WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical reaction mechanical

  1. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  2. Chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane is presented and discussed. The mechanism consists of 27 chemical species and 83 elementary chemical reactions. Ignition and combustion data as determined in shock tube studies were used to evaluate the mechanism. Numerical simulation of the shock tube experiments showed that the kinetic behavior predicted by the mechanism for stoichiometric mixtures is in good agrement with the experimental results over the entire temperature range examined (1150-2600K). Sensitivity and theoretical studies carried out using the mechanism revealed that hydrocarbon reactions which are involved in the formation of the HO2 radical and the H2O2 molecule are very important in the mechanism and that the observed nonlinear behavior of ignition delay time with decreasing temperature can be interpreted in terms of the increased importance of the HO2 and H2O2 reactions at the lower temperatures.

  3. Physical Chemistry Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Trimm, Harold H

    2011-01-01

    Physical chemistry covers diverse topics, from biochemistry to materials properties to the development of quantum computers. Physical chemistry applies physics and math to problems that interest chemists, biologists, and engineers. Physical chemists use theoretical constructs and mathematical computations to understand chemical properties and describe the behavior of molecular and condensed matter. Their work involves manipulations of data as well as materials. Physical chemistry entails extensive work with sophisticated instrumentation and equipment as well as state-of-the-art computers. This

  4. Chemical reactions modulated by mechanical stress: extended Bell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Sai Sriharsha M; Brantley, Johnathan N; Bielawski, Christopher W; Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2011-10-28

    A number of recent studies have shown that mechanical stress can significantly lower or raise the activation barrier of a chemical reaction. Within a common approximation due to Bell [Science 200, 618 (1978)], this barrier is linearly dependent on the applied force. A simple extension of Bell's theory that includes higher order corrections in the force predicts that the force-induced change in the activation energy will be given by -FΔR - ΔχF(2)∕2. Here, ΔR is the change of the distance between the atoms, at which the force F is applied, from the reactant to the transition state, and Δχ is the corresponding change in the mechanical compliance of the molecule. Application of this formula to the electrocyclic ring-opening of cis and trans 1,2-dimethylbenzocyclobutene shows that this extension of Bell's theory essentially recovers the force dependence of the barrier, while the original Bell formula exhibits significant errors. Because the extended Bell theory avoids explicit inclusion of the mechanical stress or strain in electronic structure calculations, it allows a computationally efficient characterization of the effect of mechanical forces on chemical processes. That is, the mechanical susceptibility of any reaction pathway is described in terms of two parameters, ΔR and Δχ, both readily computable at zero force.

  5. The Electronic Flux in Chemical Reactions. Insights on the Mechanism of the Maillard Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Patricio; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Herrera, Bárbara; Silva, Eduardo; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2007-11-01

    The electronic transfer that occurs during a chemical process is analysed in term of a new concept, the electronic flux, that allows characterizing the regions along the reaction coordinate where electron transfer is actually taking place. The electron flux is quantified through the variation of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate and is used, together with the reaction force, to shed light on reaction mechanism of the Schiff base formation in the Maillard reaction. By partitioning the reaction coordinate in regions in which different process might be taking place, electronic reordering associated to polarization and transfer has been identified and found to be localized at specific transition state regions where most bond forming and breaking occur.

  6. Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziaul Huque

    2007-08-31

    This is the final technical report for the project titled 'Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks'. The aim of the project was to develop an efficient chemistry model for combustion simulations. The reduced chemistry model was developed mathematically without the need of having extensive knowledge of the chemistry involved. To aid in the development of the model, Neural Networks (NN) was used via a new network topology known as Non-linear Principal Components Analysis (NPCA). A commonly used Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP-NN) was modified to implement NPCA-NN. The training rate of NPCA-NN was improved with the GEneralized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) based on kernel smoothing techniques. Kernel smoothing provides a simple way of finding structure in data set without the imposition of a parametric model. The trajectory data of the reaction mechanism was generated based on the optimization techniques of genetic algorithm (GA). The NPCA-NN algorithm was then used for the reduction of Dimethyl Ether (DME) mechanism. DME is a recently discovered fuel made from natural gas, (and other feedstock such as coal, biomass, and urban wastes) which can be used in compression ignition engines as a substitute for diesel. An in-house two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was developed based on Meshfree technique and time marching solution algorithm. The project also provided valuable research experience to two graduate students.

  7. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  8. Program Helps To Determine Chemical-Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, D. A.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1995-01-01

    General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis (LSENS) computer code developed for use in solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical-kinetics problems. Provides for efficient and accurate chemical-kinetics computations and provides for sensitivity analysis for variety of problems, including problems involving honisothermal conditions. Incorporates mathematical models for static system, steady one-dimensional inviscid flow, reaction behind incident shock wave (with boundary-layer correction), and perfectly stirred reactor. Computations of equilibrium properties performed for following assigned states: enthalpy and pressure, temperature and pressure, internal energy and volume, and temperature and volume. Written in FORTRAN 77 with exception of NAMELIST extensions used for input.

  9. Computational analysis of the mechanism of chemical reactions in terms of reaction phases: hidden intermediates and hidden transition States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-05-18

    Computational approaches to understanding chemical reaction mechanisms generally begin by establishing the relative energies of the starting materials, transition state, and products, that is, the stationary points on the potential energy surface of the reaction complex. Examining the intervening species via the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) offers further insight into the fate of the reactants by delineating, step-by-step, the energetics involved along the reaction path between the stationary states. For a detailed analysis of the mechanism and dynamics of a chemical reaction, the reaction path Hamiltonian (RPH) and the united reaction valley approach (URVA) are an efficient combination. The chemical conversion of the reaction complex is reflected by the changes in the reaction path direction t(s) and reaction path curvature k(s), both expressed as a function of the path length s. This information can be used to partition the reaction path, and by this the reaction mechanism, of a chemical reaction into reaction phases describing chemically relevant changes of the reaction complex: (i) a contact phase characterized by van der Waals interactions, (ii) a preparation phase, in which the reactants prepare for the chemical processes, (iii) one or more transition state phases, in which the chemical processes of bond cleavage and bond formation take place, (iv) a product adjustment phase, and (v) a separation phase. In this Account, we examine mechanistic analysis with URVA in detail, focusing on recent theoretical insights (with a variety of reaction types) from our laboratories. Through the utilization of the concept of localized adiabatic vibrational modes that are associated with the internal coordinates, q(n)(s), of the reaction complex, the chemical character of each reaction phase can be identified via the adiabatic curvature coupling coefficients, A(n,s)(s). These quantities reveal whether a local adiabatic vibrational mode supports (A(n,s) > 0) or resists

  10. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  11. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  12. Stochastic innovation as a mechanism by which catalysts might self-assemble into chemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford, Justin A; Dill, Ken A.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a computer model for how two different chemical catalysts in solution, A and B, could be driven to form AB complexes, based on the concentration gradients of a substrate or product that they share in common. If A's product is B's substrate, B will be attracted to A, mediated by a common resource that is not otherwise plentiful in the environment. By this simple physicochemical mechanism, chemical reactions could spontaneously associate to become chained together in solution. Accord...

  13. Free Energies of Chemical Reactions in Solution and in Enzymes with Ab Initio Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2008-05-01

    Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods provide an accurate and efficient energetic description of complex chemical and biological systems, leading to significant advances in the understanding of chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. Here we review progress in QM/MM methodology and applications, focusing on ab initio QM-based approaches. Ab initio QM/MM methods capitalize on the accuracy and reliability of the associated quantum-mechanical approaches, however, at a much higher computational cost compared with semiempirical quantum-mechanical approaches. Thus reaction-path and activation free-energy calculations based on ab initio QM/MM methods encounter unique challenges in simulation timescales and phase-space sampling. This review features recent developments overcoming these challenges and enabling accurate free-energy determination for reaction processes in solution and in enzymes, along with applications.

  14. Computational organic chemistry: bridging theory and experiment in establishing the mechanisms of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gui-Juan; Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Xu, Liping; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-02-11

    Understanding the mechanisms of chemical reactions, especially catalysis, has been an important and active area of computational organic chemistry, and close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists represent a growing trend. This Perspective provides examples of such productive collaborations. The understanding of various reaction mechanisms and the insight gained from these studies are emphasized. The applications of various experimental techniques in elucidation of reaction details as well as the development of various computational techniques to meet the demand of emerging synthetic methods, e.g., C-H activation, organocatalysis, and single electron transfer, are presented along with some conventional developments of mechanistic aspects. Examples of applications are selected to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of these techniques. Some challenges in the mechanistic studies and predictions of reactions are also analyzed.

  15. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  16. Surftherm: A program to analyze thermochemical and kinetic data in gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coltrin, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

    1994-06-01

    This report documents the Surftherm program that analyzes transport coefficient, thermochemical- and kinetic rate information in complex gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms. The program is designed for use with the Chemkin (gas-phase chemistry) and Surface Chemkin (heterogeneous chemistry) programs. It was developed as a ``chemist`s companion`` in using the Chemkin packages with complex chemical reaction mechanisms. It presents in tabular form detailed information about the temperature and pressure dependence of chemical reaction rate constants and their reverse rate constants, reaction equilibrium constants, reaction thermochemistry, chemical species thermochemistry and transport properties. This report serves as a user`s manual for use of the program, explaining the required input and the output.

  17. Elucidation of Mechanisms and Selectivities of Metal-Catalyzed Reactions using Quantum Chemical Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Stefano; Kalek, Marcin; Huang, Genping; Himo, Fahmi

    2016-05-17

    Quantum chemical techniques today are indispensable for the detailed mechanistic understanding of catalytic reactions. The development of modern density functional theory approaches combined with the enormous growth in computer power have made it possible to treat quite large systems at a reasonable level of accuracy. Accordingly, quantum chemistry has been applied extensively to a wide variety of catalytic systems. A huge number of problems have been solved successfully, and vast amounts of chemical insights have been gained. In this Account, we summarize some of our recent work in this field. A number of examples concerned with transition metal-catalyzed reactions are selected, with emphasis on reactions with various kinds of selectivities. The discussed cases are (1) copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation of indoles, (2) iridium-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H borylation of chlorosilanes, (3) vanadium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement and its combination with aldol- and Mannich-type additions, (4) palladium-catalyzed propargylic substitution with phosphorus nucleophiles, (5) rhodium-catalyzed 1:2 coupling of aldehydes and allenes, and finally (6) copper-catalyzed coupling of nitrones and alkynes to produce β-lactams (Kinugasa reaction). First, the methodology adopted in these studies is presented briefly. The electronic structure method in the great majority of these kinds of mechanistic investigations has for the last two decades been based on density functional theory. In the cases discussed here, mainly the B3LYP functional has been employed in conjunction with Grimme's empirical dispersion correction, which has been shown to improve the calculated energies significantly. The effect of the surrounding solvent is described by implicit solvation techniques, and the thermochemical corrections are included using the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. The reviewed examples are chosen to illustrate the usefulness and versatility of the adopted methodology in

  18. Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Douglas E.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O3, NO(x), Cl(x), HCl, N2O5, ClONO2 are calculated.

  19. Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O3, NOx, Clx, HCl, N2O5, ClONO2 are calculated

  20. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  1. Evaluation of Aromatic Oxidation Reactions in Seven Chemical Mechanisms with an Outdoor Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simulations using seven chemical mechanisms are intercompared against O3, NOx and hydrocarbon data from photooxidation experiments conducted at the University of North Carolina outdoor smog chamber. The mechanisms include CB4–2002, CB05, CB05-TU, a CB05 vari...

  2. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  3. FEARCF a multidimensional free energy method for investigating conformational landscapes and chemical reaction mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAIDOO Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    The development and implementation of a computational method able to produce free energies in multiple dimensions,descriptively named the free energies from adaptive reaction coordinate forces (FEARCF) method is described in this paper.While the method can be used to calculate free energies of association,conformation and reactivity here it is shown in the context of chemical reaction landscapes.A reaction free energy surface for the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate is used as an illustration of the method's efficient convergence.FEARCF simulations are shown to achieve fiat histograms for complex multidimensional free energy volumes.The sampling efficiency by which it produces multidimensional free energies is demonstrated on the complex puckering of a pyranose ring,that is described by a three dimensional W(θ1,θ2,θ3) potential of mean force.

  4. Quantum Chemical Study on the Reaction Mechanism of OBrO Radical with OH Radical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhAO,Min(赵岷); ZHAO,Yan-Ling(赵艳玲); LIU,Peng-Jun(刘朋军); CHANG,Ying-Fei(常鹰飞); PAN,Xiu-Mei(潘秀梅); SU,Zhong-Min(苏忠民); WANG,Rong-Shun(王荣顺)

    2004-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of OBrO with OH has been studied using the B3LYP/6-31 l+G(d,p) and the high-level electron-correlation CCSD(T)/6-311 +G(d,p) at single-point. The results show that the title reaction could probably proceed by four possible schemes, generating HOBr+O2, HBr+O3, BrO+HO2 and HOBrO2 products, respectively. The main channel is the one to yield HOBr+ O2. The whole reaction involves the formation of three-membered, four-membered and five-membered rings, followed by the complicated processes of association,H-shift, Br-shift and dissociation. All routes are exothermic.

  5. Chemical mechanisms and reaction rates for the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions: Cr2O3 + 2 Na2SO4(1) + 3/2 O2 yields 2 Na2CrO4(1) + 2 SO3(g)n TiO2 + Na2SO4(1) yields Na2O(TiO2)n + SO3(g)n TiO2 + Na2CrO4(1) yields Na2O(TiO2)n + CrO3(g).

  6. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  7. The mechanism of bursting phenomena in Belousov-Zhabotinsky(BZ) chemical reaction with multiple time scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a typical Belousov-Zhabotinsky(BZ)reaction with multiple time scales is investigated in this paper.Different forms of periodic bursting phenomena,and specially,three types of chaotic bursters with different structures can be obtained,which are in common with the behaviors observed in experiments.The bifurcations connecting the quiescent state and the repetitive spikes are presented to account for the occurrence of the NKoscillations as well as the different forms of chaotic bursters.The mechanism of the period-adding bifurcation sequences is explored to reveal why the length of the periods in the sequences does not change continuously with the continuous variation of the parameters.

  8. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    indicate that surface roughness undergoes continuous evolution during alternating contact loading and exposure to etchant. Surface roughness evolution is governed by the residual stress induced due to contact loading. Two different stress-assisted dissolution driven instabilities in roughness evolution have been identified. In order to investigate stressed surface damage by electrochemical reaction during active contact loading, in the first stage, surface failure due to sliding contact was investigated as a function of different residual stress states from compressive to tensile. Residual stress is usually developed during manufacturing process or former mechanical interactions playing an important role on service life of the surface. The wear mechanism of fatigue contact in the presence of residual stresses was explored by analytical model of fatigue crack growth by utilizing modified delamination wear theory with surface layer spalling model. Fatigue stress intensity factors (DeltaKI) loaded by contact stress and combined residual stress implied that buckling of subsurface crack with compressive residual stress opens crack-tip and consequently increase wear rate during sliding contact. As for the experimental verification of the modified delamination model, cyclic sliding contact experiment on metallic implant materials in ambient was conducted by utilizing atomic force microscope (AFM) and four-point-bending set up by which well characterized pre-stress was established on rectangular specimen. In addition, complex mechanism of corrosion on the damaged surface illustrated strong stress-dependent effects on wear rate in repassivating environment and dissolution rates in reactive environment.

  9. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  10. Chemical reaction and separation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.C.; Kapteijn, F.; Strous, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The invention is directed to process for performing a chemical reaction in a reaction mixture, which reaction produces water as by-product, wherein the reaction mixture is in contact with a hydroxy sodalite membrane, through which water produced during the reaction is removed from the reaction mixtu

  11. Proposed chemical mechanisms leading to secondary organic aerosol in the reactions of aliphatic amines with hydroxyl and nitrate radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Derek J.; Clark, Christopher H.; Tang, Xiaochen; Cocker, David R.; Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Silva, Philip J.

    2014-10-01

    The presence and importance of amines in the atmosphere, including aliphatic amines, continues to gain more attention. The atmospheric reaction mechanisms of these amines with key atmospheric radicals are important to predict both daytime and nighttime atmospheric chemistry. While previous studies have focused on the production of amine salts, this analysis looks at the importance of peroxy radical reactions to the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Atmospheric oxidation mechanisms are presented to explain the observed chemistry. A series of environmental chamber experiments were conducted in which aliphatic tertiary and secondary amines were reacted with either hydroxyl radical (OH) or nitrate radical (NO3). Chemical composition of the aerosol products was obtained with a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a Particle Into Liquid Sampler Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PILS-ToF-MS), while the chemical composition of the gas-phase products was obtained with a Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometer (SIFT-MS). A number of aerosol-phase mass spectra showed highly oxidized fragments at a much higher molecular weight (MW) than the amine precursor. It is proposed that these larger compounds are oligomers formed through peroxy radical reactions with hydrogen rearrangement. Another reaction pathway observed was the formation of amine salts. The relative importance of each pathway to the overall production of aerosol is found to be dependent on the type of amine and oxidant. For example, the oligomers were observed in the tertiary methyl amines, while the formation of amine salts was more prevalent in the secondary and tertiary ethyl amines.

  12. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  13. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  14. Semiempirical Predictions of Chemical Degradation Reaction Mechanisms of CL-20 as Related to Molecular Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Mohammad M.; Furey, John; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Mcgrath, Chris J.; Bajpai, Rakesh

    2004-10-01

    Quantum mechanical methods and force field molecular mechanics were used to characterize cage cyclic nitramines and to predict environmental degradation mechanisms. Due to structural similarities it is predicted that, under homologous circumstances, the major environmental RDX degradation pathways should also be effective for CL-20 and similar cyclic nitramines.

  15. Singular characteristics and unique chemical bond activation mechanisms of photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Marimuthu, Andiappan; Linic, Suljo

    2012-12-01

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has almost exclusively focused on semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, we show that plasmonic metallic nanostructures represent a new family of photocatalysts. We demonstrate that these photocatalysts exhibit fundamentally different behaviour compared with semiconductors. First, we show that photocatalytic reaction rates on excited plasmonic metallic nanostructures exhibit a super-linear power law dependence on light intensity (rate ∝intensityn, with n > 1), at significantly lower intensity than required for super-linear behaviour on extended metal surfaces. We also demonstrate that, in sharp contrast to semiconductor photocatalysts, photocatalytic quantum efficiencies on plasmonic metallic nanostructures increase with light intensity and operating temperature. These unique characteristics of plasmonic metallic nanostructures suggest that this new family of photocatalysts could prove useful for many heterogeneous catalytic processes that cannot be activated using conventional thermal processes on metals or photocatalytic processes on semiconductors.

  16. New approaches to chemical reaction mechanisms by means of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since active species generated during radiolysis can be used as oxidative or reductive regents of various organic and inorganic compounds, radiation chemistry has been applied to wide range of research fields. We have studied charge-delocalization process in molecular systems, properties of intermediates in the excited states, mechanism of light emitting device, photo-catalyst for degradation of toxic compounds and so on by means of radiation chemistry. In the present paper, we summarize our recent research results. (author)

  17. Reduction of Large Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Autoignition Using Joint Analyses of Reaction Rates and Sensitivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylam, A; Ribaucour, M; Pitz, W J; Minetti, R

    2006-11-29

    A new technique of reduction of detailed mechanisms for autoignition, which is based on two analysis methods is described. An analysis of reaction rates is coupled to an analysis of reaction sensitivity for the detection of redundant reactions. Thresholds associated with the two analyses have a great influence on the size and efficiency of the reduced mechanism. Rules of selection of the thresholds are defined. The reduction technique has been successfully applied to detailed autoignition mechanisms of two reference hydrocarbons: n-heptane and iso-octane. The efficiency of the technique and the ability of the reduced mechanisms to reproduce well the results generated by the full mechanism are discussed. A speedup of calculations by a factor of 5.9 for n-heptane mechanism and by a factor of 16.7 for iso-octane mechanism is obtained without losing accuracy of the prediction of autoignition delay times and concentrations of intermediate species.

  18. The influence of the "cage" effect on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions proceeding from different sites in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorov, Alexander B

    2016-08-28

    Manifestations of the "cage" effect at the encounters of reactants have been theoretically treated on the example of multistage reactions (including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages) proceeding from different active sites in liquid solutions. It is shown that for reactions occurring near the contact of reactants, consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of such multistage reactions (possible in the framework of the encounter theory only) can be made on the basis of chemical concepts of the "cage complex," just as in the case of one-site model described in the literature. Exactly as in the one-site model, the presence of the "cage" effect gives rise to new channels of reactant transformation that cannot result from elementary event of chemical conversion for the given reaction mechanism. Besides, the multisite model demonstrates new (as compared to one-site model) features of multistage reaction course. PMID:27586911

  19. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and buy only as much as needed. Many household products are made of toxic chemicals. It is important ... follow label instructions, including any precautions. Never store household products in food or drink containers. Leave them in ...

  20. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  1. Fundamentals of chemical reaction engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate for a one-semester undergraduate or first-year graduate course, this text introduces the quantitative treatment of chemical reaction engineering. It covers both homogeneous and heterogeneous reacting systems and examines chemical reaction engineering as well as chemical reactor engineering. The authors take a chemical approach, helping students develop an intuitive feeling for concepts, rather than an engineering approach, which tends to overlook the inner workings of systems and objects.Each chapter contains numerous worked-out problems and real-world vignettes involving commercia

  2. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  3. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  4. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  5. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  6. Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew; Soloveichik, David; Winfree, Erik; Bruck, Jehoshua

    Motivated by the intriguing complexity of biochemical circuitry within individual cells we study Stochastic Chemical Reaction Networks (SCRNs), a formal model that considers a set of chemical reactions acting on a finite number of molecules in a well-stirred solution according to standard chemical kinetics equations. SCRNs have been widely used for describing naturally occurring (bio)chemical systems, and with the advent of synthetic biology they become a promising language for the design of artificial biochemical circuits. Our interest here is the computational power of SCRNs and how they relate to more conventional models of computation. We survey known connections and give new connections between SCRNs and Boolean Logic Circuits, Vector Addition Systems, Petri nets, Gate Implementability, Primitive Recursive Functions, Register Machines, Fractran, and Turing Machines. A theme to these investigations is the thin line between decidable and undecidable questions about SCRN behavior.

  7. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however...

  8. Quantum chemical study on the catalytic mechanism of Na/K on NO-char heterogeneous reactions during the coal reburning process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-cheng WEN; Zhi-hua WANG; Jun-hu ZHOU; Ke-fa CEN

    2009-01-01

    Quantum chemical simulation was used to investigate the catalytic mechanism of Na/K on NO-char heterogeneous reactions during the coal reburning process. Both NO-char and NO-NaYK reactions were considered as three-step processes in this calculation. Based on geometry optimizations made using the UB3LYP/6-31 G(d) method, the activation energies of NO-char and NO-Na/K reactions were calculated using the QC1SD(T)/6-3 i 1G(d, p) method; Results showed that the activation energy of the NO-Na/K reaction (107.9/82.0 kJ/mol) was much lower than that of the NO-char reaction (245.1 kJ/mol). The reactions of NaO/KO and Na2P/K2O reduced by char were also studied, and their thermodynamics were calculated using the UB3LYP/6-31G(d) method; Results showed that both Na and K can be refreshed easily and rapidly by char at high temperature during the coal rebuming process. Based on the calculations and analyses, the catalytic mechanism of Na/K on NO-char het-erogeneous reactions during the coal reburning process was clarified.

  9. Mechanism for the stabilization of protein clusters above the solubility curve: the role of non-ideal chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lutsko, James F

    2016-01-01

    Dense protein clusters are known to play an important role in nucleation of protein crystals from dilute solutions. While these have generally been thought to be formed from a metastable phase, the observation of similar, if not identical, clusters above the critical point for the dilute-solution/strong-solution phase transition has thrown this into doubt. Furthermore, the observed clusters are stable for relatively long times. Because protein aggregation plays an important role in some pathologies, understanding the nature of such clusters is an important problem. One mechanism for the stabilization of such structures was proposed by Pan, Vekilov and Lubchenko and was investigated using a DDFT model which confirmed the viability of the model. Here, we revisit that model and incorporate additional physics in the form of state-dependent reaction rates. We show by a combination of numerical results and general arguments that the state-dependent rates disrupt the stability mechanism. Finally, we argue that the s...

  10. Chemical Reactions of Portland Cement with Aqueous CO2 and Their Impacts on Cement's Mechanical Properties under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyun; Lim, Yun Mook; Flores, Katharine M; Kranjc, Kelly; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-19

    To provide information on wellbore cement integrity in the application of geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), chemical and mechanical alterations were analyzed for cement paste samples reacted for 10 days under GCS conditions. The reactions were at 95 °C and had 100 bar of either N2 (control condition) or CO2 contacting the reaction brine solution with an ionic strength of 0.5 M adjusted by NaCl. Chemical analyses showed that the 3.0 cm × 1.1 cm × 0.3 cm samples were significantly attacked by aqueous CO2 and developed layer structures with a total attacked depth of 1220 μm. Microscale mechanical property analyses showed that the hardness and indentation modulus of the carbonated layer were 2-3 times greater than for the intact cement, but those in the portlandite-dissolved region decreased by ∼50%. The strength and elastic modulus of the bulk cement samples were reduced by 93% and 84%, respectively. The properties of the microscale regions, layer structure, microcracks, and swelling of the outer layers combined to affect the overall mechanical properties. These findings improve understanding of wellbore integrity from both chemical and mechanical viewpoints and can be utilized to improve the safety and efficiency of CO2 storage. PMID:25893278

  11. Tuning bimolecular chemical reactions by electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Tscherbul, Timur V

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theoretical method for solving the quantum mechanical reactive scattering problem in the presence of external fields based on a hyperspherical coordinate description of the reaction complex combined with the total angular momentum representation for collisions in external fields. The method allows us to obtain converged results for the chemical reaction LiF + H -> Li + HF in an electric field. Our calculations demonstrate that, by inducing couplings between states of different total angular momenta, electric fields with magnitudes <150 kV/cm give rise to resonant scattering and a significant modification of the total reaction probabilities, product state distributions and the branching ratios for reactive vs inelastic scattering.

  12. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  13. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  14. Is EC class predictable from reaction mechanism?

    OpenAIRE

    Nath Neetika; Mitchell John BO

    2012-01-01

    We thank the Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance (SULSA) and the Scottish Overseas Research Student Awards Scheme of the Scottish Funding Council (SFC) for financial support. Background: We investigate the relationships between the EC (Enzyme Commission) class, the associated chemical reaction, and the reaction mechanism by building predictive models using Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest (RF) and k-Nearest Neighbours (kNN). We consider two ways of encoding the reaction...

  15. Heuristics-Guided Exploration of Reaction Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeler, Maike; Proppe, Jonny; Reiher, Markus

    2015-01-01

    For the investigation of chemical reaction networks, the efficient and accurate determination of all relevant intermediates and elementary reactions is inevitable. The complexity of such a network may grow rapidly, in particular if reactive species are involved that might cause a myriad of side reactions. Without automation, a complete investigation of complex reaction mechanisms is tedious and possibly unfeasible. Therefore, only the expected dominant reaction paths of a chemical reaction network (e.g., a catalytic cycle or an enzymatic cascade) are usually explored in practice. Here, we present a computational protocol that constructs such networks in a parallelized and automated manner. Molecular structures of reactive complexes are generated based on heuristic rules and subsequently optimized by electronic-structure methods. Pairs of reactive complexes related by an elementary reaction are then automatically detected and subjected to an automated search for the connecting transition state. The results are...

  16. Neck fragmentation reaction mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, V; Di Toro, M

    2004-01-01

    Based on a microscopic transport model, we study the origin of nonstatistical Intermediate Mass Fragment ($IMF$) production in semicentral heavy ion collisions at the Fermi energies. We show that a fast, dynamical $IMF$ formation process, the {\\it neck fragmentation mechanism}, can explain the experimentally observed features: deviations from Viola systematics and anisotropic, narrow angular distributions. It may be regarded as the continuation of the multifragmentation mechanism towards intermediate impact parameters. Its relation to other dynamical mechanisms, the induced fission and the abrasion of the spectator zones, that can also contribute to mid-rapidity $IMF$ production, is discussed. The dependence on beam energy and centrality of the collision is carefully analysed. The competition between volume and surface instabilities makes this mechanism very sensitive to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interactions, from the cross sections for hard collisions to the compressibility and other Equation of State (...

  17. The smallest chemical reaction system with bistability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bistability underlies basic biological phenomena, such as cell division, differentiation, cancer onset, and apoptosis. So far biologists identified two necessary conditions for bistability: positive feedback and ultrasensitivity. Results Biological systems are based upon elementary mono- and bimolecular chemical reactions. In order to definitely clarify all necessary conditions for bistability we here present the corresponding minimal system. According to our definition, it contains the minimal number of (i reactants, (ii reactions, and (iii terms in the corresponding ordinary differential equations (decreasing importance from i-iii. The minimal bistable system contains two reactants and four irreversible reactions (three bimolecular, one monomolecular. We discuss the roles of the reactions with respect to the necessary conditions for bistability: two reactions comprise the positive feedback loop, a third reaction filters out small stimuli thus enabling a stable 'off' state, and the fourth reaction prevents explosions. We argue that prevention of explosion is a third general necessary condition for bistability, which is so far lacking discussion in the literature. Moreover, in addition to proving that in two-component systems three steady states are necessary for bistability (five for tristability, etc., we also present a simple general method to design such systems: one just needs one production and three different degradation mechanisms (one production, five degradations for tristability, etc.. This helps modelling multistable systems and it is important for corresponding synthetic biology projects. Conclusion The presented minimal bistable system finally clarifies the often discussed question for the necessary conditions for bistability. The three necessary conditions are: positive feedback, a mechanism to filter out small stimuli and a mechanism to prevent explosions. This is important for modelling bistability with

  18. Atmospheric fates of organic chemicals: prediction of ozone and hydroxyl radical reaction rates and mechanisms. Final report, February 1982-February 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, R.; Carter, W.P.L.; Aschmann, S.M.; Pitts, J.N.; Winer, A.M.

    1985-08-01

    During the three-year cooperative agreement, the kinetic, mechanistic and product data available in the literature for the gas phase reactions of OH radicals and of O3 with organic compounds were evaluated and critically reviewed. Two review articles, one on O3 reactions, the other on OH radical reactions, resulting from the work were submitted for publication to Chemical Reviews. The review dealing with O3 reactions was published in Chemical Reviews, 84, 437-470 (1984), and the OH reaction review was accepted for publication. In addition to these extensive reviews, an experimental program was carried out to obtain needed kinetic data for selected OH radical and O3 reactions. The data, and the experimental techniques used, are summarized in the report, together with a discussion of a-priori predictive techniques for the estimation of OH radical and O3 reaction rate constants for organics for which experimental data are not available.

  19. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  20. Is EC class predictable from reaction mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Neetika

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigate the relationships between the EC (Enzyme Commission class, the associated chemical reaction, and the reaction mechanism by building predictive models using Support Vector Machine (SVM, Random Forest (RF and k-Nearest Neighbours (kNN. We consider two ways of encoding the reaction mechanism in descriptors, and also three approaches that encode only the overall chemical reaction. Both cross-validation and also an external test set are used. Results The three descriptor sets encoding overall chemical transformation perform better than the two descriptions of mechanism. SVM and RF models perform comparably well; kNN is less successful. Oxidoreductases and hydrolases are relatively well predicted by all types of descriptor; isomerases are well predicted by overall reaction descriptors but not by mechanistic ones. Conclusions Our results suggest that pairs of similar enzyme reactions tend to proceed by different mechanisms. Oxidoreductases, hydrolases, and to some extent isomerases and ligases, have clear chemical signatures, making them easier to predict than transferases and lyases. We find evidence that isomerases as a class are notably mechanistically diverse and that their one shared property, of substrate and product being isomers, can arise in various unrelated ways. The performance of the different machine learning algorithms is in line with many cheminformatics applications, with SVM and RF being roughly equally effective. kNN is less successful, given the role that non-local information plays in successful classification. We note also that, despite a lack of clarity in the literature, EC number prediction is not a single problem; the challenge of predicting protein function from available sequence data is quite different from assigning an EC classification from a cheminformatics representation of a reaction.

  1. Sonoluminescence air bubbles as chemical reaction chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lohse, D; Dupont, T F; Hilgenfeldt, S; Johnston, B; Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P; Dupont, Todd F; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Johnston, Blaine

    1996-01-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles can emit light pulses, a phenomenon called sonoluminescence. Air is found to be one of the most friendly gases towards this phenomenon, but only if it contains 1\\% argon. We suggest a chemical mechanism to account for the strong dependence on the gas mixture, based on the dissociation of nitrogen at high temperatures and reactions which form \\rm{NO}_3^- and \\rm{NH}_4^+, among other ions; the reaction products should be investigated experimentally. Inert gases are crucial for stable sonoluminescence because they do not react with the fluid. Our phase diagram in the concentration vs forcing pressure space is applicable to any gas mixture and in good agreement with latest measurements of the UCLA group.

  2. Chemical reaction due to stronger Ramachandran interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2014-05-01

    The origin of a chemical reaction between two reactant atoms is associated with the activation energy, on the assumption that, high-energy collisions between these atoms, are the ones that overcome the activation energy. Here, we show that a stronger attractive van der Waals (vdW) and electron-ion Coulomb interactions between two polarized atoms are responsible for initiating a chemical reaction, either before or after the collision. We derive this stronger vdW attraction formula exactly using the quasi one-dimensional Drude model within the ionization energy theory and the energy-level spacing renormalization group method. Along the way, we expose the precise physical mechanism responsible for the existence of a stronger vdW interaction for both long and short distances, and also show how to technically avoid the electron-electron Coulomb repulsion between polarized electrons from these two reactant atoms. Finally, we properly and correctly associate the existence of this stronger attraction with Ramachandran’s `normal limits’ (distance shorter than what is allowed by the standard vdW bond) between chemically nonbonded atoms.

  3. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Segler, Marwin H S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows Organic Chemists to solve synthetic problems and to invent novel transformations. Here, we propose a model which mimics chemical reasoning and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180,000 randomly selected binary reactions. We show that our data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-) discovering novel transformations (even including transition-metal catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph, and because each single reaction prediction is typically ac...

  4. A Unified Theory of Chemical Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aubry, S

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new and general formalism for elementary chemical reactions where quantum electronic variables are used as reaction coordinates. This formalism is in principle applicable to all kinds of chemical reactions ionic or covalent. Our theory reveals the existence of an intermediate situation between ionic and covalent which may be almost barrierless and isoenegetic and which should be of high interest for understanding biochemistry.

  5. Writing mistakes and skill in organic chemical reaction mechanism%有机化学反应机理常见的书写错误及书写技巧

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张欣

    2014-01-01

    In connection with mistakes when students write organic chemical reaction mechanism,pointed out problems which should be paid attention in writing organic chemical reaction mechanism,summarize writing skills, and hoped to provide certain instructive significance for students in writing organic chemical reaction mechanism.%针对学生在书写有机化学反应机理时易出现的错误,指出在书写反应机理时应注意的问题,并总结出书写技巧,对学生能够准确写出有机化学反应机理具有重要的指导意义。

  6. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  8. Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achi...

  9. Flows and chemical reactions in heterogeneous mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This book - a sequel of previous publications 'Flows and Chemical Reactions' and 'Chemical Reactions in Flows and Homogeneous Mixtures' - is devoted to flows with chemical reactions in heterogeneous environments.  Heterogeneous media in this volume include interfaces and lines. They may be the site of radiation. Each type of flow is the subject of a chapter in this volume. We consider first, in Chapter 1, the question of the generation of environments biphasic individuals: dusty gas, mist, bubble flow.  Chapter 2 is devoted to the study at the mesoscopic scale: particle-fluid exchange of mom

  10. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  11. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  12. The effects of the mechanical-chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Gang; Sun, Chang-Jung; Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun

    2013-04-01

    A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH)2 and led to the generation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste. PMID:23375995

  13. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  14. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  15. Entropy Generation in a Chemical Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, E. N.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy generation in a chemical reaction is analysed without using the general formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics at a level adequate for advanced undergraduates. In a first approach to the problem, the phenomenological kinetic equation of an elementary first-order reaction is used to show that entropy production is always positive. A…

  16. Genetic Recombination as a Chemical Reaction Network

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Stefan; Hofbauer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The process of genetic recombination can be seen as a chemical reaction network with mass-action kinetics. We review the known results on existence, uniqueness, and global stability of an equilibrium in every compatibility class and for all rate constants, from both the population genetics and the reaction networks point of view.

  17. CHEMICAL REACTIONS SIMULATED BY GROUND-WATER-QUALITY MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, David B.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent literature concerning the modeling of chemical reactions during transport in ground water is examined with emphasis on sorption reactions. The theory of transport and reactions in porous media has been well documented. Numerous equations have been developed from this theory, to provide both continuous and sequential or multistep models, with the water phase considered for both mobile and immobile phases. Chemical reactions can be either equilibrium or non-equilibrium, and can be quantified in linear or non-linear mathematical forms. Non-equilibrium reactions can be separated into kinetic and diffusional rate-limiting mechanisms. Solutions to the equations are available by either analytical expressions or numerical techniques. Saturated and unsaturated batch, column, and field studies are discussed with one-dimensional, laboratory-column experiments predominating. A summary table is presented that references the various kinds of models studied and their applications in predicting chemical concentrations in ground waters.

  18. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  19. Deducing Reaction Mechanism: A Guide for Students, Researchers, and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Simon J.; Pitman, Catherine L.; Miller, Alexander J. M.

    2016-01-01

    An introductory guide to deducing the mechanism of chemical reactions is presented. Following a typical workflow for probing reaction mechanism, the guide introduces a wide range of kinetic and mechanistic tools. In addition to serving as a broad introduction to mechanistic analysis for students and researchers, the guide has also been used by…

  20. Synthesis of 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and Proposed Reaction Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The improved 3-step preparation of a key antitumor agent, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin(SN-38), which consists of ethylation, oxidation and photo-chemical rearrangement, is described. The proposed reaction mechanism is also discussed.

  1. Quantum-State Controlled Chemical Reactions of Ultracold KRb Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ospelkaus, S; Wang, D; de Miranda, M H G; Neyenhuis, B; Quéméner, G; Julienne, P S; Bohn, J L; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2009-01-01

    How does a chemical reaction proceed at ultralow temperatures? Can simple quantum mechanical rules such as quantum statistics, single scattering partial waves, and quantum threshold laws provide a clear understanding for the molecular reactivity under a vanishing collision energy? Starting with an optically trapped near quantum degenerate gas of polar $^{40}$K$^{87}$Rb molecules prepared in their absolute ground state, we report experimental evidence for exothermic atom-exchange chemical reactions. When these fermionic molecules are prepared in a single quantum state at a temperature of a few hundreds of nanoKelvins, we observe p-wave-dominated quantum threshold collisions arising from tunneling through an angular momentum barrier followed by a near-unity probability short-range chemical reaction. When these molecules are prepared in two different internal states or when molecules and atoms are brought together, the reaction rates are enhanced by a factor of 10 to 100 due to s-wave scattering, which does not ...

  2. Matrix isolation as a tool for studying interstellar chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David W.; Ortman, Bryan J.; Hauge, Robert H.; Margrave, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Since the identification of the OH radical as an interstellar species, over 50 molecular species were identified as interstellar denizens. While identification of new species appears straightforward, an explanation for their mechanisms of formation is not. Most astronomers concede that large bodies like interstellar dust grains are necessary for adsorption of molecules and their energies of reactions, but many of the mechanistic steps are unknown and speculative. It is proposed that data from matrix isolation experiments involving the reactions of refractory materials (especially C, Si, and Fe atoms and clusters) with small molecules (mainly H2, H2O, CO, CO2) are particularly applicable to explaining mechanistic details of likely interstellar chemical reactions. In many cases, matrix isolation techniques are the sole method of studying such reactions; also in many cases, complexations and bond rearrangements yield molecules never before observed. The study of these reactions thus provides a logical basis for the mechanisms of interstellar reactions. A list of reactions is presented that would simulate interstellar chemical reactions. These reactions were studied using FTIR-matrix isolation techniques.

  3. Classification of Chemical Reactions: Stages of Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stains, Marilyne; Talanquer, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    In this study we explore the strategies that undergraduate and graduate chemistry students use when engaged in classification tasks involving symbolic and microscopic (particulate) representations of different chemical reactions. We were specifically interested in characterizing the basic features to which students pay attention when classifying…

  4. Atoms of multistationarity in chemical reaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Badal

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction networks taken with mass-action kinetics are dynamical systems that arise in chemical engineering and systems biology. Deciding whether a chemical reaction network admits multiple positive steady states is to determine existence of multiple positive solutions to a system of polynomials with unknown coefficients. In this work, we consider the question of whether the minimal (in a precise sense) networks, which we propose to call `atoms of multistationarity,' characterize the entire set of multistationary networks. We show that if a subnetwork admits multiple nondegenerate positive steady states, then these steady states can be extended to establish multistationarity of a larger network, provided that the two networks share the same stoichiometric subspace. Our result provides the mathematical foundation for a technique used by Siegal-Gaskins et al. of establishing bistability by way of `network ancestry.' Here, our main application is for enumerating small multistationary continuous-flow stir...

