effluents. From this point of view, some kinds of drainwater of a BWR plant were sampled. These samples are the laundry drain water at charcoal bed inlet and outlet, and the floor drain water. Suspended solids were separated from these samples physically with the step filtration method and ions chemically with the ion exchange resin. Radioactivity of Co-60, Mn-54 and Cs-137 was measured with γ spectrometer. Suspended solids of the laundry drain samples were also analysed with the instrumental methods (differential thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction analysis and x-ray fluorescence analysis)

  1. Silicon coatings on copper by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coating technique based on (a) chemical vapor deposition, (b) fluidized bed technology and (c) subhalide chemistry was used to siliconize copper. Copper samples were siliconized in silicon beds kept at temperatures in the range 350-550degC. Alternating current (a.c.) impedance measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the coated samples is significantly better than that of uncoated copper. (orig.)

  2. Chemical compatibility of SiC composite structures with fusion reactor helium coolant at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic stability of SiC/SiC composite structures proposed for fusion applications is presented in this paper. Minimization of the free energy for reacting species in the temperature range 773-1273 K is achieved by utilizing the NASA-Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Thermodynamics Code (CET). The chemical stability of the matrix (SiC), as well as several fiber coatings (BN and graphite) are studied. Helium coolant is assumed to contain O2 and water moisture impurities in the range 100-1000 ppm. The work is applied to recent Magnetic and Inertial Confinement Conceptual designs. The present study indicates that the upper useful temperature limit for SiC/SiC composites, from the standpoint of high-temperature corrosion, will be in the neighborhood of 1273 K. Up to this temperature, corrosion of SiC is shown to be negligible. The main mechanism of weight loss will be by evaporation to the plasma side. The presence of a protective SiO2 condensed phase is discussed, and is shown to result in further reduction of high-temperature corrosion. The thermodynamic stability of C and BN is shown to be very poor under typical fusion reaction conditions. Further development of chemically stable interface materials is required. (orig.)

  3. Chemical-looping gasification of biomass in a 10k Wth interconnected fluidized bed reactor using Fe2 O3/Al2 O3 oxygen carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUSEYIN Sozen; WEI Guo-qiang; LI Hai-bin; HE Fang; HUANG Zhen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to design and operate a 10 kW hot chemical-looping gasification ( CLG) unit using Fe2 O3/Al2 O3 as an oxygen carrier and saw dust as a fuel. The effect of the operation temperature on gas composition in the air reactor and the fuel reactor, and the carbon conversion of biomass to CO2 and CO in the fuel reactor have been experimentally studied. A total 60 h run has been obtained with the same batch of oxygen carrier of iron oxide supported with alumina. The results show that CO and H2 concentrations are increased with increasing temperature in the fuel reactor. It is also found that with increasing fuel reactor temperature, both the amount of residual char in the fuel reactor and CO2 concentration of the exit gas from the air reactor are degreased. Carbon conversion rate and gasification efficiency are increased by increasing temperature and H2 production at 870 ℃reaches the highest rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET-surface area tests have been used to characterize fresh and reacted oxygen carrier particles. The results display that the oxygen carrier activity is not declined and the specific surface area of the oxygen carrier particles is not decreased significantly.

  4. Chemical-looping combustion of methane with CaSO4 oxygen carrier in a fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical-looping combustion is a promising technology for the combustion of gas or solid fuel with efficient use of energy and inherent separation of CO2. Chemical-looping combustion of methane with calcium sulfate as a novel oxygen carrier was conducted in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor. The effects of reaction temperature, gas flow rate, sample mass, and particle size on reduction reactions were investigated and an optimum operating condition was determined. The results show that this novel oxygen carrier has a high reduction reactivity and stability in a long-time reduction/oxidation test. The conversions of CH4 increased with a higher temperature, smaller gas flow rate, larger sample mass and smaller particle size. The suitable reaction temperature seems to be around 950 deg. C. Low temperatures lead to a low CH4 conversion, but a significant SO2 formation was observed at a higher temperature. The release of SO2, CO, H2 via a series of side reactions, carbon deposition and agglomeration were also discussed. The formation of SO2, CO, H2, and carbon can be avoided by optimization of the operating conditions

  5. Chemical analysis of nickel- and iron-base high-temperature alloys for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Committee studied problems in analysis of alloys used for High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor from September 1970 to February 1976. The alloys selected from the standpoint of analytical chemistry are Inconel 600, Incoloy 800, Inconel X750, Inco 713C and Hastelloy X. Nine standard samples (JAERI-R 1 to JAERI-R 9) of the high-temperature alloys were prepared primarily for X-ray fluorescence method. Eighteen research institutions in Japan participated in cooperative analyses of the standard samples for 19 elements (C, Si, Mn, P, S, Ni, Cr, Fe, Mo, Cu, W, V, Co, Ti, Al, B, Nb, Ta, Zr). Prior to analyses of the standard samples, 8 cooperative samples (A-H) were analyzed to develop and evaluate analytical methods. Described in this report are preparation and their characteristics of the standard samples, results of analyses, and 93 analytical methods. The results of the cooperative experiments on atomic absorption spectrophotometry and X-ray fluorescence method are also described. (auth.)

  6. Chemical and toxicological characterization of slurry reactor biotreatment of explosives-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Vass, A.A.; Ho, C.H.

    1998-08-01

    Treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil in the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) soil slurry bioreactor (SSBR) eliminated detectable TNT but left trace levels of residual monoamino and diamino metabolites under some reactor operating conditions. The reduction of solvent-extractable bacterial mutagenicity in the TNT-contaminated soil was substantial and was similar to that achieved by static pile composts at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity (UMDA) field demonstration. Aquatic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia from TNT in the leachates of TNT-contaminated soil was eliminated in the leachates of JAAP SSBR product soil. The toxicity of soil product leachates to Ceriodaphnia dubia was reasonably predicted using the specific toxicities of the components detected, weighted by their leachate concentrations. In samples where TNT metabolites were observed in the soil product and its leachates, this method determined that the contribution to predicted toxicity values was dominated by trace amounts of the diamino-metabolites, which are very toxic to ceriodaphnia dubia. When the SSBR operating conditions reduced the concentrations of TNT metabolites in the product soils and their leachates to undetectable concentrations, the main contributors to predicted aquatic toxicity values appeared to be molasses residues, potassium, and bicarbonate. Potassium and bicarbonate are beneficial or benign to the environment, and molasses residues are substantially degraded in the environment. Exotoxins, pathogenic bacteria, inorganic particles, ammonia, and dissolved metals did not appear to be important to soil product toxicity.

  7. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser with atomic iodine generated in a separate reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špalek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila; Picková, Irena; Jakubec, Ivo

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2006 - (Phipps, C.), 62611T/1-62611T/10. (Proceedings of SPIE. 6261). ISBN 0-8194-6326-4. ISSN 0277-786X. [High-Power Laser Ablation /6./. Taos, New Mexico (US), 07.05.2006-12.05.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0359 Grant ostatní: USAF EOARD(US) FA8655-02-M4040 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : atomic iodine * atomic chlorine * atomic fluorine * chemical oxygen-iodine laser * COIL Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  8. Evaluation of 237Np reaction amount by chemical analysis of neptunium sample irradiated at experiment fast reactor 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical analysis technique was established to determine the nuclide generated in Neptunium (Np) sample with a high accuracy, to contribute to evaluation of transmutation characteristics of 237Np in the fast reactor. (1) Establishment of Chemical Analysis Technique. The chemical analysis technique containing determination technique of fission amount of 237Np, which was consist of Vanadium (V) of capsule material removal and Neodymium (Nd) recovery at high efficiency, was established with optimization of experimental conditions. Four Np samples irradiated in 'JOYO' were analyzed using this technique. Results were as follows. 237Np were determined with high accuracy (relative error was 2.2% at maximum). Errors of fission amount monitoring nuclides 148Nd were half less than that of 137Cs. Small amount of 236Pu was able to determined. (2) Evaluation of 237Np Reaction Amount. The reaction amount of capture, fission and (n, 2n) reactions were evaluated using analyzed values. Transmutation characteristics of 237Np were evaluated using reaction amount. Evaluated results were as follows. The ratio of capture or fission amount to unirradiated 237Np amount were 6.1 - 25.5 at%, 0.7 - 3.6 at%, respectively. The 237Np (n, 2n) 236mNp reaction amount was 7.0 x 10-6 times of 237Np amount at maximum. The dependences of 237Np reaction amount to neutron energy spectrum were revealed from the fact such as linearity of fission to capture reaction amount ratio against fast neutron ratio in same fuel assembly. (author)

  9. Characterization and modeling of the thermal hydraulic and chemical environment of fuel claddings of PWR reactors during boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurised water reactors (PWR), nucleate boiling can strongly influence the oxidation rate of the fuel cladding. To improve our understanding of the effect of the boiling phenomenon on corrosion kinetics, information about the chemical and thermal hydraulic boundary conditions at the heating rod surface is needed. Moreover, very few data are available in the range of thermal hydraulic parameters of PWR cores (15,5 MPa and 340 deg C) concerning the two-phase flow pattern close to the fuel cladding. A visualization device has been adapted on an out-of-pile loop Reggae to obtain both qualitative and quantitative data. These observations provide a direct access to the geometrical properties of the vapor inclusions, the onset of nucleate boiling and the gas velocity and trajectory. An image processing method has been validated to measure both void fraction and interfacial area concentration in a bubbly two-phase flow. Thus, the visualization device proves to be a suitable and accurate instrumentation to characterize nucleate boiling in PWR conditions. The experimental results analysis indicates that a local approach is needed for the modelling of the fuel rod chemical environment. To simulate the chemical additives enrichment, a new model is proposed where the vapor bubbles are now considered as physical obstacles for the liquid access to the rod surface. The influence of the two-phase flow pattern appears to be of major importance for the enrichment phenomenon. This study clearly demonstrates the existence of strong interactions between the two-phase flow pattern, the rod surface condition, the corrosion process and the water chemistry. (author)

  10. Oxidative degradation of anion exchange resin in chloride form during purification of reactor coolant after alkaline permanganate treatment in dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In boiling water reactors, primary system piping is contaminated by radioactive species like 51Cr and 60Co, resulting in high radiation fields. Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) is a preferred choice to reduce the radiation field. In DCD process, oxidation step involving alkaline permanganate or acid permanganate is employed for effective dissolution of oxides (rich in chromium), from the metal surfaces of reactor components. After completion of the oxidation step, removal of the unused chemicals is carried out by the use of ion exchange process. This poses a problem of possible degradation of ion exchange resin by the oxidative chemicals during the removal. In this paper, this aspect has been investigated and the results obtained are discussed. (author)

  11. Influence of chemical kinetics on postcolumn reaction in a capillary Taylor reactor with catechol analytes and photoluminescence following electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Moon Chul; Weber, Stephen G

    2005-02-15

    Postcolumn derivatization reactions can enhance detector sensitivity and selectivity, but their successful combination with capillary liquid chromatography has been limited because of the small peak volumes in capillary chromatography. A capillary Taylor reactor (CTR), developed in our laboratory, provides simple and effective mixing and reaction in a 25-microm-radius postcolumn capillary. Homogenization of reactant streams occurs by radial diffusion, and a chemical reaction follows. Three characteristic times for a given reaction process can be predicted using simple physical and chemical parameters. Two of these times are the homogenization time, which governs how long it takes the molecules in the analyte and reagent streams to mix, and the reaction time, which governs how long the molecules in a homogeneous solution take to react. The third characteristic time is an adjustment to the reaction time called the start time, which represents an estimate of the average time the analyte stream spends without exposure to reagent. In this study, laser-induced fluorescence monitored the extent of the postcolumn reaction (reduction of Os(bpy)3(3+) by analyte to the photoluminescent Os(bpy)3(2+)) in a CTR. The reaction time depends on the reaction rates. Analysis of product versus time data yielded second-order reaction rate constants between the PFET reagent, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)osmium, and standards ((ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium cation and p-hydroquinone) or catechols (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. The extent of the reactions in a CTR were then predicted from initial reaction conditions and compared to experimental results. Both the theory and experimental results suggested the reactions of catechols were generally kinetically controlled, while those of the standards were controlled by mixing time (1-2 s). Thus, the extent of homogenization can be monitored in a CTR using the relatively fast reaction of the reagent and p

  12. Relationships between chemical oxygen demand (COD) components and toxicity in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor/aerobic completely stirred reactor system treating Kemicetine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the interactions between toxicity removals and Kemicetine, COD removals, intermediate products of Kemicetine and COD components (CODs originating from slowly degradable organics, readily degradable organics, inert microbial products and from the inert compounds) were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system with a real pharmaceutical wastewater. The total COD and Kemicetine removal efficiencies were 98% and 100%, respectively, in the sequential ABR/CSTR systems. 2-Amino-1 (p-nitrophenil)-1,3 propanediol, l-p-amino phenyl, p-amino phenol and phenol were detected in the ABR as the main readily degradable inter-metabolites. In the anaerobic ABR reactor, the Kemicetin was converted to corresponding inter-metabolites and a substantial part of the COD was removed. In the aerobic CSTR reactor the inter-metabolites produced in the anaerobic reactor were completely removed and the COD remaining from the anerobic reactor was biodegraded. It was found that the COD originating from the readily degradable organics did not limit the anaerobic degradation process, while the CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and from the inert microbial products significantly decreased the anaerobic ABR reactor performance. The acute toxicity test results indicated that the toxicity decreased from the influent to the effluent of the aerobic CSTR reactor. The ANOVA test statistics showed that there was a strong linear correlation between acute toxicity, CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and inert microbial products. A weak correlation between acute toxicity and CODs originating from the inert compounds was detected.

  13. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 2: Base Case and Sensitivity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103) of this series describes a new rotary reactor for gas-fueled chemical-looping combustion (CLC), in which, a solid wheel with microchannels rotates between the reducing and oxidizing streams. The oxygen carrier (OC) coated on the surfaces of the channels periodically adsorbs oxygen from air and releases it to oxidize the fuel. A one-dimensional model is also developed in part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103). This paper presents the simulation results based on the base-case design parameters. The results indicate that both the fuel conversion efficiency and the carbon separation efficiency are close to unity. Because of the relatively low reduction rate of copper oxide, fuel conversion occurs gradually from the inlet to the exit. A total of 99.9% of the fuel is converted within 75% of the channel, leading to 25% redundant length near the exit, to ensure robustness. In the air sector, the OC is rapidly regenerated while consuming a large amount of oxygen from air. Velocity fluctuations are observed during the transition between sectors because of the complete reactions of OCs. The gas temperature increases monotonically from 823 to 1315 K, which is mainly determined by the solid temperature, whose variations with time are limited within 20 K. The overall energy in the solid phase is balanced between the reaction heat release, conduction, and convective cooling. In the sensitivity analysis, important input parameters are identified and varied around their base-case values. The resulting changes in the model-predicted performance revealed that the most important parameters are the reduction kinetics, the operating pressure, and the feed stream temperatures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Venu; Nair, Aswathi R.; Shivashankar, S. A.; Mohan Rao, G.

    2015-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  15. High Resolution Gamma Ray Tomography and its Application to the Measurement of Phase Fractions in Chemical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Uwe; Bieberle, Andre; Schleicher, Eckhard; Hessel, Günther; Zippe, Cornelius; Friedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    We applied gamma ray tomography to the problem of phase fraction measurement in chemical reactors. Therefore, we used a new tomography device that is operated with a Cs-137 source and a high resolution gamma ray detector. One application example is the reconstruction of the fluid distribution and the measurement of radial gas fraction profiles in a laboratory scale stirred vessel. The tomograph was used to obtain radiographic projections of the averaged gamma ray attenuation for different stirrer speeds along the height of the vessel. With tomographic reconstruction techniques we calculated the angularly averaged radial distribution of the attenuation coefficient for as many as 150 single cross-sectional planes and synthesised from this data set the axial and radial fluid distribution pattern. Further, we exemplarily reconstructed the radial gas fraction distributions induced by the stirrer in the area of the stirrer blades. In a second application the gamma ray measurement system was used to visualise gas inclusions in a water cleaning column that is used to remove hazardous heavy metal species from water.

  16. Analysis of copper (I) oxide thin films grown in a photo-assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Omar H.

    Copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) has enormous potenetial for photovoltaic applications. Cu2O is a p-type semiconductor with a direct band gap of 2.2 eV. When grown on silicon, thin film Cu2O has the potential to increase photovoltaic eciency. Cu2O is a suitable photovoltaic material because it is inexpensive, non-toxic and abundant in the earth's crust. A model was developed based on a stagnation flow reactor with a reduction in activation energy for the precursor decomposition due to the light irradiation to model the light irradiation. The parameters that were tested were substrate temperature (200 to 700° C), gas temperature (100 and 150 °C) and carrier gas flow rate (25 to 100 sccm). The model was tested with a 480 nm and 172 nm light irradiation source and without any light irradiation source. This thesis utilizes a photo assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor to deposit films of Cu2O on silicon. The films were grown with a surface temperature of 700 °C, a gas temperature of 150 °C and an oxygen gas flow rate of 100 sccm. One deposition was done without the use of any light irradiation and another deposition was done with a 480 nm light irradiation source. X-ray diffraction, ellipsometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the light irradiation eect on the lm growth and morphology. When grown with light irradiation, the ellipsometer showed that the film thickness increased to 98 +/- 6 nm from 74 +/- 10 nm, which shows that there is greater uniformity with a higher thickness when grown with light irradiation. The XRD results showed an increase in crystallinity in Cu2O grown with light irradiation, and the TEM results showed the grain sizes double when grown with light irradiation. The UV irradiation has been shown to increase the copper (I) oxide film quality and lm thickness. The model showed that the effect of the light irradiation was maximized at a surface temperature of 400 °C After this temperature the thermal eects become

  17. Experiments on biomass gasification using chemical looping with nickel-based oxygen carrier in a 25 kWth reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass gasification using chemical looping (BGCL) is an innovative biomass gasification technology, which utilizes lattice oxygen from oxygen carrier instead of molecular oxygen from air. This work attempted to investigate the BGCL performance with nickel-based oxygen carrier in a 25 kWth reactor. The new prototype is composed of a high velocity fluidized bed as an air reactor, a cyclone, a bubbling fluidized bed as a fuel reactor, and a loop-seal. At first, the major reactions in the process were presented and chemical reaction thermodynamics in the fuel reactor was analyzed. The NiO/Al2O3 oxygen carrier was then applied in the reactor. Different variables, such as gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass (S/B) ratio and NiO content, were analyzed. The carbon conversion efficiency increased smoothly within the temperature range of 650–850 °C, while the syngas yield reached the maximum of 0.33 Nm3kg−1 at 750 °C. Additionally, based on the tradeoff between carbon conversion efficiency and syngas yield, it was concluded that 30 wt.% was the optimal NiO content. Besides, in order to get high quality syngas with low CO2 emission, CaO-decorated NiO/Al2O3 oxygen carrier was investigated. Experimental results showed that the addition of CaO enhanced the biomass gasification process and increased the syngas yield. - Highlights: • A new 25 kWth prototype was made in this study. • NiO was selected as oxygen carrier in the new prototype. • Gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio and NiO content were investigated. • CaO-decorated NiO/Al2O3 was tested to produce high quality syngas

  18. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  19. Modelling the chemical behaviour of tellurium species in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor cooling system under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This state of the art report contains information on the behaviour of tellurium and its compounds in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor coolant system under light water reactor severe accident conditions. To characterise tellurium behaviour, it is necessary the previous knowledge of the species of tellurium released from the core, and simultaneity of its release with that of other materials which can alter the transport, for instance, control rod and structural materials. Release and transport experiments have been reviewed along with the models implemented in the codes which are used in the international community: TRAPMELT, RAFT, VICTORIA and SOPHIE. From the experiments, it can be concluded that other species different to Te2, such as tin telluride and cesium telluride, may be released from the fuel. That is why they must be considered in the transport phenomena. There is also experimental evidence of the strong interaction of Te2 with Inconel 600 and stainless steel of the pipe walls and structures, however this strong interaction is in competition with the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, which under severe accident conditions may represent an area greater than that of the primary system. It is for the absence of significant tellurium species in the transport models, and also for the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, for which some codes show the greatest deficiencies

  20. Exergy analysis of a system using a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power generation efficiency of nuclear plants is mainly determined by the permissible temperatures and pressures of the nuclear reactor fuel and coolants. These parameters are limited by materials properties and corrosion rates and their effect on nuclear reactor safety. The advanced materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ steam as a coolant and heat carrier, permit the increased steam parameters (outlet temperature up to 625 degree C and pressure of about 25 MPa). Supercritical water-cooled (SCW) nuclear power plants are expected to increase the power generation efficiency from 35 to 45%. Supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors can be linked to thermochemical water splitting cycles for hydrogen production. An increased steam temperature from the nuclear reactor makes it also possible to utilize its energy in thermochemical water splitting cycles. These cycles are considered by many as one of the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require a heat supply at the temperatures over 550-600 degree C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump which increases the temperature the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. A high temperature chemical heat pump which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with a SCW nuclear plant on one side and thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature level of the 'nuclear' heat and, thus, the intensity of

  1. Design of a high temperature chemical vapor deposition reactor in which the effect of the condensation of exhaust gas in the outlet is minimized using computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji-Young; Geun Kim, Byeong; Nam, Deok-Hui; Yoo, Chang-Hyoung; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Seo, Won-Seon; Shul, Yong-Gun; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeong, Seong-Min

    2016-02-01

    Tetramethylsilane (TMS) was recently proposed as a safe precursor for SiC single crystal growth through high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD). Because the C content of TMS is much higher than Si, the exhaust gas from the TMS-based HTCVD contains large amounts of C which is condensed in the outlet. Because the condensed C close to the crystal growth front will influence on the thermodynamic equilibrium in the crystal growth, an optimal reactor design was highly required to exclude the effect of the condensed carbon. In this study, we report on a mass/heat transfer analysis using the finite element method (FEM) in an attempt to design an effective reactor that will minimize the effect of carbon condensation in the outlet. By applying the proposed reactor design to actual growth experiments, single 6H-SiC crystals with diameters of 50 mm were successfully grown from a 6H-SiC seed. This result confirms that the proposed reactor design can be used to effectively grow 6H-SiC crystals using TMS-based HTCVD.

