WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical physics

  1. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  2. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series presents contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study o

  3. Advances in chemical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  4. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  5. Chemical Physics Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Munn, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a guide to the chemical physics major. The scope of chemical physics is presented, along with the general features of course contents and possible course structures. This information was derived from a survey of British universities and colleges offering undergraduate degree courses in chemical physics. (BB)

  6. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  7. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  8. Chemical Physics Summer School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-06-28

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Physics Summer School was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  9. Stochastic processes in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shuler, K E

    2009-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics.

  10. Frontiers in Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowlan, Pamela Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-02

    These are slides dealing with frontiers in chemical physics. The following topics are covered: Time resolving chemistry with ultrashort pulses in the 0.1-40 THz spectral range; Example: Mid-infrared absorption spectrum of the intermediate state CH2OO; Tracking reaction dynamics through changes in the spectra; Single-shot measurement of the mid-IR absorption dynamics; Applying 2D coherent mid-IR spectroscopy to learn more about transition states; Time resolving chemical reactions at a catalysis using mid-IR and THz pulses; Studying topological insulators requires a surface sensitive probe; Nonlinear phonon dynamics in Bi2Se3; THz-pump, SHG-probe as a surface sensitive coherent 2D spectroscopy; Nanometer and femtosecond spatiotemporal resolution mid-IR spectroscopy; Coherent two-dimensional THz/mid-IR spectroscopy with 10nm spatial resolution; Pervoskite oxides as catalysts; Functionalized graphene for catalysis; Single-shot spatiotemporal measurements; Spatiotemporal pulse measurement; Intense, broad-band THz/mid-IR generation with organic crystals.

  11. Chemical Physics Electrons and Excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, Sven

    2012-01-01

    A full understanding of modern chemistry is impossible without quantum theory. Since the advent of quantum mechanics in 1925, a number of chemical phenomena have been explained, such as electron transfer, excitation energy transfer, and other phenomena in photochemistry and photo-physics. Chemical bonds can now be accurately calculated with the help of a personal computer. Addressing students of theoretical and quantum chemistry and their counterparts in physics, Chemical Physics: Electrons and Excitations introduces chemical physics as a gateway to fields such as photo physics, solid-state ph

  12. Semiclassical Methods in Chemical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the role of semiclassical theory in chemical physics both as a computational method and conceptual framework for interpreting quantum mechanical experiments and calculations. Topics covered include energy wells and eigenvalues, scattering, statistical mechanics and electronically nonadiabiatic processes. (JM)

  13. Physical Chemistry Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Trimm, Harold H

    2011-01-01

    Physical chemistry covers diverse topics, from biochemistry to materials properties to the development of quantum computers. Physical chemistry applies physics and math to problems that interest chemists, biologists, and engineers. Physical chemists use theoretical constructs and mathematical computations to understand chemical properties and describe the behavior of molecular and condensed matter. Their work involves manipulations of data as well as materials. Physical chemistry entails extensive work with sophisticated instrumentation and equipment as well as state-of-the-art computers. This

  14. Protection against radiation (biological, pharmacological, chemical, physical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksonov, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological protection for astronauts from penetrating radiation on long-term space flights is discussed. The status of pharmacochemical protection, development of protective substances, medical use of protective substances, protection for spacecraft ecologic systems, adaptogens and physical conditioning, bone marrow transplants and local protection are discussed. Combined use of local protection and pharmacochemical substances is also briefly considered.

  15. Perspective: Reaches of chemical physics in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruebele, Martin; Thirumalai, D

    2013-09-28

    Chemical physics as a discipline contributes many experimental tools, algorithms, and fundamental theoretical models that can be applied to biological problems. This is especially true now as the molecular level and the systems level descriptions begin to connect, and multi-scale approaches are being developed to solve cutting edge problems in biology. In some cases, the concepts and tools got their start in non-biological fields, and migrated over, such as the idea of glassy landscapes, fluorescence spectroscopy, or master equation approaches. In other cases, the tools were specifically developed with biological physics applications in mind, such as modeling of single molecule trajectories or super-resolution laser techniques. In this introduction to the special topic section on chemical physics of biological systems, we consider a wide range of contributions, all the way from the molecular level, to molecular assemblies, chemical physics of the cell, and finally systems-level approaches, based on the contributions to this special issue. Chemical physicists can look forward to an exciting future where computational tools, analytical models, and new instrumentation will push the boundaries of biological inquiry.

  16. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  17. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  18. Physical-chemical studies of transuranium elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Major advances in our continuing program to determine, interpret, and correlate the basic chemical and physical properties of the transuranium elements are summarized. Research topics include: Molar enthalpies of formation of BaCmO{sub 3} and BaCfO{sub 3}; luminescence of europium oxychloride at various pressures; and anti-stokes luminescence of selected actinide (III) compounds. 42 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  20. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  1. Mimicking Bone - Chemical and Physical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie C Cox

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that chemical and physical features of bone contribute to its functionality, reactivity and mechanical performance. This fundamental rationale underpins the author’s research strategy. This paper presents a summary of efforts to fabricate a synthetic structure, referred to as a scaffold, that both chemically and physical emulates the intricate structure of bone. An understanding of key features of bone tissue that contribute to its remarkable properties is presented as a background to this work. Novel work aimed at improving the understanding of the synthesis of a ceramic biomaterial, namely hydroxyapatite, that is chemically similar to bone mineral is discussed. A case study involving the manufacture of porous scaffolds by 3D printing is also presented. In summary, this article highlights a number of on-going challenges that multidisciplinary tissue engineers aim to solve to get one step closer to mimicking bone, which clinically could improve the quality of life for millions of people worldwide.  Photo credit: By Doc. RNDr. Josef Reischig, CSc. (Author's archive [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

  2. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical... physical and chemical characteristics of a test, control, or reference substance: § 160.31 (c), (d), and...

  3. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  4. 40 CFR 716.50 - Reporting physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting physical and chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.50 Reporting physical and chemical properties. Studies of physical and chemical properties must be reported under this subpart...

  5. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  6. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Paul B.

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700°C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S 2 and O 2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  7. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs

  8. Thermodynamics principles characterizing physical and chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    Honig, Jurgen M

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a concise overview of thermodynamics, and is written in a manner which makes the difficult subject matter understandable. Thermodynamics is systematic in its presentation and covers many subjects that are generally not dealt with in competing books such as: Carathéodory''s approach to the Second Law, the general theory of phase transitions, the origin of phase diagrams, the treatment of matter subjected to a variety of external fields, and the subject of irreversible thermodynamics.The book provides a first-principles, postulational, self-contained description of physical and chemical processes. Designed both as a textbook and as a monograph, the book stresses the fundamental principles, the logical development of the subject matter, and the applications in a variety of disciplines. This revised edition is based on teaching experience in the classroom, and incorporates many exercises in varying degrees of sophistication. The stress laid on a didactic, logical presentation, and on the relat...

  9. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  10. Physical and Chemical Properties of Meteoric Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, J. M.; Saunders, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Somewhere between 10 and 100 tonnes (the current range of estimates) of interplanetary dust enters the earth's atmosphere each day. At least 60 percent of this ablates completely into atoms and ions, mostly between 70 and 110 km. This paper is concerned with the subsequent fate of the ablated metals and silicon. These species form a variety of oxides and hydroxides below 90 km, and it is widely believed that these species condense into nanometer-sized dust particles, known as "meteoric smoke". Here we will report laboratory experiments to simulate the production of meteoric smoke particles. Several chemical systems were investigated using a photochemical reactor: pure iron, iron-oxygen, silicon-oxygen and mixed iron-silicon-oxygen nano-particles. The particles were analysed for size distribution (diameter greater than 3 nm), chemical and physical structure and optical extinction. The kinetics of particle growth through condensation and coagulation were also measured in a novel aerosol flow tube. The results are used to refine aerosol growth models, and then to speculate on the likely form and size distribution of meteoric smoke in the mesosphere. Finally, we will consider how changes in the interplanetary dust flux could have affected the evolution of the earth's atmosphere.

  11. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  12. Physical and chemical investigations on natural dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, S.; D'Anna, E.; de Giorgi, M. L.; Della Patria, A.; Baraldi, P.

    2010-09-01

    Natural dyes have been used extensively in the past for many purposes, such us to colour fibers and to produce inks, watercolours and paints, but their use declined rapidly after the discovery of synthetic colours. Nowadays we witness a renewed interest, as natural dyes are neither toxic nor polluting. In this work, physical and chemical properties of four selected dyes, namely red (Madder), yellow (Weld and Turmeric) and blue (Woad) colours, produced by means of traditional techniques at the Museo dei Colori Naturali (Lamoli, Italy), have been investigated. The chromatic properties have been studied through the reflectance spectroscopy, a non-invasive technique for the characterisation of chromaticity. Reflection spectra both from powders and egg-yolk tempera models have been acquired to provide the typical features of the dyes in the UV-vis spectral range. Moreover, to assess the feasibility of laser cleaning procedures, tempera layers were investigated after irradiation with an excimer laser. Micro Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray analyses have complemented the survey, returning compositional and morphological information as well. Efforts have been made to give scientific feedback to the production processes and to support the research activity in the restoration of the artworks where these dyes were employed.

  13. Compositional, physical and chemical modification of polylactide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Żenkiewicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this article was to review some of the modification methods applied to improve mechanical, barrier and/or surface properties of polylactide (PLA.Design/methodology/approach: The presented modification methods were classified into three groups due to the dominant role of compositional, physical or chemical factor effecting the most PLA properties.Findings: It was found that incorporation of small amounts of montmorillonite up to 5% leads to formation of a nanocomposite with enhanced tensile strength and improved barrier properties. Corona treatment of pure PLA and PLA contained MMT nanofiller causes a significant decrease in the water contact angle and does not essentially affect the diiodomethane contact angle. This treatment leads to an increase in surface free energy that is much more significant for pure PLA than for PLA containing MMT nanofiller. It was also found that with increasing number up to 1000 of laser pulses of energies 5 mJ/cm2 an increase in surface free energy was observed, while the next laser pulses caused decrease of this energy. The determination and comparison of the influence of 3 wt.% of trimethylopropane trimethacylate (TMPTA and 3 wt.% of trially isocyanurate (TAIC crosslinking agents on the thermomechanical properties of electron beam irradiated PLA was reported.Research limitations/implications: A number of various modification methods are widely reported in literature. In this article a review of only such modification methods is presented, which are in line with the newest trends in polymer industry and science.Practical implications: There are a number of PLA properties, which need to be improved to satisfy specific application conditions. For that reasons researches are leading to find suitable modification methods to improve selected properties of PLA.Originality/value: This article presents some of modification methods, which are in line with the newest trends in polymer industry and

  14. Chemical Physics: A Subject for Study at University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunmur, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Traces development of chemical physics as a distinct discipline and reviews its position as a subject for study in United Kingdom universities. Reports results of a survey of chemical physics courses and graduates (1975-1980), including employment data on these graduates. (Author/JN)

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-COORDINATE VOCABULARY, CHEMICAL PHYSICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LERNER, RITA G.

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A METHOD (SCHEME) FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VOCABULARY IN THE FIELD OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS FROM PRIMARY JOURNAL ARTICLES. ALL TERMS APPEARING IN A RECENT JOURNAL (VOL. 39, JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS) JUDGED TO BE IMPORTANT WERE DIVIDED INTO THREE CATEGORIES--(1) PROPERTIES, PROCESSES, PHENOMENA, (2) OBJECTS, INCLUDING SYSTEMS AND…

  16. Advances in chemical physics advances in liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya; Vij, Jagdish K

    2009-01-01

    Prigogine and Rice's highly acclaimed series, Advances in Chemical Physics, provides a forum for critical, authoritative reviews of current topics in every area of chemical physics. Edited by J.K. Vij, this volume focuses on recent advances in liquid crystals with significant, up-to-date chapters authored by internationally recognized researchers in the field.

  17. Physical and Chemical Toeholds for Exoplanet Bioastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori

    2013-01-01

    If a search for exoplanet life were mounted today, the likely focus would be to detect oxygen (or ozone) in the atmosphere of a water-bearing rocky planet orbiting roughly 1AU from a G-type star. This appropriately conservative and practical default is necessary in large part because biological input on the question of where and how to look for life has progressed little beyond a purely empirical reliance on the example of terrestrial biology. However, fundamental physical and chemical considerations may impose significant yet universal constraints on biological potential. The liquid water + oxygen paradigm will be considered as an example, with a focus on the question, is liquid water a prerequisite for life? . Life requires a solvent to mediate interactions among biological molecules. A key class of these interactions is molecular recognition with high specificity, which is essential for high fidelity catalysis and (especially) information processing. For example, to correctly reproduce a string consisting of 600,000 units of information (e.g., 600 kilobases, equivalent to the genome of the smallest free living terrestrial organisms) with a 90% success rate requires specificity greater than 10(exp 7):1 for the target molecule vs. incorrect alternatives. Such specificity requires (i) that the correct molecular association is energetically stabilized by at least 40 kJ/mol relative to alternatives, and (ii) that the system is able to sample among possible states (alternative molecular associations) rapidly enough to allow the system to fall under thermodynamic control and express the energetic stabilization. We argue that electrostatic interactions are required to confer the necessary energetic stabilization vs. a large library of molecular alternatives, and that a solvent with polarity and dielectric properties comparable to water is required for the system to sample among possible states and express thermodynamic control. Electrostatic associations can be made in

  18. Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrukhina, Avgusta K.

    1991-01-01

    Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) characteristics of the chemical composition of molecular interstellar clouds; (2) properties and physico-chemical process in the genesis of interstellar dust grains; and (3) the isotope composition of volatiles in bodies of the Solar System.

  19. Physical and Chemical Processing in Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    than the classical Troe formula, and the development of a Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis ( CEMA ) computation algorithm that allows on-the-fly...6-311++G(d,p) method. 3. Flame Stabilization and Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis ( CEMA ) Flame stabilization is essential in the understanding of

  20. Cumulative risk: toxicity and interactions of physical and chemical stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Cynthia V; Boekelheide, Kim; Catlin, Natasha; Gordon, Christopher J; Morata, Thais; Selgrade, Maryjane K; Sexton, Kenneth; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Recent efforts to update cumulative risk assessment procedures to incorporate nonchemical stressors ranging from physical to psychosocial reflect increased interest in consideration of the totality of variables affecting human health and the growing desire to develop community-based risk assessment methods. A key roadblock is the uncertainty as to how nonchemical stressors behave in relationship to chemical stressors. Physical stressors offer a reasonable starting place for measuring the effects of nonchemical stressors and their modulation of chemical effects (and vice versa), as they clearly differ from chemical stressors; and "doses" of many physical stressors are more easily quantifiable than those of psychosocial stressors. There is a commonly held belief that virtually nothing is known about the impact of nonchemical stressors on chemically mediated toxicity or the joint impact of coexposure to chemical and nonchemical stressors. Although this is generally true, there are several instances where a substantial body of evidence exists. A workshop titled "Cumulative Risk: Toxicity and Interactions of Physical and Chemical Stressors" held at the 2013 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting provided a forum for discussion of research addressing the toxicity of physical stressors and what is known about their interactions with chemical stressors, both in terms of exposure and effects. Physical stressors including sunlight, heat, radiation, infectious disease, and noise were discussed in reference to identifying pathways of interaction with chemical stressors, data gaps, and suggestions for future incorporation into cumulative risk assessments.

  1. Physical/chemical closed-loop life support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Information on physical/chemical closed-loop life support systems are given in viewgraph form. Information is given on program objectives, the elements of a life support system, and Pathfinder program elements.

  2. Microbial quality and physical-chemical characteristics of thermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlzadeh, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Hadi; Bagheri, Pari; Poureshg, Yusef; Rostami, Roohollah

    2016-04-01

    Microbial quality and physical-chemical properties of recreational spas were surveyed to investigate the health aspect of the spas' water. A total of 195 samples were collected from pools and springs of the spas in five sites from Ardebil Province of Iran. The effects of an independent factor defined as 'condition' and its component sub-factors (i.e., sampling point, location, and sampling date) on microbial quality and physical-chemical properties of the spas were studied by applying path analysis. The influence of physical-chemical properties on microbial quality was also considered. The percentage of samples exceeding the ISIRI (Swimming pool water microbiological specifications (vol 9412), Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran, Tehran, 2007) limits for Staphylococcus (spp.) was up to 55.8 in the springs and 87.8 in the pools, 58.1 and 99.2 for HPC, 90.7 and 97.8 for total coliform and fecal coliform, and 9.3 and 34.4 for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. There were significant differences between the pools and springs for both physical-chemical properties and microbial quality. From the path analysis, sampling point was the most effective sub-factor of 'condition' on both the physical-chemical properties and microbial quality. Among the physical-chemical properties, water color had the most enhancing or additive influence on microbial pollution, while EC indicated a reducing or subtractive effect.

  3. Investigation of physical and chemical stability of ointment with herbals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdoryk, Oleksandr A; Khokhlova, Kateryna O; Georgiyants, Victoriya A; Vyshnevska, Liliia I

    2014-01-01

    The physical and chemical stability of a stock preparation ointment with active ingredients-herbal tinctures of calendula and arnica-for the treatment of hemorrhoids was studied. Evaluations for physical and chemical stability were performed initially and throughout the storage period. Physical stability of the ointment was assessed by means of visual observation in normal room light. Throughout the study period, the physical appearance of the ointment did not change. The chemical stability of the ointment was evaluated by means of a stability-indicating, thin-layer chromatography analytical technique. The shelf-life was found to be one month at 25 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C/60% RH and two months at 5 degrees C +/- 3 degrees C, when protected from light.

  4. Physical and chemical characterization of Dead Sea mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khlaifat, Abdelaziz, E-mail: abdelaziz.khlaifat@me.weatherford.com [Weatherford Oil Tool Middle East Ltd., P.O. Box 4627, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Al-Khashman, Omar [Department of Environmental Engineering, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, Ma' an, P.O. Box 20 (Jordan); Qutob, Hani [Weatherford Oil Tool Middle East Ltd., P.O. Box 4627, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-05-15

    A laboratory analysis was performed to determine the physical and chemical properties of 24 Dead Sea mud samples collected from three different locations on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. Several analytical techniques were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of those samples including atomic absorption spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Physical parameters such as specific gravity, Atterberg limits, grain size, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, pH and electrical conductivity were also studied. The main focus of the work was to document mud characteristics and to study the interrelation between physical and chemical properties. The mud samples were quite rich in minerals. Strontium was the most abundant trace element in the samples (range: 410-810 ppm) followed by barium (range: 155-380 ppm), vanadium (range: 209-264 ppm) and lead (range: 108-114 ppm). There were significant differences in the elemental contents of mud samples collected from different locations.

  5. Evaluation of physical and chemical characteristics of xanthan gums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Tondo Vendruscolo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at evaluating the physical and chemical characteristics of the xanthan produced by Xanthomonas arboricola pv pruni strain 115, and at comparing it with two xanthans obtained from commercial sources – Kelzan e Roeper. The analyzed xanthans showed specified patterns mentioned in the literature, except for low pyruvic acid content in the xanthan produced by strain 115, low monovalent salt content in the Roeper sample and high divalent salt content in both commercial samples. The low pyruvic acid content in the xanthan produced by X. arboricola pv pruni 115 did not affect the aqueous solution viscosity. Thus, the xanthan produced by strain 115 show physical and chemical characteristics that allow its use by the petroleum industry, as well as, in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics products. Xanthomonas arboricola pv pruni. Xanthan. Physical and chemical characteristics.

  6. Physical-Chemical Characterization of Nanodispersed Powders Produced by a Plasma-Chemical Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. GEORGIEVA; G. VISSOKOV; Iv. GRANCHAROV

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a review on the physical-chemical properties and characteristics of plasma-chemically produced nanodispersed powders (NDP), such as metals, oxides, nitrides, carbides, and catalysts. The plasma-chemical preparation of the powders was carried out in thermal plasma (TP) created by means of high-current electric arcs, plasma jets, high-frequency (HF) discharges, etc. We also discuss certain properties and characteristics of the NDPs, which are determined largely by the conditions of preparation.

  7. Physical and chemical characterization of bioaerosols - Implications for nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariya, P. A.; Sun, J.; Eltouny, N. A.; Hudson, E. D.; Hayes, C. T.; Kos, G.

    The importance of organic compounds in the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and as cloud condensation and ice-forming nuclei, has been recognized for several decades. Organic compounds comprise a significant fraction of the suspended matter mass, leading to local (e.g. toxicity, health hazards) and global (e.g. climate change) impacts. The state of knowledge of the physical chemistry of organic aerosols has increased during the last few decades. However, due to their complex chemistry and the multifaceted processes in which they are involved, the importance of organic aerosols, particularly bioaerosols, in driving physical and chemical atmospheric processes is still very uncertain and poorly understood. Factors such as solubility, surface tension, chemical impurities, volatility, morphology, contact angle, deliquescence, wettability, and the oxidation process are pivotal in the understanding of the activation processes of cloud droplets, and their chemical structures, solubilities and even the molecular configuration of the microbial outer membrane, all impact ice and cloud nucleation processes in the atmosphere. The aim of this review paper is to assess the current state of knowledge regarding chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols with a focus on those properties important in nucleation processes. We herein discuss the potential importance (or lack thereof) of physical and chemical properties of bioaerosols and illustrate how the knowledge of these properties can be employed to study nucleation processes using a modeling exercise. We also outline a list of major uncertainties due to a lack of understanding of the processes involved or lack of available data. We will also discuss key issues of atmospheric significance deserving future physical chemistry research in the fields of bioaerosol characterization and microphysics, as well as bioaerosol modeling. These fundamental questions are to be addressed prior to any definite conclusions on the

  8. Science Sampler: Enhancing Student Understanding of Physical and Chemical Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Julie; White, Sandra; Suter, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Students within the Findlay, Ohio, City School District, as well as students across the country, struggle with understanding physical and chemical changes. Therefore, in this article, the authors suggest some standards-based activities to clarify misconceptions and provide formative assessments to measure your students' progress as they determine…

  9. Physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of pure and doped ceria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Sammes, N.M.; Tompsett, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives an extract of available data on the physical, chemical, electrochemical and mechanical properties of pure and doped ceria, predominantly in the temperature range from 200 to 1000 degrees C. Several areas are pointed out where further research is needed in order to make a better...

  10. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  11. Advanced physical-chemical life support systems research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanich, Peggy L.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed NASA space research and technology development program will provide adequate data for designing closed loop life support systems for long-duration manned space missions. This program, referred to as the Pathfinder Physical-Chemical Closed Loop Life Support Program, is to identify and develop critical chemical engineering technologies for the closure of air and water loops within the spacecraft, surface habitats or mobility devices. Computerized simulation can be used both as a research and management tool. Validated models will guide the selection of the best known applicable processes and in the development of new processes. For the integration of the habitat system, a biological subsystem would be introduced to provide food production and to enhance the physical-chemical life support functions on an ever-increasing basis.

  12. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  13. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model for solution conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Malcolm S; Leij, Feike J

    2014-02-01

    Solute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to relatively complex and inaccessible solution conduits where transport is often rapid, turbulent, and at times constrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests in solution conduits are typically positively-skewed with long tails evident. Physical nonequilibrium models to fit breakthrough curves for tracer tests in solution conduits are now routinely employed. Chemical nonequilibrium processes are likely important interactions, however. In addition to partitioning between different flow domains, there may also be equilibrium and nonequilibrium partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. A combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was developed for an instantaneous release similar to that developed by Leij and Bradford (2009) for a pulse release. The PCNE model allows for partitioning open space in solution conduits into mobile and immobile flow regions with first-order mass transfer between the two regions to represent physical nonequilibrium in the conduit. Partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases proceeds either as an equilibrium process or as a first-order process and represents chemical nonequilibrium for both the mobile and immobile regions. Application of the model to three example breakthrough curves demonstrates the applicability of the combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium model to tracer tests conducted in karst aquifers, with exceptionally good model fits to the data. The three models, each from a different state in the United States, exhibit very different velocities, dispersions, and other transport properties with most of the transport occurring via the fraction of mobile water. Fitting the model suggests the potentially important interaction of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes.

  14. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  15. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  16. Relationship between snow microstructure and physical and chemical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bartels-Rausch

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice and snow in the environment are important because they not only act as a host to rich chemistry but also provide a matrix for physical exchanges of contaminants within the ecosystem. This review discusses how the structure of snow influences both chemical reactivity and physical processes, which thereby makes snow a unique medium for study. The focus is placed on impacts of the presence of liquid and surface disorder using many experimental studies, simulations, and field observations from the molecular to the micro-scale.

  17. Physical and chemical properties of pomegranate fruit accessions from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunić, Mira; Jukić Špika, Maja; Goreta Ban, Smiljana; Gadže, Jelena; Díaz-Pérez, Juan Carlos; MacLean, Dan

    2015-06-15

    The objective was to evaluate physical and chemical properties of eight pomegranate accessions (seven cultivars and one wild genotype) collected from the Mediterranean region of Croatia. Accessions showed high variability in fruit weight and size, calyx and peel properties, number of arils per fruit, total aril weight, and aril and juice yield. Variables that define sweet taste, such as low total acidity (TA; 0.37-0.59%), high total soluble solids content (TSS; 12.5-15.0%) and their ratio (TSS/TA) were evaluated, and results generally aligned with sweetness classifications of the fruit. Pomegranate fruit had a high variability in total phenolic content (1985.6-2948.7 mg/L). HPLC-MALDI-TOF/MS analysis showed that accessions with dark red arils had the highest total anthocyanin content, with cyanidin 3-glucoside as the most abundant compound. Principal component analysis revealed great differences in fruit physical characteristics and chemical composition among pomegranate accessions.

  18. The Main Physical-Chemical Characteristics of Smoked Sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Iuliana Costescu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the organoleptic and physical-chemical quality of smoked sausage, produced by a manufacturer in the western part of Romania. The organoleptic examination highlighted: product shape, exterior and in section aspect, consistency, color, taste and flavor. The physical-chemical examination highlighted the content of moisture, fat, sodium chloride, nitrites and easy hydrolyzed nitrogen. Water content was under the maximum admitted limit of 58%. Medium fat value was 32.24%, by 5.76% under the 38% maximum limit. Medium sodium chloride content was 2.1%, under the maximum admitted limit of 3%. Easy hydrolyzed nitrogen registered a medium value of 26.71 mg NH3/100g product under the 45% maximum admitted limit. Nitrites content was 5.18 ppm, under the 7 ppm imposed limit.

  19. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A

    2008-12-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein--the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models--a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 10(5) possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 10(5) microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models.

  20. Sheep milk: physical-chemical characteristics and microbiological quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin Junior, Ivandré Antonio; Santos, Joice Sifuentes dos; Costa, Ligia Grecco; Costa, Renan Grecco; Ludovico, Agostinho; Rego, Fabiola Cristine de Almeida; Santana, Elsa Helena Walter de

    2015-09-01

    Sheep milk is the third most consumed milk in Brazil. It is much appreciated for its nutritional status and is important for children that have problems with cow milk. Little information is known about the chemical, physical and microbiological composition of sheep milk from South Brazil. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe chemical and microbiological characteristics of sheep milk produced on two rural properties located in southern Brazil (ParanA and Rio Grande do Sul). The chemical composition of sheep milk was 17.32 g/100 g total solids, 5.86 g/100 g total protein, 4.46 g/100 g casein, 1.08 g/100 g whey protein, 7.28 g/100 g fat, 0.93 g/100 g ash, and 3.41 g/100 g lactose. High somatic cell count (1.7x106 cells/mL), total mesophilic bacterias (16.0 x 106 CFU/mL) and psychrotrophics (5.8 x 106 CFU/mL) were observed. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus, enterobacteria and coliforms occurred in 100% of the samples, and 45% of the samples showed growth of Escherichia coli. The sheep milk physical-chemical and microbiology parameters are similar to those presented in the literature for other countries but somatic cell count presented high levels.

  1. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemical, biological, and physical... FILL MATERIAL Evaluation and Testing § 230.61 Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing... appropriate physical and chemical environmental characteristics. (d) Physical tests and evaluation. The...

  2. Physical-chemical evaluation of hydraulic fracturing chemicals in the context of produced water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarillo, Mary Kay; Domen, Jeremy K; Stringfellow, William T

    2016-12-01

    Produced water is a significant waste stream that can be treated and reused; however, the removal of production chemicals-such as those added in hydraulic fracturing-must be addressed. One motivation for treating and reusing produced water is that current disposal methods-typically consisting of deep well injection and percolation in infiltration pits-are being limited. Furthermore, oil and gas production often occurs in arid regions where there is demand for new water sources. In this paper, hydraulic fracturing chemical additive data from California are used as a case study where physical-chemical and biodegradation data are summarized and used to screen for appropriate produced water treatment technologies. The data indicate that hydraulic fracturing chemicals are largely treatable; however, data are missing for 24 of the 193 chemical additives identified. More than one-third of organic chemicals have data indicating biodegradability, suggesting biological treatment would be effective. Adsorption-based methods and partitioning of chemicals into oil for subsequent separation is expected to be effective for approximately one-third of chemicals. Volatilization-based treatment methods (e.g. air stripping) will only be effective for approximately 10% of chemicals. Reverse osmosis is a good catch-all with over 70% of organic chemicals expected to be removed efficiently. Other technologies such as electrocoagulation and advanced oxidation are promising but lack demonstration. Chemicals of most concern due to prevalence, toxicity, and lack of data include propargyl alcohol, 2-mercaptoethyl alcohol, tetrakis hydroxymethyl-phosphonium sulfate, thioglycolic acid, 2-bromo-3-nitrilopropionamide, formaldehyde polymers, polymers of acrylic acid, quaternary ammonium compounds, and surfactants (e.g. ethoxylated alcohols). Future studies should examine the fate of hydraulic fracturing chemicals in produced water treatment trains to demonstrate removal and clarify interactions

  3. Physical and chemical injuries to eyes and eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pargament, Jonathan M; Armenia, Joseph; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Ocular and periocular injuries are common reasons for emergency department visits. In fact, an estimated 2 million Americans suffer ocular injuries each year. Evaluation and treatment of physical and chemical injuries to the eyes and eyelids begin with a systematic examination. Visual acuity and pupillary reaction should be assessed first. Evaluation of the eye should precede examination of the periocular structures due to the potential for causing further damage to a full-thickness ocular injury with manipulation of the eyelids. Physical injuries to the eyes and periocular structures include lacerations, abrasions, foreign bodies, and open globe injuries and can range from minor irritation to visual devastation. Chemical injuries can be divided into alkali and acid injuries. Alkali burns are more common, due to the prevalent use of alkali substances in industrial and home cleaning applications, and usually result in more serious injuries. Definitive care of chemical injuries ranges from topical antibiotics to full-thickness skin grafts with the goal of preventing cicatricial scarring and exposure of the ocular surface. Familiarity with the various types of ocular and periocular injuries is important for all medical professionals and is critical to providing the most appropriate management.