  5. Clarification of sodium-water chemical reaction using laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes in a steam generator. Therefore the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for safety reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using laser diagnostics. The sodium-water, sodium-oxygen and sodium-hydrogen counter-flow reactions were measured using laser diagnostics such as Raman, absorption and photo-fragmentation spectroscopies. The measurement results show that the main product of the sodium-water reaction is NaOH. The sodium-water reaction rate is slower than that of the sodium-oxygen reaction and hydrogen does not react noticeably with sodium. (author)

  6. Chemical computing with reaction-diffusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorecki, J; Gizynski, K; Guzowski, J; Gorecka, J N; Garstecki, P; Gruenert, G; Dittrich, P

    2015-07-28

    Chemical reactions are responsible for information processing in living organisms. It is believed that the basic features of biological computing activity are reflected by a reaction-diffusion medium. We illustrate the ideas of chemical information processing considering the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction and its photosensitive variant. The computational universality of information processing is demonstrated. For different methods of information coding constructions of the simplest signal processing devices are described. The function performed by a particular device is determined by the geometrical structure of oscillatory (or of excitable) and non-excitable regions of the medium. In a living organism, the brain is created as a self-grown structure of interacting nonlinear elements and reaches its functionality as the result of learning. We discuss whether such a strategy can be adopted for generation of chemical information processing devices. Recent studies have shown that lipid-covered droplets containing solution of reagents of BZ reaction can be transported by a flowing oil. Therefore, structures of droplets can be spontaneously formed at specific non-equilibrium conditions, for example forced by flows in a microfluidic reactor. We describe how to introduce information to a droplet structure, track the information flow inside it and optimize medium evolution to achieve the maximum reliability. Applications of droplet structures for classification tasks are discussed. PMID:26078345

  7. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  8. Direct mechanism in solar nuclear reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Oberhummer, H; Staudt, G.

    1994-01-01

    A short overview of the direct reaction mechanism and the models used for the analysis of such processes is given. Nuclear reactions proceeding through the direct mechanism and involved in solar hydrogen burning are discussed. The significance of these nuclear reactions with respect to the solar neutrino problem is investigated.

  9. Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, S. P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications to reactions leading to NOx and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  10. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, G.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  11. Development of Green and Sustainable Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarning, Esben

    as well as the possibility for establishing a renewable chemical industry is discussed. The development of a procedure for using unsaturated aldehydes as olefin synthons in the Diels- Alder reaction is described in chapter three. This procedure affords good yields of the desired Diels- Alder adducts...... of a procedure for converting triose sugars into lactic acid and methyl lactate is described. Conventional and Lewis acidic zeolites are used as catalysts for this transformation and this procedure illustrates how zeolite catalysis can play an important role in the production of value added chemicals from...

  12. Chemical reaction systems with toric steady states

    CERN Document Server

    Millan, Mercedes Perez; Shiu, Anne; Conradi, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Mass-action chemical reaction systems are frequently used in Computational Biology. The corresponding polynomial dynamical systems are often large, consisting of tens or even hundreds of ordinary differential equations, and poorly parameterized (due to noisy measurement data and a small number of data points and repetitions). Therefore, it is often difficult to establish the existence of (positive) steady states or to determine whether more complicated phenomena such as multistationarity exist. If, however, the steady state ideal of the system is a binomial ideal, then we show that these questions can be answered easily. The focus of this work is on systems with this property, and we say that such systems have toric steady states. Our main result gives sufficient conditions for a chemical reaction system to have toric steady states. Furthermore, we analyze the capacity of such a system to exhibit positive steady states and multistationarity. Examples of systems with toric steady states include weakly-reversib...

  13. Optimization of a Chemical Reaction Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Sansar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This project consists of the optimization of a chemical reactor train. The reactor considered here is the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, one of the reactor models used in engineering. Given the design equation for the CSTR and the cost function for a reactor, the following values are determined; the optimum number of reactors in the reaction train, the volume of each reactor and the total cost.

  14. Optimization of a Chemical Reaction Train

    OpenAIRE

    Bahar Sansar

    2010-01-01

    This project consists of the optimization of a chemical reactor train. The reactor considered here is the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), one of the reactor models used in engineering. Given the design equation for the CSTR and the cost function for a reactor, the following values are determined; the optimum number of reactors in the reaction train, the volume of each reactor and the total cost.

  15. Neural Networks in Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Raff, Lionel; Hagan, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This monograph presents recent advances in neural network (NN) approaches and applications to chemical reaction dynamics. Topics covered include: (i) the development of ab initio potential-energy surfaces (PES) for complex multichannel systems using modified novelty sampling and feedforward NNs; (ii) methods for sampling the configuration space of critical importance, such as trajectory and novelty sampling methods and gradient fitting methods; (iii) parametrization of interatomic potential functions using a genetic algorithm accelerated with a NN; (iv) parametrization of analytic interatomic

  16. Suppression of Ostwald Ripening by Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable and coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Ostwald ripening must thus be suppressed to stabilize emulsions, e.g. to control the properties of pharmaceuticals, food, or cosmetics. Suppression of Ostwald ripening is also important in biological cells, which contain stable liquid-like compartments, e.g. germ granules, Cajal-bodies, and centrosomes. Such systems are often driven away from equilibrium by chemical reactions and can thus be called active emulsions. Here, we show that non-equilibrium chemical reactions can suppress Ostwald Ripening, leading to stable, monodisperse emulsions. We derive analytical approximations of the typical droplet size, droplet count, and time scale of the dynamics from a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics. We also compare these results to numerical simulations of the continuous concentration fields. Generally, we thus show how chemical reactions can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties in technology and nature.

  17. New methods for quantum mechanical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, W.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Quantum mechanical methods are developed to describe the dynamics of bimolecular chemical reactions. We focus on developing approaches for directly calculating the desired quantity of interest. Methods for the calculation of single matrix elements of the scattering matrix (S-matrix) and initial state-selected reaction probabilities are presented. This is accomplished by the use of absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) to obtain a localized (L{sup 2}) representation of the outgoing wave scattering Green`s function. This approach enables the efficient calculation of only a single column of the S-matrix with a proportionate savings in effort over the calculation of the entire S-matrix. Applying this method to the calculation of the initial (or final) state-selected reaction probability, a more averaged quantity, requires even less effort than the state-to-state S-matrix elements. It is shown how the same representation of the Green`s function can be effectively applied to the calculation of negative ion photodetachment intensities. Photodetachment spectroscopy of the anion ABC{sup -} can be a very useful method for obtaining detailed information about the neutral ABC potential energy surface, particularly if the ABC{sup -} geometry is similar to the transition state of the neutral ABC. Total and arrangement-selected photodetachment spectra are calculated for the H{sub 3}O{sup -} system, providing information about the potential energy surface for the OH + H{sub 2} reaction when compared with experimental results. Finally, we present methods for the direct calculation of the thermal rate constant from the flux-position and flux-flux correlation functions. The spirit of transition state theory is invoked by concentrating on the short time dynamics in the area around the transition state that determine reactivity. These methods are made efficient by evaluating the required quantum mechanical trace in the basis of eigenstates of the Boltzmannized flux operator.

  18. Mechanisms of multiple chemical sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Chris

    2002-03-10

    Sensitivity to chemicals is a toxicological concept, contained in the dose-response relationship. Sensitivity also includes the concept of hypersensitivity, although controversy surrounds the nature of effects from very low exposures. The term multiple chemical sensitivity has been used to describe individuals with a debilitating, multi-organ sensitivity following chemical exposures. Many aspects of this condition extend the nature of sensitivity to low levels of exposure to chemicals, and is a designation with medical, immunological, neuropsychological and toxicological perspectives. The basis of MCS is still to be identified, although a large number of hypersensitivity, immunological, psychological, neurological and toxicological mechanisms have been suggested, including: allergy; autosuggestion; cacosomia; conditioned response; immunological; impairment of biochemical pathways involved in energy production; impairment of neurochemical pathways; illness belief system; limbic kindling; olfactory threshold sensitivity; panic disorder; psychosomatic condition; malingering; neurogenic inflammation; overload of biotransformation pathways (also linked with free radical production); psychological or psychiatric illness; airway reactivity; sensitisation of the neurological system; time dependent sensitisation, toxicant induced loss of tolerance. Most of these theories tend to break down into concepts involving: (1) disruption in immunological/allergy processes; (2) alteration in nervous system function; (3) changes in biochemical or biotransformation capacity; (4) changes in psychological/neurobehavioural function. Research into the possible mechanisms of MCS is far from complete. However, a number of promising avenues of investigation indicate that the possibility of alteration of the sensitivity of nervous system cells (neurogenic inflammation, limbic kindling, cacosomia, neurogenic switching) are a possible mechanism for MCS.

  19. Quantum chemical study of mechanisms of dissociation and isomerization reactions in some molecules and radicals of astrophysical significance: Cyanides and related molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V P Gupta; Archina Sharma

    2006-09-01

    A theoretical study of the mechanism of photodecomposition in carbonyl cyanide, diethynyl ketone, acetyl cyanide and formyl cyanide has been conducted using density functional and MP2 theories. A complete analysis of the electronic spectra of these molecules in terms of nature, energy and intensity of electronic transitions has been provided by time-dependent density functional theory. Mixing coefficients and main configurations of the electronic states have been used to identify the states leading to the photodecomposition process. While the Rydberg state 1(n,3s) is involved in the dissociation of formyl cyanide and acetyl cyanide, the $^{*}_{CC} / ^{*}_{CN}$ states are involved in the case of carbonyl cyanide and diethynyl ketone. In all cases, however, stepwise decomposition process is preferred over the concerted reaction process. Based on potential energy curves for bond dissociation and the transition state and IRC studies, it is found that besides the direct dissociation of carbonyl cyanide, a photoisomerization process through a non-planar transition state may also occur resulting in the formation of a stable and planar isomer CNC(O)CN. A complete vibrational analysis of the higher energy isomer has been conducted and several new fundamental bands are predicted. Some of the earlier experimental results on the photodecomposition mechanism and energies of photofragments in carbonyl cyanide and acetyl cyanide have also been rationalized.

  20. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, J.C. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  1. Law of localization in chemical reaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In living cells, chemical reactions are connected by sharing their products and substrates, and form complex networks, e.g. metabolic pathways. Here we developed a theory to predict the sensitivity, i.e. the responses of concentrations and fluxes to perturbations of enzymes, from network structure alone. Responses turn out to exhibit two characteristic patterns, $localization$ and $hierarchy$. We present a general theorem connecting sensitivity with network topology that explains these characteristic patterns. Our results imply that network topology is an origin of biological robustness. Finally, we suggest a strategy to determine real networks from experimental measurements.

  2. Law of Localization in Chemical Reaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    In living cells, chemical reactions are connected by sharing their products and substrates, and form complex networks, e.g., metabolic pathways. Here we developed a theory to predict the sensitivity, i.e., the responses of concentrations and fluxes to perturbations of enzymes, from network structure alone. Nonzero response patterns turn out to exhibit two characteristic features, localization and hierarchy. We present a general theorem connecting sensitivity with network topology that explains these characteristic patterns. Our results imply that network topology is an origin of biological robustness. Finally, we suggest a strategy to determine real networks from experimental measurements.

  3. Chemical Reaction Dynamics in Nanoscle Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelyn M. Goldfield

    2006-09-26

    The major focus of the research in this program is the study of the behavior of molecular systems confined in nanoscale environments. The goal is to develop a theoretical framework for predicting how chemical reactions occur in nanoscale environments. To achieve this goal we have employed ab initio quantum chemistry, classical dynamics and quantum dynamics methods. Much of the research has focused on the behavior of molecules confined within single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). We have also studied interactions of small molecules with the exterior surface of SWCNTs. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of interfaces of sliding surface interfaces have also been performed.

  4. Quantum Chemical Study on Reaction of Acetaldehyde with Hydroxyl Radical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Ming(李明); ZHANG,Jin-Sheng(张金生); SHEN,Wei(申伟); MENG,Qing-Xi(孟庆喜)

    2004-01-01

    The reaction of acetaldehyde with hydroxyl radical was studied by means of quantum chemical methods. The geometries for all the stationary points on the potential energy surfaces were optimized fully, respectively, at the G3MP2, G3, and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) levels. Single-point energies of all the species were calculated at the QCISD/6-311 + +G(d,p) level. The mechanism of the reaction studied was confirmed. The predicted product is acetyl radical that is in agreement with the experiment.

  5. Chemical Reaction Optimization for Max Flow Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Barham

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an algorithm for MaxFlow problem using "Chemical Reaction Optimization algorithm (CRO". CRO is a recently established meta-heuristics algorithm for optimization, inspired by the nature of chemical reactions. The main concern is to find the best maximum flow value at which the flow can be shipped from the source node to the sink node in a flow network without violating any capacity constraints in which the flow of each edge remains within the upper bound value of the capacity. The proposed MaxFlow-CRO algorithm is presented, analyzed asymptotically and experimental test is conducted. Asymptotic runtime is derived theoretically. The algorithm is implemented using JAVA programming language. Results show a good performance with a complexity of O(I E2, for I iterations and E edges. The number of iterations I in the algorithm, is an important factor that will affect the results obtained. As number of iterations is increased, best possible max-Flow value is obtained.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Chemical Reactions for Use in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian Xie; Tinker, Robert

    2006-01-01

    One of the simulation engines of an open-source program called the Molecular Workbench, which can simulate thermodynamics of chemical reactions, is described. This type of real-time, interactive simulation and visualization of chemical reactions at the atomic scale could help students understand the connections between chemical reaction equations…

  7. Sugarcane bagasse gasification: Global reaction mechanism of syngas evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated using a semi batch reactor. ► Global reaction mechanism combining pyrolysis and gasification reactions is presented. ► High flow rates of syngas supported fragmentation and secondary reactions. ► CO flow rate increased at higher heating rates at the expense of CO2 production. ► At high temperatures merger between pyrolysis and char gasification occurs. -- Abstract: Steam gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated. A semi batch reactor with a fixed amount of sugarcane bagasse sample placed in steady flow of high temperature steam at atmospheric pressure has been used. The gasification of bagasse was examined at reactor and steam temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 °C. The evolution of syngas flow rate and chemical composition has been monitored. The evolution of chemical composition and total flow rate of the syngas has been used to formulate a global reaction mechanism. The mechanism combines pyrolysis reaction mechanisms from the literature and steam gasification/reforming reactions. Steam gasification steps include steam–hydrocarbons reforming, char gasification and water gas shift reactions. Evidence of fragmentation, secondary ring opening reactions and tertiary reactions resulting in formation of gaseous hydrocarbons is supported by higher flow rates of syngas and hydrogen at high heating rates and high reactor temperatures. Increase in carbon monoxide flow rate at the expense of carbon dioxide flow rate with the increase in reactor temperature has been observed. This increase in the ratio of CO/CO2 flow rate confirms the production of CO and CO2 from the competing reaction routes. At 1000 °C gasification a total merging between the pyrolysis step and the char gasification step has been observed. This is attributed to acceleration of char gasification reactions and acceleration of steam–hydrocarbons reforming reactions. These hydrocarbons are the precursors to char

  8. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions. II: Parallel reversible chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, van F.P.H.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and co

  9. Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingsong

    1993-04-01

    The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The Br + O{sub 3} reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO{sub 2} {yields} ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO{sub 2} molecule.

  10. Study on the key problems of interaction between microwave and chemical reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaoqing; HUANG Kama

    2007-01-01

    Microwave has been found as an efficient heating method in chemical industry.However,in present days the interaction between microwave and chemical reactions has not been deeply understood,which restricts a wider application of high power microwave in chemical industry.In this Paper,the key problems of interaction between microwave and chemical reaction are investigated,such as complex effective permittivity of chemical reaction,simulation of microwave heating on chemical reaction and non-thermal effect of microwave,which will enhance further knowledge of the mechanism of interaction between microwave and chemical reaction.Moreover,such an analysis is beneficial for handling with difficulties in application of microwave chemical industry.

  11. Theory of rotational transition in atom-diatom chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masato; Nakamura, Hiroki

    1989-05-01

    Rotational transition in atom-diatom chemical reaction is theoretically studied. A new approximate theory (which we call IOS-DW approximation) is proposed on the basis of the physical idea that rotational transition in reaction is induced by the following two different mechanisms: rotationally inelastic half collision in both initial and final arrangement channels, and coordinate transformation in the reaction zone. This theory gives a fairy compact expression for the state-to-state transition probability. Introducing the additional physically reasonable assumption that reaction (particle rearrangement) takes place in a spatially localized region, we have reduced this expression into a simpler analytical form which can explicitly give overall rotational state distribution in reaction. Numerical application was made to the H+H2 reaction and demonstrated its effectiveness for the simplicity. A further simplified most naive approximation, i.e., independent events approximation was also proposed and demonstrated to work well in the test calculation of H+H2. The overall rotational state distribution is expressed simply by a product sum of the transition probabilities for the three consecutive processes in reaction: inelastic transition in the initial half collision, transition due to particle rearrangement, and inelastic transition in the final half collision.

  12. Quantum mechanical calculations of vibrational population inversion in chemical reactions - Numerically exact L-squared-amplitude-density study of the H2Br reactive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, J. Z. H.; Kouri, D. J.; Haug, K.; Schwenke, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    Numerically exact, fully three-dimensional quantum mechanicl reactive scattering calculations are reported for the H2Br system. Both the exchange (H + H-prime Br to H-prime + HBr) and abstraction (H + HBR to H2 + Br) reaction channels are included in the calculations. The present results are the first completely converged three-dimensional quantum calculations for a system involving a highly exoergic reaction channel (the abstraction process). It is found that the production of vibrationally hot H2 in the abstraction reaction, and hence the extent of population inversion in the products, is a sensitive function of initial HBr rotational state and collision energy.

  13. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  14. A chemical reaction network solver for the astrophysics code NIRVANA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, U.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Chemistry often plays an important role in astrophysical gases. It regulates thermal properties by changing species abundances and via ionization processes. This way, time-dependent cooling mechanisms and other chemistry-related energy sources can have a profound influence on the dynamical evolution of an astrophysical system. Modeling those effects with the underlying chemical kinetics in realistic magneto-gasdynamical simulations provide the basis for a better link to observations. Aims: The present work describes the implementation of a chemical reaction network solver into the magneto-gasdynamical code NIRVANA. For this purpose a multispecies structure is installed, and a new module for evolving the rate equations of chemical kinetics is developed and coupled to the dynamical part of the code. A small chemical network for a hydrogen-helium plasma was constructed including associated thermal processes which is used in test problems. Methods: Evolving a chemical network within time-dependent simulations requires the additional solution of a set of coupled advection-reaction equations for species and gas temperature. Second-order Strang-splitting is used to separate the advection part from the reaction part. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) system representing the reaction part is solved with a fourth-order generalized Runge-Kutta method applicable for stiff systems inherent to astrochemistry. Results: A series of tests was performed in order to check the correctness of numerical and technical implementation. Tests include well-known stiff ODE problems from the mathematical literature in order to confirm accuracy properties of the solver used as well as problems combining gasdynamics and chemistry. Overall, very satisfactory results are achieved. Conclusions: The NIRVANA code is now ready to handle astrochemical processes in time-dependent simulations. An easy-to-use interface allows implementation of complex networks including thermal processes

  15. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  16. Control of Ultracold Chemical Reactions Through Conical Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    The pioneering work on obtaining a quantum degenerate sample of ground state KRb molecules is one of the great successes in ultracold physics. The early experimental and theoretical investigations to describe quantum chemical reactions of ultracold KRb molecules with residual ultracold K atoms have been based on probing their inelastic collision loss rates. A natural progression towards control of molecular reactivity would be to study the potential landscape of the collisional complex with the inherited degeneracies and intersections between two lowest electronic states. The topology of these surfaces provide us with a qualitative understanding of the reaction mechanism. Here we study how the ability to prepare unique initial states combined with the presence of conical intersections can be used to control the outcome of ultracold chemical reactions of alkali-metal atoms and molecules. We locate and determine properties of conical intersections for the KRbK molecular system and determine signatures of non-adiabatic passage through the conical intersection to distinguish between relaxation and reaction pathways. This work is supported by the ARO-MURI and NSF Grants.

  17. Deterministic Function Computation with Chemical Reaction Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ho-Lin; Soloveichik, David

    2012-01-01

    We study the deterministic computation of functions on tuples of natural numbers by chemical reaction networks (CRNs). CRNs have been shown to be efficiently Turing-universal when allowing for a small probability of error. CRNs that are guaranteed to converge on a correct answer, on the other hand, have been shown to decide only the semilinear predicates. We introduce the notion of function, rather than predicate, computation by representing the output of a function f:N^k --> N^l by a count of some molecular species, i.e., if the CRN starts with n_1,...,n_k molecules of some "input" species X_1,...,X_k, the CRN is guaranteed to converge to having f(n_1,...,n_k) molecules of the "output" species Y_1,...,Y_l. We show that a function f:N^k --> N^l is deterministically computed by a CRN if and only if its graph {(x,y) \\in N^k x N^l | f(x) = y} is a semilinear set. Finally, we show that each semilinear function f can be computed on input x in expected time O(polylog |x|).

  18. Flows and chemical reactions in an electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This book - a sequel of previous publications 'Flows and Chemical Reactions', 'Chemical Reactions Flows in Homogeneous Mixtures' and 'Chemical Reactions and Flows in Heterogeneous Mixtures' - is devoted to flows with chemical reactions in the electromagnetic field. The first part, entitled basic equations, consists of four chapters. The first chapter provides an overview of the equations of electromagnetism in Minkowski spacetime. This presentation is extended to balance equations, first in homogeneous media unpolarized in the second chapter and homogeneous fluid medium polarized in the thir

  19. Mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    The purpose of this series is to provide a continuing critical review of the literature concerned with mechanistic aspects of inorganic and organo­ metallic reactions in solution, with coverage being complete in each volume. The papers discussed are selected on the basis of relevance to the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and many include results of a nonkinetic nature when useful mechanistic information can be deduced. The period of literature covered by this volume is July 1982 through December 1983, and in some instances papers not available for inclusion in the previous volume are also included. Numerical results are usually reported in the units used by the original authors, except where data from different papers are com­ pared and conversion to common units is necessary. As in previous volumes material included covers the major areas of redox processes, reactions of the nonmetallic elements, reaction of inert and labile metal complexes and the reactions of organometallic compounds. While m...

  20. Development and validation of a reduced combined biodiesel–diesel reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Jo-Han;

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a compact combined biodiesel–diesel (CBD) reaction mechanism for diesel engine simulations is proposed through the combination of three component mechanisms using a chemical class-based approach. The proposed mechanism comprises the reaction mechanisms of methyl crotonate (MC...

  1. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Masataka [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Honmachi, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyodai Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  2. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method

  3. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  4. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems

  5. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshavamurthy, S.

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems.

  6. 45钢表面原位摩擦化学反应膜形成过程及力学性能%Formation and mechanical properties of in situ tribo-chemical reaction film on surface of 45 steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张保森; 许一; 徐滨士; 高飞; 史佩京; 吴毅雄

    2011-01-01

    A kind of tribo-treatment agent, which can be applied to in situ tribo-chemical treatment, was prepared using natural mineral powders. Addition of the as-prepared agent to diesel engine oil was optimized by means of wearing test on a ring-block friction and wear tester. Forming process and mechanical properties of in situ tribo-chernical reaction film on surface of 45 steel were investigated and forming mechanism of the film was discussed. Results show that the addition of 0. 5 wt% agent is most efficient for formation of in situ tribo-chemical reaction film to improve wearing performance of the surface of 45 steel. The friction coefficient and mass wear rate decreases by 19. 7% and 71.8% compared to those of the base oil, respectively. The tribo-treated surface is rather smooth and a tribo-chemical reaction film mainly consisting of iron oxides, iron and/or magnesium silicates and carbon-containing compounds is formed on the steel substrate. Moreover, the porous film tended to become compact and continuous as the wearing time increased, contributing to the improvement in surface strength and wear resistance of 45 steel.%制备了一种用于原位摩擦化学处理技术的天然矿物微粉摩擦处理剂.采用环-块摩擦磨损试验机对其在柴油机油中的添加量进行了优化,研究了其在45钢表面的原位摩擦化学反应膜的形成过程及力学性能,探讨了形成机理.结果表明:处理剂含量为0.5 wt%时对45钢表面具有较好的优化效果,其摩擦因数和质量磨损率分别较基础油降低约19.7%和71.8%.摩擦处理表面较为光滑平整,形成了由铁的氧化物、铁镁硅酸盐及含碳化合物构成的摩擦化学反应膜,且随着时间的增加逐步由疏松多孔趋于致密连续,具有较高的力学性能,显著提高了45钢的表面强度及磨损抗力.

  7. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglin

    The concept of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) was examined for finishing sapphire. In this study sapphire was used as a model system for oxide ceramics. The removal rates were determined by weight loss. Surface quality and structure were characterized with surface probe microscopy (SPM). Polishing experiments were designed to test the chemically modified surface layer. A series of abrasives with various hardnesses including mono-crystalline and polycrystalline diamond, alpha and gamma alumina, zirconia, ceria and silica were used. Diaspore was also evaluated. The results indicated that, with similar particle size and shape, harder abrasives do not necessarily cause faster material removal and better surface finish, and abrasives with hardness equal to or less than sapphire such as alpha alumina and gamma alumina achieved the best surface finish and efficient material removal. A hypothesis was proposed that the sapphire surface was modified by water to form a thin hydration laver with structure and hardness close to diaspore. Abrasives with a hardness between diaspore and sapphire polished the c-plane of sapphire with good surface finish and efficient removal. SPM indicated the hydration layer on the c-plane surface was about 1 nm thick. Removal rate and surface finish as a function of pH were also examined on c-plane sapphire with nano-alumina abrasives. The removal rate as a function of pH was compared to the solubility behavior of alumina. The results showed the deviation of pH from the lowest solubility pH for alumina (pH = 5) was a driving force for the surface reaction to form a hydration layer. The anisotropy of sapphire strongly affects removal rate and surface quality in CMP. The relationships among orientation. pH and abrasive were studied for sapphire with c (0001), a (11-20), and m (10-10) planes. Based on the results, the CMP process for sapphire includes chemical reaction of the surface to form a thin reaction layer that is softer than sapphire

  8. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01

    , they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

  9. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2011-07-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This work focused on two classes of oxygen carrier, one that merely undergoes a change in oxidation state, such as Fe3O4/Fe2O3 and one that is converted from its higher to its lower oxidation state by the release of oxygen on heating, i.e., CuO/Cu2O. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification (3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratory-scale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability (4) the identification of mechanisms and rates for the copper, cuprous oxide, and cupric oxide system using thermogravimetric analysis.

  10. Determination of caffeine using oscillating chemical reaction in a CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinzhang; Ren, Jie; Yang, Wu; Liu, XiuHui; Yang, Hua

    2003-07-14

    A new analytical method for the determination of caffeine by the sequential perturbation caused by different amounts of caffeine on the oscillating chemical system involving the manganese(II)-catalyzed reaction between potassium bromate and tyrosine in acidic medium in a CSTR was proposed. The method exposed for the first time in this work. It relies on the relationship between the changes in the oscillation amplitude of the chemical system and the concentration of caffeine. The calibration curve fits a second-order polynomial equation very well when the concentration of caffeine over the range 4.0 x 10(-6) - 1.2 x 10(-4) M (r = 0.9968). The effect of influential variables, such as the concentration of reaction components, injection point, temperature, flow rate and stirring rate were studied. Some aspects of the potential mechanism of action of caffeine on the chemical oscillating system were also discussed. A real sample was determined and the result was satisfactory.

  11. Stereodynamics: From elementary processes to macroscopic chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Che, Dock-Chil [Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Tsai, Po-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, King-Chuen [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Palazzetti, Federico [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Roma (Italy); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-12-31

    This paper aims at discussing new facets on stereodynamical behaviors in chemical reactions, i.e. the effects of molecular orientation and alignment on reactive processes. Further topics on macroscopic processes involving deviations from Arrhenius behavior in the temperature dependence of chemical reactions and chirality effects in collisions are also discussed.

  12. Localized basis functions and other computational improvements in variational nonorthogonal basis function methods for quantum mechanical scattering problems involving chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    1990-01-01

    The Generalized Newton Variational Principle for 3D quantum mechanical reactive scattering is briefly reviewed. Then three techniques are described which improve the efficiency of the computations. First, the fact that the Hamiltonian is Hermitian is used to reduce the number of integrals computed, and then the properties of localized basis functions are exploited in order to eliminate redundant work in the integral evaluation. A new type of localized basis function with desirable properties is suggested. It is shown how partitioned matrices can be used with localized basis functions to reduce the amount of work required to handle the complex boundary conditions. The new techniques do not introduce any approximations into the calculations, so they may be used to obtain converged solutions of the Schroedinger equation.

  13. Oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects in the dopamine beta-monooxygenase reaction: evidence for a new chemical mechanism in non-heme metallomonooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, G; Berry, J A; Klinman, J P

    1994-01-11

    Previous studies of dopamine beta-monooxygenase (D beta M) have implicated the formation of a substrate-derived benzylic radical via a hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism [Miller & Klinman (1985) Biochemistry 24, 2114]. We now address the nature of the oxygen species catalyzing C-H bond cleavage through the measurement of oxygen-18 isotope effects as a function of substrate structure. Using deuterium isotope effects, together with experimental O-18 isotope effects with protonated and deuterated substrates, it has been possible to calculate intrinsic O-18 isotope effects. Since the D beta M mechanism includes many steps which may involve changes in bond order at dioxygen, e.g., the reversible binding of O2 to the active-site copper and its reductive activation to a copper-hydroperoxide species, the intrinsic O-18 isotope effect is expected to be the product of two terms: (1) an overall equilibrium O-18 isotope effect on steps leading from O2 binding to the formation of the intermediate which catalyzes C-H bond cleavage and (2) a kinetic O-18 isotope effect on the C-H bond cleavage step. Thus, the magnitude of a single O-18 isotope effect measurement cannot reveal the nature of the bonding at oxygen during substrate activation. In the present study we have measured the change in O-18 isotope effect as a function of substrate structure and reactivity, finding values of 18(V/K) which decrease from 1.0281 +/- 0.001 to 1.0216 +/- 0.0003 as the rate of the C-H bond cleavage step decreases from 680 to 2 s-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8286345

  14. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J.; Zubarev, Dmitry; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reacti...

  15. Possible atmospheric lifetimes and chemical reaction mechanisms for selected HCFCs, HFCs, CH3CCl3, and their degradation products against dissolution and/or degradation in seawater and cloudwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, P. H.; Chameides, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    For a wide variety of atmospheric species including CO2, HNO3, and SO2, dissolution in seawater or cloudwater followed by hydrolysis or chemical reaction represents a primary pathway for removal from the atmosphere. In order to determine if this mechanism can also remove significant amounts of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC's), fluorocarbons (HFC's), and their degradation products, an investigation was undertaken as part of the Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS). In this investigation, the rates at which CHCl2CF3 (HCFC-123), CCl2FCH3 (HCFC-141b), CClF2CH3 (HCFC-142b), CHClF2 (HCFC-22), CHClFCF3 (HCFC-124) CH2FCF3 (HFC-134a) CHF2CH3 (HFC-152a), CHF2CF3 (HFC-125), and CH3CCl3 can be dissolved in the oceans and in cloudwater were estimated from the species' thermodynamic and chemical properties using simple mathematical formulations to simulate the transfer of gases from the atmosphere to the ocean or cloudwater. The ability of cloudwater and rainwater to remove gas phase degradation products of these compounds was also considered as was the aqueous phase chemistry of the degradation products. The results of this investigation are described.

  16. Dynamical resonance in F+H2 chemical reaction and rotational excitation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XueMing; XIE DaiQian; ZHANG DongHui

    2007-01-01

    Reaction resonance is a frontier topic in chemical dynamics research, and it is also essential to the understanding of mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions. This short article describes an important development in the frontier of research. Experimental evidence of reaction resonance has been detected in a full quantum state resolved reactive scattering study of the F+H2 reaction. Highly accurate full quantum scattering theoretical modeling shows that the reaction resonance is caused by two Feshbach resonance states. Further studies show that quantum interference is present between the two resonance states for the forward scattering product. This study is a significant step forward in our understanding of chemical reaction resonance in the benchmark F+H2 system. Further experimental studies on the effect of H2 rotational excitation on dynamical resonance have been carried out. Dynamical resonance in the F+H2 (j = 1) reaction has also been observed.

  17. Localized nonequilibrium nanostructures in surface chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, M; Ipsen, M; Mikhailov, A S; Ertl, G [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Nonequilibrium localized stationary structures of submicrometre and nanometre sizes can spontaneously develop under reaction conditions on a catalytic surface. These self-organized structures emerge because of the coupling between the reaction and a structural phase transition in the substrate. Depending on the reaction conditions they can either correspond to densely covered spots (islands), inside which the reaction predominantly proceeds, or local depletions (holes) in a dense adsorbate layer with a very small reactive output in comparison to the surroundings. The stationary localized solutions are constructed using the singular perturbation approximation. These results are compared with numerical simulations, where special adaptive grid algorithms and numerical continuation of stationary profiles are used. Numerical investigations beyond the singular perturbation limit are also presented.

  18. Chemical Reaction of In-situ Processing of NiAl/Al2O3 Composite by Using Thermite Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yin; FAN Xiaonan; ZHANG Mingxu; QIN Xiaoying

    2005-01-01

    NiAl / Al2O3 composite were synthesized by thermite reaction of nickel oxide and aluminum powder mixtures. The phase, the microstructure of the composite, as well as the thermite reaction mechanism, were investigated by X-ray diffractometry ( XRD ), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with differential scanning calorimetry ( DSC). The experimental results show that the thermite reaction leads to the interpenetrating network structure of NiAl/Al2O3 at 1223K for 60min and the chemical reaction apparent activation energy is Eap = 166.960± 13.496 kJ· mol-1 in the NiO/Al system.

  19. Acoustic wave propagation in fluids with coupled chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation presents a hydroacoustic theory which accounts for sound absorption and dispersion in a multicomponent mixture of reacting fluids (assuming a set of first-order acoustic equations without diffusion) such that several coupled reactions can occur simultaneously. General results are obtained in the form of a biquadratic characteristic equation (called the Kirchhoff-Langevin equation) for the complex propagation variable chi = - (α + iω/c) in which α is the attenuation coefficient, c is the phase speed of the progressive wave and ω is the angular frequency. Computer simulations of sound absorption spectra have been made for three different chemical systems, each comprised of two-step chemical reactions using physico-chemical data available in the literature. The chemical systems studied include: (1) water-dioxane, (2) aqueous solutions of glycine and (3) cobalt polyphosphate mixtures. Explicit comparisons are made between the exact biquadratic characteristic solution and the approximate equation (sometimes referred to as a Debye equation) previously applied to interpret the experimental data for the chemical reaction contribution to the absorption versus frequency. The relative chemical reaction and classical viscothermal contributions to the sound absorption are also presented. Several discrepancies that can arise when estimating thermodynamic data (chemical reaction heats or volume changes) for multistep chemical reaction systems when making dilute solution or constant density assumptions are discussed

  20. Non-equilibrium effects in high temperature chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rate data were collected for chemical reactions occurring at high temperatures during reentry of space vehicles. The principle of detailed balancing is used in modeling kinetics of chemical reactions at high temperatures. Although this principle does not hold for certain transient or incubation times in the initial phase of the reaction, it does seem to be valid for the rates of internal energy transitions that occur within molecules and atoms. That is, for every rate of transition within the internal energy states of atoms or molecules, there is an inverse rate that is related through an equilibrium expression involving the energy difference of the transition.

  1. Visualizing chemical reactions confined under graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Rentao; Fu, Qiang; Jin, Li; Yu, Liang; Fang, Guangzong; Tan, Dali; Bao, Xinhe

    2012-05-14

    An undercover agent: graphene has been used as an imaging agent to visualize interfacial reactions under its cover, and exhibits a strong confinement effect on the chemistry of molecules underneath. In a CO atmosphere, CO penetrates into the graphene/Pt(111) interface and reacts with O(2) therein, whereas intercalated CO desorbs from the Pt surface. PMID:22492473

  2. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-01

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  3. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    and microorganisms may be valuable biobased chemicals. Hence a new potential for industrial scale synthesis of chemicals has emerged. A better understanding of the reaction mechanisms and the impact of the reaction conditions on the product formation is thus a prerequisite for designing better biomass processing...

  4. Charge exchange and chemical reactions with trapped Th3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the reaction rates of trapped, buffer gas cooled Th3+ and various gases and have analyzed the reaction products using trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques. Ion trap lifetimes are usually limited by reactions with background molecules, and the high electron affinity of multiply charged ions such as Th3+ make them more prone to loss. Our results show that reactions of Th3+ with carbon dioxide, methane, and oxygen all occur near the classical Langevin rate, while reaction rates with argon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are orders of magnitude lower. Reactions of Th3+ with oxygen and methane proceed primarily via charge exchange, while simultaneous charge exchange and chemical reaction occurs between Th3+ and carbon dioxide. Loss rates of Th3+ in helium are consistent with reaction with impurities in the gas. Reaction rates of Th3+ with nitrogen and argon depend on the internal electronic configuration of the Th3+.

  5. Charge Exchange and Chemical Reactions with Trapped Th$^{3+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, L R; Chapman, M S

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the reaction rates of trapped, buffer gas cooled Th$^{3+}$ and various gases and have analyzed the reaction products using trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques. Ion trap lifetimes are usually limited by reactions with background molecules, and the high electron affinity of multiply charged ions such as Th$^{3+}$ make them more prone to loss. Our results show that reactions of Th$^{3+}$ with carbon dioxide, methane, and oxygen all occur near the classical Langevin rate, while reaction rates with argon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are orders of magnitude lower. Reactions of Th$^{3+}$ with oxygen and methane proceed primarily via charge exchange, while simultaneous charge exchange and chemical reaction occurs between Th$^{3+}$ and carbon dioxide. Loss rates of Th$^{3+}$ in helium are consistent with reaction with impurities in the gas. Reaction rates of Th$^{3+}$ with nitrogen and argon depend on the internal electronic configuration of the Th$^{3+}$.

  6. Quantum chemical investigation of mechanisms of silane oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Mary M.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2001-01-01

    Several mechanisms for the peroxide oxidation of organosilanes to alcohols are compared by quantum chemical calculations, including solvation with the PCM method. Without doubt, the reaction proceeds via anionic, pentacoordinate silicate species, but a profound difference is found between in vacuo...

  7. The Law of Conservation of Energy in Chemical Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, I A

    2000-01-01

    Earlier it has been supposed that the law of conservation of energy in chemical reactions has the following form: DU=DQ-PDV+SUM(muiDN) In the present paper it has been proved by means of the theory of ordinary differential equations that in the biggest part of the chemical reactions it must have the following form: DU=DQ+PDV+SUM(muiDN) The result obtained allows to explain a paradox in chemical thermodynamics: the heat of chemical processes measured by calorimetry and by the Vant-Hoff equation differs very much from each other. The result is confirmed by many experiments.

  8. Developing Secondary Students' Conceptions of Chemical Reactions: The Introduction of Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driel, Jan H.; De Vos, Wobbe; Verloop, Nico; Dekkers, Hetty

    1998-01-01

    Describes an empirical study concerning the introduction of the concept of chemical equilibrium in chemistry classrooms in a way which challenges students' initial conceptions of chemical reactions. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  9. Accelerating chemical reactions: Exploring reactive free-energy surfaces using accelerated ab initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Levi C. T.; Markwick, Phineus R. L.; McCammon, J. Andrew; Doltsinis, Nikos L.

    2011-01-01

    A biased potential molecular dynamics simulation approach, accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD), has been implemented in the framework of ab initio molecular dynamics for the study of chemical reactions. Using two examples, the double proton transfer reaction in formic acid dimer and the hypothetical adiabatic ring opening and subsequent rearrangement reactions in methylenecyclopropane, it is demonstrated that ab initio AMD can be readily employed to efficiently explore the reactive potential energy surface, allowing the prediction of chemical reactions and the identification of metastable states. An adaptive variant of the AMD method is developed, which additionally affords an accurate representation of both the free-energy surface and the mechanism associated with the chemical reaction of interest and can also provide an estimate of the reaction rate. PMID:21548673

  10. Inelastic Collisions and Chemical Reactions of Molecules at Ultracold Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Quéméner, Goulven; Balakrishnan, Naduvalath; Dalgarno, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent theoretical works on inelastic collisions and chemical reactions at cold and ultracold temperatures involving neutral or ionic systems of atoms and molecules. Tables of zero-temperature rate constants of various molecules are provided.