  2. Experimentation and simulation of tin oxide deposition on glass based on the SnCl4 hydrolysis in an in-line atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates in an in-line atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor under various conditions, which were numerically simulated using a commercial package. A soda-lime glass sheet was used as a deposition substrate, and SnCl4 and H2O in gas phase were separately supplied as the precursor and the oxidizer, respectively. By assuming that the main chemical reactions followed the Rideal–Eley mechanism, the experimentally determined deposition rates were fitted to obtain the reaction factors needed to describe the deposition process. The role of barrier gas injection for minimizing unwanted surface reaction or particle generation inside of the reactor, and not on the target (glass backplane itself) has been elucidated. Furthermore, the optimal operating conditions for the deposition on glass with the additives such as CH3OH and HF have been investigated. - Highlights: • Tin oxide deposition on glass based on the SnCl4 hydrolysis in an in-line reactor • Simulations using Rideal–Eley mechanism were compared to experimental observations. • Results: activation energy—79.3 kJ/mol and frequency factor—1.93 × 1010 m4/kmol·s • Influences of additives on transmittances, hazes, and electrical resistivities

  3. Design of a multi-model observer-based estimator for Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI strategy: application to a chemical reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chetouani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a FDI strategy for nonlinear dynamic systems. It shows a methodology of tackling the fault detection and isolation issue by combining a technique based on the residuals signal and a technique using the multiple Kalman filters. The usefulness of this combination is the on-line implementation of the set of models, which represents the normal mode and all dynamics of faults, if the statistical decision threshold on the residuals exceeds a fixed value. In other cases, one Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is enough to estimate the process state. After describing the system architecture and the proposed FDI methodology, we present a realistic application in order to show the technique's potential. An algorithm is described and applied to a chemical process like a perfectly stirred chemical reactor functioning in a semi-batch mode. The chemical reaction used is an oxido reduction one, the oxidation of sodium thiosulfate by hydrogen peroxide.

  4. On the Design of a Reactor for High Temperature Heat Storage by Means of Reversible Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This work aims on the investigation of factors influencing the discharge characteristicsof a heat storage system, which is based on the reversible reaction system of Ca(OH)2and CaO. As storage, a packed bed reactor with embedded plate heat exchanger forindirect heat transfer is considered. The storage system was studied theoretically bymeans of finite element analysis of a corresponding mathematical model. Parametricstudies were carried out to determine the influence of reactor design and ope...

  5. Fast hydrothermal liquefaction for production of chemicals and biofuels from wet biomass - The need to develop a plug-flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Khanh-Quang

    2016-08-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a promising technology for converting wet plant biomass directly to liquid fuels and chemicals. However, some aspects of the technology are not fully understood and still disputed. The reactor material constraints and difficulties coupled with the formation of unwanted products are the main challenges limiting the applications of the technology. In addition, heat and mass transfer limitations in the reaction system result in a lower conversion efficiency and selectivity, of which the later would make it difficult and expensive for products separation, purification, and/or modification of the products. This paper discusses the challenges and current status of possible solutions to the challenges, focusing on the need of developing a special plug-flow reactor for scaling up of the HTL process. PMID:27085989

  6. Flow field velocity measurements for non-isothermal systems. [of chemically reactive flow inside fused silica CVD reactor vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. J.; Hyer, P. V.; Culotta, P. W.; Clark, I. O.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental techniques which can be potentially utilized to measure the gas velocity fields in nonisothermal CVD systems both in ground-based and space-based investigations are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of a three-component laser velocimetry (LV) system that was adapted specifically for quantitative determination of the mixed convective flows in a chamber for crystal growth and film formation by CVD are discussed. Data from a horizontal research CVD reactor indicate that current models for the effects of thermophoretic force are not adequate to predict the thermophoretic bias in arbitrary flow configurations. It is concluded that LV techniques are capable of characterizing the fluid dynamics of a CVD reactor at typical growth temperatures. Thermal effects are shown to dominate and stabilize the fluid dynamics of the reactor. Heating of the susceptor increases the gas velocities parallel to the face of a slanted susceptor by up to a factor of five.

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  8. High solids fermentation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  9. Preparation of LWBR [Light Water Breeder Reactor] spent fuel for shipment to ICPP [Idaho Chemical Processing Plant] for long term storage (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport facility. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to prepare and to ship all LWBR nuclear fuel to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for long-term storage. Preparation processes included the underwater loading of LWBR fuel into storage liners, the sealing, dewatering and drying of the storage liners, and the final pressurization of the storage liners with inert neon gas. Shipping operations included the underwater installation of the fuel loaded storage liner into the Peach Bottom shipping cask, cask removal from the waterpit, cask preparations for shipping, and cask shipment by tractor trailer to the ICPP facility for long-term storage. The ICPP facility preparations for LWBR fuel storage and the ICPP process for discharge of the fuel into underground silos are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs

  10. Geometrical effects of the discharge system on the corona discharge and chemically active species generated in wire-cylinder and wire-plate reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yongho; Park, Jinmyung; Hong, Sanghee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    Time-dependent one- and two-dimensional numerical models are developed to analyze the influence of the design and the operating conditions on streamer propagation and active-species generation in wire-cylinder and wire-plate reactors. One-dimensional calculations for the corona model of a wire-cylinder reactor showed that fixed ratios of the wire to the cylinder radii, a/b, and the applied voltage to the cylinder radius, V{sub a}/b, were the key design parameters for controlling the discharge characteristics. In addition, shape of pulse voltage externally applied to the electrodes is newly suggested for generating a near-uniform electric field over the entire discharge region. Two-dimensional calculations for a wire-plate reactor found that the wire-to-wire spacing, c, along the parallel-plate direction should be at least twice the wire-to-plate distance, d, to produce non-equilibrium plasmas effectively for generating a large volume of resultant chemically active species (c/d>=2).

  11. Geometrical effects of the discharge system on the corona discharge and chemically active species generated in wire-cylinder and wire-plate reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent one- and two-dimensional numerical models are developed to analyze the influence of the design and the operating conditions on streamer propagation and active-species generation in wire-cylinder and wire-plate reactors. One-dimensional calculations for the corona model of a wire-cylinder reactor showed that fixed ratios of the wire to the cylinder radii, a/b, and the applied voltage to the cylinder radius, Va/b, were the key design parameters for controlling the discharge characteristics. In addition, shape of pulse voltage externally applied to the electrodes is newly suggested for generating a near-uniform electric field over the entire discharge region. Two-dimensional calculations for a wire-plate reactor found that the wire-to-wire spacing, c, along the parallel-plate direction should be at least twice the wire-to-plate distance, d, to produce non-equilibrium plasmas effectively for generating a large volume of resultant chemically active species (c/d≥2).

  12. Experimental Program for the validation of the design of a 150KWth Chemical looping Combustion reactor system with main focus on the reactor flexibility and operability

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbaniyan, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion is one of the most promising way to limit the CO2 release to the atmosphere among the other technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). It constitutes an indirect fuel combustion strategy, in which metal oxide is used as oxygen carrier, to transfer oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel, avoiding direct contact between air and fuel. It is basically an unmixed combustion process (fuel and air are never mixed) whose flue gases are mainly CO2 and steam. Thu...

  13. HYDRODYNAMIC BEHAVIOR AND ABSORPTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE BY CHEMICAL REACTION WITH GLUCOSAMINE IN AN AIR-LIFT REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia García-Abuín; Diego Gómez-Díaz; Navaza, José M.; Isabel Vidal-Tato

    2010-01-01

    In this work, it has been studied the behavior of aqueous solutions of glucosamine used as absorbent phase in the carbon dioxide capture process using an air-lift reactor. The experimental results indicate that the reagent (glucosamine) shows a similar behavior related to absorption rate, than previously observed for aqueous solutions of other amines widely used for carbon dioxide capture. The value of mass transfer rate has been determined, as well as the effect of these operation conditions...

  14. Complex dynamics and spatio-temporal patterns in a network of three distributed chemical reactors with periodical feed switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the dynamics of a periodically forced network of three catalytic reactors is studied. The reactors are modeled as distributed parameter systems with a Z3xS1 spatio-temporal symmetry. The symmetry property is induced by periodical forcing, and it forces the Poincare map to be the third iterate of another non-stroboscopic map. This property is used to compute the bifurcation diagram of the periodic and multiperiodic regimes of the reactor network through the continuation of the corresponding fixed points of the non-stroboscopic map. Moreover, this property is used to determine the symmetry and multiplicity of the regimes by comparing the invariant sets of the Poincare map with those of the non-stroboscopic map. As demonstrated in this paper, this is possible even for quasi-periodic and chaotic regime. For symmetry and spatially distributed nature of the system, several complex symmetric and asymmetric spatio-temporal patterns corresponding to multiperiodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes are found in a wide range of the bifurcation parameter. Symmetry breaking bifurcations, catastrophic transitions from periodic to quasi-periodic regimes, and different routes to chaotic regimes (Curry-Yorke, type I and III intermittencies and torus doubling cascade) are found and discussed

  15. Kinetics and Modeling of Chemical Leaching of Sphalerite Concentrate Using Ferric Iron in a Redox-controlled Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋健; 高玲; 林建群; 吴洪斌; 林建强

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study for chemical leaching of sphalerite concentrate under various constant Fe3+concentrations and redox potential conditions. The effects of Fe3+ concentration and redox potential on chemical leaching of sphalerite were investigated. The shrinking core model was applied to analyze the experimental results. It was found that both the Fe3+ concentration and the redox potential controlled the chemical leaching rate of sphalerite. A new kinetic model was developed, in which the chemical leaching rate of sphalerite was proportional to Fe3+concentration and Fe3+/Fe2+ratio. All the model parameters were evaluated from the experimental data. The model predictions fit well with the experimental observed values.

  16. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  17. Kinetics of methane fermentation yield in biogas reactors: Genetic variation and association with chemical composition in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the most competitive crop for methane production in Germany. Methane fermentation yield per unit of dry matter (MFY) is a determinant of methane yield, but little information is available on this trait. Our objectives were to investigate the kinetics of MFY during fermentation of maize, estimate quantitative-genetic parameters for different traits related to MFY and examine the relationship of MFY with chemical composition and silage quality. Whole-plant material of 16 inbreds and their 32 testcrosses was analyzed for MFY over 35 days of fermentation using a discontinuous laboratory assay. Data were also generated on chemical composition and in vitro digestible organic matter (IVDOM). Significant genotypic variances and high heritabilities were observed for MFY at early fermentation stages (up to 5 days) probably due to different concentrations of easily degradable chemical components. However, genotypic variances and heritability of MFY reduced as fermentation progressed, because of complete or partial degradation of all chemical components. Further, there were strong correlations of MFY with chemical components at early fermentation stages but not at later stages. Therefore, MFY at later stages, which is closer to potential MFY, does not seem to be amenable to selection. High heritability of IVDOM and its strong correlation with MFY in testcrosses indicated its possible use for preliminary or indirect selection. Keeping in view the magnitude of genetic variance that was low for MFY and high for dry matter yield (DMY), the other component of methane yield, more emphasis on breeding for DMY seems appropriate. -- Highlights: ► We investigated methane fermentation yield (MFY) of diverse germplasm of maize. ► The kinetics of MFY and its correlations with chemical composition were examined. ► Genetic variance and heritability for MFY decreased with fermentation time. ► Complete fermentation (35 d) reduced correlations of MFY with chemical

  18. Modified DLC coatings prepared in a large-scale reactor by dual microwave/pulsed-DC plasma-activated chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films find abundant applications as hard and protective coatings due to their excellent mechanical and tribological performances. The addition of new elements to the amorphous DLC matrix tunes the properties of this material, leading to an extension of its scope of applications. In order to scale up their production to a large plasma reactor, DLC films modified by silicon and oxygen additions have been grown in an industrial plant of 1m3 by means of pulsed-DC plasma-activated chemical vapour deposition (PACVD). The use of an additional microwave (MW) source has intensified the glow discharge, partly by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), accelerating therefore the deposition process. Hence, acetylene, tetramethylsilane (TMS) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) constituted the respective gas precursors for the deposition of a-C:H (DLC), a-C:H:Si and a-C:H:Si:O films by dual MW/pulsed-DC PACVD. This work presents systematic studies of the deposition rate, hardness, adhesion, abrasive wear and water contact angle aimed to optimize the technological parameters of deposition: gas pressure, relative gas flow of the monomers and input power. This study has been completed with measures of the atomic composition of the samples. Deposition rates around 1 μm/h, typical for standard processes held in the large reactor, were increased about by a factor 10 when the ionization source has been operated in ECR mode

  19. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  20. Modeling studies of an impinging jet reactor design for hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition of superconducting MgB 2 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborn, Daniel R.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Li, Qi; Xi, X. X.; Snyder, David W.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2009-03-01

    An impinging jet reactor was developed for the deposition of superconducting MgB 2 thin films by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition, a technique that combines Mg evaporation with the thermal decomposition of B 2H 6 gas. A transport and chemistry model for boron film deposition from B 2H 6 was initially used to investigate the effect of carrier gas, Mg crucible temperature and gas flow rates on boron film growth rate and uniformity. The modeling studies, which were validated experimentally, demonstrated a reduction in B 2H 6 gas-phase depletion and an increased boron film growth rate using an argon carrier gas compared to hydrogen. The results were used to identify a suitable set of process conditions for MgB 2 deposition in the impinging jet reactor. The deposition of polycrystalline MgB 2 thin films that exhibited a transition temperature of 39.5 K was demonstrated at growth rates up to ˜50 μm/h.

  1. Chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1994--95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 14 wells during 1994--95 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and manmade contaminants. A total of 111 samples were collected from 10 monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twelve quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 1 was a blank sample and 11 were replicate samples. The blank sample contained concentrations of one inorganic constituent, one organic constituent, and five radioactive constituents that were greater than the reporting levels. Concentrations of other constituents in the blank sample were less than their respective reporting levels. The 11 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 293 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 293 data pairs, 258 were statistically equivalent at the 95-percent confidence level; about 88 percent of the analytical results were in agreement

  2. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1991--93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 14 wells during 1991--93 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. One hundred sixty-one samples were collected from 10 ground-water monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twenty-one quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 2 were blank samples and 19 were replicate samples. The two blank samples contained concentrations of six inorganic constituents that were slightly greater than the laboratory reporting levels (the smallest measured concentration of a constituent that can be reported using a given analytical method). Concentrations of other constituents in the blank samples were less than their respective reporting levels. The 19 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 614 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 614 data pairs, 588 were statistically equivalent at the 95% confidence level; about 96% of the analytical results were in agreement. Two pairs of turbidity measurements were not evaluated because of insufficient information and one primary sample collected in January 1992 contained tentatively identified organic compounds when the replicate sample did not

  3. Effect of dissolved hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of chemically vapor deposited SiC in a simulated pressurized water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of CVD SiC was studied under PWR-simulating water conditions. • Dissolved hydrogen significantly reduced the corrosion rate of SiC. • Dissolved hydrogen was likely to retard the formation of surface oxide layer. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of chemically vapor deposited SiC was investigated in relation to its application as fuel cladding in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Corrosion tests were conducted in deoxygenated, pressurized water at 360 °C with control of dissolved hydrogen. The dissolved hydrogen dramatically reduced the corrosion rate of SiC compared with that in water without the dissolved hydrogen. It was revealed that the dissolution of the surface oxide of SiC primarily contributed to the weight loss at the initial stage of corrosion. Further weight loss was minimal for 210 d because dissolved hydrogen effectively retarded the formation of SiO2

  4. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  5. Thermal analysis experiment for elucidating sodium-water chemical reaction mechanism in steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanism of the sodium-water surface reaction in steam generator of sodium-cooled after reactors, kinetic study of the sodium (Na)-sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reaction has been carried out by using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) technique. The parameters, including melting point of Na and NaOH, transition temperature of NaOH, Na-NaOH reaction temperature, and the decomposition temperature of sodium hydride (NaH) have been identified from DTA curves. Based on the measured reaction temperature, rate constant of Na2O generation was obtained. Thermal analysis results indicated that Na2O generation at the secondary overall reaction would be considered during the sodium-water reaction. (author)

  6. Fission production and actinides in the spent graphite of the reactor stacks of the Siberian chemical integrated plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peculiarity of the accomplished studies consisted in the representative selection of the reactor graphite stacks samples and in the performance of the complex analysis of their radioactive contamination. The role of incidents in forming the graphite contamination by individual radionuclides is identified and their distribution in stacks is studied. The correlation between the content of various radionuclides is investigated. The schemes for evaluating their reserve in the graphite stack are plotted. The results on evaluating the radionuclides reserve in the graphite stack highly differ from the earlier forecasted ones. The fission products and actinides reserves are by 10 times lesser as it was fore coated earlier, which may essentially simplify dismantling and selection of utilization technologies

  7. Utilization of cross-linked laccase aggregates in a perfusion basket reactor for the continuous elimination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Hubert; Jones, J Peter; Agathos, Spiros N

    2009-04-15

    A perfusion basket reactor (BR) was developed for the continuous utilization of insolubilized laccase as cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs). The BR consisted of an unbaffled basket made of a metallic filtration module filled with CLEAs and continuously agitated by a 3-blade marine propeller. The agitation conditions influenced both the apparent laccase activity in the reactor and the stability of the biocatalyst. Optimal laccase activity was obtained at a rotational speed of 12.5 rps and the highest stability was reached at speeds of 1.7 rps or lower. The activity and stability of the biocatalyst were affected drastically upon the appearance of vortices in the reaction medium. This reactor was used for the continuous elimination of the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), and triclosan (TCS). Optimization of EDC elimination by laccase CLEAs as a function of temperature and pH was achieved by response surface methodology using a central composite factorial design. The optimal conditions of pH and temperature were, respectively, 4.8 and 40.3 degrees C for the elimination of p353NP (a branched isomer of NP), 4.7 and 48.0 degrees C for BPA, and 4.9 and 41.2 degrees C for TCS. Finally, the BR was used for the continuous elimination of these EDCs from a 5 mg L(-1) aqueous solution using 1 mg of CLEAs at pH 5 and room temperature. Our results showed that at least 85% of these EDCs could be eliminated with a hydraulic retention time of 325 min. The performances of the BR were quite stable over a 7-day period of continuous treatment. Furthermore, this system could eliminate the same EDCs from a 100 mg L(-1) solution. Finally, a mathematical model combining the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the laccase CLEAs and the continuous stirred tank reactor behavior of the BR was developed to predict the elimination of these xenobiotics. PMID:19061241

  8. Chemically enhanced biological NOx removal from flue gases : nitric oxide and ferric EDTA reduction in BioDeNox reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Maas,, F.

    2005-01-01

    The emission of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to the atmosphere is a major environmental problem. To abate NOx emissions from industrial flue gases, to date, mainly chemical processes like selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are applied. All these processes require high temperatures (>300 °C) and expensive catalysts. Therefore, biological NOx removal techniques using denitrification may represent promising alternatives for the conventional SCR techniques. However, water based biofiltration require...