  4. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, S.; Jin, J. S.; Hwang, G. S.; Jang, K. S.; Han, W. S.; OH, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been recently paid attention more in environmental research due to their negative effects on air quality, public health, and climate change. The aerosols contain approximately >20-50% carbonaceous components such as organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) (or elemental carbon [EC]) derived from organic compounds, biomass burning, and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The physical, chemical, and biological properties of atmospheric aerosols are strongly dependent on the carbonaceous components. In particular, the BC could significantly affect the regional air quality in the northeastern Asia, because China is one of the foremost BC emission country in the world. Previous studies have mainly focused on the quantification and source identification for carbonaceous aerosols. However, understanding of physical and chemical properties for the carbonaceous aerosols related to environmental contamination and toxicity was still incomplete due to analytical difficulties. This study is addressed to evaluate the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to air pollution through the surface, mass spectroscopic, and electron microscopic analyses, and determination of chemical composition and structure using the air particulate matter (PM2.5 and >PM2.5) samples.

  5. BI-LAYER HYBRID BIOCOMPOSITES: CHEMICAL RESISTANT AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jawaid,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bi-layer hybrid biocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up technique by reinforcing oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB and jute fibre mats with epoxy matrix. Hybrid composites were prepared by varying the relative weight fraction of the two fibres. The physical (void content, density, dimensional stability, and chemical resistant properties of hybrid composites were evaluated. When the jute fibre loading increased in hybrid composites, physical and chemical resistant properties of hybrid composites were enhanced. Void content of hybrid composites decreased with an increase in jute fibre loading because jute fibres showed better fibre/matrix interface bonding, which leads to a reduction in voids. The density of hybrid composite increased as the quantity of jute fibre loading increased. The hybridization of the jute fibres with EFB composite improved the dimensional stability of the hybrid composites. The performance of hybrid composites towards chemical reagents improved with an increase in jute fibre loading as compared to the EFB composite. The combination of oil palm EFB/jute fibres with epoxy matrix produced hybrid biocomposites material that is competitive to synthetic composites.

  6. Tailoring Hydrogel Viscoelasticity with Physical and Chemical Crosslinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bartnikowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological tissues are viscoelastic, demonstrating a mixture of fluid and solid responses to mechanical strain. Whilst viscoelasticity is critical for native tissue function, it is rarely used as a design criterion in biomaterials science or tissue engineering. We propose that viscoelasticity may be tailored to specific levels through manipulation of the hydrogel type, or more specifically the proportion of physical and chemical crosslinks present in a construct. This theory was assessed by comparing the mechanical properties of various hydrogel blends, comprising elastic, equilibrium, storage and loss moduli, as well as the loss tangent. These properties were also assessed in human articular cartilage explants. It was found that whilst very low in elastic modulus, the physical crosslinks found in gellan gum-only provided the closest approximation of loss tangent levels found in cartilage. Blends of physical and chemical crosslinks (gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA combined with gellan gum gave highest values for elastic response. However, a greater proportion of gellan gum to GelMA than investigated may be required to achieve native cartilage viscoelasticity in this case. Human articular chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogels remained viable over one week of culture. Overall, it was shown that viscoelasticity may be tailored similarly to other mechanical properties and may prove a new criterion to be included in the design of biomaterial structures for tissue engineering.

  7. QSPR between Physical- Chemical Properties and Molecule Parameters of Alkanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qing-qing; LI Liang-chao; HU Li-ya

    2005-01-01

    A set of molecule parameters, namely, N, N′, p, q,n, were used to express the structures of alkanes. A correlative model was established between certain physical-chemical properties and molecular parameters of alkanes by regression method. Eightphysical-chemical properties, such as evaporation heat (△vH20m ),density(D20 ), capacity(C20 ), surface tension(σ20 ), boiling point ( Tb ), critical temperature ( Tc ), critical pressure (Pc) and critical volume(Vc), of fifty-six C3-C16 alkanes were calculated directly from the model in this paper. The calculated values are in good accordance with the literature ones reported for alkanes, and the correlation coefficients (R) equal or exceed 0.99. The research results indicate that the principle of the method is simple and clear, the method is practical, the correlativity is excellent, and the predicted data are credible.

  8. The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of MALDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The coupled physical and chemical dynamics model of ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has reproduced and explained a wide variety of MALDI phenomena. The rationale behind and elements of the model are reviewed, including the photophysics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of primary and secondary reaction steps. Experimental results are compared with model predictions to illustrate the foundations of the model, coupling of ablation and ionization, differences between and commonalities of matrices, secondary charge transfer reactions, ionization in both polarities, fluence and concentration dependencies, and suppression and enhancement effects.

  9. Surface treatments for biological, chemical and physical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Karaman, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    A step-by-step guide to the topic with a mix of theory and practice in the fields of biology, chemistry and physics. Straightforward and well-structured, the first chapter introduces fundamental aspects of surface treatments, after which examples from nature are given. Subsequent chapters discuss various methods to surface modification, including chemical and physical approaches, followed by the characterization of the functionalized surfaces. Applications discussed include the lotus effect, diffusion barriers, enzyme immobilization and catalysis. Finally, the book concludes with a look at future technology advances. Throughout the text, tutorials and case studies are used for training purposes to grant a deeper understanding of the topic, resulting in an essential reference for students as well as for experienced engineers in R&D.

  10. The Physical, Chemical and Physiological Limits of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Schulze-Makuch, Alexander; Houtkooper, Joop M

    2015-07-17

    Life on Earth displays an incredible diversity in form and function, which allows it to survive not only physical extremes, but also periods of time when it is exposed to non-habitable conditions. Extreme physiological adaptations to bridge non-habitable conditions include various dormant states, such as spores or tuns. Here, we advance the hypothesis that if the environmental conditions are different on some other planetary body, a deviating biochemistry would evolve with types of adaptations that would manifest themselves with different physical and chemical limits of life. In this paper, we discuss two specific examples: putative life on a Mars-type planet with a hydrogen peroxide-water solvent and putative life on a Titan-type planetary body with liquid hydrocarbons as a solvent. Both examples would have the result of extending the habitable envelope of life in the universe.

  11. The Physical, Chemical and Physiological Limits of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Schulze-Makuch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Life on Earth displays an incredible diversity in form and function, which allows it to survive not only physical extremes, but also periods of time when it is exposed to non-habitable conditions. Extreme physiological adaptations to bridge non-habitable conditions include various dormant states, such as spores or tuns. Here, we advance the hypothesis that if the environmental conditions are different on some other planetary body, a deviating biochemistry would evolve with types of adaptations that would manifest themselves with different physical and chemical limits of life. In this paper, we discuss two specific examples: putative life on a Mars-type planet with a hydrogen peroxide-water solvent and putative life on a Titan-type planetary body with liquid hydrocarbons as a solvent. Both examples would have the result of extending the habitable envelope of life in the universe.

  12. The Physical, Chemical and Physiological Limits of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Schulze-Makuch, Alexander; Houtkooper, Joop M.

    2015-01-01

    Life on Earth displays an incredible diversity in form and function, which allows it to survive not only physical extremes, but also periods of time when it is exposed to non-habitable conditions. Extreme physiological adaptations to bridge non-habitable conditions include various dormant states, such as spores or tuns. Here, we advance the hypothesis that if the environmental conditions are different on some other planetary body, a deviating biochemistry would evolve with types of adaptations that would manifest themselves with different physical and chemical limits of life. In this paper, we discuss two specific examples: putative life on a Mars-type planet with a hydrogen peroxide-water solvent and putative life on a Titan-type planetary body with liquid hydrocarbons as a solvent. Both examples would have the result of extending the habitable envelope of life in the universe. PMID:26193325

  13. Chemical and physical structures of proteinoids and related polyamino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Hajime; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Nomoto, Shinya

    Studies of polyamino acid formation pathways in the prebiotic condition are important for the study of the origins of life. Several pathways of prebiotic polyamino acid formation have been reported. Heating of monoammonium malate [1] and heating of amino acids in molten urea [2] are important pathways of the prebiotic peptide formation. The former case, globular structure called proteinoid microsphere is formed in aqueous conditions. The later case, polyamino acids are formed from unrestricted amino acid species. Heating of aqueous aspargine is also interesting pathway for the prebiotic polyamino acid formation, because polyamino acid formation proceeds in aqueous condition [3]. In this study, we analyzed the chemical structure of the proteinoids and related polyamino acids formed in the above three pathways using with mass spectrometer. In addition, their physical structures are analyzed by the electron and optical microscopes, in order to determine the self-organization abilities. We discuss the relation between the chemical and the physical structures for the origins of life. References [1] Harada, K., J. Org. Chem., 24, 1662 (1959), Fox, S. W., Harada, K., and Kendrick, J., Science, 129, 1221 (1959). [2] Terasaki, M., Nomoto, S., Mita, H., and Shimoyama, A., Chem. Lett., 480 (2002), Mita, H., Nomoto, S., Terasaki, M., Shimoyama, A., and Yamamoto, Y., Int. J. Astrobiol., 4, 145 (2005). [3] Kovacs, K and Nagy, H., Nature, 190, 531 (1961), Munegumi, T., Tanikawa, N., Mita, H. and Harada, K., Viva Origino, 22, 109 (1994).

  14. ANTIMICROBIAL, PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL QUALITIES OF MEDICINAL ANTISEPTIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliy D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our research results of the study of antimicrobial, physical and chemical qualities of antiseptic medicines of decamethoxin (DCM. Antimicrobial activity of DCM, palisan, decasan, deseptol against srains of S.aureus (n 56, S.epidermidis (n 26, E.coli (n 24, P.mirabilis (n 11, P.vulgaris (n 8 was studied by means of method of serial dilutions. Obtained data of mass spectrometry study of antimicrobial compositions with constant concentrations of DCM have shown that medicinal forms of DCM are complex physical and chemical systems, because of different origin and number of adjuvant ingredients used during their fabrication. Among synthetic quaternary ammonium agents there have been found the substance (commercial name of medicine is decamethoxin to have high antimicrobial activity against strains of grampositive and gram-negative microorganisms, an also C.albicans. There was found that antimicrobial activity of antiseptic palisan had been higher comparably to DCM in equivalent concentration. The composition and concentrations of acting agents and the methodology of preparation of palisan have been substantiated on the basis of microbiological, mass spectrometry characteristics of antiseptics DCM, palisan.

  15. [Chemical, physical and biological risks in law enforcement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Andrea; Grana, Mario; Vicentini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chemical, physical and biological risks among public safety and security forces. Law enforcement personnel, involved in routine tasks and in emergency situations, are exposed to numerous and several occupational hazards (chemical, physical and biological) whith likely health and security consequences. These risks are particularly high when the organization and preparation are inadequate, there is a lacking or insufficient coordination, information, education and communication and safety and personal protective equipment are inadequate or insufficient. Despite the objective difficulties, caused by the actual special needs related to the service performed or the organizational peculiarities, the risk identification and assessment is essential for worker health and safety of personnel, as provided for by Legislative Decree no. 81/2008. Chemical risks include airborne pollutants due to vehicular traffic (carbon monoxide, ultrafine particles, benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, nitrogen and sulfur oxides, lead), toxic gases generated by combustion process following fires (aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, dioxins and furans, biphenyls, formaldehyde, metals and cyanides), substances emitted in case of chemical accidents (solvents, pesticides, toxic gases, caustics), drugs (methylamphetamine), riot control agents and self-defence spray, lead at firing ranges, and several materials and reagents used in forensic laboratory. The physical hazards are often caused by activities that induce biomechanical overload aid the onset of musculoskeletal disorders, the use of visual display terminals and work environments that may expose to heat stress and discomfort, high and low pressure, noise, vibrations, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The main biological risks are blood-borne diseases (viral hepatitis, AIDS), airborne diseases (eg, tuberculosis, meningitis, SARS, anthrax), MRSA, and vector-borne diseases. Many of these risk factors are unavoidable or are not

  16. Theoretical investigation of chemical and physical properties of gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    This thesis is discussing the chemical and physical properties of different gaseous fuels. A mapping of about seventy gaseous fuels resulted in eleven type gases, these gases have mainly five components (inerts, H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and higher order of hydrocarbons) of different quantities. Calculations of heating value and Wobbe number have been done. Dew point temperatures have been estimated by using three different programs. Flammability limits, laminar flame speed and auto ignition temperatures have been calculated by using a kinetic and chemical program developed by Mauss. Flammability limits have been compared with Le Chatelier's law and measurements. Problems related to combustion such as flash back, lift off and instability are closely connected with flame speed and flow patterns. These problems are discussed in terms of laminar flame speed and Reynolds' number. The main results of this study were: Auto ignition temperature for gas mixtures behavior is very complex and unpredictable. In general small quantities of hydrogen decrease the temperature of auto ignition. The calculations of flammability limits by the kinetic and chemical software showed good agreement to measurements. Low Btu gases requires large flow area in order to avoid large pressure drop.

  17. Chemical physics: the standing of a mature discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eduardo A

    2007-03-02

    It is always promising and enticing to start a new editorial task in the scientific arena and the launch of the Chemistry Central Journal is no exception. The different thematic sections making up this journal are quite representative of the whole chemistry enterprise. However, one of them has a special relevance. In fact, Chemical Physics (CP) is the most general and it embodies a wide diversity of issues. Of particular importance at the launch of this groundbreaking new journal is the confidence of the Section Editor in BioMed Central (owners of Chemistry Central) as publishers, and from Chemistry Central to its Editorial Board. I feel deeply grateful for this new assignment and I hope to be able to perform a thorough job in editing this section. Below, I make my request to you as potential authors and reviewers.

  18. Chemical physics: The standing of a mature discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Eduardo A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is always promising and enticing to start a new editorial task in the scientific arena and the launch of the Chemistry Central Journal is no exception. The different thematic sections making up this journal are quite representative of the whole chemistry enterprise. However, one of them has a special relevance. In fact, Chemical Physics (CP is the most general and it embodies a wide diversity of issues. Of particular importance at the launch of this groundbreaking new journal is the confidence of the Section Editor in BioMed Central (owners of Chemistry Central as publishers, and from Chemistry Central to its Editorial Board. I feel deeply grateful for this new assignment and I hope to be able to perform a thorough job in editing this section. Below, I make my request to you as potential authors and reviewers.

  19. Physical, Chemicals and Flavors of Some Varieties of Arabica Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Export of Arabica coffee was 28,100 tons/year or 8.28% total export of Indonesian coffee, most of them are specialty coffee. Beside their origin, variety and determine the of physical, chemical and flavors characters. The promising clones or varieties i.e. BP 416A, BP 418A, BP 430A, BP 431A, BP 432A, BP 507A, BP 508A, BP 509A, BP 511A, BP 513A, BP 516A, BP 517A and BP 518A still not be determined their quality This research was conducted to analyze their physicals, chemicals and flavors during 2 periods of harvesting (2004 and 2005, using AS 1, S 795 and USDA 762 as the control. Mature coffee berry was harvested, sorted manually, and depulped, cleaned manually and then fermented in plastic sacks during 36 hours. The fermented parchment was washed, and then sun dried, dehulled to get green coffee. Observations wre conducted on green coffee yield, husk content, color of green coffee, distribution of size, bulk density of green and roasted coffee, roasting characters, color of roasted beans, and pH, acidity and flavors. The results showed (a The lowest content of husk was BP 432A and the highest was USDA 762. The control varieties of AS 1, S 795 and USDA 762, showed husk content >15%, while those potential varieties were < 15% except BP 416A. (b Beans size >6,5 mm and more than 80% were BP 416A, BP 430A, BP 432A, BP 509A, P 88 and S 795. Green coffee of BP 430A, BP 432A and BP 509A were uniform, but S 795 was not uniform. AS 1 and BP 416A and P 88 was one group; S 795 was one group with BP 542A; BP 509 was a group with BP 432A; but BP4 30A and USDA 762 were the other groups. (c Green coffee of USDA 762 was the palest color, but BP 542A was the darkest color. AS 1 and S 795 were a group with all potential varieties, except BP 542A. (d Roasted coffee of USDA 762 was the palest color and AS 1 was the darkest. In this case, AS 1 was a group with BP 430A, BP 509A and P 88, while S 795 was a group with BP 416A and BP 432A, but USDA 762 and BP 542A were

  20. Chemical and physical properties of dry flue gas desulfurization products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, David A; Bigham, Jerry M; Stehouwer, Richard C; Beeghly, Joel H; Fowler, Randy; Traina, Samuel J; Wolfe, William E; Dick, Warren A

    2005-01-01

    Beneficial and environmentally safe recycling of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products requires detailed knowledge of their chemical and physical properties. We analyzed 59 dry FGD samples collected from 13 locations representing four major FGD scrubbing technologies. The chemistry of all samples was dominated by Ca, S, Al, Fe, and Si and strong preferential partitioning into the acid insoluble residue (i.e., coal ash residue) was observed for Al, Ba, Be, Cr, Fe, Li, K, Pb, Si, and V. Sulfur, Ca, and Mg occurred primarily in water- or acid-soluble forms associated with the sorbents or scrubber reaction products. Deionized water leachates (American Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM] method) and dilute acetic acid leachates (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP] method) had mean pH values of >11.2 and high mean concentrations of S primarily as SO(2-)4 and Ca. Concentrations of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se (except for ASTM Se in two samples) were below drinking water standards in both ASTM and TCLP leachates. Total toxicity equivalents (TEQ) of dioxins, for two FGD products used for mine reclamation, were 0.48 and 0.53 ng kg(-1). This was similar to the background level of the mine spoil (0.57 ng kg(-1)). The FGD materials were mostly uniform in particle size. Specific surface area (m2 g(-1)) was related to particle size and varied from 1.3 for bed ash to 9.5 for spray dryer material. Many of the chemical and physical properties of these FGD samples were associated with the quality of the coal rather than the combustion and SO2 scrubbing processes used.

  1. Physical and chemical characteristics of pitaya fruits at physiological maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, T A; Takahashi, L S A

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physical and chemical characteristics of the maturation process of pitaya fruit (Hylocereus undatus) to identify indicators that can be used to determine the point of physiological maturity and establish the optimal timing of physiological maturity for harvesting the fruit. A completely randomized experimental design was employed and four biological repeats were performed. Physiological maturity was assessed using various physical characteristics: longitudinal length (LL), equatorial diameter (ED), pericarp thickness (PeT), pulp thickness (PuT), fruit mass (FM), pulp mass (PuM), pericarp mass (PeM), pericarp percentage (%Pe), pulp percentage (%Pu), pulp/pericarp ratio (Pu/Pe), pericarp color index (CI), hue color angle (h°), lightness index (L*), chroma (C*), blue-yellow variation (b*), and green-red variation (a*). Additionally, chemical characteristics such as soluble solid content (SS), titratable acidity (TA), SS/TA ratio, and pH were screened. The data were statistically analyzed by fitting regression models and computing Pearson's correlation coefficients (P pitaya fruits occurred between the 30th and 32nd days after anthesis, and this proved to be the optimal period for harvest. At this time, the fruit was completely red with high SS, and had the recommended values of TA, pH, and SS/TA ratio. During this period, ED, PuT, FM, PuM, %Pu, and Pu/Pe increased while PeT, PeM, and %Pe fell; these changes are considered desirable by producers and/or consumers. PuM was the variable that displayed more strong's association with other variables in the analysis.

  2. Physical and chemical characteristics of common bean varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio de Barros

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is one of the most widely consumed legumes in the world, but nevertheless different varieties vary with respect to their physical and chemical aspects. This study evaluated the physical and chemical characteristics (color, hardness after cooking, water absorption capacity, cooking time, integrity of the beans after cooking, proximate composition and mineral composition of the following varieties of the common bean: Carioca, IAPAR 81, Saracura, Juriti, Pérola, Colibri and IAPAR 31, all destined for both the internal Brazilian and external markets. The varieties studied had different proximate compositions and contents of the following minerals: K, Ca, N, Mg, S, Cu, Fe and Mn; but identical contents of P, Zn and B. The beans were classified as small in size. The Carioca variety showed the lowest values for L* (41.29 and H* (57.22, and the highest values for a* (12.17, its beans being redder and darker than the others. The Saracura variety showed the lowest degree of hydration (95.70 g/100g, cooking time (22.67 min. and whole beans after cooking (30%, while the Pérola variety showed the highest values for these same parameters, 106.77 g/100g, 43.67 min. and 82.16%, respectively. No correlation was observed between the calcium and magnesium contents of the beans and the hardness of the raw bean, degree of hydration during maceration, cooking time and integrity of the cooked beans. According to the characteristics studied, the Saracura variety is a good option for both industrial and domestic use.

  3. Physical and chemical properties of two Iranian peat types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rahgozar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because peat has high organic content and high natural water content, it is potentially problematic for civil engineering projects involving construction on peatland. Therefore, it is important to understand the physical, chemical and geotechnical properties of the peat. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the properties of two Iranian peat types. Peat and water samples were collected from sites within two extensive wetland areas (Chaghakhor Wetland and Gavkhuni Swamp where construction works are planned. Both sites had peat layers more than three metres thick, which were sampled at depths of 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, 2.4 and 3.0 metres below ground level with four replicates per site. Degree of humification was determined in the field. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the pH of water and peat; and the natural (field moisture content, organic content, ash content, bulk density, dry density, density of solids, liquid limit, initial void ratio, linear shrinkage, unconfined compressive strength, shear strength and falling-head permeability of each peat sample. We also investigated the elemental compositions and microstructure of the peats using X-Ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The laboratory tests of physical and geotechnical properties indicated that, for construction purposes, Chaghakhor peat is weaker than Gavkhuni peat.

  4. Chemical and physical properties of opencast lignite minesoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, C.; Vazquez, C.; Gonzalez-Sangregorio, M.V.; Leiros, M.C.; Gil-Sotres, F. (Facultad de Farmacia de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-09-01

    The evolution of chemical and physical properties in a series of mine soils aged between 0 and 5 years, developed from spoil materials of the Meirama opencast lignite mine in Galicia (NW Spain), was studied. The soils are recovered without use of topsoil and are subject to identical management. In the surface horizon (0-7 cm), total C and N, CEC, and pyrophosphate-extracted Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] increased with soil age. Oxalic-oxalate-extracted Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] on the other hand, increased with soil age in all the horizons studied. Rapid recovery in terms of physical properties was also observed: bulk density dropped, while total porosity, percentage of macropores, and hydraulic conductivity increased, and aggregates showed greater stability on immersion in water. The results indicate that mineral weathering and organometallic complexation are the dominant processes at these early stages of edaphogenesis and that properties associated with gas exchange showed more rapid development than those associated with water movement. In spite of the above rapid modifications, the characteristics of the oldest soils in the series were still very different from those of native Galician soils.

  5. 40 CFR 156.78 - Precautionary statements for physical or chemical hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Precautionary Statements § 156.78 Precautionary statements for physical or chemical hazards. (a) Requirement... instructions must be added to the “Physical and Chemical Hazards” warning statement, in addition to any... equivalent symbol, must be displayed along with the required language adjoining the “Physical and...

  6. An Investigation on Physical and Chemical Quality of Spring Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fesem BAŞARI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the chemical and physical qualities of spring water coming to Water Chemistry Laboratory of Adana Hygiene Institute in 2009. The water quality parameters analysed were colour, flavor, odour, turbidity, conductivity, pH, iron, aluminum, boron, manganese, arsenic, ammonia, ozone and bromate. Method: The spring water samples coming to the laboratory, colour in 59 samples, flavor in 22 samples, odour in 57 samples, turbidity and bromate in 61 samples, pH in 63 samples, conductivity in 62 samples, aluminum and iron in 30 samples, boron in 15 samples, arsenic and manganese in 18 samples, ammonia in 60 samples, ozone in 48 samples were studied. ISO (International Organization for Standardization, DIN (Deutsches Institut für Normung, TS (Turkish Standard methods were used for study. The results evaluated according to criterion of ‘‘Regulation on the Quality of Water Intended for Human Comsumption’’.Results: As a result of physical analysis of spring water, turbidity was assigned in just two (%3,2 of 61 samples. pH and conductivity were studied in 63 and in 62 samples respectively and all the values were appropriate. Higher concentrations than the regulation limits were found for bromate in three samples (4,9 % of 61, and in one sample of respectively boron (6,7 % out of 15, manganese (5,6 % out of 18 and arsenic (5,6% out of 18. Aluminum, ammonia, iron and ozone values in the analized samples were not found over the limits.Conclusion: Being found of bromate rates high was related to ozonize. And found of boron, manganese and arsenic was a symptom of dangerous pollution in terms of health. So, spring water pollution control essential for public health.

  7. A Study on Physical Dispersion and Chemical Modification of Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Eun-Chae; Kim, Seong-Jun [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Graphene has a wide spectrum on its application field due to various and excellent physical properties. However, it is very difficult to apply that graphene exists as lump or fold condition in general organic solvents. Besides, graphene was difficult to maintain as uniform condition due to chemical inert and distributions with various size and shapes. Therefore, this study was focused to study dispersion and modifying methods of aggregated graphene. The dispersion methods contain as follow: i) physical milling using glass bead, ii) co-treatment of glass bead and ultrasonic waves, iii) dispersion in organic solvents, iv) modifying with dry-ice. Milling using glass bead with size 2.5 mm was effective to be size decrease of 36.4% in comparison with control group. Mixed treatment of glass bead (size 2.5 mm) and ultrasonic waves (225W, 10 min) showed relative size decrease of 76%, suggesting that the size decrease depends on the size of glass bead, intensity of ultrasonic waves and treatment time. Solvents of Ethyl acetate (EA) and Isoprophyl alcohol (IPA) were used in order to improve dispersion by modifying surface of graphene. IPA of them showed a favorable dispersion with more -CO functional groups in the FT-IR analysis. On the other hand, the oxygen content of graphene surface modified by dry-ice was highly increased from 0.8 to 4.9%. From the results, it was decided that the favorable dispersion state for a long time was obtained under the condition of -CO functional group increase in IPA solvent.

  8. Physical, Chemical and Mineral Properties of the Polonnaruwa Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Jamie; Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, Daryl H.; Miyake, Nori; Wallis, M. K.; Hoover, Richard B.; Samaranayake, Anil; Wickramarathne, Keerthi; Oldroyd, Anthony

    We report on the physical, chemical and mineral properties of a series of stone fragments recovered from the North Central Province of Sri Lanka following a witnessed fireball event on 29 December 2012. The stones exhibit highly porous poikilitic textures comprising of isotropic silica-rich/plagioclase-like hosts. Inclusions range in size and shape from mm-sized to smaller subangular grains frequently more fractured than the surrounding host and include ilmenite, olivine (fayalitic), quartz and accessory zircon. Bulk mineral compositions include accessory cristobalite, hercynite, anorthite, wuestite, albite, anorthoclase and the high pressure olivine polymorph wadsleyite, suggesting previous endurance of a shock pressure of ~20GPa. Further evidence of shock is confirmed by theconversion of all plagioclase to maskelynite. Here the infrared absorption spectra in the region 580 cm-1 to 380 cm-1 due to the Si-O-Si or Si-O-Al absorption band shows a partial shift in the peak at 380 cm-1 towards 480 cm-1 indicating an intermediate position between crystalline and amorphous phase. Host matrix chemical compositions vary between samples, but all are rich in SiO2. Silica-rich melts display a heterogeneous K-enrichment comparable to that reported in a range of nonterrestrial material from rare iron meteorites to LL chondritic breccias and Lunar granites. Bulk chemical compositions of plagioclase-like samples are comparable to reported data e.g. Miller Ranger 05035 (Lunar), while Si-rich samples accord well with mafic and felsic glasses reported in NWA 1664 (Howardite)as well asdata for fusion crust present in a variety of meteoritic samples.Triple oxygen isotope results show Δ17O = .0.335 with δ18O (‰ rel. SMOW) values of 17.816 ± 0.100 and compare well with those of known CI chondrites and are within the range of CI-like (Meta-C) chondrites. Rare earth elemental abundances show a profound Europium anomaly of between 0.7 and 0.9 ppm while CI normalized REE patterns

  9. Physical-chemical pretreatment as an option for increased sustainability of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mels, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords : municipal wastewater treatment, physical-chemical pretreatment, chemically enhanced primary treatment, organic polymers, environmental sustainabilityMost of the currently applied municipal wastewater treatment plants in The Netherlands are based on the activated sludge process and include

  10. Amphibian and benthic macroinvertebrate response to physical and chemical properties of Themi River, Arusha, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Lyimo, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    I hypothesized that variation in physical and chemical properties and habitat destruction of the Themi River as a result of human activities would affect abundance and diversity of amphibian and benthic macroinvertebrates. Variation in habitat physical and chemical conditions, and amphibian and benthic macroinvertebrate diversity and abundance were assessed in the Themi River of Arusha municipality. These physical, chemical and biological conditions were assessed at forty sampling stations...

  11. Physical and chemical performances of high Al steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-chuan; DONG Yuan-chi; ZHANG Wen-ming; WANG Shi-jun; ZHOU Yun

    2005-01-01

    The effects of acid-soluble Al content on the physical and chemical performances of high Al steels were investigated. The results show that the distribution of acid-soluble Al in steel substrate is uniform. With increasing Al content, the strength and toughness of steels decrease a little but the hardness increases. The average yield strength and tensile strength are 425 MPa and 570 MPa, respectively, and the Rockwell hardness is 89.7. For non-Al steels the average oxidation rate is up to 0.421 mg/(cm2·h) at 1 373 K. For high Al steels, when the mass fraction of Al is less than 5%, there is a thinner gray oxidized layer on surface and the oxidation rate is high; when the mass fraction of Al is more than 8.0%, the thin, close and yellow glossing film still exists, and the average oxidation rate is only 0.016 mg/(cm2·h).