  11. Pyrimidine-specific chemical reactions useful for DNA sequencing.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, C M; Schmid, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Potassium permanganate reacts selectively with thymidine residues in DNA (1) while hydroxylamine hydrochloride at pH 6 specifically attacks cytosine (2). We have adopted these reactions for use with the chemical sequencing method developed by Maxam and Gilbert (3).

  12. Reaction mechanisms in heavy ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubian J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the reaction mechanisms involved in heavy ion fusion. We begin with collisions of tightly bound systems, considering three energy regimes: energies above the Coulomb barrier, energies just below the barrier and deep sub-barrier energies. We show that channel coupling effects may influence the fusion process at above-barrier energies, increasing or reducing the cross section predicted by single barrier penetration model. Below the Coulomb barrier, it enhances the cross section, and this effect increases with the system’s size. It is argued that this behavior can be traced back to the increasing importance of Coulomb coupling with the charge of the collision partners. The sharp drop of the fusion cross section observed at deep sub-barrier energies is addressed and the theoretical approaches to this phenomenon are discussed. We then consider the reaction mechanisms involved in fusion reactions of weakly bound systems, paying particular attention to the calculations of complete and incomplete fusion available in the literature.

  13. Study of the mechanism of the dissolution of actinide's dioxides (UO2, NpO2 PuO2, AmO2) by chemical or electrochemical redox reactions in aqueous acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the mechanism of the dissolution of MO2 type actinide's oxides (with M = U,Np,Pu,Am) has been realized. Three basic tools have been employed: 1/ thermodynamic calculations, 2/ electrochemistry of the oxides in carbon paste electrodes (CPE), 3/ isotopic labelling (18O) followed by the measurement of the MO22+ entities by RAMAN spectroscopy. The thermodynamic study demonstrates that: 1/ the dissolution of MO2 oxides leading to MIV ions in acidic non complexing medium is impossible: these oxides are thus strictly insoluble in these conditions, 2/ the dissolution of MO2 oxides leading to M III, M V and M VI aquo ions is possible and the range of potential corresponding to these transformations have been calculated. The results of the thermodynamic study are supported by those obtained by electrochemistry. Quantitative transformations: MO2(solid) → MO22+(solution) or MO2(solid) → M3(solution) are observable. The knowledge of the reactional chemical path has been improved in the case of the oxidizing dissolution (MO2(solid) → MO22+(solution), in the course of the experiment where 18O labelling of actinyl's oxygen (MO22+) was realized: the species M16O22+, M16,18O22+ and M18,18O22+ were detected after reaction by RAMAN spectroscopy. This study demonstrated that the first step of an oxidizing dissolution of an actinide's oxide of the MO2 type consist in the conversion of M IV O2 into an M V (MO2+) species on the surface of the oxide

  14. Systematic Error Estimation for Chemical Reaction Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Simm, Gregor N

    2016-01-01

    For the theoretical understanding of the reactivity of complex chemical systems accurate relative energies between intermediates and transition states are required. Despite its popularity, density functional theory (DFT) often fails to provide sufficiently accurate data, especially for molecules containing transition metals. Due to the huge number of intermediates that need to be studied for all but the simplest chemical processes, DFT is to date the only method that is computationally feasible. Here, we present a Bayesian framework for DFT that allows for error estimation of calculated properties. Since the optimal choice of parameters in present-day density functionals is strongly system dependent, we advocate for a system-focused re-parameterization. While, at first sight, this approach conflicts with the first-principles character of DFT that should make it in principle system independent, we deliberately introduce system dependence because we can then assign a stochastically meaningful error to the syste...

  15. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  16. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water chemical reaction field using laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes. Therefore, the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of importance for security reasons. This study aims to clarify the gas phase sodium-water reaction path and reaction products. Na, Na2, H2O, and reaction products in the counter-flow sodium-water reaction field were measured using laser diagnostics such as Raman scattering and photo-fragmentation. The main product in the sodium-water reaction was determined to be NaOH and its reaction path was discussed using Na-H2O elementally reaction analysis. (author)

  17. New directions: Atmospheric chemical mechanisms for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduwela, Ajith; Luecken, Deborah; Carter, William; Derwent, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric chemical reaction scheme, commonly referred to as the chemical mechanism, is the portion of an air quality model that represents the atmospheric chemistry of the pollutants. It is at the heart of every air quality model used in research and policy applications to predict and analyse the complex air pollutants: ozone, air toxics and PM2.5. The chemical mechanism should incorporate available information on chemical kinetics and reaction pathways and be the conduit through which the fundamental science of atmospheric chemistry is applied to solve real-world problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of policies developed to reduce exposure to harmful pollutants depend on how well the mechanisms reflect the actual chemistry. If the mechanism has reaction pathways that are incorrectly characterised or completely missing, the resulting predictions may underestimate emission reduction requirements needed to meet public health and ecosystem protection targets, or may overstate the emission reductions needed and cause unnecessary implementation costs. It is therefore essential that mechanisms utilise the best, most up-to-date atmospheric chemistry information available so that policy development is based on air quality model predictions that are robust, transparent and free from scientific challenge. We are concerned that this may not continue to be the case.

  18. Chemical reactions driven by concentrated solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Moshe

    Solar energy can be used for driving endothermic reactions, either photochemically or thermally. The fraction of the solar spectrum that can be photochemically active is quite small. Therefore, it is desirable to be able to combine photochemical and thermal processes in order to increase the overall efficiency. Two thermally driven reactions are being studied: oil shale gasification and methane reforming. In both cases, the major part of the work was done in opaque metal reactors where photochemical reactions cannot take place. We then proceeded working in transparent quartz reactors. The results are preliminary, but they seem to indicate that there may be some photochemical enhancement. The experimental solar facilities used for this work include the 30 kW Schaeffer Solar Furnace and the 3 MW Solar Central Receiver in operation at the Weizmann Institute. The furnace consists of a 96 sq. m flat heliostat, that follows the sun by computer control. It reflects the solar radiation onto a spherical concentrator, 7.3 m in diameter, with a rim angle of 65 degrees. The furnace was characterized by radiometric and calorimetric measurements to show a solar concentration ratio of over 10,000 suns. The central receiver consists of 64 concave heliostats, 54 sq. m each, arranged in a north field and facing a 52 m high tower. The tower has five target levels that can be used simultaneously. The experiments with the shale gasification were carried out at the lowest level, 20 m above ground, which has the lowest solar efficiency and is assigned for low power experiments. We used secondary concentrators to boost the solar flux.

  19. Accelerated Chemical Reactions and Organic Synthesis in Leidenfrost Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ryan M; Pulliam, Christopher J; Thery, Fabien; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-08-22

    Leidenfrost levitated droplets can be used to accelerate chemical reactions in processes that appear similar to reaction acceleration in charged microdroplets produced by electrospray ionization. Reaction acceleration in Leidenfrost droplets is demonstrated for a base-catalyzed Claisen-Schmidt condensation, hydrazone formation from precharged and neutral ketones, and for the Katritzky pyrylium into pyridinium conversion under various reaction conditions. Comparisons with bulk reactions gave intermediate acceleration factors (2-50). By keeping the volume of the Leidenfrost droplets constant, it was shown that interfacial effects contribute to acceleration; this was confirmed by decreased reaction rates in the presence of a surfactant. The ability to multiplex Leidenfrost microreactors, to extract product into an immiscible solvent during reaction, and to use Leidenfrost droplets as reaction vessels to synthesize milligram quantities of product is also demonstrated.

  20. Quantum chemical approach to estimating the thermodynamics of metabolic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinich, Adrian; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Dunn, Ian; Sanchez-Lengeling, Benjamin; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Noor, Elad; Even, Arren Bar; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-11-12

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfer reactions and for reactions not including multiply charged anions. The errors in standard Gibbs reaction energy estimates are correlated with the charges of the participating molecules. The quantum chemical approach is amenable to systematic improvements and holds potential for providing thermodynamic data for all of metabolism.

  1. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  2. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-04-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  3. Chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of paraffinic hydrocarbons needed for primary reference fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is described which simulates the oxidation of the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. The high temperature subset of these mechanisms is identified, and the extensions to deal with low temperature conditions are also explained. The algorithms used to assign reaction rates to elementary steps in the reaction mechanism are described, and the means of identifying the different chemical species and the relevant reactions are outlined. Finally, we show how interested kinetic modeling researchers can obtain copies of this reaction mechanism.

  4. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-01-01

    A treatment of chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a ve

  5. Open complex-balanced mass action chemical reaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; van der Schaft, Arjan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2014-01-01

    We consider open chemical reaction networks, i.e. ones with inflows and outflows. We assume that all the inflows to the network are constant and all outflows obey the mass action kinetics rate law. We define a complex-balanced open reaction network as one that admits a complex-balanced steady state.

  6. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  7. Results of the 2010 Survey on Teaching Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, David L.; Vigeant, Margot A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of faculty teaching the chemical reaction engineering course or sequence during the 2009-2010 academic year at chemical engineering programs in the United States and Canada reveals change in terms of content, timing, and approaches to teaching. The report consists of two parts: first, a statistical and demographic characterization of the…

  8. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  9. Use of radioactive tracers in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of small quantities of nickel using radioactive tracers is presented. An analytical application of the displacement reaction between nickel and zinc ethylenediaminetetraacetate labeled with zinc-65 is pursued. This method is based on the extraction of radioactive zinc displaced by nickel from the zinc chelate into a dithizone-carbon tetracloride solution and the subsequent measurement of the activity of an aliquot of the extract. The method is very sensitive and nickel can be measured in concentrations as small as 0.1μg/ml or even less, depending on the specific activity of the radioreagent used. The precision and the accuracy of the method are determined. The problem of interferences, trying to eliminate them by using masking agents or by means of a previous separation between nickel and other interfering metals, is also investigated

  10. On the Complexity of Reconstructing Chemical Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Rolf; Flamm, Christoph; Merkle, Daniel;

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the structure of chemical reaction networks is crucial for a better understanding of chemical processes. Such networks are well described as hypergraphs. However, due to the available methods, analyses regarding network properties are typically made on standard graphs derived from...... the full hypergraph description, e.g. on the so-called species and reaction graphs. However, a reconstruction of the underlying hypergraph from these graphs is not necessarily unique. In this paper, we address the problem of reconstructing a hypergraph from its species and reaction graph and show NP...

  11. Numerical simulation of rising bubble with chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Kirti; Tripathi, Manoj; Matar, Omar; Karapetsas, George

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of a rising bubble under the action of gravity and in the presence of an exothermic chemical reaction at the interface is investigated via direct numerical simulation using Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method. The product of the chemical reaction, and temperature rise due to the exothermic chemical reaction influence the local viscosity and surface tension near the interfacial region, which in turn give rise to many interesting dynamics. The flow is governed by continuity, Navier-Stokes equations along with the convection equation of the volume fraction of the outer fluid and the energy equation. The effects of the Bond, Damkohler, and Reynolds numbers, and of the dimensionless heat of reaction are investigated. The results of this parametric study will be presented at the meeting.

  12. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Theory of Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1986-01-01

    The calculation of cross sections and rate constants for chemical reactions in the gas phase has long been a major problem in theoretical chemistry. The need for reliable and applicable theories in this field is evident when one considers the significant recent advances that have been made in developing experimental techniques, such as lasers and molecular beams, to probe the microscopic details of chemical reactions. For example, it is now becoming possible to measure cross sections for chemical reactions state selected in the vibrational­ rotational states of both reactants and products. Furthermore, in areas such as atmospheric, combustion and interstellar chemistry, there is an urgent need for reliable reaction rate constant data over a range of temperatures, and this information is often difficult to obtain in experiments. The classical trajectory method can be applied routinely to simple reactions, but this approach neglects important quantum mechanical effects such as tunnelling and resonances. For al...

  13. Sequential Voronoi diagram calculations using simple chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Costello, Ben de Lacy; Adamatzky, Andy

    2012-01-01

    In our recent paper [de Lacy Costello et al. 2010] we described the formation of complex tessellations of the plane arising from the various reactions of metal salts with potassium ferricyanide and ferrocyanide loaded gels. In addition to producing colourful tessellations these reactions are naturally computing generalised Voronoi diagrams of the plane. The reactions reported previously were capable of the calculation of three distinct Voronoi diagrams of the plane. As diffusion coupled with a chemical reaction is responsible for the calculation then this is achieved in parallel. Thus an increase in the complexity of the data input does not utilise additional computational resource. Additional benefits of these chemical reactions is that a permanent record of the Voronoi diagram calculation (in the form of precipitate free bisectors) is achieved, so there is no requirement for further processing to extract the calculation results. Previously it was assumed that the permanence of the results was also a potenti...

  14. Mercury Methylation by Cobalt Corrinoids: Relativistic Effects Dictate the Reaction Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Taye B; Garabato, Brady D; Ruud, Kenneth; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2016-09-12

    The methylation of Hg(II) (SCH3 )2 by corrinoid-based methyl donors proceeds in a concerted manner through a single transition state by transfer of a methyl radical, in contrast to previously proposed reaction mechanisms. This reaction mechanism is a consequence of relativistic effects that lower the energies of the mercury 6p1/2 and 6p3/2 orbitals, making them energetically accessible for chemical bonding. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling, the predicted reaction mechanism is qualitatively different. This is the first example of relativity being decisive for the nature of an observed enzymatic reaction mechanism. PMID:27510509

  15. Coupled Thermal-Chemical-Mechanical Modeling of Validation Cookoff Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERIKSON,WILLIAM W.; SCHMITT,ROBERT G.; ATWOOD,A.I.; CURRAN,P.D.

    2000-11-27

    The cookoff of energetic materials involves the combined effects of several physical and chemical processes. These processes include heat transfer, chemical decomposition, and mechanical response. The interaction and coupling between these processes influence both the time-to-event and the violence of reaction. The prediction of the behavior of explosives during cookoff, particularly with respect to reaction violence, is a challenging task. To this end, a joint DoD/DOE program has been initiated to develop models for cookoff, and to perform experiments to validate those models. In this paper, a series of cookoff analyses are presented and compared with data from a number of experiments for the aluminized, RDX-based, Navy explosive PBXN-109. The traditional thermal-chemical analysis is used to calculate time-to-event and characterize the heat transfer and boundary conditions. A reaction mechanism based on Tarver and McGuire's work on RDX{sup 2} was adjusted to match the spherical one-dimensional time-to-explosion data. The predicted time-to-event using this reaction mechanism compares favorably with the validation tests. Coupled thermal-chemical-mechanical analysis is used to calculate the mechanical response of the confinement and the energetic material state prior to ignition. The predicted state of the material includes the temperature, stress-field, porosity, and extent of reaction. There is little experimental data for comparison to these calculations. The hoop strain in the confining steel tube gives an estimation of the radial stress in the explosive. The inferred pressure from the measured hoop strain and calculated radial stress agree qualitatively. However, validation of the mechanical response model and the chemical reaction mechanism requires more data. A post-ignition burn dynamics model was applied to calculate the confinement dynamics. The burn dynamics calculations suffer from a lack of characterization of the confinement for the flaw

  16. Asymmetric chemical reactions by polarized quantum beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jun-Ichi; Kobayashi, Kensei

    One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bio-organic compounds (L-amino acid and D-sugar dominant) is nominated as "Cosmic Scenario"; a chiral impulse from asymmetric excitation sources in space triggered asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such space materials as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life. 1) Effective asymmetric excitation sources in space are proposed as polarized quantum beams, such as circularly polarized light and spin polarized electrons. Circularly polarized light is emitted as synchrotron radiation from tightly captured electrons by intense magnetic field around neutron stars. In this case, either left-or right-handed polarized light can be observed depending on the direction of observation. On the other hand, spin polarized electrons is emitted as beta-ray in beta decay from radioactive nuclei or neutron fireballs in supernova explosion. 2) The spin of beta-ray electrons is longitudinally polarized due to parity non-conservation in the weak interaction. The helicity (the the projection of the spin onto the direction of kinetic momentum) of beta-ray electrons is universally negative (left-handed). For the purpose of verifying the asymmetric structure emergence in bio-organic compounds by polarized quantum beams, we are now carrying out laboratory simulations using circularly polarized light from synchrotron radiation facility or spin polarized electron beam from beta-ray radiation source. 3,4) The target samples are solid film or aqueous solution of racemic amino acids. 1) K.Kobayashi, K.Kaneko, J.Takahashi, Y.Takano, in Astrobiology: from simple molecules to primitive life; Ed. V.Basiuk; American Scientific Publisher: Valencia, 2008. 2) G.A.Gusev, T.Saito, V.A.Tsarev, A.V.Uryson, Origins Life Evol. Biosphere. 37, 259 (2007). 3) J.Takahashi, H.Shinojima, M.Seyama, Y.Ueno, T.Kaneko, K.Kobayashi, H.Mita, M.Adachi, M.Hosaka, M.Katoh, Int. J. Mol. Sci. 10, 3044

  17. The role of van der Waals interactions in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying the role of van der Waals interactions in the chemical reactions from the theoretical view point, especially, a case related to the tunnel effect. The fist case that the cumulative reaction probability depends on the tunnel effect was increased by the van der waals force. This case was proved by theoretical calculation of the reaction rate constant of the reaction: Mu + F2 → MuF + F. The second case was that a van der Waals well was so deep that pseudo bound state was observed in the reaction: F + H2 → HF + H. A van der Waals complex such as AB(v=j=0)...C was excited to the resonance state of AB(vij)...C and A...BC(v,j) by laser, than the resonance state proceeded to AB + C (predissociation) or A + BC(pre-reaction). We succeeded for the first time to calculate theoretically the pre-reaction by the real three dimentional potential curve. The pre-reaction can be observed only the case that the tunnel probability is larger than the non-adiabatic transition probability. The chemical reactions in solid were explained, too. (S.Y.)

  18. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers that discuss: Target Dependence of Complex Fragment Emission in 47-MeV/u La-Induced Reactions; Deconvolution of Time-of-Flight Data to Improve Mass Identification; and Study of the Reaction of La + Al at E/A = 50 MeV with Landau-Vlasov Dynamics

  19. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  20. Knockout Reaction Mechanism for 6He+%Knockout Reaction Mechanism for 6He+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕林辉; 叶沿林; 曹中鑫; 肖军; 江栋兴; 郑涛; 华辉; 李智焕; 葛俞成; 李湘庆; 楼建玲; 李阔昂; 李奇特; 乔锐; 游海波; 陈瑞九

    2012-01-01

    A knockout reaction experiment was carried out by using the 6He beam at 82.5 MeV/nucleon impinging on CH2 and C targets. The a core fragments at forward angles were detected in coincidence with the recoiled protons at larger angles. From this exclusive measure- ment the valence nucleon knockout mechanism and the core knockout mechanism are separated. This study provides a basis for the exclusive spectroscopic investigation of the exotic nuclei.

  1. STM CONTROL OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS: Single-Molecule Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hla, Saw-Wai; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2003-10-01

    The fascinating advances in single atom/molecule manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip allow scientists to fabricate atomic-scale structures or to probe chemical and physical properties of matters at an atomic level. Owing to these advances, it has become possible for the basic chemical reaction steps, such as dissociation, diffusion, adsorption, readsorption, and bond-formation processes, to be performed by using the STM tip. Complete sequences of chemical reactions are able to induce at a single-molecule level. New molecules can be constructed from the basic molecular building blocks on a one-molecule-at-a-time basis by using a variety of STM manipulation schemes in a systematic step-by-step manner. These achievements open up entirely new opportunities in nanochemistry and nanochemical technology. In this review, various STM manipulation techniques useful in the single-molecule reaction process are reviewed, and their impact on the future of nanoscience and technology are discussed.

  2. The thermodynamic natural path in chemical reaction kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moishe garfinkle

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Natural Path approach to chemical reaction kinetics was developed to bridge the considerable gap between the Mass Action mechanistic approach and the non-mechanistic irreversible thermodynamic approach. The Natural Path approach can correlate empirical kinetic data with a high degree precision, as least equal to that achievable by the Mass-Action rate equations, but without recourse mechanistic considerations. The reaction velocities arising from the particular rate equation chosen by kineticists to best represent the kinetic behavior of a chemical reaction are the natural outcome of the Natural Path approach. Moreover, by virtue of its thermodynamic roots, equilibrium thermodynamic functions can be extracted from reaction kinetic data with considerable accuracy. These results support the intrinsic validity of the Natural Path approach.

  3. Is There a Minimum Electrophilicity Principle in Chemical Reactions?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NOORIZADEH,Siamak

    2007-01-01

    For 25 simple reactions, the changes of the hardness (△η), polarizability (△α) and electrophilicity index (△ω)and their cube-roots (△η1/3, △α1/3, △ω1/3) were calculated. It is shown that although the Maximum Hardness and Minimum Polarizability Principles are not valid for all reactions, but in most cases △ω1/3<0, whereas we always find △ω<0. Our observation impliesto this fact that for those chemical reactions in which the number of moles decreases or at least remains constant, the most stable species (reactants or products) have the lowest sum of electrophilicities. In other words "the natural direction of a chemical reaction is toward a state of minimum electrophilicity". This fact may be called Minimum Electrophilicity Principle (MEP).

  4. Weber's law for biological responses in autocatalytic networks of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masayo; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-22

    Biological responses often obey Weber's law, according to which the magnitude of the response depends only on the fold change in the external input. In this study, we demonstrate that a system involving a simple autocatalytic reaction shows such a response when a chemical is slowly synthesized by the reaction from a faster influx process. We also show that an autocatalytic reaction process occurring in series or in parallel can obey Weber's law with an oscillatory adaptive response. Considering the simplicity and ubiquity of the autocatalytic process, our proposed mechanism is thought to be commonly observed in biological reactions. PMID:21867048

  5. Planarization mechanism of alkaline copper CMP slurry based on chemical mechanical kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shengli; Yin Kangda; Li Xiang; Yue Hongwei; Liu Yunling

    2013-01-01

    The planarization mechanism of alkaline copper slurry is studied in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process from the perspective of chemical mechanical kinetics.Different from the international dominant acidic copper slurry,the copper slurry used in this research adopted the way of alkaline technology based on complexation.According to the passivation property of copper in alkaline conditions,the protection of copper film at the concave position on a copper pattern wafer surface can be achieved without the corrosion inhibitors such as benzotriazole (BTA),by which the problems caused by BTA can be avoided.Through the experiments and theories research,the chemical mechanical kinetics theory of copper removal in alkaline CMP conditions was proposed.Based on the chemical mechanical kinetics theory,the planarization mechanism of alkaline copper slurry was established.In alkaline CMP conditions,the complexation reaction between chelating agent and copper ions needs to break through the reaction barrier.The kinetic energy at the concave position should be lower than the complexation reaction barrier,which is the key to achieve planarization.

  6. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schaft, A. J.; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-04-01

    A treatment of a chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption, the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a very simple derivation of a number of key results in the chemical reaction network theory, and which directly relates to the thermodynamics and port-Hamiltonian formulation of the system. Central in this formulation is the definition of a balanced Laplacian matrix on the graph of chemical complexes together with a resulting fundamental inequality. This immediately leads to the characterisation of the set of equilibria and their stability. Furthermore, the assumption of complex balancedness is revisited from the point of view of Kirchhoff's matrix tree theorem. Both the form of the dynamics and the deduced behaviour are very similar to consensus dynamics, and provide additional perspectives to the latter. Finally, using the classical idea of extending the graph of chemical complexes by a 'zero' complex, a complete steady-state stability analysis of mass action kinetics reaction networks with constant inflows and mass action kinetics outflows is given, and a unified framework is provided for structure-preserving model reduction of this important class of open reaction networks.

  7. Waste dissolution with chemical reaction, diffusion and advection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper extends the mass-transfer analysis to include the effect of advective transport in predicting the steady-state dissolution rate, with a chemical-reaction-rate boundary condition at the surface of a waste form of arbitrary shape. This new theory provides an analytic means of predicting the ground-water velocities at which dissolution rate in a geologic environment will be governed entirely to the chemical reaction rate. As an illustration, we consider the steady-state potential flow of ground water in porous rock surrounding a spherical waste solid. 3 refs., 2 figs

  8. Fluctuation theorem for entropy production in a chemical reaction channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuation theorem for entropy production in a mesoscopic chemical reaction network is discussed. When the system size is sufficiently large, it is found that, by defining a kind of coarse-grained dissipation function, the entropy production in a reversible reaction channel can be approximately described by a type of detailed fluctuation theorem. Such a fluctuation relation has been successfully tested by direct simulations in a linear reaction model consisting of two reversible channels and in an oscillatory model wherein only one channel is reversible.

  9. Students' Ideas about How and Why Chemical Reactions Happen: Mapping the conceptual landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fan; Talanquer, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Research in science education has revealed that many students struggle to understand chemical reactions. Improving teaching and learning about chemical processes demands that we develop a clearer understanding of student reasoning in this area and of how this reasoning evolves with training in the domain. Thus, we have carried out a qualitative study to explore students reasoning about chemical causality and mechanism. Study participants included individuals at different educational levels, from college to graduate school. We identified diverse conceptual modes expressed by students when engaged in the analysis of different types of reactions. Main findings indicate that student reasoning about chemical reactions is influenced by the nature of the process. More advanced students tended to express conceptual modes that were more normative and had more explanatory power, but major conceptual difficulties persisted in their reasoning. The results of our study are relevant to educators interested in conceptual development, learning progressions, and assessment.

  10. Effects of incomplete mixing on chemical reactions under flow heterogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Lazaro; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of the mixing process in aquifers is of primary importance when assessing attenuation of pollutants. In aquifers different hydraulic and chemical properties can increase mixing and spreading of the transported species. Mixing processes control biogeochemical transformations such as precipitation/dissolution reactions or degradation reactions that are fast compared to mass transfer processes. Reactions are local phenomena that fluctuate at the pore scale, but predictions are often made at much larger scales. However, aquifer heterogeities are found at all scales and generates flow heterogeneities which creates complex concentration distributions that enhances mixing. In order to assess the impact of spatial flow heterogeneities at pore scale we study concentration profiles, gradients and reaction rates using a random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method and kernel density estimators to reconstruct concentrations and gradients in two setups. First, we focus on a irreversible bimolecular reaction A+B → C under homogeneous flow to distinguish phenomena of incomplete mixing of reactants from finite-size sampling effects. Second, we analise a fast reversible bimolecular chemical reaction A+B rightleftharpoons C in a laminar Poiseuille flow reactor to determine the difference between local and global reaction rates caused by the incomplete mixing under flow heterogeneities. Simulation results for the first setup differ from the analytical solution of the continuum scale advection-dispersion-reaction equation studied by Gramling et al. (2002), which results in an overstimation quantity of reaction product (C). In the second setup, results show that actual reaction rates are bigger than the obtained from artificially mixing the system by averaging the concentration vertically. - LITERATURE Gramling, C. M.,Harvey, C. F., Meigs, and L. C., (2002). Reactive transport in porous media: A comparison of model prediction with laboratory visualization, Environ. Sci

  11. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  12. Insight into the Mechanism of the Michael Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Carolina; Gómez, Sara; Weinhold, Frank; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism for the nucleophilic addition step of the Michael reaction between methanethiol as a model Michael donor and several α-substituted methyl acrylates (X=F, Cl, Me, H, CN, NO2 ) as model Michael acceptors is described in detail. We suggest a novel way to condense electrophilic Fukui functions at specific atoms in terms of the contributions from the atomic orbitals to the LUMO or, more generally, to the orbital controlling the reaction. This procedure correctly associates activation energies to local electrophilic Fukui indices for the cases treated in this work. The calculated reaction barriers strongly depend on the nature of the substituent. As a general rule, activation energies are governed by structural changes, although electronic factors are significant for electron-withdrawing groups. Nucleophilic addition to Michael receptors is best described as a highly nonsynchronous process, in which the geometry of the transition state comprises a nonplanar six-membered ring. Formation of the S⋅⋅⋅C bond, which defines the interaction between the reactants, progresses ahead of all other primitive processes in the early stages of the transformation. In view of our results, we postulate that highly complex chemical reactions, as is the case for the nucleophilic addition step studied herein, that involve cleavage/formation of a total of six bonds, lower their activation energies by favoring nonsynchronicity, that is, for these types of systems, primitive changes should advance at different rates.

  13. Chemical reaction mediated self-assembly of PTCDA into nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyad, Arshad S; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2011-09-01

    Uniform and crystalline nanofibers of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), an insoluble organic semiconducting molecule, have been achieved by self-assembling the molecules using chemical reaction mediated conversion of an appropriately designed soluble precursor, perylene tetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) using carbodiimide chemistry. PMID:21814688

  14. On the steady states of weakly reversible chemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Jian; Jones, Christopher; Feinberg, Martin; Nachman, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    A natural condition on the structure of the underlying chemical reaction network, namely weak reversibility, is shown to guarantee the existence of an equilibrium (steady state) in each positive stoichiometric compatibility class for the associated mass-action system. Furthermore, an index formula is given for the set of equilibria in a given stoichiometric compatibility class.

  15. Complex and detailed balancing of chemical reaction networks revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the notions of complex and detailed balancing for mass action kinetics chemical reaction networks is revisited from the perspective of algebraic graph theory, in particular Kirchhoff’s Matrix Tree theorem for directed weighted graphs. This yields an elucidation of previously

  16. Molecular codes in biological and chemical reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Görlich

    Full Text Available Shannon's theory of communication has been very successfully applied for the analysis of biological information. However, the theory neglects semantic and pragmatic aspects and thus cannot directly be applied to distinguish between (bio- chemical systems able to process "meaningful" information from those that do not. Here, we present a formal method to assess a system's semantic capacity by analyzing a reaction network's capability to implement molecular codes. We analyzed models of chemical systems (martian atmosphere chemistry and various combustion chemistries, biochemical systems (gene expression, gene translation, and phosphorylation signaling cascades, an artificial chemistry, and random reaction networks. Our study suggests that different chemical systems possess different semantic capacities. No semantic capacity was found in the model of the martian atmosphere chemistry, the studied combustion chemistries, and highly connected random networks, i.e. with these chemistries molecular codes cannot be implemented. High semantic capacity was found in the studied biochemical systems and in random reaction networks where the number of second order reactions is twice the number of species. We conclude that our approach can be applied to evaluate the information processing capabilities of a chemical system and may thus be a useful tool to understand the origin and evolution of meaningful information, e.g. in the context of the origin of life.

  17. 2011 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Stair

    2011-02-11

    The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is dedicated to promoting and advancing the fundamental science of interfacial chemistry and physics by providing surface scientists with the foremost venue for presentation and discussion of research occurring at the frontiers of their fields.

  18. Coriolis coupling and nonadiabaticity in chemical reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Emilia L

    2010-12-01

    The nonadiabatic quantum dynamics and Coriolis coupling effect in chemical reaction have been reviewed, with emphasis on recent progress in using the time-dependent wave packet approach to study the Coriolis coupling and nonadiabatic effects, which was done by K. L. Han and his group. Several typical chemical reactions, for example, H+D(2), F+H(2)/D(2)/HD, D(+)+H(2), O+H(2), and He+H(2)(+), have been discussed. One can find that there is a significant role of Coriolis coupling in reaction dynamics for the ion-molecule collisions of D(+)+H(2), Ne+H(2)(+), and He+H(2)(+) in both adiabatic and nonadiabatic context.

  19. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capellos, Christos

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the formal lectures and contributed papers presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on. the Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics. The meeting convened at the city of Iraklion, Crete, Greece on 25 August 1985 and continued to 7 September 1985. The material presented describes the fundamental and recent advances in experimental and theoretical aspects of, reaction dynamics. A large section is devoted to electronically excited states, ionic species, and free radicals, relevant to chemical sys­ tems. In addition recent advances in gas phase polymerization, formation of clusters, and energy release processes in energetic materials were presented. Selected papers deal with topics such as the dynamics of electric field effects in low polar solutions, high electric field perturbations and relaxation of dipole equilibria, correlation in picosecond/laser pulse scattering, and applications to fast reaction dynamics. Picosecond transient Raman spectroscopy which has been used for the elucidati...

  20. Reaction mechanism of dicofol removal by cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Yang, Ting; Zhai, Zihan; Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear whether dicofol should be defined as a persistent organic pollutant. Its environmental persistence has gained attention. This study focused on its degradation by cellulase. Cellulase was separated using a gel chromatogram, and its degradation activity towards dicofol involved its endoglucanase activity. By analyzing the kinetic parameters of cellulase reacting with mixed substrates, it was shown that cellulase reacted on dicofol and carboxyl methyl cellulose through two different active centers. Thus, the degradation of dicofol was shown to be an oxidative process by cellulase. Next, by comparing the impacts of tert-butyl alcohol (a typical OH free-radical inhibitor) on the removal efficiencies of dicofol under both cellulase and Fenton reagent systems, it was shown that the removal of dicofol was initiated by OH free radicals produced by cellulase. Finally, 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone and chloride were detected using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and ion chromatography analysis, which supported our hypothesis. The reaction mechanism was analyzed and involved an attack by OH free radicals at the orthocarbon of dicofol, resulting in the degradation product 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone. PMID:26456602

  1. Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for NOx emission prediction in biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshfar, Ehsan; Skreiberg, Øyvind; Glarborg, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Because of the complex composition of biomass, the chemical mechanism contains many different species and therefore a large number of reactions. Although biomass gas‐phase combustion is fairly well researched and understood, the proposed mechanisms are still complex and need very long computational...... reactions and chemical species, that is, 35 species and 198 reactions, corresponding to 72% reduction in the number of reactions and, therefore, improving the computational time considerably. Yet, the model based on the reduced mechanism predicts correctly concentrations of NOx and CO that are essentially...... parameters on NOx emission. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Chem Kinet 44: 219–231, 2012...

  2. Effect of Chemicals on Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Glass Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang-Yong; ZHANG Kai-Liang; SONG Zhi-Tang; FENG Song-Lin

    2007-01-01

    @@ We investigate the effect of chemicals on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of glass substrates. Ceria slurry in an ultra-low concentration of 0.25wt.% is used and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Three typical molecules, i.e. acetic acid, citric acid and sodium acrylic polymer, are adopted to investigate the effect on CMP performance in terms of material removal rate (MRR) and surface quality. The addition of sodium acrylic polymer shows the highest MRR as well as the best surface by atomic force microscopy after CMP, vhile the addition of citric acid shows the worst performance. These results reveal a mechanism that a long-chain molecule without any branches rather than small molecules and common molecules with ramose abundant-electron groups is better for the dispersion of the slurry and thus better for the CMP process.

  3. A thermodynamic force generated by chemical gradient and adsorption reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sugawara, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Biological units such as macromolecules, organelles, and cells are directed to a proper location under gradients of relevant chemicals. By considering a macroscopic element that has binding sites for a chemical adsorption reaction to occur on its surface, we show the existence of a thermodynamic force that is generated by the gradient and exerted on the element. By assuming local equilibrium and adopting the grand potential from thermodynamics, we derive a formula for such a thermodynamic force, which depends on the chemical potential gradient and Langmuir isotherm. The conditions under which the formula can be applied are demonstrated to hold in intracellular reactions. The role of the force in the partitioning of bacterial chromosome/plasmid during cell division is discussed.

  4. Single-molecule chemical reactions on DNA origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru;

    2010-01-01

    as templates for building materials with new functional properties. Relatively large nanocomponents such as nanoparticles and biomolecules can also be integrated into DNA nanostructures and imaged. Here, we show that chemical reactions with single molecules can be performed and imaged at a local position...... on a DNA origami scaffold by atomic force microscopy. The high yields and chemoselectivities of successive cleavage and bond-forming reactions observed in these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of post-assembly chemical modification of DNA nanostructures and their potential use as locally......DNA nanotechnology and particularly DNA origami, in which long, single-stranded DNA molecules are folded into predetermined shapes, can be used to form complex self-assembled nanostructures. Although DNA itself has limited chemical, optical or electronic functionality, DNA nanostructures can serve...

  5. Two Experiments to Approach the Boltzmann Factor: Chemical Reaction and Viscous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio R.; Guastella, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pedagogical approach aimed at pointing out the role played by the Boltzmann factor in describing phenomena usually perceived as regulated by different mechanisms of functioning. Experimental results regarding some aspects of a chemical reaction and of the viscous flow of some liquids are analysed and described in terms…

  6. The chemical, mechanical, and hydrological evolution of weathering granitoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Bradley W.; Hilley, George E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Moon, Seulgi; Olson, Christopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Surprisingly few studies connect the chemical, mechanical, and hydrological evolution of rock as it weathers to saprolite and soil. We assess this coevolution in granodiorite from Monterey Peninsula, California, by measuring changes in bulk chemistry, mineralogy, volumetric strain, the oxidation state of Fe in biotite crystals, tensile strength, abrasion rate, connected porosity, and hydraulic conductivity in samples covering a range of weathering grades. We identify the oxidative dissolution of biotite as the key chemical reaction because of the volumetric expansion that accompanies formation of altered biotite and precipitation of ferrihydrite. We show how the associated accumulation of elastic strain produces an energy density that is sufficient to support rock fracturing over length scales equivalent to constituent crystals. The resulting intragranular and intergranular cracking profoundly reduces tensile strength and increases the abrasion rate, connected porosity, and hydraulic conductivity of the rock matrix. These changes increase the rate of plagioclase weathering, and ultimately the rock disintegrates into grus and clay. Major changes in rock properties can occur with only minor element leaching, and the threshold behavior of weathering that arises from the coevolution of chemical, hydrological, and mechanical properties may be difficult to capture using simplified weathering models that fail to incorporate these properties. Our results, which combine the mechanical and hydrological evolution of weathering rock with more common measurements of chemical changes, should help to more accurately model the effects of, and mechanical and hydrological feedbacks upon, chemical weathering of rock.

  7. Reaction Networks For Interstellar Chemical Modelling: Improvements and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Herbst, E; Troe, J; Geppert, W; Linnartz, H; Oberg, K; Roueff, E; Agundez, M; Pernot, P; Cuppen, H M; Loison, J C; Talbi, D

    2010-01-01

    We survey the current situation regarding chemical modelling of the synthesis of molecules in the interstellar medium. The present state of knowledge concerning the rate coefficients and their uncertainties for the major gas-phase processes -- ion-neutral reactions, neutral-neutral reactions, radiative association, and dissociative recombination -- is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on those reactions that have been identified, by sensitivity analyses, as 'crucial' in determining the predicted abundances of the species observed in the interstellar medium. These sensitivity analyses have been carried out for gas-phase models of three representative, molecule-rich, astronomical sources: the cold dense molecular clouds TMC-1 and L134N, and the expanding circumstellar envelope IRC +10216. Our review has led to the proposal of new values and uncertainties for the rate coefficients of many of the key reactions. The impact of these new data on the predicted abundances in TMC-1 and L134N is reported. Interstellar dust p...

  8. Mathematical description of the nonlinear chemical reactions with oscillatory inflow to the reaction field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aldona Krupska

    2015-06-01

    In this paper the arduous attempt to find a mathematical solution for the nonlinear autocatalytic chemical processes with a time-varying and oscillating inflow of reactant to the reaction medium has been taken. Approximate analytical solution is proposed. Numerical solutions and analytical attempts to solve the non-linear differential equation indicates a phase shift between the oscillatory influx of intermediate reaction reagent to the medium of chemical reaction and the change of its concentration in this medium. Analytical solutions indicate that this shift may be associated with the reaction rate constants 1 and 2 and the relaxation time . The relationship between the phase shift and the oscillatory flow of reactant seems to be similar to that obtained in the case of linear chemical reactions, as described previously, however, the former is much more complex and different. In this paper, we would like to consider whether the effect of forced phase shift in the case of nonlinear and non-oscillatory chemical processes occurring particularly in the living systems have a practical application in laboratory.