  9. The effects of chemical factors on stress corrosion of Alloy 600 exposed to the cooling medium in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of chemical factors in reducing stress corrosion of Alloy 600 in a primary coolant medium were investigated in France as part of a test program undertaken by three laboratories (EDF, FRAMATOME and CEA) on tubes with differing sensitivity to corrosion. Studied parameters were type of Alloy 600 material, temperature, lithium concentration and pH. The effect of each parameter was first estimated separately by qualitative analysis and the parameter groups which best describe the corrosion phenomenon were then defined. The preponderant effect of increasing the temperature (by 40 degrees C) and the type of material were confirmed, as was that of the boron and lithium concentrations. The risk of cracking increases with lithium content but the phenomenon reverses at high concentrations. The effect of pH variations is mainly reflected in variations in the lithium content. A quantitative study was then carried out to assess the effect of each parameter in terms of risk and time to cracking in a given reference medium. A model of the chemical effects is proposed, based on the mechanism involving dissolution-repassivation of the metal after failure of the passive film during the phase when cracks propagate slowly. This allows a quantitative approach to the effects of hydrogen and the other chemical parameters involved and the results are compared with those of the statistical model

  10. Hot sodium-triggered thermo-chemical degradation of concrete aggregates in the sodium resistant sacrificial layers of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Concrete aggregates were exposed to liquid sodium exposure at 550 °C. • Thermal and chemical effects were studied using megascopic and micro-analytical techniques. • Aggregates underwent significant thermo-chemical degradation upon exposure. • Limestone found more suitable for sodium environment than siliceous aggregate. - Abstract: Sodium is used as an efficient coolant in fast breeder reactor (FBR) for extracting nuclear heat from its high power density core to steam generator, to produce electricity. Accidentally spilled Sodium at elevated temperatures of 550 °C or above may interact with concrete leading to its deterioration. A sacrificial concrete layer is provided on the structural concrete to mitigate the harmful impacts of these interactions. Locally available crushed rocks like limestone and granite are employed as aggregates in sacrificial and structural concrete respectively. Rocks are naturally occurring multi-mineral and multiphase inorganic systems of the earth. Aggregates are the main constituents of concrete accounting for 70–80% of its mass. In this paper, an attempt is made to study the physico-chemical modifications that may occur in the aggregates during the interactions between liquid sodium and the aggregates of concrete. The experimental strategy consists of heating of granite, limestone and river sand aggregates at 550 °C for 30 min and further treating them with 1 Normal aqueous solution of NaOH, to differentiate thermal and chemical effects. Furthermore, sodium-aggregate interaction study at 550 °C was conducted to characterize the combined effects of heat and sodium. Siliceous aggregates (granite and river sand) were found to be easily attacked by ferric oxidation during heating in air and also subjected to rapid chemical reactions with liquid NaOH, producing mineral phases of sodium silicate, sodium orthosilicates, calcium orthosilicates and sodium carbonates. Initiation and propagation of cracking in the

  11. Kinetics of para-nitrophenol and chemical oxygen demand removal from synthetic wastewater in an anaerobic migrating blanket reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was operated at different HRTs (1-10.38 days) in order to determine the para-nitrophenol (p-NP) and COD removal kinetic constants. The reactor was fed with 40 mg L-1p-NP and 3000 mg L-1 glucose-COD. Modified Stover-Kincannon and Grau second-order kinetic models were applied to the experimental data. The predicted p-NP and COD concentrations were calculated using the kinetic constants. It was found that these data were in better agreement with the observed ones in the modified Stover-Kincannon compared to Grau second-order model. The kinetic constants calculated according to Stover-Kincannon model are as follows: the saturation value constant (KB) and maximum utilization rate constants (Rmax) were found as 31.55 g COD L-1 day-1, 29.49 g COD L-1 day-1 for COD removal and 0.428 g p-NP L-1 day-1, 0.407 g p-NP L-1 day-1 for p-NP removal, respectively (R2 = 1). The values of (a) and (b) were found to be 0.096 day and 1.071 (dimensionless) with high correlation coefficients of R2 = 0.85 for COD removal. Kinetic constants for specific gas production rate were evaluated using modified Stover-Kincannon, Van der Meer and Heerrtjes and Chen and Hasminoto models. It was shown that Stover-Kincannon model is more appropriate for calculating the effluent COD, p-NP concentrations in AMBR compared to the other models. The maximum specific biogas production rate, Gmax, and proportionality constant, GB, were found to be 1666.7 mL L-1 day-1 and 2.83 (dimensionless), respectively in modified Stover-Kincannon gas model. The bacteria had low Haldane inhibition constants (KID = 14 and 23 mg L-1) for p-NP concentrations higher than 40 mg L-1 while the half velocity constant (Ks) increased from 10 to 60 and 118 mg L-1 with increasing p-NP concentrations from 40 to 85 and 125 mg L-1

  12. Gravimetrical and chemical characterization of SiOx structures deposited on fine powders by short plasma exposure in a plasma down stream reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of lactose particles was modified by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process to improve the flow behavior of the powder. For this, the particulates were treated in a plasma down stream reactor which provides a short (50 ms) and homogeneous exposure to the capacitively coupled RF discharge. The organosilicon monomer hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) was used as a precursor for the formation of SiOx which is deposited on the substrate particle surface. For varying process gas mixtures (O2/Ar/HMDSO) and RF power applied, the amount of the deposited material was determined gravimetrically after dissolution of the lactose substrate particles and the chemical composition of the accumulated deposition material was investigated by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The concentration of the deposited SiOx relating to the substrate material was found to be in the range of 0.1 wt.%. Based on the ATR-FTIR analysis, the inorganic, i.e. oxidic SiOx fraction of the obtained deposits was shown to be controllable by varying the process parameters, whilst a relatively large amount of organic structures must be considered.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis investigation and chemical speciation of aerosol samples formed in light water reactor core-melting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol samples consisting of fission products and elements of light water reactor structural materials were collected during laboratory-scale simulation of the heat-up phase of a core melt accident. The aerosol particles were formed in a steam atmosphere at temperatures of the melting charge between 1200 and 19000C. The investigation of the samples by use of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) permitted the chemical speciation of the detected aerosol constituents silver, cadmium, indium, tellurium, iodine, and cesium. A comparison of the elemental analysis results obtained from XPS with those achieved from electron probe x-ray microanalysis revealed that aerosol particle surface and aerosol particle bulk are principally composed of the same elements. The compositions determined in dependence of the release temperature reflect the differing volatilities of the detected elements. Quantitative differences between the composition of surface and bulk have been observed only for those aerosol samples that were collected at higher melting charge temperatures. These samples show an enrichment of more volatile species at the particles' surfaces. In order to obtain direct information on chemical species below the surface, selected samples were argon ion bombarded. Changes in composition and chemistry were monitored by XPS, and the results were interpreted under consideration of possible influences of the sputter process on the surface composition

  14. Gravimetrical and chemical characterization of SiO{sub x} structures deposited on fine powders by short plasma exposure in a plasma down stream reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spillmann, Adrian; Sonnenfeld, Axel [Institute of Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland); Rohr, Philipp Rudolf von [Institute of Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland)], E-mail: vonrohr@ipe.mavt.ethz.ch

    2008-12-30

    The surface of lactose particles was modified by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process to improve the flow behavior of the powder. For this, the particulates were treated in a plasma down stream reactor which provides a short (50 ms) and homogeneous exposure to the capacitively coupled RF discharge. The organosilicon monomer hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) was used as a precursor for the formation of SiO{sub x} which is deposited on the substrate particle surface. For varying process gas mixtures (O{sub 2}/Ar/HMDSO) and RF power applied, the amount of the deposited material was determined gravimetrically after dissolution of the lactose substrate particles and the chemical composition of the accumulated deposition material was investigated by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The concentration of the deposited SiO{sub x} relating to the substrate material was found to be in the range of 0.1 wt.%. Based on the ATR-FTIR analysis, the inorganic, i.e. oxidic SiO{sub x} fraction of the obtained deposits was shown to be controllable by varying the process parameters, whilst a relatively large amount of organic structures must be considered.

  15. Qualitative Aspects of the Solutions of a Mathematical Model for the Dynamic Analysis of the Reversible Chemical Reaction SO2(g)+1/2O2(g)<=>SO3(g) in a Catalytic Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Wilfredo, Angulo

    2014-01-01

    We present some qualitative aspects concerning the solution to the mathematical model describing the dynamical behavior of the reversible chemical reaction SO2(g)+1/2O2(g)SO3(g) carried out in a catalytic reactor used in the process of sulfuric acid production.

  16. Degradation of organic pollutants and characteristics of activated sludge in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic reactor treating chemical industrial wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic system operated at the hydraulic retention times (HRT of 20, 40, and 60 h with mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS concentrations of 3 g/L and 6 g/L was considered for treating chemical industrial wastewater rich in complex organic compounds and total dissolved solids. Extending the HRT and increasing the MLSS concentration resulted in higher removal efficiency for chemical oxygen demand at 72%. Organic compounds in wastewater could be classified into easily-removed and refractory compounds during treatment. The easily-removed compounds consisted primarily of ethers, alcohols, and aldehydes, whereas the refractory compounds included mainly oxygen-containing heterocyclic and benzene-containing compounds. Results from energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that several metal ions accumulated in activated sludge, particularly Fe(III. Fe accumulated mainly on the surface of sludge floc pellets and resulted in the compactness of activated sludge, which caused the values of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids /MLSS and sludge volume index to decrease.

  17. CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3 as oxygen carrier for chemical-looping combustion with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU)—Experiments in a continuously operating fluidized-bed reactor system

    KAUST Repository

    Rydén, Magnus

    2011-03-01

    Particles of the perovskite material CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3 has been examined as oxygen carrier for chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling, and for chemical-looping combustion of natural gas, by 70h of experiments in a circulating fluidized-bed reactor system. For the oxygen uncoupling experiments, it was found that the particles released O2 in gas phase at temperatures above 720°C when the fuel reactor was fluidized with CO2. The effect increased with increased temperature, and with the O2 partial pressure in the air reactor. At 950°C, the O2 concentration in the outlet from the fuel reactor was in the order of 4.0vol%, if the particles were oxidized in air. For the chemical-looping combustion experiments the combustion efficiency with standard process parameters was in the order of 95% at 950°C, using 1000kg oxygen carrier per MW natural gas, of which about 30% was located in the fuel reactor. Reducing the fuel flow so that 1900kg oxygen carrier per MW natural gas was used improved the combustion efficiency to roughly 99.8%. The particles retained their physical properties, reactivity with CH4 and ability to release gas-phase O2 reasonably well throughout the testing period and there were no problems with the fluidization or formation of solid carbon in the reactor. X-ray diffraction showed that the particles underwent changes in their phase composition though. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Pilot scale study of a chemical treatment process for decontamination of aqueous radioactive waste of pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical treatment process for the low level liquid radioactive waste generated at PINSTECH was previously optimized on lab-scale making use of coprecipitation of hydrous oxides of iron in basic medium. Ferrous sulfate was used as coagulant. Batch wise application of this procedure on pilot scale has been tested on a 1200 L batch volume of typical PINSTECH liquid waste. Different parameters and unit operations have been evaluated. The required data for the construction of a small size treatment plant envisioned can be used for demonstration/teaching purpose as well as for the decontamination of the waste effluents of the Institute. The lab-scale process parameters were verified valid on pilot scale. It was observed that reagent doses can further be economized with out any deterioration of the Decontamination Factors (DF) achieved or of any other aspect of the process. This simple, cost- effective, DF-efficient and time-smart batch wise process could be coupled with an assortment of other treatment operations thus affording universal application. Observations recorded during this study are presented. (author)

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Venu, E-mail: venuanand@cense.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: venuanand83@gmail.com; Shivashankar, S. A. [Centre for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India); Nair, Aswathi R.; Mohan Rao, G. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics (IAP), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-08-31

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  1. The synergic impact of the boiling and water radiolysis on the pressurized water reactor fuel cladding's chemical environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-07-01

    with higher resistance properties by the changed physical-chemical environment. Such kind of fuel cladding materials, as alternatives to Zircaloy-4 U.S. fuel cladding material which has a limited corrosion resistance under oxidizing conditions, are the French fuel cladding material M5 and the Russian fuel cladding material E 110 (Zr1Nb) and also the U.S. fuel cladding material ZIRLO. The fuel cladding material E 110 has been used for a long time to manufacture fuel assembly claddings of Russian Light Water Reactors - WWER-440 and WWER-1000. This cladding material shows enough high corrosion resistance by the implementation of {sup 235}U higher enriched (up to 4,3%) fuel in NPP Kozloduy, Bulgaria. The routine reactor coolant bulk chemistry monitoring data normally do not indicate the presence of oxidants in primary coolant. Specially the observed permanent presence of {sup 122}Sb (half life period - 2,7 days) during the entire operation period in the WWER-1000 Units in NPP Kozloduy, Bulgaria is an indirect indicator of the presence of SNB and water radiolysis processes. (author)

  2. Prediction of TiO2 thin film growth on the glass beads in a rotating plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Kyo-Seon

    2010-05-01

    We calculated the concentration profiles of important chemical species for TiO2 thin film growth on the glass beads in the TTIP + O2 plasmas and compared the predicted growth rates of thin films with the experimental measurements. The film thickness profile depends on the concentration profile of TiO(OC3H7)3 precursors in the gas phase because TiO(OC3H7)3 is the main precursor of the thin film. The TTIP concentration decreases with time, while the TiO(OC3H7)3 concentration increases, and they reach the steady state about 2 approximately 3 sec. The growth rate of TiO2 film predicted in this study was 9.2 nm/min and is in good agreements with the experimental result of 10.5 nm/min under the same process conditions. This study suggests that a uniform TiO2 thin film on particles can be obtained by using a rotating cylindrical PCVD reactor. PMID:20358924

  3. Physical-chemical and operational performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR treating swine wastewater - 10.4025/actascitechnol.v32i4.7203

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlon Lopes Pereira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Since hog raising concentrates a huge amount of swine manure in small areas, it is considered by the environmental government organizations to be one of the most potentially pollutant activities. Therefore the main objective of this research was to evaluate by operational criteria and removal efficiency, the performance of a Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR, working as a biological pre-treatment of swine culture effluents. The physical-chemical analyses carried out were: total COD, BOD5, total solids (TS, fix (TFS and volatiles (TVS, temperature, pH, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, phosphorus, total acidity and alkalinity. The ABR unit worked with an average efficiency of 65.2 and 76.2%, respectively, concerning total COD and BOD5, with a hydraulic retention time (HRT about 15 hours. The results for volumetric organic loading rate (VOLR, organic loading rate (OLR and hydraulic loading rate (HLR were: 4.46 kg BOD m-3 day-1; 1.81 kg BOD5 kg TVS-1 day-1 and 1.57 m3 m-3 day-1, respectively. The average efficiency of the whole treatment system for total COD and BOD5 removal were 66.5 and 77.8%, showing an adequate performance in removing the organic matter from swine wastewater.

  4. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  5. A review of the UK fast reactor programme. March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the Fast Reactor Programme of United Kingdom. These are the main lines: Dounreay Fast Reactor; Prototype Fast Reactor; Commercial Fast Reactor; engineering development; materials development; chemical engineering/sodium technology; fast reactor fuel; fuel cycle; safety; reactor performance study

  6. Design of a rotary reactor for chemical-looping combustion. Part 2: Comparison of copper-, nickel-, and iron-based oxygen carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2014-04-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising option for several applications including carbon capture (CC), fuel reforming, H 2 generation, etc. Previous studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing CLC in a novel rotary design with micro-channel structures. Part 1 of this series studied the fundamentals of the reactor design and proposed a comprehensive design procedure, enabling a systematic methodology of designing and evaluating the rotary CLC reactor with different OCs and operating conditions. This paper presents the application of the methodology to the designs with three commonly used OCs, i.e., copper, nickel, and iron. The physical properties and the reactivities of the three OCs are compared at operating conditions suitable for the rotary CLC. Nickel has the highest reduction rate, but relatively slow oxidation reactivity while the iron reduction rate is most sensitive to the fuel concentration. The design parameters and the operating conditions for the three OCs are selected, following the strategies proposed in Part 1, and the performances are evaluated using a one-dimensional plug-flow model developed previously. The simulations show that for all OCs, complete fuel conversion and high carbon separation efficiency can be achieved at periodic stationary state with reasonable operational stabilities. The nickel-based design includes the smallest dimensions because of its fast reduction rate. The operation of nickel case is mainly limited to the slow oxidation rate, and hence a relatively large share of air sector is used. The iron-based design has the largest size, due to its slow reduction reactivity near the exit or in the fuel purge sector where the fuel concentration is low. The gas flow temperature increases monotonically for all the cases, and is mainly determined by the solid temperature. In the periodic state, the local temperature variation is within 40 K and the thermal distortion is limited. The design of the rotary CLC is

  7. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors; Etudes relatives au comportement physico-chimique de l'eau lourde dans les reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenouard, J.; Dirian, G.; Roth, E.; Vignet, P.; Platzer, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author) [French] Parmi les degradations subies par l'eau lourde dans les reacteurs nucleaires, les deux plus importantes sont la pollution chimique et isotopique et la decomposition radiolytique. La pollution chimique a conduit a mettre au point pour le cas particulier des reacteurs, des circuits d'epuration par echange d'ions. On decrit ici en detail la mise en oeuvre de cette methode dans les reacteurs de recherche du CEA; les controles qu'elle necessite, les resultats obtenus et leur interpretation. En ce qui concerne la dissociation radiolytique de l'eau, les renseignements obtenus sur ces memes reacteurs sont communiques, ainsi que les details des dispositifs de recombinaison et des moyens de controle. Enfin, on fait le point des etudes poursuivies au CEA sur ces memes problemes de recombinaison dans le cas des reacteurs de puissance. (auteur)

  8. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Lambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2×1010 molec cm−3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm−3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94 and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58 of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm−3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed

  9. Chemical kinetic study of a novel lignocellulosic biofuel: Di-n-butyl ether oxidation in a laminar flow reactor and flames

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2014-03-01

    The combustion characteristics of promising alternative fuels have been studied extensively in the recent years. Nevertheless, the pyrolysis and oxidation kinetics for many oxygenated fuels are not well characterized compared to those of hydrocarbons. In the present investigation, the first chemical kinetic study of a long-chain linear symmetric ether, di-n-butyl ether (DBE), is presented and a detailed reaction model is developed. DBE has been identified recently as a candidate biofuel produced from lignocellulosic biomass. The model includes both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways with reaction rates generated using appropriate rate rules. In addition, experimental studies on fundamental combustion characteristics, such as ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds have been performed. A laminar flow reactor was used to determine the ignition delay times of lean and stoichiometric DBE/air mixtures. The laminar flame speeds of DBE/air mixtures were measured in the stagnation flame configuration for a wide rage of equivalence ratios at atmospheric pressure and an unburned reactant temperature of 373. K. All experimental data were modeled using the present kinetic model. The agreement between measured and computed results is satisfactory, and the model was used to elucidate the oxidation pathways of DBE. The dissociation of keto-hydroperoxides, leading to radical chain branching was found to dominate the ignition of DBE in the low temperature regime. The results of the present numerical and experimental study of the oxidation of di-n-butyl ether provide a good basis for further investigation of long chain linear and branched ethers. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Measurement and modeling of Ar/H2/CH4 arc jet discharge chemical vapor deposition reactors II: Modeling of the spatial dependence of expanded plasma parameters and species number densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed methodology and results are presented for a two-dimensional (r,z) computer model applicable to dc arc jet reactors operating on argon/hydrogen/hydrocarbon gas mixtures and used for chemical vapor deposition of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond and diamondlike carbon films. The model incorporates gas activation, expansion into the low pressure reactor chamber, and the chemistry of the neutral and charged species. It predicts the spatial variation of temperature, flow velocities and number densities of 25 neutral and 14 charged species, and the dependence of these parameters on the operating conditions of the reactor such as flows of H2 and CH4 and input power. Selected outcomes of the model are compared with experimental data in the accompanying paper [C. J. Rennick et al., J. Appl. Phys. 102, 063309 (2007)]. Two-dimensional spatial maps of the number densities of key radical and molecular species in the reactor, derived from the model, provide a summary of the complicated chemical processing that occurs. In the vortex region beyond the plume, the key transformations are CH4→CH3↔C2H2↔large hydrocarbons; in the plume or the transition zone to the cooler regions, the chemical processing involves C2Hx↔(CHy and CHz), C3Hx↔(CHy and C2Hz), (C2Hy and C2Hz)↔C4Hx↔(CHy and C3Hz). Depending on the local gas temperature Tg and the H/H2 ratio, the equilibria of H-shifting reactions favor C, CH, and C2 species (in the hot, H-rich axial region of the plume) or CH2, C2H, and C2H2 species (at the outer boundary of the transition zone). Deductions are drawn about the most abundant C-containing radical species incident on the growing diamond surface (C atoms and CH radicals) within this reactor, and the importance of chemistry involving charged species is discussed. Modifications to the boundary conditions and model reactor geometry allow its application to a lower power arc jet reactor operated and extensively studied by Jeffries and co-workers at SRI

  11. N Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  12. Multiwafer growth of CdTe on GaAs by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition in a vertical, high-speed, rotating disk reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, G. S.; Nelson, C. R.; Saracino, M. A.; Colter, P. C.; Anderson, P. L.