  12. Physical and Chemical Aspects of Fire Suppression in Extraterrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, F.; Linteris, G. T.; Katta, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    A fire, whether in a spacecraft or in occupied spaces on extraterrestrial bases, can lead to mission termination or loss of life. While the fire-safety record of US space missions has been excellent, the advent of longer duration missions to Mars, the moon, or aboard the International Space Station (ISS) increases the likelihood of fire events, with more limited mission termination options. The fire safety program of NASA's manned space flight program is based largely upon the principles of controlling the flammability of on-board materials and greatly eliminating sources of ignition. As a result, very little research has been conducted on fire suppression in the microgravity or reduced-gravity environment. The objectives of this study are: to obtain fundamental knowledge of physical and chemical processes of fire suppression, using gravity and oxygen concentration as independent variables to simulate various extraterrestrial environments, including spacecraft and surface bases in Mars and moon missions; to provide rigorous testing of analytical models, which include comprehensive descriptions of combustion and suppression chemistry; and to provide basic research results useful for technological advances in fire safety, including the development of new fire-extinguishing agents and approaches, in the microgravity environment associated with ISS and in the partial-gravity Martian and lunar environments.

  13. Robinia pseudoacacia leaves improve soil physical and chemical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babar; KHAN; Abdukadir; Ablimit; Rashed; MAHMOOD; Muhammad; QASIM

    2010-01-01

    The role of the leaves of Robinia pseudoacacia L., which is widely distributed in the arid lands, on improving soil physical and chemical properties was analyzed at various incubation periods. The incubated soils added with 0, 25, 50 and 75 g Robinia pseudoacacia leaves were tested after consecutive incubation intervals of 6, 8 and 10 months and the different soil parameters were measured. The results showed the increases in organic matter (OM), extractable K, cation exchange capacity (CEC), aggregate stability and water holding capacity, but the decreases in pH value and bulk density after 6 months’ incubation. The gradual decrease in change rates of soil properties indicated less microbial population and organic residual mineralization under acidic conditions, which were resulted from fast decomposition of leaves after the first 6 months incubation. The increases in soil organic matter content, extractable K, CEC, aggregate stability and water holding capacity and the decreases in soil pH and bulk density provide favorable conditions for crop’s growth.

  14. Robinia pseudoacacia leaves improve soil physical and chemical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babar KHAN; Abdukadir Ablimit; Rashed MAHMOOD; Muhammad QASIM

    2010-01-01

    The role of the leaves of Robinia pseudoacacia L.,which is widely distributed in the arid lands,on improving soil physical and chemical properties was analyzed at various incubation periods.The incubated soils added with 0,25,50 and 75 g Robinia pseudoacacia leaves were tested after consecutive incubation intervals of 6,8 and 10 months and the different soil parameters were measured.The results showed the increases in organic matter (OM),extractable K,cation exchange capacity (CEC),aggregate stability and water holding capacity,but the decreases in pH value and bulk density after 6 months' incubation.The gradual decrease in change rates of soil properties indicated less microbial population and organic residual mineralization under acidic conditions,which were resulted from fast decomposition of leaves after the first 6 months incubation.The increases in soil organic matter content,extractable K,CEC,aggregate stability and water holding capacity and the decreases in soil pH and bulk density provide favorable conditions for crop's growth.

  15. Chemical enrichment and physical conditions in I Zw 18

    CERN Document Server

    Lebouteiller, Vianney; Hubeny, Ivan; Kunth, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Abridged. Low-metallicity star-forming dwarf galaxies are prime targets to understand the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. The HI region provides important constraints on the dispersal and mixing of heavy elements released by successive star-formation episodes. Our primary objective is to study the enrichment of the HI region and the interplay between star-formation history and metallicity evolution. We observed the most metal-poor star-forming galaxy in the Local Universe, I Zw 18, with Hubble/COS. The abundances in the neutral gas are derived from far-UV absorption-lines (HI, CII, CII*, NI, OI, ...) and are compared to the abundances in the HII region. Models are constructed to calculate the ionization structure and the thermal processes. We investigate the gas cooling in the HI region through physical diagnostics drawn from the fine-structure level of C+. We find that HI region abundances are lower by a factor of ~2 as compared to the HII region. There is no differential depletion on dust be...

  16. Microbiological and physical-chemical characteristics of fermented milk beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.H.P. Andrade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate some microbiological and physical-chemical characteristics of fermented milk beverages collected at the main supermarkets in Belo Horizonte (MG. 40 samples of the products corresponding to five distinct brands were collected. They were submitted to the following analyses: Most Probable Number (MPN of total (30ºC and thermal tolerant coliforms (45ºC, Salmonella spp., coagulase positive Staphylococcus, molds and yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, pH, titratable acidity and contents of moisture, total solids, protein and fat. The analyses were carried out during the last week of shelf life. The microbiological quality of the samples was good and the counts of lactic bacteria were above the minimum established by the official legislation. Streptococcus and Lactobacillus were isolated and identified from the products and Lactobacillus delbrueckii was molecularly identified in three samples. The mean values for the contents of fat and protein, titratable acidity, pH, moisture and total solids ranged from 1.24 to 1.98%; 1.88 to 2.22%; 0.54 to 0.66%; 3.91 to 4.16; 81.18 to 83.25% and 16.75 to 18.82%, respectively. All samples had protein content in agreement with the official legislation.

  17. Analysis of physical and chemical parameters of bottled drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar; Walia, T P S; Lark, B S; Sumanjit

    2006-04-01

    Seventeen different brands of bottled drinking water, collected from different retail shops in Amritsar, were analyzed for different physical and chemical parameters to ascertain their compliability with the prescribed/recommended limits of the World Heath Organization (WHO) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). It was found that the majority of the brands tested were over-treated. Lower values of hardness, total dissolved solids (TDS) and conductance than the prescribed limits of WHO showed that water was deficient in essential minerals. Minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium and fluoride were present in some cases in such a low concentration that water seemed to be as good as distilled water. Samples showing fluoride lesser than 0.5 mg/l warranted additional sources of fluoride for the people consuming only bottled water for drinking purposes. Zero values for chlorine demand as shown by all the bottled water samples showed that water samples were safe from micro-organisms. In case of heavy metals, only lead had been found to be greater than the limit of 0.015 mg/l as prescribed by WHO and USEPA, in seven out of 17 samples. Lead even at such a low concentration can pose a great health hazard.

  18. Physical and chemical characterization of asphalt (bitumen) paving exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Robert F; McClean, Michael D; Meeker, John D; Zwack, Leonard; Hanley, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of asphalt (bitumen) fume and vapor in hot mix asphalt roadway paving operations. Area and personal air samples were taken using real-time equipment and extractive sampling and analytical methods to determine worker asphalt exposure, as well as to characterize the properties of the particulate and vapor phase components. Analysis of personal inhalation and dermal samples by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy showed that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon profile is dominated by compounds with molecular weights below 228, and that substituted and heterocyclic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons comprised approximately 71% of the detectable mass concentration (vapor and particulate combined). Principal components analysis shows that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights greater than 190 are the driving force behind the polycyclic aromatic compound exposures measured for the dermal and particulate phases; there was no clear trend for the vapor phase Most of the aerosol particles are fine (mass median aerodynamic diameter 1.02 microm; count median diameter 0.24 microm).

  19. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-05-10

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t{sup 1/2} law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction.

  20. Physical and Chemical Sciences Center - research briefs. Volume 1-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattern, P.L.

    1994-12-31

    This report provides brief summaries of research performed in chemical and physical sciences at Sandia National Laboratories. Programs are described in the areas of advanced materials and technology, applied physics and chemistry, lasers, optics, and vision, and resources and capabilities.

  1. Physical and chemical properties of substrates produced using macrophytes aquatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walda Monteiro Farias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic macrophytes are widely used as bioindicators of water quality because their proliferation usually occurs in eutrophic water sources and has hit several parts of Brazil and the world, restricted the multiple uses of aquatic ecosystems. However, this group of plants is able to retain considerable amounts of nutrients, presenting high productivity and high growth rate, thus, a good source of biomass for use in the production of substrates. In order to evaluate the potential of aquatic macrophytes water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes Solms., water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L. and cattail (Typha domingensis Pers. in the production of substrates was performed in this work, the physical and chemical characterization and evaluation of the degree of humification. The treatments were arranged in a 3 × 4 factorial, completely randomized design with three replications. All substrates produced with 100% macrophyte density present within the limits of 400 kg m-3, considered ideal. The composite substrates with water hyacinth and water lettuce are with the electrical conductivity of 0,79 a 2,49 dS m-1 within recommended. organic compounds produced are considered mature and have high levels of nitrogen phosphorus and potassium; The substrate produced with 70% water lettuce +30 % dung and 70% composed of cattail manure +20% +10% topsoil and 70 +30% cattail manure have C/N ratio within the considered ideal; the humification ratio and humification index, except for the four treatments (70 % water lettuce manure +30%, 5 (100% water hyacinth and 8 (70% water hyacinth manure +30% are within the considered ideal, the percentage of humic acids and polymerization rate, except for treatments 1 (100% water lettuce and 12 (100% cattail, are shown below the ideal.

  2. Physical and chemical characterization of residential oil boiler emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Michael D; Beck, Lee; Barfield, Pamela; Lavrich, Richard J; Dong, Yuanji; Vander Wal, Randy L

    2008-04-01

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil coupled with the regional proximity and seasonal use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important public health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source is available for climate and air quality modeling and for improving our understanding of aerosol-related human health effects. The gas- and particle-phase emissions from an active ROB firing distillate fuel oil (commonly known as diesel fuel) were evaluated to address this deficiency. Ion chromatography of impactor samples showed that the ultrafine ROB aerosol emissions were approximately 45% (w/w) sulfate. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected various n-alkanes at trace levels, sometimes in accumulation mode particles, and out of phase with the size distributions of aerosol mass and sulfate. The carbonaceous matter in the ROB aerosol was primarily light-adsorbing elemental carbon. Gas chromatography-atomic emission spectroscopy measured a previously unrecognized organosulfur compound group in the ROB aerosol emissions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of ROB soot indicated the presence of a highly ordered primary particle nanostructure embedded in larger aggregates. Organic gas emissions were measured using EPA Methods TO-15 and TO-11A. The ROB emitted volatile oxygenates (8 mg/(kg of oil burned)) and olefins (5 mg/(kg of oil burned)) mostly unrelated to the base fuel composition. In the final analysis, the ROB tested was a source of numerous hazardous air pollutants as defined in the Clean Air Act Amendments. Approximations conducted using emissions data from the ROB tests show relatively low contributions to a regional-level anthropogenic emissions inventory for volitile organic compounds, PM2.5, and SO2 mass.

  3. [Physical, chemical and bioactive compounds of tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Alexia

    2012-12-01

    Tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea) is appreciated for its excellent nutritional qualities, being considered a good source of antioxidants compounds, calcium, phosphorus, potassium and iron, sugars, organic acids, pectins and flavonoids. In this study, were evaluated physical parameters (weight, size, compression strength and humidity) and chemical (degrees Brix, titratable acidity, pH, protein, dietary fiber, ash, minerals and their bioaccesibility, pectin, antioxidants compounds) of the fruit from the Aragua State, Venezuela, as a contribution to stimulate and diversify the consumption of the tree tomato. The characterization showed that the fruits were at the ripening stage for consumption (degrees Brix 10.51, pH 3.5, acidity 0.02 g/100ml and 4.32 Kgf/cm2 compression strength) gave a yield of 74% pulp. The analytical results of the ripped pulp showed a content of 30 Kcal/100 g, dietary fiber (4.10 g/100 g), and minerals such as phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, potassium and iron (331.32, 21.25, 21.18, 17.03 and 7.44 mg/100 g, respectively). Bioaccesibility values of 6.71 and 1.86% were reported for calcium and iron. The extracted pectin (1.00 g/100 g) was classified as high methoxyl with high degree of esterification. The antioxidant capacity of the ripped pulp (EC50 of 165.00 g/g DPPH and reducing power of 0.07 mmol Fe +2/100 g), could be attributed to the presence of ascorbic acid (23.32 mg/100 g), lycopene (1.22 mg/100 g), and phenolic compounds (1.39 mg GAE/g), anthocyanins (0.29 mg cyanidin/g) and tannins (0.40 mg catechin/100 g).The results obtained encourage the nutritional benefits and suggest applications as a functional ingredient in food product development.

  4. Models of cortical malformation--Chemical and physical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-02-15

    Pharmaco-resistant epilepsies, and also some neuropsychiatric disorders, are often associated with malformations in hippocampal and neocortical structures. The mechanisms leading to these cortical malformations causing an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory system are largely unknown. Animal models using chemical or physical manipulations reproduce different human pathologies by interfering with cell generation and neuronal migration. The model of in utero injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate mimics periventricular nodular heterotopia. The freeze lesion model reproduces (poly)microgyria, focal heterotopia and schizencephaly. The in utero irradiation model causes microgyria and heterotopia. Intraperitoneal injections of carmustine 1-3-bis-chloroethyl-nitrosurea (BCNU) to pregnant rats produces laminar disorganization, heterotopias and cytomegalic neurons. The ibotenic acid model induces focal cortical malformations, which resemble human microgyria and ulegyria. Cortical dysplasia can be also observed following prenatal exposure to ethanol, cocaine or antiepileptic drugs. All these models of cortical malformations are characterized by a pronounced hyperexcitability, few of them also produce spontaneous epileptic seizures. This dysfunction results from an impairment in GABAergic inhibition and/or an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. The cortical region initiating or contributing to this hyperexcitability may not necessarily correspond to the site of the focal malformation. In some models wide-spread molecular and functional changes can be observed in remote regions of the brain, where they cause pathophysiological activities. This paper gives an overview on different animal models of cortical malformations, which are mostly used in rodents and which mimic the pathology and to some extent the pathophysiology of neuronal migration disorders associated with epilepsy in humans.

  5. Mental Rolodexing: Senior Chemistry Majors' Understanding of Chemical and Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Bruce, Heather; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Using a constructivist framework, eight senior chemistry majors were interviewed twice to determine: (i) structural inferences they are able to make from chemical and physical properties; and (ii) their ability to apply their inferences and understandings of these chemical and physical properties to solve tasks on the reactivity of organic…

  6. Chemical Enrichment and Physical Conditions in IZw18*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebouteiller, V.; Heap, S.; Hubeny, I.; Kunth, D.

    2013-01-01

    Low-metallicity star-forming dwarf galaxies are prime targets to understand the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. The H I region contains the bulk of the mass in blue compact dwarfs, and it provides important constraints on the dispersal and mixing of heavy elements released by successive star-formation episodes. The metallicity of the H I region is also a critical parameter to investigate the future star-formation history, as metals provide most of the gas cooling that will facilitate and sustain star formation. Aims. Our primary objective is to study the enrichment of the H I region and the interplay between star-formation history and metallicity evolution. Our secondary obje ctive is to constrain the spatial- and time-scales over which the HI and H II regions are enriched, and the mass range of stars responsible for the heavy element production. Finally, we aim to examine the gas heating and cooling mechanisms in the H I region. Methods. We observed the most metal-poor star-forming galaxy in the Local Universe, I Zw 18, with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph onboard Hubble. The abundances in the neutral gas are derived from far-ultraviolet absorption-lines (H I, CIII, CIIi*, N I, OI,...) and are compared to the abundances in the H II region. Models are constructed to calculate the ionization structure and the thermal processes. We investigate the gas cooling in the HIi region through physical diagnostics drawn from the fine-structure level of C+. Results. We find that H I region abundances are lower by a factor of approx 2 as compared to the H II region. There is no differential depletion on dust between the H I and H II region. Using sulfur as a metallicity tracer, we calculate a metallicity of 1/46 Z(solar) (vs. 1/31 Z(solar) in the H II region). From the study of the C/O, [O/Fe], and N/O abundance ratios, we propose that C, N, O, and Fe are mainly produced in massive stars. We argue that the H I envelope may contain pockets of pristine gas with a

  7. Chemical energy in an introductory physics course for the life sciences

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Energy is a complex idea that cuts across scientific disciplines. For life science students, an approach to energy that incorporates chemical bonds and chemical reactions is better equipped to meet the needs of life sciences students than a traditional introductory physics approach that focuses primarily on mechanical energy. We present a curricular sequence, or thread, designed to build up students' understanding of chemical energy in an introductory physics course for the life sciences. Thi...

  8. Chemical and physical basics of routine formaldehyde fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooban Thavarajah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is the widely employed fixative that has been studied for decades. The chemistry of fixation has been studied widely since the early 20 th century. However, very few studies have been focused on the actual physics/chemistry aspect of process of this fixation. This article attempts to explain the chemistry of formaldehyde fixation and also to study the physical aspects involved in the fixation. The factors involved in the fixation process are discussed using well documented mathematical and physical formulae. The deeper understanding of these factors will enable pathologist to optimize the factors and use them in their favor.

  9. Physical and Chemical Interactions with Conspecifics Mediate Sex Change in a Protandrous Gastropod Crepidula fornicata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Abigail E; Juman, Alia Rehana; Pellman-Isaacs, Aaron; Bruno, William T

    2015-12-01

    The protandrous marine snail Crepidula fornicata has been a theoretical and empirical model for studies of sex change for many decades. We investigated the social conditions under which sex change occurs in this species by manipulating physical and chemical contact with conspecifics. Male snails were either in physical and chemical contact with females or in chemical contact with, but physically isolated from, females. Males were tested both with living females and with empty, sterilized shells. Males that were physically touching a living female were less likely to change sex than the isolated controls, while males in chemical (but not physical) contact with females changed sex no slower than the isolated controls. These results provide experimental evidence that the factor controlling sex change in C. fornicata is due to a contact-borne inhibitor associated with female conspecifics. These findings serve as a basis for future studies of sex change in this model system.

  10. Physical and chemical characterization of cerium(IV) oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepriá, Gemma; Córdova, Walvin R; Céspedes, Oscar; Sánchez-García, Laura; Ferrer, Pilar; Gianolio, Diego; Castillo, Juan R

    2016-09-01

    Chemical composition, size and structure of the nanoparticle are required to describe nanoceria. Nanoparticles of similar size and Ce(III) content might exhibit different chemical behaviour due to their differences in structure. A simple and direct procedure based on affordable techniques for all the laboratories is presented in this paper. The combination of Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy and particle impact coulometry (PIC) allows the characterization of nanoceria of small size from 4 to 65 nm at a concentration from micromolar to nanomolar, a concentration range suitable for the analysis of lab-prepared or commercial nanoparticle suspensions, but too high for most analytical purposes aimed at nanoparticle monitoring. While the PIC limits of size detection are too high to observe small nanoparticles unless catalytic amplification is used, the method provides a simple means to study aggregation of nanoparticles in the media they are needed to be dispersed for each application. Raman spectroscopy provided information about structure of the nanoparticle, and UV-vis about their chemical behaviour against some common reducing and oxidizing agents. Graphical Abstract To characterize nanoceria it is necessary to provide information about the shape, size and structure of the nanoparticles as well as the chemical composition.

  11. The Formation Age of Comets: Predicted Physical and Chemical Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, J. A., III; Hill, H. G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical composition of a comet has always been considered to be a function of where it formed in the nebula. We suggest that the most important factor in determining a comet's chemistry might actually be when it formed. Specific predictions are presented.

  12. Control of Dermatomycoses by Physical, Chemical and Biological Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-31

    were purchased from Sigma Chemical Co. (St. Louis , Mo.). Lycopene was Isolated from tomato according to the method described by Weedor (22...Bacteriol . To E~e pub1Ished in December 1978. 4. Emyanitoff, R. G. and 1. ~1ashimoto . The effect of temperature ,Incubation atmosphere and medium

  13. Physical and chemical characterization of particles in producer gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus; Henriksen, Ulrik B.; Bentzen, Jens Dall;

    2000-01-01

    Particles in the gas from a two-stage (separate pyrolysis and gasification) down-draft biomass gasifier were collected and characterized. Their concentration, geometries and chemical compositions were investigated. Special attention was given to features suspected to harm internal combustion (IC...

  14. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  15. Physical, Chemical, Bibological, and Biotechnological sciences are incomplete without each other

    Science.gov (United States)

    By coupling of mechanics, optics, and mathematics, Theodor Svedberg invented the ultracentrifuge, which allowed separation of important biological materials by high centrifugal force, resulting in physical chemical separation and characterization of atherogenic low density lipoproteins and other bio...

  16. Steroid monochloroacetates : Physical-chemical characteristics and use in gas-liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, H.J. van der; Groen, D.; Maas, J.H. van der

    1965-01-01

    Synthesis and physical-chemical characteristics (melting points, infrared-, visible- and ultraviolet spectra, paper-,thin-layer- and gas-liquid Chromatographie behaviour) of monochloroacetate derivatives of steroids representing the androstane-, pregnane-, estrane- and cholestane series are describe

  17. Physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpaste and evaluation of its effects on enamel roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenberg, Sérgio Paulo; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Santos, Fábio André; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpastes and their effect on bovine enamel after application of a bleaching agent (16% carbamide peroxide). Physical-chemical analysis was made considering mass loss by desiccation, ash content and pH of the toothpastes. Thirty bovine dental enamel fragments were prepared for roughness measurements. The samples were subjected to bleaching treatments and simulated brushing: G1. Sorriso Dentes Brancos (Conventional toothpaste), G2. Close-UP Whitening (Whitening toothpaste), and G3. Sensodyne Branqueador (Whitening toothpaste). The average roughness (Ra) was evaluated prior to the bleaching treatment and after brushing. The results revealed differences in the physical-chemical characteristics of the toothpastes (p toothpaste groups and bleaching treatment. Interaction (toothpaste and bleaching treatment) showed significant difference (p toothpastes showed differences in their physical-chemical properties. All toothpastes promoted changes to the enamel surface, probably by the use of a bleaching agent.

  18. Physical and chemical properties of San Francisco Bay waters, 1969-1976 (NODC Accession 8400194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — One magnetic tape containing the physical and chemical properties of San Francisco Bay waters was forwarded to NODC by Mr. Richard Smith of the U.S Geological Survey...

  19. Permeability Characteristics of Tailings considering Chemical and Physical Clogging in Lixi Tailings Dam, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengguang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and physical clogging frequently occur in tailings dam. The clogging seriously influences the safety of tailings dam. This paper conducts several column experiments to analyse the physical and chemical clogging of the Lixi tailings dam in China. The experiment results of chemical clogging show that average flow velocity and permeability decrease by approximately 50% to 60%. The experiment results of physical clogging show that these values decrease by approximately 50% to 70%. For physical clogging, a higher hydraulic gradient could result in a larger extent of decrease in the permeability coefficient. The permeability did not decrease when the hydraulic gradient was equal to 0.125. The results of chemical clogging column experiments show that ferrous ion solution concentration is disproportional to the permeability coefficient. This scenario can be attributed to the extremely small concentration gradients.

  20. The effect of milkfat melting properties on chemical and physical properties of 20% reformulated cream

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Lisa Lenore

    1999-01-01

    The Effect of Milkfat Melting Properties on Chemical and Physical Properties of 20% Reformulated Cream Lisa L. Scott (ABSTRACT) Skim, sweet buttermilk, and butter derived aqueous phase components were used to re-emulsify low-melt and medium-melt fraction butteroils to yield 20% milkfat creams. The implications of separation temperature in obtaining components, melting point characteristics, and formulation on the chemical and physical properties of reformulated and natural crea...

  1. Research and Discussion on Physical and Chemical Properties of Cultivating Substrate with Facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This article, by comparing the basic concepts of substrate and soil, their composition of substance and methods of measuring the indexes of physical and chemical properties, analyzes and researches ways of choosing substrate for cultivation with facilities. It indicates that the normal physical and chemical indexes of evaluating a substrate are bulk density, total porosity, non-capillary porosity, ratio of big porosity to small porosity, the pH and the electrical conductivity (EC) value of the substrate. By...

  2. 76 FR 63304 - Guidance for Industry on Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers Into Solid Oral Dosage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0212] Guidance for Industry on Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers Into... availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers Into Solid... design considerations for incorporating physical-chemical identifiers (PCIDs) into solid oral...

  3. The physical and chemical properties of ultrathin oxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, S C; Xu, C; Goodman, D W

    1997-01-01

    Thin oxide films (from one to tens of monolayers) of SiO2, MgO, NiO, Al2O3, FexOy, and TiO2 supported on refractory metal substrates have been prepared by depositing the oxide metal precursor in a background of oxygen (ca 1 x 10(-5) Torr). The thinness of these oxide samples facilitates investigation by an array of surface techniques, many of which are precluded when applied to the corresponding bulk oxide. Layered and mixed binary oxides have been prepared by sequential synthesis of dissimilar oxide layers or co-deposition of two different oxides. Recent work has shown that the underlying oxide substrate can markedly influence the electronic and chemical properties of the overlayer oxide. The structural, electronic, and chemical properties of these ultrathin oxide films have been probed using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS), ion-scattering spectroscopy (ISS), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), infrared reflectance absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS).

  4. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, volumes, and physical-chemical properties of chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base flui...

  5. Study of physical chemical characteristics of a shungite

    OpenAIRE

    Maira Kazankapova; A. Bekzhanova; Sergey Efremov; Mikhail Nauryzbayev

    2012-01-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics of shungite from the field of Kazakhstan ("Bakyrchik") and Russia ("Zazhegino") was studied by elemental analysis, IR- spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The content of carbon in the schungite field "Zazhegino" is 28,0-31,0 %,  in the field "Bakyrchik" - 15,0-19,0 %, in schungite concentrate  "Bakyrchik" is 40,0 ± 2,0 %.  IR-spectroscopic analysis have been shown that carboxyl groups appear in addition to the concentrate of polycyclic hydrocarbons conta...

  6. Physical/chemical closed-loop water-recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Cal C.; Wydeven, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    Water needs, water sources, and means for recycling water are examined in terms appropriate to the water quality requirements of a small crew and spacecraft intended for long duration exploration missions. Inorganic, organic, and biological hazards are estimated for waste water sources. Sensitivities to these hazards for human uses are estimated. The water recycling processes considered are humidity condensation, carbon dioxide reduction, waste oxidation, distillation, reverse osmosis, pervaporation, electrodialysis, ion exchange, carbon sorption, and electrochemical oxidation. Limitations and applications of these processes are evaluated in terms of water quality objectives. Computerized simulation of some of these chemical processes is examined. Recommendations are made for development of new water recycling technology and improvement of existing technology for near term application to life support systems for humans in space. The technological developments are equally applicable to water needs on Earth, in regions where extensive water recycling is needed or where advanced water treatment is essential to meet EPA health standards.

  7. The Physical and Chemical Structure of Hot Molecular Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, H

    2004-01-01

    We have made self-consistent models of the density and temperature profiles of the gas and dust surrounding embedded luminous objects using a detailed radiative transfer model together with observations of the spectral energy distribution of hot molecular cores. Using these profiles we have investigated the hot core chemistry which results when grain mantles are evaporated, taking into account the different binding energies of the mantle molecules, as well a model in which we assume that all molecules are embedded in water ice and have a common binding energy. We find that most of the resulting column densities are consistent with those observed toward the hot core G34.3+0.15 at a time around 10$^4$ years after central luminous star formation. We have also investigated the dependence of the chemical structure on the density profile which suggests an observational possibility of constraining density profiles from determination of the source sizes of line emission from desorbed molecules.

  8. Spatially resolved physical and chemical properties of the planetary nebula NGC 3242

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, H; Leal-Ferreira, M L; Corradi, R L M

    2013-01-01

    Optical integral-field spectroscopy was used to investigate the planetary nebula NGC 3242. We analysed the main morphological components of this source, including its knots, but not the halo. In addition to revealing the properties ofthe physical and chemical nature of this nebula, we also provided reliable spatially resolved constraints that can be used for future photoionisation modelling of the nebula. The latter is ultimately necessary to obtain a fully self-consistent 3D picture of the physical and chemical properties of the object. The observations were obtained with the VIMOS instrument attached to VLT-UT3. Maps and values for specific morphological zones for the detected emission-lines were obtained and analysed with routines developed by the authors to derive physical and chemical conditions of the ionised gas in a 2D fashion. We obtained spatially resolved maps and mean values of the electron densities, temperatures, and chemical abundances, for specific morphological structures in NGC~3242. These r...

  9. Chemical and physical properties of bone cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Liang Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral compression fracture is the most common complication of osteoporosis. It may result in persistent severe pain and limited mobility, and significantly impacts the quality of life. Vertebroplasty involves a percutaneous injection of bone cement into the collapsed vertebrae by fluorescent guide. The most commonly used bone cement in percutaneous vertebroplasty is based on the polymerization of methylmethacrylate monomers to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA polymers. However, information on the properties of bone cement is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the clinical community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the physical properties of PMMA. The effects of altering the portions and contents of monomer liquid and polymer powders on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also discussed. This information will allow spine surgeons to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific clinical applications and improve safety.

  10. Determination of Physical, Chemical and Digestibility of some Agricultural by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majed dehgan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, physical and chemical characteristics and estimation of effective fiber and digestibility of some agricultural by-products such as lerd, pulp and date kernel, grape pomace, pistachio hulls, lime and rice straw were determined by using in vitro technique. Experimental data were analyzed as a complete randomized design, with three replicates. Physical and chemical characteristics and digestibility parameters among samples were significantly different. Rice straw due to high water holding capacity and low-density mass were floating on the liquid phase of reticulo-rumen and stimulates rumination but palm seed with high bulk density tends to deposit in the rumen. Chemical characteristics such as non-fibrous carbohydrates of lemon pulp and pistachio hull and crude protein of grape pomace, lerd and pulp of date were significantly different between samples. Results of physical characteristics, particle size separation and physical effective cell wall showed that rice straw provides adequate fiber in diet. Also, to some extent physical effective cell wall can be provided by grape pomace, kernel and lerd of date. The predictions of particle size separation and physical effective cell wall were found to compare reasonably well when new Pennsylvania sieves, compare to old ones, were used. By considering physical and chemical characteristics of above mentioned agricultural by-products date pulp with non-fibrous carbohydrate and high protein content and digestibility can be used in higher amounts in ruminant diets.