  9. Computational Analyses of Complex Flows with Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kang-Sik

    The heat and mass transfer phenomena in micro-scale for the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the simulation of oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, and a reduced chemical kinetic modeling of gas turbine combustion for Jet propellant-10 have been studied numerically. For the numerical analysis of the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the governing equations are derived from the cylindrical matrix systems, Krogh cylinder model, which modeling system is comprised of a capillary to a surrounding cylinder tissue along with the arterial distance to veins. ADI (Alternative Direction Implicit) scheme and Thomas algorithm are applied to solve the nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). This study shows that the important factors which have an effect on the drug penetration depth to the tissue are the mass diffusivity and the consumption of relevant species during the time allowed for diffusion to the brain tissue. Also, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to simulate the blood flow and oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, which are satisfied in the physiological range of a typical capillary. A three dimensional geometry has been constructed to replicate the one studied by Secomb et al. (2000), and the computational framework features a non-Newtonian viscosity model for blood, the oxygen transport model including in oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation and wall flux due to tissue absorption, as well as an ability to study the diffusion of drugs and other materials in the capillary streams. Finally, a chemical kinetic mechanism of JP-10 has been compiled and validated for a wide range of combustion regimes, covering pressures of 1atm to 40atm with temperature ranges of 1,200 K--1,700 K, which is being studied as a possible Jet propellant for the Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) and other high-speed flight applications such as hypersonic

  10. Cellular automaton model of mass transport with chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport and chemical reactions of solutes are modelled as a cellular automaton in which molecules of different species perform a random walk on a regular lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. The model describes advection and diffusion in a simple way, and as no restriction is placed on the number of particles at a lattice site, it is also able to describe a wide variety of chemical reactions. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. Simulations on one-and two-dimensional lattices show that the discrete model can be used to approximate the solutions of the continuum equations. We discuss discrepancies which arise from correlations between molecules and how these discrepancies disappear as the continuum limit is approached. Of particular interest are simulations displaying long-time behaviour which depends on long-wavelength statistical fluctuations not accounted for by the standard equations. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔ c and a + b → c with homogeneous and inhomogeneous initial conditions as well as to systems subject to autocatalytic reactions and displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. (author) 9 figs., 34 refs

  11. EFFECTIVE SOLUTION METHOD OF CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS WITH DIFFUSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The time integration method with four-order accuracy, self-starting and implicit for the diffuse chemical reaction kinetics equation or the transient instantaneous temperature filed equation was presented. The examples show that both accuracy and stability are better than Runge-Kutta method with four-order. The coefficients of the equation are stored with sparse matrix pattern, so an algorithm is presented which combines a compact storage scheme with reduced computation cost. The computation of the competitive and consecutive reaction in the rotating packed bed, taken as examples,shows that the method is effective.

  12. 机械活化固相化学反应制备木薯醋酸酯淀粉%Preparation for cassava starch acetate by mechanical activation-strengthened solid phase chemical reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈渊; 杨家添; 黄祖强; 朱万仁; 唐春洁; 秦顾

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop a new preparation method of starch acetate,the cassava starch acetate was synthesized by mechanical activation-strengthened solid phase chemical reaction.The effects of acetic anhydride content,sodium hydroxide content,ball-milling temperature,ball-milling time,stirring speed and the volume of the stack for ball-milling media on esterification of cassava starch were investigated.The degree of substitution (DS) of starch acetate was used as the evaluating parameter.The best conditions of preparation technique were confirmed by orthogonal test.The optimum conditions of cassava starch acetate preparation were 60% acetic anhydride,2.0% sodium hydroxide,ball-milling temperature 60℃,ball-milling time 60min,stirring speed 380r/min,tack media 500 mL,the DS of the products 0.2632,and the RE was 25.57%.Furthermore,the structure of native starch and the starch acetate were further characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The mechanical activation considerably enhanced the esterification of cassava starch.%为获得制备醋酸酯淀粉的新工艺,采用机械活化固相化学反应法制备木薯醋酸酯淀粉.以醋酸酯淀粉的取代度为评价指标,分别探讨醋酸酐用量、NaOH用量、球磨温度、球磨时间、搅拌速度、球磨介质的堆体积等因素对木薯淀粉醋酸酯反应的影响,并对影响因素进行了正交优化.结果表明:在醋酸酐质量分数60%、NaOH质量分数2.0%、球磨温度60℃、球磨时间60 min、搅拌速度380 r/min、球磨介质堆体积500 mL的反应条件下,制备得到的木薯醋酸酯淀粉的取代度为0.263 2,反应效率为25.57%.并采用红外光谱(FTIR)、X-射线衍射(XRD)对木薯醋酸酯淀粉的结构进行了表征.机械活化对淀粉发生酯反应有显著的强化作用.

  13. Mechanical and chemical properties of sewage pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Ł. Wierzbicki; M. Szymiczek

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the compatibility of the physico-chemical properties of sewage pipes with the requirements of PN – EN ISO 1401-01: Plastics piping systems for non-pressure underground drainage and sewerage. This article is based on a research carried out for the water supply company. The article presents the results of mechanical and chemical testing of four pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride and one pipe of polypropylene. All the test pipes were app...

  14. Fluctuation Induced Structure in Chemical Reaction with Small Number of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    We investigate the behaviors of chemical reactions of the Lotka-Volterra model with small number of molecules; hence the occurrence of random fluctuations modifies the deterministic behavior and the law of mass action is replaced by a stochastic model. We model it by using Abstract Rewriting System on Multisets, ARMS; ARMS is a stochastic method of simulating chemical reactions and it is based on the reaction rate equation. We confirmed that the magnitude of fluctuations on periodicity of oscillations becomes large, as the number of involved molecules is getting smaller; and these fluctuations induce another structure, which have not observed in the reactions with large number of molecules. We show that the underling mechanism through investigating the coarse grained phase space of ARMS.

  15. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  16. A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tarrazo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Sanz, Mario; Sánchez, Antonio L.; Williams, Forman A.

    2016-07-01

    A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion comprising 8 overall reactions and 11 reacting chemical species is presented. The development starts by investigating the minimum set of elementary reactions needed to describe methanol combustion with reasonable accuracy over a range of conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition of interest in combustion. Starting from a 27-step mechanism that has been previously tested and found to give accurate predictions of ignition processes for these conditions, it is determined that the addition of 11 elementary reactions taken from its basis (San Diego) mechanism extends the validity of the description to premixed-flame propagation, strain-induced extinction of non-premixed flames, and equilibrium composition and temperatures, giving results that compare favourably with experimental measurements and also with computations using the 247-step detailed San Diego mechanism involving 50 reactive species. Specifically, premixed-flame propagation velocities and extinction strain rates for non-premixed counterflow flames calculated with the 38-step mechanism show departures from experimental measurements and detailed-chemistry computations that are roughly on the order of 10%, comparable with expected experimental uncertainties. Similar accuracy is found in comparisons of autoignition times over the range considered, except at very high temperatures, under which conditions the computations tend to overpredict induction times for all of the chemistry descriptions tested. From this 38-step mechanism, the simplification is continued by introducing steady-state approximations for the intermediate species CH3, CH4, HCO, CH3O, CH2OH, and O, leading to an 8-step reduced mechanism that provides satisfactory accuracy for all conditions tested. The flame computations indicate that thermal diffusion has a negligible influence on methanol combustion in all cases considered and that a mixture-average species

  17. Chemical Synthesis of Proanthocyanidins in Vitro and Their Reactions in Aging Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Hong Pan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins are present in many fruits and plant products like grapes and wine, and contribute to their taste and health benefits. In the past decades of years, substantial progresses has been achieved in the identification of composition and structure of proanthocyanidins, but the debate concerning the existence of an enzymatic or nonenzymatic mechanism for proanthocyanidin condensation still goes on. Substantial attention has been paid to elucidating the potential mechanism of formation by means of biomimetic and chemical synthesis in vitro. The present paper aims at summarizing the research status on chemical synthesis of proanthocyanidins, including non-enzymatic synthesis of proanthocyanidin precursors, chemical synthesis of proanthocyanidins with direct condensation of flavanols and stereoselective synthesis of proanthocyanidins. Proanthocyanidin-involved reactions in aging wines are also reviewed such as direct and indirect reactions among proanthocyanidins, flavanols and anthocyanins. Topics for future research in this field are also put forward in this paper.

  18. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Debin; Yu Yong; Niu Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD) methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier-Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  19. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  20. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  1. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  2. Separation of the isotopes of boron by chemical exchange reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCandless, F.P.; Herbst, R.S.

    1995-05-30

    The isotopes of boron, {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B, are separated by means of a gas-liquid chemical exchange reaction involving the isotopic equilibrium between gaseous BF{sub 3} and a liquid BF{sub 3} donor molecular addition complex formed between BF{sub 3} gas and a donor chosen from the group consisting of: nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or diisobutyl ketone. 1 Fig.

  3. Nonlinear chemical reaction between Na2S2O3 and Peroxide compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高庆宇; 汪跃民; 王贵昌; 张松林; 臧雅茹; 赵学庄

    1997-01-01

    Kinetics of reaction between Na2S2O3 and peroxide compound ( H2O2 or Na2S2O8) in a batch reactor and in a continuous stirring tank reactor (CSTR) were studied.Steady oscillations in uncatalyzed reactions in a CSTR were first discovered.In Na2S2O3-H2O2-H2SO4 reaction system,Pt potential and pH of higher and lower flow rutes beyond oscillation flow rates were in around the same extreme values.The reaction catalyeed by Cu2+ corsist of the catalyzed oscillation process and the uncatalyzed osciliation one.On the basis of experiment,a reaction mechanism consisting of three stages was put forward.The three stages are H positive-feedback reactions,proton negative-feedba k (uncatalyzed negative-feedback and catalyzed negative-feedback) reactions and transitional reactions.The mechanism is able to explain reasonably the nonlinear chemical phenomena appearing in the thiosulfatc oxidation reaction by peroxide-compounds.

  4. Heterogeneously Catalysed Chemical Reactions in Carbon Dioxide Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musko, Nikolai E.

    the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated aldehydes in carbon dioxide medium. It was found that supported tungstosilicic acid catalysts and acidic resin Amberlyst-15 are very effective for performing aldol reactions. The positive influence of temperature and CO2-content on catalyst activity was studied...... useful for the phase behaviour investigations. The direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and CO2 has been investigated for quite a long time, however hardly any sufficiently active catalysts have been found so far. Nevertheless, optimisation of the phase equilibria of the reaction mixture...... studies of catalytic chemical reactions in dense and supercritical carbon dioxide have been complemented by the theoretical calculations of phase equilibria using advanced thermodynamic models. In the recent years, the use of compressed carbon dioxide as innovative, non-toxic and non-flammable, cheap...

  5. Cation Effect on Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang-Yong; LIU Bo; SONG Zhi-Tang; FENG Song-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effect of cations in solutions containing benzotriazole (BTA) and H2O2 on copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). On the base of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and material removal rate (MRR) results, it is found that ammonia shows the highest MRR as well as good surface after CMP, while KOH demon-strates the worst performance. These results reveal a mechanism that sma//molecules with lone-pairs rather than molecules with steric effect and common inorganic cations are better for copper CMP process, which is indirectly confirmed by open circuit potential (OCP).

  6. The role of chemical reaction in waste-form performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution rate of waste solids in a geologic repository is a complex function of waste form geometry, chemical raction rate, exterior flow field, and chemical environment. We present here an analysis to determine the stady-state mass transfer rate, over the entire range of flow conditions relevant to geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The equations for steady-state mass transfer with a chemical-reaction-rate boundary condition are solved by three different mathematical techniques which supplement each other. This theory is illustrated with laboratory leach data for borosilicate-glass and a spherical spent-fuel waste form under typical repository conditions. For borosilicate glass waste in the temperature range of 57/degree/C to 250/degree/C, dissolution rate in a repository is determined for a wide range of chemical reaction rates and for Peclet numbers from zero to well over 100, far beyond any Peclet values expected in a repository. Spent-fuel dissolution in a repository is also investigated, based on the limited leach data now available. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Application of laser diagnostics to sodium-water chemical reaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes in a steam generator. Therefore the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for safety reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using laser diagnostics. The sodium-water counter-flow reactions were measured using laser diagnostics such as laser induced fluorescence, CARS, Raman scattering and photo-fragmentation. The measurement results show that the sodium-water reaction proceeds mainly by the reaction Na + H2O → NaOH + H and the main product is NaOH in this reaction. Its forward and backward reaction rates tend to balance with each other and the whole reaction rate reduces as temperature increases. (author)

  8. Automatic learning for the classification of chemical reactions and in statistical thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Latino, Diogo Alexandre Rosa Serra

    2008-01-01

    This Thesis describes the application of automatic learning methods for a) the classification of organic and metabolic reactions, and b) the mapping of Potential Energy Surfaces(PES). The classification of reactions was approached with two distinct methodologies: a representation of chemical reactions based on NMR data, and a representation of chemical reactions from the reaction equation based on the physico-chemical and topological features of chemical bonds. NMR-based classification of ...

  9. Reaction mechanism for the thermal decomposition of BCl3/CH4/H2 gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Guillaume; Vignoles, Gérard L; Leyssale, Jean-Marc

    2011-10-27

    This paper presents an ab initio study of the B/C/Cl/H gas phase mechanism, featuring 10 addition-elimination reactions involving BH(i)Cl(j) (i + j ≤ 3) species and a first description of the chemical interaction between the carbon-containing and boron-containing subsystems through the three reactions BCl(3) + CH(4) ⇌ BCl(2)CH(3) + HCl, BHCl(2) + CH(4) ⇌ BCl(2)CH(3) + H(2), and BCl(2) + CH(4) ⇌ BHCl(2) + CH(3). A reaction mechanism is then proposed and used to perform some illustrative equilibrium and kinetic calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of boron carbide. Our results show that the new addition-elimination reaction paths play a crucial role by lowering considerably the activation barrier with respect to previous theoretical evaluations; they also confirm that BCl(2)CH(3) is an important species in the mechanism.

  10. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  11. Photochemical Reactions of Cyclohexanone: Mechanisms and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Dorit; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-09-15

    Photochemistry of carbonyl compounds is of major importance in atmospheric and organic chemistry. The photochemistry of cyclohexanone is studied here using on-the-fly molecular dynamics simulations on a semiempirical multireference configuration interaction potential-energy surface to predict the distribution of photoproducts and time scales for their formation. Rich photochemistry is predicted to occur on a picosecond time scale following the photoexcitation of cyclohexanone to the first singlet excited state. The main findings include: (1) Reaction channels found experimentally are confirmed by the theoretical simulations, and a new reaction channel is predicted. (2) The majority (87%) of the reactive trajectories start with a ring opening via C-Cα bond cleavage, supporting observations of previous studies. (3) Mechanistic details, time scales, and yields are predicted for all reaction channels. These benchmark results shed light on the photochemistry of isolated carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere and can be extended in the future to photochemistry of more complex atmospherically relevant carbonyl compounds in both gaseous and condensed-phase environments.

  12. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Pirouz

    1999-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as an enabling electronic technology for many aerospace applications. The Lewis team is focusing on the chemical vapor deposition of the thin, single-crystal SiC films from which devices are fabricated. These films, which are deposited (i.e., epitaxially "grown") on commercial wafers, must consist of a single crystal with very few structural defects so that the derived devices perform satisfactorily and reliably. Working in collaboration (NASA grant) with Professor Pirouz of Case Western Reserve University, we developed a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) technique for removing the subsurface polishing damage prior to epitaxial growth of the single-crystal SiC films.

  13. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions—II. parallel reversible chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, F.P.H. van; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and co

  14. Holistic Metrics for Assessment of the Greenness of Chemical Reactions in the Context of Chemical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. Gabriela T. C.; Machado, Adelio A. S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Two new semiquantitative green chemistry metrics, the green circle and the green matrix, have been developed for quick assessment of the greenness of a chemical reaction or process, even without performing the experiment from a protocol if enough detail is provided in it. The evaluation is based on the 12 principles of green chemistry. The…

  15. Thermal energy storage. [by means of chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The principles involved in thermal energy storage by sensible heat, chemical potential energy, and latent heat of fusion are examined for the purpose of evolving selection criteria for material candidates in the low ( 0 C) and high ( 100 C) temperature ranges. The examination identifies some unresolved theoretical considerations and permits a preliminary formulation of an energy storage theory. A number of candidates in the low and high temperature ranges are presented along with a rating of candidates or potential candidates. A few interesting candidates in the 0 to 100 C region are also included. It is concluded that storage by means of reactions whose reversibility can be controlled either by product removal or by catalytic means appear to offer appreciable advantages over storage with reactions whose reversability cannot be controlled. Among such advantages are listed higher heat storage capacities and more favorable options regarding temperatures of collection, storage, and delivery. Among the disadvantages are lower storage efficiencies.

  16. Tribology analysis of chemical-mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runnels, S.R.; Eyman, L.M. (Sematech, Austin, TX (United States))

    1994-06-01

    To better understand the variation of material removal rate on a wafer during chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP), knowledge of the stress distribution on the wafer surface is required. The difference in wafer-surface stress distributions could be considerable depending on whether or not the wafer hydroplanes during polishing. This study analyzes the fluid film between the wafer and pad and demonstrates that hydroplaning is possible for standard CMP processes. The importance of wafer curvature, slurry viscosity, and rotation speed on the thickness of the fluid film is also demonstrated.

  17. Mechanical and Chemical Signaling in Angiogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of Studies in Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials describes the most recent advances in angiogenesis research at all biological length scales: molecular, cellular and tissue, in both in vivo and in vitro settings.  Angiogenesis experts from diverse fields including engineering, cell and developmental biology, and chemistry have contributed chapters which focus on the mechanical and chemical signals which affect and promote blood vessel growth. Specific emphasis is given to novel methodologies and biomaterials that have been developed and applied to angiogenesis research. 

  18. The Mechanism of Surface Chemical Kinetics of Dissolution of Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭凯旋; 张哲儒; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the mechanism of dissolution reaction kinetics of minerals in aqueous solution based on the theory of surface chemistry.Surface chemical catalysis would lead to an obvous decrease in active energy of dissolution reaction of minerals.The dissolution rate of minerals is controlled by suface adsorption,surface exchange reaction and desorption,depending on pH of the solution and is directly proportional to δHn0+,When controlled by surface adsorption,i.e.,nθ=1,the dissolution rate will decrease with increasing pH;when controlled by surface exchane reaction,i.e.,nθ=0,the dissolution rate is independent of pH;when controlled by desorption,nθis a positive decimal between 0 and 1 in acidic solution and a negative decimal between-1 and 0 in alkaline solution.Dissolution of many minerals is controlled by surface adsorption and/or surface exchange reactions under acid conditions and by desorption under alkaline conditions.

  19. Stepwise Chlorination-Chemical Vapor Transport Reactions for Bastnaesite Concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽清; 王军; 范世华; 雷鹏翔; 王之昌

    2002-01-01

    Vapor phase extraction and mutual separation of rare earth (RE) elements from bastnaesite concentrate were investigated using stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport reactions mediated by vapor complexes LnAlnCl3n+3 (Ln=RE elements). The bastnaesite was heated to 800 K and chlorinated between 800~1300 K with C+Cl2+SiCl4 to remove CO2, SiF4 and high volatile chlorides. At the temperature of 1300 K for 6 h, the resulted RE chlorides were chemically transported and mutual separated with the vapor complexes while CaCl2 and BaCl2 were remained in the residues. Significantly different CVT characteristics were observed for gradually decreased and wave form temperature gradients

  20. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, J.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  1. Simulations of isoprene: Ozone reactions for a general circulation/chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, P. A.; Mcconnell, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    A parameterized reaction mechanism has been created to examine the interactions between isoprene and other tropospheric gas-phase chemicals. Tests of the parameterization have shown that its results match those of a more complex reaction set to a high degree of accuracy. Comparisons between test runs have shown that the presence of isoprene at the start of a six day interval can enhance later ozone concentrations by as much as twenty-nine percent. The test cases used no input fluxes beyond the initial time, implying that a single input of a biogenic hydrocarbon to an airmass can alter its ozone chemistry over a time scale on the order of a week.

  2. Mechanism of cis-prenyltransferase reaction probed by substrate analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yen-Pin; Liu, Hon-Ge [Institute of Biochemical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Teng, Kuo-Hsun [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liang, Po-Huang, E-mail: phliang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} The extremely slow trans-OPPS reaction using 2-Fluoro-FPP supports the sequential mechanism with the carbocation intermediate. {yields} The similar UPPS reaction rate under single turnover supports the concerted mechanism, without the carbocation intermediate. {yields} The secondary kinetic isotope effect also supports associate transition state for UPPS reaction, without the carbocation intermediate. -- Abstract: Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS) is a cis-type prenyltransferases which catalyzes condensation reactions of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with eight isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) units to generate C{sub 55} product. In this study, we used two analogues of FPP, 2-fluoro-FPP and [1,1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]FPP, to probe the reaction mechanism of Escherichia coli UPPS. The reaction rate of 2-fluoro-FPP with IPP under single-turnover condition is similar to that of FPP, consistent with the mechanism without forming a farnesyl carbocation intermediate. Moreover, the deuterium secondary KIE of 0.985 {+-} 0.022 measured for UPPS reaction using [1,1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]FPP supports the associative transition state. Unlike the sequential mechanism used by trans-prenyltransferases, our data demonstrate E. coli UPPS utilizes the concerted mechanism.

  3. Studying chemical reactions in biological systems with MBN Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Verkhovtsev, Alexey V.;

    2016-01-01

    The concept of molecular mechanics force field has been widely accepted nowadays for studying various processes in biomolecular systems. In this paper, we suggest a modification for the standard CHARMM force field that permits simulations of systems with dynamically changing molecular topologies....... for studying processes where rupture of chemical bonds plays an essential role, e.g., in irradiation- or collision-induced damage, and also in transformation and fragmentation processes involving biomolecular systems....

  4. Influence of oxygen on the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    The simulation of the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism may be very helpful in studying the radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation when the water radical clusters formed by the densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particle may form DSBs damaging DNA molecules in living cells. It is possible to study not only the efficiency of individual radicals but also the influence of other species or radiomodifiers (mainly oxygen) being present in water medium during irradiation. The mathematical model based on Continuous Petri nets (proposed by us recently) will be described. It makes it possible to analyze two main processes running at the same time: chemical radical reactions and the diffusion of radical clusters formed during energy transfer. One may study the time change of radical concentrations due to the chemical reactions running during diffusion process. Some orientation results concerning the efficiency of individual radicals in DSB formation (in the case of Co60 radiation) will be presented; the influence of oxygen present in water medium during irradiation will be shown, too.

  5. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies.

  6. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. PMID:27225077

  7. Miscible viscous fingering involving viscosity changes of the displacing fluid by chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Chika; Matsuda, Kenji; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2010-02-01

    In our previous study, we experimentally studied the effects of changes in the viscosity of the displaced more-viscous liquid by instantaneous reactions on miscible viscous fingering pattern [Y. Nagatsu, K. Matsuda, Y. Kato, and Y. Tada, "Experimental study on miscible viscous fingering involving viscosity changes induced by variations in chemical species concentrations due to chemical reactions," J. Fluid Mech. 571, 475 (2007)]. In the present study, experiments have been performed on the miscible viscous fingering involving changes in the viscosity of the displacing less-viscous liquid by instantaneous reactions in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. We have found that the shielding effect is suppressed and the fingers are widened when the viscosity is increased. As a result, the reaction makes the fingering pattern denser. In contrast, the shielding effect is enhanced, and the fingers are narrowed when the viscosity is decreased. As a result, the reaction makes the fingering pattern less dense. These results are essentially same as those obtained by the above-mentioned previous study. This shows that the effects of changes in the viscosity due to the instantaneous reactions are independent of whether the changes occur in the displaced liquid or in the displacing liquid. A mechanism for the independence is discussed.

  8. Recent developments in semiclassical mechanics: eigenvalues and reaction rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H.

    1976-04-01

    A semiclassical treatment of eigenvalues for a multidimensional non-separable potential function and of the rate constant for a chemical reaction with an activation barrier is presented. Both phenomena are seen to be described by essentially the same semiclassical formalism, which is based on a construction of the total Hamiltonian in terms of the complete set of ''good'' action variables (or adiabatic invariants) associated with the minimum in the potential energy surface for the eigenvalue case, or the saddle point in the potential energy surface for the case of chemical reaction.

  9. Effect of CO2-induced reactions on the mechanical behaviour of fractured wellbore cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, Timotheus K.T.; Hangx, Suzanne J.T.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Geomechanical damage, such as fracturing of wellbore cement, can severely impact well integrity in CO2 storage fields. Chemical reactions between the cement and CO2-bearing fluids may subsequently alter the cement’s mechanical properties, either enhancing or inhibiting damage accumulation during ong

  10. Reaction Mechanism of the Multi-channel Decomposition Reactions of 1-Pentenyl Free Radicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG,Xue-Li; ZHAO,Yan-Yun; LI,Feng; LI,Li-Qing; TAO,Xiu-Jun

    2008-01-01

    The reactions of 1-pentenyl decomposition system have been studied extensively at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level with Gaussion 98 package. The potential energy surface with zero-point energy correction was drawn. All reaction channels were fully investigated with the vibrational mode analysis, frontier orbital analysis and electron population analysis to confirm the transition states and reveal the reaction mechanism.

  11. The hunt for the dynamical resonances in chemical reaction dynamics: a perspective on historical advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Angyang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical background and basic definition of the resonances in chemical reaction dynamics have been introduced in this article. The historical breakthrough in the experimental search for the reaction resonances has been reviewed in this report, with an emphasis on the crossed molecular beam apparatus. The research of the chemical reaction resonances has attracted many scientists’ attention from 80s of last century. The chemical reaction resonances in the F+H2 reaction were firstly observed by the researchers of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2006. Besides, the partial wave resonances in the chemical reactions have been observed for the first time in 2010.

  12. Nitrile reaction in high-temperature water: Kinetics and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, B.; Harrell, C.L.; Klein, M.T. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-08-01

    The reaction pathways, kinetics and mechanisms underlying the hydrolysis of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles in high-temperature water (HTW) were investigated. The reaction products were the associated amides and carboxylic acids. Autocatalytic kinetics were observed and confirmed by experiment and analysis of the physical chemistry of the HTW reaction environment. A model incorporating two autocatalytic steps captured the observed kinetics well, and the associated optimized rate constants highlighted the key differences in the reaction chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles. The rate behavior of nitrile hydrolysis at these conditions has tangible consequences regarding optimal processing strategies.

  13. Interest of uranium complexes for the mechanism study of the McMurry reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reducing coupling reactions of ketones in diols and olefins are generally carried out with titanium or samarium compounds. In this work uranium complexes have been used. They have allowed to study the chemical reaction mechanism. This thesis is divided into three parts: 1) the reduction mechanism of uranium tetrachloride by cyclic voltametry has been studied at first. It has been shown that this reduction is followed by a transfer reaction of chlorides between the reduced specie of the higher electronic density and UCl . 2) In the second part is described: the synthesis, the crystal structure, the reactivity of the chemical agents, the stereochemistry of diols and alkenes formation and the pinacolisation reaction catalysis. 3) In the last part, the limits of the McMurry reaction are given by the study of the aromatic ketones pinacolisation reaction by-products. The obtained results show that the complexes of the metals which present a high reducing and oxo-philic (Ti, Sm, U..) character react in a similar way with the carbonyl compounds. If the uranium compounds are less used than those of the titanium in the field of the organic synthesis applications, they are precious auxiliaries and excellent models for reactions mechanisms study and for the synthesis methods optimization. (O.M.)

  14. Density Functional Study on the Mechanism of Amadori Rearrangement Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Xiu-Xiu; CHEN Zu-Qin; XIE Hu-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of amadori rearrangement in the initial stage of Maillard reaction has been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution. Cyclic ribose and glycine were taken as the model in the amadori rearrangement. Reaction mechanisms have been proposed, and possibility for the formation of different compounds has been evaluated through calculating the relative energy changes for different steps of the reaction by following the total mass balance. The calculations reveal that the amadori rearrangement initialized via the intramolecular rearrangement, transferring one proton from N(3) to O(4) atom. In the next step, the second proton is also transferred from N(3) to O(4) atom,corresponding to the cleavage of C(4)-O(4) bond and the release of one water molecule. Then another proton is transferred from N(3) to C(5) atom via TS3 with the reaction barrier of 58.3kcal.mol-1 after tunneling the effect correction calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory,and this step is rate limiting for the whole catalytic cycle. Ultimately, the product is generated via keto-enolic tautomerization. Present calculation could provide insights into the reaction mechanism of Maillard reaction since experimental evaluation of the role of intermediates in the Maillard reaction is quite complicated.

  15. Chemical Reactions in the Processing of Mosi2 + Carbon Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lee, Kang N.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1993-01-01

    Hot-pressing of MoSi2 powders with carbon at high temperatures reduces the siliceous grain boundary phase in the resultant compact. The chemical reactions in this process were examined using the Knudsen cell technique. A 2.3 wt pct oxygen MoSi2 powder and a 0.59 wt pct oxygen MoSi2 powder, both with additions of 2 wt pct carbon, were examined. The reduction of the siliceous grain boundary phase was examined at 1350 K and the resultant P(SiO)/P(CO) ratios interpreted in terms of the SiO(g) and CO(g) isobars on the Si-C-O predominance diagram. The MoSi2 + carbon mixtures were then heated at the hot-pressing temperature of 2100 K. Large weight losses were observed and could be correlated with the formation of a low-melting eutectic and the formation and vaporization of SiC.

  16. Miscible viscous fingering involving production of gel by chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hoshino, Kenichi

    2015-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated miscible viscous fingering with chemical reactions producing gel. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and aluminum ion (Al3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, SPA solution and ferric ion (Fe3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In the case of Al3 +, displacement efficiency was smaller than that in the non-reactive case, whereas in the case of Fe3 +, the displacement efficiency was larger. We consider that the difference in change of the patterns in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. We discuss relationship between the VF patterns and the rheological measurement.

  17. Mass transfer in porous media with heterogeneous chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza S.M.A.G.Ulson de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the modeling of the mass transfer process in packed-bed reactors is presented and takes into account dispersion in the main fluid phase, internal diffusion of the reactant in the pores of the catalyst, and surface reaction inside the catalyst. The method of volume averaging is applied to obtain the governing equation for use on a small scale. The local mass equilibrium is assumed for obtaining the one-equation model for use on a large scale. The closure problems are developed subject to the length-scale constraints and the model of a spatially periodic porous medium. The expressions for effective diffusivity, hydrodynamic dispersion, total dispersion and the Darcy's law permeability tensors are presented. Solution of the set of final equations permits the variations of velocity and concentration of the chemical species along the packed-bed reactors to be obtained.

  18. Graphene-Semiconductor Catalytic Nanodiodes for Quantitative Detection of Hot Electrons Induced by a Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I; Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Changhwan; Choi, Hongkyw; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-03-01

    Direct detection of hot electrons generated by exothermic surface reactions on nanocatalysts is an effective strategy to obtain insight into electronic excitation during chemical reactions. For this purpose, we fabricated a novel catalytic nanodiode based on a Schottky junction between a single layer of graphene and an n-type TiO2 layer that enables the detection of hot electron flows produced by hydrogen oxidation on Pt nanoparticles. By making a comparative analysis of data obtained from measuring the hot electron current (chemicurrent) and turnover frequency, we demonstrate that graphene's unique electronic structure and extraordinary material properties, including its atomically thin nature and ballistic electron transport, allow improved conductivity at the interface between the catalytic Pt nanoparticles and the support. Thereby, graphene-based nanodiodes offer an effective and facile way to approach the study of chemical energy conversion mechanisms in composite catalysts with carbon-based supports. PMID:26910271

  19. The mechanism and kinetics of epoxy-amine reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.Silane coupling agents have an important role at the interface for improving the performance of composite materials based on polymer matrices reinforced with glass fibers or mineral fillers. The silanes are also used in some adhesive formulations or as substrate primers, giving higher strength of adhesives joints. In these interface or interphase problems, most of the data in the literature concerns the final properties of the composite materials, such as strength or young's modulus; there is very little information about the chemical properties of the interphase. The aim of this study is to try to provide some of this basic data. The coupling agent studied here is the γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) or A1100. It is the most commonly used coupling agents. During composite processing, it is frequently reacted with an epoxy prepolymer based on diglycidylether of bisphenol A. We have studied these reactions from a fundamental point of view and not in industrial conditions. First we compared the kinetics results of different analytical techniques. Secondly, we compared the reactivities of the epoxy in DGEBA and the amino-hydrogen functions in coupling agent to those of model reagents like phenylglycidylether and hexylamine. the third part consists of validating a kinetic mechanism and calculating the rate constants, activation energy and reactivity ratios

  20. Ab initio studies of equations of state and chemical reactions of reactive structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava

    subject of studies of the shock or thermally induced chemical reactions of the two solids comprising these reactive materials, from first principles, is a relatively new field of study. The published literature on ab initio techniques or quantum mechanics based approaches consists of the ab initio or ab initio-molecular dynamics studies in related fields that contain a solid and a gas. One such study in the literature involves a gas and a solid. This is an investigation of the adsorption of gasses such as carbon monoxide (CO) on Tungsten. The motivation for these studies is to synthesize alternate or synthetic fuel technology by Fischer-Tropsch process. In this thesis these studies are first to establish the procedure for solid-solid reaction and then to extend that to consider the effects of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energy and chemisorptions of CO on tungsten. Then in this thesis, similar studies are also conducted on the effect of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energies of Titanium and hydrogen. The motivations are again to understand the method and extend the method to such solid-solid reactions. A second motivation is to seek strained conditions that favor hydrogen storage and strain conditions that release hydrogen easily when needed. Following the establishment of ab initio and ab initio studies of chemical reactions between a solid and a gas, the next step of research is to study thermally induced chemical reaction between two solids (Ni+Al). Thus, specific new studies of the thesis are as follows: (1) Ab initio Studies of Binding energies associated with chemisorption of (a) CO on W surfaces (111, and 100) at elevated temperatures and strains and (b) adsorption of hydrogen in titanium base. (2) Equations of state of mixtures of reactive material structures from ab initio methods. (3) Ab initio studies of the reaction initiation, transition states and reaction products of intermetallic mixtures of (Ni+Al) at elevated

  1. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Galagali, Nikhil

    2015-02-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model structure. Most existing applications of Bayesian model selection methods to chemical kinetics have been limited to comparisons among a small set of models, however. The significant computational cost of evaluating posterior model probabilities renders traditional Bayesian methods infeasible when the model space becomes large. We present a new framework for tractable Bayesian model inference and uncertainty quantification using a large number of systematically generated model hypotheses. The approach involves imposing point-mass mixture priors over rate constants and exploring the resulting posterior distribution using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The posterior samples are used to identify plausible models, to quantify rate constant uncertainties, and to extract key diagnostic information about model structure-such as the reactions and operating pathways most strongly supported by the data. We provide numerical demonstrations of the proposed framework by inferring kinetic models for catalytic steam and dry reforming of methane using available experimental data.

  2. Chemical reactions of excited nitrogen atoms for short wavelength chemical lasers. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-15

    Accomplishments of this program include the following: (1) Scalable, chemical generation of oxygen atoms by reaction of fluorine atoms and water vapor. (2) Production of nitrogen atom densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 1}5 cm{sup {minus}3} with 5% electrical efficiency by injecting trace amounts of fluorine into microwave discharged nitrogen. (3) Production of cyanide radicals by reaction of high densities of N atoms with cyanogen. (4) Production of carbon atoms by reaction of nitrogen atoms with cyanogen or with fluorine atoms and hydrogen cyanide. (5) Confirmation that the reaction of carbon atoms and carbonyl sulfide produces CS(a{sup 3} {Pi}{sub r}), as predicted by conservation of electron spin and orbital angular momenta and as proposed by others under another SWCL program. (6) Production of cyanide radicals by injection of cyanogen halides into active nitrogen and use as spectroscopic calibration source. (7) Demonstration that sodium atoms react with cyanogen chloride, bromide and iodide and with cyanuric trifluoride to produce cyanide radicals. (8) Demonstration of the potential utility of the fluorine atom plus ammonia reaction system in the production of NF(b{sup l}{Sigma}{sup +}) via N({sup 2}D) + F{sub 2}.

  3. Chemical Reaction and Flow Modeling in Fullerene and Nanotube Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Greendyke, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of processes to produce fullerenes and carbon nanotubes has largely been empirical. Fullerenes were first discovered in the soot produced by laser ablation of graphite [1]and then in the soot of electric arc evaporated carbon. Techniques and conditions for producing larger and larger quantities of fullerenes depended mainly on trial and error empirical variations of these processes, with attempts to scale them up by using larger electrodes and targets and higher power. Various concepts of how fullerenes and carbon nanotubes were formed were put forth, but very little was done based on chemical kinetics of the reactions. This was mainly due to the complex mixture of species and complex nature of conditions in the reactors. Temperatures in the reactors varied from several thousand degrees Kelvin down to near room temperature. There are hundreds of species possible, ranging from atomic carbon to large clusters of carbonaceous soot, and metallic catalyst atoms to metal clusters, to complexes of metals and carbon. Most of the chemical kinetics of the reactions and the thermodynamic properties of clusters and complexes have only been approximated. In addition, flow conditions in the reactors are transient or unsteady, and three dimensional, with steep spatial gradients of temperature and species concentrations. All these factors make computational simulations of reactors very complex and challenging. This article addresses the development of the chemical reaction involved in fullerene production and extends this to production of carbon nanotubes by the laser ablation/oven process and by the electric arc evaporation process. In addition, the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process is discussed. The article is in several parts. The first one addresses the thermochemical aspects of modeling; and considers the development of chemical rate equations, estimates of reaction rates, and thermodynamic properties where they are available. The second part

  4. Polarization of molecular angular momentum in the chemical reactions Li + HF and F + HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B; Popov, Ruslan S; Roncero, Octavio; De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2013-06-28

    The quantum mechanical approach to vector correlation of angular momentum orientation and alignment in chemical reactions [G. Balint-Kurti and O. S. Vasyutinskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 14281 (2009)] is applied to the molecular reagents and products of the Li + HF [L. Gonzalez-Sanchez, O. S. Vasyutinskii, A. Zanchet, C. Sanz-Sanz, and O. Roncero, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13656 (2011)] and F + HD [D. De Fazio, J. Lucas, V. Aquilanti, and S. Cavalli, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 8571 (2011)] reactions for which accurate scattering information has become recently available through time-dependent and time-independent approaches. Application of the theory to two important particular cases of the reactive collisions has been considered: (i) the influence of the angular momentum polarization of reactants in the entrance channel on the spatial distribution of the products in the exit channel and (ii) angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction between unpolarized reactants. In the former case, the role of the angular momentum alignment of the reactants is shown to be large, particularly when the angular momentum is perpendicular to the reaction scattering plane. In the latter case, the orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum was found to be significant and strongly dependent on the scattering angle. The calculation also reveals significant differences between the vector correlation properties of the two reactions under study which are due to difference in the reaction mechanisms. In the case of F + HD reaction, the branching ratio between HF and DF production points out interest in the insight gained into the detailed dynamics, when information is available either from exact quantum mechanical calculations or from especially designed experiments. Also, the geometrical arrangement for the experimental determination of the product angular momentum orientation and alignment based on a compact and convenient spherical tensor expression for

  5. Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

    1977-08-01

    A bibliographic review of 195 references is presented outlining the history of the research into the mechanisms of cellulose pyrolysis. Topics discussed are: initial product identification, mechanism of initial formation of levoglucosan, from cellulose and from related compounds, decomposition of cellulose to other compounds, formation of aromatics, pyrolysis of levoglucosan, crosslinking of cellulose, pyrolytic reactions of cellulose derivatives, and the effects of inorganic salts on the pyrolysis mechanism. (JSR)

  6. Atherton–Todd reaction: mechanism, scope and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie S. Le Corre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Initially, the Atherton–Todd (AT reaction was applied for the synthesis of phosphoramidates by reacting dialkyl phosphite with a primary amine in the presence of carbon tetrachloride. These reaction conditions were subsequently modified with the aim to optimize them and the reaction was extended to different nucleophiles. The mechanism of this reaction led to controversial reports over the past years and is adequately discussed. We also present the scope of the AT reaction. Finally, we investigate the AT reaction by means of exemplary applications, which mainly concern three topics. First, we discuss the activation of a phenol group as a phosphate which allows for subsequent transformations such as cross coupling and reduction. Next, we examine the AT reaction applied to produce fire retardant compounds. In the last section, we investigate the use of the AT reaction for the production of compounds employed for biological applications. The selected examples to illustrate the applications of the Atherton–Todd reaction mainly cover the past 15 years.

  7. The catalytic reaction mechanism of drosophilid alcohol dehydrogenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imin Wushur

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes the current knowledge about the reaction mechanism of drosophilid alcohol dehydrogenases (DADH, a member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR superfamily. Included is the binding order of the substrates to the enzyme, rate limiting steps, stereochemistry of the reaction, active site topology, role of important amino acids and water molecules in the reaction and pH dependence of kinetic coefficients. We focus on the contribution from steady state kinetics where alternative substrates, dead end and product inhibitors, isotopes and mutated DADHs have been used as well as on the contributions from X-ray crystallography, NMR and theoretical calculations. Furthermore, we also raise some open questions in order to fully understand the reaction mechanism of this enzyme.