    1989-07-01

    Growth by the MOCVD (at temperatures between 308 and 402 C) of CdTe (111) layers on GaAs (100) and GaAs (111) substrates in a commercial vertical high-speed rotating disk reactor was investigated, using dimethylcadmium (DMCd) and diisopropyltelluride as the growth precursors. For growth temperatures greater than 368 C, DMCd molar growth efficiencies greater than 50 percent were obtained. Results of SEM, IR spectroscopy, and FIR reflectivity examinations indicate that the CdTe films obtained in the vertical reactor were more uniform and of higher quality than the best films produced in a horizontal reactor using similar growth procedures.

  13. Optimization of a Chemical Reaction Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Sansar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This project consists of the optimization of a chemical reactor train. The reactor considered here is the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, one of the reactor models used in engineering. Given the design equation for the CSTR and the cost function for a reactor, the following values are determined; the optimum number of reactors in the reaction train, the volume of each reactor and the total cost.

  14. Optimization of a Chemical Reaction Train

    OpenAIRE

    Bahar Sansar

    2010-01-01

    This project consists of the optimization of a chemical reactor train. The reactor considered here is the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), one of the reactor models used in engineering. Given the design equation for the CSTR and the cost function for a reactor, the following values are determined; the optimum number of reactors in the reaction train, the volume of each reactor and the total cost.

  15. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  16. Effect of pentachlorophenol and chemical oxygen demand mass concentrations in influent on operational behaviors of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Dongsheng [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China)]. E-mail: shends@zju.edu.cn; He Ruo [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China); Liu Xinwen [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China); Department of Chemical engineering, Ningbo University of Technology, 20 Cuibai Road, NingBo 315016 (China); Long Yan [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China)

    2006-08-25

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that was seeded with anaerobic sludge acclimated to chlorophenols was used to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of synthetic wastewater containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) with additional sucrose as carbon source. Two sets of UASB reactors were operated at one time. But the seeded sludge for the two reactors was different and Reactor I was seeded with the sludge that was acclimated to PCP completely for half a year, and Reactor II was seeded with the mixed sludge that was acclimated for half a year to PCP, 4-CP, 3-CP or 2-CP, respectively. The degradation of PCP and the operation fee treating the wastewater are affected by the concentration of MEDS (microorganism easily degradable substrate). So the confirmation of the suitable ratio of [COD] and [PCP] was the key factor of treating the wastewater containing PCP economically and efficiently. During the experiment, the synthetic wastewater with 180.0 mg L{sup -1} PCP and 1250-10000 mg L{sup -1} COD could be treated steadily in the experimental Reactor I. The removal efficiency of PCP was more than 99.5% and the removal efficiency of COD was up to 90%. [PCP] (concentration of PCP) in effluent was less than 0.5 mg L{sup -1}. [PCP] in influent could affect proper [COD] (concentration of COD) range in influent that was required for maintenance of steady running of the experimental reactor with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 20 to 22 h. [PCP] in influent would directly affect the necessary [COD] in influent when the UASB reactor ran normally and treated the wastewater containing PCP. When [PCP] was 100.4, 151.6 and 180.8 mg L{sup -1} in influent, respectively, [COD] in influent had to be controlled about 1250-7500, 2500-5000 and 5000 mg L{sup -1} to maintain the UASB reactor steady running normally and contemporarily ensure that [COD] and [PCP] in effluent were less than 300 and 0.5 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. With the increase of [PCP] in influent

  17. Effect of pentachlorophenol and chemical oxygen demand mass concentrations in influent on operational behaviors of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that was seeded with anaerobic sludge acclimated to chlorophenols was used to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of synthetic wastewater containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) with additional sucrose as carbon source. Two sets of UASB reactors were operated at one time. But the seeded sludge for the two reactors was different and Reactor I was seeded with the sludge that was acclimated to PCP completely for half a year, and Reactor II was seeded with the mixed sludge that was acclimated for half a year to PCP, 4-CP, 3-CP or 2-CP, respectively. The degradation of PCP and the operation fee treating the wastewater are affected by the concentration of MEDS (microorganism easily degradable substrate). So the confirmation of the suitable ratio of [COD] and [PCP] was the key factor of treating the wastewater containing PCP economically and efficiently. During the experiment, the synthetic wastewater with 180.0 mg L-1 PCP and 1250-10000 mg L-1 COD could be treated steadily in the experimental Reactor I. The removal efficiency of PCP was more than 99.5% and the removal efficiency of COD was up to 90%. [PCP] (concentration of PCP) in effluent was less than 0.5 mg L-1. [PCP] in influent could affect proper [COD] (concentration of COD) range in influent that was required for maintenance of steady running of the experimental reactor with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 20 to 22 h. [PCP] in influent would directly affect the necessary [COD] in influent when the UASB reactor ran normally and treated the wastewater containing PCP. When [PCP] was 100.4, 151.6 and 180.8 mg L-1 in influent, respectively, [COD] in influent had to be controlled about 1250-7500, 2500-5000 and 5000 mg L-1 to maintain the UASB reactor steady running normally and contemporarily ensure that [COD] and [PCP] in effluent were less than 300 and 0.5 mg L-1, respectively. With the increase of [PCP] in influent, the range of variation of [COD] in

  18. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book first explains the choice of sodium-cooled reactors by outlining the reasons of the choice of fast neutron reactors (fast neutrons instead of thermal neutrons, recycling opportunity for plutonium, full use of natural uranium, nuclear waste optimization, flexibility of fast neutron reactors in nuclear material management, fast neutron reactors as complements of water-cooled reactors), and by outlining the reasons for the choice of sodium as heat-transfer material. Physical, chemical, and neutron properties of sodium are presented. The second part of the book first presents the main design principles for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors and their core. The third part proposes an historical overview and an assessment of previously operated sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (French reactors from Rapsodie to Superphenix, other reactors in the world), and an assessment of the main incidents which occurred in these reactors. It also reports the experience and lessons learned from the dismantling of various sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors in the world. The next chapter addresses safety issues (technical and safety aspects related to the use of sodium) and environmental issues (dosimetry, gaseous and liquid releases, solid wastes, and cooling water). Then, various technological aspects of these reactors are addressed: the energy conversion system, main components, sodium chemistry, sodium-related technology, advances in in-service inspection, materials used in reactors and their behaviour, and fuel system. The next chapter addresses the fuel cycle in these reactors: its integrated specific character, report of the French experience in fast neutron reactor fuel processing, description of the transmutation of minor actinides in these reactors. The last chapter proposes an overview of reactors currently projected or under construction in the world, presents the Astrid project, and gives an assessment of the economy of these reactors. A glossary and an index

  19. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100–260 Torr pressure range and 1.5–2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (ηcoup) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance

  20. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (ηcoup) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  1. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  2. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kenton, M.A. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  3. Effect of reactor pressure on optical and electrical properties of InN films grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alevli, Mustafa; Gungor, Nese [Department of Physics, Marmara University, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey); Alkis, Sabri; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Okyay, Ali Kemal [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Gamage, Sampath; Senevirathna, Indika; Dietz, Nikolaus [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Nano-Optics (CeNO), Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The influences of reactor pressure on the stoichiometry, free carrier concentration, IR and Hall determined mobility, effective optical band edge, and optical phonon modes of HPCVD grown InN films have been analysed and are reported. The In 3d, and N 1s XPS spectra results revealed In-N and N-In bonding states as well as small concentrations of In-O and N-O bonds, respectively in all samples. InN layers grown at 1 bar were found to contain metallic indium, suggesting that the incorporation of nitrogen into the InN crystal structure was not efficient. The free carrier concentrations, as determined by Hall measurements, were found to decrease with increasing reactor pressure from 1.61 x 10{sup 21} to 8.87 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and the room-temperature Hall mobility increased with reactor pressure from 21.01 to 155.18 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 1 and 15 bar reactor pressures, respectively. IR reflectance spectra of all three (1, 8, and 15 bar) InN samples were modelled assuming two distinct layers of InN, having different free carrier concentration, IR mobility, and effective dielectric function values, related to a nucleation/interfacial region at the InN/sapphire, followed by a bulk InN layer. The effective optical band gap has been found to decrease from 1.19 to 0.95 eV with increasing reactor pressure. Improvement of the local structural quality with increasing reactor pressure has been further confirmed by Raman spectroscopy measurements. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  5. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  7. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  8. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  9. Composition Modulation of Catalytic Reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gogová, Zuzana; Hanika, Jiří

    Bratislava: Slovak University of Technology, 2009 - (Markoš, J.), s. 84 ISBN 978-80-227-3072-3. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /36./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 25.05.2009-29.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : gas- lift reactor * stirred tank reactor * design Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  10. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  11. SNAP Nuclear Space Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R

    1966-01-01

    This booklet describes the principles of nuclear-reactor space power plants and shows how they will contribute to the exploration and use of space. It compares them with chemical fuels, solar cells, and systems using energy from radioisotopes. The SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) Program, begun in 1955, is described.

  12. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  13. Chemical and spectrochemical production analysis of ThO2 and 233UO2-ThO2 pellets for the light water breeder reactor core for Shippingport (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory has utilized wet chemical, emission spectrochemical, and mass spectrometric analytical techniques for the production analysis of the ThO2 and 233UO2-ThO2 (1 to 6 wt percent 233UO2) pellets for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core for Shippingport. Proof of the fuel breeding concept necessitates measurement of precise and accurate chemical characterization of all fuel pellets before core life. Chemistry's efforts toward this goal are presented in three main sections: (1) general discussions relating the chemical requirements for ThO2 and 233UO2-ThO2 core materials to the analytical capabilities, (2) technical discussions of the chemical and instrumental technology applied for the analysis of aluminum, boron, calcium, carbon, chloride plus bromide, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, fluoride, gadolinium, iron, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen, samarium, silicon, titanium, vanadium, thorium, and uranium (total, trace, and uranium VI), and (3) a formal presentation of the analytical procedures as applied to the LWBR Development Program. (U.S.)

  14. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  15. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  16. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world's research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted

  17. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To provide a jet and missile protective wall of a configuration being inflated toward the center of a reactor container on the inside of a body of the reactor container disposed within a biological shield wall to thereby increase safety of the reactor container. Structure: A jet and missile protective wall comprised of curved surfaces internally formed with a plurality of arch inflations filled with concrete between inner and outer iron plates and shape steel beam is provided between a reactor container surrounded by a biological shield wall and a thermal shield wall surrounding the reactor pressure vessel, and an adiabatic heat insulating material is filled in space therebetween. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Monolithic reactor: higher yield, less energy

    OpenAIRE

    Mols, B.

    2004-01-01

    The production of margarine, the desulphurisation of crude oil, and the manufacture of synthetic diesel fuel, these are only three of the many industrial processes in which a three-phase reactor is used. Traditionally, this type of reactor is rather ill-defined. Success with a lab scale set-up is no guarantee that a large commercial reactor will work. Scalability is less than perfect, one might say. Researchers at the Reactor & Catalysis Engineering epartment of the Chemical Technology facult...

  19. Nuclear reactor plant for production process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature reactor is suitable as a heat source for carrying out endothermal chemical processes. A heat exchanger is required for separating the reactor coolant gases and the process medium. The heat of the reactor is transferred at a temperature lower than the process temperature to a secondary gas and is compressed to give the required temperature. The compression energy is obtained from the same reactor. (RW)

  20. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper dwells upon the design and the operation of one of the German test reactors, namely, the TRIGA Mainz one (TRIGA: Training Research Isotope Production General Atomic). The TRIGA reactor is a pool test reactor the core of which contains a graphite reflector and is placed into 2 m diameter and 6.25 m height aluminum vessel. There are 75 fuel elements in the reactor core, and any of them contains about 36 g of 235U. The TRIGA reactors under the stable operation enjoy wide application to ensure tests and irradiation, namely: neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production, application of a neutron beam to ensure the physical, the chemical and the medical research efforts. Paper presents the reactor basic experimental program lines

  1. Request for interim approval to operate Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground as a chemical waste landfill for disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl waste in submarine reactor compartments. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, G.D.

    1994-06-01

    This request is submitted to seek interim approval to operate a Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 chemical waste landfill for the disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. Operation of a chemical waste landfill for disposal of PCB waste is subject to the TSCA regulations of 40 CFR 761. Interim approval is requested for a period not to exceed 5 years from the date of approval. This request covers only the disposal of small 10 quantities of solid PCB waste contained in decommissioned, defueled submarine reactor compartments (SRC). In addition, the request applies only to disposal 12 of this waste in Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground (Trench 94) in the 13 200 East Area of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Facility. Disposal of this waste will be conducted in accordance with the Compliance 15 Agreement (Appendix H) between the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and 16 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. During the 5-year interim approval period, the DOE-RL will submit an application seeking final 18 approval for operation of Trench 94 as a chemical waste landfill, including 19 any necessary waivers, and also will seek a final dangerous waste permit from 20 the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for disposal of lead 21 shielding contained in the SRCS.

  2. Request for interim approval to operate Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground as a chemical waste landfill for disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl waste in submarine reactor compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This request is submitted to seek interim approval to operate a Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 chemical waste landfill for the disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. Operation of a chemical waste landfill for disposal of PCB waste is subject to the TSCA regulations of 40 CFR 761. Interim approval is requested for a period not to exceed 5 years from the date of approval. This request covers only the disposal of small 10 quantities of solid PCB waste contained in decommissioned, defueled submarine reactor compartments (SRC). In addition, the request applies only to disposal 12 of this waste in Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground (Trench 94) in the 13 200 East Area of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Facility. Disposal of this waste will be conducted in accordance with the Compliance 15 Agreement (Appendix H) between the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and 16 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. During the 5-year interim approval period, the DOE-RL will submit an application seeking final 18 approval for operation of Trench 94 as a chemical waste landfill, including 19 any necessary waivers, and also will seek a final dangerous waste permit from 20 the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for disposal of lead 21 shielding contained in the SRCS

  3. Chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the naval reactors facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Tucker, Betty J.; Twining, Brian V.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Phtsburgh Naval Reactors Ofilce, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997?98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A totalof91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen qualityassurance samples also were collected and analyze~ seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however, some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  4. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1990--91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 12 wells as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. Sixty samples were collected from eight groundwater monitoring wells and four production wells. Ten quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. Most of the samples contained concentrations of total sodium and dissolved anions that exceeded reporting levels. The predominant category of nitrogen-bearing compounds was nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Concentrations of total organic carbon ranged from less than 0.1 to 2.2 milligrams per liter. Total phenols in 52 of 69 samples ranged from 1 to 8 micrograms per liter. Extractable acid and base/neutral organic compounds were detected in water from 16 of 69 samples. Concentrations of dissolved gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity in all samples exceeded the reporting level. Radium-226 concentrations were greater than the reporting level in 63 of 68 samples

  5. A review of the UK fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the United Kingdom Fast Reactor Programme is introduced. Operational experience with the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) is briefly summarized. The design concept of the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) is given in some detail. The emphasis is on materials development, chemical engineering/sodium technology, fuel reprocessing and fuel cycle, engineering component development and reactor safety

  6. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole reactor building is accommodated in a shaft and is sealed level with the earth's surface by a building ceiling, which provides protection against penetration due to external effects. The building ceiling is supported on walls of the reactor building, which line the shaft and transfer the vertical components of forces to the foundations. The thickness of the walls is designed to withstand horizontal pressure waves in the floor. The building ceiling has an opening above the reactor, which must be closed by cover plates. Operating equipment for the reactor can be situated above the building ceiling. (orig./HP)

  7. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author)

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  9. Chemical interactions between the metallic silver aerosols and the iodide compounds in the containment building of a PWR reactor during a serious accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During an hypothetical severe accident in a PWR, the iodide fission products can be transferred into the liquid phase of the containment with silver particles (or silver colloid) resulting from the fusion and the vaporization of neutronic control rods. The chemical interactions between the iodide ions and the molecular iodine with the silver particles are studied in an aqueous phase separately and without radiation. The interaction between the iodide ions and silver particles requires a preliminary oxidation step of the silver particles the rate of which depends on the pH, the temperature and the liquid oxygen concentration. A kinetic model including two independent stoichiometries allows to represent correctly the whole experimental runs. At pH = 3, the chemical interactions between molecular iodine and silver particles do not require an oxidation step and a second order kinetic model is able to represent the experimental results considering the operating conditions studied. (authors)

  10. Laccases immobilized on mesoporous silica particles and their application in a continuous stirred reactor for the elimination of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Rakesh; Demarche, Philippe; Junghanns, Charles; Agathos, Spiros N.; Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology in the frame of the Knowledge-Based Bio and Green Economy (EMB2012)

    2012-01-01

    Immobilization of enzymes increases stability of enzymes and their re-use in multiple cycles. Mesoporous silicates (MPs) is an established support for enzyme immobilization with respect to the requirements for enzyme carriers such as high surface area, chemical and thermal stability, uniform pore distribution, high adsorption capacity, ordered porous network, mechanical strength and toxicological safety. Organic micropollutants present in wastewater at very low concentrations such as the plas...

  11. Plasma reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Bertrán Serra, Enric

    2008-01-01

    [EN] A plasma reactor that can operate in a wide pressure range, from vacuum and low pressures to atmospheric pressure and higher pressures. The plasma reactor is also able to regulate other important settings and can be used for processing a wide range of different samples, such as relatively large samples or samples with rough surfaces.