  11. Chemical and physical gradients along the OMC-1 ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerechts, H.; Bergin, E. A.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Snell, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a survey of the distribution of 20 chemical and isotopic molecular species along the central ridge of the Orion molecular cloud from 6' north to 6' south of BN-KL observed with the QUARRY focal plane array on the FCRAO 14 m telescope, which provides an angular resolution of approximately 50" in the 3 mm wavelength region. We use standard tools of multivariate analysis for a systematic investigation of the similarities and differences among the maps of integrated intensities of the 32 lines observed. The maps fall in three broad classes: first, those strongly peaked toward BN-KL; second, those having rather flat distributions along the ridge; and third, those with a clear north-south gradient or contrast. We identify six positions or regions where we calculate relative abundances. Line velocities and line widths indicate that the optically thin lines generally trace the same volume of dense gas, except in the molecular bar, where C18O, C34S, H13CO+, CN, C2H, SO, and C3H2 have velocities characteristic of the bar itself, whereas the emission from other detected species is dominated by the background cloud. The strongest abundance variations in our data are the well-known enhancements seen in HCN, CH3OH, HC3N, and SO toward BN-KL and, less strongly, toward the Orion-South outflow 1'.3S. The principal result of this study is that along the extended quiescent ridge the chemical abundances, within factors of 3-4, exhibit an impressive degree of uniformity. The northern part of the ridge has a chemistry closest to that found in quiescent dense clouds. While temperature and density are similar around the northern radical-ion peak near 3'.5N and in the southern core near 4'.2S, some abundances, in particular, those of the ions HCO+ and N2H+, are significantly lower toward 4'.2S. The areas near 4.'2S and the molecular bar itself around (1'.7E, 2'.4S) stand out with peculiar and similar properties probably caused by stronger UV fields penetrating deeper into the

  12. Study of physical chemical characteristics of a shungite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Kazankapova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The physico-chemical characteristics of shungite from the field of Kazakhstan ("Bakyrchik" and Russia ("Zazhegino" was studied by elemental analysis, IR- spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The content of carbon in the schungite field "Zazhegino" is 28,0-31,0 %,  in the field "Bakyrchik" - 15,0-19,0 %, in schungite concentrate  "Bakyrchik" is 40,0 ± 2,0 %.  IR-spectroscopic analysis have been shown that carboxyl groups appear in addition to the concentrate of polycyclic hydrocarbons containing methylene groups. Analysis of electron microscopy have been shown that as a result of enrichment by carbon, shungite can get a more developed surface structure and porosity.

  13. Titan. [physical and chemical processes in satellite atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunten, D. M.; Tomasko, M. G.; Flasar, F. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Strobel, D. F.; Stevenson, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that Titan, which is the second largest satellite in the solar system, is considerably larger than Mercury. It is made unique by its dense atmosphere, which consists mainly of nitrogen, although a substantial component of methane is present. The basic properties of Titan are summarized in a table. Many of the data were obtained during the close pass of Voyager 1 in November 1980. The atmospheric temperature decreases from its surface value of 94 K at a pressure of 1500 mbar to a minimum of 71 K at a height of 42 km and a pressure of 128 mbar. Details of atmospheric composition and thermal structure are discussed, taking into account chemical identifications and abundances, the vertical temperature structure, the horizontal temperature and opacity structure, and the radiative equilibrium. The upper atmosphere composition and temperature is considered along with the properties of aerosols, and meteorology and atmospheric dynamics. Titan's interior has an average density of 1.88 g per cu cm. Attention is given to Titan's surface and interior, and its formation.

  14. Physical and chemical evaluation of furniture waste briquettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ana Isabel; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A

    2016-03-01

    Furniture waste is mainly composed of wood and upholstery foam (mostly polyurethane foam). Both of these have a high calorific value, therefore, energy recovery would be an appropriate process to manage these wastes. Nevertheless, the drawback is that the energy content of these wastes is limited due to their low density mainly that of upholstery foam. Densification of separate foam presents difficulties due to its elastic character. The significance of this work lies in obtaining densified material by co-densification of furniture wood waste and polyurethane foam waste. Densification of furniture wood and the co-densification of furniture wood waste with polyurethane foam have been studied. On the one hand, the parameters that have an effect on the quality of the furniture waste briquettes have been analysed, i.e., moisture content, compaction pressure, presence of lignin, etc. The maximum weight percentage of polyurethane foam that can be added with furniture wood waste to obtain durable briquettes and the optimal moisture were determined. On the other hand, some parameters were analysed in order to evaluate the possible effect on the combustion. The chemical composition of waste wood was compared with untreated wood biomass; the higher nitrogen content and the concentration of some metals were the most important differences, with a significant difference of Ti content.

  15. Physical and Chemical Sciences Center: Research briefs. Volume 9-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vook, F.L.; Samara, G.A. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    As Sandia National Laboratories and the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center develop an increasingly diverse set of customers, research partners, and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA`s) with industry, there is a need for providing more concise information describing the technical achievements and capabilities. This publication, Research Briefs, is designed to inform the present and potential partners in research and technology advancement. The research emphasizes semiconductor physics, electronic materials, surface physics and chemistry, plasma and chemical processing sciences, lasers and optics, vision science, ion-solid interactions and defect physics, and advanced materials physics. The specific programs pursued are driven by the research goals which are greatly influenced by interactions with the government and industrial customers.

  16. Water quality index calculated from biological, physical and chemical attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Francisco Cleiton; Andrade, Eunice Maia; Lopes, Fernando Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    To ensure a safe drinking water supply, it is necessary to protect water quality. To classify the suitability of the Orós Reservoir (Northeast of Brazil) water for human consumption, a Water Quality Index (WQI) was enhanced and refined through a Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Samples were collected bi-monthly at seven points (P1 - P7) from July 2009 to July 2011. Samples were analysed for 29 physico-chemical attributes and 4 macroinvertebrate metrics associated with the macrophytes Pistia stratiotes and Eichhornia crassipes. PCA allowed us to reduce the number of attributes from 33 to 12, and 85.32% of the variance was explained in five dimensions (C1 - C5). Components C1 and C3 were related to water-soluble salts and reflect the weathering process, while C2 was related to surface runoff. C4 was associated with macroinvertebrate diversity, represented by ten pollution-resistant families. C5 was related to the nutrient phosphorus, an indicator of the degree of eutrophication. The mean values for the WQIs ranged from 49 to 65 (rated as fair), indicating that water can be used for human consumption after treatment. The lowest values for the WQI were recorded at the entry points to the reservoir (P3, P1, P5, and P4), while the best WQIs were recorded at the exit points (P6 and P7), highlighting the reservoir's purification ability. The proposed WQI adequately expressed water quality, and can be used for monitoring surface water quality.

  17. Enzymatically cross-linked tilapia gelatin hydrogels: physical, chemical, and hybrid networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Franziska; da Silva, Marcelo Alves; Drake, Alex F; Ross-Murphy, Simon B; Dreiss, Cécile A

    2011-10-10

    This Article investigates different types of networks formed from tilapia fish gelatin (10% w/w) in the presence and absence of the enzymatic cross-linker microbial transglutaminase. The influence of the temperature protocol and cross-linker concentration (0-55 U mTGase/g gelatin) was examined in physical, chemical, and hybrid gels, where physical gels arise from the formation of triple helices that act as junction points when the gels are cooled below the gelation point. A combination of rheology and optical rotation was used to study the evolution of the storage modulus (G') over time and the number of triple helices formed for each type of gel. We attempted to separate the final storage modulus of the gels into its chemical and physical contributions to examine the existence or otherwise of synergism between the two types of networks. Our experiments show that the gel characteristics vary widely with the thermal protocol. The final storage modulus in chemical gels increased with enzyme concentration, possibly due to the preferential formation of closed loops at low cross-linker amount. In chemical-physical gels, where the physical network (helices) was formed consecutively to the covalent one, we found that below a critical enzyme concentration the more extensive the chemical network is (as measured by G'), the weaker the final gel is. The storage modulus attributed to the physical network decreased exponentially as a function of G' from the chemical network, but both networks were found to be purely additive. Helices were not thermally stabilized. The simultaneous formation of physical and chemical networks (physical-co-chemical) resulted in G' values higher than the individual networks formed under the same conditions. Two regimes were distinguished: at low enzyme concentration (10-20 U mTGase/g gelatin), the networks were formed in series, but the storage modulus from the chemical network was higher in the presence of helices (compared to pure chemical gels

  18. The effect of physical and chemical cues on hepatocellular function and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatef, Shimaa A; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2014-03-11

    Physical topographical features and/or chemical stimuli to the extracellular matrix (ECM) provide essential cues that manipulate cell functions. From the physical point of view, contoured nanostructures are very important for cell behavior in general, and for cellular functions. From the chemical point of view, ECM proteins containing an RGD sequence are known to alter cell functions. In this study, the influence of integrated physical and chemical cues on a liver cell line (HepG2) was investigated. To mimic the physical cues provided by the ECM, amorphous TiO2 nanogratings with specific dimensional and geometrical characteristics (nanogratings 90 nm wide and 150 nm apart) were fabricated. To mimic the chemical cues provided by the ECM, the TiO2 inorganic film was modified by immobilization of the RGD motif. The hepatic cell line morphological and functional changes induced by simultaneously combining these diversified cues were investigated, including cellular alignment and the expression of different functional proteins. The combination of nanopatterns and surface modification with RGD induced cellular alignment and expression of functional proteins, indicating that physical and chemical cues are important factors for optimizing hepatocyte function.

  19. Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Lake Edku Water, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. OKBAH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to evaluate the quality of Lake Edku water. Regional and seasonal variations of some physico-chemical parameters (nutrient salts, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and silicate, in addition to pH, total alkalinity, chlorosity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand and oxidizable organic matter that were determined during the period from January to December 2000. Important variations have occurred in the investigated area as a result of human activity and the discharge of wastewater to the lake. The relatively low pH values reflect the decreased productivity of the Lake as a result of the polluted water discharged into the lake. Total alkalinity varied between 2.25 ± 0.35 to 8.38 ± 0.9 meq/l. In comparison with previous decades chlorosity content (586-1562 mg/l showed the general decreasing trend. Dissolved oxygen varied (2.37 ± 0.72 - 4.47 ± 0.94 mg/l. The ratios of BOD/ OOM values indicate that the lake water has a biodegradable nature. There was a noticeable variation in ammonia levels; a lower ammonia content was recorded in summer and spring. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in Lake Edku water showed values ranging from 3.7±1.4 to 7.8±1.9 ΜM and from 15.2±2.9 to 45.9±11.8 ΜM, respectively. The total nitrogen of the lake exhibited higher levels (53.1±12.2 – 164.2±30.7 ΜM. The ratio of NH4/TIN (0.09-0.45 seems to be highly representative of the microbial nitrification rate as well as of the varying agricultural inflows. It is interesting to note that increasing values of reactive phosphate (11.6±1.8 – 14.7±2.5 ΜM were determined in autumn and winter respectively. The higher concentrations of reactive silicate were directly proportional to drainage water discharged into the Lake. It is clear from the mean ratio of N/P (2.4-8.8 nitrogen is the limiting factor. The lower values of N/P ratio could be related to an allochthonous condition.

  20. Surface chemical and physical modification in stent technology for the treatment of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazneen, Feroze; Herzog, Grégoire; Arrigan, Damien W M; Caplice, Noel; Benvenuto, Pasquale; Galvin, Paul; Thompson, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) kills millions of people every year. It results from a narrowing of the arteries (stenosis) supplying blood to the heart. This review discusses the merits and limitations of balloon angioplasty and stent implantation, the most common treatment options for CAD, and the pathophysiology associated with these treatments. The focus of the review is heavily placed on research efforts geared toward the modification of stent surfaces for the improvement of stent-vascular compatibility and the reduction in the occurrence of related pathophysiologies. Such modifications may be chemical or physical, both of which are surveyed here. Chemical modifications may be passive or active, while physical modification of stent surfaces can also provide suitable substrates to manipulate the responses of vascular cells (endothelial, smooth muscle, and fibroblast). The influence of micro- and nanostructured surfaces on the in vitro cell response is discussed. Finally, future perspectives on the combination of chemical and physical modifications of stent surfaces are also presented.

  1. Physical-chemical fundamentals and the application of fluid chromatography (SFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasen, U. van; Swaid, I.; Schneider, G.M.

    1980-08-01

    In super fluid chromatography chromatography (SFC), highly condensed gases in the critical temperature region are used as mobile phases. This method has considerable advantages in the analytical or preparative separation of particularly difficultly volatile or thermally unstable substances compared to gas chromatography. It competes with HPLC and gel chromatography in certain special applications and preparative separations, e.g. in petroleum industry and the separation of oligomers. It is also of great interest for basic investigations of fluid extraction and determination of physical-chemical parameters of fluid systems. The most important physical-chemical, methodical and apparative fundamentals of SFC are discussed in summary form; characteristic physical-chemical examples of application are the determination of capacity ratios, distribution quotients, partial mole volumes, mixed virial coefficients and diffusion coefficients.

  2. Reverse engineering life: physical and chemical mimetics for controlled stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuse, Gary R; Lamkin-Kennard, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to manipulate stem cells in order to induce differentiation along a desired developmental pathway has improved immeasurably in recent years. That is in part because we have a better understanding of the intracellular and extracellular signals that regulate differentiation. However, there has also been a realization that stem cell differentiation is not regulated only by chemical signals but also by the physical milieu in which a particular stem cell exists. In this regard we are challenged to mimic both chemical and physical environments. Herein we describe a method to induce stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes using a combination of chemical and physical cues. This method can be applied to produce differentiated cells for research and potentially for cell-based therapy of cardiomyopathies.

  3. SIFAT FISIK, KIMIA, DAN FUNGSIONAL DAMAR [Brief Review on: Physical, Chemical and Functional Properties of Dammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noryawati Mulyono1

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Dammar is one of Indonesian forestry products which is abundant. It has unique physical, chemical and functional properties. The important physical properties of dammar include its solubility in some organic solvents, softening temperature, viscosity and its absorbance. The important chemical properties reviewed here include its properties as resin, composition of terpenoid compounds present in dammar, and essential oil yielded from distillation of fresh dammar. Physical and chemical properties of dammar need to be studied further in order to optimize its functional properties. So far, dammar is widely used as weighting agent and source of essential oil. However, now, some species of dammar are being explored and developed for sal flour, fat source, triacylglycerol substituent for cocoa butter and wood preservatives.

  4. Development of new materials and structures based on managed physical-chemical factors of local interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakov, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states that assigning certain physical and chemical characteristics to pills and medical drugs solutions can substitute for the development of new drugs (which is essentially equivalent to the creation of new medicines). It is established that the purposeful change of physical and chemical characteristics of the standard ("old") materials (in other words, the known substances) is fundamental for the production of solid and liquid medicines, which allows us to get "new" structures and materials. The paper shows that assigning new physical and chemical properties to "old" materials and their further usage for the production of tablets and solutions from the "old" and well-known medicines can turn even very "old" medicine into very "novel" (moreover, even very fashionable) one with unprecedented (fantastic) pharmacological activity and new mechanisms of action.

  5. Chemical energy in an introductory physics course for the life sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W; Geller, Benjamin D; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    Energy is a complex idea that cuts across scientific disciplines. For life science students, an approach to energy that incorporates chemical bonds and chemical reactions is better equipped to meet the needs of life sciences students than a traditional introductory physics approach that focuses primarily on mechanical energy. We present a curricular sequence, or thread, designed to build up students' understanding of chemical energy in an introductory physics course for the life sciences. This thread is designed to connect ideas about energy from physics, biology, and chemistry. We describe the kinds of connections among energetic concepts that we intended to develop to build interdisciplinary coherence, and present some examples of curriculum materials and student data that illustrate our approach.

  6. A new principle of synthetic cascade utilization of chemical energy and physical energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Hongguang; HONG; Hui; WANG; Baoqun; HAN; Wei; LIN; Rum

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new principle of the cascade utilization of both chemical energy and physical energy in energy systems with the integration of chemical processes and thermal cycles. Particularly, a general equation of energy levels of substance, Gibbs free energy of chemical reaction and physical energy is explicitly founded. On the basis of this equation, a chemical-looping combustion and an indirect combustion are investigated. Furthermore, a mechanism of energy release, with the combination of decreasing the energy level of Gibbs free energy and upgrading the energy level of low or middle- temperature thermal energy, is clarified. The promising results obtained here establish a theoretical basis for the further investigation of multi-function systems in which energy and the environment are compatible, and create a new approach to improve the performance of traditional thermal cycles.

  7. Optimization of the sampling scheme for maps of physical and chemical properties estimated by kriging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gener Tadeu Pereira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sampling scheme is essential in the investigation of the spatial variability of soil properties in Soil Science studies. The high costs of sampling schemes optimized with additional sampling points for each physical and chemical soil property, prevent their use in precision agriculture. The purpose of this study was to obtain an optimal sampling scheme for physical and chemical property sets and investigate its effect on the quality of soil sampling. Soil was sampled on a 42-ha area, with 206 geo-referenced points arranged in a regular grid spaced 50 m from each other, in a depth range of 0.00-0.20 m. In order to obtain an optimal sampling scheme for every physical and chemical property, a sample grid, a medium-scale variogram and the extended Spatial Simulated Annealing (SSA method were used to minimize kriging variance. The optimization procedure was validated by constructing maps of relative improvement comparing the sample configuration before and after the process. A greater concentration of recommended points in specific areas (NW-SE direction was observed, which also reflects a greater estimate variance at these locations. The addition of optimal samples, for specific regions, increased the accuracy up to 2 % for chemical and 1 % for physical properties. The use of a sample grid and medium-scale variogram, as previous information for the conception of additional sampling schemes, was very promising to determine the locations of these additional points for all physical and chemical soil properties, enhancing the accuracy of kriging estimates of the physical-chemical properties.

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics transport and rate processes in physical, chemical and biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Demirel, Yasar

    2014-01-01

    Natural phenomena consist of simultaneously occurring transport processes and chemical reactions. These processes may interact with each other and may lead to self-organized structures, fluctuations, instabilities, and evolutionary systems. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics, 3rd edition emphasizes the unifying role of thermodynamics in analyzing the natural phenomena. This third edition updates and expands on the first and second editions by focusing on the general balance equations for coupled processes of physical, chemical, and biological systems. The new edition contains a new chapte

  9. Devulcanization of ground tire rubber: Physical and chemical changes after different microwave exposure times

    OpenAIRE

    P. S. Garcia; F. D. B. de Sousa; J.A. Lima; S. A. Cruz; C. H. Scuracchio

    2015-01-01

    Microwave devulcanization is known to be a promising and an efficient rubber recycling method which makes possible for the rubber to regain its fluidity, and makes it capable of being remolded and revulcanized. The focus of this work is to understand the physical and chemical changes that occur in the ground tire rubber after different microwave exposure periods. For this purpose chemical, thermal, rheological and morphological analyses were performed on the tire rubber, which contains natura...

  10. Analysis and classification of physical and chemical methods of fuel activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorchak Viktoriya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The offered article explores various research studies, developed patents in terms of physical and chemical approaches to the activation of fuel. In this regard, national and foreign researches in the field of fuels activators with different principles of action were analysed, evaluating their pros and cons. The article also intends to classify these methods and compare them regarding diverse desired results and types of fuels used. In terms of physical and chemical influences on fuels and the necessity of making constructive changes in the fuel system of internal combustion engines, an optimal approach was outlined.

  11. Chemical, physical and morphometric properties of Peruvian carrot (Arracacia xanthorrhiza B.) starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, E E; Borneo, R; Melito, C G; Tovar, J

    1999-01-01

    Starch was isolated from Peruvian carrot (PC)--or arracacha--(Arraccacia xanthorrhiza B.) roots. Its chemical, physical, physicochemical and granular structural properties were compared to those of commercial cassava starch. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a granular size for PC starch ranging between 4 and 26 microns in diameter, with spherical and truncated-egg shapes. PC and cassava starches were similar regarding gross chemical composition and basic physical characteristics but differed in pasting properties, with PC starch showing lower breakdown and consistency indices. The two starches also showed different water absorption and solubility patterns.

  12. Physical and chemical injury as causes of sudden cardiac death: the forensic forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, L

    1994-01-01

    Physical and chemical injuries account for the largest number of sudden, unexpected cardiac deaths in persons between the ages of 1 and 44 years. Blunt-force injuries, lacerations, avulsions, and contusions of the heart and great vessels sustained during motor vehicle crashes constitute the most prevalent type of lethal physical trauma to the cardiovascular system. The second most prevalent type of trauma is from penetrating and perforating wounds inflicted by firearms. The mechanisms of these injuries are discussed, with emphasis placed on those factors contributing to lethality. The three most prevalent chemicals associated with sudden cardiac death-ethyl alcohol, cocaine, and tricylic antidepressants-are briefly mentioned.

  13. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Després, V.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Psenner, R.; Ariya, P. A.; Pósfai, M.; Ahern, H. E.; Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2009-04-01

    The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques) required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  14. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Georgakopoulos

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  15. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Georgakopoulos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  16. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Collapsing Low-mass Prestellar Dense Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincelin, U.; Commerçon, B.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S.; Herbst, E.

    2016-05-01

    The first hydrostatic core, also called the first Larson core, is one of the first steps in low-mass star formation as predicted by theory. With recent and future high-performance telescopes, the details of these first phases are becoming accessible, and observations may confirm theory and even present new challenges for theoreticians. In this context, from a theoretical point of view, we study the chemical and physical evolution of the collapse of prestellar cores until the formation of the first Larson core, in order to better characterize this early phase in the star formation process. We couple a state-of-the-art hydrodynamical model with full gas-grain chemistry, using different assumptions for the magnetic field strength and orientation. We extract the different components of each collapsing core (i.e., the central core, the outflow, the disk, the pseudodisk, and the envelope) to highlight their specific physical and chemical characteristics. Each component often presents a specific physical history, as well as a specific chemical evolution. From some species, the components can clearly be differentiated. The different core models can also be chemically differentiated. Our simulation suggests that some chemical species act as tracers of the different components of a collapsing prestellar dense core, and as tracers of the magnetic field characteristics of the core. From this result, we pinpoint promising key chemical species to be observed.

  17. Analysis of physical-chemical processes governing SSME internal fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, A. K.; Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Prakash, C.; Przekwas, A. J.; Kannapel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The basic issues concerning the physical chemical processes of the Space Shuttle Main Engine are discussed. The objectives being to supply the general purpose CFD code PHOENICS and the associated interactive graphics package - GRAFFIC; to demonstrate code usage on SSME related problems; to perform computations and analyses of problems relevant to current and future SSME's; and to participate in the development of new physical models of various processes present in SSME components. These objectives are discussed in detail.

  18. The effects of motive gas physical properties on the performance of ejector for chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jungkun; Kim, Sehoon; Kwon, Hyuckmo; Kwon, Sejin

    2005-03-01

    Axi-symmetric annular type ejector has been developed as a pressure recovery system for HF/DF chemical laser. Ejector was tested using air as operating gases and low-pressure entrained flow was obtained. In this paper, we changed motive gas since operating gases for chemical laser system are products of chemical reaction. By selection of motive gas, physical properties of operating gas changes, therefore the performance of ejector is different for each motive gas, i.e., specific heat at constant pressure (CP) and average molecular weight (MW) on the effectiveness of ejection. The research was carried out by both numerical analysis using commercial CFD code, FLUENT and experiments.

  19. Influence of particle size and preparation methods on the physical and chemical stability of amorphous simvastatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fang; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Tian, Fang

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the stability of amorphous simvastatin. Quench-cooled amorphous simvastatin in two particle size ranges, 150-180 microm (QC-big) and physical and chemical......, particle size, a factor that has often been overlooked when dealing with amorphous materials, was shown to have an influence on physical stability of amorphous simvastatin....... stability were investigated. Physical stability (crystallization) of amorphous simvastatin stored at two conditions was monitored by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Assessment of enthalpy relaxation of amorphous forms was conducted...

  20. Chemical, physical and nutritional changes in soybean meal as a result of toasting and extrusion cooking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, G.J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of soybean meal extrusion and the development of shear forces during single-screw extrusion was compared with the toasting process of soybean meal. Attention was focused on chemical, physical and nutritional changes during these thermo-mechanical treatments.Monitoring target parameters we

  1. A Jigsaw Cooperative Learning Application in Elementary Science and Technology Lessons: Physical and Chemical Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayyildiz, Yildizay; Ogunc, Aylin; Sesen, Burcin Acar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cooperative learning is an active learning approach in which students work together in small groups to complete an assigned task. Students commonly find the subject of "physical and chemical changes" difficult and abstract, and thus they generally have many misconceptions about it. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the…

  2. Chemical and Physical Indicators in Drinking Water and Water Sources of Boroujerd Using Principal Components Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darabi , M. (MSC

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Quality control of drinking water is important for maintaining health and safety of consumers, and the first step is to study the water quality variables. This study aimed to evaluate the chemical and physical indicators, water quality variables and qualitative classification of drinking water stations and water sources in Boroujerd. Material and Methods: This descriptive-cross sectional study was conducted on 70 samples of drinking water and 10 samples from sources in 2011-2012. Nine Water quality variables were measured and coded using STATISTICA10 Software. Principal component analysis (PCA was performed for qualitative classification of water samples and determination of water quality variables. Results: Based on PCA, chemical variables such as fluoride, nitrate, total hardness and iron, and physical variables such as pH and TDS were paramount importance to water quality. According to T-test, the average concentration of fluoride and iron, and the turbidity in all samples were significantly less than the standard. But other variables were up to standard. Conclusion: For the large water quality data, the use of PCA to identify the main qualitative variables and to classify physical and chemical variables can be used as an effective way in water quality management. Keywords: Physical and Chemical Indicators, Drinking Water and Sources, Boroujerd, Principal Component Analysis

  3. OPEN BURNING OF AGRICULTURAL BIOMASS: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF PARTICLE-PHASE EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This effort presents the physical and chemical characterization of PM2.5 emissions from simulated agricultural fires of surface residuals of two major grain crops, rice (Oryza sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L). The O2 levels and CO/CO

  4. Self-reported occupational exposure to chemical and physical factors and risk of skin problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso, Jose Hernan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Tynes, Tore;

    2015-01-01

    Prospective studies on occupational dermatoses in the general working population are sparse. This study investigated prospectively the impact of self-reported occupational exposure to chemicals and physical factors on the risk of skin problems. The cohort comprised respondents drawn randomly from...

  5. Writing Material in Chemical Physics Research: The Laboratory Notebook as Locus of Technical and Textual Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Chad

    2010-01-01

    This article, drawing on ethnographic study in a chemical physics research facility, explores how notebooks are used and produced in the conduct of laboratory science. Data include written field notes of laboratory activity; visual documentation of "in situ" writing processes; analysis of inscriptions, texts, and material artifacts produced in the…

  6. Physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpaste and evaluation of its effects on enamel roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Paulo Hilgenberg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpastes and their effect on bovine enamel after application of a bleaching agent (16% carbamide peroxide. Physical-chemical analysis was made considering mass loss by desiccation, ash content and pH of the toothpastes. Thirty bovine dental enamel fragments were prepared for roughness measurements. The samples were subjected to bleaching treatments and simulated brushing: G1. Sorriso Dentes Brancos (Conventional toothpaste, G2. Close-UP Whitening (Whitening toothpaste, and G3. Sensodyne Branqueador (Whitening toothpaste. The average roughness (Ra was evaluated prior to the bleaching treatment and after brushing. The results revealed differences in the physical-chemical characteristics of the toothpastes (p < 0.0001. The final Ra had higher values (p < 0.05 following the procedures. The mean of the Ra did not show significant differences, considering toothpaste groups and bleaching treatment. Interaction (toothpaste and bleaching treatment showed significant difference (p < 0.0001. The whitening toothpastes showed differences in their physical-chemical properties. All toothpastes promoted changes to the enamel surface, probably by the use of a bleaching agent.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVATED CARBONS' PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION TO THEIR MERCURY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a characterization of the physical and chemical properties of the activated carbons used for elemental mercury (Hgo) adsorption, in order to understand the role of oxygen surface functional groups on the mechanism of Hgo adsorption by activated carbons....

  8. THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE EMISSIONS FROM A RESIDENTIAL OIL BOILER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil and the use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source are available for dispersion, climate, and source-recep...

  9. 2005 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2005-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its second annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2005. During this period, sixteen PNNL scientists hosted fourteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the fourteen participants, twelve were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and one was a university faculty member.

  10. Heterogeneity in physical, chemical and plankton-community structures in Lake Tanganyika

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, V.T.; Tumba, J.M.; Tshibangu, K.; Lukwesa, C.; Chitamwebwa, D.; Bwebwa, D.; Makasa, L.; Roijackers, R.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    From 28 August to 6 September 1995, we monitored the lake-wide physical, chemical and biological properties of the pelagic waters in Lake Tanganyika. The aim of this study was to examine the spatial environmental variability and its relation to fluctuations in plankton abundance and community assemb

  11. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting.

  12. Physical and chemical effects of ultrasound vibration on polymer melt in extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyao; Chen, Yingzi; Li, Huilin; Lai, Shih-Yaw; Jow, Jinder

    2010-01-01

    The physical and chemical effects of ultrasound on polypropylene (PP) melts in extrusion were investigated. By applying ultrasound vibration to the entrance of the die, apparent pressure and viscosity of PP can be obviously decreased under the appropriate ultrasound power. Ultrasound has both physical and chemical effects on the polymer melt. In our study with specific polymer and ultrasound system, we determined that the chemical effect makes up 35-40% of the total effect of ultrasound on the apparent viscosity reduction of PP melts at most of the studied intensities. The physical effect plays a more important role in the ultrasound-applied extrusion than the chemical effect. This chemical effect is an irreversible and permanent change in molecule weight and the molecular-weight distribution due to ultrasound. As the ultrasound intensity increases, the molecular weight of PP reduces and its molecular-weight distribution becomes narrower; the orientation of PP molecules along the flow direction reduces (in melt state) and the crystallinity of PP samples (in solid state) decreases by applying the ultrasound vibration. Ultrasound vibration increases the motion of molecular chains and makes them more disorder; it also affects the relaxation process of polymer melts by shortening the relaxation time of chain segments, leading to weakening the elastic effect and decreasing the extruding swell ratios. All the factors discussed above reduce the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of the polymer melt and result in the viscosity drop of the polymer melt in extrusion.

  13. Physical, chemical, and biological data for selected streams in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1981-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.

    1999-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected at 51 sampling sites in Chester County, Pa., from 1970 through 1994 as part of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program. This report presents data collected from 1981 through 1994. Physical data include water temperature, instantaneous stream discharge, pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen. Chemical data include laboratory determinations of nutrients, major ions, and selected metals in whole water samples and selected metals, pesticides, gross polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s), gross polychlorinated napthalenes (PCN?s), and total carbon in stream-bottom sediment samples. The biological data consists of benthic macroinvertebrate population analyses and diversity indices. Chester County is undergoing rapid urbanization as agricultural lands are converted to residential, commercial, and industrial areas. The purpose of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program is to further the understanding of stream habitat and chemical changes in response to this urbanization.