  8. On the Reaction Mechanism of Br2 with OCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Tao YU; Hua ZHONG; Ming Xia LI; Hong Gang FU; Jia Zhong SUN

    2005-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of photochemical reaction between Br2 ( 1 ∑ ) and OCS ( 1 ∑ ) is predicted by means of theoretical methods. The calculated results indicate that the direct addition of Br2 to the CS bond of OCS molecule is more favorable in energy than the direct addition of Br2to the CO bond. Furthermore, the intermediate isomer syn-BrC(O)SBr is more stable thermodynamically and kinetically than anti-BrC(O)SBr. The original resultant anti-BrC(O)SBr formed in the most favorable reaction channel can easily isomerize into the final product syn-BrC(O)SBr with only 31.72 kJ/mol reaction barrier height. The suggested mechanism is in good agreement with previous experimental study.

  9. Learning the mechanisms of chemical disequilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Schuyler B.; Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Green, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    When at equilibrium, large-scale systems obey thermodynamics because they have microscopic configurations that are typical. "Typical" states are a fraction of those possible with the majority of the probability. A more precise definition of typical states underlies the transmission, coding, and compression of information. However, this definition does not apply to natural systems that are transiently away from equilibrium. Here, we introduce a variational measure of typicality and apply it to atomistic simulations of a model for hydrogen oxidation. While a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and oxygen combusts, reactant molecules transform through a variety of ephemeral species en route to the product, water. Out of the exponentially growing number of possible sequences of chemical species, we find that greater than 95% of the probability concentrates in less than 1% of the possible sequences. Overall, these results extend the notion of typicality across the nonequilibrium regime and suggest that typical sequences are a route to learning mechanisms from experimental measurements. They also open up the possibility of constructing ensembles for computing the macroscopic observables of systems out of equilibrium.

  10. Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) for Microelectronic Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuzhuo

    2004-01-01

    Surface planarity is of paramount importance in microelectronics. Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) is the most viable approach to address the planarity issues during the fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices. With the integration of copper as interconnect and low k materials as dielectric, the CMP community is facing an ever increasing demand on reducing defectivity without scarifying production throughput. Key issues in CMP today include reduction of surface defectivity and enhancement of planarization efficiency. More specifically, the polished surface should be free of defects such as scratches, pits, corrosion spots, and residue particles. To accomplish these goals, we have investigated a wide range of pathways including reduction of oversized particles,use of unique abrasives such as functionalized nanoparticles, and development of polishing solution without abrasive particles.In this presentation, some fundamental aspects of the CMP process will be given first.Several academic and industrial examples will be used to illustrate the issues and challenges during the implementation of various slurry designs into the CMP processes.

  11. Theoretical Study on the Dark Oxidation Reaction Mechanism of Ethers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-Xiu; ZHU Rong-Xiu; ZHANG Dong-Ju; LIU Cheng-Bu

    2006-01-01

    The dark oxidation reactions of ethers including aether, isopropyl ether, phenyl isopropyl ether, and benzyl isopropyl ether have been studied by using density functional theory calculations. The structures of initial contact charge transfer complexes (CCTCs), transition states and caged radical intermediates have been located at the B3LYP/6-31G (d) level. The bonding nature of ethers with triplet O2 in CCTCs has been analyzed, and the detailed mechanism of dark oxidation reactions of ether is presented clearly.

  12. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate the wide variety of experimental studies that provide information on the reaction products and reaction mechanisms involved in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins (including chromosomal proteins) in both aqueous and solid-state systems. The comparative radiation chemistry of these systems is developed in terms of specific reactions of the peptide main-chain and the aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing side-chains. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy is included. 147 refs

  13. Abiotic reduction reactions of anthropogenic organic chemicals in anaerobic systems: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Grundl, Timothy J.

    1986-02-01

    This review is predicated upon the need for a detailed process-level understanding of factors influencing the reduction of anthropogenic organic chemicals in natural aquatic systems. In particular, abiotic reductions of anthropogenic organic chemicals are reviewed. The most important reductive reaction is alkyl dehalogenation (replacement of chloride with hydrogen) which occurs in organisms, sediments, sewage sludge, and reduced iron porphyrin model systems. An abiotic mechanism involving a free radical intermediate has been proposed. The abstraction of vicinal dihalides (also termed dehalogenation) is another reduction that may have an abiotic component in natural systems. Reductive dehalogenation of aryl halides has recently been reported and further study of this reaction is needed. Several other degradation reactions of organohalides that occur in anaerobic environments are mentioned, the most important of which is dehydrohalogenation. The reduction of nitro groups to amines has also been thoroughly studied. The reactions can occur abiotically, and are affected by the redox conditions of the experimental system. However, a relationship between nitro-reduction rate and measured redox potential has not been clearly established. Reductive dealkylation of the N- and O-heteroatom of hydrocarbon pollutants has been observed but not investigated in detail. Azo compounds can be reduced to their hydrazo derivatives and a thorough study of this reaction indicates that it can be caused by extracellular electron transfer agents. Quinone-hydroquinone couples are important reactive groups in humic materials and similar structures in resazurin and indigo carmine make them useful as models for environmental redox conditions. The interconversion of sulfones, sulfoxides, and sulfides is a redox process and is implicated in the degradation of several pesticides though the reactions need more study. Two reductive heterocyclic cleavage reactions are also mentioned. Finally, several

  14. Colloid Aspects of Chemical-Mechanical Planarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević, E.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The essential parts of interconnects for silicon based logic and memory devices consist of metal wiring (e.g. copper, a barrier metal (Ta, TaN, and of insulation (SiO2 , low-k polymer. The deposition of the conducting metal cannot be confined to trenches, resulting in additional coverage of Cu and Ta/TaN on the surface of the dielectrics, yielding an electrically conducting continuous but an uneven surface. The surplus metal must be removed until a perfectly flat surface consisting of electrically isolated metal lines is achieved with no imperfections. This task is accomplished by the chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP process, in which the wafer is polished with a slurry containing abrasives of finely dispersed particles in submicrometer to nanometer size. The slurries also contain dissolved chemicals to modify the surfaces to be planarized. Eventually the final product must be cleared of any adhered particles and debris left after polishing is completed. Obviously the entire process deals with materials and interactions which are the focal subjects of colloid and surface science, such as the natures of abrasive particles and their stability in the slurry, the properties of various surfaces and their modifications, adhesion and detachment of the particles and different methods for the characterization of constituents, as well as elucidation of the relevant interfacial phenomena. This review endeavors to describe the colloid approach to optimize the materials and processes in order to achieve desirable polish rates and final surfaces with no imperfections. Specifically, the effects of the composition, size, shape, and charge of abrasive particles on the polish process and the quality of planarized wafers is described in detail. Furthermore, the interactions of metal surfaces with oxidizing, chelating, and other species which affect the dissolution and surface modification of metal (copper surfaces are illustrated and related to the

  15. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  16. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  17. Thermal degradation reaction mechanism of xylose: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Wu, Longqin; Tong, Hong

    2016-08-01

    The thermal degradation reaction mechanism of xylose as hemicellulose model compound was investigated by using density functional theory methods M062X with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. Eight possible pyrolytic reaction pathways were proposed and the standard kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in all reaction pathways were calculated at different temperatures. In reaction pathway (1), xylose is first transformed into acyclic containing-carbonyl isomer, and then the isomer further decomposes through four possible pyrolysis pathways (1-1)-(1-4). Pathways (2) and (3) depict an immediate ring-opening process through the simultaneous breaking of C-O and C-C bonds. Pathways (4)-(7) describe the pyrolysis processes of various anhydro-xyloses through a direct ring-opening process. Pathway (8) gives the evolutionary process of pyranones. The calculation results show that reaction pathways (1), (2) and (5) are the major reaction channels and reaction pathways (3), (4), and (6)-(8) are the competitive reaction channels in pyrolysis of xylose. The major products of xylose pyrolysis are low molecular products such as 2-furaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and acetone, and the main competitive products are formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, CO2, CH4, acetol, pyranone, and so on.

  18. Chemical Mechanism Solvers in Air Quality Models

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John C.; Adrian Sandu; Rolf Sander; Hong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The solution of chemical kinetics is one of the most computationally intensive tasks in atmospheric chemical transport simulations. Due to the stiff nature of the system, implicit time stepping algorithms which repeatedly solve linear systems of equations are necessary. This paper reviews the issues and challenges associated with the construction of efficient chemical solvers, discusses several families of algorithms, presents strategies for increasing computational efficiency, and gives insi...

  19. Reaction mechanism study of 7Li(7Li, 6He) reaction at above Coulomb barrier energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V V Parkar; V Jha; S Santra; B J Roy; K Ramachandran; A Shrivastava; K Mahata; A Chatterjee; S Kailas

    2009-02-01

    The elastic scattering and the 6He angular distributions were measured in 7Li + 7Li reaction at two energies, lab = 20 and 25 MeV. FRDWBA calculations have been performed to explain the measured 6He data. The calculations were very sensitive to the choice of the optical model potentials in entrance and exit channels. The one-step proton transfer was found to be the dominant reaction mechanism in 6He production.

  20. From chemical reactions to evolution: Emergence of species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletti, T.; Fanelli, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Chemoton model constitutes a minimalistic description of a protocell unit. The original formulation assumes three coupled chemical networks, representing a proto-metabolism, a template duplication and the membrane growth. An improved version is here proposed that explicitly incorporates the effects of the volume changes, due to the membrane growth. A stochastic mechanism is also introduced that mimics a stochastic source of error in the template duplication process. Numerical simulations are performed to monitor the time evolution of a family of protocells, under the chemoton hypothesis. An open-ended Darwinian evolution under the pressure of the environment is reproduced thus allowing to conclude that differentiation into species is an emergent property of the model.

  1. Reaction mechanism and reaction coordinates from the viewpoint of energy flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2016-03-21

    Reaction coordinates are of central importance for correct understanding of reaction dynamics in complex systems, but their counter-intuitive nature made it a daunting challenge to identify them. Starting from an energetic view of a reaction process as stochastic energy flows biased towards preferred channels, which we deemed the reaction coordinates, we developed a rigorous scheme for decomposing energy changes of a system, both potential and kinetic, into pairwise components. The pairwise energy flows between different coordinates provide a concrete statistical mechanical language for depicting reaction mechanisms. Application of this scheme to the C7eq → C7ax transition of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum revealed novel and intriguing mechanisms that eluded previous investigations of this well studied prototype system for biomolecular conformational dynamics. Using a cost function developed from the energy decomposition components by proper averaging over the transition path ensemble, we were able to identify signatures of the reaction coordinates of this system without requiring any input from human intuition.

  2. Reaction mechanism and reaction coordinates from the viewpoint of energy flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2016-03-01

    Reaction coordinates are of central importance for correct understanding of reaction dynamics in complex systems, but their counter-intuitive nature made it a daunting challenge to identify them. Starting from an energetic view of a reaction process as stochastic energy flows biased towards preferred channels, which we deemed the reaction coordinates, we developed a rigorous scheme for decomposing energy changes of a system, both potential and kinetic, into pairwise components. The pairwise energy flows between different coordinates provide a concrete statistical mechanical language for depicting reaction mechanisms. Application of this scheme to the C7eq → C7ax transition of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum revealed novel and intriguing mechanisms that eluded previous investigations of this well studied prototype system for biomolecular conformational dynamics. Using a cost function developed from the energy decomposition components by proper averaging over the transition path ensemble, we were able to identify signatures of the reaction coordinates of this system without requiring any input from human intuition.

  3. Chemical reaction calculation simulation of redox behavior of metal ions and the like in the nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that corrosion rate of stainless steel in nitric acid solution is affected by the valence change of oxidizing metallic ions. In this study, we conducted redox reaction analyses using chemical reaction calculation model to clarify the mechanism of valence change. We obtained that the oxidization of metallic ions in the solution is not only caused by nitric acid but also nitrogen oxides. (author)

  4. Uses and abuses of the Langevin equation for chemical reactions in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations are useful in the description of many classical and quantum mechanical systems. However, these equations are justifiable from molecular considerations under very restricted conditions. These conditions include weak coupling. Brownian motion, and systems with special Hamiltonians. The application of these equations to chemical reactions in condensed phases is fraught with peril, particularly for fluid systems. The authors examine the molecular derivations of these equations and describe the conditions under which they are justifiable. It is, of course, possible that the equations are useful under other conditions

  5. Chemical Reaction Between Polyvinyl Alcohol and Titanate Coupling Agent with X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bei-xing; ZHANG Wen-sheng

    2003-01-01

    The chemical reaction between polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and tri(dioctylpyrophosphoryloxy) isopropyl titanate (NDZ-201) was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).The results show that some C-OH functional groups of PVA react with the titanate coupling agent to form CPVA-O-Ti-O-CPVA bond.The cross-linking of the PVA chains occurs through the formation of CPVA-O-Ti-O-CPVA bonds and produces a three dimensional hydrophobic polymer network.Accordingly,the mechanism is proposed that the titanate coupling agent improves the moisture sensitivity of high alumina cement/polyvinyl alcohol (HAC/PVA) based macro defect free (MDF) composite material.

  6. Physical Mechanism of Nuclear Reactions at Low Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Oleinik, V P; Arepjev, Yu.D

    2002-01-01

    The physical mechanism of nuclear reactions at low energies caused by spatial extension of electron is considered. Nuclear reactions of this type represent intra-electronic processes, more precisely, the processes occurring inside the area of basic localization of electron. Distinctive characteristics of these processes are defined by interaction of the own field produced by electrically charged matter of electron with free nuclei. Heavy nucleus, appearing inside the area of basic localization of electron, is inevitably deformed because of interaction of protons with the adjoining layers of electronic cloud, which may cause nuclear fission. If there occur "inside" electron two or greater number of light nuclei, an attractive force appears between the nuclei which may result in the fusion of nuclei. The intra-electronic mechanism of nuclear reactions is of a universal character. For its realization it is necessary to have merely a sufficiently intensive stream of free electrons, i.e. heavy electric current, an...

  7. Reaction of niobium with hexane and methanol by mechanical grinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mechanical alloying (MA) processing, alcohol, acetone and other organic solvents are often added as dispersants in order that powders will not stick to a vessel. It has been however considered that these organic solvents are simply additives. Enough attention has not been paid to the role or reaction of these dispersants. Recently, it was found that these organic solvents could react with some metals. For example, the authors reported that NbC is obtained by a reaction between Nb and methanol in the preparation of Al3Nb intermetallics by the MA method. Niobium hydrides are obtained by milling of Nb powders in hydrocarbon. In this paper, the authors discuss the reaction between Nb powder and hexane (C6H14) or methanol (CH3OH) during mechanical grinding (MG) processing

  8. Hydroxylation Reaction Mechanism for Nitrosodimethylamine by Oxygen Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lan; LIN Xiao-yan; LI Zong-he

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxylation reaction mechanism of nitrosodimethylamine(NDMA)by oxygen atom was theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G** level.It has been found that the path of the oxydation of the C-H bond is easier than the path involving a Singlet/Triplet crossing.The study of the potential surface shows that both solvent effect at B3LYP/6-31G** level and different method at more credible MP2/6-311G** level in the gas phase have no effect on the hydroxylation reaction mechanism.The oxidation hydroxylation process of NDMA by O is exothermic reaction and easy to occur.

  9. Reaction parameter study for the chemical synthesis of adsorbent silica gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carolina Sáenz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an appropriate set of reaction parameters (reaction temperature, sulphuric acid and sodium silicate reagent concentration for obtaining adsorbent silica gel (ASG using Colombian-produced raw materials. The core of ASG synthesis lies in sulphuric acid’s neutralisation reaction with sodium silicate. Their effect on final ASG moisture adsorption capacity was measured after changing such synthesis’ above–mentioned reaction parameters. Within the range of conditions studied, it was found that the highest adsorption capacity occurred by combining both low sodium silicate concentration with high temperatures or high sulphuric acid concentration and temperature. Synthesised ASG was also compared to a commercial product (Gel de sílice granulare con indicatore. Montedison group. Batch number 1684G100. Code number 453301 using adsorption capacity plots, BET areas, X–ray di-ffraction, mass and infrared spectrometry and mechanical strength measurements. Synthesised ASG presented larger specific surface areas but weaker mechanical strength than the commercial one. Likewise, all evaluated samples exhibited a low degree of molecular arrangement and conventional ASG chemical structure.

  10. Mechanism and Kinetics Analysis of NO/SO2/N2/O2 Dissociation Reactions in Non-Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinliang; LI Tingting; WEI Dongxiang; WEI Yanli; GU Fan

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics mechanism of the dissociation reactions in a NO/SO2/N2/O2 system was investigated in consideration of energetic electrons' impacts on a non-thermal plasma. A model was derived from the Boltzmann equation and molecule collision theory to predict the dissociation reaction rate coefficients. Upon comparison with available literature, the model was confirmed to be acceptably accurate in general. Several reaction rate coefficients of the NO/SO2/N2/O2 dissociation system were derived according to the Arrhenius formula. The activation energies of each plasma reaction were calculated by quantum chemistry methods. The relation between the dissociation reaction rate coefficient and electron temperature was established to describe the importance of each reaction and to predict relevant processes of gaseous chemical reactions. The sensitivity of the mechanism of NO/SO2/N2/O2 dissociation reaction in a non-thermal plasma was also analysed.

  11. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs: the role of the aromatic ring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, K.B.; Puijenbroek, E.P. van; Bijl, A.H.; Hermens, W.A.; Rijkom, JE Zwart-van; Hekster, Y.A.; Egberts, T.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  12. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs : the role of the aromatic ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, Kim B; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; Bijl, Annemarie H; Hermens, Walter A J J; Zwart-van Rijkom, Jeannette E F; Hekster, Yechiel A; Egberts, Toine C G

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  13. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  15. Benzoxazinone-Mediated Triazine Degradation: A Proposed Reaction Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, C D; Lerch, R N; Lin, C-H; Goyne, K W; Leigh, N D; Roberts, C A

    2016-06-22

    The role of benzoxazinones (Bx, 2-hydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one) in triazine resistance in plants has been studied for over half a century. In this research, fundamental parameters of the reaction between DIBOA-Glc (2-β-d-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one) and atrazine (ATR, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) were examined. Through a series of experiments employing a variety of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques, the DIBOA-Glc/ATR reaction was characterized in terms of reactant and product kinetics, stoichiometry, identification of a reaction intermediate, and reaction products formed. Results of these experiments demonstrated that the reaction mechanism proceeds via nucleophilic attack of the hydroxamic acid moiety of DIBOA-Glc at the C-2 position of the triazine ring to form hydroxyatrazine (HA, 2-hydroxy-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), with associated degradation of DIBOA-Glc. Degradation of reactants followed first-order kinetics with a noncatalytic role of DIBOA-Glc. A reaction intermediate was identified as a DIBOA-Glc-HA conjugate, indicating a 1:1 DIBOA-Glc:ATR stoichiometry. Reaction products included HA and Cl(-), but definitive identification of DIBOA-Glc reaction product(s) was not attained. With these reaction parameters elucidated, DIBOA-Glc can be evaluated in terms of its potential for a myriad of applications, including its use to address the problem of widespread ATR contamination of soil and water resources. PMID:27215133

  16. DFT study on mechanism of the classical Biginelli reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Guang Ma; Ji Ming Zhang; Hai Hui Jiang; Wan Yong Ma; Jian Hua Zhou

    2008-01-01

    The condensation of benzaldehyde, urea, and ethyl acetoacetate according to the procedure described by Biginelli was investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p), and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) levels to explore the reaction mechanism. According to the mechanism proposed by Kappe, structures of five intermediates were optimized and four transition states were found. The calculation results proved that the mechanism proposed by Kappe is right.

  17. Separation of chemical reaction intermediates by metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrone, Andrea; Santiso, Erik E; Hatton, T Alan

    2011-08-22

    HPLC columns custom-packed with metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are used for the separation of four small intermediates and byproducts found in the commercial synthesis of an important active pharmaceutical ingredient in methanol. In particular, two closely related amines can be separated in the methanol reaction medium using MOFs, but not with traditional C18 columns using an optimized aqueous mobile phase. Infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis are used in combination with molecular dynamic simulations to study the separation mechanism for the best-performing MOF materials. It is found that separation with ZIF-8 is the result of an interplay between the thermodynamic driving force for solute adsorption within the framework pores and the kinetics of solute diffusion into the material pores, while the separation with Basolite F300 is achieved because of the specific interactions between the solutes and Fe(3+) sites. This work, and the exceptional ability to tailor the porous properties of MOF materials, points to prospects for using MOF materials for the continuous separation and synthesis of pharmaceutical compounds.

  18. Effect of Grain Size and Reaction Time in Characterisation of Aggregates for Alkali Silica Reaction Using Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Pathak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete can deteriorate as a result of alkali aggregate reaction, an interaction between alkalis present in alkaline pore solution originating from the Portland cement and reactive minerals in certain types of aggregates. Potential reactivity of aggregates with regard to alkalis present in concrete mix can be determined by Mortar Bar method, Chemical Method and Petrographic analysis. Of these the chemical method though is quick and does not require a large quantity of material for testing yet have its own inherent limitations. It does not ensure completion of reaction as the observations are limited to 24hour only and also does not assess the effect of varying the combination of coarse and fine aggregates. A study on chemical method by allowing the reaction for a prolonged time up to 96 hours and also on different grain size ranged matrix was carried at Central Soil and Materials Research Station, New Delhi. Simultaneously the test results of the modified method are compared to the existing Mortar Bar method, Chemical Method and Petrographic analysis The outcome of the studies clearly reflects that the grain size play an important role in the reaction, the reaction time has a demarked impact on reactivity, in the cases having a high value of silica release the choice of reduction in alkalinity as an indicator of degree of reaction is not reliable, instead measuring remaining Na2O concentration in Sodium hydroxide solution after the reaction seems to be much more meaningful in justifying the silica release.

  19. Nuclear reaction mechanisms. Progress report, June 1975--May 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.

    1976-01-01

    Research under the subject contract has been directed along two major lines: (1) development and exploration of pre-equilibrium statistical models; (2) experimental measurement and theoretical investigation of heavy ion reaction mechanisms, with emphasis on the limits on compound nucleus formation. Much of the work under this contract has been published and a list of publications is part of this report. This work is not otherwise summarized herein. New unpublished results on heavy ion reactions are briefly summarized, as are results of precompound ..cap alpha.. emission. Colloquia and addresses are also summarized. Separate abstracts appear in ERA for six of the papers in this report.

  20. Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2013-05-29

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Non-allergic cutaneous reactions in airborne chemical sensitivity--a population based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Linneberg, Allan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan;

    2011-01-01

    the relationship between cutaneous reactions from patch testing and self-reported severity of chemical sensitivity to common airborne chemicals. A total of 3460 individuals participating in a general health examination, Health 2006, were patch tested with allergens from the European standard series and screened...... for chemical sensitivity with a standardised questionnaire dividing the participants into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity. Both allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions--defined as irritative, follicular, or doubtful allergic reactions--were analysed in relationship with severity of chemical...... most severe groups of self-reported sensitivity to airborne chemicals. When adjusting for confounding, associations were weakened, and only non-allergic cutaneous reactions were significantly associated with individuals most severely affected by inhalation of airborne chemicals (odds ratio = 2.5, p = 0...

  2. [Studies of chemical reactions in solid matrices]. Final report, December 1,, 1979-November 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program, which has been supported for 35 years by the Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, has produced significant advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of: (1) chemical activation by nuclear processes; (2) radiation chemistry; and (3) photochemistry. It has advanced knowledge of the reactions of electrons, hydrogen atoms and small free radicals, particularly in solids at cryogenic temperatures. It has applied radioisotopes as a tool in the solution of a number of chemical problems, has developed useful new techniques, and has contributed to the training of approximately 150 scientists at various levels. This final report includes a review of the evolution of areas of research emphasized, tabulations of the publications (chronologically and by research area) and Ph.D. theses resulting from the program, and tabulations of the research personnel (by academic category, by dates in the program and by subsequent employment)

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Ozone with Double Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumovskii, S. D.; Zaikov, Gennadii E.

    1980-12-01

    Analysis of the results of recent studies has shown that the reaction of ozone with the double bonds of organic compounds apparently takes place not by a synchronous addition mechanism but through a reversible stage involving the formation of an intermediate complex of ozone with the double bond. The subsequent stages of the reaction involve the formation of a primary ozonide, its decomposition into two fragments, their combination, and a number of other transformations. The properties of the intermediate products, the relationship between the structure of the original alkenes and their reactivity towards ozone, the influence of the nature of the solvent on the direction and rate of the reaction, and the practical application of the reaction of ozone with double bonds in research and chemical technology have been examined. The bibliography contains 205 references.

  4. Mixing and chemical reaction in sheared and nonsheared homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations were made to examine the local structure of the reaction zone for a moderately fast reaction between unmixed species in decaying, homogeneous turbulence and in a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Pseudospectral techniques were used in domains of 64 exp 3 and higher wavenumbers. A finite-rate, single step reaction between non-premixed reactants was considered, and in one case temperature-dependent Arrhenius kinetics was assumed. Locally intense reaction rates that tend to persist throughout the simulations occur in locations where the reactant concentration gradients are large and are amplified by the local rate of strain. The reaction zones are more organized in the case of a uniform mean shear than in isotropic turbulence, and regions of intense reaction rate appear to be associated with vortex structures such as horseshoe vortices and fingers seen in mixing layers. Concentration gradients tend to align with the direction of the most compressive principal strain rate, more so in the isotropic case.

  5. Chemical Reaction CO+OH(•) → CO2+H(•) Autocatalyzed by Carbon Dioxide: Quantum Chemical Study of the Potential Energy Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunov, Artëm E; Wait, Elizabeth; Vasu, Subith S

    2016-08-01

    The supercritical carbon dioxide medium, used to increase efficiency in oxy combustion fossil energy technology, may drastically alter both rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Here we investigate potential energy surface of the second most important combustion reaction with quantum chemistry methods. Two types of effects are reported: formation of the covalent intermediates and formation of van der Waals complexes by spectator CO2 molecule. While spectator molecule alter the activation barrier only slightly, the covalent bonding opens a new reaction pathway. The mechanism includes sequential covalent binding of CO2 to OH radical and CO molecule, hydrogen transfer from oxygen to carbon atoms, and CH bond dissociation. This reduces the activation barrier by 11 kcal/mol at the rate-determining step and is expected to accelerate the reaction rate. The finding of predicted catalytic effect is expected to play an important role not only in combustion but also in a broad array of chemical processes taking place in supercritical CO2 medium. It may open a new venue for controlling reaction rates for chemical manufacturing. PMID:27351778

  6. Mapping Students' Conceptual Modes When Thinking about Chemical Reactions Used to Make a Desired Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, M. L.; Talanquer, V.

    2015-01-01

    The central goal of this qualitative research study was to uncover major implicit assumptions that students with different levels of training in the discipline apply when thinking and making decisions about chemical reactions used to make a desired product. In particular, we elicited different ways of conceptualizing why chemical reactions happen…

  7. Design criteria for extraction with chemical reaction and liquid membrane permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, H. J.; Bauer, A.; Lorbach, D.; Marr, R.

    1988-01-01

    The design criteria for heterogeneous chemical reactions in liquid/liquid systems formally correspond to those of classical physical extraction. More complex models are presented which describe the material exchange at the individual droplets in an extraction with chemical reaction and in liquid membrane permeation.

  8. Motivational Factors Contributing to Turkish High School Students' Achievement in Gases and Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Cansel; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of motivational factors to 10th grade students' achievement in gases and chemical reactions in chemistry. Three hundred fifty nine 10th grade students participated in the study. The Gases and Chemical Reactions Achievement Test and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire were…

  9. Introducing Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Reactions Using the Gillespie Algorithm and MATLAB: Revisited and Augmented

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoti, A.; Fan, L. T.; Cruz, J.; Chou, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    The stochastic simulation of chemical reactions, specifically, a simple reversible chemical reaction obeying the first-order, i.e., linear, rate law, has been presented by Martinez-Urreaga and his collaborators in this journal. The current contribution is intended to complement and augment their work in two aspects. First, the simple reversible…

  10. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  11. Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.; Escher, C.

    1988-06-07

    The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

  12. Unraveling the reaction mechanisms governing methanol-to-olefins catalysis by theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelsoet, Karen; Van der Mynsbrugge, Jeroen; De Wispelaere, Kristof; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2013-06-01

    The conversion of methanol to olefins (MTO) over a heterogeneous nanoporous catalyst material is a highly complex process involving a cascade of elementary reactions. The elucidation of the reaction mechanisms leading to either the desired production of ethene and/or propene or undesired deactivation has challenged researchers for many decades. Clearly, catalyst choice, in particular topology and acidity, as well as the specific process conditions determine the overall MTO activity and selectivity; however, the subtle balances between these factors remain not fully understood. In this review, an overview of proposed reaction mechanisms for the MTO process is given, focusing on the archetypal MTO catalysts, H-ZSM-5 and H-SAPO-34. The presence of organic species, that is, the so-called hydrocarbon pool, in the inorganic framework forms the starting point for the majority of the mechanistic routes. The combination of theory and experiment enables a detailed description of reaction mechanisms and corresponding reaction intermediates. The identification of such intermediates occurs by different spectroscopic techniques, for which theory and experiment also complement each other. Depending on the catalyst topology, reaction mechanisms proposed thus far involve aromatic or aliphatic intermediates. Ab initio simulations taking into account the zeolitic environment can nowadays be used to obtain reliable reaction barriers and chemical kinetics of individual reactions. As a result, computational chemistry and by extension computational spectroscopy have matured to the level at which reliable theoretical data can be obtained, supplying information that is very hard to acquire experimentally. Special emphasis is given to theoretical developments that open new perspectives and possibilities that aid to unravel a process as complex as methanol conversion over an acidic porous material.

  13. Physical and chemical mechanisms in oxide-based resistance random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Zhang, Rui; Hung, Ya-Chi; Syu, Yong-En; Chang, Yao-Feng; Chen, Min-Chen; Chu, Tian-Jian; Chen, Hsin-Lu; Pan, Chih-Hung; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of our work in resistive switching mechanisms on oxide-based resistance random access memory (RRAM) devices. Based on the investigation of physical and chemical mechanisms, we focus on its materials, device structures, and treatment methods so as to provide an in-depth perspective of state-of-the-art oxide-based RRAM. The critical voltage and constant reaction energy properties were found, which can be used to prospectively modulate voltage and operation time to control RRAM device working performance and forecast material composition. The quantized switching phenomena in RRAM devices were demonstrated at ultra-cryogenic temperature (4K), which is attributed to the atomic-level reaction in metallic filament. In the aspect of chemical mechanisms, we use the Coulomb Faraday theorem to investigate the chemical reaction equations of RRAM for the first time. We can clearly observe that the first-order reaction series is the basis for chemical reaction during reset process in the study. Furthermore, the activation energy of chemical reactions can be extracted by changing temperature during the reset process, from which the oxygen ion reaction process can be found in the RRAM device. As for its materials, silicon oxide is compatible to semiconductor fabrication lines. It is especially promising for the silicon oxide-doped metal technology to be introduced into the industry. Based on that, double-ended graphene oxide-doped silicon oxide based via-structure RRAM with filament self-aligning formation, and self-current limiting operation ability is demonstrated. The outstanding device characteristics are attributed to the oxidation and reduction of graphene oxide flakes formed during the sputter process. Besides, we have also adopted a new concept of supercritical CO2 fluid treatment to efficiently reduce the operation current of RRAM devices for portable electronic applications.

  14. Formation of slow molecules in chemical reactions in crossed molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Barinovs, Ğ.; Kłos, J.; Krems, R. V.

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions in collisions of molecular beams can generally produce low-velocity molecules in the laboratory-fixed frame. Our analysis shows that collisions of beams may simultaneously yield slow reactant molecules and slow products. The reaction products are formed in selected rovibrational states and scattered in a specific direction, which can be controlled by tuning the kinetic energies of the incident beams and the angle between the beams. Our calculations indicate that chemical reactions of polar alkali-metal dimers are barrierless and we suggest that chemical reactions involving alkali-metal dimers may be particularly suitable for producing slow molecules in crossed beams.

  15. A Novel Oscillating Chemical Reaction Using Ninhydrin as Single Organic Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Wei YANG; Jin Zhang GAO; Wu YANG; Kan Jun SUN

    2006-01-01

    A novel oscillating chemical reaction using ninhydrin as a single organic substrate was represented in this paper. It distinguished from the classically catalyzed BZ oscillating chemical reaction due to there was no active methene (CH2=) and/or enol structure in the ninhydrin molecule, which served as single organic substrate. This suggested that the substrates used in catalyzed BZ reaction were not always the organic compounds containing active methene (CH2=) and/or enol structure and bromination process in this kind of catalyzed chemical oscillating reaction was not also necessary.

  16. Mechanism-based bioanalysis and biomarkers for hepatic chemical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, D J; Mercer, A E; Williams, D P; Park, B K

    2009-08-01

    Adverse drug reactions, in particular drug-induced hepatotoxicity, represent a major challenge for clinicians and an impediment to safe drug development. Novel blood or urinary biomarkers of chemically-induced hepatic stress also hold great potential to provide information about pathways leading to cell death within tissues. The earlier pre-clinical identification of potential hepatotoxins and non-invasive diagnosis of susceptible patients, prior to overt liver disease is an important goal. Moreover, the identification, validation and qualification of biomarkers that have in vitro, in vivo and clinical transferability can assist bridging studies and accelerate the pace of drug development. Drug-induced chemical stress is a multi-factorial process, the kinetics of the interaction between the hepatotoxin and the cellular macromolecules are crucially important as different biomarkers will appear over time. The sensitivity of the bioanalytical techniques used to detect biological and chemical biomarkers underpins the usefulness of the marker in question. An integrated analysis of the biochemical, molecular and cellular events provides an understanding of biological (host) factors which ultimately determine the balance between xenobiotic detoxification, adaptation and liver injury. The aim of this review is to summarise the potential of novel mechanism-based biomarkers of hepatic stress which provide information to connect the intracellular events (drug metabolism, organelle, cell and whole organ) ultimately leading to tissue damage (apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation). These biomarkers can provide both the means to inform the pharmacologist and chemist with respect to safe drug design, and provide clinicians with valuable tools for patient monitoring. PMID:19621999

  17. Kinetics and reaction mechanism of hydroxyl radical reaction with methyl formate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.A.; Hanson, J.; Francisco, J.S.; Li, Z.; Jeong, G.R.

    1999-12-16

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory has been used to examine the kinetics and mechanism for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with methyl formate. From the ab initio parameters the room temperature rate constant is calculated and found to be in good agreement with the experimental determination. It is found that 86% of the reaction proceeds via abstraction of the carbonyl hydrogen from methyl formate by hydroxyl radical, resulting in the formation of CH{sub 3}OCO radical. CH{sub 3}OCO is expected to oxidize to formaldehyde and carbon dioxide under tropospheric conditions.

  18. Chemical modeling of irreversible reactions in nuclear waste-water-rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical models of aqueous geochemical systems are usually built on the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium. Though many elementary reactions in a geochemical system may be close to equilibrium, others may not be. Chemical models of aqueous fluids should take into account that many aqueous redox reactions are among the latter. The behavior of redox reactions may critically affect migration of certain radionuclides, especially the actinides. In addition, the progress of reaction in geochemical systems requires thermodynamic driving forces associated with elementary reactions not at equilibrium, which are termed irreversible reactions. Both static chemical models of fluids and dynamic models of reacting systems have been applied to a wide spectrum of problems in water-rock interactions. Potential applications in nuclear waste disposal range from problems in geochemical aspects of site evaluation to those of waste-water-rock interactions. However, much further work in the laboratory and the field will be required to develop and verify such applications of chemical modeling

  19. Chemical reactions of ultracold alkali dimers in the lowest-energy $^3\\Sigma$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Tomza, Michał; Moszynski, Robert; Krems, Roman V

    2013-01-01

    We show that the interaction of polar alkali dimers in the quintet spin state leads to the formation of a deeply bound reaction complex. The reaction complex can decompose adiabatically into homonuclear alkali dimers (for all molecules except KRb) and into alkali trimers (for all molecules). We show that there are no barriers for these chemical reactions. This means that all alkali dimers in the $a^3\\Sigma^+$ state are chemically unstable at ultracold temperature, and the use of an optical lattice to segregate the molecules and suppress losses may be necessary. In addition, we calculate the minimum energy path for the chemical reactions of alkali hydrides. We find that the reaction of two molecules is accelerated by a strong attraction between the alkali atoms, leading to a barrierless process that produces hydrogen atoms with large kinetic energy. We discuss the unique features of the chemical reactions of ultracold alkali dimers in the $a^3\\Sigma^+$ electronic state.

  20. Reactions of a stable dialkylsilylene and their mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mitsuo Kira

    2012-11-01

    Various reactions for a stable dialkylsilylene, 2,2,5,5-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silacyclopentane-1,1-diyl (1), are summarized and their mechanisms are discussed. Silylene 1 isomerizes to the corresponding silaethene via the 1,2-trimethylsilyl migration. Reduction of 1 with alkali metals affords the corresponding radical anion 1.− with a relatively small 29Si hfs constant (2.99 mT) and a large g-factor (g = 2.0077) compared with those for trivalent silyl radicals. Photo-excitation of 1 generates the corresponding singlet excited state (11*) with the lifetime of 80.5 ns. The excited state reacts with C=C double bond compounds including benzene, naphthalene, and ()- and ()-2-butenes. Although the thermal reactions of 1 with haloalkanes occur via radical mechanisms, the insertion into O-H, Si-H and Si-Cl bonds proceeds concertedly via the threemembered cyclic transition states. The reaction of 1 with H2SiCl2 gives the Si-Cl insertion product exclusively, while the quantitative insertion to Si-H bond occurs when Me2SiHCl is used as a substrate. The origin of the rather unusual Si-H/Si-Cl selectivity is elucidated using DFT calculations. Silylene 1 adds to C=C, C≡C, and C=O bonds to afford the corresponding silacycles as stable compounds. The importance of the carbonyl silaylides during the reactions of silylenes with aldehydes and ketones is emphasized.

  1. Chemical Synthesis Accelerated by Paper Spray: The Haloform Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ryan M.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Raab, Shannon A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-01-01

    In this laboratory, students perform a synthetic reaction in two ways: (i) by traditional bulk-phase reaction and (ii) in the course of reactive paper spray ionization. Mass spectrometry (MS) is used both as an analytical method and a means of accelerating organic syntheses. The main focus of this laboratory exercise is that the same ionization…

  2. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  3. Reaction Kinetics and Mechanism of Magnetic Field Effects in Cryptochrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ilia A Solov'yov; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and birds have an intriguing ‘sixth’ sense that allows them to orient themselves in the Earth's magnetic field. Despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically sensitive radical pair reactions occurring in the retina, the light-sensitive part of animal eyes. A photoreceptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to endow birds with magnetoreceptive abilities...

  4. Preliminary analysis of chemical reaction under the radiation of electromagnetic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Microwave can be used to accelerate chemical reaction and improve the rate of production.Does microwave only act as a heating factor? Do there exist any specific effects? These questions are still holding a violent controversy.Here we will choose the Belousov- Zhabotinsky reaction,which is sensitive to surrounding effects,to study the influence of microwave on chemical reactions.Visible changes of periods have been observed.It appeares that there could have been specific effects of microwave.

  5. Polarization of molecular angular momentum in the chemical reactions Li + HF and F + HD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B.; Popov, Ruslan S.; Roncero, Octavio; De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2013-06-01

    The quantum mechanical approach to vector correlation of angular momentum orientation and alignment in chemical reactions [G. Balint-Kurti and O. S. Vasyutinskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 14281 (2009)], 10.1021/jp902796v is applied to the molecular reagents and products of the Li + HF [L. Gonzalez-Sanchez, O. S. Vasyutinskii, A. Zanchet, C. Sanz-Sanz, and O. Roncero, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13656 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02452j and F + HD [D. De Fazio, J. Lucas, V. Aquilanti, and S. Cavalli, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 8571 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02738c reactions for which accurate scattering information has become recently available through time-dependent and time-independent approaches. Application of the theory to two important particular cases of the reactive collisions has been considered: (i) the influence of the angular momentum polarization of reactants in the entrance channel on the spatial distribution of the products in the exit channel and (ii) angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction between unpolarized reactants. In the former case, the role of the angular momentum alignment of the reactants is shown to be large, particularly when the angular momentum is perpendicular to the reaction scattering plane. In the latter case, the orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum was found to be significant and strongly dependent on the scattering angle. The calculation also reveals significant differences between the vector correlation properties of the two reactions under study which are due to difference in the reaction mechanisms. In the case of F + HD reaction, the branching ratio between HF and DF production points out interest in the insight gained into the detailed dynamics, when information is available either from exact quantum mechanical calculations or from especially designed experiments. Also, the geometrical arrangement for the experimental determination of the product angular momentum orientation and alignment based

  6. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on (1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and (2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects o...