  12. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  13. Semi-empirical chemical model for indirect advanced oxidation of Acid Orange 7 using an unmodified carbon fabric cathode for H2O2 production in an electrochemical reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, B; Rondán, V; Ortiz-Hernández, L; Silva-Martínez, S; Alvarez-Gallegos, A

    2016-04-15

    A commercial Unidirectional Carbon Fabric piece was used to design an electrode for the cathodic O2 reduction reaction in a divided (by a Nafion(®) 117 membrane) parallel plate reactor. The anode was a commercial stainless steel mesh. Under this approach it is feasible to produce H2O2 at low energy (2.08 kWh kg(-1) H2O2) in low ionic acidic medium. In the catholyte side the H2O2 can be activated with Fe(2+) to develop the Fenton reagent. It was found that Acid Orange 7 (AO7) indirect oxidation (in the concentration range of 0.12-0.24 mM) by Fenton chemistry follows a first order kinetic equation. The energy required for 0.24 mM AO7 degradation is 1.04 kWhm(-3). From each experimental AO7 oxidation the main parameters (a, mM and k, min(-1)) of the first order kinetic equation are obtained. These parameters can be correlated with AO7 concentration in the concentration range studied. Based on this method a semi-empirical chemical model was developed to predict the AO7 abatement, by means of Fenton chemistry. Good AO7 oxidation predictions can be made in the concentration range studied. A detailed discussion of the energy required for oxidizing AO7 and the accuracy of the chemical model to predict its oxidation is included in this paper. PMID:26874037

  14. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  15. Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation is relatively new reactor dosimetry method and the number of relevant papers is rather small. Some difficulties in applying standard methods (chemical dosemeters, ionization chambers) exist because of the complexity of radiation. In general application of calorimetric dosemeters for measuring absorbed doses is most precise. In addition to adequate choice of calorimetric bodies there is a possibility of determining the yields of each component of the radiation mixture in the total absorbed dose. This paper contains a short review of the basic calorimetry methods and some results of measurements at the RA reactor in Vinca performed by isothermal calorimeter

  16. Iodine releases from reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The airborne releases of iodine from water reactor accidents are small fractions of the available iodine and occur only slowly. However, in reactor accidents in which water is absent, the release of iodine to the environment can be large and rapid. These differences in release fraction and rate are related to the chemical states attained by iodine under the accident conditions. It is clear that neither rapid issue of blocking KI nor rapid evacuation of the surrounding population is required to protect the public from the radioiodine released in the event of a major water reactor accident

  17. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  18. Numerical Simulation of Fixed-Bed Catalytic Reforming Reactors: Hydrodynamics / Chemical Kinetics Coupling Simulation numérique des réacteurs de reformage catalytique en lit fixe : couplage hydrodynamique-cinétique chimique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferschneider G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fixed bed reactors with a single fluid phase are widely used in the refining or petrochemical industries for reaction processes catalysed by a solid phase. The design criteria for industrial reactors are relatively well known. However, they rely on a one-dimensional writing and on the separate resolution of the equation of conservation of mass and energy, and of momentum. Thus, with complex geometries, the influence of hydrodynamics on the effectiveness of the catalyst bed cannot be taken into account. The calculation method proposed is based on the multi-dimensional writing and the simultaneous resolution of the local conservation equations. The example discussed concerns fixed-bed catalytic reactors. These reactors are distinguished by their annular geometry and the radial circulation of the feedstock. The flow is assumed to be axisymmetric. The reaction process is reflected by a simplified kinetic mechanism involving ten chemical species. Calculation of the hydrodynamic (mean velocities, pressure, thermal and mass fields (concentration of each species serves to identify the influence of internal components in two industrial reactor geometries. The map of the quantity of coke formed and deposited on the catalyst, calculated by the model, reveals potential areas of poor operation. Les réacteurs à lit fixe avec une seule phase fluide sont largement utilisés dans l'industrie du raffinage et de la pétrochimie, pour mettre en oeuvre un processus réactionnel catalysé par une phase solide. Les règles de conception des réacteurs industriels sont relativement bien connues. Cependant, elles reposent sur l'écriture monodimensionnelle et la résolution séparée, d'une part, des équations de conservation de la masse et de l'énergie et d'autre part, de la quantité de mouvement. Ainsi dans le cas de géométries complexes, l'influence de l'hydrodynamique sur l'efficacité du lit catalytique ne peut être prise en compte. La méthode de calcul

  19. Problems of mathematical modeling of thermal-hydraulic and water-chemical processes in steam generators of NPPs with WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical model describing conditions of steam generator washing-out by chelates was used to consider problems of modelling of thermal-hydraulic and water-chemical processes in PGV-1000 steam generators. Steam generator is divided into 80 sections because the design features of steam generator are responsible for sufficient irregularities of thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics over its cross section. To describe process kinetics each section is supplied with its own system of differential equations. The structure of hydrodynamic overflows in steam generator volume was determined on the basis of three-dimensional model of steam generator taking into account the nonideal character of displacement. It is concluded that PGV steam generator contains regions, where circulation water flows converge, and where accumulation of impurities is possible

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  2. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This draft chart contains graphical symbols from which the type of (nuclear) reactor can be seen. They will serve as illustrations for graphical sketches. Important features of the individual reactor types are marked out graphically. The user can combine these symbols to characterize a specific reactor type. The basic graphical symbol is a square with a point in the centre. Functional groups can be depicted for closer specification. If two functional groups are not clearly separated, this is symbolized by a dotted line or a channel. Supply and discharge lines for coolant, moderator and fuel are specified in accordance with DIN 2481 and can be further specified by additional symbols if necessary. The examples in the paper show several different reactor types. (orig./AK)

  3. Expeditious method to determine uranium in the process control samples of chemical plant separating (233)U from thoria irradiated in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedari, C S; Kharwandikar, B K; Banerjee, K

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of U in the samples containing a significant proportion of (232)U and high concentration of Th is of great concern. Transmutation of Th in the nuclear power reactor produces a notable quantity of (232)U (half life 68.9 years) along with fissile isotope (233)U. The decay series of (232)U is initiated with (228)Th (half life 1.9 year) and it is followed by several short lived α emitting progenies, (224)Ra, (220)Rn, (216)Po, (212)Bi and (212)Po. Even at the smallest contamination of (228)Th in the sample, a very high pulse rate of α emission is obtained, which is to be counted for the radiometric determination of [U]. A commercially available anionic type of extractant Alamine®336 is used to obtain the selective extraction of U from other alpha active elements and fission products present in the sample. Experimental conditions of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are optimized for obtaining maximum decontamination and recovery of U in the organic phase. The effect of some interfering ionic impurities in the sample on the process of separation is investigated. Depending on the level of the concentration of U in the samples, spectrophotometry or radiometry methods are adopted for its determination after separation by LLE. Under optimized experimental conditions, i.e. 5.5M HCl in the aqueous phase and 0.27M Alamin®336 in the organic phase, the recovery of U is about 100%, the decontamination factor with respect to Th is >2000 and the extraction of fission products like (90)Sr, (144)Ce and (134,137)Cs is negligible. The detection limit for [U] using α radiometry is 10mg/L, even in presence of >100g/L of Th in the sample. Accuracy and precision for the determination of U is also assessed. Reproducibility of results is within 5%. This method shows very good agreement with the results obtained by mass spectrometry. PMID:27591623

  4. Multifunctional reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much emphasis in research in the last decade. A survey is given of modern developments and the first successful applications on a large scale. It is explained why their application in many instances is ...

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  7. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components

  8. Research reactors - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and uppermost part of the Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Test Reactors Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex sequence of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds underlies the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Test Reactors Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho. Wells drilled to a depth of 700 feet penetrate a sequence of 23 basalt-flow groups and 15 to 20 sedimentary interbeds that range in age from 200,000 to 640,000 years. The 23 flow groups consist of about 40 separate basalt flows and flow units. Each flow group is made up of one to three petrographically similar basalt flows that erupted from related source areas during periods of less than 200 years. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated during periods of volcanic inactivity ranging from thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. Multiple flow groups and sedimentary interbeds of similar age and source form seven composite stratigraphic units with distinct upper and lower contacts. Composite units older than 350,000 years were tilted, folded, and fractured by differential subsidence and uplift. Basalt and sediment of this sequence are unsaturated to a depth that ranges from 430 to 480 feet below land surface. Basalt and sediment in the lower part of the sequence are saturated and make up the uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer. Stratigraphic relations in the lowermost part of the aquifer below a depth of 700 feet are uncertain. 23 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab

  10. Iodine release characteristic in reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the chemical behavior for the iodine release from the fuel element in nuclear reactor accidents, partition coefficient in the water and air and the release characteristic in time. The research of the iodine release was suggested

  11. Reactor utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1962, the RA reactor was operated almost three times more than in 1961, producing total of 25 555 MWh. Diagram containing comparative data about reactor operation for 1960, 1961, and 1962, percent of fuel used and U-235 burnup shows increase in reactor operation. Number of samples irradiated was 659, number of experiments done was 16. mean powered level was 5.93 MW. Fuel was added into the core twice during the reporting year. In fact the core was increased from 56 to 68 fuel channels and later to 84 fuel channels. Fuel was added to the core when the reactivity worth decreased to the minimum operation level due to burnup. In addition to this 5 central fuel channels were exchanged with fresh fuel in february for the purpose of irradiation in the VISA-2 channel

  12. Reactor Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T; Lasserre, Thierry; Sobel, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrino oscillation physics in the last years. It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the last undetermined neutrino mixing angle theta13. We conclude by opening on possible use of neutrinos for Society: NonProliferation of Nuclear materials and Geophysics.

  13. Computational Modeling of Multiphase Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, J B; Nandakumar, K

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase reactors are very common in chemical industry, and numerous review articles exist that are focused on types of reactors, such as bubble columns, trickle beds, fluid catalytic beds, etc. Currently, there is a high degree of empiricism in the design process of such reactors owing to the complexity of coupled flow and reaction mechanisms. Hence, we focus on synthesizing recent advances in computational and experimental techniques that will enable future designs of such reactors in a more rational manner by exploring a large design space with high-fidelity models (computational fluid dynamics and computational chemistry models) that are validated with high-fidelity measurements (tomography and other detailed spatial measurements) to provide a high degree of rigor. Understanding the spatial distributions of dispersed phases and their interaction during scale up are key challenges that were traditionally addressed through pilot scale experiments, but now can be addressed through advanced modeling. PMID:26134737

  14. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor has a large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. A reactor core assembly of a plurality of fluid-tight fuel elements is located within a water-filled tank. Each fuel element contains a solid homogeneous mixture of 50-79 w/o zirconium hydride, 20-50 w/o uranium and 0.5-1.5 W erbium. The uranium is not more than 20 percent enriched, and the ratio of hydrogen atoms to zirconium atoms is between 1.5:1 and 7:1. The core has a long lifetime, E.G., at least about 1200 days

  15. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a liquid cooled nuclear reactor, the combination is described for a single-walled vessel containing liquid coolant in which the reactor core is submerged, and a containment structure, primarily of material for shielding against radioactivity, surrounding at least the liquid-containing part of the vessel with clearance therebetween and having that surface thereof which faces the vessel make compatible with the liquid, thereby providing a leak jacket for the vessel. The structure is preferably a metal-lined concrete vault, and cooling means are provided for protecting the concrete against reaching a temperature at which damage would occur. (U.S.)

  16. Thermochemical data for reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a computer database of thermochemical properties of nuclear reactor materials to be used for source term calculations in reactor accident codes. In the first part, the structure and the content of the computer file is described. In the second part a set of thermochemical data is presented pertaining to chemical reactions occurring during severe nuclear reactor accidents and involving fuel (uranium dioxide), fission products and structural materials. These data are complementary to those collected in the databook recently published by Cordfunke and Potter after a study supported by the Commission of the European Communities. The present data were collected from review articles and databanks and follow a discussion on the uncertainties and errors involved in the calculation of complex chemical equilibria in the extrapolated temperature range

  17. Microstructured Reactors for Electroorganic Synthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouzek, K.; Jiřičný, Vladimír; Kodým, R.; Křišťál, Jiří; Bystroň, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 7 (2010), s. 8172-8181. ISSN 0013-4686. [Annual Meeting of ISE /60./. Beijing, 16.08.2009-21.08.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : microstructured reactor * bipolar * electroorganic synthesis Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.642, year: 2010

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an improved reactor core for a high conversion BWR reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type rector, FEBR type reactor, etc., two types of fuel assemblies are loaded such that fuel assemblies using a channel box of a smaller irradiation deformation ratio are loaded in a high conversion region, while other fuel assemblies are loaded in a burner region. This enables to suppress the irradiation deformation within an allowable limit in the high conversion region where the fast neutron flux is high and the load weight from the inside of the channel box due to the pressure loss is large. At the same time, the irradiation deformation can be restricted within an allowable limit without deteriorating the neutron economy in the burner region in which fast neutron flux is low and the load weight from the inside of the channel box is small since a channel box with smaller neutron absorption cross section or reduced wall thickness is charged. As a result, it is possible to prevent structural deformations such as swelling of the channel box, bending of the entire assemblies, bending of fuel rods, etc. (K.M.)

  19. Sodium fast reactors with closed fuel cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Raj, Baldev; Vasudeva Rao, PR 0

    2015-01-01

    Sodium Fast Reactors with Closed Fuel Cycle delivers a detailed discussion of an important technology that is being harnessed for commercial energy production in many parts of the world. Presenting the state of the art of sodium-cooled fast reactors with closed fuel cycles, this book:Offers in-depth coverage of reactor physics, materials, design, safety analysis, validations, engineering, construction, and commissioning aspectsFeatures a special chapter on allied sciences to highlight advanced reactor core materials, specialized manufacturing technologies, chemical sensors, in-service inspecti

  20. New insights into the chemical structure of Y2Ti2O7-δ nanoparticles in oxide dispersion-strengthened steels designed for sodium fast reactors by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjeck, V.; Walls, M. G.; Chaffron, L.; Malaplate, J.; March, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel with the nominal composition Fe-14Cr-1W-0.3TiH2-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) designed to withstand the extreme conditions met in Gen. IV nuclear reactors. After denoising via principal component analysis (PCA) the data are analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA) which is useful in the investigation of the physical properties and chemical structure of the material by separating the individual spectral responses. The Y-Ti-O nanoparticles are found to be homogeneously distributed in the ferritic matrix, sized from 1 to 20 nm and match a non-stoichiometric pyrochlore-Y2Ti2O7-δ structure for sizes greater than 5 nm. We show that they adopt a (Y-Ti-O)-Cr core-shell structure and that Cr also segregates at the matrix grain boundaries, which may slightly modify the corrosion properties of the steel. Using Ti-L2,3 and O-K fine structure (ELNES) the Ti oxidation state is shown to vary from the center of the nanoparticles to their periphery, from Ti4+ in distorted Oh symmetry to a valency often lower than 3+. The sensitivity of the Ti "white lines" ELNES to local symmetry distortions is also shown to be useful when investigating the strain induced in the nanoparticles by the surrounding matrix. The Cr-shell and the variation of the Ti valence state highlight a complex nanoparticle-matrix interface.

  1. New insights into the chemical structure of Y2Ti2O7−δ nanoparticles in oxide dispersion-strengthened steels designed for sodium fast reactors by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we study by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1W–0.3TiH2–0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) designed to withstand the extreme conditions met in Gen. IV nuclear reactors. After denoising via principal component analysis (PCA) the data are analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA) which is useful in the investigation of the physical properties and chemical structure of the material by separating the individual spectral responses. The Y–Ti–O nanoparticles are found to be homogeneously distributed in the ferritic matrix, sized from 1 to 20 nm and match a non-stoichiometric pyrochlore-Y2Ti2O7−δ structure for sizes greater than 5 nm. We show that they adopt a (Y–Ti–O)–Cr core–shell structure and that Cr also segregates at the matrix grain boundaries, which may slightly modify the corrosion properties of the steel. Using Ti-L2,3 and O-K fine structure (ELNES) the Ti oxidation state is shown to vary from the center of the nanoparticles to their periphery, from Ti4+ in distorted Oh symmetry to a valency often lower than 3+. The sensitivity of the Ti “white lines” ELNES to local symmetry distortions is also shown to be useful when investigating the strain induced in the nanoparticles by the surrounding matrix. The Cr-shell and the variation of the Ti valence state highlight a complex nanoparticle–matrix interface

  2. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  3. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor container has a suppression chamber partitioned by concrete side walls, a reactor pedestal and a diaphragm floor. A plurality of partitioning walls are disposed in circumferential direction each at an interval inside the suppression chamber, so that independent chambers in a state being divided into plurality are formed inside the suppression chamber. The partition walls are formed from the bottom portion of the suppression chamber up to the diaphragm floor to isolate pool water in a divided state. Operation platforms are formed above the suppression chamber and connected to an access port. Upon conducting maintenance, inspection or repairing, a pump is disposed in the independent chamber to transfer pool water therein to one or a plurality of other independent chambers to make it vacant. (I.N.)

  4. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a structure of ABWR-type reactor buildings, which can increase the capacity of a spent fuel storage area at a low cost and improved earthquake proofness. In the reactor building, the floor of a spent fuel pool is made flat, and a depth of the pool water satisfying requirement for shielding is ensured. In addition, a depth of pool water is also maintained for a equipment provisionally storing pool for storing spent fuels, and a capacity for a spent fuel storage area is increased by utilizing surplus space of the equipment provisionally storing pool. Since the flattened floor of the spent fuel pool is flushed with the floor of the equipment provisionally storing pool, transfer of horizontal loads applied to the building upon occurrence of earthquakes is made smooth, to improve earthquake proofness of the building. (T.M.)

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor cooled by a freezable liquid has a vessel for containing said liquid and comprising a structure shaped as a container, and cooling means in the region of the surface of said structure for effecting freezing of said liquid coolant at and for a finite distance from said surface for providing a layer of frozen coolant on and supported by said surface for containing said liquid coolant. In a specific example, where the reactor is sodium-cooled, the said structure is a metal-lined concrete vault, cooling is effected by closed cooling loops containing NaK, the loops extending over the lined surface of the concrete vault with outward and reverse pipe runs of each loop separated by thermal insulation, and air is flowed through cooling pipes embedded in the concrete behind the metal lining. 7 claims, 3 figures

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.B.

    1960-01-01

    A reactor is described which comprises a tank, a plurality of coaxial steel sleeves in the tank, a mass of water in the tank, and wire grids in abutting relationship within a plurality of elongated parallel channels within the steel sleeves, the wire being provided with a plurality of bends in the same plane forming adjacent parallel sections between bends, and the sections of adjacent grids being normally disposed relative to each other.

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactor has got fuel subassemblies which are bundled and enclosed by a common can. In order to reduce bending of the sides of the can because of the load caused by the coolant pressure the can has got a dodecagon-shaped crosssection. The surfaces of the can may be of equal width. One out of two surfaces may also be convex towards the center. (RW)

  8. High-temperature and breeder reactors - economic nuclear reactors of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis begins with a review of the theory of nuclear fission and sections on the basic technology of nuclear reactors and the development of the first generation of gas-cooled reactors applied to electricity generation. It then deals in some detail with currently available and suggested types of high temperature reactor and with some related subsidiary issues such as the coupling of different reactor systems and various schemes for combining nuclear reactors with chemical processes (hydrogenation, hydrogen production, etc.), going on to discuss breeder reactors and their application. Further sections deal with questions of cost, comparison of nuclear with coal- and oil-fired stations, system analysis of reactor systems and the effect of nuclear generation on electricity supply. (C.J.O.G.)

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector having high sensitivity to fast neutrons and having low sensitivity to thermal neutrons is disposed for reducing influences of neutron detector signals on detection values of neutron fluxes when the upper end of control rod pass in the vicinity of the neutron flux detector. Namely, the change of the neutron fluxes is greater in the thermal neutron energy region while it is smaller in the fast neutron energy region. This is because the neutron absorbing cross section of B-10 used as neutron absorbers of control rods is greater in the thermal neutron region and it is smaller in the fast neutron region. As a result, increase of the neutron detection signals along with the local neutron flux change can be reduced, and detection signals corresponding to the reactor power can be obtained. Even when gang withdrawal of operating a plurality of control rods at the same time is performed, the reactor operation cycle can be measured accurately, thereby enabling to shorten the reactor startup time. (N.H.)

  10. The optimal design of chemical reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Aris, Rutherford

    1961-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank mat

  11. Kinetics and Product Selectivity (Yield) of Second Order Competitive Consecutive Reactions in Fed-Batch Reactor and Plug Flow Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Selvamony, Subash Chandra Bose

    2013-01-01

    This literature compares the performance of second order competitive consecutive reaction in Fed-Batch Reactor with that in continuous Plug Flow Reactor. In a kinetic sense, this simulation study aims to develop a case for continuous Plug Flow Reactor in pharmaceutical, fine chemical, and related other chemical industries. MATLAB is used to find solutions for the differential equations. The simulation results show that, for certain cases of nonelementary scenario, product selectivity is highe...

  12. Study of isotopic exchange reactors (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the general case of the theory of first-order isotopic chemical exchange between a gaseous and a liquid phase in a reactor, starting from fundamental reaction kinetics data, and without making any limiting hypothesis concerning the value of the separation factor. The cases of counter-current reactors and of co-current reactors are considered successively. The general deuterium conservation equation requires the definition of the quotient of the reactor; the performances of this reactor are characterised by its overall efficiency. The idea of the ratio is introduced because it represents a convenient intermediary in the calculations. The search for an additive value for reactors in series leads logically to the defining of an exchange capacity, and a total efficiency, or number of theoretical reactors. This method of expressing the performances of a reactor is more general than the efficiency due to Murphee which only has a physical significance in the particular case of homogeneous liquid reactors. The relationships between these various quantities are established, and the representation due to Mc Cabe and Thiele is generalized. The reactor performances are linked to the first - order reaction kinetics by the transfer number. The relationships are given for a certain number of concrete cases. Finally the application of these calculations is given, together with the approximations necessary in the case where, because of the presence of several components in each phase, the exchange reaction no longer obeys a single kinetic law. (authors)

  13. Decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors of WWR-S type were built in countries under Soviet influence in '60, last century and consequently reached their service life. Decommissioning implies removal of all radioactive components, processing, conditioning and final disposal in full safety of all sources on site of radiological pollution. The WWR-S reactor at Bucuresti-Magurele was put into function in 1957 and operated until 1997 when it was stopped and put into conservation in view of decommissioning. Presented are three decommissioning variants: 1. Reactor shut-down for a long period (30-50 years) what would entail a substantial decrease of contamination with lower costs in dismantling, mechanical, chemical and physical processing followed by final disposal of the radioactive wastes. The drawback of this solution is the life prolongation of a non-productive nuclear unit requiring funds for personnel, control, maintenance, etc; 2. Decommissioning in a single stage what implies large funds for a immediate investment; 3. Extending the operation on a series of stages rather phased in time to allow a more convenient flow of funds and also to gather technical solutions, better than the present ones. This latter option seems to be optimal for the case of the WWR-S Research at Bucharest-Magurele Reactor. Equipment and technologies should be developed in order to ensure the technical background of the first operations of decommissioning: equipment for scarification, dismantling, dismemberment in a highly radioactive environment; cutting-to-pieces and disassembling technologies; decontamination modern technologies. Concomitantly, nuclear safety and quality assurance regulations and programmes, specific to decommissioning projects should be implemented, as well as a modern, coherent and reliable system of data acquisition, recording and storing. Also the impact of decommissioning must be thoroughly evaluated. The national team of specialists will be assisted by IAEA experts to ensure the

  14. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor VGR-50 for power-technological use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VGR-50 reactor is the first experimental commercial prototype of a reactor with continuous fuel circulation in the reactor core. The development of the reactor design is described together with is use for electricity production and as a source of radiations for radio-chemical and energo-technological processes. (U.K.)