  14. IMPROVEMENTS IN WOOD THERMOPLASTIC MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROPERTIES BY PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Zivkovic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a short overview of the developments made in the field of wood thermoplastic composites in terms of surface treatment, flammability, matrix/reinforcement model, properties and application of recycled polymer matrices. The usage of lignocellulosic fibers as reinforcement in composite materials demands well formed interface between the fiber and the matrix. Because of the different nature of reinforcement and matrix components some physical and chemical treatment methods which improve the fiber matrix adhesion were introduced, as well as the improvements of lignocellulosic fibers and thermoplastic polymer matrix based composites flammability characteristics. These physical and chemical treatments influence the hydrophilic character of the lignocellulosic fibers, and therefore change their physical and mechanical properties.

  15. Biochar and hydrochar reactivity assessed by chemical, physical and biological methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naisse, Christophe; Alexis, Marie; Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; pozzi, Alessandro; Carcaillet, Christopher; Criscuoli, Irene; Miglietta, Franco; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2014-05-01

    Field application of biochar is intended to increase soil carbon (C) storage. The assessment of C storage potential of biochars lacks methods and standard materials. In this study, we compared the chemical reactivity of biochars and hydrochars and their potential mineralisation before and after physical weathering as one possibility to evaluate their environmental stability. We used biochars produced by gasification (GSs) and hydrochars produced by hydrothermal carbonisation (HTCs) produced from three different feedstocks as well as Holocene charcoals (150 and 2000 yr old). Their chemical reactivity was analysed after acid dichromate oxidation and their mineralisation potential after laboratory incubations before and after physical weathering. Our results showed that use of acid dichromate oxidation may allow for differentiation of the reactivity of modern biochars but that chemical reactivity of biochars is poorly suited to assess their environmental residence time because it may change with exposure time in soil. Physical weathering induced a carbon loss and increased biological stability of biochar, while reducing its positive priming effect on native soil organic matter. Model extrapolations based on our data showed that decadal C sequestration potential of GS and HTC is globally equivalent when all losses including those due to priming and physical weathering were taken into account. However, at century scale only GS may have the potential to increase soil C storage.

  16. Mantle convection and plate tectonics: toward an integrated physical and chemical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley

    2000-06-16

    Plate tectonics and convection of the solid, rocky mantle are responsible for transporting heat out of Earth. However, the physics of plate tectonics is poorly understood; other planets do not exhibit it. Recent seismic evidence for convection and mixing throughout the mantle seems at odds with the chemical composition of erupted magmas requiring the presence of several chemically distinct reservoirs within the mantle. There has been rapid progress on these two problems, with the emergence of the first self-consistent models of plate tectonics and mantle convection, along with new geochemical models that may be consistent with seismic and dynamical constraints on mantle structure.

  17. Advances in Methane Activation Studies at Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Following successful implementation of selective oxida-tion of methane into methanol at low temperature (80℃) through setting up a circulating system of multiple electron pairs the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) has made new stride in the fundamental research on direct acti-vation of methane. This institute by means of collaboration with the US West Pacific National Laboratory has acquired the complete information on the structure of active centers of solid catalysts with the relevant results published in the latest issue of Journal of American Chemical Society.

  18. Physics of a ballistic missile defense - The chemical laser boost-phase defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1988-01-01

    The basic physics involved in proposals to use a chemical laser based on satellites for a boost-phase defense are investigated. After a brief consideration of simple physical conditions for the defense, a calculation of an equation for the number of satellites needed for the defense is made along with some typical values of this for possible future conditions for the defense. Basic energy and power requirements for the defense are determined. A sumary is made of probable minimum conditions that must be achieved for laser power, targeting accuracy, number of satellites, and total sources for power needed.

  19. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  20. DAWN (Design Assistant Workstation) for advanced physical-chemical life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudokas, Mary R.; Cantwell, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Peter I.; Shenk, Timothy W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (NASA-OAST) under the Advanced Life Support Development Program. It is an initial attempt to integrate artificial intelligence techniques (via expert systems) with conventional quantitative modeling tools for advanced physical-chemical life support systems. The addition of artificial intelligence techniques will assist the designer in the definition and simulation of loosely/well-defined life support processes/problems as well as assist in the capture of design knowledge, both quantitative and qualitative. Expert system and conventional modeling tools are integrated to provide a design workstation that assists the engineer/scientist in creating, evaluating, documenting and optimizing physical-chemical life support systems for short-term and extended duration missions.

  1. Physical, chemical, and biological data for selected streams in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1995-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.

    2000-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected at 51 sampling sites in Chester County, Pa., from 1970 through 1997 as part of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program. This report presents data collected from 43 sites from 1995 through 1997 that constitute a continuation of the program. Physical data include water temperature, instantaneous stream discharge, pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen. Chemical data collected include laboratory determinations of nutrients and major ions in whole water samples and selected metals, pesticides, gross polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), gross polychlorinated napthalenes (PCN's), and total carbon in stream-sediment samples. The biological data include benthic-macroinvertebrate populations. The data are presented without interpretation. Chester County is undergoing urbanization as agricultural land is converted to residential developments, commercial areas, and industrial and corporate parks. The major goal of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program is to further the understanding of stream changes in response to urbanization.

  2. Prediction of chemical, physical and sensory data from process parameters for frozen cod using multivariate analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Iben Ellegaard; Jensen, H.S.; Bøknæs, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Physical, chemical and sensory quality parameters were determined for 115 cod (Gadus morhua) samples stored under varying frozen storage conditions. Five different process parameters (period of frozen storage, frozen storage. temperature, place of catch, season for catching and state of rigor) were...... varied systematically at two levels. The data obtained were evaluated using the multivariate methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression. The PCA models were used to identify which process parameters were actually most important for the quality of the frozen cod....... PLS models that were able to predict the physical, chemical and sensory quality parameters from the process parameters of the frozen raw material were generated. The prediction abilities of the PLS models were good enough to give reasonable results even when the process parameters were characterised...

  3. Boundary conditions for the paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    The present research includes searches for important new interstellar constituents; observations relevant to differentiating between different models for the chemical processes that are important in the interstellar environment; and coordinated studies of the chemistry, physics, and dynamics of molecular clouds which are the sites or possible future sites of star formation. Recent research has included the detection and study of four new interstellar molecules; searches which have placed upper limits on the abundance of several other potential constituents of interstellar clouds; quantitative studies of comparative molecular abundances in different types of interstellar clouds; investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and the observed abundance of related species such as isomers and isotopic variants; studies of possible tracers of energenic events related to star formation, including silicon and sulfur containing molecules; and mapping of physical, chemical, and dynamical properties over extended regions of nearby cold molecular clouds.

  4. Physical and Chemical Properties of Some European Plum Cultivars (Prunus domestica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Elena IONICA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fruits from twelve plum cultivars (Prunus domestica L., were analyzed in terms of physical and chemical characteristics. The fruits trees were grown in a trial at University of Craiova - Fruit Growing Research Station (SCDP Valcea, which is located in Bujoreni, an important Romanian plum production area. Fruits were picked at harvest maturity. Several analyzes were performed, such as fruit linear dimensions, size index, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, total anthocyanins, malic, tartaric and citric acids content. The best features in terms of physical and chemical properties proved to be found in ‘Alina’, ‘Alutus’, ‘Tuleu Timpuriu’, ‘Oltenal’ and ‘Renclod Althan’.

  5. Uncertainty of inhalation dose coefficients for representative physical and chemical forms of iodine-131

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Richard Paul, III

    Releases of radioactive material have occurred at various Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities and facilities associated with the nuclear fuel cycle in the generation of electricity. Many different radionuclides have been released to the environment with resulting exposure of the population to these various sources of radioactivity. Radioiodine has been released from a number of these facilities and is a potential public health concern due to its physical and biological characteristics. Iodine exists as various isotopes, but our focus is on 131I due to its relatively long half-life, its prevalence in atmospheric releases and its contribution to offsite dose. The assumption of physical and chemical form is speculated to have a profound impact on the deposition of radioactive material within the respiratory tract. In the case of iodine, it has been shown that more than one type of physical and chemical form may be released to, or exist in, the environment; iodine can exist as a particle or as a gas. The gaseous species can be further segregated based on chemical form: elemental, inorganic, and organic iodides. Chemical compounds in each class are assumed to behave similarly with respect to biochemistry. Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratories have demonstrated that 131I is released as a particulate, as well as in elemental, inorganic and organic chemical form. The internal dose estimate from 131I may be very different depending on the effect that chemical form has on fractional deposition, gas uptake, and clearance in the respiratory tract. There are many sources of uncertainty in the estimation of environmental dose including source term, airborne transport of radionuclides, and internal dosimetry. Knowledge of uncertainty in internal dosimetry is essential for estimating dose to members of the public and for determining total uncertainty in dose estimation. Important calculational steps in any lung model is regional estimation of deposition fractions

  6. Physical and Chemical Properties of Some Imported Woods and their Degradation by Termites

    OpenAIRE

    Shanbhag, Rashmi R.; Sundararaj, R.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of physical and chemical properties of 20 species of imported wood on degradation of the wood by termites under field conditions was studied. The wood species studied were: Sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) (from two countries), Camphor, Dryobalanops aromatic C.F.Gaertner (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), Beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart (Fagales: Fagaceae), F. sylvatica L. (from two countries), Oak, Quercus robur L., Ash, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl (L...

  7. Influence of copper nanoparticles on the physical-chemical properties of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The nanoparticles released from commercial products will enter WWTPs and can induce potential adverse effects on activated sludge. This paper focused on the effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on these specific physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It was found that most of these properties were unaffected by the exposure to lower CuNPs concentration (5 ppm), but different observation were made at higher CuNPs concentrations (30 and 50 ppm). At the higher CuNPs concentrations, the sludge surface charge increased and the hydrophobicity decreased, which were attributed to more Cu2+ ions released from the CuNPs. The carbohydrate content of EPS was enhanced to defense the toxicity of CuNPs. The flocculating ability was found to be deteriorated due to the increased cell surface charge, the decreased hydrophobicity, and the damaged cell membrane. The worsened flocculating ability made the sludge flocs more dispersed, which further increased the toxicity of the CuNPs by increasing the availability of the CuNPs to the bacteria present in the sludge. Further investigation indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased at higher CuNPs concentrations, which was consistent with the deteriorated physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It seems that the physical-chemical properties can be used as an indicator for determining CuNPs toxicity to the bacteria in activated sludge. This work is important because bacteria toxicity effects to the activated sludge caused by nanoparticles may lead to the deteriorated treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment, and it is therefore necessary to find an easy way to indicate this toxicity.

  8. Efficient Regeneration of Physical and Chemical Solvents for CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tande, Brian; Seames, Wayne; Benson, Steve

    2013-05-31

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the use of composite polymer membranes and porous membrane contactors to regenerate physical and chemical solvents for capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from synthesis gas or flue gas, with the goal of improving the energy efficiency of carbon capture. Both a chemical solvent (typical for a post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2} from flue gas) and a physical solvent (typical for pre- combustion capture of CO{sub 2} from syngas) were evaluated using two bench-scale test systems constructed for this project. For chemical solvents, polytetrafluoroethylene and polypropylene membranes were found to be able to strip CO{sub 2} from a monoethanolamine (MEA) solution with high selectivity without significant degradation of the material. As expected, the regeneration temperature was the most significant parameter affecting the CO{sub 2} flux through the membrane. Pore size was also found to be important, as pores larger than 5 microns lead to excessive pore wetting. For physical solvents, polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS)-based membranes were found to have a higher CO{sub 2} permeability than polyvinylalcohol (PVOH) based membranes, while also minimizing solvent loss. Overall, however, the recovery of CO{sub 2} in these systems is low – less than 2% for both chemical and physical solvents – primarily due to the small surface area of the membrane test apparatus. To obtain the higher regeneration rates needed for this application, a much larger surface area would be needed. Further experiments using, for example, a hollow fiber membrane module could determine if this process could be commercially viable.

  9. Analysis of Physical andChemical Characteristics and Influence Factors of UCG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the UCG(underground coal gasification) theory, the “three zones” which are oxidization zone,reduction zone, and drying zone, were divided; physical and chemical properties of each zone were analyzed. Fac-tors, such as temperature, rate of water pouring, quantity of air blast, thickness of coal seam, and the operationpressure were discussed. Among the influencing factors, the temperature is the most important one.

  10. Chemical and physical characteristics of local lecithin in comparison with some other food emulsifiers

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shattory, Y.; El-Magoli, Salwa B.; Abu-Ria, S. H.; Magahed, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of local lecithin and other food emulsifiers (Emulfuid E, Triodan R 90, Panodan 150 and Glycerol mono stéarate) were studied. The characteristics of these emulsifiers studied were solubility, hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), stability index (SI), fatty acid composition and infrared spectrum. The results obtained showed that Emulfuid E and local lecithin were mixture of lecithins and phosphatidyl ethanol-amine. In addition, Triodan R 90 was a polygl...

  11. Chemical and physical properties of poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel films formed by irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Chemical and physical properties of poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVA) hydrogel films were investigated as a function of production factors.The experimental results show that the gel fraction dependsstrongly on the radiation dose, the degree of swelling is inverselydependent on the concentration of PVA solution, the tensile strengthdepends mainly on the PVA blending ratio and the elongation at breakis inversely dependent on the radiation dose.

  12. The use of physical/chemical mutagens for crop improvements in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeranto, H.; Manurung, Simon; Masrizal [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Jakarta (ID)] [and others

    2001-03-01

    Most research on the use of physical and chemical mutagens for crop improvement in Indonesia are carried out at the Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (Bataan). At the plant breeding section of this center, much progress has been achieved in term of facilities set-up (gamma irradiators, laboratory, greenhouse and experimental fields), manpower and expertise development. Mutation breeding activities were initially started in rice in 1972, in attempts to improve the protein content of rice grain. During this earlier time, researches on detecting more effective mutagen treatments, using physical and chemical mutagenesis, were conducted in different plant species. The use of chemical mutagens have recently been very limited and it tends to be abandoned simply because of its unpractical treatment procedures working with it and less effective results. Nowadays, most induced mutations in plant breeding are primarily dependent on the use of physical mutagen i.e. gamma irradiation which is emitted from Cobalt-60 source. The effective use of gamma irradiation in plant breeding has been proven by results of finding useful mutant varieties for the country level. Major achievements were the release of some mutant varieties by the Department of Agriculture of Indonesia. These mutant varieties included 6 varieties for rice, 3 for soybean, and 1 for mungbean. Meanwhile, some promising mutant lines of other important crops such as peanuts, sorghum, banana, onions etc. are now being investigated in the field experiments. The effective use of gamma irradiation seems to vary between crop species or varieties being investigated. Experiences on breeding food crops, restricted on self-pollinated crops, the effective dose treatments of gamma irradiation on the seed materials were found to vary between 10-30 Gy. Some experiment results on the use of physical and chemical mutagens for crop improvements are discussed here

  13. Occurrence and distribution of Chytridiales related to some physical and chemical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy K. Hassan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical properties of water and soil were positively corelated with the occurrence and distribution of chytrides. Thirty-six zoosporic members of chytrids belonging to fourteen genera were recorded in the present study. Nowakowskiella, Karlingia, Cladochytrium, Endochytrium and Rhizophlyctis were the most common genera observed along River Nileshore and other canals in nine Governorates in Egypt during the winter of 1989/1990.

  14. 2006 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Nikki B.; Barlow, Stephan E.

    2006-11-10

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its third annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2006. During this period, twenty PNNL scientists hosted twenty-seven scientists from twenty-five different universities. Of the twenty-seven participants, one was a graduating senior; twenty-one were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and four were university faculty members.

  15. STUDY REGARDING SOME PHYSICAL - CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE YOGHURT WITH RED BEETROOT JUICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Prodaniuc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some physical - chemical characteristics of the beetroot juice yoghurt. The following determinations were carried out: the determination of the acidity by titration with sodium hydroxide ( NaOH N/10, the determination of the fat content by the acid-butirometric method and the determination of the dry substance using the drying oven with a 102 °C temperature.

  16. Efficient Regeneration of Physical and Chemical Solvents for CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tande, Brian [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Seames, Wayne [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Benson, Steve [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the use of composite polymer membranes and porous membrane contactors to regenerate physical and chemical solvents for capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from synthesis gas or flue gas, with the goal of improving the energy efficiency of carbon capture. Both a chemical solvent (typical for a post-combustion capture of CO2 from flue gas) and a physical solvent (typical for pre- combustion capture of CO2 from syngas) were evaluated using two bench-scale test systems constructed for this project. For chemical solvents, polytetrafluoroethylene and polypropylene membranes were found to be able to strip CO2 from a monoethanolamine (MEA) solution with high selectivity without significant degradation of the material. As expected, the regeneration temperature was the most significant parameter affecting the CO2 flux through the membrane. Pore size was also found to be important, as pores larger than 5 microns lead to excessive pore wetting. For physical solvents, polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS)-based membranes were found to have a higher CO2 permeability than polyvinylalcohol (PVOH) based membranes, while also minimizing solvent loss. Overall, however, the recovery of CO2 in these systems is low – less than 2% for both chemical and physical solvents – primarily due to the small surface area of the membrane test apparatus. To obtain the higher regeneration rates needed for this application, a much larger surface area would be needed. Further experiments using, for example, a hollow fiber membrane module could determine if this process could be commercially viable.

  17. 2007 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its fourth annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from April through September 2007. During this time, 21 PNNL scientists hosted 23 participants from 20 different universities. Of the 23 participants, 20 were graduate students, 1 was a postdoctoral fellow, and 2 were university faculty members. This report covers the essense of the program and the research the participants performed.

  18. Disruption of the 'disease triangle' by chemical and physical environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelka, A H; Grulke, N E

    2016-01-01

    The physical and chemical environment of the Earth has changed rapidly over the last 100 years and is predicted to continue to change into the foreseeable future. One of the main concerns with potential alterations in climate is the propensity for increases in the magnitude and frequency of extremes to occur. Even though precipitation is predicted to increase in some locations, in others precipitation is expected to decrease and evapotranspiration increase with air temperature, resulting in exacerbated drought in the future. Chemical [ozone (O3 ) and other air contaminants] and subsequent physical alterations in the environment will have a profound effect on the 'disease triangle' (a favourable environment, a susceptible host and a virulent pathogen) and should be included in any analysis of biological response to climate change. The chemical and physical environment affects plant health and alters plant susceptibility to insect and pathogen attack through increased frequency, duration and severity of drought and reduction in host vigour. The potential effects of climate change and O3 on tree diseases with emphasis on the western United States are discussed. We describe a generalised modelling approach to incorporate the complexities of the 'disease triangle' into dynamic vegetation models.

  19. Spatial variability of chemical and physical attributes of dystrophic Red-Yellow Latosol in no tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vidal de Negreiros Neto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of spatial variability in chemical and physical properties of the soil is very important, especially for precision agriculture. Geostatistics is seeking to improve techniques that can enable the correct and responsible use of soil. So during the agricultural year 2011/2012 in an area of direct planting the corn crop in the municipality of Gurupi (TO, in the Brazilian Cerrado, aimed to analyze the spatial variability of chemical and physical properties in a Typic Dystrophic tillage. Was installed sampling grid for the collection of soil, with 100 sampling points in an area of 1755m2. The contents of available phosphorus, organic matter, pH (H2O, concentrations of K +, Ca2+, Mg2+, the sum of values and base saturation (BS, V at depths of 0-0.20 m, and resistance to penetration (RP at depths 0-0.05 m, 0.05-0.10 m, 0.10-0.20 m and 0.20-0.40 m and bulk density (Ds. We conducted a descriptive analysis classic, with the aid of statistical software ASSISTAT, and then were modeled semivariograms for all attributes, resulting in their cross-validation and kriging maps. The chemical and physical properties of soil, except the base saturation (V, spatial dependence. Probably the discontinuity of the spatial dependence of Vvalue, is due to fertility management over the years.

  20. Physical and Chemical Properties of Coal Bottom Ash (CBA) from Tanjung Bin Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzati Raihan Ramzi, Nurul; Shahidan, Shahiron; Zulkhairi Maarof, Mohamad; Ali, Noorwirdawati

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of Coal Bottom Ash (CBA) obtained from Tanjung Bin Power Plant Station and compare them with the characteristics of natural river sand (as a replacement of fine aggregates). Bottom ash is the by-product of coal combustion during the electricity generating process. However, excess bottom ash production due to the high production of electricity in Malaysia has caused several environmental problems. Therefore, several tests have been conducted in order to determine the physical and chemical properties of bottom ash such as specific gravity, density, particle size distribution, Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) and X- Ray Fluorescence (XRF) in the attempt to produce sustainable material from waste. The results indicated that the natural fine aggregate and coal bottom ash have very different physical and chemical properties. Bottom ash was classified as Class C ash. The porous structure, angular and rough texture of bottom ash affected its specific gravity and particle density. From the tests, it was found that bottom ash is recommended to be used in concrete as a replacement for fine aggregates.

  1. Multiple Chemical Sources Localization Using Virtual Physics-Based Robots with Release Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method of simultaneously locating chemical sources by a virtual physics-based multirobot system with a release strategy. The proposed release strategy includes setting forbidden area, releasing the robots from declared sources and escaping from it by a rotary force and goal force. This strategy can avoid the robots relocating the same source which has been located by other robots and leading them to move toward other sources. Various turbulent plume environments are simulated by Fluent and Gambit software, and a set of simulations are performed on different scenarios using a group of six robots or parallel search by multiple groups’ robots to validate the proposed methodology. The experimental results show that release strategy can be successfully used to find multiple chemical sources, even when multiple plumes overlap. It can also extend the operation of many chemical source localization algorithms developed for single source localization.

  2. Interplay between physical movements of soils and mineral grains and chemical weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.

    2007-12-01

    Most soil biogeochemistry studies treat the soils and their inorganic and organic constituents as physically immobile. Those soil materials, however, are in perpetual motion due to the conversion of bedrock to soils, colluvial transport, and vertical mixing by various biophysical perturbations of the soils. Subsequently, a soil is continuously replaced by the materials from the neighboring soils and the underlying parent material, while its individual horizons are gradually mixed with the materials in the neighboring horizons. The movements of bulk soil materials are ultimately driven by moving individual mineral grains. While rarely appreciated, these physical movements of soil's mineral components operate in the presence of strong vertical and topographic gradients of the rates of mineral dissolution and leaching. The result is that the physical movement of soil constituents affects chemical weathering. The fluxes of soil materials (via physical movements and solute fluxes) in and out of a soil system defined by a researcher determine the time length that the materials reside in the system. The residence time, together with the system-specific rates of chemical weathering, determine the degree of weathering of the materials within the system. This presentation provides a new mathematical framework to consistently quantify the residence times of minerals, individual soil horizons, soil profiles, and an entire soil within a watershed boundary. Soil age, which is equivalent of the time length since the cessation of erosion or deposition on level grounds, becomes a special case of the residence time. The model is combined with empirical data to quantitatively illustrate the impacts that the physical motion of soil constituents have on the rates of chemical weathering. The data are drawn from ongoing field and laboratory studies focusing on the impact of river incision, colluvial flux, bioturbation, and agricultural tillage on the vertical and lateral variation of

  3. A coupled physical-biological-chemical model for the Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P S Swathi; M K Sharada; K S Yajnik

    2000-12-01

    A coupled physical-biological-chemical model has been developed at C-MMACS. for studying the time- variation of primary productivity and air-sea carbon-dioxide exchange in the Indian Ocean. The physical model is based on the Modular Ocean Model, Version 2 (MOM2) and the biological model describes the nonlinear dynamics of a 7-component marine ecosystem. The chemical model includes dynamical equation for the evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity. The interaction between the biological and chemical model is through the Redfield ratio. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide pCO2 of the surface layer is obtained from the chemical equilibrium equations of Peng et al 1987. Transfer coefficients for air-sea exchange of CO2 are computed dynamically based on the wind speeds. The coupled model reproduces the high productivity observed in the Arabian Sea off the Somali and Omani coasts during the Southwest (SW) monsoon. The entire Arabian Sea is an outgassing region for CO2 in spite of high productivity with transfer rates as high as 80 m-mol C/m2/day during SW monsoon near the Somali Coast on account of strong winds.

  4. Characterization of Physically and Chemically Separated Athabasca Asphaltenes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundaraín Hurtado, Jesús Leonardo; Chodakowski, Martin; Long, Bingwen; Shaw, John M. (Alberta)

    2012-02-07

    Athabasca asphaltenes were characterized using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Two methods were used to separate asphaltenes from the Athabasca bitumen: namely, chemical separation by precipitation with n-pentane and physical separation by nanofiltration using a zirconia membrane with a 20 nm average pore size. The permeate and chemically separated samples were diluted in 1-methylnaphtalene and n-dodecane prior to SAXS measurements. The temperature and asphaltene concentration ranges were 50-310 C and 1-10.4 wt %, respectively. Model-independent analysis of SAXS data provided the radius of gyration and the scattering coefficients. Model-dependent fits provided size distributions for asphaltenes assuming that they are dense and spherical. Model-independent analysis for physically and chemically separated asphaltenes showed significant differences in nominal size and structure, and the temperature dependence of structural properties. The results challenge the merits of using chemically separated asphaltene properties as a basis for asphaltene property prediction in hydrocarbon resources. While the residuals for model-dependent fits are small, the results are inconsistent with the structural parameters obtained from model-independent analysis.

  5. Modelling the physiological strain and physical burden of chemical protective coveralls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, ShuQin; Petersen, Stewart; McQueen, Rachel; Batcheller, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the impact of selected chemical protective coveralls (CPC) on physiological responses and comfort sensations. Fifteen males exercised at approximately 6 METS in three CPC (Tyvek®, Gulf and Tychem®) and a control garment. Physiological strain was characterised by core and skin temperatures, heart rate, V̇O2, perceived exertion, hotness and wetness. Physical burden was characterised by restriction to movement, V̇O2 and RPE. The highest levels of physiological strain and physical burden were found in Tychem®, and the lowest in control. Seven statistical regression models were developed through correlation and multiple regression analyses between the human responses and the results from previously conducted fabric and garment property testing. These models showed that physical burden was increased by adding weight and/or restricting movement. Oxygen consumption was best predicted by clothing weight and fabric bending hysteresis. Fabric evaporative resistance and thickness were the two best predictors of physiological and perceptual responses. Practitioner Summary: Traditional evaluation of chemical protective coveralls (CPC) involves testing at the fabric and garment levels and rarely is based on human trials. This study integrates information from fabric, garment and human trials to better understand physiological strain and physical comfort during prolonged exercise in CPC.

  6. Final Report from the Department of Kinetics of Chemical and Biological Processes, Institute of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    photokeratitis, senile cataract, macular degeneration and so on. In laboratory of physical-chemical basis of reception, Institute of Chemical... rehabilitating complex of vitamins according to the methods developed in the Institute improved the biophysical parameters and, hence, restored organism...forage of animals. 6. Environmental and human rehabilitation Antioxidants at Low Doses for Afforestation in Polluted Regions Burlakova E.B., Apasheva

  7. Effects of pig slurry application on soil physical and chemical properties and glyphosate mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida de Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pig slurry applied to soil at different rates may affect soil properties and the mobility of chemical compounds within the soil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of rates of pig slurry application in agricultural areas on soil physical and chemical properties and on the mobility of glyphosate through the soil profile. The study was carried out in the 12th year of an experiment with pig slurry applied at rates of 0 (control, 50, 100 and 200 m³ ha-1 yr-1 on a Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (Hapludox soil. In the control, the quantities of P and K removed by harvested grains were replaced in the next crop cycle. Soil physical properties (bulk density, porosity, texture, and saturated hydraulic conductivity and chemical properties (organic matter, pH, extractable P, and exchangeable K were measured. Soil solution samples were collected at depths of 20, 40 and 80 cm using suction lysimeters, and glyphosate concentrations were measured over a 60-day period after slurry application. Soil physical and chemical properties were little affected by the pig slurry applications, but soil pH was reduced and P levels increased in the surface layers. In turn, K levels were increased in sub-surface layers. Glyphosate concentrations tended to decrease over time but were not affected by pig slurry application. The concentrations of glyphosate found in different depths show that the pratice of this application in agricultural soils has the potential for contamination of groundwater, especially when the water table is the surface and heavy rains occur immediately after application.