  7. Detonation wave solutions and linear stability in a four component gas with bimolecular chemical reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Filipe; De Silva, A.W.; Soares, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a four component gas undergoing a bimolecular chemical reaction of type A1 + A2 = A3 + A4, described by the Boltzmann equation (BE) for chemically reactive mixtures. We adopt hard-spheres elastic cross sections and modified line-of-centers reactive cross sections depending on both the activation energy and geometry of the reactive collisions. Then we consider the hydrodynamic limit specified by the reactive Euler equations, in an earlier stage of the chemical reaction, when the ga...

  8. A new type of power energy for accelerating chemical reactions: the nature of a microwave-driving force for accelerating chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jicheng; Xu, Wentao; You, Zhimin; Wang, Zhe; Luo, Yushang; Gao, Lingfei; Yin, Cheng; Peng, Renjie; Lan, Lixin

    2016-04-01

    The use of microwave (MW) irradiation to increase the rate of chemical reactions has attracted much attention recently in nearly all fields of chemistry due to substantial enhancements in reaction rates. However, the intrinsic nature of the effects of MW irradiation on chemical reactions remains unclear. Herein, the highly effective conversion of NO and decomposition of H2S via MW catalysis were investigated. The temperature was decreased by several hundred degrees centigrade. Moreover, the apparent activation energy (Ea’) decreased substantially under MW irradiation. Importantly, for the first time, a model of the interactions between microwave electromagnetic waves and molecules is proposed to elucidate the intrinsic reason for the reduction in the Ea’ under MW irradiation, and a formula for the quantitative estimation of the decrease in the Ea’ was determined. MW irradiation energy was partially transformed to reduce the Ea’, and MW irradiation is a new type of power energy for speeding up chemical reactions. The effect of MW irradiation on chemical reactions was determined. Our findings challenge both the classical view of MW irradiation as only a heating method and the controversial MW non-thermal effect and open a promising avenue for the development of novel MW catalytic reaction technology.

  9. A new type of power energy for accelerating chemical reactions: the nature of a microwave-driving force for accelerating chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jicheng; Xu, Wentao; You, Zhimin; Wang, Zhe; Luo, Yushang; Gao, Lingfei; Yin, Cheng; Peng, Renjie; Lan, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    The use of microwave (MW) irradiation to increase the rate of chemical reactions has attracted much attention recently in nearly all fields of chemistry due to substantial enhancements in reaction rates. However, the intrinsic nature of the effects of MW irradiation on chemical reactions remains unclear. Herein, the highly effective conversion of NO and decomposition of H2S via MW catalysis were investigated. The temperature was decreased by several hundred degrees centigrade. Moreover, the apparent activation energy (Ea') decreased substantially under MW irradiation. Importantly, for the first time, a model of the interactions between microwave electromagnetic waves and molecules is proposed to elucidate the intrinsic reason for the reduction in the Ea' under MW irradiation, and a formula for the quantitative estimation of the decrease in the Ea' was determined. MW irradiation energy was partially transformed to reduce the Ea', and MW irradiation is a new type of power energy for speeding up chemical reactions. The effect of MW irradiation on chemical reactions was determined. Our findings challenge both the classical view of MW irradiation as only a heating method and the controversial MW non-thermal effect and open a promising avenue for the development of novel MW catalytic reaction technology. PMID:27118640

  10. Modelling of chemical reaction in foods: a multiresponse approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    The quality of foods depends on several factors. One of these factors is the occurrence of (bio)chemical changes taking place during the post-harvest period and during processing, storage and distribution. In order to optimise quality it is of utmost importance to control (bio)chemical changes as mu

  11. A model for chemically-induced mechanical loading on MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiot, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    The development of full displacement field measurements as an alternative to the optical lever technique to measure the mechanical response for microelectro-mechanical systems components in their environment calls for a modeling of chemically-induced mechanical fields (stress, strain, and displac...

  12. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  13. Vicher: A Virtual Reality Based Educational Module for Chemical Reaction Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John T.; Fogler, H. Scott

    1996-01-01

    A virtual reality application for undergraduate chemical kinetics and reactor design education, Vicher (Virtual Chemical Reaction Model) was originally designed to simulate a portion of a modern chemical plant. Vicher now consists of two programs: Vicher I that models catalyst deactivation and Vicher II that models nonisothermal effects in…

  14. Reaction route graphs. III. Non-minimal kinetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishtik, Ilie; Callaghan, Caitlin A; Datta, Ravindra

    2005-02-24

    The concept of reaction route (RR) graphs introduced recently by us for kinetic mechanisms that produce minimal graphs is extended to the problem of non-minimal kinetic mechanisms for the case of a single overall reaction (OR). A RR graph is said to be minimal if all of the stoichiometric numbers in all direct RRs of the mechanism are equal to +/-1 and non-minimal if at least one stoichiometric number in a direct RR is non-unity, e.g., equal to +/-2. For a given mechanism, four unique topological characteristics of RR graphs are defined and enumerated, namely, direct full routes (FRs), empty routes (ERs), intermediate nodes (INs), and terminal nodes (TNs). These are further utilized to construct the RR graphs. One algorithm involves viewing each IN as a central node in a RR sub-graph. As a result, the construction and enumeration of RR graphs are reduced to the problem of balancing the peripheral nodes in the RR sub-graphs according to the list of FRs, ERs, INs, and TNs. An alternate method involves using an independent set of RRs to draw the RR graph while satisfying the INs and TNs. Three examples are presented to illustrate the application of non-minimal RR graph theory.

  15. Hydrogen-air detonation cells computed using skeletal and reduced reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David; Taylor, Brian; Gamezo, Vadim; Oran, Elaine

    2011-11-01

    The multidimensional instability of gas-phase detonations results in a complex dynamic structure at the detonation front that leaves behind characteristic cellular patterns as it propagates. In fuel-air mixtures with high effective activation energies, such as hydrogen and air, these detonation cells can become irregular and modelling this behavior using reduced chemical reaction mechanisms can be challenging. Using complex reaction mechanisms, however, can be computationally overwhelming for problems of practical interest. We compare the reaction front structures and dynamic behavior of two-dimensional detonations in a stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture computed using a 12-step skeletal mechanism and several reduced mechanisms, including a calibrated one-step model. We pay particular attention to how transverse instabilities that form in this high-activation-energy mixture are affected by the details of the chemistry model. We then discuss how to adjust the parameters in reduced reaction models to better describe irregular triple point behavior. NAS/NRC Postdoctoral Research Associate.

  16. Cutaneous reactions in nuclear, biological and chemical warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Sandeep

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear, biological and chemical warfare have in recent times been responsible for an increasing number of otherwise rare dermatoses. Many nations are now maintaining overt and clandestine stockpiles of such arsenal. With increasing terrorist threats, these agents of mass destruction pose a risk to the civilian population. Nuclear and chemical attacks manifest immediately while biological attacks manifest later. Chemical and biological attacks pose a significant risk to the attending medical personnel. The large scale of anticipated casualties in the event of such an occurrence would need the expertise of all physicians, including dermatologists, both military and civilian. Dermatologists are uniquely qualified in this respect. This article aims at presenting a review of the cutaneous manifestations in nuclear, chemical and biological warfare and their management.

  17. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  18. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Kabachnik-Fields reaction: synthetic potential and the problem of the mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkasov, Rafael A; Galkin, Vladimir I [Department of Chemistry, Kazan State University, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-31

    The published data of the last decade concerning the mechanism of the Kabachnik-Fields reaction and its significance for the chemistry of organophosphorus compounds as a method for the synthesis of {alpha}-amino phosphonates and their numerous functionally substituted derivatives and analogues, such as phosphinates and phosphine oxides, are generalised and systematised. The review discusses the classical version of the Kabachnik-Fields reaction, its modifications with the use of phosphorus chlorides, neutral esters and inorganic phosphorus acids, as well as chemical processes simulating separate steps of the reaction, viz., hydrophosphorylation of imines and amination of {alpha}-hydroxy phosphonates. Data on the practical application of {alpha}-amino phosphonates are presented. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  20. Influence of additives on microstructures, mechanical properties and shock-induced reaction characteristics of Al/Ni composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Xianfeng, E-mail: lynx@mail.njust.edu.cn; Wu, Yang; He, Yong; Wang, Chuanting; Guo, Lei

    2015-11-05

    Granular composites containing aluminum (Al) and nickel (Ni) are typical structural energetic materials, which possess ideal combination of both mechanical properties and energy release capability. The influence of two additives, namely Teflon (PTFE) and copper (Cu), on mechanical properties and shock-induced chemical reaction (SICR) characteristics of Al/Ni material system has been investigated. Three composites, namely Al/Ni, Al/Ni/PTFE and Al/Ni/Cu with same volumetric ratio of Al powder to Ni powder, were processed by means of static pressing. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure of the mentioned three composites. Quasi static compression tests were also conducted to determine the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the mentioned three composites. It was shown that the additives affected both compressive strength and fracture mode of the three composites. Impact initiation experiments on the mentioned three composites were performed to determine their shock-induced chemical reaction characteristics by considering pressure histories measured in the test chamber. The experimental results showed that the additives had significant effects on critical initiation velocity, reaction rate, reaction efficiency and post-reaction behavior. - Highlights: • .Al/Ni, Al/Ni/PTFE and Al/Ni/Cu were processed by means of static pressing. • .Microstructures, mechanical properties and shock-induced reactions were studied. • .Microstructures affect both compressive strength and fracture mode. • .Impact velocity is an important factor in shock-induced chemical characteristics. • .Each additive has significant effects on energy release behavior.

  1. Mechanisms and chemical induction of aneuploidy in rodent germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailhes, J B; Marchetti, F

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this review is to suggest that the advances being made in our understanding of the molecular events surrounding chromosome segregation in non-mammalian and somatic cell models be considered when designing experiments for studying aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells. Accurate chromosome segregation requires the temporal control and unique interactions among a vast array of proteins and cellular organelles. Abnormal function and temporal disarray among these, and others to be inidentified, biochemical reactions and cellular organelles have the potential for predisposing cells to aneuploidy. Although numerous studies have demonstrated that certain chemicals (mainly those that alter microtubule function) can induce aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells, it seems relevant to point out that such data can be influenced by gender, meiotic stage, and time of cell-fixation post-treatment. Additionally, a consensus has not been reached regarding which of several germ cell aneuploidy assays most accurately reflects the human condition. More recent studies have shown that certain kinase, phosphatase, proteasome, and topoisomerase inhibitors can also induce aneuploidy in rodent germ cells. We suggest that molecular approaches be prudently incorporated into mammalian germ cell aneuploidy research in order to eventually understand the causes and mechanisms of human aneuploidy. Such an enormous undertaking would benefit from collaboration among scientists representing several disciplines.

  2. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Solvation Scheme for Computing Free Energies of Reactions at Metal-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Muhammad; Heyden, Andreas

    2014-08-12

    We report the development of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics free energy perturbation (QM/MM-FEP) method for modeling chemical reactions at metal-water interfaces. This novel solvation scheme combines planewave density function theory (DFT), periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method (PEECM) calculations using Gaussian-type orbitals, and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain a free energy description of a complex metal-water system. We derive a potential of mean force (PMF) of the reaction system within the QM/MM framework. A fixed-size, finite ensemble of MM conformations is used to permit precise evaluation of the PMF of QM coordinates and its gradient defined within this ensemble. Local conformations of adsorbed reaction moieties are optimized using sequential MD-sampling and QM-optimization steps. An approximate reaction coordinate is constructed using a number of interpolated states and the free energy difference between adjacent states is calculated using the QM/MM-FEP method. By avoiding on-the-fly QM calculations and by circumventing the challenges associated with statistical averaging during MD sampling, a computational speedup of multiple orders of magnitude is realized. The method is systematically validated against the results of ab initio QM calculations and demonstrated for C-C cleavage in double-dehydrogenated ethylene glycol on a Pt (111) model surface.

  3. Roles of interfacial reaction on mechanical properties of solder interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pilin

    This study investigated roles of interfacial reaction in fracture and fatigue of solder interconnects. The interfacial reaction phases in the as-reflowed and after aging were examined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) while interfacial mechanical properties were determined from a flexural peel fracture mechanics technique. Because of their widespread uses in microelectronic packaging, SnPb solder interfaces, and Bi-containing Pb-free solder interfaces were chosen as the subjects of this study. In the interfacial reaction study, we observed a complicated micro structural evolution during solid-state aging of electroless-Ni(P)/SnPb solder interconnects. In as-reflowed condition, the interfacial reaction produced Ni3Sn 4 and P-rich layers. Following overaging, the interfacial microstructure degenerated into a complex multilayer structure consisting of multiple layers of Ni-Sn compounds and transformed Ni-P phases. In SnPb solder interfacial system, fatigue study showed that the overaging of the high P electroless Ni-P/SnPb interconnects resulted in a sharp reduction in the fatigue resistance of the interface in the high crack growth rate regime. Fracture mechanism analysis indicated that the sharp drop in fatigue resistance was triggered by the brittle fracture of the Ni3Sn2 intermetallic phase developed at the overaged interface. The fatigue behavior was strongly dependent on P concentration in electroless Ni. Kirkendall voids were found in the interfacial region after aging, but they did not cause premature fracture of the solder interfaces. In Bi-containing solder interfacial system, we found that Bi segregated to the Cu-intermetallic interface during aging in SnBi/Cu interconnect. This caused serious embrittlement of Sn-Bi/Cu interface. Further aging induced numerous voids along the Cu3Sn/Cu interface. These interfacial voids were different from Kirkendall voids. Their formation was explained on basis of vacancy condensation at the

  4. Recent Developments in the Theory of Mechanisms in Radiation Chemical Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the mechanisms of radiation-initiated chemical reactions are reviewed. The role of ion molecule processes is reviewed, with particular reference to the radiation chemistry of methane. In this system, the existence of reactions of excited molecules, in addition to ionic processes is deduced. It is shown that, in the radiolysis of methane, unsaturated hydrocarbons play a considerable part in the mechanism of reaction. Developments in ionic polymerization and also polymerization under heterogenous conditions are reviewed. The importance of reactant purity, and also cleanliness of reaction vessels is discussed. The effect of an applied external potential in solid state polymerization is briefly reviewed. The importance of free-radical processes to radiation chemists is considered in the light of the Dow process for the production of ethyl bromide. (author)

  5. Numerical modelling of shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Siva Prasad A. V.; Basu, Sumit

    2015-10-01

    Shock compaction of reactive powder mixtures to synthesize new materials is one of the oldest material processing techniques and has been studied extensively by several researchers over the past few decades. The quantitative connection between the shock energy imparted and the extent of reaction that can be completed in the small time window associated with the passage of the shock wave is complicated and depends on a large variety of parameters. In particular, our understanding of the complex interplay between the thermo-elasto-viscoplastic behaviour of the granular constituents and their temperature dependent, diffusion-limited reaction mechanism may be enriched through careful numerical simulations. A robust numerical model should be able to handle extremely large deformations coupled with diffusion mediated fast reaction kinetics. In this work, a meshfree discrete particle numerical method based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures is proposed. We present a numerical strategy to carry out reactions between reactant powder particles and partition the obtained products between the particles in a manner that accounts for the requirement that the total mass of the entire system remains constant as the reactions occur. Instead of solving the reaction-diffusion problem, we propose a ‘pseudo-diffusion’ model in which a distance dependent reaction rate constant is defined to carry out chemical reaction kinetics. This approach mimics the actual reaction-diffusion process at short times. Our numerical model is demonstrated for the well-studied reaction system Nb  +  2Si \\rightleftharpoons NbSi 2 . The predicted mass fractions of the product obtained from the simulations are in agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the effects of impact speed, particle arrangement and mixing ratio on the predicted product mass fractions are discussed.

  6. Theoretical Studies of Chemical Reactions following Electronic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-configurational wave functions is demonstrated for several processes: tautomerization reactions in the ground and excited states of the DNA base adenine, dissociation of glycine molecule after electronic excitation, and decomposition/deformation of novel rare gas molecules HRgF. These processes involve bond brealung/formation and require multi-configurational approaches that include dynamic correlation.

  7. Arrangement for carrying out and studying chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, A.D.; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Abstract of NL 9102029 (A) Described is an arrangement for carrying out TAP experiments. Such an arrangement comprises a reaction chamber in which a very short-lived beam of molecules is directed at a target to produce a short-lived beam of intermediate-product molecules, and a vacuum chamber wher

  8. Theoretical studies of the dynamics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Recent research effort has focussed on several reactions pertinent to combustion. The formation of the formyl radical from atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide, recombination of alkyl radicals and halo-alkyl radicals with halogen atoms, and the thermal dissociation of hydrogen cyanide and acetylene have been studied by modeling. In addition, the inelastic collisions of NCO with helium have been investigated.

  9. Chemical Principles Revisited. Redox Reactions and the Electropotential Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper suggests a nontraditional pedagogic approach to the subject of redox reactions and electrode potentials suitable for freshman chemistry. Presented is a method for the representation of galvanic cells without the introduction of the symbology and notation of conventional cell diagrams. (CW)

  10. Reaction kinetics and mechanism of magnetic field effects in cryptochrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and birds have an intriguing sixth sense that allows them to orient themselves in the Earth's magnetic field. Despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically...... absorption and electron-spin-resonance observations together with known facts on avian magnetoreception. The reaction cycle permits one to predict magnetic field effects on cryptochrome activation and deactivation. The suggested analysis method gives insight into structural and dynamic design features...... required for optimal detection of the geomagnetic field by cryptochrome and suggests further experimental and theoretical studies....

  11. Effect of mechanical stress on biofilms challenged by different chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Manuel; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Vieira, Maria João

    2005-12-01

    In this study a methodology was applied in order to ascertain the mechanical stability of biofilms, by using a stainless-steel (SS) rotating device immersed in a biological reactor where biofilms formed by Pseudomonas fluorescens were allowed to grow for 7 days at a Reynolds number of agitation of 2400. The biofilms developed with this system were characterised in terms of amount of total, extracellular and intracellular proteins and polysaccharides, amount of mass, metabolic activity and mechanical stability, showing that the biofilms were active, had a high content of extracellular constituents and an inherent mechanical stability. In order to assess the role of chemical agents on the mechanical stability, the biofilms were exposed to chemical agents followed by mechanical treatments by submission to increase Reynolds number of agitation. Seven different chemical agents were tested (two non-oxidising biocides, three surfactants and two oxidising biocides) and their effects on the biofilm mechanical stability were evaluated. The increase in the Reynolds number increased the biofilm removal, but total biofilm removal was not found for all the conditions tested. For the experiment without chemical addition (only mechanical treatment), the biofilm remaining on the surface was about 76%. The chemical treatment followed by the subsequent mechanical treatment did not remove all the biofilms from the surface. The biofilm remaining on the SS cylinder ranged from 3% to 62%, depending on the chemical treatment, showing that the chemical treatment is far from being a cause that induces massive biofilm detachment and even the synergistic chemical and mechanical treatments did not promote biofilm removal. Some chemical agents promoted an increase in the biofilm mechanical stability such as glutaraldehyde (GTA), benzalkonium chloride (BC), except for the lower concentration tested, and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), except for the higher concentration tested. Treatments that

  12. X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

    2011-12-31

    Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

  13. Flow-Injection Responses of Diffusion Processes and Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2000-01-01

    The technique of Flow-injection Analysis (FIA), now aged 25 years, offers unique analytical methods that are fast, reliable and consuming an absolute minimum of chemicals. These advantages together with its inherent feasibility for automation warrant the future applications of FIA as an attractiv...

  14. Transmission coefficients for chemical reactions with multiple states: role of quantum decoherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Řezáč, Jan; Lévy, Bernard; Sanders, Barry C; Salahub, Dennis R

    2011-03-23

    Transition-state theory (TST) is a widely accepted paradigm for rationalizing the kinetics of chemical reactions involving one potential energy surface (PES). Multiple PES reaction rate constants can also be estimated within semiclassical approaches provided the hopping probability between the quantum states is taken into account when determining the transmission coefficient. In the Marcus theory of electron transfer, this hopping probability was historically calculated with models such as Landau-Zener theory. Although the hopping probability is intimately related to the question of the transition from the fully quantum to the semiclassical description, this issue is not adequately handled in physicochemical models commonly in use. In particular, quantum nuclear effects such as decoherence or dephasing are not present in the rate constant expressions. Retaining the convenient semiclassical picture, we include these effects through the introduction of a phenomenological quantum decoherence function. A simple modification to the usual TST rate constant expression is proposed: in addition to the electronic coupling, a characteristic decoherence time τ(dec) now also appears as a key parameter of the rate constant. This new parameter captures the idea that molecular systems, although intrinsically obeying quantum mechanical laws, behave semiclassically after a finite but nonzero amount of time (τ(dec)). This new degree of freedom allows a fresh look at the underlying physics of chemical reactions involving more than one quantum state. The ability of the proposed formula to describe the main physical lines of the phenomenon is confirmed by comparison with results obtained from density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations for a triplet to singlet transition within a copper dioxygen adduct relevant to the question of dioxygen activation by copper monooxygenases.

  15. Effect of Coriolis coupling in chemical reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-05-14

    It is essential to evaluate the role of Coriolis coupling effect in molecular reaction dynamics. Here we consider Coriolis coupling effect in quantum reactive scattering calculations in the context of both adiabaticity and nonadiabaticity, with particular emphasis on examining the role of Coriolis coupling effect in reaction dynamics of triatomic molecular systems. We present the results of our own calculations by the time-dependent quantum wave packet approach for H + D2 and F(2P3/2,2P1/2) + H2 as well as for the ion-molecule collisions of He + H2 +, D(-) + H2, H(-) + D2, and D+ + H2, after reviewing in detail other related research efforts on this issue.

  16. A semiclassical non-adiabatic theory for elementary chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aubry, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Electron Transfer (ET) reactions are modeled by the dynamics of a quantum two-level system (representing the electronic state) coupled to a thermalized bath of classical harmonic oscillators (representing the nuclei degrees of freedom). Unlike for the standard Marcus theory, the complex amplitudes of the electronic state are chosen as reaction coordinates. Then, the dynamical equations at non vanishing temperature become those of an effective Hamiltonian submitted to damping terms and their associated Langevin random forces. The advantage of this new formalism is to extend the original theory by taking into account both ionic and covalent interactions. The standard theory is recovered only when covalent interactions are neglected. Increasing these covalent interactions from zero, the energy barrier predicted by the standard theory first depresses, next vanish (or almost vanish) and for stronger covalent interactions, covalent bond formation takes place of ET. In biochemistry, the standard Marcus theory often ...

  17. A New Formulation of the Lindemann Mechanism of Unimolecular Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱人元

    2003-01-01

    A new formulation of the Lindemann mechanism of unimolecular reactions in gaseous phase is presented, without the use of steady state hypothesis. It is hereby shown that the nature of applicability of steady state hypothesis in the regime of high reactant gas pressure is different from that in the regime of low gas pressure. In the former case it is an equilibrium approximation, while in the latter case it is a highly reactive intermediate approximation in no connection with a steady state. Furthermore for the latter case it is shown that in the classical formulation of Lindemann mecbRnism the use of steady state hypothesis is an ad hoc assumption. A highly reactive intermediate in the sense that its concentration is very small during the whole course of reaction is a necessary condition for the applicability of very reactive intermediate approximation. When the two distinctive nature of the applicability of steady state hypothesis is mlxed-up, wrong or useless conclusion may be arrived at. The only possible case of realizing a true steady state in a complex reaction is pointed out.

  18. Dissipative structure of mechanically stimulated reaction; Kikaiteki reiki hanno ni okeru san`itsu kozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hida, M. [Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-20

    Recently various studies have been conducted concerning the state changes of materials obtained through mechanical alloying (MA) or mechano-chemical (MC) processing. What is noticeable is the quasi-steady state of almost all the materials obtained through various processes including MA and MC, and that the super cooling, supersaturating and high residue distortion realized under unbalanced conditions have not been clarified. In other words, the tracing capability to the external binding conditions is low. In this report, the appearance of the high temperature phase and high pressure phase obtained through MA or MC processing, the forming of amorphous, the mesomerism of the amorphous materials, the interesting phenomena generated by combination between the mechanical disturbance and chemical reactions were discussed with concrete examples, and a steady dissipative organization theory was approached from the viewpoint of dissipative structure development which is equal to the forming process of the quasi-steady phase. 34 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Theory for Diffusion-Limited Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bussemaker, H. J.; Brito López, Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic description of lattice-gas automaton models for reaction-diffusion systems is presented. It provides corrections to the mean-field rate equations in the diffusion-limited regime. When applied to the two-species Maginu model, the theory gives an excellent quantitative prediction of the effect of slow diffusion on the periodic oscillations of the average concentrations in a spatially homogeneous state.

  20. Theory for Diffusion-Limited Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussemaker, H J

    1997-01-01

    A kinetic description of lattice-gas automaton models for reaction-diffusion systems is presented. It provides corrections to the mean-field rate equations in the diffusion-limited regime. When applied to the two-species Maginu model, the theory gives an excellent quantitative prediction of the effect of slow diffusion on the periodic oscillations of the average concentrations in a spatially homogeneous state.

  1. Carbon compounds in the atmosphere and their chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Martišová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The essay dissert on compounds of carbon in the atmosphere and its reaction. The most important are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane. Included among important compounds of carbon are volatile organic substances, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and dioxin. Carbon dioxide and methane representing greenhouse gases have also indispensable meaning. As they, together with water vapour, nitrogen monoxide and other gases are causing the major part of greenhouse effect. Primarily because of...

  2. Surface chemical reactions induced by well-controlled molecular beams: translational energy and molecular orientation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Michio, E-mail: okada@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.j, E-mail: mokada@cw.osaka-u.ac.j [Renovation Center of Instruments for Science Education and Technology, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 and 1-2 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2010-07-07

    I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams suggest that the translational energy of the incident molecules plays a significant role. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. Oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility for controlling surface chemical reactions by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of achieving material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for creating new materials on surfaces with well-controlled chemical reactions. (topical review)

  3. Effects of chemical reactions on the performance of gas dynamic lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rom, J.; Stricker, J.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that chemical reactions in the stagnation region of a gasdynamic laser in the shock tube may not be completed during the available test time. Therefore, analysis of data obtained in the shock tube must account for the instantaneous composition which may be effected by chemical reactions. A CO/sub 2/--N/sub 2/ gasdynamic laser experimental program in the shock tube including addition of H/sub 2/ into the system is described. This experiment involves reasonably complicated chemical reactions. These chemical reactions result in H/sub 2/O production under certain conditions. The comparison of the experimental results with the calculated results shows that such measurements can also be used to evaluate the energy transfer rates. The small-signal gain measurements indicate that the hydrogen is much more effective in depopulating the ..nu.. sub 3 level to ..nu.. sub 2 than previously assumed.

  4. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  5. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  6. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  7. Heavy ion reactions: an experimental vista. [Review, angular momentum, compound-nucleus decay, reaction mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Examples of recent experiments in the areas of fusion and deep-inelastic scattering are presented and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the importance of individual nucleons in the fusion process, the effects of high angular momentum, and the understanding of compound nuclear decay. Experiments on deep inelastic scattering are entering a new stage in which important parameters of the reaction mechanism are now open to investigation. Primarily through coincidence measurements, direct information on the angular momentum transferred in a collision and on the time scale of decay is being obtained.

  8. Properties of Random Complex Chemical Reaction Networks and Their Relevance to Biological Toy Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the properties of large random conservative chemical reaction networks composed of elementary reactions endowed with either mass-action or saturating kinetics, assigning kinetic parameters in a thermodynamically-consistent manner. We find that such complex networks exhibit qualitatively similar behavior when fed with external nutrient flux. The nutrient is preferentially transformed into one specific chemical that is an intrinsic property of the network. We propose a self-consi...

  9. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  10. Ca + HF - The anatomy of a chemical insertion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, R. L.; Pattengill, M. D.; Mascarello, F. G.; Zare, R. N.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive first-principles theoretical investigation of the gas phase reaction Ca + HF - CaF + H is reported. Ab initio potential energy calculations are first discussed, along with characteristics of the computed potential energy surface. Next, the fitting of the computed potential energy points to a suitable analytical functional form is described, and maps of the fitted potential surface are displayed. The methodology and results of a classical trajectory calculation utilizing the fitted potential surface are presented. Finally, the significance of the trajectory study results is discussed, and generalizations concerning dynamical aspects of Ca + HF scattering are drawn.

  11. Study on the Reaction Mechanism of Naphthalene with Oxalyl Chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reaction of naphthalene with oxalyl chloride in the presence of anhydrous AlCl3 was investigated. The homolog of dinaphthyl methanone can be obtained mainly from this reaction. Naphthalene conversion does not have evident correlation with the amount of AlCl3. The results show that the reaction proceeds via carbon cation electrophilic substitution reaction-free radical substitution reaction pathway.

  12. Research on the chemical mechanism in the polyacrylate latex modified cement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the chemical mechanism in the polyacrylate latex modified cement system was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and compact pH meter. All results have shown that the chemical reactions in the polyacrylate modified system can be divided into three stages. The hydration reactions of cement can produce large amounts of Ca(OH)2 (calcium hydroxide) and lead the whole system to be alkali-rich and exothermic at the first stage. Subsequently, this environment can do great contributions to the hydrolysis of ester groups in the polyacrylate chains, resulting in the formation of carboxyl groups at the second stage. At the third stage, the final crosslinked network structure of the product was obtained by the reaction between the carboxyl groups in the polyacrylate latex chains and Ca(OH)2

  13. Research on the chemical mechanism in the polyacrylate latex modified cement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Min [The Key Laboratory of Space Applied Physics and Chemistry, Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Science and Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang, Rumin, E-mail: wangmin19@mail.nwpu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Space Applied Physics and Chemistry, Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Science and Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Zheng, Shuirong [The Key Laboratory of Space Applied Physics and Chemistry, Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Science and Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Northwestern Polytechnical University–East China University of Science and Technology Combined Research Institute of New High Speed Railway Materials (China); Farhan, Shameel; Yao, Hao; Jiang, Hao [The Key Laboratory of Space Applied Physics and Chemistry, Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Science and Technology, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the chemical mechanism in the polyacrylate latex modified cement system was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and compact pH meter. All results have shown that the chemical reactions in the polyacrylate modified system can be divided into three stages. The hydration reactions of cement can produce large amounts of Ca(OH){sub 2} (calcium hydroxide) and lead the whole system to be alkali-rich and exothermic at the first stage. Subsequently, this environment can do great contributions to the hydrolysis of ester groups in the polyacrylate chains, resulting in the formation of carboxyl groups at the second stage. At the third stage, the final crosslinked network structure of the product was obtained by the reaction between the carboxyl groups in the polyacrylate latex chains and Ca(OH){sub 2}.

  14. Evaluation of the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Hardening High-Calcium Fly Ash Blended Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jie Fan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available High-calcium fly ash (FH is the combustion residue from electric power plants burning lignite or sub-bituminous coal. As a mineral admixture, FH can be used to produce high-strength concrete and high-performance concrete. The development of chemical and mechanical properties is a crucial factor for appropriately using FH in the concrete industry. To achieve sustainable development in the concrete industry, this paper presents a theoretical model to systematically evaluate the property developments of FH blended concrete. The proposed model analyzes the cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of phases in FH other than free CaO. The mutual interactions among cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of other phases in FH are also considered through the calcium hydroxide contents and the capillary water contents. Using the hydration degree of cement, the reaction degree of free CaO in FH, and the reaction degree of other phases in FH, the proposed model evaluates the calcium hydroxide contents, the reaction degree of FH, chemically bound water, porosity, and the compressive strength of hardening concrete with different water to binder ratios and FH replacement ratios. The evaluated results are compared to experimental results, and good consistencies are found.

  15. Development of a novel fingerprint for chemical reactions and its application to large-scale reaction classification and similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nadine; Lowe, Daniel M; Sayle, Roger A; Landrum, Gregory A

    2015-01-26

    Fingerprint methods applied to molecules have proven to be useful for similarity determination and as inputs to machine-learning models. Here, we present the development of a new fingerprint for chemical reactions and validate its usefulness in building machine-learning models and in similarity assessment. Our final fingerprint is constructed as the difference of the atom-pair fingerprints of products and reactants and includes agents via calculated physicochemical properties. We validated the fingerprints on a large data set of reactions text-mined from granted United States patents from the last 40 years that have been classified using a substructure-based expert system. We applied machine learning to build a 50-class predictive model for reaction-type classification that correctly predicts 97% of the reactions in an external test set. Impressive accuracies were also observed when applying the classifier to reactions from an in-house electronic laboratory notebook. The performance of the novel fingerprint for assessing reaction similarity was evaluated by a cluster analysis that recovered 48 out of 50 of the reaction classes with a median F-score of 0.63 for the clusters. The data sets used for training and primary validation as well as all python scripts required to reproduce the analysis are provided in the Supporting Information. PMID:25541888

  16. A comparison of reversible chemical reactions for solar thermochemical power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, O. M.

    1980-01-01

    Reversible chemical reactions operating in a thermochemical energy transfer system have been proposed for solar electricity generation in order to solve not only the problem of energy transport from the solar collection field to a central power plant, but also potentially the long term lossless energy storage problem through underground storage of the reaction products. A number of reactions have been proposed for solar thermochemical power generation and in this paper the thermodynamic and c...

  17. Production of cold formaldehyde molecules for study and control of chemical reaction dynamics with hydroxyl radicals

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Eric R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Sawyer, Brian C.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Lewandowski, H. J.; Bochinski, J. R.; Bohn, John L.; Ye, Jun

    2005-01-01

    We propose a method for controlling a class of low temperature chemical reactions. Specifically, we show the hydrogen abstraction channel in the reaction of formaldehyde (H$_{2}$CO) and the hydroxyl radical (OH) can be controlled through either the molecular state or an external electric field. We also outline experiments for investigating and demonstrating control over this important reaction. To this end, we report the first Stark deceleration of the H$_{2}$CO molecule. We have decelerated ...

  18. Students' Ideas about How and Why Chemical Reactions Happen: Mapping the Conceptual Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fan; Talanquer, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Research in science education has revealed that many students struggle to understand chemical reactions. Improving teaching and learning about chemical processes demands that we develop a clearer understanding of student reasoning in this area and of how this reasoning evolves with training in the domain. Thus, we have carried out a qualitative…

  19. The Technology for Intensification of Chemical Reaction Process Envisaged in the "863" Plan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ It is learned from the Ministry of Science and Technology that in order to promote the shift of China's chemical industry toward an energy efficient and environmentally friendly product mode, the technology for intensification of chemical reaction processes has been included in the National "863" Project of the "Eleventh Five-Year Plan", and the application for research project proposals is to be accepted.

  20. The diagnostic of the chemical reaction zone at the detonation of condensed explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Satonkina, Nataliya P

    2016-01-01

    The highly-sensitive method is proposed for the real-time diagnostics of the von Neumann peak at detonation of brisant high explosives. The absence of the direct link between the pressure and the course of chemical reactions was shown. For TNT (trinitrotoluene), the influence of the structure of charge on the kinetics of chemical peak was demonstrated.

  1. Computing multi-species chemical equilibrium with an algorithm based on the reaction extents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model for the solution of a set of chemical equilibrium equations in a multi-species and multiphase chemical system is described. The computer-aid solution of model is achieved by means of a Newton-Raphson method enhanced with a line-search scheme, which deals with the non-negative......A mathematical model for the solution of a set of chemical equilibrium equations in a multi-species and multiphase chemical system is described. The computer-aid solution of model is achieved by means of a Newton-Raphson method enhanced with a line-search scheme, which deals with the non......-negative constrains. The residual function, representing the distance to the equilibrium, is defined from the chemical potential (or Gibbs energy) of the chemical system. Local minimums are potentially avoided by the prioritization of the aqueous reactions with respect to the heterogeneous reactions. The formation...

  2. Mechanisms of selectivity loss during tungsten CVD (chemical vapor deposition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creighton, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The tungsten subfluoride mechanism as well as other proposed mechanisms of selectivity loss are reviewed. To further demonstrate the viability of the tungsten subfluoride mechanism, we have extended the measurement of the tungsten subfluoride production rate down to 450{degree}C. We also report results from some preliminary experiments designed to identify the selectivity loss mechanism when elemental silicon is available for reaction. Comments regarding the origins of the insulator effect and selectivity loss for silane reduction are offered. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO. PMID:15901543

  4. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of chemical reaction and reaction-induced self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H. [Advanced Science Research Center(ASRC), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8501 (Japan); Koizumi, S. [Advanced Science Research Center(ASRC), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Advanced Science Research Center(ASRC), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan) and Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: hashimoto.takeji@jaea.go.jp; Kurosaki, K. [Department of Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8501 (Japan); Ohmae, M. [Department of Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8501 (Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Department of Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8501 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    We have investigated a self-assembling process of cellulose artificially synthesized via enzymatic polymerization by means of in-situ and time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results elucidated the following: (i) cellulose molecules were synthesized at a special reaction site of the enzyme (cellulase) located on or near the smooth surface of the self-assembled enzymes formed in the reaction medium; (ii) the synthesized molecules associated themselves via diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and crystallized into fibrils and (iii) the fibrils formed the aggregates, which had the surface fractal dimension D {sub s} increasing from 2 to 2.3 with the reaction time, on the smooth surface of the enzyme aggregates.

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation - current transients under chemical reaction control

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ajello-Tettamanzy, P C; Kipervaser, Z G S

    2002-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation on catalytic surfaces plunged into a fluid is described through a stochastic model. To generate this non-equilibrium process we assume that the turn on of a electrostatic potential triggers a complex dynamics that includes a free Brownian motion, a reaction kinetic and a stimulated migration before the final adhesion of ions on the surface (electrode). At, when the potential is switched on, the spatial symmetry is broken and a two-stage process is developed. First the ion undergoes a change in its electrochemical character (at some region of the space) and then reacts at some specific points to stick together on the surface. The continuous addition of ions develops a material deposit connected to the current transient signals measured in electrochemical deposition processes. Unlike current models found in the literature, this procedure avoids the computation of the area covered by the diffusion zones, allowing a formalism skill to describe equally well the absorption of ions by channe...

  6. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  7. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  8. A reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to develop a reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene) with an emphasis on the formation of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Starting from an existing base mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels with the largest chemical species being pyrene (C 16H 10), this new mechanism is generated by adding PAH sub-mechanisms to account for the formation and growth of PAHs up to coronene (C 24H 12). The density functional theory (DFT) and the transition state theory (TST) have been adopted to evaluate the rate constants for several PAH reactions. The mechanism is validated in the premixed laminar flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, benzene and ethylene. The characteristics of PAH formation in the counterflow diffusion flames of iso-octane/toluene and n-heptane/toluene mixtures have also been tested for both the soot formation and soot formation/oxidation flame conditions. The predictions of the concentrations of large PAHs in the premixed flames having available experimental data are significantly improved with the new mechanism as compared to the base mechanism. The major pathways for the formation of large PAHs are identified. The test of the counterflow diffusion flames successfully predicts the PAH behavior exhibiting a synergistic effect observed experimentally for the mixture fuels, irrespective of the type of flame (soot formation flame or soot formation/oxidation flame). The reactions that lead to this synergistic effect in PAH formation are identified through the rate-of-production analysis. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  9. Empirical Force Fields for Mechanistic Studies of Chemical Reactions in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A K; Meuwly, M

    2016-01-01

    Following chemical reactions in atomistic detail is one of the most challenging aspects of current computational approaches to chemistry. In this chapter the application of adiabatic reactive MD (ARMD) and its multistate version (MS-ARMD) are discussed. Both methods allow to study bond-breaking and bond-forming processes in chemical and biological processes. Particular emphasis is put on practical aspects for applying the methods to investigate the dynamics of chemical reactions. The chapter closes with an outlook of possible generalizations of the methods discussed. PMID:27498633

  10. BlenX-based compositional modeling of complex reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Zámborszky

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions are wired in a fascinating way resulting in complex behavior of biological systems. Theoretical modeling provides a useful framework for understanding the dynamics and the function of such networks. The complexity of the biological networks calls for conceptual tools that manage the combinatorial explosion of the set of possible interactions. A suitable conceptual tool to attack complexity is compositionality, already successfully used in the process algebra field to model computer systems. We rely on the BlenX programming language, originated by the beta-binders process calculus, to specify and simulate high-level descriptions of biological circuits. The Gillespie's stochastic framework of BlenX requires the decomposition of phenomenological functions into basic elementary reactions. Systematic unpacking of complex reaction mechanisms into BlenX templates is shown in this study. The estimation/derivation of missing parameters and the challenges emerging from compositional model building in stochastic process algebras are discussed. A biological example on circadian clock is presented as a case study of BlenX compositionality.