  15. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type nuclear reactor, the number of first fuel assemblies (uranium) loaded in a reactor core is smaller than that of second fuel assemblies (mixed oxide), the average burnup degree upon take-out of the first fuel assemblies is reduced to less than that of the second fuel assemblies, and the number of the kinds of the fuel rods constituting the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than that of the fuel rods constituting the second fuel assemblies. As a result, the variety of the plutonium enrichment degree is reduced to make the distribution of the axial enrichment degree uniform, thereby enabling to simplify the distribution of the enrichment degree. Then the number of molding fabrication steps for MOX fuel assemblies can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost for molding and fabrication. (N.H.)

  16. Types of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation is based on the following areas: Types of Nuclear Reactors, coolant, moderator, neutron spectrum, fuel type, pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor pressurized heavy water (PHWR), gas-cooled reactor, RBMK , Nuclear Electricity Generation,Challenges in Nuclear Technology Deployment,EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR.

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  18. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  19. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  20. The Indian high temperature reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), in India, is currently developing concepts of high temperature nuclear reactors capable of supplying process heat at a temperature around 873-1273K. These nuclear reactors are being developed with the objective of providing energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Under the programme, currently India is developing a Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR) as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. CHTR is mainly 233U-thorium fuelled, lead-bismuth cooled and beryllium oxide moderated reactor. This reactor, initially being developed to generate about 100 kW(th) power, will have a core life of around 15 years and will have several advanced passive safety features to enable its operation as compact power pack in remote areas not connected to the electrical grid. The reactor is being designed to operate at 1273K, to facilitate demonstration of technologies for high temperature process heat applications such as hydrogen production by splitting water through high efficiency thermo-chemical process. Molten lead based coolant has been selected for the reactor so as to achieve a higher level of safety. For this reactor, developmental work in the areas of fuel, structural materials, coolant technologies, and passive systems are being done in BARC. Experimental facilities are being set up to demonstrate associated technologies. In parallel, design work has been initiated for the development of a 600 MW(th) High Temperature Reactor for commercial hydrogen production by high temperature thermo-chemical water splitting processes. Technologies being developed for CHTR would be utilized for the development of this reactor. Various analytical studies have been carried out in order to compare different options as regards fuel configuration and coolants. Initial studies carried out indicate selection of pebble bed reactor configuration with either lead or molten salt-based cooling by

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover gas spaces for primary coolant vessel, such as a reactor container, a pump vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger vessel are in communication with each other by an inverted U-shaped pressure conduit. A transmitter and a receiver are disposed to the pressure conduit at appropriate positions. If vibration frequencies (pressure vibration) from low frequency to high frequency are generated continuously from the transmitter to the inside of the communication pipe, a resonance phenomenon (air-column resonance oscillation) is caused by the inherent frequency or the like of the communication pipe. The frequency of the air-column resonance oscillation is changed by the inner diameter and the clogged state of the pipelines. Accordingly, by detecting the change of the air-column oscillation characteristics by the receiver, the clogged state of the flow channels in the pipelines can be detected even during the reactor operation. With such procedures, steams of coolants flowing entrained by the cover gases can be prevented from condensation and coagulation at a low temperature portion of the pipelines, otherwise it would lead clogging in the pipelines. (I.N.)

  2. Testing of the Micro-Reactor System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beneš, Ondřej; Hanková, Libuše; Klusoň, Petr; Šolcová, Olga

    Bratislava: Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering, 2015 - (Markoš, J.), s. 40 ISBN 978-80-89475-14-8. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /42./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 25.05.2015-29.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14228S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : micro-reactor technology * testing * partial oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  3. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units

  4. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-21

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units. (MOW)

  5. Solar chemical heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a solar chemical heat pipe was studied using CO2 reforming of methane as a vehicle for storage and transport of solar energy. The endothermic reforming reaction was carried out in an Inconel reactor, packed with a Rh catalyst. The reactor was suspended in an insulated box receiver which was placed in the focal plane of the Schaeffer Solar Furnace of the Weizman Institute of Science. The exothermic methanation reaction was run in a 6-stage adiabatic reactor filled with the same Rh catalyst. Conversions of over 80% were achieved for both reactions. In the closed loop mode the products from the reformer and from the metanator were compressed into separate storage tanks. The two reactions were run either separately or 'on-line'. The complete process was repeated for over 60 cycles. The overall performance of the closed loop was quite satisfactory and scale-up work is in progress in the Solar Tower. (authors). 35 refs., 2 figs

  6. Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical pr...

  7. Flow Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The twelve principles of Green Chemistry presented by Anastas and Warner provide the philosophical basis and identify potential areas to increase the level of greenness in designing or implementing chemical reactions in the pharmaceutical industry. With these efforts in mind, the...

  8. Flow Simulation and Optimization of Plasma Reactors for Coal Gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冀春俊; 张英姿; 马腾才

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a 3-d numerical simulation system to analyze the complicatedflow in plasma reactors for coal gasification, which involve complex chemical reaction, two-phaseflow and plasma effect. On the basis of analytic results, the distribution of the density, tempera-ture and components' concentration are obtained and a different plasma reactor configuration isproposed to optimize the flow parameters. The numerical simulation results show an improvedconversion ratio of the coal gasification. Different kinds of chemical reaction models are used tosimulate the complex flow inside the reactor. It can be concluded that the numerical simulationsystem can be very useful for the design and optimization of the plasma reactor.

  9. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent shocks exerted on a vent head due to pool-swell caused within a pressure suppression chamber (disposed in a torus configuration around the dry well) upon loss of coolant accident in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The following relationship is established between the volume V (m3) of a dry well and the ruptured opening area A (m2) at the boundary expected upon loss of coolant accident: V >= 30340 (m) x A Then, the volume of the dry well is made larger than the ruptured open area, that is, the steam flow rate of leaking coolants upon loss of coolant accident to decrease the pressure rise in the dry well at the initial state where loss of coolant accident is resulted. Accordingly, the pressure of non-compressive gases jetted out from the lower end of the downcomer to the pool water is decreased to suppress the pool-swell. (Ikeda, J.)

  10. Tritium Behaviour in the Fusion Reactor Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Pajuste, Elīna

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Doctoral thesis is devoted to the development of future energy source nuclear fusion. The objective of this research is to evaluate fusion reactor material suitability regarding their behaviour and tritium retention in the fusion reactor relevant conditions. Methods and technique developed in the UL Institute of Chemical Physics Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solid State has been used in this study. Synergetic facilitating effect of accelerated electrons and high magnetic fi...

  11. Investigation of Design Parameters in Ultrasound Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Jordens, Jeroen; Degrève, Jan; Braeken, Leen; Van Gerven, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The cavitational activity of a tubular sonoreactor was simulated and related to the chemical reaction rate in order to study the effect of different design parameters. The conversion was improved with a factor 10 by optimization of the reactor diameter. Further improvement of the conversion with 20% was achieved by shifting the transducers apart. When the reactor diameter is in the millimeter scale, stainless steel and borosilicate glass walls very well resemble sound-hard walls. The impact o...

  12. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  13. Optimizing Reactors Selection and Sequencing:Minimum Cost versus Minimum Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachid Chebbi

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation targets minimum cost of reactors in series for the case of one single chemical reaction, considering plug flow and stirred tank reactor(s) in the sequence of flow reactors. Using Guthrie’s cost correlations three typical cases were considered based on the profile of the reaction rate reciprocal versus conversion. Significant differences were found compared to the classical approach targeting minimum total reactor volume.

  14. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. Emphasize is put essentially on the fuel salt of the primary circuit inside which fission reactions occur. The reasons why the (LiF-BeF2-ThF4-UF4) salt was chosen for the M.S.B.R. concept are examined; the physical, physicochemical and chemical properties of this salt are discussed with its interactions with the structural materials and its evolution in time. An important part of this volume is devoted to the continuous reprocessing of the active salt, the project designers having deemed advisable to take advantage at best from the availability of a continuous purification, in a thermal breeding. The problem of tritium formation and distribution inside the reactor is also envisaged and the fundamentals of the chemistry of the secondary coolant salt are given. The solutions proposed are: the hydrogen scavenging of the primary circuit, a reduction in metal permeability by an oxyde layer deposition on the side in contact with the vapor, and tritium absorption through an isotope exchange with the hydroxifluoroborate

  15. Space reactor shield technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor shield mass contributes a large portion (10% to 25%) to the total mass of an unmanned reactor system. Different shield materials are required to attenuate neutrons and gamma rays and still obtain a minimum mass. The shield material selection should also consider structural characteristics, physical and chemical properties, fabricability and availability. Minimum mass is achieved by using a shadow shield. Neutron capture gamma ray and heat generation are extremely important considerations. Lithium hydride was selected for the neutron shield material due to its excellent properties. It has to be canned and may be compartmentalized to reduce the probability of complete shielding effectiveness loss due to meteoroid puncture of the can. The initial shield design was based on previous SNAP shield design experience. The Monte Carlo Neutron Photon code, which includes the radiation scattering with the radiator and power conversion system, was then used to ensure that the design requirements were met. Fabrication of the shield by casting techniques is recommended to maintain shield integrity during vibration and to accommodate complex penetrations. A method for casting full-scale shields is described

  16. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  17. Survey of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  18. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  19. RB reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical fluctuations of reactivity represent reactor noise. Analysis of reactor noise enables determining a series of reactor kinetic parameters. Fluctuations of power was measured by ionization chamber placed next to the tank of the RB reactor. The signal was digitized by an analog-digital converter. After calculation of the mean power, 3000 data obtained by sampling were analysed

  20. Seclazone Reactor Modeling And Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinga, T. [ETH-Zuerich (Switzerland); Olalde, G. [CNRS Odeillo (France); Steinfeld, A. [PSI and ETHZ (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model is formulated for the SOLZINC solar chemical reactor for the production of Zn by carbothermal reduction of ZnO. The model involves solving, by the finite-volume technique, a 1D unsteady state energy equation that couples heat transfer to the chemical kinetics for a shrinking packed bed exposed to thermal radiation. Validation is accomplished by comparison with experimentally measured temperature profiles and Zn production rates as a function of time, obtained for a 5-kW solar reactor tested at PSI's solar furnace. (author)

  1. Radiation damage of light water reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor materials and irradiation conditions have changed as reactor types advanced from light water reactors to fast breeder reactors and future nuclear fusion reactors, but the physical and chemical processes of irradiation damage at the final stage of service of the structural materials of light water reactors must be studied more in detail. The research on the secular change of LWR materials under irradiation is regarded as most important. Especially in the problems of the embrittlement of pressure vessels, the irradiation damage of in-core structures, and the irradiation growth and creep of zircaloy, it has become more important to continuously evaluate the secular deterioration and assure the soundness, and to elucidate the process of microstructure chanage of the materials under irradiation for forecasting the life. The structure and the materials of light water reactors are explained. The neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels must be forecast more accurately as the years of operation elapse. The factors affecting the irradiation embrittlement are described. The physical model and the microstructure of the irradiation embittlement are shown. As for in-core structures, intergranular stress corrosion cracking is discussed. As for zirconium alloy, the factors affecting the irradiation creep and growth are explained. (K.I.)

  2. Fundamentals of chemical reaction engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate for a one-semester undergraduate or first-year graduate course, this text introduces the quantitative treatment of chemical reaction engineering. It covers both homogeneous and heterogeneous reacting systems and examines chemical reaction engineering as well as chemical reactor engineering. The authors take a chemical approach, helping students develop an intuitive feeling for concepts, rather than an engineering approach, which tends to overlook the inner workings of systems and objects.Each chapter contains numerous worked-out problems and real-world vignettes involving commercia

  3. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  4. Industrial applications of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Harmsen, G.J.; Chewter, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    To reveal trends in the design and operation of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors, this paper describes, in historical sequence, three industrial applications of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors developed and operated by Shell Chemicals during the last five decades. For each case, we describe the design requirements, the design knowledge that was used and how the reactor was designed conceptually. In addition, we also indicate what development methods, models and tools were applied...

  5. Thermodynamic characterization of salt components for Molten Salt Reactor fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Capelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a promising future nuclear fission reactor technology with excellent performance in terms of safety and reliability, sustainability, proliferation resistance and economics. For the design and safety assessment of this concept, it is extremely important to have a thorough knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of molten fluorides salts, which are one of the best options for the reactor fuel. This dissertation presents the thermodynamic description of the ...

  6. Modelling and control design for SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work presents a complete model of the SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence. The dynamics of the reactor were explored pointing out the different scales of the rates in the system: slow microbial metabolism against fast chemical reaction and mass transfer. Likewise, the analysis of the dynamics contributed to establish qualitatively the requirements for control of the reactors, both for regulation...

  7. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  8. Introduction of Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces development, status, supply and demand and resource of nuclear reactor. It deals with basic knowledge of nuclear reactor, which are reactor system, heat recovery in reactor core, structural feature in reactor, materials of structure in reactor, shielding of gamma ray, shielding of reactor, safety and environmental problem of nuclear power plant, nuclear fuel and economical efficiency of nuclear energy.

  9. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Institut fuer Kernchemie became first critical on August 3rd, 1965. It can be operated in the steady state mode with a maximum power of 100 kWth and in the pulse mode with a peak power of 250 MWth. A survey of the research programmes performed at the TRIGA Mainz is given covering applications in basic research as well as applied science in nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics. Furthermore, the reactor is used for neutron activation analysis and for education and training of scientists, teachers, students and technical personal. Important projects for the future of the TRIGA Mainz are the UCN (ultra cold neutrons) experiment, fast chemical separation, medical applications and the use of the NAA as well as the use of the reactor facility for the training of students in the fields of nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics and radiation protection. Taking into account the past and future operation schedule and the typically low burn-up of TRIGA fuel elements (∝4 g U-235/a), the reactor can be operated for at least the next decade taking into account the fresh fuel elements on stock and without changing spent fuels. (orig.)

  10. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author)

  11. Reactor dosimeter for irradiation experiments on the reactor station Geesthacht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of the reactor dosimetry is the determination of the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron flux in using irradiation. The reactor dosimetry in Geesthacht is carried out with wires or foils made of iron, nickel, cobalt, titanium, niobium, silver and with a few of their alloys. The activities of the wires or foil series are here gamma spectroscopically batchwise automatically measured with semiconductor detectors. The data obtained are firstly stored on magnetic tapes and then are evaluated on the large computer TR 440 to calculate the fluence values. Niobium probes must generally be subjected to chemical treatment prior to the measurement to separate off the interfering tantalum activity if a seperation due to the various half-lifes is not possible. The influence of the neutron spectrum on the evalutation is shown by means of examples. (orig.)

  12. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  13. Research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the divergence of the first nuclear reactor in 1942, about 600 research or test reactors have been built throughout the world. Today 255 research reactors are operating in 57 countries and about 70% are over 25 years old. Whereas there are very few reactor types for power plants because of rationalization and standardisation, there is a great diversity of research reactors. We can divide them into 2 groups: heavy water cooled reactors and light water moderated reactors. Heavy water cooled reactors are dedicated to the production of high flux of thermal neutrons which are extracted from the core by means of neutronic channels. Light water moderated reactors involved pool reactors and slightly pressurized closed reactors, they are polyvalent but their main purposes are material testing, technological irradiations, radionuclide production and neutron radiography. At the moment 8 research reactors are being built in Canada, Germany, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia and Slovakia and 8 others are planned in 7 countries (France, Indonesia, Nigeria, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand and Tunisia. Different research reactors are described: Phebus, Masurca, Phenix and Petten HFR. The general principles of nuclear safety applied to test reactors are presented. (A.C.)

  14. 04 - Sodium cooled fast breeder fourth-generation reactors - The experimental reactor ALLEGRO, the other ways for fast breeder fourth-generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors first present the technology of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors (basic principles, specific innovations, feasibility studies, fuel element, safety) and notably the ALLEGRO project (design options and expected performances, preliminary safety demonstration). Then, they present the lead-cooled fast-breeder reactor technology: interests and obstacles, return on experience, the issue of lead density, neutron assessment, transmutation potential, dosimetry, safety chemical properties and compatibility with the fuel, water, air and steels. The next part addresses the technology of molten-salt fast-breeder reactors: choice of the liquid fuel and geometry, reactor concept (difficulties, lack of past R and D), demonstration and demonstrators, international context

  15. Materials for Chemical-Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias Mattisson

    2013-01-01

    Chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) is a novel combustion technology with inherent separation of carbon dioxide. The process is a three-step process which utilizes a circulating oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel. The process utilizes two interconnected fluidized bed reactors, an air reactor and a fuel reactor. In the fuel reactor, the metal oxide decomposes with the release of gas phase oxygen (step 1), which reacts directly with the fuel through...

  16. Properties of weld deposit for butt weldings of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties of weld deposit type MnNiMo from submerged arc- and manual shielded arc weldings for reactor components, influence of chemical composition and heat treatment condition, proposal for the testing of mechanical properties for weld deposit. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent seismic vibrations of external buildings from transmitting to the side walls of a reactor container in a tank type FBR reactor building. Constitution: The reactor building is structured such that the base mat for a reactor container chamber and a reactor container is separated from the base mat for the walls of building, and gas-tight material such as silicon rubber is filled in the gap therebetween. With such a constitution, even if the crane-supporting wall vibrates violently upon occurrence of earthqualkes, the seismic vibrations do not transmit toward the reactor container chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  19. Safety problems in fast reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast neutron reactors fuels have a high proportion of plutonium and undergo severe irradiation. Risks during spent fuel reprocessing and subsequent fabrication will depend on isotopic composition, fission product content, physico-chemical form of products, quantities handled. These risks (criticality, contamination, irradiation) are listed for the different steps of the cycle and methods used to control the risks (chemical reaction yields, equipment reliability, intervention, conditions...) are indicated. Problem arising from wastes and effluents produced at each step are briefly given

  20. Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors - history and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core and also by the requirements of continuous 'on-line' reprocessing of the spent fuel. The history of Molten Salt Reactors reaches the period of fifties and sixties, when the first experimental Molten Salt Reactors were constructed and tested in ORNL (US). Several molten salt techniques dedicated to fresh molten salt fuel processing and spent fuel reprocessing were studied and developed in those days. Today, after nearly thirty years of discontinuance, a renewed interest in the Molten Salt Reactor technology is observed. Current experimental R and D activities in the area of Molten Salt Reactor technology are realized by a relatively small number of research institutions mainly in the EU, Russia and USA. The main effort is directed primarily to the development of separation processes suitable for the molten salt fuel processing and reprocessing technology. The techniques under development are molten salt/liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media, fused salt volatilization techniques and gas extraction from the molten salt medium

  1. The Partial Oxidation in Micro-Reactor System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beneš, Ondřej; Pavlorková, Jana; Klusoň, Petr; Šolcová, Olga

    Bratislava: AXIMA Graphics Design & Printing Services, 2014, s. 34 ISBN 978-80-89475-13-1. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /41./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] Grant ostatní: RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2011-00002 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : micro-reactor * micro-photo-reactor * partial oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  2. Clad-coolant chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. Low-temperature oxidation of zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (authors)

  3. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  4. Biofilm reactors for industrial bioconversion processes: employing potential of enhanced reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karcher Patrick

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent or form flocs/aggregates (also called granules without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as "biofilms." As a result of biofilm formation, cell densities in the reactor increase and cell concentrations as high as 74 gL-1 can be achieved. The reactor configurations can be as simple as a batch reactor, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, packed bed reactor (PBR, fluidized bed reactor (FBR, airlift reactor (ALR, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor, or any other suitable configuration. In UASB granular biofilm particles are used. This article demonstrates that reactor productivities in these reactors have been superior to any other reactor types. This article describes production of ethanol, butanol, lactic acid, acetic acid/vinegar, succinic acid, and fumaric acid in addition to wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactors. As the title suggests, biofilm reactors have high potential to be employed in biotechnology/bioconversion industry for viable economic reasons. In this article, various reactor types have been compared for the above bioconversion processes.