  8. Physical and chemical effects of low octane gasoline fuels on compression ignition combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2016-09-30

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines running on low octane gasoline fuels are considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. In this study, three fuels with different chemical and physical characteristics have been investigated in single cylinder engine running in GCI combustion mode at part-load conditions both experimentally and numerically. The studied fuels are: Saudi Aramco light naphtha (SALN) (Research octane number (RON) = 62 and final boiling point (FBP) = 91 °C), Haltermann straight run naphtha (HSRN) (RON = 60 and FBP = 140 °C) and a primary reference fuel (PRF65) (RON = 65 and FBP = 99 °C). Injection sweeps, where the start of injection (SOI) is changed between −60 and −11 CAD aTDC, have been performed for the three fuels. Full cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were executed using PRFs as chemical surrogates for the naphtha fuels. Physical surrogates based on the evaporation characteristics of the naphtha streams have been developed and their properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. It was found that the three fuels have similar combustion phasings and emissions at the conditions tested in this work with minor differences at SOI earlier than −30 CAD aTDC. These trends were successfully reproduced by the CFD calculations. The chemical and physical effects were further investigated numerically. It was found that the physical characteristics of the fuel significantly affect the combustion for injections earlier than −30 CAD aTDC because of the low evaporation rates of the fuel because of the higher boiling temperature of the fuel and the colder in-cylinder air during injection. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  9. Chemical purification of Gunungpati elephant foot yam flour to improve physical and chemical quality on processed food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramita, Octavianti; Wahyuningsih, Ansori, Muhammad

    2017-03-01

    This study was aimed at improving the physicochemical quality of elephant foot yam flour in Gunungpati, Semarang by chemical purification. The utilization of elephant foot yam flour in several processed food was also discussed in this study. The flour purification discussed in this study was expected to become a reference for the manufacturers of elephant foot yam flour and its processed food in Gunungpati. This study modified the elephant foot yam flour using pre - gelatinization method. The physical and chemical quality of each elephant foot yam flour purification sample were assessed using proximate analysis. The likability test was conducted for its processed food. 20 grams of elephant foot yam flour was put into a beaker glass, then 60 ml of water was added. The suspension was then heated at a temperature of 60 ° C and 70 ° C while stirred until it was homogeneous and thickened for 10, 30 and 60 minutes. The flour which had been heated was then cooled at room temperature for 1 hour and then at a temperature of 0 ° C until it was frozen. Furthermore, flour was dried in an oven at a temperature of 60 ° C for 9 hours. The dried flour was sifted with a 80 mesh sieve. Chemical test was conducted after elephant foot yam was pre-gelatinized to determine changes in the quality flour: test levels of protein, fat, crude fiber content, moisture content, ash content and starch content. In addition, color tests and granular test on elephant foot yam flour were also conducted. The pre-gelatinization as chemical treatment on elephant foot yam flour in this study was able to change the functional properties of elephant foot yam flour towards a better processing characterized by a brighter color (L = 70, a = 6 and b = 12), the hydrolysis of polysaccharides flour into shorter chain (flour content decreased to 44%), the expansion of granules in elephant foot yam resulting in a process - ready flour, and better monolayer water content of 9%. The content of protein and fiber

  10. Chemical and Physical Properties of the Remote Marine Aerosol by Gravimetric and Electron Microscopic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Lynn Mari

    The chemical and physical properties of the individual submicrometer particles in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL) atmosphere are important parameters used to study atmospheric processes. Particles in this size range influence the total number concentration of particles, the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei, and the total light scattering. As the aerosol evolves by physical and chemical mechanisms, the aerosol properties will also change. It is therefore important to measure the changing aerosol properties as a function of individual particle size within the meteorologically important time periods. Individual particle analysis using electron microscopy (EM) techniques coupled with X ray analysis can provide chemical, morphological, and particle size information on samples collected for only a few minutes. It is also possible to determine the ambient particle size distribution and relative abundances from the EM analysis using correction techniques. Measurements obtained from aerosol particles collected from the remote (MBL) during the Pacific Sulfur Stratus Investigation (PSI-3) and Cloud and Aerosol Chemistry Experiment (CACHE-1) at Cheeka Peak in the spring of 1991 and 1993 are presented along with results obtained from aerosol particles collected during the Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange (MAGE) Experiment in the Equatorial Pacific and Radiatively Important Trace Species (RITS) Experiment in the spring of 1992 and 1993. Measurements of relative abundance of sea-salt, sulfate, and carbon-containing particles are presented as well as their chemistry. In particular the chemical reactions involving sea-salt particles are discussed in relation to the measurements of chloride depletion and sulfur enriched reported for individual particles. To supplement the few available measurements of the total submicrometer aerosol mass, samples were also collected for gravimetric analysis. Comparisons of the gravimetric mass to the total aerosol mass

  11. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  12. Anatomical, chemical and physical characterization of candeia wood (Eremanthus erythropappus (DC. Macleish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Lopes Selvati de Oliveira Mori

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the anatomical, chemical and physics characteristics of candeia wood (Eremanthus erythropappus (DC. Macleish. Five trees were collected from Carrancas-MG, and disks were obtained at the breast high (DBH to sample preparation. The description and mensuration were performed at the principal anatomical structures (fibers, vessel and radial parenchyma. For chemical analysis, the extractives content, hollocelulose, lignin and inorganic components were determined. The physical properties included the basic specific gravity, specific gravity at 12% moisture content as well as tangential, radial and volumetric shrinkage and coefficients of shrinkage and anisotropy. The main results found for macroscopic characteristics were: awkward odor due to presence of oil-resin; reversal grain and hardness to the cut; microscopical characteristics: scarce parenchyma axial and radial very thin, elements of vases with numerous and very small pits, short plates of simple perforation, libriforms fibers with thick cellular wall and presence of oil cells in the ray. Chemical composition: 20.89% total extractives; 50.52% holocelulose; 28.59% lignin and 0.39% of inorganic constituents. The specific gravity at 12% was of 0.98 g/cm3 and the basic specific gravity of 0.79 g/cm3. The anisotropy coefficient was 1.91 and the coefficient of volumetric retratibility was 0.28%.

  13. Accessible protocol for practice classroom about physical and chemical factors that affect the biomembranes integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Barros Galvão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current work is to review a protocol used in practical classes to demonstrate some factors that affect biomembrane integrity. Sugar-beet fragments were utilized as the experimental model as membrane damage could be visualized by leakage of betacyanins, hydrophilic pigments accumulated in the cell vacuoles. The tests were carried out as discrete experiments utilizing physical agents and chemical products present in the student daily routine. To test the effect of temperature, sugar-beet fragments were submitted to heat, cold or both at different times of exposition. When chemical products were tested, sugar-beet fragments were exposed to organic solvents (common alcohol and acetone or polar and amphipathic substances (disinfectant, detergent, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorite. The obtained results were discussed in terms of the capacity of the physical and chemical factors to cause membrane damage. The review of this protocol using reagents that are present in the student daily routine were able to demonstrate clearly the effect of the different tested factors, allowing the utilization of this practical class under limited conditions.

  14. Physical and chemical effects of acoustic cavitation in selected ultrasonic cleaning applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Nor Saadah Mohd; Babgi, Bandar; Alghamdi, Yousef; Aksu, Mecit; Madhavan, Jagannathan; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic cavitation in a liquid medium generates several physical and chemical effects. The oscillation and collapse of cavitation bubbles, driven at low ultrasonic frequencies (e.g., 20 kHz), can generate strong shear forces, microjets, microstreaming and shockwaves. Such strong physical forces have been used in cleaning and flux improvement of ultrafiltration processes. These physical effects have also been shown to deactivate pathogens. The efficiency of deactivation of pathogens is not only dependent on ultrasonic experimental parameters, but also on the properties of the pathogens themselves. Bacteria with thick shell wall are found to be resistant to ultrasonic deactivation process. Some evidence does suggest that the chemical effects (radicals) of acoustic cavitation are also effective in deactivating pathogens. Another aspect of cleaning, namely, purification of water contaminated with organic and inorganic pollutants, has also been discussed in detail. Strong oxidising agents produced within acoustic cavitation bubbles could be used to degrade organic pollutants and convert toxic inorganic pollutants to less harmful substances. The effect of ultrasonic frequency and surface activity of solutes on the sonochemical degradation efficiency has also been discussed in this overview.

  15. Grout to meet physical and chemical requirements for closure at Hanford grout vaults. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-21

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout based on portland cement, Class F fly ash, and bentonite clay, for the Hanford Grout Vault Program. The purpose of this grout was to fill the void between a wasteform containing 106-AN waste and the vault cover blocks. Following a successful grout development program, heat output, volume change, and compressive strength were monitored with time in simulated repository conditions and in full-depth physical models. This research indicated that the cold-cap grout could achieve and maintain adequate volume stability and other required physical properties in the internal environment of a sealed vault. To determine if contact with 106-AN liquid waste would cause chemical deterioration of the cold-cap grout, cured specimens were immersed in simulated waste. Over a period of 21 days at 150 F, specimens increased in mass without significant changes in volume. X-ray diffraction of reacted specimens revealed crystallization of sodium aluminum silicate hydrate. Scanning electron microscopy used with X-ray fluorescence showed that clusters if this phase had formed in grout pores, increasing grout density and decreasing its effective porosity. Physical and chemical tests collectively indicate a sealing component. However, the Hanford Grout Vault Program was cancelled before completion of this research. This report summarizes close-out Waterways Experiment Station when the Program was cancelled.

  16. Physical and chemical transformations of cereal food during oral digestion in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebler, C; Karinthi, A; Devaux, M F; Guillon, F; Gallant, D J; Bouchet, B; Melegari, C; Barry, J L

    1998-11-01

    Chemical and physical transformations of solid food begin in the mouth, but the oral phase of digestion has rarely been studied. In the present study, twelve healthy volunteers masticated mouthfuls of either bread or spaghetti for a physiologically-determined time, and the levels of particle degradation and starch digestion before swallowing were compared for each food. The amounts of saliva moistening bread and spaghetti before swallowing were, respectively, 220 (SEM 12) v. 39 (SEM 6) g/kg fresh matter. Particle size reduction also differed since bread particles were highly degraded, showing a loss of structure, whereas spaghetti retained its physical structure, with rough and incomplete reduction of particle size. Starch hydrolysis was twice as high for bread as for spaghetti, mainly because of the release of high-molecular-mass alpha-glucans. The production of oligosaccharides was similar after mastication of the two foods, respectively 125 (SEM 8) and 92 (SEM 7) g/kg total starch. Starch hydrolysis, which clearly began in the mouth, depended on the initial structure of the food, as in the breakdown of solid food. These significant physical and chemical degradations of solid foods during oral digestion may influence the entire digestive process.

  17. Perspective: Fifty years of density-functional theory in chemical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, Axel D

    2014-05-14

    Since its formal inception in 1964-1965, Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) has become the most popular electronic structure method in computational physics and chemistry. Its popularity stems from its beautifully simple conceptual framework and computational elegance. The rise of KS-DFT in chemical physics began in earnest in the mid 1980s, when crucial developments in its exchange-correlation term gave the theory predictive power competitive with well-developed wave-function methods. Today KS-DFT finds itself under increasing pressure to deliver higher and higher accuracy and to adapt to ever more challenging problems. If we are not mindful, however, these pressures may submerge the theory in the wave-function sea. KS-DFT might be lost. I am hopeful the Kohn-Sham philosophical, theoretical, and computational framework can be preserved. This Perspective outlines the history, basic concepts, and present status of KS-DFT in chemical physics, and offers suggestions for its future development.

  18. Chemical and physical characterization of collapsing low-mass prestellar dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Hincelin, U; Wakelam, V; Hersant, F; Guilloteau, S; Herbst, E

    2016-01-01

    The first hydrostatic core, also called the first Larson core, is one of the first steps in low-mass star formation, as predicted by theory. With recent and future high performance telescopes, details of these first phases become accessible, and observations may confirm theory and even bring new challenges for theoreticians. In this context, we study from a theoretical point of view the chemical and physical evolution of the collapse of prestellar cores until the formation of the first Larson core, in order to better characterize this early phase in the star formation process. We couple a state-of-the-art hydrodynamical model with full gas-grain chemistry, using different assumptions on the magnetic field strength and orientation. We extract the different components of each collapsing core (i.e., the central core, the outflow, the disk, the pseudodisk, and the envelope) to highlight their specific physical and chemical characteristics. Each component often presents a specific physical history, as well as a sp...

  19. Enhancing sewage sludge dewaterability by bioleaching approach with comparison to other physical and chemical conditioning methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenwu Liu; Jun Zhou; Dianzhan Wang; Lixiang Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The sewage sludge conditioning process is critical to improve the sludge dewaterability prior to mechanical dewatering.Traditionally,sludge is conditioned by physical or chemical approaches,mostly with the addition of inorganic or organic chemicals.Here we report that bioleaching,an efficient and economical microbial method for the removal of sludge-borne heavy metals,also plays a significant role in enhancing sludge dewaterability.The effects of bioleaching and physical or chemical approaches on sludge dewaterability were compared.The conditioning result of bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans on sludge dewatering was investigated and compared with the effects of hydrothermal(121 ℃ for 2 hr),microwave(1050 W for 50 sec),ultrasonic (250 W for 2 min),and chemical conditioning(24% ferric chloride and 68% calcium oxide; dry basis).The results show that the specific resistance to filtration(SRF)or capillary suction time(CST)of sludge is decreased by 93.1% or 74.1%,respectively,after fresh sludge is conditioned by bioleaching,which is similar to chemical conditioning treatment with ferric chloride and calcium oxide but much more effective than other conditioning approaches including hydrothermal,microwave,and ultrasonic conditioning.Furthermore,after sludge dewatering,bioleached sludge filtrate contains the lowest concentrations of chroma(18 times),COD(542 mg/L),total N(TN,300 mg/L),NH4+-N(208 mg/L),and total P(TP,2 mg/L)while the hydrothermal process resulted in the highest concentration of chroma(660 times),COD(18,155 mg/L),TN(472 mg/L),NH4+-N(381 mg/L),and TP(191 mg/L)among these selected conditioning methods.Moreover,unlike chemical conditioning,sludge bioleaching does not result in a significant reduction of organic matter,TN,and TP in the resulting dewatered sludge cake.Therefore,considering sludge dewaterability and the chemical properties of sludge filtrate and resulting dewatered sludge cakes,bioleaching has

  20. Effectiveness of mindfulness and emotion regulation trainings on physical and psychological well-being among chemical weapon victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Narimani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical weapon victims are suffering from physical difficulties and psychological trainings may help to decrease these problems. The purpose of this research was to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness and emotion regulation training on physical and psychological well-being in chemical weapon victims.Methods: An experimental, pre-post and follow-up study designed. Forty seven chemical weapon victims men with low mental health in Sardasht city (North-Western Iran randomly selected and assigned into three groups: 1-Mindfulness training group 2- Emotion regulation training group and 3- Control group. The first two groups were received mindfulness-based stress eduction training and emotion regulation training respectively, while no training provided for control group. Data was collected using the General Health Questionnaire, and Physical Syndromes Scale. Analysis of variance with repeated measure was used for analyzing the data.Results: Results indicated that mindfulness and emotion regulation were significantly improved physical syndromes and mental health in chemical weapon victims. Also, the effectiveness of mindfulness in follow-up scores of physical syndromes and in post-test and follow-up scores of mental health was higher than the base line scores (P<0.01. Conclusion: Our findings confirmed effectiveness of mindfulness and emotion regulation on improvement of physical syndromes and mental health in chemical weapon victims. Therefore, mindfulness and emotion regulation training could be suggested for improvement of physical and psychological well-being among chemical weapon victims.

  1. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Gupta, Roop N.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1989-01-01

    The conservation equations for simulating hypersonic flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium and details of the associated physical models are presented. These details include the curve fits used for defining thermodynamic properties of the 11 species air model, curve fits for collision cross sections, expressions for transport properties, the chemical kinetics models, and the vibrational and electronic energy relaxation models. The expressions are formulated in the context of either a two or three temperature model. Greater emphasis is placed on the two temperature model in which it is assumed that the translational and rotational energy models are in equilibrium at the translational temperature, T, and the vibrational, electronic, and electron translational energy modes are in equilibrium at the vibrational temperature, T sub v. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the Jacobian of the flux vector are also presented in order to accommodate the upwind based numerical solutions of the complete equation set.

  2. Physical and chemical modification of the surface of Venus by windblown particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Marshall, John R.; Pollack, James B.

    1987-01-01

    The results of simulations of the Venusian surface environment involving windblown grains are presented which show that significant chemical and physical changes may occur even in the slow-moving winds recorded on Venus. The edges of grains beome worn and shed comminuted debris, which collects on weathered surfaces and grains alike. The resulting transfer of material from loose grains to bedrock surfaces (and vice versa) could yield misleading results on rock composition; moreover, the generation of comminuted debris would enhance chemical reactions that could affect the composition of the atmosphere. The results are thus relevant in assessing rates of surface degradation, the evolution of small-scale surface features as seen in images returned from the Soviet Venera missions, and in the interpretation of compositional data for surface materials.

  3. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Daniel F.; Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Dunderdale, Gary J.; Hozumi, Atsushi, E-mail: a.hozumi@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98, Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 463-8560 (Japan); Yagihashi, Makoto [Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute, Rokuban, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0058 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  4. Thermoreversible associating polymer networks. I. Interplay of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and polymer physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Robert S; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2009-12-14

    Hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo simulations are used to study melts of unentangled, thermoreversibly associating supramolecular polymers. In this first of a series of papers, we describe and validate a model that is effective in separating the effects of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics on the dynamics and mechanics of these systems, and is extensible to arbitrarily nonequilibrium situations and nonlinear mechanical properties. We examine the model's quiescent (and heterogeneous) dynamics, nonequilibrium chemical dynamics, and mechanical properties. Many of our results may be understood in terms of the crossover from diffusion-limited to kinetically limited sticky bond recombination, which both influences and is influenced by polymer physics, i.e., the connectivity of the parent chains.

  5. Use of physical/chemical mutagens in plant breeding program in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Duy Quy; Nguyen Huu Dong; Bui Huy Thuy; Le Van Nha; Nguyen Van Bich [Agricultural Genetics Institute, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    Among more than 1870 new plant varieties formed by mutation breeding in the world, 44 varieties of different plants were formed by Vietnamese scientists. Research on induced mutation in Vietnam started in 1966, was promoted in Agricultural Institute, Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute, Institute of Food Crop Research, and Agriculture Universities, and has produced varieties of rice, maize, soybean, peanut, tomato, jujuba, green bean etc using physical and chemical mutagens: Irradiation with gamma rays or neutrons, and use of such chemicals as dimethylsulfate (DMS), diethylsulfate (DES), ethyleneimine (EI), N-nitrosomethylurea (NUM), N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU), and sodium azide (NaN{sub 3}). In the present report, the results of cytological and genetic effects in M1 plants, the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and morphological mutants, the mutants obtained and the genetic nature of the next generation are described, particularly for the case of rice. Radiation dose and dose rate used as mutagens are also reported. (S. Ohno)

  6. Evaluation of physical-chemical and biological treatment of shale oil retort water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, B.W.; Mason, M.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Wakamiya, W.

    1982-09-01

    Bench scale studies were conducted to evaluate conventional physical-chemical and biological treatment processes for removal of pollutants from retort water produced by in situ shale oil recovery methods. Prior to undertaking these studies, very little information had been reported on treatment of retort water. A treatment process train patterned after that generally used throughout the petroleum refining industry was envisioned for application to retort water. The treatment train would consist of processes for removing suspended matter, ammonia, biodegradable organics, and nonbiodegradable or refractory organics. The treatment processes evaluated include anaerobic digestion and activated sludge for removal of biodegradable organics and other oxidizable substances; activated carbon adsorption for removal of nonbiodegradable organics; steam stripping for ammonia removal; and chemical coagulation, sedimentation and filtration for removal of suspended matter. Preliminary cost estimates are provided.

  7. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Miranda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  8. Enhancing the functionality of cotton fabric by physical and chemical pre-treatments: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargoubi, Sondes; Tolouei, Ranna; Chevallier, Pascale; Levesque, Lucie; Ladhari, Neji; Boudokhane, Chedly; Mantovani, Diego

    2016-08-20

    Recently, antimicrobial and decontaminating textiles, such as cotton a natural carbohydrate polymer, are generating more attention. Plant materials used for natural dyes are expected to impart biofunctional properties and high added valued functional textiles. In the current study, surface modification of cotton to maximize the dye amount on the surface has been investigated. Physical modification using nitrogen-hydrogen plasma, chemical modification using chitosan and chemical modification using dopamine as biopolymers imparting amino groups were explored. Furthermore, dye exhaustion of curcumin, as a natural functional dye has been studied. Dye stability tests were also performed after fabric washing using hospital washing protocol to predict the durability of the functionalizations. The results demonstrated that cotton surfaces treated with dopamine exhibit a high level of dye uptake (78%) and a good washing fastness. The use of non-toxic and natural additives during cotton finishing process could give the opportunity of cradle to cradle design for antimicrobial textile industries.

  9. Physical and chemical characterizations of corn stover and poplar solids resulting from leading pretreatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mago, Gaurav; Balan, Venkatesh; Wyman, Charles E

    2009-09-01

    In order to investigate changes in substrate chemical and physical features after pretreatment, several characterizations were performed on untreated (UT) corn stover and poplar and their solids resulting pretreatments by ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), ammonia recycled percolation (ARP), controlled pH, dilute acid, flowthrough, lime, and SO(2) technologies. In addition to measuring the chemical compositions including acetyl content, physical attributes determined were biomass crystallinity, cellulose degree of polymerization, cellulase adsorption capacity of pretreated solids and enzymatically extracted lignin, copper number, FT-IR responses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) visualizations, and surface atomic composition by electron spectroscopy of chemical analysis (ESCA). Lime pretreatment removed the most acetyl groups from both corn stover and poplar, while AFEX removed the least. Low pH pretreatments depolymerized cellulose and enhanced biomass crystallinity much more than higher pH approaches. Lime pretreated corn stover solids and flowthrough pretreated poplar solids had the highest cellulase adsorption capacity, while dilute acid pretreated corn stover solids and controlled pH pretreated poplar solids had the least. Furthermore, enzymatically extracted AFEX lignin preparations for both corn stover and poplar had the lowest cellulase adsorption capacity. ESCA results showed that SO(2) pretreated solids had the highest surface O/C ratio for poplar, but for corn stover, the highest value was observed for dilute acid pretreatment with a Parr reactor. Although dependent on pretreatment and substrate, FT-IR data showed that along with changes in cross linking and chemical changes, pretreatments may also decrystallize cellulose and change the ratio of crystalline cellulose polymorphs (Ialpha/Ibeta).

  10. MgB2 superconducting whiskers synthesized by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Zhuang, Chenggang; Gao, Jingyun; Shan, Xudong; Zhang, Jingmin; Liao, Zhimin; Xu, Hongjun; Yu, Dapeng; Feng, Qingrong

    2009-02-25

    In this work, MgB(2) whiskers were fabricated on a copper substrate by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition, which was one of the most effective ways to make high quality pure MgB(2) films, with the possible growth mechanism discussed. The whiskers are hexagonal and conelike and grow along the [0001] direction with a single-crystal structure. The onset transition temperature is approximately 39 K, which is among the best in the published nanostructure MgB(2) papers. Fabrication of nanoscale MgB(2) whiskers provides the fundamental understanding of the effect of dimensionality and size on superconductivity.

  11. Hard-to-recover oils with anomalous physical and chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchenko, I. G.; Polishchuk, Y. M.

    2016-11-01

    Using the global database on physical and chemical properties of oils, the analysis of distribution of viscous, heavy, waxy and highly resinous oils in terms of volumes of their reserves was carried out. It is known that heavy and viscous oils account for slightly more than 33% of the total sample. Resinous and paraffin oils account for less than 30% of the total sample. The criteria necessary to classify oils as hard-to-recover oil reserves are determined. Features of physicochemical properties of these oils are studied under various conditions. The results obtained could be used to solve practical issues in the oil sector.

  12. Micronucleation in the lens epithelium following in vivo exposure to physical and chemical mutagens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odrich, S.; Medvedovsky, C.; Merriam, G. R. Jr; Worgul, B. V.

    1988-01-01

    Rats were exposed to cataractogenic doses of known physical and chemical genotoxic agents in order to study the efficacy of using micronuclei to monitor mutagenicity in the lens epithelium. The total numbers of micronuclei were counted in lens epithelia from rats exposed to graded doses of either 250 kVp X-rays or the anti-leukemic drug, 1,4 dimethanesulfonoxybutane (Myleran (R)). The results indicate a dose-dependent incidence of micronucleation in the lens epithelium following exposure. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the cataractogenicity of certain agents may be related to their effect on the genome of lens epithelial cells.

  13. Laboratory measurements of physical, chemical, and optical characteristics of Lake Chicot sediment waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, diffuse attenuation, beam attenuation, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of lake bottom sediment. Mixture concentrations range from 5 ppm to 700 ppm by weight of total suspended solids in filtered deionized tap water. Upwelled reflectance is a nonlinear function of remote sensing wave lengths. Near-infrared wavelengths are useful for monitoring highly turbid waters with sediment concentrations above 100 ppm. It is found that both visible and near infrared wavelengths, beam attenuation correlates well with total suspended solids ranging over two orders of magnitude.

  14. Inference of Surface Chemical and Physical Properties Using Mid-Infrared (MIR) Spectral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.

    2016-01-01

    Reflected or emitted energy from solid surfaces in the solar system can provide insight into thermo-physical and chemical properties of the surface materials. Measurements have been obtained from instruments located on Earth-based telescopes and carried on several space missions. The characteristic spectral features commonly observed in Mid-Infrared (MIR) spectra of minerals will be reviewed, along with methods used for compositional interpretations of MIR emission spectra. The influence of surface grain size, and space weathering processes on MIR emissivity spectra will also be discussed. Methods used for estimating surface temperature, emissivity, and thermal inertias from MIR spectral observations will be reviewed.

  15. Physical and chemical analyses on single source precursor growth CdSe semiconductor nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arl, D. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et de Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, F-57078 Metz Cedex 03 (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, F-57078 Metz Cedex 03 (France); Dalmasso, S., E-mail: dalmasso@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, F-57078 Metz Cedex 03 (France); Bozzolo, N.; Zhang, Y. [Laboratoire d' etude des Textures et Application aux Materiaux, Ile du Saulcy, F-57012 Metz Cedex 01 (France); Gaumet, J.-J. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et de Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, F-57078 Metz Cedex 03 (France); Laurenti, J.-P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, F-57078 Metz Cedex 03 (France)

    2010-11-01

    CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) are synthesized by the single source precursor thermal method. The use of a temperature ramp allows to obtain faster elaboration and smaller nano-particles in size. A cross-disciplinary study between chemical analyses and physical techniques provides consistent data for these small size NCs. Joint mass spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical spectrometry techniques give a coherent picture about average size and size dispersion of the NCs, as well as their optical spectral response in correlation with their size via quantum confinement effects.

  16. Chemical structure and physical properties of radiation-induced crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Akihiro E-mail: aks@taka.jaeri.go.jp; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Katoh, Etsuko; Tabata, Yoneho

    2001-07-01

    The chemical structure and physical properties of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that has been crosslinked by radiation have been studied by various methods. It has been found that a Y-type crosslinking structure and a Y-type structure incorporating a double bond (modified Y-type) is formed in PTFE by radiation-crosslinking in the molten state. In addition, various types of double bond structures, excluding the crosslinking site, have been identified. The crosslinked PTFE has a good light transparency due to the loss of crystallites, whilst it retains the excellent properties of electrical insulation and heat resistance. The coefficient of abrasion and the permanent creep are also greatly improved by crosslinking.

  17. Estimating Escherichia coli loads in streams based on various physical, chemical, and biological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Dipankar; Mohanty, Binayak P; Lesikar, Bruce J

    2013-05-01

    Microbes have been identified as a major contaminant of water resources. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a commonly used indicator organism. It is well recognized that the fate of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by multiple physical, chemical, and biological factors. The aim of this work is to provide insight into the physical, chemical, and biological factors along with their interactions that are critical in the estimation of E. coli loads in surface streams. There are various models to predict E. coli loads in streams, but they tend to be system or site specific or overly complex without enhancing our understanding of these factors. Hence, based on available data, a Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) is presented for estimating E. coli loads based on physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams. The BNN has the dual advantage of overcoming the absence of quality data (with regards to consistency in data) and determination of mechanistic model parameters by employing a probabilistic framework. This study evaluates whether the BNN model can be an effective alternative tool to mechanistic models for E. coli loads estimation in streams. For this purpose, a comparison with a traditional model (LOADEST, USGS) is conducted. The models are compared for estimated E. coli loads based on available water quality data in Plum Creek, Texas. All the model efficiency measures suggest that overall E. coli loads estimations by the BNN model are better than the E. coli loads estimations by the LOADEST model on all the three occasions (three-fold cross validation). Thirteen factors were used for estimating E. coli loads with the exhaustive feature selection technique, which indicated that six of thirteen factors are important for estimating E. coli loads. Physical factors included temperature and dissolved oxygen; chemical factors include phosphate and ammonia; biological factors include suspended solids and chlorophyll. The results highlight that the LOADEST model

  18. Physical chemical studies of dispersed aluminosilicate wastes for obtaining the burned building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuriev, I. Y.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Volokitin, G. G.; Volokitin, O. G.; Lutsenko, A. V.; Kosmachev, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of the studies that determined that grinding can be one of the ways to modify aluminosilicate wastes. The optimal grinding modes were defined in laboratory conditions. Physical and chemical studies of modified ashes were carried out by means of X-ray phase analysis, differential thermal analysis and microscopy. The results have shown that modified ashes of thermal power stations when being applied in production of ceramic brick influence positively the processing properties of raw materials and the ready products.

  19. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Acharya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc and high critical current density (Jc. The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  20. Sensitivity of two garden pea genotypes to physical and chemical mutagens

    OpenAIRE

    Slavka Kalapchieva; Nasya Tomlekova

    2016-01-01

    A study on the sensitivity of two breeding lines of garden pea to mutagenic agents was carried out in the Maritsa Vegetable Crops Research Institute, Plovdiv. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity of the Pisum sativum L. genotypes to physical and chemical mutagens. In the experiment, the pea seeds were irradiated single or combined with 60Co gamma rays (40, 80, 100, 200 and 400 Gy) and Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2 %. Visible morphological changes of the ...

  1. COMPARISON BETWEEN SOME PHYSICAL - CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CACAO MILK AND RAW MILK

    OpenAIRE

    Florin Roman

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a comparison between some physical - chemical characteristics of the cacao milk and of the raw milk. For this comparison we made the following determinations for both types of milk: the determination of the dry substance using the drying oven with a 102 °C temperature, the determination of the proteic substance by titration with sodium hydroxide ( NaOH ) N/10, the milk pasteurization control by the starch and potassium iodide test and the pH determination using the indicato...

  2. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Tan, Teng; Lee, Namhoon; Lang, Andrew C.; Taheri, Mitra; Cunnane, Dan; Karasik, Boris. S.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc) and high critical current density (Jc). The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  3. Science reference room index to physical, chemical and other property data

    CERN Document Server

    This nice reference guide from Arizona State University's Noble Science and Engineering Library amounts to "an index to selected library and internet resources that contain chemical, physical, thermodynamic, mechanical, toxicological, and safety data with a list of suggested standard reference sources that may be found in most technical libraries, this reference guide goes on to include a vast reservoir of alphabetically listed library books and Internet sites where a user may locate specific information. From Abrasion Resistance to Yield Strength data, this index is quite comprehensive.

  4. Modelling of Physical, Chemical, and Material Properties of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Kupecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of modelling techniques applicable for system-level studies to account for physical, chemical, and material properties of solid oxide fuel cells. Functionality of 0D to 3D models is discussed and selected examples are given. Author provides information on typical length scales in evaluation of power systems with solid oxide fuel cells. In each section, proper examples of previous studies done in the field of 0D–3D modelling are recalled and discussed.

  5. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.H. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    These Appendices describe various technologies that may be applicable to the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (MWTP) Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). These technologies were identified by the CPTS Technical Support Group (TSG) as potentially applicable to a variety of separation, volume reduction, and decontamination requirements. The purpose was to identify all available and developing technologies, and their characteristics, for subsequent evaluation for specific requirements identified for the CPTS. However, the technologies described herein are not necessarily all inclusive, nor are they necessarily all applicable.