  11. Reaction mechanisms and staggering in S+Ni collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agostino, M., E-mail: dagostino@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Bruno, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Gulminelli, F. [LPC (IN2P3-CNRS/Ensicaen et Universite), F-14076 Caen cedex (France); Morelli, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Baiocco, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Bologna (Italy); LPC (IN2P3-CNRS/Ensicaen et Universite), F-14076 Caen cedex (France); Bardelli, L. [INFN, Firenze (Italy); INFN, Catania (Italy); Barlini, S. [INFN, Firenze (Italy); Cannata, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Casini, G. [INFN, Firenze (Italy); Geraci, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Catania (Italy); INFN, Catania (Italy); Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy); Marchi, T. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Padova (Italy); Moroni, A. [INFN, Milano (Italy); Ordine, A. [INFN, Napoli (Italy); Raduta, Ad.R. [NIPNE, Bucharest-Magurele, POB-MG6 (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    The reactions {sup 32}S+{sup 58}Ni and {sup 32}S+{sup 64}Ni are studied at 14.5 A MeV. After a selection of the collision mechanism, we show that important even-odd effects are present in the isotopic fragment distributions when the excitation energy is small. Close to the multifragmentation threshold this staggering appears hidden by the rapid variation of the production yields with the fragment size. Once this effect is accounted for, the staggering appears to be a universal feature of fragment production, slightly enhanced when the emission source is neutron poor. A closer look at the behavior of the production yields as a function of the neutron excess N-Z, reveals that odd-even effects cannot be explained by pairing effects in the nuclear masses alone, but depend in a more complex way on the de-excitation chain.

  12. Reaction mechanisms and staggering in S+Ni collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Morelli, L.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Cannata, F.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Raduta, Ad. R.

    2011-07-01

    The reactions S32+Ni58 and S32+Ni64 are studied at 14.5 A MeV. After a selection of the collision mechanism, we show that important even-odd effects are present in the isotopic fragment distributions when the excitation energy is small. Close to the multifragmentation threshold this staggering appears hidden by the rapid variation of the production yields with the fragment size. Once this effect is accounted for, the staggering appears to be a universal feature of fragment production, slightly enhanced when the emission source is neutron poor. A closer look at the behavior of the production yields as a function of the neutron excess N-Z, reveals that odd-even effects cannot be explained by pairing effects in the nuclear masses alone, but depend in a more complex way on the de-excitation chain.

  13. Mechanical reaction-diffusion model for bacterial population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ngamsaad, Waipot

    2015-01-01

    The effect of mechanical interaction between cells on the spreading of bacterial population was investigated in one-dimensional space. A nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation has been formulated as a model for this dynamics. In this model, the bacterial cells are treated as the rod-like particles that interact, when contacting each other, through the hard-core repulsion. The repulsion introduces the exclusion process that causes the fast diffusion in bacterial population at high density. The propagation of the bacterial density as the traveling wave front in long time behavior has been analyzed. The analytical result reveals that the front speed is enhanced by the exclusion process---and its value depends on the packing fraction of cell. The numerical solutions of the model have been solved to confirm this prediction.

  14. Chemical and mechanical interactions of interstitials with vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Chitwood, L.D.; DeVan, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Oxidation studies of V-4Cr-4Ti were conducted in air and reduced oxygen partial pressures (10{sup 4}, 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -6} torr). Reaction rates were determined by weight change measurements and chemical analyses. Mechanical properties after the exposures were determined by room temperature tensile tests. In air at 400 and 500{degrees}C, oxide films form on the surface. Initially, rates are high but decrease with time reaching similiar values to those found in oxygen partial pressures at 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5}, and 10{sup -6} torr. At 400{degrees}C, oxygen pick-up followed a logarithmic function of time and was confined to regions near the surface. Little change in room temperature tensile properties was noted for oxygen increase up to 1500 ppm. Thermal cycling specimens from 400{degrees}C to room temperature up to 14 times had no apparent effect on oxidation rate or tensile properties. At 500{degrees}C, oxygen pick-up appeared to follow a parabolic relation with time. Rates were {approx} 10 times those at 400{degrees}C and correspondingly larger oxygen increases occurred when compared with the 400{degrees}C tests after similiar time periods. This resulted in a significant decrease in total elongation after 240 h. At reduced oxygen partial pressures, rates were measured for times <100 h. Data are relatively sparse but generally show a slightly higher initial rate before slowing. At 400{degrees}C increases to {approx}200 ppm oxygen were found with no effect on room temperature elongation. At 500{degrees}C increase in oxygen of 2400 ppm after 50h/10{sup -5} torr resulted in a decrease of around 25% in room temperature elongation. By comparison, exposure to air at 500{degrees}C for 12 h caused nearly the same results.

  15. An in-situ chemical reaction deposition of nanosized wurtzite CdS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu Juan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Jin Zhengguo, E-mail: zhgjin@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Cai Shu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Jingxia [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hong Zhanglian, E-mail: hong_zhanglian@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline CdS thin films were deposited on glass substrates by an ammonia-free in-situ chemical reaction synthesis technique using cadmium cationic precursor solid films as reaction source and sodium sulfide based solutions as anionic reaction medium. Effects of ethanolamine addition to the cadmium cationic precursor solid films, deposition cycle numbers and annealing treatments in Ar atmosphere on structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the resultant films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and UV-Vis spectra measurements. The results show that CdS thin films deposited by the in-situ chemical reaction synthesis have wurtzite structure with (002) plane preferential orientation and crystallite size is in the range of 16 nm-19 nm. The growth of film thickness is almost constant with deposition cycle numbers and about 96 nm per cycle.

  16. Thermally activated reaction–diffusion-controlled chemical bulk reactions of gases and solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical kinetics of the reaction of thin films with reactive gases is investigated. The removal of thin films using thermally activated solid–gas to gas reactions is a method to in-situ control deposition inventory in vacuum and plasma vessels. Significant scatter of experimental deposit removal rates at apparently similar conditions was observed in the past, highlighting the need for understanding the underlying processes. A model based on the presence of reactive gas in the films bulk and chemical kinetics is presented. The model describes the diffusion of reactive gas into the film and its chemical interaction with film constituents in the bulk using a stationary reaction–diffusion equation. This yields the reactive gas concentration and reaction rates. Diffusion and reaction rate limitations are depicted in parameter studies. Comparison with literature data on tokamak co-deposit removal results in good agreement of removal rates as a function of pressure, film thickness and temperature.

  17. Multiparameter Estimation in Voltammetry When an Electron Transfer Process Is Coupled to a Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, Alexandr N; Morris, Graham P; Mashkina, Elena; Bethwaite, Blair; Gillow, Kathryn; Baker, Ruth E; Gavaghan, David J; Bond, Alan M

    2016-05-01

    Estimation of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in electrochemical studies is usually undertaken via comparison of the experimental results with theory based on a model that mimics the experiment. The present study examines the credibility of transient d.c. and a.c. voltammetric theory-experiment comparisons for recovery of the parameters needed to model the ubiquitous mechanism when an electron transfer (E) reaction is followed by a chemical (C) step in the EC process ([Formula: see text]). The data analysis has been undertaken using optimization methods facilitated in some cases by grid computing. These techniques have been applied to the simulated (5% noise added) and experimental (reduction of trans-stilbene) voltammograms to assess the capabilities of parameter recovery of E(0) (reversible potential for the E step), k(0) (heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E(0)), α (charge transfer coefficient for the E step), and k(f) and k(b) (forward and backward rate constants for the C step) under different kinetic regimes. The advantages provided by the use of a.c. instead of d.c. voltammetry and data optimization methods over heuristic approaches to "experiment"-theory comparisons are discussed, as are the limitations in the efficient recovery of a unique set of parameters for the EC mechanism. In the particular experimental case examined herein, results for the protonation of the electrochemically generated stilbene dianion demonstrate that, notwithstanding significant advances in experiment and theory of voltammetric analysis, reliable recovery of the parameters for the EC mechanism with a fast chemical process remains a stiff problem. PMID:27041344

  18. Momentum balance equation for nonelectrolytes in models of coupling between chemical reaction and diffusion in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałdzicki, Z; Miekisz, S

    1984-04-01

    The role of viscosity in coupling between chemical reaction (complex formation) and diffusion in membranes has been investigated. The Fick law was replaced by the momentum balance equation with the viscous term. The irreversible thermodynamics admits coupling of the chemical reaction rate with the gradient of velocity. The proposed model has shown the contrary effect of viscosity and confirmed the experimental results. The chemical reaction rate increases only above the limit value of viscosity. The parameter Q (degree of complex formation) was introduced to investigate coupling. Q equals to the ratio of the chemical contribution into the flux of the complex to the total flux of the substance transported. For different values of the parameters of the model the dependence of Q upon position inside the membrane has been numerically calculated. The assumptions of the model limit it to a specific case and they only roughly model the biological situation. PMID:6537360

  19. Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze theory and its connection to quantum transition state theory. We then focus on its practical application to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rates in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rates. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  20. Effect of CO2-induced reactions on the mechanical behaviour of fractured wellbore cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterbeek, Timotheus; Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Geomechanical damage, such as fracturing of wellbore cement, can severely impact well integrity in CO2 storage fields. Chemical reactions between the cement and CO2-bearing fluids may subsequently alter the cement's mechanical properties, either enhancing or inhibiting damage accumulation during ongoing changes in wellbore temperature and stress-state. To evaluate the potential for such effects, we performed triaxial compression tests on Class G Portland cement, conducted at down-hole temperature (80 ° C) and effective confining pressures ranging from 1 to 25 MPa. After deformation, samples displaying failure on localised shear fractures were reacted with CO2-H2O, and then subjected to a second triaxial test to assess changes in mechanical properties. Using results from the first phase of deformation, baseline yield and failure criteria were constructed for virgin cement. These delineate stress conditions where unreacted cement is most prone to dilatational (permeability-enhancing) failure. Once shear-fractures formed, later reaction with CO2 did not produce further geomechanical weakening. Instead, after six weeks of reaction, we observed up to 83% recovery of peak-strength and increased frictional strength (15-40%) in the post-failure regime, due to calcium carbonate precipitation in the fractures. As such, our results suggest more or less complete mechanical healing on timescales of the order of months.

  1. Two Optimization Methods to Determine the Rate Constants of a Complex Chemical Reaction Using FORTRAN and MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Latif A. Seoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: For chemical reactions, the determination of the rate constants is both very difficult and a time consuming process. The aim of this research was to develop computer programs for determining the rate constants for the general form of any complex reaction at a certain temperature. The development of such program can be very helpful in the control of industrial processes as well as in the study of the reaction mechanisms. Determination of the accurate values of the rate constants would help in establishing the optimum conditions of reactor design including pressure, temperature and other parameters of the chemical reaction. Approach: From the experimental concentration-time data, initial values of rate constants were calculated. Experimental data encountered several types of errors, including temperature variation, impurities in the reactants and human errors. Simulations of a second order consecutive irreversible chemical reaction of the saponification of diethyl ester were presented as an example of the complex reactions. The rate equations (system of simultaneous differential equations of the reaction were solved to get the analytical concentration versus time profiles. The simulation results were compared with experimental results at each measured point. All deviations between experimental and calculated values were squared and summed up to form a new function. This function was fed into a minimizer routine that gave the optimal rate constants. Two optimization techniques were developed using FORTRAN and MATLAB for accurately determining the rate constants of the reaction at certain temperature from the experimental data. Results: Results showed that the two proposed programs were very efficient, fast and accurate tools to determine the true rate constants of the reaction with less 1% error. The use of the MATLAB embedded subroutines for simultaneously solving the differential equations and minimization of the error function

  2. Automatic reaction to a chemical event detected by a low-cost wireless chemical sensing network

    OpenAIRE

    Beirne, Stephen; Lau, King-Tong; Corcoran, Brian; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    A test-scale wireless chemical sensor network (WCSN) has been deployed within a controlled Environmental Chamber (EC). The combined signals from the WCSN were used to initiate a controllable response to the detected chemical event. When a particular sensor response pattern was obtained, a purging cycle was initiated. Sensor data were continuously checked against user-defined action limits, to determine if a chemical event had occurred. An acidic contaminant was used to demonstrate the respons...

  3. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  4. Chemical Reactions and Kinetics of the Carbon Monoxide Coupling in the Presence of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fandong Meng; Genhui Xu; Zhenhua Li; Pa Du

    2002-01-01

    The chemical reactions and kinetics of the catalytic coupling reaction of carbon monoxide to diethyl oxalate were studied in the presence of hydrogen over a supported palladium catalyst in the gaseous phase at the typical coupling reaction conditions. The experiments were performed in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that hydrogen only reacts with ethyl nitrite to form ethanol, and kinetic studies revealed that the rate-determining step is the surface reaction of adsorbed hydrogen and the ethoxy radical (EtO-). A kinetic model is proposed and a comparison of the observed and calculated conversions showed that the rate expressions are of rather high confidence.

  5. Modeling of Chemical Reactions in Afterburning for the Reduction of N2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Glarborg, Peter; Leckner, Bo

    1996-01-01

    Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions.......Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions....

  6. Preparation by a Rheological Phase Reaction Method and Thermal Decomposition Reaction Mechanism of Nickelous Salicylate Tetrahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin-long; Yuan Liang-jie; Yang Yi-yong; Sun Ju-tang; Zhang Ke-li

    2003-01-01

    The single crystal nickel salicylate tetrahydrate was prepared with the rheological phase reaction method from nickelous hydroxide and salicylic acid. The crystal structure was determined. It is monoclinic, space group P21 /n, a =0.67874(3), b=0. 515 91(2), c=2. 313 30(9) nm, β=90.9286(17)°, V=0. 809 94(6) nm3, Z=2, ρcalcd =0. 065 0[I >2a(I)]. The thermal decomposition mechanism in an inert atmosphere was investigated via TG, DTG and DTA. The thermal decomposition products were characterized with IR and micro-powder X-ray diffraction method. A new coordination polymer (NiC6 H4O)n as an intermediate product and nanoscale metal nickel were obtained in the ranges of 364-429 ℃ and 429-680 ℃, respectively.

  7. Characterization of Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Polymer Based Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Wafy, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Polymer Based NanocompositesThe University of ManchesterTamer Wafy Doctor of Philosophy17 January, 2013One of the most significant issues in nanocomposite performance is improving the dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in thermosetting or thermoplastic polymers in order to gain good mechanical properties. Several studies have investigated the fabrication of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes and analysed properties, but there ...

  8. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  9. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting. PMID:27147197

  10. Photo-induced isomerization and chemical reaction dynamics in superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Jeremy; Douberly, Gary; Miller, Roger

    2008-03-01

    Near threshold photo-induced isomerization and photo-induced chemical reactions have long been sough after as sensitive probes of the underlying potential energy surface. One of the most important questions asked is how the initially bright quantum state couples to the reaction coordinate, and thus relates to energy transfer in general. Helium droplets have now allowed us to stabilize entrance channel clusters behind very small reaction barriers such that vibrational excitation may result in reaction. Through two examples, namely the isomerization of the 2 binary complexes of HF-HCN Douberly et al. PCCP 2005, 7,463, and the induced reaction of the gallium-HCN complex Merritt et al. JPCA 2007, DOI:10.1021/jp074981e we will show how the branching ratios for reaction and predissociation can determined and the influence of the superfluid He solvent.

  11. An optimized chemical kinetic mechanism for HCCI combustion of PRFs using multi-zone model and genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new chemical kinetic mechanism for PRFs HCCI combustion is developed. • New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. • Engine-related combustion and performance parameters are predicted accurately. • Engine unburned HC and CO emissions are predicted by the model properly. - Abstract: Development of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms is required for HCCI combustion and emissions prediction to be used in engine development. The main purpose of this study is development of a new chemical kinetic mechanism for primary reference fuels (PRFs) HCCI combustion, which can be applied to combustion models to predict in-cylinder pressure and exhaust CO and UHC emissions, accurately. Hence, a multi-zone model is developed for HCCI engine simulation. Two semi-detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms those are suitable for premixed combustion are used for n-heptane and iso-octane HCCI combustion simulation. The iso-octane mechanism contains 84 species and 484 reactions and the n-heptane mechanism contains 57 species and 296 reactions. A simple interaction between iso-octane and n-heptane is considered in new mechanism. The multi-zone model is validated using experimental data for pure n-heptane and iso-octane. A new mechanism is prepared by combination of these two mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane blended fuel, which includes 101 species and 594 reactions. New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. Mechanism contains low temperature heat release region, which decreases with increasing octane number. The results showed that the optimized chemical kinetic mechanism is capable of predicting engine-related combustion and performance parameters. Also after implementing the optimized mechanism, engine unburned HC and CO emissions predicted by the model are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data

  12. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, A.; Tan, K. C.; Pawela, Ł.; Kurzyński, P.; Paterek, T.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013), 10.1063/1.4844355], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010), 10.1016/j.cplett.2010.01.063]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  13. Discrete formulation of mixed finite element methods for vapor deposition chemical reaction equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhen-dong; ZHOU Yan-jie; ZHU Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The vapor deposition chemical reaction processes, which are of extremely extensive applications, can be classified as a mathematical modes by the following governing nonlinear partial differential equations containing velocity vector,temperature field,pressure field,and gas mass field.The mixed finite element(MFE)method is employed to study the system of equations for the vapor deposition chemical reaction processes.The semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE formulations are derived.And the existence and convergence(error estimate)of the semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE solutions are deposition chemical reaction processes,the numerical solutions of the velocity vector,the temperature field,the pressure field,and the gas mass field can be found out simultaneonsly.Thus,these researches are not only of important theoretical means,but also of extremely extensive applied vistas.

  14. Mathematical Formalism of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics for Nonlinear Chemical Reaction Systems with General Rate Law

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a mathematical formalism of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for chemical reaction models with $N$ species, $M$ reactions, and general rate law. We establish a mathematical basis for J. W. Gibbs' macroscopic chemical thermodynamics under G. N. Lewis' kinetic law of entire equilibrium (detailed balance in nonlinear chemistry kinetics). In doing so, the equilibrium thermodynamics is then naturally generalized to nonequilibrium settings without detailed balance. The kinetic models are represented by a Markovian jumping process. A generalized macroscopic chemical free energy function and its associated balance equation with nonnegative source and sink are the major discoveries. The proof is based on the large deviation principle of this type of Markov processes. A general fluctuation dissipation theorem for stochastic reaction kinetics is also proved. The mathematical theory illustrates how a novel macroscopic dynamic law can emerges from the mesoscopic kinetics in a multi-scale system.

  15. CHEMICAL REACTION EFFECTS ON FLOW PAST AN EXPONENTIALLY ACCELERATED VERTICAL PLATE WITH VARIABLE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muthucumaraswamy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is performed to study the unsteady flow past an exponentially accelerated infinite vertical plate with variable temperature and uniform mass diffusion, in the presence of a homogeneous chemical reaction of first-order. The plate temperature is raised linearly with time and the concentration level near the plate is raised uniformly. The dimensionless governing equations are solved using the Laplace transform. The velocity profiles are studied for different physical parameters such as the chemical reaction parameter, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number, a, and time. It is observed that the velocity increases with increasing values of a or t. But the trend is just the reverse in the chemical reaction parameter.

  16. Automated Discovery of Elementary Chemical Reaction Steps Using Freezing String and Berny Optimization Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Green, William H

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple protocol which allows fully automated discovery of elementary chemical reaction steps using in cooperation double- and single-ended transition-state optimization algorithms--the freezing string and Berny optimization methods, respectively. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach, the reactivity of several single-molecule systems of combustion and atmospheric chemistry importance is investigated. The proposed algorithm allowed us to detect without any human intervention not only "known" reaction pathways, manually detected in the previous studies, but also new, previously "unknown", reaction pathways which involve significant atom rearrangements. We believe that applying such a systematic approach to elementary reaction path finding will greatly accelerate the discovery of new chemistry and will lead to more accurate computer simulations of various chemical processes. PMID:26575920

  17. Automated Discovery of Elementary Chemical Reaction Steps Using Freezing String and Berny Optimization Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, Yury V

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple protocol which allows fully automated discovery of elementary chemical reaction steps using in cooperation single- and double-ended transition-state optimization algorithms - the freezing string and Berny optimization methods, respectively. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach, the reactivity of several systems of combustion and atmospheric chemistry importance is investigated. The proposed algorithm allowed us to detect without any human intervention not only "known" reaction pathways, manually detected in the previous studies, but also new, previously "unknown", reaction pathways which involve significant atom rearrangements. We believe that applying such a systematic approach to elementary reaction path finding will greatly accelerate the possibility of discovery of new chemistry and will lead to more accurate computer simulations of various chemical processes.

  18. Automated Discovery of Elementary Chemical Reaction Steps Using Freezing String and Berny Optimization Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Green, William H

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple protocol which allows fully automated discovery of elementary chemical reaction steps using in cooperation double- and single-ended transition-state optimization algorithms--the freezing string and Berny optimization methods, respectively. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach, the reactivity of several single-molecule systems of combustion and atmospheric chemistry importance is investigated. The proposed algorithm allowed us to detect without any human intervention not only "known" reaction pathways, manually detected in the previous studies, but also new, previously "unknown", reaction pathways which involve significant atom rearrangements. We believe that applying such a systematic approach to elementary reaction path finding will greatly accelerate the discovery of new chemistry and will lead to more accurate computer simulations of various chemical processes.

  19. Determining the mechanical strength of CO2-induced reaction zones in wellbore cement: is it worth it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Marcelis, Fons; van der Linden, Arjan; Liteanu, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    CO2 injection, either for long-term CO2 storage (CCS) or Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), strongly hinges on maintaining storage integrity. Injection and legacy wells penetrating the caprock pose one of the most likely points of leakage. In order to be able to predict the long-term integrity of such wellbores, it's important to understand their chemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviour, and how it may change due to CO2 exposure. Generally, in response to CO2/brine/cement interactions, a number of different reaction zones are observed, each with their own chemical, and hence mechanical, signature. To aid mechanical modelling efforts, assessing the risk of cement failure caused by stress and temperature changes, knowledge is required of the strength of each of these zones. We performed experiments on Class G Portland cement to investigate the chemical-mechanical coupling due to CO2-exposure. Batch reaction experiments, in the presence of CO2-rich brine, were performed under typical storage conditions (T = 65° C, PCO2 = 8 MPa) for various periods of time (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 months). After exposure, mechanical tests were performed on the observed reaction zones, using the so-called core scratching technique, to evaluate the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) as a function of exposure time. Chemical analyses (CT-imaging, SEM microscopy, EDX chemical analysis) showed the formation of three reaction zones, similarly to what has been observed in other studies. Measurements of the mechanical strength of these different zones showed highly variable results. Such variations have also been observed in other studies, using different measurement techniques. The large variability in strength measurements is most likely an inherent result of the heterogenic nature of cement, which affects the extent and location of reaction throughout the sample. This begs the question: is it worth studying the mechanical strength of reaction-induced zones in cement? Or will it suffice to

  20. Theoretical Study on the Mechanism of Sonogashira Coupling Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li-Ping; HONG San-Guo; HOU Hao-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction has been studied theoretically by DFT (density functional theory) calculations. The model system studied consists of Pd(PH3)2 as the starting catalyst complex, phenyl bromide as the substrate and acetylene as the terminal alkyne, without regarding to the co-catalyst and base. Mechanistically and energetically plausible catalytic cycles for the cross-coupling have been identified. The DFT analysis shows that the catalytic cycle occurs in three stages: oxidative addition of phenyl bromide to the palladium center, alkynylation of palladium(II) intermediate, and reductive elimination to phenylacetylene. In the oxidative addition, the neutral and anionic pathways have been investigated, which could both give rise to cis-configured palladium(II) diphosphine intermediate. Starting from the palladium(II) diphosphine intermediate, the only identifiable pathway in alkynylation involves the dissociation of Br group and the formation of square-planar palladium(II) intermediate, in which the phenyl and alkynyl groups are oriented cis to each other. Due to the close proximity of phenyl and alkynyl groups, the reductive elimination of phenylacetylene proceeds smoothly.

  1. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  2. New Approach to the Stability of Chemical Reaction Networks: Piecewise Linear in Rates Lyapunov Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Radhawi, M. Ali; Angeli, David

    2014-01-01

    Piecewise-Linear in Rates (PWLR) Lyapunov functions are introduced for a class of Chemical Reaction Networks (CRNs). In addition to their simple structure, these functions are robust with respect to arbitrary monotone reaction rates, of which mass-action is a special case. The existence of such functions ensures the convergence of trajectories towards equilibria, and guarantee their asymptotic stability with respect to the corresponding stoichiometric compatibility class. We give the definiti...

  3. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers : transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Giselle M.; Marques Júnior, Wilson; Soares, A. J.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solution of the Boltzmann equation is determined through an expansion in Sonine polyn...

  4. Transformation of Symmetrization Order to Nuclear-Spin Magnetization by Chemical Reaction and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, C. Russell; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    1986-01-01

    A method of obtaining very large nuclear-spin polarizations is proposed and illustrated by density-operator calculations. The prediction is that chemical reaction and rf irradiation can convert the scalar parahydrogen state into polarization of order unity on the nuclear spins of the products of molecular-hydrogen addition reactions. A means of extending the resultant sensitivity enhancement to other spins is proposed in which the transfer of order occurs through population differences not as...

  5. On the Mathematical Structure of Balanced Chemical Reaction Networks Governed by Mass Action Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    der Schaft, Arjan van; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress on the interplay between graph theory, dynamics, and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics. For reaction networks possessing a thermodynamic equilibrium we derive a compact formulation exhibiting at the same time the structure of the complex graph and the stoichiometry of the network, and which admits a direct thermodynamical interpretation. This formulation allows us to easily characterize the set ...

  6. Products and mechanism of the reaction of ozone with phospholipids in unilamellar phospholipid vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santrock, J.; Gorski, R.A.; O' Gara, J.F. (Biomedical Science Department, General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, MI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    While considerable effort has been expended on determining the health effects of exposure to typical urban concentrations of O3, little is known about the chemical events responsible for toxicity. Phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membranes of lung cells are likely reaction sites for inhaled ozone (O3). In this study, we examined the reaction of O3 with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) in unilamellar phospholipid vesicles. Reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bond of POPC yielded an aldehyde and a hydroxy hydroperoxide. The hydroxy hydroperoxide eliminated H2O2 to yield a second aldehyde. Upon further ozonolysis, the aldehydes were oxidized to the corresponding carboxylic acids. A material balance showed that no other reaction consumed POPC and O3 or produced these products. As a mechanistic probe, we measured incorporation of oxygen-18 from 18O3 into aldehyde, carboxylic acid, and H2O2. Approximately 50% of the aldehyde oxygen atoms were derived from O3. Oxygen in H2O2 was derived solely from O3, where both oxygen atoms in a molecule of H2O2 were from the same molecule of O3. One of the carboxylic acid oxygen atoms was derived from the precursor aldehyde, while the other was derived from O3. These results support the following mechanism. Cleavage of the carbon-carbon double bond of POPC by O3 yields a carbonyl oxide and an aldehyde. Reaction of H2O with the carbonyl oxide yields a hydroxy hydroperoxide, preventing formation ozonide by reaction of the carbonyl oxide and aldehyde. Elimination of H2O2 from the hydroxy hydroperoxide yields a second aldehyde. Oxidation of the aldehydes by O3 yields carboxylic acids.

  7. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.;

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  8. On the study of nonlinear dynamics of complex chemical reaction systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With ever-increasing attentions being paid to complex systems such as the life system, soft matter, and nano-systems, theoretical studies of non-equilibrium nonlinear problems involved in chemical dynamics are now of general interest. In this mini-review, we mainly give a brief introduction to some frontier topics in this field, namely, nonlinear state-state dynamics, nonlinear chemical dynamics on complex networks, and nonlinear dynamics in mesoscopic chemical reaction systems. Deep study of these topics will make great contribution to discovering new laws of chemical dynamics, to exploring new control methods of complex chemical processes, to figuring out the very roles of chemical processes in the life system, and to crosslinking the scientific study of chemistry, physics and biology.

  9. Modulation of mechanical resonance by chemical potential oscillation in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Koshino, Mikito; Lee, Sunwoo; Gondarenko, Alexander; MacDonald, Allan H.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    2016-03-01

    The classical picture of the force on a capacitor assumes a large density of electronic states, such that the electrochemical potential of charges added to the capacitor is given by the external electrostatic potential and the capacitance is determined purely by geometry. Here we consider capacitively driven motion of a nano-mechanical resonator with a low density of states, in which these assumptions can break down. We find three leading-order corrections to the classical picture: the first of which is a modulation in the static force due to variation in the internal chemical potential; the second and third are changes in the static force and dynamic spring constant due to the rate of change of chemical potential, expressed as the quantum (density of states) capacitance. As a demonstration, we study capacitively driven graphene mechanical resonators, where the chemical potential is modulated independently of the gate voltage using an applied magnetic field to manipulate the energy of electrons residing in discrete Landau levels. In these devices, we observe large periodic frequency shifts consistent with the three corrections to the classical picture. In devices with extremely low strain and disorder, the first correction term dominates and the resonant frequency closely follows the chemical potential. The theoretical model fits the data with only one adjustable parameter representing disorder-broadening of the Landau levels. The underlying electromechanical coupling mechanism is not limited by the particular choice of material, geometry, or mechanism for variation in the chemical potential, and can thus be extended to other low-dimensional systems.

  10. Development and Validation of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Large-Scale Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin;

    2014-01-01

    This work is an extension to a previously reported work on chemical kinetic mechanism reduction scheme for large-scale mechanisms. Here, Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) was added as a criterion of data source for mechanism reduction instead of using only auto-ignition condition. As a result......, a reduced n-hexadecane mechanism with 79 species for diesel fuel surrogate was successfully derived from the detailed mechanism. Following that, the reduced n-hexadecane mechanism was validated under auto-ignition and PSR conditions using zero-dimensional (0-D) closed homogeneous batch reactor in CHEMKIN...

  11. Structure and reaction mechanism of basil eugenol synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon V Louie

    Full Text Available Phenylpropenes, a large group of plant volatile compounds that serve in multiple roles in defense and pollinator attraction, contain a propenyl side chain. Eugenol synthase (EGS catalyzes the reductive displacement of acetate from the propenyl side chain of the substrate coniferyl acetate to produce the allyl-phenylpropene eugenol. We report here the structure determination of EGS from basil (Ocimum basilicum by protein x-ray crystallography. EGS is structurally related to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases (SDRs, and in particular, enzymes in the isoflavone-reductase-like subfamily. The structure of a ternary complex of EGS bound to the cofactor NADP(H and a mixed competitive inhibitor EMDF ((7S,8S-ethyl (7,8-methylene-dihydroferulate provides a detailed view of the binding interactions within the EGS active site and a starting point for mutagenic examination of the unusual reductive mechanism of EGS. The key interactions between EMDF and the EGS-holoenzyme include stacking of the phenyl ring of EMDF against the cofactor's nicotinamide ring and a water-mediated hydrogen-bonding interaction between the EMDF 4-hydroxy group and the side-chain amino moiety of a conserved lysine residue, Lys132. The C4 carbon of nicotinamide resides immediately adjacent to the site of hydride addition, the C7 carbon of cinnamyl acetate substrates. The inhibitor-bound EGS structure suggests a two-step reaction mechanism involving the formation of a quinone-methide prior to reduction. The formation of this intermediate is promoted by a hydrogen-bonding network that favors deprotonation of the substrate's 4-hydroxyl group and disfavors binding of the acetate moiety, akin to a push-pull catalytic mechanism. Notably, the catalytic involvement in EGS of the conserved Lys132 in preparing the phenolic substrate for quinone methide formation through the proton-relay network appears to be an adaptation of the analogous role in hydrogen bonding played by the equivalent

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic investigation of a chemical reaction-based miniature heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Flueckiger, Scott M.; Volle, Fabien; Garimella, S V; Mongia, Rajiv K.

    2012-01-01

    Representative reversible endothermic chemical reactions (paraldehyde depolymerization and 2-proponal dehydrogenation) are theoretically assessed for their use in a chemical heat pump design for compact thermal management applications. Equilibrium and dynamic simulations are undertaken to explore the operation of the heat pump which upgrades waste heat from near room temperature by approximately 20 in a minimized system volume. A model is developed based on system mass and energy balances cou...

  13. Chemical reaction model of cathode failure in large prebaked anode aluminum reduction cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵群; 谢雁丽; 高炳亮; 邱竹贤; 赵无畏

    2002-01-01

    By partial and general dissection of large prebaked alumina electrolysis cells, the macro appearance, chemical composition and phase variations were studied employing actual observations and measurements on the cells together with X-ray diffraction phase analysis and scanning electron microscopy of samples from different locations. According to the practical production, a chemical reaction model of aluminum reduction cell failure was set up in order to reduce the incidence of cell failure and extend pot service life.

  14. Product-form stationary distributions for deficiency zero chemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, David F.; Craciun, Gheorghe; Kurtz, Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    We consider stochastically modeled chemical reaction systems with mass-action kinetics and prove that a product-form stationary distribution exists for each closed, irreducible subset of the state space if an analogous deterministically modeled system with mass-action kinetics admits a complex balanced equilibrium. Feinberg's deficiency zero theorem then implies that such a distribution exists so long as the corresponding chemical network is weakly reversible and has a deficiency of zero. The...

  15. The reaction mechanism of the (3HE,T) reaction and applications to nuclear structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis we present a study on the reaction meachanism of the (3He,t) reaction at 70-80 MeV bombarding energy and on structures of the residual nuclei excited in this reaction: 24-Al, 26-Al, 28-P, 32-Cl, 40-Sc, 42-Sc and 58-Cu... Zie: Summary

  16. Identifying the causes of differences in ozone production from the CB05 and CBMIV chemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Saylor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted to identify the mechanistic differences between two versions of the carbon bond gas-phase chemical mechanism (CB05 and CBMIV which consistently lead to larger ground-level ozone concentrations being produced in the CB05 version of the National Air Quality Forecasting Capability (NAQFC modeling system even though the two parallel forecast systems utilize the same meteorology and base emissions and similar initial and boundary conditions. Box models of each of the mechanisms as they are implemented in the NAQFC were created and a set of 12 sensitivity simulations was designed. The sensitivity simulations independently probed the conceptual mechanistic differences between CB05 and CBMIV and were exercised over a 45-scenario simulation suite designed to emulate the wide range of chemical regimes encountered in a continental-scale atmospheric chemistry model. Results of the sensitivity simulations indicate that two sets of reactions that were included in the CB05 mechanism, but which were absent from the CBMIV mechanism, are the primary causes of the greater ozone production in the CB05 version of the NAQFC. One set of reactions recycles the higher organic peroxide species of CB05 (ROOH, resulting in additional photochemically reactive products that act to produce additional ozone in some chemical regimes. The other set of reactions recycles reactive nitrogen from less reactive forms back to NO2, increasing the effective NOx concentration of the system. In particular, the organic nitrate species (NTR, which was a terminal product for reactive nitrogen in the CBMIV mechanism, acts as a reservoir species in CB05 to redistribute NOx from major source areas to potentially NOx-sensitive areas where additional ozone may be produced in areas remote from direct NOx sources.

  17. Identifying the causes of differences in ozone production from the CB05 and CBMIV chemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Saylor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted to identify the mechanistic differences between two versions of the carbon bond gas-phase chemical mechanism (CB05 and CBMIV which consistently lead to larger ground-level ozone concentrations being produced in the CB05 version of the National Air Quality Forecasting Capability (NAQFC modeling system even though the two parallel forecast systems utilize the same meteorology and base emissions and similar initial and boundary conditions. Box models of each of the mechanisms as they are implemented in the NAQFC were created and a set of 12 sensitivity simulations was designed. The sensitivity simulations independently probed the conceptual mechanistic differences between CB05 and CBMIV and were exercised over a 45-scenario simulation suite designed to emulate the wide range of chemical regimes encountered in a continental-scale atmospheric chemistry model. Results of the sensitivity simulations indicate that two sets of reactions that were included in the CB05 mechanism, but which were absent from the CBMIV mechanism, are the primary causes of the greater ozone production in the CB05 version of the NAQFC. One set of reactions recycles the higher organic peroxide species of CB05 (ROOH, resulting in additional photochemically reactive products that act to produce additional ozone in some chemical regimes. The other set of reactions recycles reactive nitrogen from less reactive forms back to NO2, increasing the effective NOx concentration of the system. In particular, the organic nitrate species (NTR, which was a terminal product for reactive nitrogen in the CBMIV mechanism, acts as a reservoir species in CB05 to redistribute NOx from major source areas to potentially NOx-sensitive areas where additional ozone may be produced in areas remote from direct NOx sources.

  18. A micro-mapping strategy to investigate mechanical and chemical mass transport in migmatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, Pierre; Riel, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Migmatites are fantastic objects to study both mechanical and chemical mass transport occurring at mm to cm-scale. However, migmatitic outcrops are the result of complex space and time interactions between (i) melt producing reactions, (ii) melt gain/loss and (iii) retrograde reactions. This succession of events is recorded in the minerals and microstructures of migmatites, and accounts for their apparent complexity. In order to explore the controlling parameters of these chemico-mechanical mass transport, it is thus necessary to characterize in great details the compositional changes between the different migmatitic domains, such as between leucosome and residuum. In this contribution we show how suitable local effective bulk (LEB) compositions can be derived by means of standardized microprobe X-ray images, using the program XMapTools. For chemically heterogeneous samples, such as migmatites, these LEB allow to forward model the stable mineral assemblages for each domain. Those thermodynamic models are used to investigate the conditions of leucosome-residuum separation. The studied sample is a metapelite embedded within a metasedimentary xenolith in the Marcabeli pluton, El Oro Complex, Ecuador. The sample exhibits complex mineral patterns due to local melt redistribution (at mm to cm-scale). Such physical mass transport involves major changes that affect the local chemical composition observed today. At the same time gradients in chemical potential can be established between adjacent domains such as residuum and leucosome, thus triggering chemical interaction. Diffusive transport between domains aims to reduce such chemical potential gradients. Along a modelled P-T path the chemical and mineralogical evolution of micro-domains can be reconstructed for (at least the reactive parts of) the crystallization history.

  19. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanxuan; Wan, Jinquan; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO4(-)) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH3.0 and pH7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to OH, superoxide radical (O2(-)) was detected at pH11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH3.0 by GC-MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH3.0. PMID:27125682

  20. Mechanisms in adverse reactions to food. The nose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A

    1995-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common symptom in food allergic patients, but rhinitis is rarely the only symptom. Rhinitis due to adverse reactions to preservatives and colorants is very rare. In anaphylactic systemic reactions to foods the rhinitis symptoms are caused by inflammatory mediators transported...... by the circulation. In non-anaphylactic reactions, the nasal inflammation and symptoms are probably induced by interaction with food allergens transported to the nasal mucosa via the blood circulation....

  1. Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaoyong Liu; Zhongdong Zhang; Pusheng Liu; Jianing Zhai; Chaohe Yang

    2015-01-01

    FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking) catalyst iron poisoning would not only influence units’ product slate; when the poisoning is serious, it could also jeopardize FCC catalysts’ fluidization in reaction-regeneration system and further cause bad influences on units’ stable operation. Under catalytic cracking reaction conditions, large amount of iron nanonodules is formed on the seriously iron contaminated catalyst due to exothermic reaction. These nodules intensify the attrition between catalyst pa...

  2. Preparation by a Rheological Phase Reaction Method and Thermal Decomposition Reaction Mechanism of Nickelous Salicylate Tetrahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangJin-long; YuanLiang-jie; YangYi-yong; SunJu-tang; ZhangKe-li

    2003-01-01

    The single crystal nickel salicylate tetrahydrate was prepared with the rheological phase reaction method from nickelous hydroxide and salicylic acid. The crystal structure was determinecL It is monoclinic, space group P21/n, α=0.678 74(3), b=0. 515 91(2), c=2. 313 30(9) nm, β=90.9286(17)°,V=0. 809 94(6) nm3, Z=2, ρcalod =1. 661 g· cm-3. Final R indices: R=0. 027 9 and ωR=0.065 0[Ⅰ>2σ(Ⅰ)]. The thermal decomposition mechanism in an inert atmosphere was investigated via TG, DTG and DTA. The thermal decomposition products were characterized with IR and micro-powder X-ray diffraction method. A new coordination polymer ( NiC6 H4 O)n as an intermediate product and nanoscale metal nickel were obtained in the ranges of 364-429℃ and 429-680℃, respectively.

  3. The phase transition and classification of critical points in the multistability chemical reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunhuaZHANG; FugenWU; ChunyanWU; FaOU

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the phase transition and classification of critical points in multistability chemical reaction systems. Referring to the spirit of Landau's theory of phase transitions, this paper deals with the varied transitions and critical phenomena in multistable chemical systems. It is demonstrated that the higher the order of the multistability,the wider the variety of phase transitions will be. A classification scheme of critical points according to the stability criterion and the thermodynamic potential continuity is suggested.It is useful for us to study critical phenomena especially in the non-equilibrium systems including the multi-stable chemical ones.