  5. Entropy generation reduction through chemical pinch analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pinch analysis (PA) concept emerged, late '80s, as one of the methods to address the energy management in the new era of sustainable development. It was derived from combined first and second law analysis, as a technique ensuring a better thermal integration, aiming the minimization of entropy production or, equivalently, exergy destruction by heat exchanger networks (HEN). Although its ascendance from the second law analysis is questionable, the PA reveals as a widespread tool, nowadays, helping in energy savings mostly through a more rational use of utilities. Unfortunately, as principal downside, one should be aware that the global minimum entropy production is seldom attained, since the PA does not tackle the whole plant letting aside the chemical reactors or separation trains. The chemical reactor network (CRN) is responsible for large amounts of entropy generation (exergy losses), mainly due to the combined composition and temperature change. The chemical pinch analysis (CPA) concept focuses on, simultaneously, the entropy generation reduction of both CRN and HEN, while keeping the state and working parameters of the plant in the range of industrial interest. The fundamental idea of CPA is to include the CRN (through the chemical reaction heat developed in reactors) into the HEN and to submit this extended system to the PA. This is accomplished by replacing the chemical reactor with a virtual heat exchanger system producing the same amount of entropy. For an endothermic non-adiabatic chemical reactor, the (stepwise infinitesimal) supply heat δq flows from a source (an external/internal heater) to the stream undergoing the chemical transformation through the reactor, which in turn releases the heat of reaction ΔHR to a virtual cold stream flowing through a virtual cooler. For an exothermic non-adiabatic chemical reactor, the replacement is likewise, but the heat flows oppositely. Thus, in the practice of designing or retrofitting a flowsheet, in order to

  6. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  7. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  8. Process heat reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consumption of heat, for industrial and domestic needs, takes up half of the national energy supply; direct utilization of the heat produced by nuclear reactors could therefore contribute to reduce the deficit in the energetic results. The restraints proper to heat consumption (dispersal and variety of consumers, irregular demand) involve the development of the heat transport system structures and adequate nuclear reactors. With this in view, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and Technicatome are developing the CAS reactor series, pressurized water reactors (PWR), (CAS 3G reactor with a power of 420 MW.th.), and the Thermos reactor (100 MW.th.), directly conceived to produce heat at 1200C and whose technology derives from the experimental pool reactors type. In order to prove the value of the Thermos design, an experimental reactor should soon be constructed in the Saclay nuclear research centre

  9. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  10. Partial oxidation of methane in the pulsed compression reactor: experiments and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, Timo; Glushenkov, Maxim; Kronberg, Alexander; Verbeek, Anton A.; Meer, van der Theo H.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Compression Reactor promises to be a compact, economical and energy efficient alternative to conventional chemical reactors. In this article, the production of synthesis gas using the Pulsed Compression Reactor is investigated. This is done experimentally as well as with simulations. The

  11. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 11, Reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the following chapters describing: Organisation of reactor operation (including operational safety, fuel management, and regulatory rules for RA reactor operation); Control and maintenance of reactor components (reactor core, nuclear fuel, heavy water and cover gas systems, mechanical structures, electric power supply system, reactor instrumentation); Quality assurance and Training of the reactor personnel

  12. The Chernobylsk reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction, the safety philosophy, the major reactor physical parameters of RBMK-1000 type reactor units and the detailed description of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident, its causes and conclusions, the efforts to reduce the consequences on the reactor site and in the surroundings are discussed based on different types of Soviet documents including the report presented to the IAEA by the Soviet Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986. (V.N.)

  13. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  14. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  15. Fusion reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of fusion reactor systems studies, the objectives of these studies are outlined and some recent conceptual reactor designs are described. The need for further studies in greater depth is indicated so that progress towards a commercial fusion reactor may be consolidated. (U.K.)

  16. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  17. Sulphur K-edge XANES and acid volatile sulphide analyses of changes in chemical speciation of S and Fe during sequential extraction of trace metals in anoxic sludge from biogas reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr; Gustavsson, Jenny; Svensson, Bo H.; Skyllberg, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The effect of sequential extraction of trace metals on sulphur (S) speciation in anoxic sludge samples from two lab-scale biogas reactors augmented with Fe was investigated. Analyses of sulphur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (S XANES) spectroscopy and acid volatile sulphide (AVS) were conducted on the residues from each step of the sequential extraction. The S speciation in sludge samples after AVS analysis was also determined by S XANES. Sulphur was mainly present as FeS (~60% o...

  18. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    contribute in improving the quality of life of the Brazilian people. The nuclear fuel cycle is a series of steps involved in the production and use of fuel for nuclear reactors. The Laboratories of Chemistry and Environmental Diagnosis Center, CQMA, support the demand of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program providing chemical characterization of uranium compounds and other related materials. In this period the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) concentrated efforts on improving equipment and systems to enable the IEA-R1 research reactor to operate at higher power, increasing the capacity of radioisotopes production, samples irradiation, tests and experiments. (author)

  19. Passive safety of the Medical Isotope Production Reactor (MIPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Medical Isotope Production Reactor (MIPR) is an aqueous homogeneous reactor designed with the minimum possible waste heat and waste radioactive products, lowest uranium consumption, and enhanced passive safety to produce medical isotopes that are based on short-lived fission products. A major product of the reactor is 99Mo, which decays to a daughter isotope, 99Tc, which can be fixed chemically to pharmaceuticals. Technetium-99 is widely used by the medical community for diagnostic purposes arising form the short half-life and desirable gamma energy of the decay. The only approved method of obtaining 99Mo for use in humans is from a fission product using chemical separation means

  20. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  1. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  4. Polarized neutron reflectometry at Dhruva reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surendra Singh; Saibal Basu

    2004-08-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) is an ideal non-destructive tool for chemical and magnetic characterization of thin films and multilayers. We have installed a position sensitive detector-based polarized neutron reflectometer at Dhruva reactor, Trombay. In this paper we will discuss the results obtained from this instrument for two multilayer samples. The first sample is a (Ni–Mo alloy)/Ti multilayer sample. We have determined the chemical structure of this multilayer by unpolarized neutron reflectometry (NR). The other sample is a Fe/Ge multilayer sample for which we obtained the chemical structure by NR and magnetic moment per Fe atom by PNR.

  5. CFD Simulation of Laboratory Scale Airlift Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Havlica, Jaromír; Růžička, Marek; Drahoš, Jiří

    Bratislava: Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering, 2008 - (Markoš, J.), s. 310 ISBN 978-80-227-2903-1. [35th International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 26.05.2008-30.05.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA ČR GA104/06/1418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : cfd simulation * airlift reactor Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  6. Chemistry in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international conference Chemistry in Water Reactors was arranged in Nice 24-27/04/1994 by the French Nuclear Energy Society. Examples of technical program areas were primary chemistry, operational experience, fundamental studies and new technology. Furthermore there were sessions about radiation field build-up, hydrogen chemistry, electro-chemistry, condensate polishing, decontamination and chemical cleaning. The conference gave the impression that there are some areas that are going to be more important than others during the next few years to come. Cladding integrity: Professor Ishigure from Japan emphasized that cladding integrity is a subject of great concern, especially with respect to waterside corrosion, deposition and release of crud. Chemistry control: The control of the iron/nickel concentration quotient seems to be not as important as previously considered. The future operation of a nuclear power plant is going to require a better control of the water chemistry than achievable today. One example of this is solubility control via regulation in BWR. Trends in USA: means an increasing use of hydrogen, minimization of SCC/IASCC, minimization of radiation fields by thorough chemistry control, guarding fuel integrity by minimization of cladding corrosion and minimization of flow assisted corrosion. Stellite replacement: The search for replacement materials will continue. Secondary side crevice chemistry: Modeling and practical studies are required to increase knowledge about the crevice chemistry and how it develops under plant operation conditions. Inhibitors: Inhibitors for IGSCC and IGA as well for the primary- (zinc) as for the secondary side (Ti) should be studied. The effects and mode of operation of the inhibitors should be documented. Chemical cleaning: of heat transfer surfaces will be an important subject. Prophylactic cleaning at regular intervals could be one mode of operation

  7. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPRTM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENATM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENATM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  8. Fluoride reactor for the destruction of actinides from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor based on liquid salts (Molten Salt Reactor - MSR) is one of 6 prospective reactors, designed in the Generation IV initiative. Fluoride in the reactor fuel is dissolved in a mixture of fluoride salts. This technology was developed in the fifties and sixties of the twentieth century. New technologies associated with this research include the Brayton cycle, which eliminates several shortcomings related to the historical construction of fluoride reactor, mainly focusing on security. When compared with other reactors, the largest differences are in the MSR that uses less fissionable material and to maintain a controlled nuclear reaction in its radius has only a homogeneous liquid mixture of all the chemical components. (author)

  9. Water chemistry management in cooling system of research reactor in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The department of research reactor presently operates three research reactors (JRR-2, JRR-3M and JRR-4). For controlling and management of water and gas in each research reactor are performed by the staffs of the research reactor technology development division. Water chemistry management of each research reactor is one of the important subject. The main objects are to prevent the corrosion of water cooling system and fuel elements, to suppress the plant radiation build-up and to minimize the radioactive waste. In this report describe a outline of each research reactor facilities, radiochemical analytical methods and chemical analytical methods for water chemistry management. (author)

  10. The Maple reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  11. High temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements

  12. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  13. A review of the United Kingdom fast reactor program - March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the United Kingdom Fast Reactor Programme was given in March 1983. Operational experience with the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) is briefly summarized. The design concept of the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR), including design codes, engineering components, materials and fuels development, chemical engineering/sodium technology, safety and reactor performance, is reviewed. The problems of PFR and CDFR fuel reprocessing are also discussed

  14. Minimizing the Entropy Production of the Methanol Producing Reaction in a Methanol Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick; Johannessen, Eivind; Rosjorde, Audun; Nummedal, Lars

    2000-01-01

    The entropy production of the reaction that produces methanol in a methanol reactor, has been minimized. The results show that the entropy production of the reaction can be reduced by more than 70%. The optimal path through the reactor is characterized by a driving force for the chemical reaction that is close to constant. The entropy production due to heat transfer across the reactor walls in this state is large, however. Variations of the reactor design show that it is possible to accomplis...

  15. Reactor Safety: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the Reactor Safety Division focuses on the development of expertise on materials behaviour under irradiation for fission and fusion oriented applications. Furthermore, as nuclear energy needs international public acceptance with respect to safety and efficient management of natural resources and wants to reduce the burden of nuclear waste, the Reactor Safety Division enhanced its efforts to develop the MYRRHA project. MYRRHA, an accelerator driven sub-critical system, might have the potential to cope in Europe with the above mentioned constraints on acceptability and might serve as a technological platform for GEN IV reactor development, in particular the Liquid Metal Fast Reactor.The Reactor Safety Division gathers three research entities that are internationally recognised: the Reactor Materials Research department, the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA department and the Instrumentation department.The objectives of Reactor Materials Research are: to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials and nuclear fuels used in present and future nuclear power industry; to perform research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material and fuel behaviour under or after irradiation; to contribute to the interpretation and modelling of the materials and fuels behaviour in order to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the Reactor Materials Research department concentrate on four distinct disciplines: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel embrittlement Stress corrosion cracking in reactor coolant environment, including Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking; Nuclear Fuel characterisation and development of new fuel types for commercial and test reactors. Development of materials for Fusion and advanced nuclear fission reactors. The safe operation of present nuclear power plants relies primarily on the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel

  16. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  17. Decommissioning of a small reactor (BR3 reactor, Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1989, SCK-CEN has been dismantling its PWR reactor BR3 (Belgian Reactor No. 3). After gaining a great deal of experience in remote dismantling of highly radioactive components during the actual dismantling of the two sets of internals, the BR3 team completed the cutting of its reactor pressure vessel (RPV). During the feasibility phase of the RPV dismantling, a decision was made to cut it under water in the refuelling pool of the plant, after having removed it from its cavity. The RPV was cut into segments using a milling cutter and a bandsaw machine. These mechanical techniques have shown their ability for this kind of operations. Prior to the segmentation, the thermal insulation situated around the RPV was remotely removed and disposed of. The paper will describe all these operations. The BR3 decommissioning activities also include the dismantling of contaminated loops and equipment. After a careful sorting of the pieces, optimized management routes are selected in order to minimize the final amount of radioactive waste to be disposed of. Some development of different methods of decontamination were carried out: abrasive blasting (or sand blasting), chemical decontamination (Oxidizing-Reducing process using Cerium). The main goal of the decontamination program is to recycle most of the metallic materials either in the nuclear world or in the industrial world by reaching the respective recycling or clearance level. Overall the decommissioning of the BR3 reactor has shown the feasibility of performing such a project in a safe and economical way. Moreover, BR3 has developed methodologies and decontamination processes to economically reduce the amount of radwaste produced. (author)

  18. Design options for a bunsen reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles

    2013-10-01

    This work is being performed for Matt Channon Consulting as part of the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA). Matt Channon Consulting has requested Sandia's assistance in the design of a chemical Bunsen reactor for the reaction of SO2, I2 and H2O to produce H2SO4 and HI with a SO2 feed rate to the reactor of 50 kg/hour. Based on this value, an assumed reactor efficiency of 33%, and kinetic data from the literature, a plug flow reactor approximately 1%E2%80%9D diameter and and 12 inches long would be needed to meet the specification of the project. Because the Bunsen reaction is exothermic, heat in the amount of approximately 128,000 kJ/hr would need to be removed using a cooling jacket placed around the tubular reactor. The available literature information on Bunsen reactor design and operation, certain support equipment needed for process operation and a design that meet the specification of Matt Channon Consulting are presented.

  19. Quantitative analysis of diamond deposition reactor efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Surface H atom densities in a diamond deposition plasma reactor and the highest predicted value (black line). A 350 μm diamond crystal grown at 70 μm/h. Highlights: ► Electron temperature measurement at high pressure in diamond deposition reactor. ► H-atom density measurements at high pressure and high power in diamond deposition reactor. ► Surface H-atom density measurements at high pressure and high power in diamond deposition reactor. ► Microwave cavity based reactor efficiency compared to others reactors. - Abstract: Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to characterize diamond deposition microwave chemical vapour deposition (MWCVD) plasmas operating at high power density. Electron temperature has been deduced from H atom emission lines while H-atom mole fraction variations have been estimated using actinometry technique, for a wide range of working conditions: pressure 25–400 hPa and MW power 600–4000 W. An increase of the pressure from 14 hPa to 400 hPa with a simultaneous increase in power causes an electron temperature decrease from 17,000 K to 10,000 K and a H atom mole fraction increase from 0.1 to up to 0.6. This last value however must be considered as an upper estimate due to some assumptions made as well as experimental uncertainties.

  20. Chemical operational experience with the water/steam-circuit at KNK II; Presentation at the meeting on Experience exchange on operational experience of fast breeder reactors, Karlsruhe/Bensberg/Kalkar, June 18. - 22. 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of sodium cooled reactors depends essentially from the safety and reliability of the sodium heated steam generator. The transition from experimental plants with 12-20 MW electrical power to larger plants with 600 MW (BN-600) or 1200 MW (Superphenix) required the change from modular components to larger and compact steam generators with up to 800 MW. Defects of these large components cause extreme losses in availability of the plant and have to be avoided. In view of this request, a comprehensive test program has been performed at KNK II in addition to the normal control of the water/steam-circuit to compile all operational data on the water and steam side of the sodium heated steam generator. This paper describes the plant and the water/steam-circuit with its mode of operation. The experience with the surveillance and different methods of the conditioning are discussed in detail in this presentation

  1. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  2. Chemical elimination of alumina in suspension in nuclear reactors heavy water; Elimination de l'alumine en suspension dans l'eau lourde des reacteurs nucleaires par voie chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledoux, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-02-01

    Corrosion of aluminium in contact with moderating water in nuclear reactor leads to the formation of an alumina hydrosol which can have an adverse effect on the operation of the reactor. Several physical methods have been used in an attempt to counteract this effect. The method proposed here consists in the elimination of the aluminium by dissolution and subsequent fixation in the ionic form on mixed-bed ion-exchange resin. In order to do this, the parameters and the values of these parameters most favorable to the dissolution process have been determined. If the moderator is heavy water, the deuterated acid can be prepared by converting a solution in heavy water to a salt of the acid using a deuterated cationic resin. (author) [French] La corrosion de l'aluminium au contact de l'eau moderatrice des reacteurs nucleaires, donne lieu a la formation d'un hydrosol d'alumine nuisible au bon fonctionnement des reacteurs. Plusieurs methodes physiques ont ete mises en oeuvre pour pallier ces inconvenients. On propose ici d'eliminer l'alumine par solubilisation pour la fixer ensuite sous forme ionique par des resines echangeuses d'ions, en lit melange. A cette fin on determine les parametres et leurs grandeurs favorables a cette solubilisation. Si le moderateur est de l'eau lourde la preparation d'acide deutere peut etre effectuee par passage d'une solution en eau lourde a un sel de l'acide sur resine cationique deuteree.

  3. Update of recent TRIGA reactor projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent activities related to several TRIGA projects are reported, including reactor upgrades, fuel processing, and instrumentation and control system upgrades at existing research reactors. The installations reported include: Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares, Bogota, Colombia; Centre National de l'Energie des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires, Rabat, Morocco; Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti, Romania. New computer-based digital instrumentation and control systems are in various stages of completion at: - Imperial Chemical Industries, Billingham, England; - University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois; - National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; - Research Centre for Nuclear Techniques, Bandung, Indonesia

  4. Membrane reactors for continuous coenzyme regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrey, C.; Wichmann, R.

    1982-12-01

    The importance of continuous coenzyme regeneration is discussed with respect to chemical reaction engineering. The benefit of coenzymes covalently bound to water soluble polymers is especially stressed. The performance of membrane reactors for coenzyme regeneration is discussed in comparison with other reactor concepts. The coenzyme dependent production of L-amino acids from the corresponding alpha-keto acids is used to illustrate how precise turnover numbers as a function of enzyme/coenzyme ratio, initial substrate concentration, and conversion are obtained. Thus, it becomes possible to develop a concept for optimal operating points with respect to enzyme, coenzyme, and substrate costs per unit weight of product.

  5. 12th Annual conference of the Nuclear Society of Russia. Research reactors: science and high technologies. Proceedings. Vol. 2. Part 3. Research reactors - present and future (Physics and engineering of research reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The part 3 of the volume 2 of the Proceedings of the 12th Annual conference of the Nuclear Society of Russia - Research reactors: science and high technologies (June 25-29, 2001, Dimitrovgrad, SRC RIAR) is presented. The scope of reports published in this part includes: projects of the pool-type reactor for heat supply and the neutron therapy centrum on the basis of the MEPhI reactor; water-chemical mode by storage of the research reactors (RR) spent fuel elements; possibility of the RR service life prolongation; material science problems on the operational control of the RR reactor core elements and heat exchangers

  6. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  7. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  8. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  9. Design for reactor core safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide covers the neutronic, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and irradiation considerations important to the safe design of a nuclear reactor core. The Guide applies to the types of thermal neutron reactor power plants that are now in common use and fuelled with oxide fuels: advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR), boiling water reactor (BWR), pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) (pressure tube and pressure vessel type) and pressurized water reactor (PWR). It deals with the individual components and systems that make up the core and associated equipment and with design provisions for the safe operation of the core and safe handling of the fuel and other core components. The Guide discusses the reactor vessel internals and the reactivity control and shutdown devices mounted on the vessel. Possible effects on requirements for the reactor coolant, the reactor coolant system and its pressure boundary (including the pressure vessel) are considered only as far as necessary to clarify the interface with the Safety Guide on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13) and other Guides. In relation to instrumentation and control systems the guidance is mainly limited to functional requirements

  10. Combustion of Corn Straw in a Fluidized-Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durda, Tomáš

    Prague : Institute of Chemical Process Fundamental of the CAS, v. v. i, 2015 - (Bendová, M.; Wagner, Z.), s. 22-23 ISBN 978-80-86186-70-2. [Bažant Postgraduate Conference 2015. Prague (CZ)] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluidized-bed reactor * combustion processes * corn straw Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  11. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  12. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.)

  13. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  14. Evaluation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of research reactors with highly enriched (93%) uranium fuel at JAERI, JRR-2 and JMTR is described. JRR-2 is a heterogeneous type of reactor, using heavy water as moderator and coolant. It uses both MTR type and cylindrical type of fuel elements. The maximum thermal power and the thermal neutron flux are 10 MW and 2x1014 n/cm2 see respectively. The reactor has been used for various experiments such as solid state physics, material irradiation, reactor fuel irradiation and radioisotope production. The JMTR is a multi-purpose tank type material testing reactor, and light water moderator and coolant, operated at 50 MW. The evaluation of lower enriched fuel and its consequences for both reactors is considered more especially

  15. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. The nuclear soliton reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic reactor physics of a completely novel nuclear fission reactor design - the soliton-reactor - is presented on the basis of a simple model. In such a reactor, the neutrons in the critical region convert either fertile material in the adjacent layers into fissile material or reduce the poisoning of fissile material in such a manner that successively new critical regions emerge. The result is an autocatalytically driven burn-up wave which propagates throughout the reactor. Thereby, the relevant characteristic spatial distributions (neutron flux, specific power density and the associated particle densities) are solitons - wave phenomena resulting from non-linear partial differential equations which do not change their shape during propagation. A qualitativley new kind of harnessing nuclear fission energy may become possible with fuel residence times comparable with the useful lifetime of the reactor system. In the long run, fast breeder systems which exploit the natural uranium and thorium resources, without any reprocessing capacity are imaginable. (orig.)