  6. Warm neutral halos around molecular clouds. VI - Physical and chemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Wannier, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    A combined physical and chemical modeling of the halos around molecular clouds is presented, with special emphasis on the H-to-H2 transition. On the basis of H I 21 cm observations, it is shown that the halos are extended. A physical model is employed in conjunction with a chemistry code to provide a self-consistent description of the gas. The radiative transfer code provides a check with H I, CO, and OH observations. It is concluded that the warm neutral halos are not gravitationally bound to the underlying molecular clouds and are isobaric. It is inferred from the observed extent of the H I envelopes and the large observed abundance of OH in them that the generally accepted rate for H2 information on grains is too large by a factor of two to three.

  7. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected in Weeks Bay, Alabama (June 1990 - May 2000) (NODC Accession 0116469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: This dataset contains ten years of physical, chemical, and biological data collected during shipboard surveys in Weeks Bay, Alabama, between June 1990 and...

  8. Analysis of the Engineering Restoration Effect of Abandoned Yongledian Quarry in Beijing City Based on Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liwei; CAI

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of the soil physical and chemical properties is the most important foundation for mine ecological restoration.The experiment is aimed at undisturbed area,restored area,and damaged area of abandoned Yongledian Quarry in Beijing.Through determination and analysis of soil physical and chemical properties,it shows that there are significant differences in the composite effects of soil physical and chemical properties between restored area,and undisturbed area,damaged area,and engineering restoration effectively improves the composite effects of soil physical and chemical properties in the restored area.The single factor hypothesis test shows that soil pH value,organic matter,alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen,and total nitrogen traits are the key targets to be restored in this mining area.

  9. Interactions of physical, chemical, and biological weather calling for an integrated approach to assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Thomas; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Dahl, Aslög; Bossioli, Elissavet; Baklanov, Alexander; Vik, Aasmund Fahre; Agnew, Paul; Karatzas, Kostas D; Sofiev, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews interactions and health impacts of physical, chemical, and biological weather. Interactions and synergistic effects between the three types of weather call for integrated assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality. Today's air quality legislation falls short of addressing air quality degradation by biological weather, despite increasing evidence for the feasibility of both mitigation and adaptation policy options. In comparison with the existing capabilities for physical and chemical weather, the monitoring of biological weather is lacking stable operational agreements and resources. Furthermore, integrated effects of physical, chemical, and biological weather suggest a critical review of air quality management practices. Additional research is required to improve the coupled modeling of physical, chemical, and biological weather as well as the assessment and communication of integrated air quality. Findings from several recent COST Actions underline the importance of an increased dialog between scientists from the fields of meteorology, air quality, aerobiology, health, and policy makers.

  10. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected in Mobile Bay, Alabama in May 1989-December 1999 (NODC Accession 0116496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains physical, chemical, and biological data collected during ten years of near-monthly shipboard surveys carried out in Mobile Bay between May 1989...

  11. Physical and Chemical Properties of Water Treatment Residue and the Characteristics of Red Pepper Growth by Using it

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seok-Gon; Yahata, Hisashi; Kurosawa, Kiyoshi; Shin, Hyun-Tak

    2010-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of the water treatment residue (WTR) and the WTR_, which contained compost (CP), were measured, and the effect of the properties on growth of the red pepper (Capsicum annuum‘Takanotsume’) was studied to reuse the WTR as an alternative material for decomposed granite soil (DGS). The physical properties of relative gas diffusivity (D/D_0), saturated hydraulic conductivity (K_s), water retention curve, porosity and plant-available water, and the chemical propert...

  12. Physical and chemical mechanisms in oxide-based resistance random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Zhang, Rui; Hung, Ya-Chi; Syu, Yong-En; Chang, Yao-Feng; Chen, Min-Chen; Chu, Tian-Jian; Chen, Hsin-Lu; Pan, Chih-Hung; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of our work in resistive switching mechanisms on oxide-based resistance random access memory (RRAM) devices. Based on the investigation of physical and chemical mechanisms, we focus on its materials, device structures, and treatment methods so as to provide an in-depth perspective of state-of-the-art oxide-based RRAM. The critical voltage and constant reaction energy properties were found, which can be used to prospectively modulate voltage and operation time to control RRAM device working performance and forecast material composition. The quantized switching phenomena in RRAM devices were demonstrated at ultra-cryogenic temperature (4K), which is attributed to the atomic-level reaction in metallic filament. In the aspect of chemical mechanisms, we use the Coulomb Faraday theorem to investigate the chemical reaction equations of RRAM for the first time. We can clearly observe that the first-order reaction series is the basis for chemical reaction during reset process in the study. Furthermore, the activation energy of chemical reactions can be extracted by changing temperature during the reset process, from which the oxygen ion reaction process can be found in the RRAM device. As for its materials, silicon oxide is compatible to semiconductor fabrication lines. It is especially promising for the silicon oxide-doped metal technology to be introduced into the industry. Based on that, double-ended graphene oxide-doped silicon oxide based via-structure RRAM with filament self-aligning formation, and self-current limiting operation ability is demonstrated. The outstanding device characteristics are attributed to the oxidation and reduction of graphene oxide flakes formed during the sputter process. Besides, we have also adopted a new concept of supercritical CO2 fluid treatment to efficiently reduce the operation current of RRAM devices for portable electronic applications.

  13. Improving cancer therapies by targeting the physical and chemical hallmarks of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2016-09-28

    Tumors are highly heterogeneous at the patient, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. This multi-scale heterogeneity poses significant challenges for effective therapies, which ideally must not only distinguish between tumorous and healthy tissue, but also fully address the wide variety of tumorous sub-clones. Commonly used therapies either leverage a biological phenotype of cancer cells (e.g. high rate of proliferation) or indiscriminately kill all the cells present in a targeted volume. Tumor microenvironment (TME) targeting represents a promising therapeutic direction, because a number of TME hallmarks are conserved across different tumor types, despite the underlying genetic heterogeneity. Historically, TME targeting has largely focused on the cells that support tumor growth (e.g. vascular endothelial cells). However, by viewing the intrinsic physical and chemical alterations in the TME as additional therapeutic opportunities rather than barriers, a new class of TME-inspired treatments has great promise to complement or replace existing therapeutic strategies. In this review we summarize the physical and chemical hallmarks of the TME, and discuss how these tumor characteristics either currently are, or may ultimately be targeted to improve cancer therapies.

  14. Improving N(6)-methyladenosine site prediction with heuristic selection of nucleotide physical-chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Sun, Jia-Wei; Liu, Zi; Ren, Ming-Wu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-09-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most common and abundant post-transcriptional RNA modifications found in viruses and most eukaryotes. m(6)A plays an essential role in many vital biological processes to regulate gene expression. Because of its widespread distribution across the genomes, the identification of m(6)A sites from RNA sequences is of significant importance for better understanding the regulatory mechanism of m(6)A. Although progress has been achieved in m(6)A site prediction, challenges remain. This article aims to further improve the performance of m(6)A site prediction by introducing a new heuristic nucleotide physical-chemical property selection (HPCS) algorithm. The proposed HPCS algorithm can effectively extract an optimized subset of nucleotide physical-chemical properties under the prescribed feature representation for encoding an RNA sequence into a feature vector. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed HPCS algorithm under different feature representations, including pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC), auto-covariance (AC), and cross-covariance (CC). Based on the proposed HPCS algorithm, we implemented an m(6)A site predictor, called M6A-HPCS, which is freely available at http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/M6A-HPCS. Experimental results over rigorous jackknife tests on benchmark datasets demonstrated that the proposed M6A-HPCS achieves higher success rates and outperforms existing state-of-the-art sequence-based m(6)A site predictors.

  15. 2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

    2008-11-01

    For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

  16. Repeatability, correlation and path analysis of physical and chemical characteristics of peach fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Gonçalves Pires Matias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the number of measurements necessary to evaluate physical and chemical characteristics of peach fruits, study the relationships between them and their direct and indirect effects on the content of ascorbic acid and total carotenoids. The characteristics skin and pulp color, fruit weight, suture, equatorial and polar diameters, firmness, soluble solids (SS, titratable acidity (TA, SS/TA ratio, ascorbic acid and total carotenoids were evaluated in 39 cultivars of peach and 3 cultivars of nectarine from the orchard of the Universidade Federal de Viçosa. The repeatability coefficient was estimated by ANOVA and CPCOR. Phenotypic correlation coefficients (rf were estimated and, after the multicollinearity diagnostics, they were unfolded to direct and indirect effects of the explanatory variables on the response variable using path analysis. There was agreement on the magnitude of repeatability coefficients obtained by the two methods; however, they varied among the 14 characteristics. The highest correlations were found between FW, SD, ED and PD. Seven fruits are sufficient to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of peach with a correlation coefficient of 90%. The characteristics considered in the path diagrams (b* skin, hº skin, b* pulp, hº pulp, ED, PD, FIR, SS, SS/AT and TC are not the main determinants of the ascorbic acid. The yellow hue of the pulp (hº pulp has the potential to be used in indirect selection for total carotenoids.

  17. Influence of physical, chemical and inducer treatments on menaquinone-7 biosynthesis by Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2756

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Puri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of physical and chemical treatment on nutrient mobility, their utilization for menaquinone-7 (MK-7 biosynthesis; growth of microbial cells has been investigated in the present research. Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2756 fermented medium was supplied with 1-naphthol and hypoxanthine resulted in a significant increase in MK-7 production. Ultrasonication, electric shock, heat shock, and tween 80 were used for inducer uptake by Bacillus subtilis and menaquinone-7 production. Induction of Bacillus subtilis (at 16 hours of fermentation using 1-naphthol (2 mg/ml, along with tween 80 (0.1% was found to increase the MK-7 production by 3 fold i.e. 14.4 µg/ml as compared to the untreated fermentation medium. The ultrasonicated (ultrasonic power 33 W, treatment time 4 min and frequency 36 KHz microbial cells yielded higher biomass and 2.5 fold increase in the MK-7 production i.e.10.3 µg/ml than control. 1-naphthol along with physical or chemical treatment is required for maximum MK-7 production by Bacillus subtilis.

  18. Physical and Chemical Transformation of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles in Aqueous Sol after Preparation and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The co-precipitation method followed by ultrasound and heat treatment is a common way to prepare below 100 nm sized hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for biomedical studies and applications. The size and pH value of the obtained calcium phosphate nanoparticles in aqueous sol have a strong impact on the interactions with cells and tissue. The physical and chemical properties of material samples for in vitro and in vivo studies are often assumed to remain constant from the time after fabrication to the actual use. Only little attention is paid to eventual changes of the material over time or due to the different in vitro conditions. In this study, the physical and chemical transformation of calcium phosphate nanoparticles after preparation and in vitro was investigated. As the result showed, dispersed nano sized amorphous calcium phosphate precipitation as well as crystallized hydroxyapatite nanoparticles continue to crystallize even when kept at 4 ℃ leading to declining pH values and particle sizes.Due to the pH buffer in the medium the pH value of the cell culture remained stable after adding 20% nanoparticle sol in vitro. However, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles immediately became unstable in the presents of cell culture medium. The resulting loose agglomerations showed a size of above 500 nm.

  19. Solid waste disposal in the soil: effects on the physical, chemical, and organic properties of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Regina Lasaro Mangieri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is growing concern over the final destination of the solid waste generated by society. Landfills should not be considered the endpoint for substances contained or generated in solid waste. The sustainable use of natural resources, especially soil and water, has become relevant, given the increase in anthropogenic activities. Agricultural use is an alternative to solid waste (leachate, biosolid disposal, considering the hypothesis that the agricultural use of waste is promising for reducing waste treatment costs, promoting nutrient reuse and improving the physical and chemical conditions of soil. Thus, this literature review, based on previously published data, seeks to confirm or disprove the hypothesis regarding the promising use of solid waste in agriculture to decrease the environmental liability that challenges public administrators in the development of efficient management. The text below addresses the following subtopics after the introduction: current solid waste disposal and environmental issues, the use of solid waste in agriculture, and the effect on the physical and chemical properties of soil and on organic matter, ending with final considerations.

  20. Experiment on the thermal conductivity and permeability of physical and chemical compound adsorbents for sorption process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Z. Q.; Wang, L. W.; Jiang, L.; Wang, R. Z.

    2013-08-01

    For the adsorbents in the application of refrigeration, the density of the material inside the adsorber changes because the adsorption/desorption of the refrigerant inside the adsorbents. Consequently the thermal conductivity and permeability of the adsorbents also change. In order to investigate the heat and mass transfer performance of consolidated compound adsorbent under the different equilibrium state of adsorption/desorption, the thermal conductivity and permeability test system is set up using the guarded hot plate measuring method and the principle of Ergun equation. Then various mass ratios between adsorbent and matrix of consolidated physical and chemical compound adsorbents are developed and tested under different ammonia adsorption quantity. Result shows that the thermal conductivity and permeability have strong dependence with the ratios and consolidated density of the compound adsorbent. Meanwhile, the thermal conductivity and permeability of the chemical compound adsorbents vary significantly with different adsorption quantity of ammonia, and the values for the physical compound adsorbents almost maintain a constant value with different values of adsorption quantity.

  1. Hancornia speciosa latex for biomedical applications: physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility assessment and angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciane Madureira; Floriano, Juliana Ferreira; Ribeiro, Thuanne Pires; Magno, Lais Nogueira; da Mota, Lígia Souza Lima Silveira; Peixoto, Nei; Mrué, Fátima; Melo-Reis, Paulo; Lino Junior, Ruy de Souza; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira; Gonçalves, Pablo José

    2014-09-01

    The latex obtained from Hancornia speciosa is used in folk medicine for treatment of several diseases, such as acne, warts, diabetes, gastritis and inflammation. In this work, we describe the biocompatibility assessment and angiogenic properties of H. speciosa latex and its potential application in medicine. The physical-chemical characterization was carried out following different methodologies (CHN elemental analyses; thermogravimetric analyses and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). The biocompatibility was evaluated through cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests in fibroblast mouse cells and the angiogenic properties were evaluated using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay model. The physical-chemical results showed that the structure of Hancornia speciosa latex biomembrane is very similar to that of Hevea brasiliensis (commercially available product). Moreover, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that H. speciosa latex is biocompatible with life systems and can be a good biomaterial for medical applications. The CAM test showed the efficient ability of H. speciosa latex in neovascularization of tissues. The histological analysis was in accordance with the results obtained in the CAM assay. Our data indicate that the latex obtained from H. speciosa and eluted in water showed significant angiogenic activity without any cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on life systems. The same did not occur with H. speciosa latex stabilized with ammonia. Addition of ammonia does not have significant effects on the structure of biomembranes, but showed a smaller cell survival and a significant genotoxicity effect. This study contributes to the understanding of the potentialities of H. speciosa latex as a source of new phytomedicines.

  2. Eugenol improves physical and chemical stabilities of nanoemulsions loaded with β-carotene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yongguang; Wu, Jine; Zhong, Qixin

    2016-03-01

    Food-grade nanoemulsions are potential vehicles of labile lipophilic compounds such as β-carotene, but much work is needed to improve physical and chemical stabilities. The objective of this work was to study impacts of eugenol on physical and chemical stabilities of β-carotene-loaded nanoemulsions prepared with whey protein and lecithin. The combination of whey protein and lecithin resulted in stable nanoemulsions with eugenol added at 10% mass of soybean oil. Nanoemulsions, especially with eugenol, drastically reduced the degradation of β-carotene during ambient storage, heating at 60 and 80°C, and UV radiation at 254, 302, and 365nm. The droplet diameter of the nanoemulsion without eugenol increased from 153.6 to 227.3nm after 30-day ambient storage, contrasting with no significant changes of nanoemulsions with eugenol. Heating or UV radiation up to 8h did not significantly change the droplet diameter. Therefore, eugenol can be used to improve the stability of nanoemulsion delivery systems.

  3. Correlation of Chemical and Physical Test Data For the Environment Ageing of Coflon (PVDF). Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, G. J.; Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    This report aims to identify correlations between mechanical property changes and chemical/morphological structure changes for Coflon. It is intended both to illustrate the overall methodology and to indicate the testing that needs to be undertaken in order to obtain correlations. Many fluid exposures have now been carried out on Coflon during the project and many data generated as a result. The report summarises the changes observed in mechanical and physical properties and relates these as well as possible to the chemistry thought to be occurring during ageing. For this purpose, data have been collated from already-issued MERL and TRI technical and progress reports. Most of the mechanical testing of aged testpieces has been performed soon after the completion of the exposure; however, there is of necessity a delay in obtaining chemical analysis of the same testpieces, so that more physical than chemical data are shown. Three fluids have so far caused measurable deterioration of Coflon, these being: methanol (Fluid A), a methanol and amine mixture (Fluid G), and a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide gas and hydrogen sulphide gas plus aqueous amine (Fluid F). Only the effects of these fluids will be dealt with in any detail in this report, although other fluids are assessed to give relevant background information. Relevant test data collated here include: tensile modulus and related properties, mode of sample failure at break, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth rate and resistance, stress relaxation rate, permeation coefficients, % crystallinity and molecular weight distributions together with changes in fluorine levels, and other observations where appropriate. However, not all of these were obtained for every ageing condition. Because of the wide range of tests employed, and the different ways in which their results are obtained, the following section has been included to serve as a background for making comparisons.

  4. Temporal changes in physical, chemical and biological sediment parameters in a tropical estuary after mangrove deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Marianne; Nguyen, Ngoc Tuong Giang; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Michelsen, Anders; Nguyen, Ngoc Lam; Doan, Nhu Hai; Kristensen, Erik; Weckström, Kaarina; Son, Tong Phuoc Hoang; Lund-Hansen, Lars Chresten

    2014-04-01

    Dated sediment cores taken near the head and mouth of a tropical estuary, Nha-Phu/Binh Cang, in south central Viet Nam were analyzed for changes over time in physical, chemical and biological proxies potentially influenced by removal of the mangrove forest lining the estuary. A time-series of satellite images was obtained, which showed that the depletion of the mangrove forest at the head of the estuary was relatively recent. Most of the area was converted into aquaculture ponds, mainly in the late 1990's. The sediment record showed a clear increase in sedimentation rate at the head of the estuary at the time of mangrove deforestation and a change in diatom assemblages in the core from the mouth of the estuary indicating an increase in the water column turbidity of the entire estuary at the time of the mangrove deforestation. The proportion of fine-grained sediment and the δ13C signal both increased with distance from the head of the estuary while the carbon content decreased. The nitrogen content and the δ15N signal were more or less constant throughout the estuary. The proportion of fine-grained material and the chemical proxies were more or less stable over time in the core from the mouth while they varied synchronously over time in the core from the head of the estuary. The sediment proxies combined show that mangrove deforestation had large effects on the estuary with regard to both the physical and chemical environment with implications for the biological functioning.

  5. Sensorial, physical and chemical evaluation of bio-fortified Ipomoea batatas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara N.G. Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: Bio-fortified sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L. Lamarck beta-carotene rich, has been included in the most vulnerable population’s diet with the purpose of reducing health disturbances associated with hipovitaminosis. Aims:To evaluate a physical and chemical analysis of total carotenes and beta-carotene and to determine the antioxidant potential as well as to carry out a sensorial analysis of the bio-fortified Ipomoea batatas (L. Lamarck (BDB in nature and processed. Methods: BDB was processed as sweet (in natura, paste and syrup and physicochemical characteristics were compared, total carotenoids, beta-carotene, antioxidant activity (DPPH and microbiological and sensory analyses were performed. Results:The analysis of total carotenoids, beta-carotene and anti-oxidant potential showed the following results: BDB in nature – 11.81 mg/100 g/440.5 mg/100 g/26.30%; sweet paste – 0.61 mg/100 g/53.5 mg/100 g/53.40% and savored syrup – 0.85 mg/100 g/46.0 mg/100 g/14.30%. The methods of conservation avoided the coliforms growth at 35 and 45°C, Staphylococcus coagulasa positivo, Bacillus cereus and Salmonella in all elaborated candies. The sensorial analysis didn’t detect significant differences among the syrup or paste. Conclusions: The conservation methods have an important function keeping the physical, chemical characteristics and sensorial of BDB, although they can influence in their chemical and nutritional composition, mainly in relation to the quantity of total carotenoids and beta-carotene.

  6. Sputtered titanium oxynitride coatings for endosseous applications: Physical and chemical evaluation and first bioactivity assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banakh, Oksana, E-mail: oksana.banakh@he-arc.ch [Institute of Applied Microtechnologies, Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie (HES-SO), Eplatures-Grise 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Moussa, Mira, E-mail: mira.moussa@unige.ch [Laboratory of Biomaterials, University of Geneva, 19, rue Barthelemy Menn, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Matthey, Joel, E-mail: joel.matthey@he-arc.ch [Institute of Applied Microtechnologies, Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie (HES-SO), Eplatures-Grise 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Pontearso, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.pontearso@he-arc.ch [Institute of Applied Microtechnologies, Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie (HES-SO), Eplatures-Grise 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Cattani-Lorente, Maria, E-mail: maria.cattani-lorente@unige.ch [Laboratory of Biomaterials, University of Geneva, 19, rue Barthelemy Menn, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Sanjines, Rosendo, E-mail: rosendo.sanjines@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Fontana, Pierre, E-mail: Pierre.Fontana@hcuge.ch [Haemostasis laboratory, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Wiskott, Anselm, E-mail: anselm.wiskott@unige.ch [Laboratory of Biomaterials, University of Geneva, 19, rue Barthelemy Menn, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Durual, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.durual@unige.ch [Laboratory of Biomaterials, University of Geneva, 19, rue Barthelemy Menn, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Titanium oxynitride coatings (TiN{sub x}O{sub y}) with chemical composition ranging from TiN to TiO{sub 2} were deposited by magnetron sputtering from a metallic Ti target using a mixture of O{sub 2} + N{sub 2}. • The coatings structure as well as physical, chemical and mechanical properties progressively changes as a function of oxygen content in the TiN{sub x}O{sub y.} • All TiN{sub x}O{sub y} coatings show a significantly higher level of bioactivity as compared to bare Ti substrates (1.2 to 1.4 fold increase in cell proliferation). Despite variations in surface chemistry, topography and surface tension observed on films as a function of chemical composition, no significant differences in the films’ biological activity were observed after 3 days of testing. - Abstract: Titanium oxynitride coatings (TiN{sub x}O{sub y}) are considered a promising material for applications in dental implantology due to their high corrosion resistance, their biocompatibility and their superior hardness. Using the sputtering technique, TiN{sub x}O{sub y} films with variable chemical compositions can be deposited. These films may then be set to a desired value by varying the process parameters, that is, the oxygen and nitrogen gas flows. To improve the control of the sputtering process with two reactive gases and to achieve a variable and controllable coating composition, the plasma characteristics were monitored in-situ by optical emission spectroscopy. TiN{sub x}O{sub y} films were deposited onto commercially pure (ASTM 67) microroughened titanium plates by reactive magnetron sputtering. The nitrogen gas flow was kept constant while the oxygen gas flow was adjusted for each deposition run to obtain films with different oxygen and nitrogen contents. The physical and chemical properties of the deposited films were analyzed as a function of oxygen content in the titanium oxynitride. The potential application of the coatings in dental implantology was assessed by

  7. Physical and chemical basics of modification of poly(vinyl chloride) by means of polyisocyanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamov, Anvar; Fakhrutdinova, Venera; Abdrakhmanova, Lyailya

    2016-01-01

    This research presents data relating to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) modification by means of reactive oligomer and measures technological, physical and mechanical properties of the modified composites. Polyisocyanate (PIC) has been chosen as the modifying reactive oligomer. It has been shown that insertion of the oligomer has a double effect on PVC. Primarily, PIC produces a plasticizing effect on PVC and in particular leads to an increase in thermal stability and melt flow index at the stage of processing. In addition, the molded PVC composites possess higher strength properties and lower deformability when exposed to temperature because of chemical transformations of PIC in polymer matrix and, as the result, the formation of cross-linked systems takes place. In this case, semi-interpenetrating structures are formed based on cross-linked products of PIC chemical transformations homogeneously distributed in the PVC matrix. It has been determined by means of IR-spectroscopy that the basic products of PIC curing are compounds with urea and biuret groups which leads to modifying effect on PVC especially: increase in strength, thermal and mechanical properties, and chemical resistance.

  8. Physical and Chemical Properties of Sediments in Huainan Segment of Huaihe River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yong-hong; XU Jun; WANG Juan; TIAN Dong; CHEN Jun; GAO Zhi-kang

    2005-01-01

    The chemical and physical properties of nitrogen and phosphorus as well as their concentrations in the overlying water, pore-water and sediments in Huainan segment of the Huaihe river were analyzed. The chemical forms of phosphorus in sediments were differentiated by a sequential fraction method. The results revealed that the NH4+-N content in pore-water of 6 surface sediments is obviously higher than that in overlying water, indicating that there is a dynamic tendency of releasing NH4+-N from sediment into overlying water. Chemical compound of nitrogen differs among segments of the river, while phosphorus has no such difference. Calcium bound phosphate (Ca-P) and iron bound phosphate (Fe-P) accounts for 60 % of the total phosphorus, and occluded-P (O-P) accounts for less than 20 %. Our findings indicate that 1) industrial waste water and domestic sewage have contributed to the excessive nutrient salts in Huaihe river, 2) decreased water flow during low water periods, and the interaction between sediments and overlying water disturbed by transport ships accelerate nutrient salt releasing into overlying water, which results in eutrophication of the river.

  9. Effect of grinding on chemical and physical properties of rice husk ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumrerng Rukzon; Prinya Chindaprasirt; Rattana Mahachai

    2009-01-01

    The effect of grinding on the chemical and physical properties of rice husk ash was studied.Four rice husk ashes with dif-ferent finenesses, i.e.coarse original rice husk ash (RHA0), RHAI, RHA2, and RHA3 were used for the study.Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was partially replaced with rice husk ash at 20% by weight of binder.The water to binder ratio (W/B) of the mortar was maintained at 110%±5% with flow table test.Specific gravity, fineness, chemical properties, compressive strength, and porosity test of mortars were determined.The differences in chemical composition of the rice husk ashes with different finenesses from the same batch are small.The use of RHA3 produces the mortars with good strength and low porosity.The strength of the mortar im-proves with partial replacement of RHA3 in comparison with normal coarse rice husk ash.The use of RHA3 results in a strong anddense mortar, which is due to the better dispersion and filling effect, as well as an increase in the pozzolanic reaction.

  10. USE OF AMAZONIAN SPECIES FOR AGING DISTILLED BEVERAGES: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL WOOD ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonnys Paz Castro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of storing liquor in wooden barrels is a practice that aims to improve the sensory characteristics, such as color, aroma and flavor, of the beverage. The quality of the liquor stored in these barrels depends on wood characteristics such as density, permeability, chemical composition, anatomy, besides the wood heat treatment used to fabricate the barrels. Brazil has a great diversity of forests, mainly in the north, in the Amazon. This region is home to thousands of tree species, but is limited to the use of only a few native species to store liquors. The objective of this study was to determine some of the physical and chemical characteristics for four Amazon wood species. The results obtained in this study will be compared with others from woods that are traditionally used for liquor storage. The species studied were angelim-pedra (Hymenolobium petraeum Ducke cumarurana (Dipteryx polyphylla (Huber Ducke, jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L. and louro-vermelho (Nectandra rubra (Mez CK Allen. The trees were collected from Precious Woods Amazon Company forest management area, in Silves, Amazonas. Analyzes such as: concentration of extractives, lignin amount, percentage of minerals (ash and tannin content, density, elemental analysis (CHNS-O and thermal analysis were done. It was observed that the chemical composition (lignin, holocellulose and elemental analysis (percentage of C, H, N and O of the woods have significant differences. The jatobá wood presented higher tannin content, and in the thermal analysis, was that which had the lowest mass loss.

  11. Chemical and physical characterisation of biomass-based pyrolysis oils. Literature view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagernaes, L. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1995-12-31

    Biomass-based pyrolysis oils are complex mixtures of mainly organic compounds and water. The determination of their physical and chemical properties and chemical composition is a challenge for researchers. Characterisation of biomass pyrolysis oils has been studied at many universities in North America and Europe in the 1980s and 1990s. The existing literature on the analytical methods used for these oils is reviewed in this report. For characterising the chemical composition, the bio-oils have first been mainly fractionated into different classes. Solvent extraction and adsorption chromatography are the most general methods used. In adsorption chromatography, the oils have been fractionated into different hydrocarbon and polar fractions. The fractions obtained have been analysed with various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique is the analytical method most widely used and well adaptable for the fractions. For high-molecular-mass and highly polar compounds liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques as well as infrared (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR and 13C NMR) spectroscopies are more suitable due to the low volatility of pyrolysis oils. For whole pyrolysis oils, LC techniques, primarily size exclusion chromatography and FT-IR and FT-NMR spectroscopies have proved to be useful methods

  12. Physical-chemical characterization of Tunisian clays for the synthesis of geopolymers materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmani, S.; Essaidi, N.; Gouny, F.; Bouaziz, S.; Joussein, E.; Driss, A.; Sdiri, A.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-03-01

    Natural clay materials from Tunisia were examined as an aluminosilicate source for the synthesis of consolidated materials at low temperatures. Three clay samples were collected from the El Kef, Douiret and Gafsa basins and calcined at different temperatures. All of the samples were characterized using chemical and mineralogical analyses, thermogravimetry, dilatometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. The chemical (XRF) and mineralogical analyses (XRD and FTIR) indicated that all of the samples contained various amounts of kaolinite and quartz, followed by calcite, mica, palygorskite and gypsum. Curing produced a binder which did not significantly affect the physic-chemical properties of these clays. The obtained materials heterogeneous did not reach the geopolymerization stage, most likely because of their low kaolinite content. The addition of a suitable aluminosilicate to these clays is therefore recommended to produce homogeneous consolidated geopolymers. The synthesized materials obtained after the addition of metakaolin to the formulation to improve reactivity have interesting properties, thereby providing good potential for Tunisian clays in the synthesis of geopolymers.