  4. The mechanisms of delayed onset type adverse reactions to oseltamivir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Rokuro

    2016-09-01

    Oseltamivir is recommended for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza in persons at higher risk for influenza complications such as individuals with diabetes, neuropsychiatric illnesses, and respiratory, cardiac, renal, hepatic or haematological diseases. However, a recent Cochrane review reported that reduction of antibody production, renal disorders, hyperglycaemia, psychiatric disorders, and QT prolongation may be related to oseltamivir use. The underlying mechanisms are reviewed. There is decisive evidence that administration of a clinically compatible dose of oseltamivir in mice challenged by a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) that lacks a neuraminidase gene showed symptom-relieving effects and inhibition of viral clearance. These effects were accompanied by decreased level of T cell surface sialoglycosphingolipid (ganglioside) GM1 that is regulated by the endogenous neuraminidase in response to viral challenge. Clinical and non-clinical evidence supports the view that the usual dose of oseltamivir suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha almost completely with partial suppression of viral shedding in human influenza virus infection experiment. Animal toxicity tests support the clinical evidence with regard to renal and cardiac disorders (bradycardia and QT prolongation) and do not disprove the metabolic effect. Reduction of antibody production and cytokine induction and renal, metabolic, cardiac, and prolonged psychiatric disorders after oseltamivir use may be related to inhibition of the host's endogenous neuraminidase. While the usual clinical dose of zanamivir may not have this effect, a higher dose or prolonged administration of zanamivir and other neuraminidase inhibitors may induce similar delayed reactions, including reduction of the antibody and/or cytokine production. PMID:27251370

  5. Electronic processes in fast thermite chemical reactions: A first-principles molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Vashishta, Priya

    2008-06-01

    Rapid reaction of a molten metal with an oxide is the key to understanding recently discovered fast reactions in nanothermite composites. We have investigated the thermite reaction of Fe2O3 with aluminum by molecular dynamics simulations with interatomic forces calculated quantum mechanically in the framework of the density functional theory. A redox reaction to form iron metal and Al2O3 initiates with the rapid formation of Al-O bonds at the interface within 1 ps, followed by the propagation of the combustion front with a velocity of 70 m/s for at least 5 ps at 2000 K. The reaction time for an oxygen atom to change character from Fe2O3 type to Al2O3 type at the interface is estimated to be 1.7±0.9ps , and bond-overlap population analysis has been used to calculate reaction rates.

  6. Theoretical studies on reaction mechanisms of unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies on reactions of unstable nuclei by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) are briefly reviewed. The topics covered are: four-body breakup processes for 6He induced reaction, microscopic description of projectile breakup processes, and new approach to inclusive breakup processes. (author)

  7. Mechanism of reaction synthesis of Li-B alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Zhijian; (刘志坚); QU; Xuanhui; (曲选辉); LI; Zhiyou; (李志友); HUANG; Baiyun; (黄伯云)

    2003-01-01

    A model for reaction synthesis of Li-B alloys has been presented. Results show that the first exothermal reaction can be divided into three stages. The first stage is an instantaneous reaction on the boundary between boron particles and lithium melting, in which the caloric released is inversely proportional to the particle size of the boron powder. The second stage is a reaction between the unreacted boron and the lithium that diffuses through the product LiB3 on the surface of the boron particle. This process can be described by Johnston model. The third stage is dissolution of the product LiB3 to Li liquid, which takes place at temperature up to 420℃. At the same time, the second exothermal reaction begins, which consists of nucleation and growth of the last Li-B compound. It can be divided into two substages, i.e. the nucleation pregnant stage and the exploded reaction stage. When the concentration of the particle nucleated is high enough, an exploding reaction takes place. The lower the temperature, the longer the time needed for the exploding reaction. By the model presented, the experimental phenomena in the synthesis are explained.

  8. Theoretical Study on Reaction Mechanism of Aluminum-Water System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-lan Sun; Yan Tian; Shu-fen Li

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical study on the reaction of aluminum with water in the gas phase was performed using the hybrid density functional B3LYP and QCISD(T) methods with the 6-311+G(d,p) and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The results show that there are three possible reaction pathways that involve four isomers, seven transition structures, and two possible products for the reaction of aluminum with water. The two most favorable reaction pathways were found, whose intermediates and products agreed quite well with experimental results. The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy change of the reaction between AI and H2O at 298 and 2000 K were calculated. Some results are also in good agreement with the previous calculations or experimental results.

  9. The underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures: A case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Dayong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China); Lin, Zhifen, E-mail: lzhifen@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhou, Xianghong [Department of Public Management, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yin, Daqiang [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Intracellular chemical reaction of chemical mixtures is one of the main reasons that cause synergistic or antagonistic effects. However, it still remains unclear what the influencing factors on the intracellular chemical reaction are, and how they influence on the toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures. To reveal this underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures, a case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed, and both their joint effects and mixture toxicity were observed. Then series of two-step linear regressions were performed to describe the relationships between joint effects, the expected additive toxicities and descriptors of individual chemicals (including concentrations, binding affinity to receptors, octanol/water partition coefficients). Based on the quantitative relationships, the underlying joint toxicological mechanisms were revealed. The result shows that, for mixtures with their joint effects resulting from intracellular chemical reaction, their underlying toxicological mechanism depends on not only their interaction with target proteins, but also their transmembrane actions and their concentrations. In addition, two generic points of toxicological mechanism were proposed including the influencing factors on intracellular chemical reaction and the difference of the toxicological mechanism between single reactive chemicals and their mixtures. This study provided an insight into the understanding of the underlying toxicological mechanism for chemical mixtures with intracellular chemical reaction. - Highlights: • Joint effects of nitriles and aldehydes at non-equitoxic ratios were determined. • A novel descriptor, ligand–receptor interaction energy (E{sub binding}), was employed. • Quantitative relationships for mixtures were developed based on a novel descriptor. • The underlying toxic mechanism was revealed based on quantitative relationships. • Two

  10. Changes in mechanical and chemical wood properties by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.schnabel@fh-salzburg.ac.at [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); Huber, Hermann [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); Grünewald, Tilman A. [BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Physics and Materials Science, Peter Jordan Straße 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Petutschnigg, Alexander [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Konrad Lorenzstraße 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Changes in wood due to electron beam irradiations (EBI) were evaluated. • Wood components undergo different altering mechanisms due to the irradiation. • Chemical reactions in wood lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood. - Abstract: This study deals with the influence of various electron beam irradiation (EBI) dosages on the Brinell hardness of Norway spruce. The results of the hardness measurements and the FT-IR spectroscopic analysis show different effects of the EBI at dosages of 25, 50, 100 and 200 kGy. It was assumed that the lignin and carbohydrates undergo different altering mechanisms due to the EBI treatment. New cleavage products and condensation reactions of lignin and carbohydrates lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood samples. These results provide a useful basis for further investigations on the changes in wood chemistry and material properties due to electron beam irradiations.

  11. Relativistic thermodynamics of irreversible processes I. Heat conduction, diffusion, viscous flow and chemical reactions; formal part

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, G.A.; Groot, S.R. de; Mazur, P.

    1953-01-01

    The relativistic thermodynamics of irreversible processes is developed for an isotropic mixture in which heat conduction, diffusion, viscous flow, chemical reactions and their cross-phenomena may occur. The four-vectors, representing the relative flows of matter, are defined in such a way that, in t

  12. Using Drawing Technology to Assess Students' Visualizations of Chemical Reaction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Quintana, Chris; Krajcik, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how students used a drawing tool to visualize their ideas of chemical reaction processes. We interviewed 30 students using thinking-aloud and retrospective methods and provided them with a drawing tool. We identified four types of connections the students made as they used the tool: drawing on existing knowledge,…

  13. Mapping Students' Modes of Reasoning When Thinking about Chemical Reactions Used to Make a Desired Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, M. L.; Talanquer, V.

    2016-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to analyze the complexity of students' explanations about how and why chemical reactions happen in terms of the types of causal connections students built between expressed concepts and ideas. We were particularly interested in characterizing differences in the types of reasoning applied by students with…

  14. Turkish, Indian, and American Chemistry Textbooks Use of Inscriptions to Represent "Types of Chemical Reactions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sevgi; Sinha, Somnath; Izci, Kemal; Volkmann, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate inscriptions used in "Types of Chemical Reactions" topic in Turkish, Indian, and American chemistry textbooks. We investigated both the types of inscriptions and how they were used in textbooks to support learning. A conceptual analysis method was employed to determine how those textbooks use…

  15. Facilitating High School Students' Use of Multiple Representations to Describe and Explain Simple Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    This study involved the evaluation of the efficacy of a planned instructional program to facilitate understanding of the macroscopic, submicroscopic and symbolic representational systems when describing and explaining chemical reactions by sixty-five Grade 9 students in a Singapore secondary school. A two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument…

  16. Quantitative global studies of reactomes and metabolomes using a vectorial representation of reactions and chemical compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triviño Juan C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global studies of the protein repertories of organisms are providing important information on the characteristics of the protein space. Many of these studies entail classification of the protein repertory on the basis of structure and/or sequence similarities. The situation is different for metabolism. Because there is no good way of measuring similarities between chemical reactions, there is a barrier to the development of global classifications of "metabolic space" and subsequent studies comparable to those done for protein sequences and structures. Results In this work, we propose a vectorial representation of chemical reactions, which allows them to be compared and classified. In this representation, chemical compounds, reactions and pathways may be represented in the same vectorial space. We show that the representation of chemical compounds reflects their physicochemical properties and can be used for predictive purposes. We use the vectorial representations of reactions to perform a global classification of the reactome of the model organism E. coli. Conclusions We show that this unsupervised clustering results in groups of enzymes more coherent in biological terms than equivalent groupings obtained from the EC hierarchy. This hierarchical clustering produces an optimal set of 21 groups which we analyzed for their biological meaning.

  17. Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Text-Oriented Instruction on Students' Understanding of Energy in Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastan, Ozgecan; Yalcinkaya, Eylem; Boz, Yezdan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of conceptual change text instruction (CCT) in the context of energy in chemical reactions. The subjects of the study were 60, 10th grade students at a high school, who were in two different classes and taught by the same teacher. One of the classes was randomly selected as the experimental…

  18. The Effective Concepts on Students' Understanding of Chemical Reactions and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz, Yildizay; Tarhan, Leman

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the basic concepts related to the unit of "Chemical Reactions and Energy" and the sub-concepts underlying for meaningful learning of the unit and to investigate the effectiveness of them on students' learning achievements. For this purpose, the basic concepts of the unit were…

  19. Chemical equilibrium and reaction modeling of arsenic and selenium in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical processes and soil factors that affect the concentrations of As and Se in soil solution were discussed. Both elements occur in two redox states differing in toxicity and reactivity. Methylation and volatilization reactions occur in soils and can act as detoxification pathways. Precip...

  20. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Schaft, Arjan van der

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we

  1. Variable elimination in chemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, C.

    2012-01-01

    We consider chemical reaction networks taken with mass-action kinetics. The steady states of such a system are solutions to a system of polynomial equations. Even for small systems the task of finding the solutions is daunting. We develop an algebraic framework and procedure for linear elimination...

  2. Real-time studies of chemical reactions in lab-on-a-chip devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brivio, Monica

    2005-01-01

    The realization of a lab-on-a-chip system in which chemical reactions are carried out in a continuous flow mode and monitored on-line by a suitable analytical technique is the main topic of this thesis. Two types of a lab-on-a-chip were realized, both using mass spectrometry (MS) as the on-line dete

  3. Water effect on peroxy radical measurement by chemical amplification: Experimental determination and chemical mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Bin; LIU Lu; CHAO YuTao; WANG ZhuQing; YANG HongYan

    2008-01-01

    The water effect on peroxy radical measurement by chemical amplification was determined experi-mentally for HO2 and HO2+OH, respectively at room temperature (298+9) K and atmospheric pressure (1×105 Pa). No significant difference in water effect was observed with the type of radicals. A theoretical study of the reaction of HO2. H2O adduct with NO was performed using density functional theory at CCSD(T)/6-311 G(2d, 2p)//B3LYPI6-311 G(2d, 2p) level of theory. It was found that the primary reaction channel for the reaction is HO2. H2O+NO→HNO3+H2O (R4a). On the basis of the theoretical study, the rate constant for (R4a) was calculated using Polyrate Version 8.02 program. The fitted Arrenhnius equation for (R4a) is k=5.49×107 T1.03exp(-14798/T) between 200 and 2000 K. A chemical model in-corporated with (R4a) was used to simulate the water effect. The water effect curve obtained by the model is in accordance with that of the experiment, suggesting that the water effect is probably caused mainly by (R4a).

  4. Water effect on peroxy radical measurement by chemical amplification: Experimental determination and chemical mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The water effect on peroxy radical measurement by chemical amplification was determined experimentally for HO2 and HO2+OH, respectively at room temperature (298±2) K and atmospheric pressure (1×105 Pa). No significant difference in water effect was observed with the type of radicals. A theoretical study of the reaction of HO2·H2O adduct with NO was performed using density functional theory at CCSD(T)/6-311 G(2d, 2p)//B3LYP/6-311 G(2d, 2p) level of theory. It was found that the primary reaction channel for the reaction is HO2·H2O+NO→HNO3+H2O (R4a). On the basis of the theoretical study, the rate constant for (R4a) was calculated using Polyrate Version 8.02 program. The fitted Arrenhnius equation for (R4a) is k = 5.49×107 T 1.03exp(?14798/T) between 200 and 2000 K. A chemical model incorporated with (R4a) was used to simulate the water effect. The water effect curve obtained by the model is in accordance with that of the experiment, suggesting that the water effect is probably caused mainly by (R4a).

  5. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-01

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration.

  6. A Quantum Chemical Exploration of the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Peter; Norrby, Per-Ola; Martin, Ivar;

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) reaction has been investigated using high level quantum mechanical calculations on a realistic model system. The solvation contribution has been evaluated using the PCM/DIR method. In the free, anionic system, the rate determining step was found ...

  7. New mechanism of spiral wave initiation in a reaction-diffusion-mechanics system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the "classical vulnerable zone." Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the "classical," and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the "classical vulnerable zone." We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback.

  8. Quantum chemical study on insertion and abstraction reaction of dichlorocarbene with methyl alcohol and methyl mercaptan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-Feng; ZHU Yuan-Cheng; LI Hui-Xue; LIU Xin-Wen; LU Xiao-Quan

    2009-01-01

    The Insertion and abstraction reaction mechanisms of singlet and triplet CCl2 with CH3MH (M=O, S) have been studied by using the DFT, NBO and AIM methods. The geometries of reactions, the transition state and products were completely optimized by B3LYP/6-311G(d, p). All the energy of the species was obtained at the CCSD(T)/6-311G(d, p) level. The calculated results indicated that the major pathways of the reaction were obtained on the singlet potential energy surface. The singlet CCl2 can not only trigger the insertion reaction with C-H and M-H in four pathways, by which the products P1 [CH3OCHCl2, reaction I (1)], P3[Cl2HCCH2OH, reaction Ⅰ(2)], PS[CH3SCHCl2, reaction Ⅱ(1)] and P7[Cl2HCCH2SH, reac-tion Ⅱ(2)] are produced respectively, but also abstract M-H, resulting P4 [CH2O+CH2Cl2, reaction Ⅰ(3)] and PS[CH2S+CH2Cl2, reaction Ⅱ (3)]. In addition, the important geometries in domain pathways have been studied by AIM and NBO theories.

  9. Effect of mechanical activation on structure changes and reactivity in further chemical modification of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yanjuan; Hu, Huayu; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei; Chen, Dong; Huang, Kai; Huang, Aimin; Qin, Xingzhen; Feng, Zhenfei

    2016-10-01

    Lignin was treated by mechanical activation (MA) in a customized stirring ball mill, and the structure and reactivity in further esterification were studied. The chemical structure and morphology of MA-treated lignin and the esterified products were analyzed by chemical analysis combined with UV/vis spectrometer, FTIR,NMR, SEM and particle size analyzer. The results showed that MA contributed to the increase of aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups but the decrease of methoxyl groups. Moreover, MA led to the decrease of particle size and the increase of specific surface area and roughness of surface in lignin. The reactivity of lignin was enhanced significantly for the increase of hydroxyl content and the improvement of mass transfer in chemical reaction caused by the changes of molecular structure and morphological structure. The process of MA is green and simple, and is an effective method for enhancing the reactivity of lignin. PMID:27344951

  10. Stability of a laminar premixed supersonic free shear layer with chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Pai, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of a two-dimensional compressible supersonic flow in the wake of a flat plate is discussed. The fluid is a multi-species mixture which is undergoing finite rate chemical reactions. The spatial stability of an infinitesimal disturbance in the fluid is considered. Numerical solutions of the eigenvalue stability equations for both reactive and nonreactive supersonic flows are presented and discussed. The chemical reactions have significant influence on the stability behavior. For instance, a neutral eigenvalue is observed near the freestream Mach number of 2.375 for the nonreactive case, but disappears when the reaction is turned on. For reactive flows, the eigenvalues are not very dependent on the free stream Mach number.

  11. Chemical cleavage reactions of DNA on solid support: application in mutation detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotton Richard GH

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conventional solution-phase Chemical Cleavage of Mismatch (CCM method is time-consuming, as the protocol requires purification of DNA after each reaction step. This paper describes a new version of CCM to overcome this problem by immobilizing DNA on silica solid supports. Results DNA test samples were loaded on to silica beads and the DNA bound to the solid supports underwent chemical modification reactions with KMnO4 (potassium permanganate and hydroxylamine in 3M TEAC (tetraethylammonium chloride solution. The resulting modified DNA was then simultaneously cleaved by piperidine and removed from the solid supports to afford DNA fragments without the requirement of DNA purification between reaction steps. Conclusions The new solid-phase version of CCM is a fast, cost-effective and sensitive method for detection of mismatches and mutations.

  12. Use of Site-Specifically Tethered Chemical Nucleases to Study Macromolecular Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Srabani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a complex macromolecular reaction multiple changes in molecular conformation and interactions with ligands may occur. X-ray crystallography may provide only a limited set of snapshots of these changes. Solution methods can augment such structural information to provide a more complete picture of a macromolecular reaction. We analyzed the changes in protein conformation and protein:nucleic acid interactions which occur during transcription initiation by using a chemical nuclease tethered to cysteines introduced site-specifically into the RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 (T7 RNAP. Changes in cleavage patterns as the polymerase steps through transcription reveal a series of structural transitions which mediate transcription initiation. Cleavage by tethered chemical nucleases is seen to be a powerful method for revealing the conformational dynamics of macromolecular reactions, and has certain advantages over cross-linking or energy transfer approaches.

  13. Chemical reaction path modeling of ore deposition in Mississippi Valley-type Pb-Zn deposits of the Ozark region, US midcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G.S.; Leach, D.L.; Hofstra, A.H.; Landis, G.P.; Rowan, E.L.; Viets, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Ozark region of the US midcontinent is host to a number of Mississippi Valley-type districts. This study uses chemical speciation and reaction path calculations, based on quantitative chemical analyses of fluid inclusions, to constrain likely hydrothermal brine compositions and to determine which precipitation mechanisms are consistent with the hydrothermal mineral assemblages observed regionally and locally within each Mississippi Valley-type district in the Ozark region. -from Authors

  14. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yiteng [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kais, Sabre [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Berman, Gennady Petrovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.

  15. Nonequilibrium thermodynamic formalism of nonlinear chemical reaction systems with Waage-Guldberg's law of mass action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Macroscopic entropy production rate σ (tot) in the general nonlinear isothermal chemical reaction system with mass action kinetics is decomposed into a free energy dissipation rate and a house-keeping heat dissipation rate: σ (tot) =σ (fd) +σ (hk) ; σ (fd) = -d A /d t , where A is a generalized free energy function. This yields a novel nonequilibrium free energy balance equation d A /d t = -σ (tot) +σ (hk) , which is on a par with celebrated entropy balance equation d S /d t =σ (tot) +η (ex) where η (ex) is the rate of entropy exchange with the environment. For kinetic systems with complex balance, σ (fd) and σ (hk) are the macroscopic limits of stochastic free energy dissipation rate and house-keeping heat dissipation rate, which are both nonnegative, in the Delbrück-Gillespie description of the stochastic chemical kinetics. A full kinetic and thermodynamic theory of chemical reaction systems that transcends mesoscopic and macroscopic levels emerges.

  16. Chemical kinetic analysis of hydrogen-air ignition and reaction times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, R. C.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An anaytical study of hydrogen air kinetics was performed. Calculations were made over a range of pressure from 0.2 to 4.0 atm, temperatures from 850 to 2000 K, and mixture equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 2.0. The finite rate chemistry model included 60 reactions in 20 species of the H2-O2-N2 system. The calculations also included an assessment of how small amounts of the chemicals H2O, NOx, H2O2, and O3 in the initial mixture affect ignition and reaction times, and how the variation of the third body efficiency of H2O relative of N2 in certain key reactions may affect reaction time. The results indicate that for mixture equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7, ignition times are nearly constant; however, the presence of H2O and NO can have significant effects on ignition times, depending on the mixture temperature. Reaction time is dominantly influenced by pressure but is nearly independent of initial temperature, equivalence ratio, and the addition of chemicals. Effects of kinetics on reaction at supersonic combustor conditions are discussed.

  17. Effect of Chemical Reactions on the Hydrologic Properties of Fractured and Rubbelized Glass Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of geological media, such as porosity, permeability and dispersivity, is critical to many natural and engineered sub-surface systems. Influence of glass corrosion (precipitation and dissolution) reactions on fractured and rubbelized (crushed) forms HAN28 and LAWBP1, two candidate waste glass forms for a proposed immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) disposal facility at the Hanford, WA site, was investigated. Flow and tracer transport experiments were conducted using fractured and rubbelized forms, before and after subjecting them to corrosion using Vapor Hydration Testing (VHT) at 200 C temperature and 200 psig pressure, causing the precipitation of alteration products. Data were analyzed using analytical expressions and CXTFIT, a transport parameter optimization code, for the estimation of the hydrologic characteristics before and after VHT. It was found that glass reactions significantly influence the hydrologic properties of ILAW glass media. Hydrologic properties of rubbelized glass decreased due to precipitation reactions, whereas those of fractured glass media increased due to reaction which led to unconfined expansion of fracture aperture. The results are unique and useful to better understand the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of fractured and rubbelized stony media in general and glass media in particular

  18. Chemical reactions at metallic and metal/semiconductor interfaces stimulated by pulsed laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, E. J.; Caudano, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer Al/Sb thin films have been evaporated on GaSb single crystals in ultra-high vacuum and pulsed-laser irradiated in-situ above the energy density threshold for surface melting. Superficial and interfacial chemical reactions have been characterized in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy; and later, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical reaction between the Al and Sb films is considered as a model reaction for laser-assisted synthesis of high-purity intermetallic compounds. The observation of a strong interfacial reaction between the melted film and the substrate is also a subject of great concern for optical data recording and laser alloying of ohmic contacts on semiconductors. We show that a suitable choice of the substrate and adding a low surface tension element into the metallic film can improve its stability during melting, and prevent inhomogeneous reaction and formation of holes, cracks and particles. Finally, other solutions are suggested to improve the control of these reactions.

  19. Coupling between chemical degradation and mechanical behaviour of leached concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is in the context of the long term behavior of concrete employed in radioactive waste disposal. The objective is to study the coupled chemo-mechanical modelling of concrete. In the first part of this contribution, experimental investigations are described where the effects of the calcium leaching process of concrete on its mechanical properties are highlighted. An accelerated method has been chosen to perform this leaching process by using an ammonium nitrate solution. In the second part, we present a coupled phenomenological chemo-mechanical model that represents the degradation of concrete materials. On one hand, the chemical behavior is described by the simplified calcium leaching approach of cement paste and mortar. Then a homogenization approach using the asymptotic development is presented to take into account the influence of the presence of aggregates in concrete. And on the other hand, the mechanical part of the modelling is given. Here continuum damage mechanics is used to describe the mechanical degradation of concrete. The growth of inelastic strains observed during the mechanical tests is describes by means of a plastic like model. The model is established on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes framework. The coupled nonlinear problem at hand is addressed within the context of the finite element method. Finally, numerical simulations are compared with the experimental results for validation. (author)

  20. Identifying Enclosed Chemical Reaction and Dynamics at the Molecular Level Using Shell-Isolated Miniaturized Plasmonic Liquid Marble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuemei; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Lee, Yih Hong; Hao, Wei; Liu, Yejing; Phang, In Yee; Li, Shuzhou; Ling, Xing Yi

    2016-04-21

    Current microscale tracking of chemical kinetics is limited to destructive ex situ methods. Here we utilize Ag nanocube-based plasmonic liquid marble (PLM) microreactor for in situ molecular-level identification of reaction dynamics. We exploit the ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability imparted by the plasmonic shell to unravel the mechanism and kinetics of aryl-diazonium surface grafting reaction in situ, using just a 2-μL reaction droplet. This reaction is a robust approach to generate covalently functionalized metallic surfaces, yet its kinetics remain unknown to date. Experiments and simulations jointly uncover a two-step sequential grafting process. An initial Langmuir chemisorption of sulfonicbenzene diazonium (dSB) salt onto Ag surfaces forms an intermediate sulfonicbenzene monolayer (Ag-SB), followed by subsequent autocatalytic multilayer growth of Ag-SB3. Kinetic rate constants reveal 19-fold faster chemisorption than multilayer growth. Our ability to precisely decipher molecular-level reaction dynamics creates opportunities to develop more efficient processes in synthetic chemistry and nanotechnology. PMID:27050645

  1. Harvesting candidate genes responsible for serious adverse drug reactions from a chemical-protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying genetic factors responsible for serious adverse drug reaction (SADR is of critical importance to personalized medicine. However, genome-wide association studies are hampered due to the lack of case-control samples, and the selection of candidate genes is limited by the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms of SADRs. We hypothesize that drugs causing the same type of SADR might share a common mechanism by targeting unexpectedly the same SADR-mediating protein. Hence we propose an approach of identifying the common SADR-targets through constructing and mining an in silico chemical-protein interactome (CPI, a matrix of binding strengths among 162 drug molecules known to cause at least one type of SADR and 845 proteins. Drugs sharing the same SADR outcome were also found to possess similarities in their CPI profiles towards this 845 protein set. This methodology identified the candidate gene of sulfonamide-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN: all nine sulfonamides that cause TEN were found to bind strongly to MHC I (Cw*4, whereas none of the 17 control drugs that do not cause TEN were found to bind to it. Through an insight into the CPI, we found the Y116S substitution of MHC I (B*5703 enhances the unexpected binding of abacavir to its antigen presentation groove, which explains why B*5701, not B*5703, is the risk allele of abacavir-induced hypersensitivity. In conclusion, SADR targets and the patient-specific off-targets could be identified through a systematic investigation of the CPI, generating important hypotheses for prospective experimental validation of the candidate genes.

  2. Reaction mechanisms for the synthesis of the heaviest elements from heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review paper concerns fusion reactions with light heavy-ions, cold fusion, transfer reactions using light heavy-ions or heavy ions. In two appendices, methods for the separation and detection of nuclides in the domain of heaviest elements are described and a comment on the discovery of the element 104 is given. 51 figs., 10 tabs., 335 refs

  3. Generation Mechanism of Deferoxamine Radical by Tyrosine-Tyrosinase Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Mika; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide radical formations of deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) that is used clinically to treat iron-overload patients was examined by a tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction system as models of the H-atom transfer or proton-coupled electron transfer. When DFX was exposed to the tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction, nine-line ESR spectrum (g = 2.0063, hfcc; aN = 0.78 mT, aH(2) = 0.63 mT) was detected, indicating that the oxidation of DFX leads to a nitroxide radical. The signal intensity of the DFX radical increased dependently on the concentrations of tyrosine and tyrosinase. The amounts of DMPO-OH spin adducts via the tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction declined with DFX. Furthermore, mass spectra of an extra removed from the tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction mixture showed that the enzyme reactions might not be degradations of DFX. Therefore, there might be two types of DFX reaction passways, which could be through an internal electron transfer from tyrosine and hydrogen absorptions by ·OH directly.

  4. The Kabachnik–Fields Reaction: Mechanism and Synthetic Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Keglevich

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Kabachnik–Fields (phospha-Mannich reaction involving the condensation of primary or secondary amines, oxo compounds (aldehydes and ketones and >P(OH species, especially dialkyl phosphites, represents a good choice for the synthesis of α-aminophosphonates that are of significant importance due to their biological activity. In general, these three-component reactions may take place via an imine or an α-hydroxy-phosphonate intermediate. The monitoring of a few Kabachnik–Fields reactions by in situ Fourier transform IR spectroscopy has indicated the involvement of the imine intermediate that was also justified by theoretical calculations. The Kabachnik–Fields reaction was extended to >P(OH species, comprising cyclic phosphites, acyclic and cyclic H-phosphinates, as well as secondary phosphine oxides. On the other hand, heterocyclic amines were also used to prepare new α-amino phosphonic, phosphinic and phosphine oxide derivatives. In most cases, the synthesis under solvent-free microwave (MW conditions is the method of choice. It was proved that, in the cases studied by us, there was no need for the use of any catalyst. Moreover, it can be said that sophisticated and environmentally unfriendly catalysts suggested are completely unnecessary under MW conditions. Finally, the double Kabachnik–Fields reaction has made available bis(phosphonomethylamines, bis(phosphinoxidomethylamines and related species. The bis(phosphinoxidomethylamines serve as precursors for bisphosphines that furnish ring platinum complexes on reaction with dichlorodibenzonitriloplatinum.

  5. Modeling Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Couple Stress Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张朝辉; 雒建斌; 温诗铸

    2004-01-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a manufacturing process used to achieve high levels of global and local planarity.Currently, the slurries used in CMP usually contain nanoscale particles to accelerate the removal ratio and to optimize the planarity, whose rheological properties can no longer be accurately modeled with Newtonian fluids.The Reynolds equation, including the couple stress effects, was derived in this paper.The equation describes the mechanism to solve the CMP lubrication equation with the couple stress effects.The effects on load and moments resulting from the various parameters, such as pivot height, roll angle, and pitch angle, were subsequently simulated.The results show that the couple stress can provide higher load and angular moments.This study sheds some lights into the mechanism of the CMP process.

  6. The effect of a mechanical force on quantum reaction rate: quantum Bell formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2011-11-21

    The purpose of this note is to derive a quantum-mechanical analog of Bell's formula, which describes the sensitivity of a chemical reaction to a mechanical pulling force. According to this formula, the reaction rate depends exponentially on the force f, i.e., k(f) ~ exp(f/f(c)), where the force scale f(c) is estimated as the thermal energy k(B)T divided by a distance a between the reactant and transition states along the pulling coordinate. Here I use instanton theory to show that, at low temperatures where quantum tunneling is dominant, this force scale becomes f(c) ~ ℏω/a (in the limit where frictional damping is absent) or f(c) ~ ℏτ(-1)/a (in the strong damping limit). Here ω is a characteristic vibration frequency along the pulling coordinate and τ is a characteristic relaxation time in the reactant state. That is, unlike the classical case where f(c) is unaffected by dissipation, this force scale becomes friction dependent in the quantum limit. I further derive higher-order corrections in the force dependence of the rate, describe generalizations to many degrees of freedom, and discuss connection to other quantum rate theories. PMID:22112071

  7. Kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in Li/SOCl2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D.; Frank, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    Work is described that was designed to determine the kinetic constants necessary to extrapolate kinetic data on Li/SOCl2 cells over the temperature range from 25 to 75 C. A second objective was to characterize as far as possible the chemical reactions that occur in the cells since these reactions may be important in understanding the potential hazards of these cells. The kinetics of the corrosion processes in undischarged Li/SOCl2 cells were determined and separated according to their occurrence at the anode and cathode; the effects that switching the current on and off has on the corrosion reactions was determined; and the effects of discharge state on the kinetics of the corrosion process were found. A thermodynamic analysis of the current-producing reactions in the cell was done and is included.

  8. Middle atmosphere heating by exothermic chemical reactions involving odd-hydrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Solomon, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The rate of heating which occurs in the middle atmosphere due to four exothermic reactions involving members of the odd-hydrogen family is calculated. The following reactions are considered: O + OH yields O2 + H; H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M; H + O3 yields OH + O2; and O + HO2 yields OH + O2. It is shown that the heating rates due to these reactions rival the oxygen-related heating rates conventionally considered in middle-atmosphere models. The conversion of chemical potential energy into molecular translational energy (heat) by these odd-hydrogen reactions is shown to be a significant energy source in the middle atmosphere that has not been previously considered.

  9. A modified next reaction method for simulating chemical systems with time dependent propensities and delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David F

    2007-12-01

    Chemical reaction systems with a low to moderate number of molecules are typically modeled as discrete jump Markov processes. These systems are oftentimes simulated with methods that produce statistically exact sample paths such as the Gillespie algorithm or the next reaction method. In this paper we make explicit use of the fact that the initiation times of the reactions can be represented as the firing times of independent, unit rate Poisson processes with internal times given by integrated propensity functions. Using this representation we derive a modified next reaction method and, in a way that achieves efficiency over existing approaches for exact simulation, extend it to systems with time dependent propensities as well as to systems with delays.

  10. Review and analysis of high temperature chemical reactions and the effect of non-equilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical reactions at high temperatures have been considered extensively because of their importance to the heating effects on re-entry of space vehicles. Data on these reactions however, are not abundant and even when found there are discrepancies in data collected by various investigators. In particular, data for recombination reactions are calculated from the dissociation reactions or vice versa through the equilibrium constant. This involves the use of the principle of detailed balancing. This principle is discussed in reference to conditions where it is valid as well as to those where it is not valid. Related topics that merit further study or for which applicable information was available are briefly mentioned in an appendix to this report.

  11. The potential role of magmatic gases in the genesis of Illinois- Kentucky fluorspar deposits: implications from chemical reaction path modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G.S.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Rowan, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    Presents results of reaction path calculations using the chemical speciation and reaction path program SOLVEQ and CHILLER to model possible fluorite deposition mechanisms in the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district. The results indicate that the fluids responsible for Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar mineralization were most likely quite acidic (pH < 4) and rich in fluorine in order to produce the fluorite-rich, dolomite-poor mineral assemblages and extensive dissolution of host limestones. A possible source for the acid and fluorine may have been HF-rich gases which were expelled from alkalic magmas and then incorporated by migrating basinal brines. An analysis of the geologic setting of other fluorite deposits and districts worldwide suggests that involvement of magmatic gases is probable for many of these districts as well. -from Authors

  12. Multimass thermal desorption spectroscopy as a monitoring device for chemical reaction products

    OpenAIRE

    Zagatta, Gunther; Müller, H; Böwering, N.; Heinzmann, Ulrich

    1994-01-01

    To observe the products of surface reaction mechanisms we combined a standard quadrupole mass spectrometer featuring high-speed scanning options with fast data acquisition and a computer-controlled sample heating system. This combination served to obtain a general view (like a 'fingerprint') of the reaction occurring on a Pt(100) crystal upon heating the adsorbate covered surface, as well as to allow for a detailed analysis of the gas compounds leaving the surface within a single measurement....

  13. Ultracold chemical reactions of a single Rydberg atom in a dense gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schlagmüller, Michael; Engel, Felix; Kleinbach, Kathrin S; Böttcher, Fabian; Westphal, Karl M; Gaj, Anita; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H

    2016-01-01

    Within a dense environment ($\\rho \\approx 10^{14}\\,$atoms/cm$^3$) at ultracold temperatures ($T 140$ compared to $1\\,\\mu\\text{s}$ at $n=90$. In addition, a second observed reaction mechanism, namely Rb$_2^+$ molecule formation, was studied. Both reaction products are equally probable for $n=40$ but the fraction of Rb$_2^+$ created drops to below 10$\\,$% for $n\\ge90$.

  14. Structrue and Characteristics of Mesoporous Silica Synthesized in Acid Medium and Its Reaction Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Jia-heng; ZHAO Jun; CHEN Yong-xi; GUO Li-ping; LIU Dan

    2004-01-01

    Structrue and pore characteristics of the mesoporous silica synthesized in acid medium were studied by means of XRD, HRTEM, BET, FT-IR, DSC-TGA, and the reaction mechanism was also investigated deeply. The results show that mesopores in the sample possess hexagonal arrays obviously, whereas the structure of silica matrix is amorphous. The results also show that the acting mode of silica and CTMA+ inside the mesopores was chemical bonding force. The structure of mesoporous silica was mainly dependent on the aggregational condition of micelle of CTMA+ as well as their liquid-crystallized status. In addition, condensation and dehydration of silicate radicals were accompanied in the process of calcination, which resulted in the mesoporous structure ordered in local range and the pore sizes largening.

  15. Alkene Cleavage Catalysed by Heme and Nonheme Enzymes: Reaction Mechanisms and Biocatalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco G. Mutti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative cleavage of alkenes is classically performed by chemical methods, although they display several drawbacks. Ozonolysis requires harsh conditions (−78°C, for a safe process and reducing reagents in a molar amount, whereas the use of poisonous heavy metals such as Cr, Os, or Ru as catalysts is additionally plagued by low yield and selectivity. Conversely, heme and nonheme enzymes can catalyse the oxidative alkene cleavage at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in an aqueous buffer, showing excellent chemo- and regioselectivities in certain cases. This paper focuses on the alkene cleavage catalysed by iron cofactor-dependent enzymes encompassing the reaction mechanisms (in case where it is known and the application of these enzymes in biocatalysis.

  16. Preparation of nanometer complex oxide of CexZr1-xO2 by mechanically activated solid state chemical reaction%机械力活化固相化学反应法制备CexZr1-xO2纳米复合氧化物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑育英; 黄慧民; 黄世炎; 孙明

    2008-01-01

    Nanometer cerium-zirconium oxide solution Ce1-x ZrxO2 was synthesized by mechanically activated solid state re-action at middle-low temperatures, with Ce2(CO3)3, ZrOC12-8H2O and H2C2O4.2H2O as raw materials. The crystal structureand microstructure of the nanometer Ce1-xZrxO2 were studied with X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electronmicroscope (TEM). The results show that the product is single-cubic-phase solid solution with an average crystal size 19.64nm. In this article, the influence of surface active agent is also evaluated. Mechanically activated solid state reaction for thepreparation of Ce1-xZrxO2 is a new technique of green chemistry without solvent and waste.

  17. Method of Investigating Fast Chemical Reactions Based on μ+-Meson Depolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a μ+-meson is slowed down in a substance the hydrogenoid muonium atom formed enters into chemical reactions similar to the corresponding interactions of atomic hydrogen. The observed angular distribution effect of the meson decay is associated with the chemical state of the meson. The absolute constants of the rate of the chemical reactions are determined in relation to the known nuclear physical decay characteristics. The method is independent of the state of aggregation of the substance and can be applied at essentially any temperature. Quantitative identification of the classes of the substances obtained (radical and molecular products are determined separately) is possible, as is individual determination based on variations in the precession of the system of spins in the magnetic field using a number of diatomic molecules as an example. The authors consider the possibility of studying the structural parameters of the radicals and molecules, and of estimating the lifetime of the short-lived intermediate compounds. The elementary steps in fast chemical reactions are investigated. (author)

  18. Mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction: US interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in LMFBR fuel pins are reviewed and examined in terms of in-pile and out-of-pile data. From this examination several factors are identified which may govern the occurrence of localized deep intergranular penetrations of Type-316SS cladding. Using a plausible mechanistic hypothesis for FCCI, first steps have been taken towards developing a quantitative, physically-meaningful, mathematical method of predicting cladding wastage in operating fuel pins. Both kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of FCCI are considered in the development of this prediction method, together with a fuel chemistry model that describes the evolution of thermochemical conditions at the fuel-cladding gap. On the basis of results from recent fuel pin and laboratory tests a thermal transport mechanism has been proposed to explain the thermal gradient-induced migration of Fe, Cr, and Ni from cladding into the fuel. This mechanism involves chemical transport of the metallic cladding components (as tellurides) in liquid Cs-Te. (author)

  19. Nanostructured palladium tailored via carbonyl chemical route towards oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical Abstract: Mass-depending morphologies of nanostructured Palladium obtained via the carbonyl chemical route. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Mass-depending morphology was observed in nanostructured palladium supported on carbon prepared by the carbonyl chemical route. •The Morphological effect of carbon supported Pd was investigated towards ORR. -- Abstract: Carbon supported palladium nanostructures were synthesized via the carbonyl chemical route. Compared with nanostructured platinum, prepared via carbonyl chemical route, Pd nanomaterials showed mass-loading morphology, whereas particle size and morphology of Pt nanostructures was constant. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on nanostructured Pd, with different morphology in both acid and alkaline medium was investigated. A relationship, based on X-ray diffraction structural analysis pattern, transmission electron microscope, with the Pd morphological effect on ORR activity was identified

  20. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.