  17. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  18. Fusion reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work covers four separate areas: (1) development of technology for processing liquid lithium from blankets, (2) investigation of hydrogen isotope permeation in candidate structural metals and alloys for near-term fusion reactors, (3) analytical studies encompassing fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, tritium facility design, and fusion reactor safety, and (4) studies involving dosimetry and damage analysis. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas are summarized

  19. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  1. PFBR reactor protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design philosophy adopted for Prototype Fast breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a classical one and has the following features: triplicated sensors for measuring important safety parameters; two independent reactor protection Logic Systems based on solid state devices; reactivity control achieved by control rods; gas equipped modules at the core blanket interface providing negative reactivity. Design verification of these features showed that safety of the reactor can be achieved by a traditional approach since the inherent features of LMFBR make this easy

  2. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  3. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  4. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  5. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  6. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  7. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1979 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committees on Reactor Physics and on Decomissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  8. Chemical machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yardimeden

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials. Advantages and disadvantages of the chemical machining are mentioned.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, chemical machining process was described its importance as nontraditional machining process. The steps of process were discussed in detail. The tolerances of machined parts were examined.Findings: Paper describes the chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials.Practical implications: The machining operation should be carried out carefully to produce a desired geometry. Environmental laws have important effects when chemical machining is used.Originality/value: The importance of nontraditional machining processes is very high.

  9. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  10. New reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document gives a summary of new nuclear reactor concepts from a technological point of view. Belgium supports the development of the European Pressurized-Water Reactor, which is an evolutionary concept based on the European experience in Pressurized-Water Reactors. A reorientation of the Belgian choice for this evolutionary concept may be required in case that a decision is taken to burn plutonium, when the need for flexible nuclear power plants arises or when new reactor concepts can demonstrate proved benefits in terms of safety and cost

  11. Reactor construction steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic functions of light water reactor components are shown on the example of a pressurized water reactor and the requirements resulting therefrom for steel, the basic structural material, are derived. A detailed analysis of three main groups of reactor steels is presented and the applications are indicated of low-alloyed steels, high-alloyed austenitic steels, and steels with a high content of Ni and of alloying additions for steam generator pipes. An outline is given of prospective fast breeder reactor steels. (J.K.)

  12. Commercialization of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative analysis has been performed of capital and fuel cycle costs for fast BN-type and pressurized light water VVER-type reactors. As a result of materials demand and components costs comparison of NPPs with VVER-1000 and BN-600 reactors, respectively, conclusion was made, that under equal conditions of the comparison, NPP with fast reactor had surpassed the specific capital cost of NPP with VVER by about 30 - 40 %. Ways were determined for further decrease of this difference, as well as for the fuel cycle cost reduction, because at present it is higher than that of VVER-type reactors. (author)

  13. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  14. Natural convection type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a natural convection type nuclear reactor, a reactor core is disposed such that the top of the reactor core is always situated in a flooded position even if pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured and the level at the inside of the reactor vessel is reduced due to flashing. Further, a lower dry well situated below the pressure vessel is disposed such that it is in communication with a through hole to a pressure suppression chamber situated therearound and the reactor core is situated at the level lower than that of the through hole. If pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured to cause loss of water, although the water level is lowered after the end of the flashing, the reactor core is always flooded till the operation of a pressure accummulation water injection system to prevent the top of the reactor core even from temporary exposure. Further, injected water is discharged to the outside of the pressure vessel, transferred to the lower dry well, and flows through the through hole to the pressure control chamber and cools the surface of the reactor pressure vessel from the outside. Accordingly, the reactor core is cooled to surely and efficiently remove the after-heat. (N.H.)

  15. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors IAEA safety

  16. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a control device which can conduct scram and avoid lowering of the power of a nuclear power plant upon occurrence of earthquakes. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises, in addition to an existent power control device, (1) an earthquake detector for detecting occurrence and annihilation of earthquakes and (2) a reactor control device for outputting control rod operation signals and reactor core flow rate control signals depending on the earthquake detection signals from the detector, and reactor and plant information. With such a constitution, although the reactor is vibrated by earthquakes, the detector detects slight oscillations of the reactor by initial fine vibration waves as premonitory symptoms of serious earthquakes. The earthquake occurrence signals are outputted to the reactor control device. The reactor control device, receiving the signals, changes the position of control rods by way of control rod driving mechanisms to make the axial power distribution in the reactor core to a top peak type. As a result, even if the void amount in the reactor core is reduced by the subsequent actual earthquakes, since the void amount is moved, effects on the increase of neutron fluxes by the actual earthquakes is small. (I.S.)

  17. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  18. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  19. Oklo natural reactors: geological and geochemical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published as well as unpublished material on the Oklo natural reactors in Gabon was evaluated with regard to the long-term aspects of nuclear waste disposal. Even though the vast data base available at present can provide only a site specific description of the phenomenon, already this material gives relevant information on plutonium retention, metamictization, fission product release, hydrogeochemical stability and migration of fission products. Generalized conclusions applicable to other nuclear waste repository would require the quantitative reconstruction of t s coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical processes. This could be achieved by studying the deviations in the 2H/1H and 18O/16O ratios of minerals at Oklo. A further generalization of the findings from Oklo could be realized by examining the newly-discovered reactor zone 10, which was active under very different thermal conditions than the other reactors. 205 refs

  20. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  1. Adaptive Controller Design for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu, K; V. Murali Bhaskaran

    2014-01-01

    Continues Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is an important issue in chemical process and a wide range of research in the area of chemical engineering. Temperature Control of CSTR has been an issue in the chemical control engineering since it has highly non-linear complex equations. This study presents problem of temperature control of CSTR with the adaptive Controller. The Simulation is done in MATLAB and result shows that adaptive controller is an efficient controller for temperature control of C...

  2. Purpose Tailored Design of Gas-Lift Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gogová, Zuzana; Hanika, Jiří

    Bratislava: Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering, 2008 - (Markoš, J.), s. 271 ISBN 978-80-227-2903-1. [35th International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 26.05.2008-30.05.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : gas- lift reactor * model * glucose Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  3. Fiscal 1998 R and D project on global environmental industrial technology. R and D result report on environment- friendly production technology (advanced chemical synthesis reactor); 1998 nendo chikyu kankyo sangyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Kankyo chowagata seisan gijutsu (kokino kagaku gosei bio reactor) kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For high-efficiency production of substances by bioreactor, study was made on a bio-control mechanism as its elementary technology. On the study of breeding technology by expression control, the structure design of a control region and development of new expression vectors had been finished, and study was made on breeding of high-efficiency recombinant production cells by using candidate expression vectors. On the study of breeding technology by multi-stage enzyme reaction control, the enzyme gene of a system synthesizing cysteine from glycerol was searched, and hydroxypyruvaldehyde hydrogenase gene was isolated as substance production model. Cysteine production Escherichia coli combined with serineacetyl transferase gene was also prepared. In addition, study started on cloning of hydroxyacetone oxidase gene. On development of reactor system technology, for conversion of serine to cysteine, study was made on optimization of a reaction condition by theory of enzyme reaction rate. (NEDO)

  4. Inherently safe technologies-chemical and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic risk assessments show an inverse relationship between the likelihood and the consequences of nuclear and chemical plant accidents, but the Bhopal accident has change public complacency about the safety of chemical plants to such an extent that public confidence is now at the same low level as with nuclear plants. The nuclear industry's response was to strengthen its institutions and improve its technologies, but the public may not be convinced. One solution is to develop reactors which do not depend upon the active intervention of humans of electromechanical devices to deal with emergencies, but which have physical properties that limit the possible temperature and power of a reactor. The Process Inherent Ultimately Safe and the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactors are two possibilities. the chemical industry needs to develop its own inherently safe design precepts that incorporate smallness, safe processes, and hardening against sabotage. 5 references

  5. Chemical Looping Combustion of Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmeet Singh Monga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic investigation of direct chemical looping combustion (CLC of rice husk is presented in this paper. Both steam and CO2 are used for gasification within the temperature range of 500–1200˚C and different amounts of oxygen carriers. Chemical equilibrium model was considered for the CLC fuel reactor. The trends in product compositions of the fuel reactor, were determined. Rice husk gasification using 3 moles H2O and 0 moles CO2 per mole carbon (in rice husk at 1 bar pressure and 900˚C was found to be the best operating point for hundred percent carbon conversion in the fuel reactor. Such detailed thermodynamic studies can be useful to design chemical looping combustion processes using different fuels.

  6. Chemical networks*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One o...

  7. One piece reactor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Research Reactor No.3 (JRR-3) was the first reactor consisting of 'Japanese-made' components alone except for fuel and heavy water. After reaching its initial critical state in September 1962, JRR-3 had been in operation for 21 years until March 1983. It was decided that the reactor be removed en-bloc in view of the work schedule, cost and management of the reactor following the removal. In the special method developed jointly by the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute and Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd., the reactor main unit was cut off from the building by continuous core boring, with its major components bound in the block with biological shield material (heavy concrete), and then conveyed and stored in a large waste store building constructed near the reactor building. Major work processes described in this report include the cutting off, lifting, horizontal conveyance and lowering of the reactor main unit. The removal of the JRR-3 reactor main unit was successfully carried out safely and quickly by the en-block removal method with radiation exposure dose of the workers being kept at a minimum. Thus the high performance of the en-bloc removal method was demonstrated and, in addition, valuable knowhow and other data were obtained from the work. (Nogami, K.)

  8. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  9. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  10. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  11. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  12. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  13. Light water reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  14. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  15. Light water type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear reactor of the present invention prevents disruption of a reactor core even in a case of occurrence of entire AC power loss event, and even if a reactor core disruption should occur, it prevents a rupture of the reactor container due to excess heating. That is, a high pressure water injection system and a low pressure water injection system operated by a diesel engine are disposed in the reactor building in addition to an emergency core cooling system. With such a constitution, even if an entire AC power loss event should occur, water can surely be injected to the reactor thereby enabling to prevent the rupture of the reactor core. Even if it should be ruptured, water can be sprayed to the reactor container by the low pressure water injection system. Further, if each of water injection pumps of the high pressure water injection system and the low pressure water injection system can be driven also by motors in addition to the diesel engine, the pump operation can be conducted more certainly and integrally. (I.S.)

  16. Accessibility and Radioactivity Calculations for Nuclear Reactor Shutdown System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important consideration in the design of power reactors is providing access to the reactor cooling system for the purposes of maintenance, repair and refuelling. The major sources of radiation which tend to prohibit such access are: induced activity of the reactor coolant, activated impurities in the reactor coolant and radiation originating in the reactor core both during reactor operation and after shut down. Impurities in the reactor coolant may be present in high enough concentrations so that their activation restricts accessibility for maintenance after shutdown. When water being used as a coolant, the activity of the water itself is very short- lived but their corrosive nature, resultant high impurity and induced activity of structural material are the major source of activity in the system after reactor shutdown. In this case, it may be necessary to chemically remove some of the impurity by a purification process to prevent a build up of long-lived induced activity in the system from restricting access to the plant, and to keep the radiation dose at the working places within the permissible limits. A mathematical modelling is developed. A system of coupled first-order linear differential equations describing adequately the activity behaviour has to be derived and solved. It treats the determination of equilibrium concentrations of impurities on system surface , and the effect of release of fission products from the reactor core

  17. The TRIGA reactor as chemistry apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Irvine campus of the University of California, the Mark I, 250 kilowatt TRIGA reactor is used as a regular teaching and research tool by the Department of Chemistry which operates the reactor. Students are introduced to radiochemistry and activation analysis in undergraduate laboratory courses and the relation of nuclear to chemical phenomena is emphasized even in Freshman chemistry. Special peripheral items have been developed for use in graduate and undergraduate research, including a fast pneumatic transfer system for studying short-lived isotopes and arrangements for irradiations at low temperatures. These and other unique features of a purely chemically oriented operation will be discussed and some remarks appended with regard to the merits of a low budget operation. (author)

  18. Naval propulsion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article deals with the design and exploitation of naval propulsion reactors, mainly of PWR-type. The other existing or conceivable types of reactors are also presented: 1 - specificities of nuclear propulsion (integration in the ship, marine environment, maneuverability, instantaneous availability, conditions of exploitation-isolation, nuclear safety, safety authority); 2 - PWR-type reactor (stable operation, mastered technology, general design, radiation protection); 3 - other reactor types; 4 - compact or integrated loops architecture; 5 - radiation protection; 6 - reactor core; 7 - reactivity control (core lifetime, control means and mechanisms); 8 - core cooling (natural circulation, forced circulation, primary flow-rate program); 9 - primary loop; 10 - pressurizer; 11 - steam generators and water-steam secondary loop; 12 - auxiliary and safety loops; 13 - control instrumentation; 14 - operation; 15 - nuclear wastes and dismantling. (J.S.)

  19. Iris reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  20. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 1014 n/cm2/sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  1. Reactor core monitoring method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Michitsugu [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Ebata, Shigeo

    1998-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of monitoring the state of coolant flow in a reactor of a BWR power plant. Namely, a plurality of local power region monitors (LPRM) are disposed to the inside of the reactor core for monitoring a power distribution. Signals of at least two optional LPRM detectors situated at positions different in axial or radial positions of the reactor core are obtained. General fluctuation components which nuclear hydrothermally fluctuate in overall reactor core are removed from the components of the signals. Then, correlational functions between these signals are determined. The state of coolant flow in the reactor is monitored based on the correlational function. When the axial flowing rate and radial flow interference are monitored, the accuracy upon monitoring axial and radial local behaviors of coolants can be improved by thus previously removing the general fluctuation components from signals of LPRM detectors and extracting local void information near to LPRM detectors at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  2. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual covers all the aspects of the science of neutron transport in nuclear reactors and can be used with great advantage by students, engineers or even reactor experts. It is composed of 18 chapters: 1) basis of nuclear physics, 2) the interactions of neutrons with matter, 3) the interactions of electromagnetic radiations and charged-particles with matter, 4) neutron slowing-down, 5) resonant absorption, 6) Doppler effect, 7) neutron thermalization, 8) Boltzmann equation, 9) calculation methods in neutron transport theory, 10) neutron scattering, 11) reactor reactivity, 12) theory of the critical homogenous pile, 13) the neutron reflector, 14) the heterogeneous reactor, 15) the equations of the fuel cycle, 16) neutron counter-reactions, 17) reactor kinetics, and 18) calculation methods in neutron scattering

  3. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  4. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circular neutron reflector is disposed vertically movably so as to surround the outer circumference of a reactor core barrel. A reflector driving device comprises a driving device main body attracted to the outer wall surface of the reactor barrel by electromagnetic attraction force and an inertia body disposed above the driving device main body vertically movably. A reflector is connected below the reactor driving device. At the initial stage, a spontaneous large current is supplied to upper electromagnetic repulsion coils of the reflector driving device, impact electromagnetic repulsion force is caused between the inertia body and the reflector driving device, so that the driving device main body moves downwardly by a predetermined distance and stopped. The reflector driving device can be lowered in a step-like manner to an appropriate position suitable to restart the reactor during stoppage of the reactor core by conducting spontaneous supply of current repeatedly to the upper electromagnetic repulsion coils. (I.N.)

  5. TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  6. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  7. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  8. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  9. Progress report 1981-1982. Reactor Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the activities performed by the Reactor Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina during 1981-1982. This Department provides services and assistance in all matters related to water chemistry and nuclear reactors chemistry, in all their phases: design, construction, commissioning and decommissioning. During this period, the following tasks were performed: study of the metallic oxide-water interphases; determination of the goethite and magnetite surficial charges; synthesis of the monodispersed nickel ferrites; study of the iron oxides dissolution mechanism in presence of different complexing agents; chemical decontamination of structural metals; thermodynamics of the water-nitrogen system; physico-chemical studies of aqueous solutions at high temperatures; hydrothermal decomposition of ionic exchange resines and study of the equilibria of the anionic exchange for the chemistry of pressurized reactor's primary loops. The appendix includes information on the Reactor Chemistry Department staff, its publications, services, seminars, courses and conferences performed during 1981-1982. (R.J.S.)

  10. Energy production from distillery wastewater using single and double-phase upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muyodi, F.J.; Rubindamayugi, M.S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A Single-phase (SP) and Double-phase (DP) Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating distillery wastewater were operated in parallel. The DP UASB reactor showed better performance than the SP UASB reactor in terms of maximum methane production rate, methane content and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency. (au) 20 refs.

  11. Liquid metal tribology in fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) require mechanisms operating in various sodium liquid and sodium vapor environments for extended periods of time up to temperatures of 900 K under different chemical properties of the fluid. The design of tribological systems in those reactors cannot be based on data and past experience of so-called conventional tribology. Although basic tribological phenomena and their scientific interpretation apply in this field, operating conditions specific to nuclear reactors and prevailing especially in the nuclear part of such facilities pose special problems. Therefore, in the framework of the R and D-program accompanying the construction phase of SNR 300 experiments were carried out to provide data and knowledge necessary for the lay-out of friction systems between mating surfaces of contacting components. Initially, screening tests isolated material pairs with good slipping properties and maximum wear resistance. Those materials were subjected to comprehensive parameter investigations. A multitude of laboratory scale tests have been performed under largely reactor specific conditions. Unusual superimpositions of parameters were analyzed and separated to find their individual influence on the friction process. The results of these experiments were made available to the reactor industry as well as to factories producing special tribo-materials. (orig.)

  12. Behavior of water reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviewed the fuels used widely in forms of (1) Zircaloy-sheathed UO2 fuel in light water-commercial power reactor, (2) Zircaloy-sheathed PuO2-UO2 fuel in plutonium-thermal reactor and advanced reactor (ATR), (3) aluminide and silicide fuel in Material Testing Reactors. From fundamental view points, physical/chemical properties and irradiation behaviors of both fuels and zircaloy claddings are briefly reviewed in chapters 1 and 2. Change of the fuel rod physical parameters with progress of burn-up are summed up in chapter 3. Some fuel troubles and failures encountered in past usage of worldwide LWR fuels are introduced with counterplans taken. In the last session of this chapter, recent results of R and D works have been carried out by fuel vendors are reviewed. Especially, in-core behaviors of PCI-remedy fuels developed to use for high burn-up extension and for load-follow operation are highlighted. Reactor accidents occurred through past forty years are surveyed and reviewed. Fuel behaviors during the reactivity initiated accident (RIA), the power-coolant mismatch (PCM), and the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) are taken into this review by using disclosed literatures. Safety criteria being used in Japanese licensing authorities are introduced relating to the fuel design limit. (author)

  13. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MWth, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co60) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  14. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author)

  15. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  16. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1983 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  17. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  18. Testing of the Micro-Reactor System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krystyník, Pavel; Beneš, Ondřej; Klusoň, Petr; Šolcová, Olga

    Praha: Česká společnost průmyslové chemie, 2015, s. 30 /p104./. ISBN 978-80-86238-73-9. [mezinárodní chemicko-technologická konference (ICCT 2015) /3./. Mikulov (CZ), 13.04.2015-15.04.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14228S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : micro-reactor technology * heat transfer * testing Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  19. Fluid dynamic modelling of bubble column reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Khurram Imran

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of rectangular shape bubble column reactors (BCR) are validated starting from preliminary simulations aimed at identifying proper simulation parameters for a given system and resulting up to the numerical simulation with mass transfer and chemical reactions. The transient, three dimensional simulations are carried out using FLUENT software and the results obtained for a system with low gas flow rate (48 L/h) indicated that we need enough fine mesh grid and appropriate cl...

  20. Chemical Looping Combustion of Rice Husk

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmeet Singh Monga; Ganesh R. Kale

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic investigation of direct chemical looping combustion (CLC) of rice husk is presented in this paper. Both steam and CO2 are used for gasification within the temperature range of 500–1200˚C and different amounts of oxygen carriers. Chemical equilibrium model was considered for the CLC fuel reactor. The trends in product compositions of the fuel reactor, were determined. Rice husk gasification using 3 moles H2O and 0 moles CO2 per mole carbon (in rice husk) at 1 bar pr...