  13. Physical, chemical and biological characteristics of space flown tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esyanti, Rizkita R.; Dwivany, Fenny M.; Almeida, Maria; Swandjaja, Leonita

    2016-11-01

    Several research showed that space flown treated seeds had a different characteristic with that of ground treated seed, which eventually produced a different characteristic of growth and productivity. Research was conducted to study the physical, chemical and biological properties, such as the rate of germination and the growth of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) space flown seeds compared with that of control one. Observations of physical properties using a SEM showed that there were pores on the surface of some tomato space flown seeds. Observations using a stereo and inverted microscope showed that the coat layer of space flown seeds was thinner than control seeds. The total mineral content in the control seeds (22.88%) was averagely higher than space flown seeds (18.66%), but the average carbohydrate content in control seed was lower (15.2 ± 2.79%) than the space flown seeds (9.02 ± 1.87%). The level of auxin (IAA) of control seeds (142 ± 6.88 ppm) was averagely lower than the space flown seeds (414 ± 78.84 ppm), whereas the level of cytokinins (zeatin) for the control seeds (381 ± 68.86 ppm) was higher than the space flown seeds (68 ± 9.53 ppm), and the level of gibberellin (GA3) for the control seeds (335 ± 10.7 ppm) was higher than the space flown seeds (184 ± 7.4 ppm). The results of this study showed that the physical and chemical properties of tomato space flown seeds were generally different compare with that to control seeds, so that it might also be resulted in different germination and growth characteristic. The germination test showed that space flown seeds had lower germination rate compare to control. The growth pattern indicated that planted space flown seeds generally grew better than control. However, those data were more homogenous in control seeds compare to that in space flown tomato seeds.

  14. pypk - A Python extension module to handle chemical kinetics in plasma physics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PLASMAKIN is a package to handle physical and chemical data used in plasma physics modeling and to compute gas-phase and gas-surface kinetics data: particle production and loss rates, photon emission spectra and energy exchange rates. A large number of species properties and reaction types are supported, namely: gas or electron temperature dependent collision rate coefficients, vibrational and cascade levels, evaluation of branching ratios, superelastic and other reverse processes, three-body collisions, radiation imprisonment and photoelectric emission. Support of non-standard rate coefficient functions can be handled by a user-supplied shared library.

    The main block of the PLASMAKIN package is a Fortran module that can be included in an user's program or compiled as a shared library, libpk. pypk is a new addition to the package and provides access to libpk from Python programs. It is build on top of the ctypes foreign function library module and is prepared to work with several Fortran compilers. However pypk is more than a wrapper and provides its own classes and functions taking advantage of Python language characteristics. Integration with Python tools allows substantial productivity gains on program development and insight on plasma physics problems.

  15. A Comparative Study of Physical and Chemical Processes for Removal of Biomass in Biofilters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Mendoza-Pérez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available After 6 months of operation a long-term biofilter was stopped for two weeks and then it was started up again for a second experimental period of almost 1.3 years, with high toluene loads and submitted to several physical and chemical treatments in order to remove excess biomass that could affect the reactor’s performance due to clogging, whose main effect is a high pressure drop. Elimination capacity and removal efficiency were determined after each treatment. The methods applied were: filling with water and draining, backwashing, and air sparging. Different flows and temperatures (20, 30, 45 and 60 °C were applied, either with distilled water or with different chemicals in aqueous solutions. Treatments with chemicals caused a decrease of the biofilter performance, requiring periods of 1 to 2 weeks to recover previous values. The results indicate that air sparging with pure distilled water as well as with solutions of NaOH (0.01% w/v and NaOCl (0.01% w/v were the treatments that removed more biomass, working either at 20, 30 or 45 °C and at relatively low flow rates (below 320 L h−1, but with a high biodegradation inhibition after the treatments. Dry biomass (g VS content was determined at three different heights of the biofilter in order to carry out each experiment under the same conditions. The same amount of dry biomass when applying a treatment was established so it could be considered that the biofilm conditions were identical. Wet biomass was used as a control of the biofilter’s water content during treatments. Several batch assays were performed to support and quantify the observed inhibitory effects of the different chemicals and temperatures applied.

  16. Effect of consolidate application of organic and chemical fertilizers on the physical and chemical traits of soil and qualitative index of corn (Zea mays L plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Namazi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Present study was conducted to analysis the effect of Vermicompost and chemical nitrogen fertilizer on physical and chemical traits of soil's and qualitative indexes of corn plant. A factorial test with complete random block designs with 4 repetitions was conducted in the year of 2012. Three doses of chemical nitrogen fertilizers viz 50, 75 & 100 kg/hectare and two level of vermicompost viz 5 & 10 tons/hectare were used either individually or in combination with each others. Results of the study revealed that the use of Vermicompost and chemical nitrogen fertilizer caused a significant increase in the percentage of seed oil contents. At individual application of chemical nitrogen fertilizer highest increment in seed oil content was reported at 100 kg/hectare application, while in combination it was reported higher in the combination of 75 kg/hectare chemical Nitrogen fertilizer and 10ton/hectare vermicompost. The least effective treatment of was the combination of 100 kg/hectare chemical nitrogen fertilizer and 10 tons/hectare vermicompost combination. The most bulk gravity and real gravity is due to the treatment of Nitrogen chemical fertilizer at 50kg/hectare of soil test and without the use of vermicompost and the least bulk and real gravity of soil belong to the treatment of Nitrogen chemical fertilizer at the amount of 100kg/hectare of soil test and use of vermicompost at the amount of 10 tons in hectare.

  17. Environmental parameters of the Tennessee River in Alabama. 2: Physical, chemical, and biological parameters. [biological and chemical effects of thermal pollution from nuclear power plants on water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosing, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological water quality data from five sites in the Tennessee River, two in Guntersville Reservoir and three in Wheeler Reservoir were correlated with climatological data for three annual cycles. Two of the annual cycles are for the years prior to the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant operations and one is for the first 14 months of Plant operations. A comparison of the results of the annual cycles indicates that two distinct physical conditions in the reservoirs occur, one during the warm months when the reservoirs are at capacity and one during the colder winter months when the reservoirs have been drawn-down for water storage during the rainy months and for weed control. The wide variations of physical and chemical parameters to which the biological organisms are subjected on an annual basis control the biological organisms and their population levels. A comparison of the parameters of the site below the Power plant indicates that the heated effluent from the plant operating with two of the three reactors has not had any effect on the organisms at this site. Recommendations given include the development of prediction mathematical models (statistical analysis) for the physical and chemical parameters under specific climatological conditions which affect biological organisms. Tabulated data of chemical analysis of water and organism populations studied is given.

  18. Chemical and physical conversion in cold atmosphere and the effect of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulmala, M.; Aalto, P.; Korhonen, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Vesala, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The project is focusing on the formation and growth mechanisms of atmospheric aerosol and cloud droplets. Both aerosol particles and cloud droplets affect strongly on the atmospheric radiation fluxes by scattering and absorption. The droplet formation results from physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously. The studies concerning the tropospheric cloud droplet formation, laboratory experiments with a cloud chamber and stratospheric cloud formation are summarized. The recent studies summarized in this presentation indicate that both aerosol particles and cloud droplets have a significant role in climatic change and ozone depletion problems. The anthropogenic emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants change the properties of atmospheric aerosols and cloud droplets. The research in this field will be continued and more quantitative understanding based both experimental and theoretical studies is required

  19. Physical and chemical analysis of a Ni/H2 cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, H.; Earl, M. W.; Kirkendall, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    A cycled aerospace nickel hydrogen (Ni/H2) cell was subjected to destructive physical analysis to determine the reason for a capacity loss after 5,967 cycles at 60 percent depth of discharge. The positive plates in the cell were analyzed in terms of chemical composition, active material utilization, charge efficiency, and thickness increase. The microstructure of a cross section of the positive plate was determined by backscattered electron image analysis. The results suggest that the capacity loss in the cell is caused by low charge acceptance and low active material utilization at the positive plate. The oxidized nickel species content of the positive plate increased due to corrosion of the nickel sintered skeleton. This appears to circumvent the orderly reaction of the active material. Microstructural analysis has indicated that a new phase of active material is formed with cycling.

  20. The Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardo, Vincent J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The various elements of the Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Research Project (P/C CLLS) are described including both those currently funded and those planned for implementation at ARC and other participating NASA field centers. The plan addresses the entire range of regenerative life support for Space Exploration Initiative mission needs, and focuses initially on achieving technology readiness for the Initial Lunar Outpost by 1995-97. Project elements include water reclamation, air revitalization, solid waste management, thermal and systems control, and systems integration. Current analysis estimates that each occupant of a space habitat will require a total of 32 kg/day of supplies to live and operate comfortably, while an ideal P/C CLLS system capable of 100 percent reclamation of air and water, but excluding recycling of solid wastes or foods, will reduce this requirement to 3.4 kg/day.

  1. Coupled Physical/Chemical and Biofiltration Technologies to Reduce Air Emissions from Forest Products Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. McGinnis

    2001-12-31

    The research is a laboratory and bench-scale investigation of a system to concentrate and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including hazardous air pollutants, formed from the drying of wood and the manufacture of wood board products (e.g., particle board and oriented strandboard). The approach that was investigated involved concentrating the dilute VOCs (<500 ppmv) with a physical/chemical adsorption unit, followed by the treatment of the concentrated voc stream (2,000 to 2,500 ppmv) with a biofiltration unit. The research program lasted three years, and involved three research organizations. Michigan Technological University was the primary recipient of the financial assistance, the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Mississippi State University (MSU) were subcontractors to MTU. The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a pilot-scale demonstration of the technology with sufficient data to provide for the design of an industrial system. No commercialization activities were included in this project.

  2. Effective use of physical/chemical mutagens in crop hybrid breeding in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Luxiang; Wang Jing [Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Institute for Application of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2001-03-01

    Crop heterosis utilization was one of the greatest achievements in the agriculture production in the 20th century. It is proved that every breakthrough in crop hybrid breeding was predicated on the discovery or successful development of new heterosis germplasm. In recent years, in order to open up the scope and ways of using crop heterosis, it has been paid much close attention to apply mutation techniques to hybrid breeding. Useful tool materials like male sterile mutant lines, fertile restoration mutants in many crops have been obtained by effective use of physical/chemical mutagens. Brief introduction is made in this paper on the newest research improvement concerning the effective use of the techniques of mutation induction in China to create special useful genes, enrich the diversity of germplasm and promote the rapid development of crop hybrid breeding. (author)

  3. The XPS study of physical and chemical forms of neptunium group on the surface of minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption behavior and the physical and chemical forms of neptunium on the surface of minerals of the two chlorate samples, biotite and kaolin, with different contents of Fe(II was studied. The liquid-liquid extraction and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to identify the valence forms of neptunium. On the basis of the obtained data the quantitative elemental composition of the surface of the studied minerals, as well as the ionic composition of the formed neptunium complexes was determined. It was shown that the Np(IV and Np(VI containing compounds did not form, while the complexes Np(VO+ -hydroxyl did form on the surface. The oxygen ions bonded with iron and oxygen belonging to water and/or of carboxyl were suggested to be present in the equatorial plane of the neptunyl group NpO+.

  4. Physical and ergonomic hazards in the textile, chemical, food, metal products, and woodworking industries in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soytas, Ugur

    2006-01-01

    Questionnaires were administered in 272 textile, chemical, food, metal products and woodworking firms in ten cities in industry-dense areas to assess the general OHS situation in Turkey. This paper explores the portion related to exposures of workers to physical and ergonomic hazards. OHS experts where available, firm owners, partners, or engineers responsible for safety were asked to answer structured questions regarding percentages of workers exposed to specific hazards. About 65% of respondents reported exposures to noise risks among at least some percentage of employees; 26.3% reported more than 50% of employees were so exposed. In more than 60% of the firms employees were exposed to ergonomic risks related to the need to meet production quotas and the need to maintain constant posture. The most prevalent risk factors in five industries and the relative frequencies of exposed employees are described.

  5. Physical and chemical cross analyses of II-VI semiconductor nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, S.; Laurenti, J.P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Arl, D.; Fregnaux, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et de Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Gaumet, J.J. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et de Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Zhang, Y. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux, Univ. Paul Verlaine, Metz (France)

    2010-06-15

    CdS quantum dots (QDs) are synthesized by the single source precursor thermal method. Compared with previous reports, a temperature ramp allows faster elaboration of smaller nanocrystals (NCs) with efficient room temperature (RT) visible emission. A cross-disciplinary study between chemical analyses and physical techniques provides consistent data for these small NCs. Joint mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and optical spectrometry techniques give a consistent picture about purity and stability of precursors, average size and size dispersion of the NCs, as well as their optical spectral response in correlation with their size via quantum confinement effects. RT photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals the great potential of such QDs and their tunable response wavelength in the visible spectrum. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Physical and chemical structure of planet-forming disks probed by millimeter observations and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Dutrey, Anne; Chapillon, Edwige; Gorti, Uma; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Hersant, Franck; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Hughes, Meredith; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Nomura, Hideko; Piétu, Vincent; Qi, Chunhua; Wakelam, Valentine

    2014-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks composed of dust and gas are ubiquitous around young stars and are commonly recognized as nurseries of planetary systems. Their lifetime, appearance, and structure are determined by an interplay between stellar radiation, gravity, thermal pressure, magnetic field, gas viscosity, turbulence, and rotation. Molecules and dust serve as major heating and cooling agents in disks. Dust grains dominate the disk opacities, reprocess most of the stellar radiation, and shield molecules from ionizing UV/X-ray photons. Disks also dynamically evolve by building up planetary systems which drastically change their gas and dust density structures. Over the past decade significant progress has been achieved in our understanding of disk chemical composition thanks to the upgrade or advent of new millimeter/Infrared facilities (SMA, PdBI, CARMA, Herschel, e-VLA, ALMA). Some major breakthroughs in our comprehension of the disk physics and chemistry have been done since PPV. This review will present and discus...

  7. Rheology and physical-chemical characteristics of the solutions of the medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakov, A.; Urakova, N.

    2015-04-01

    In the laboratory studied the dynamics of rheology of water solutions with plasma- inflammatory and antiseptic funds when mixing them with blood, plasma and pus under the influence of the following physical and chemical factors of local interaction: gravity, specific gravity, temperature, relative viscosity, internal pressure, sparkling water, total concentration of the ingredients, surface activity, volume of acid and osmotic activity of medicines. Found that the rheology of biological liquids improve hyperthermic, highly alkaline and highly carbonated solution medicines. For the dilution of pus, dense festering mass of sulfur plugs and tear stones invited to apply heated to +39 - +42°C with aqueous solution of 0.5 - 3% hydrogen peroxide and 0.5 - 10% sodium bicarbonate saturated with carbon dioxide to excess pressure 0.2 ATM.

  8. Evaluating effects of sewage sludge and household compost on soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Petersen, S.O.; Kure, L.K.

    2002-01-01

    , effects of waste amendment were positive, but moderate compared to the dynamics observed in unamended soil, and mainly occurred in the first several weeks after amendment. The temporal dynamics of inorganic N, FDA hydrolysis activity, biomass C and PLFA composition appeared to be faster under...... amendment on the fraction of soil in wet-stable aggregates, or on the microbiological properties tested, which supported the observation from the incubation study that effects of organic wastes were transient. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.......Recycling of organic wastes within agriculture may help maintain soil fertility via effects on physical, chemical and biological properties. Efficient use, however, requires an individual assessment of waste products, and effects should be compared with natural variations due to climate and soil...

  9. MgB{sub 2} thin films by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, X.X. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]. E-mail: xxx4@psu.edu; Pogrebnyakov, A.V. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xu, S.Y.; Chen, K.; Cui, Y.; Maertz, E.C. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhuang, C.G. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Qi [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lamborn, D.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Redwing, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liu, Z.K.; Soukiassian, A.; Schlom, D.G.; Weng, X.J.; Dickey, E.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chen, Y.B.; Tian, W.; Pan, X.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cybart, S.A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dynes, R.C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) has been the most effective technique for depositing MgB{sub 2} thin films. It generates high magnesium vapor pressures and provides a clean environment for the growth of high purity MgB{sub 2} films. The epitaxial pure MgB{sub 2} films grown by HPCVD show higher-than-bulk T {sub c} due to tensile strain in the films. The HPCVD films are the cleanest MgB{sub 2} materials reported, allowing basic research, such as on magnetoresistance, that reveals the two-band nature of MgB{sub 2}. The carbon-alloyed HPCVD films demonstrate record-high H {sub c2} values promising for high magnetic field applications. The HPCVD films and multilayers have enabled the fabrication of high quality MgB{sub 2} Josephson junctions.

  10. Physical and chemical response of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated Kapton-H polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Virk; P S Chandi; A K Srivastava

    2001-10-01

    Physical and chemical responses of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated Kapton-H polymer were studied by using UV-visible, FTIR and XRD techniques. The ion fluences ranging from 9.3 × 1011–9 × 1013 ions cm–2 were used. Recorded UV-visible spectra clearly showed a decrease in absorption initially with fluence, but for the higher fluences it showed a recovery characteristic. A decrease in band-gap energy of 0.07 eV was observed. The FTIR analysis indicated the high resistance to radiation induced degradation of polymer. The diffraction pattern of Kapton-H indicates that this polymer is semi-crystalline in its nature. In case of irradiated one, there was an average increase of crystallite size by 20%, but diffuse pattern indicates that there was a decrease in crystallinity, which may be attributed to the formation of complex structure induced by the cross-linking of the polymeric chains.

  11. Chemical and physical transformations of mercury in the ocean: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Batrakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is well known as a dangerous neurotoxin enriched in the environment by human activities. It disperses over the globe, cycling between different environmental media. The ocean plays an important role in the global mercury cycle, acting both as a dispersion medium and as an exposure pathway. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the major physical and chemical transformations of mercury in the ocean. This review describes the mechanisms and provides a compilation of available rate constants for the major processes in seawater, including oxidation and reduction reactions under light and dark conditions, biotic and abiotic methylation/demethylation, and adsorption by particles. These data could be useful for the development of transport models describing processes undergone by mercury in the ocean.

  12. Chemical and physical transformations of mercury in the ocean: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Batrakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is well known as a dangerous neurotoxin enriched in the environment by human activities. It disperses over the globe, cycling between different environmental media. The ocean plays an important role in the global mercury cycle, acting both as a dispersion medium and as an exposure pathway. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the major physical and chemical transformations of mercury in the ocean. This review describes the mechanisms and provides a compilation of available rate constants for the major processes in seawater, including oxidation and reduction reactions under light and dark conditions, biotic and abiotic methylation/demethylation, and adsorption by particles. In perspective, these data could be useful for the development of transport models describing processes undergone by mercury in the ocean and in air–seawater exchange.

  13. Effect of the heat treatment on physical and chemical properties of Pinus caribaea wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallyene da Silva Poubel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of the heat treatment on physical properties (density, equilibrium moisture content, mass loss, volumetric and linear swelling and shrinkage and chemical composition of normal (opposite side and compression wood of Pinus caribaea Morelet. Samples of 25 x 25 x 50 mm were heat-treated under two different temperatures: 200 and 220 ºC. The results indicated a reduction in equilibrium moisture content and swelling and shrinkage following heat treatment, independent of wood type. The compression wood showed higher longitudinal swelling than normal one, however, after heat treatment, the improvements were similar between both wood types. Samples heat-treated at 200 and 220 ºC had mass losses of 9.94 and 21.03 %, respectively. The heat treatment promoted a relative increase in lignin content and a decrease in holocellulose and α-cellulose contents, indicating the occurrence of thermal degradation of these components.

  14. [Nictemeral variation of physical and chemical variables in the Paticos wetland, Ayapel swamp complex, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya M, Yimmy; Aguirre R, Néstor

    2009-09-01

    The nictemeral variation of abiotic factors in a key factor for tropical organisms. We evaluated some climatic, physical and chemical variables during four surveys of the hydrologic cycle in the Paticos wetland (8 degrees 21'08.2" N, 75 degrees 08'45.7" W). Of climatic variables, pluviosity presented the highest variation (C.V. = 1 022%) followed by air temperature (C.V. = 19.7%). There was a high relation in the coefficients of variation for these variables (84:1). This relation may be associated with altitude. Throughout the day-night cycle, most variables presented significant differences; except for pluviosity, air and water temperature (because of their high variability). Variables most related with nictemeral variation were pluviosity, wind speed and direction, air temperature and dissolved oxygen.

  15. A high throughput platform for understanding the influence of excipients on physical and chemical stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raijada, Dhara; Cornett, Claus; Rantanen, Jukka;

    2013-01-01

    selected. Binary physical mixtures of drug and excipient were transferred to a 96-well plate followed by addition of water to simulate aqueous granulation environment. The plate was subjected for XRPD measurements followed by drying and subsequent XRPD and HPLC measurements of the dried samples. Excipients...... with different water sorbing potential were found to influence distinctly on the phase transformation behaviour of each drug. Moreover, the amount of water addition was also a critical factor affecting phase transformation behaviour. HPLC analysis revealed one of the drug:excipient pairs with a tendency...... for chemical degradation. The proposed high-throughput platform can be used during early drug development to simulate typical processing induced stress in a small scale and to understand possible phase transformation behaviour and influence of excipients on this....

  16. Physical and chemical composition of swamp and water buffalo milk: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. R. Siddiki

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The research was carried out to compare the physical and chemical parameters of Swamp and Water buffalo milk collected from Senbari village in Trishal Upazila under Mymensingh district of Bangladesh. Results revealed that average color, flavor and taste score of Swamp and Water buffalo milk differed significantly (P0.05 with Water buffalo milk. Texture of all samples was normal. It was observed that average fat, total solids (TS, solids-not-fat (SNF and protein content differed significantly (P0.05 were found among, acidity, water. From these results, it may be inferred that the quality of Swamp buffalo milk is superior to that of Water buffalo milk.

  17. Effect of Spent Mushroom Substrate on Physical and Chemical Properties and Enzymic Activity of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hairu YU; Xue LI; Xin ZHANG; Changming GE; Renzhe PIAO; Meishan LI; Zongjun CUI; Hongyan ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the substitution substrate for rice seedling on upland fields,this paper uses spent mushroom substrate to study the physical and chemical properties of substrate,enzymic activity and number of tillers during the cultivation of rice seedling on upland fields.The results show that at the three stages of rice seedling cultivation( two-leaf stage,three-leaf stage,four-leaf stage),the content of organic matter and EC in spent mushroom substrate is higher than in the control soil,p H is within the range suitable for the growth of rice,and other nutrients( total nitrogen,total phosphorus,total potassium,available nitrogen,available phosphorus) are slightly different in different periods;except phosphatase,there are significant differences in urease,catalase and sucrase between spent mushroom substrate and the control soil; the number of tillers under spent mushroom substrate is larger than under the control.

  18. Physical and chemical assessment of MSF distillate and SWRO product for drinking purpose

    KAUST Repository

    Gacem, Yasmine

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical proprieties of desalinated seawater produced by Multi Stage Flash (MSF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) processes for drinking purpose. The final products, after post-treatment and blending, of Kahrama MSF and Bousfer SWRO plants located in different sites were investigated in this study. Different samples were taken from raw water and product before and after post-treatments in both plants. The physical and chemical balance revealed that the desalinated water produced by MSF plant is of better quality than that produced by the SWRO plant. The Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) was used as an indicator of the aggressiveness and corrosiveness of potable water. Indeed, the LSI of the distillate was slightly positive with over 77% of the values ranging from 0 to 0.13 while about 23% of the values were negative. This is due to the increase of MSF product water temperature from 29 °C to 33.82 °C during the investigation period and the calcium levels which decreased to a minimum value of 45.95. mg/l. On the other hand, the SWRO desalinated water had a negative LSI with values ranging from -3.27 to -1.85. These results are not within the recommended LSI values (between 0 and 0.4), which means that the product is highly aggressive and becomes improper for human consumption. These negative values are directly related to the RO product water temperature below 24.6 °C and calcium concentration below 16.03. mg/l as well as the lack of proper post-treatment process. From this investigation, it was recommended to improve the RO product post-treatment to make the remineralization process more effective. Some recommended guidelines suggested by the authors were presented in this paper. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Strategies and applications for incorporating physical and chemical signal gradients in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Milind; Berkland, Cory; Detamore, Michael S

    2008-12-01

    From embryonic development to wound repair, concentration gradients of bioactive signaling molecules guide tissue formation and regeneration. Moreover, gradients in cellular and extracellular architecture as well as in mechanical properties are readily apparent in native tissues. Perhaps tissue engineers can take a cue from nature in attempting to regenerate tissues by incorporating gradients into engineering design strategies. Indeed, gradient-based approaches are an emerging trend in tissue engineering, standing in contrast to traditional approaches of homogeneous delivery of cells and/or growth factors using isotropic scaffolds. Gradients in tissue engineering lie at the intersection of three major paradigms in the field-biomimetic, interfacial, and functional tissue engineering-by combining physical (via biomaterial design) and chemical (with growth/differentiation factors and cell adhesion molecules) signal delivery to achieve a continuous transition in both structure and function. This review consolidates several key methodologies to generate gradients, some of which have never been employed in a tissue engineering application, and discusses strategies for incorporating these methods into tissue engineering and implant design. A key finding of this review was that two-dimensional physicochemical gradient substrates, which serve as excellent high-throughput screening tools for optimizing desired biomaterial properties, can be enhanced in the future by transitioning from two dimensions to three dimensions, which would enable studies of cell-protein-biomaterial interactions in a more native tissue-like environment. In addition, biomimetic tissue regeneration via combined delivery of graded physical and chemical signals appears to be a promising strategy for the regeneration of heterogeneous tissues and tissue interfaces. In the future, in vivo applications will shed more light on the performance of gradient-based mechanical integrity and signal delivery

  20. Effect of pozzolans with different physical and chemical characteristics on concrete properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva, H.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The durability of concrete structures is an important issue nowadays. Specifically in the case of reinforced concrete bridges or other infrastructures one of the main form of environmental attack is the penetration of chloride ions, which leads to corrosion of concrete steel reinforcement. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the introduction of metakaolin and diatomite, two chemically and physically different pozzolans, on the resistance of concrete to the penetration of chlorides but also the effect on other properties of concrete, namely, its compressive strength and its porosity distribution. The results of this study show that the pozzolans physical and chemical characteristics have a strong influence on the pozzolans behavior and, consequently, on the concrete properties.La durabilidad de las estructuras de hormigón es un tema importante hoy en día. En concreto, en el caso de los puentes de hormigón armado u otras infraestructuras, el principal factor de agresión medioambiental es la penetración de iones cloruro, lo que conduce a la corrosion del acero de refuerzo del hormigón. Este estudio tiene como objetivo evaluar el efecto de la introducción de metacaolín y diatomita, dos puzolanas química y físicamente diferentes, sobre la resistencia del hormigón a la penetración de cloruros, y también sobre otras de sus propiedades como la distribución de su porosidad o su resistencia a compresión. Los resultados de este estudio muestran que las características fisicoquímicas de las puzolanas tienen una fuerte influencia en su comportamiento y en consecuencia, en las propiedades del hormigón.

  1. Physical-chemical determinant properties of biological communities in continental semi-arid waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Francisco Cleiton; de Andrade, Eunice Maia; Lopes, Fernando Bezerra; de Paula Filho, Francisco José; Filho, José Hamilton Costa; da Silva, Merivalda Doroteu

    2016-08-01

    Throughout human history, water has undergone changes in quality. This problem is more serious in dry areas, where there is a natural water deficit due to climatic factors. The aims of this study, therefore, were (i) to verify correlations between physical attributes, chemical attributes and biological metrics and (ii) from the biological attributes, to verify the similarity between different points of a body of water in a tropical semi-arid region. Samples were collected every 2 months, from July 2009 to July 2011, at seven points. Four physical attributes, five chemical attributes and four biological metrics were investigated. To identify the correlations between the physicochemical properties and the biological metrics, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) were applied. Nine classes of phytoplankton were identified, with the predominance of species of cyanobacteria, and ten families of macroinvertebrates. The use of HCA resulted in the formation of three similar groups, showing that it was possible to reduce the number of sampling points when monitoring water quality with a consequent reduction in cost. Group I was formed from the waters at the high end of the reservoir (points P1, P2 and P3), group II by the waters from the middle third (points P4 and P5), and group III by the waters from the lower part of the reservoir (points P6 and P7). Richness of the phytoplanktons Cyanophyceae, Chorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae was the attribute which determined dissimilarity in water quality. Using CCA, it was possible to identify the spatial variability of the physicochemical attributes (TSS, TKN, nitrate and total phosphorus) that most influence the metrics of the macroinvertebrates and phytoplankton present in the water. Low macroinvertebrate diversity, with a predominance of indicator families for deterioration in water quality, and the composition of phytoplankton showing a predominance of cyanobacteria, suggests greater

  2. Physical chemical and citotoxic evaluation of highly diluted solutions of Euphorbia tirucalli L. prepared through the fifty milesimal homeopathic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: although Hahnemann described the fifty-milesimal (LM method in the 6th edition of the Organon of the Medical Art, very little research has been carried out on the physical chemical properties of these homeopathic preparations. Furthermore, there is still no evidence allowing for the correlation between the alleged physical chemical properties and the biological effects of high dilutions. Aims: to evaluate physical chemical characteristics of LM preparations including electrical conductivity, pH and refraction index, and their effect on biological experimental models. Materials and methods: preparations tested for physical chemical analysis were dilutions 1 lm to 10 lm of Euphorbia tirucalli L. prepared from the latex and the juice of the plant. To rule the seasonal characteristics of this plant, 2 different populations were used, one collected in June 2007 and the other in May 2008. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of Euphorbia tirucalli 5 lm was tested on human breast cancer cells (MCF7 through MTT assay. Some differences among the two collections were observed. However, any clear correlation could be observed between physical chemical properties and biological activity.

  3. Effects of Green Banana Flour on the Physical, Chemical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Yangılar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, possible eff ects of the addition of banana flour at different mass fractions (1 and 2 % are investigated on physical (overrun, viscosity, chemical (dry matter, fat and ash content, acidity, pH, water and oil holding capacity and colour, mineral content (Ca, K, Na, P, S, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Ni and sensory properties of ice cream. Fibre-rich banana pieces were found to contain 66.8 g per 100 g of total dietary fibre, 58.6 g per 100 g of which were insoluble dietary fi bre, while 8.2 g per 100 g were soluble dietary fi bre. It can be concluded from these results that banana is a valuable dietary fi bre source which can be used in food production. Flour obtained from green banana pulp and peel was found to have signifi cant (p<0.05 effect on the chemical composition of ice creams. Sulphur content increased while calcium content decreased in ice cream depending on banana flour content. Sensory results indicated that ice cream sample containing 2 % of green banana pulp flour received the highest score from panellists.

  4. Uptake of Organic Vapors by Sulfate Aerosols: Physical and Chemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L.T.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    While it is known that upper tropospheric sulfate particles contain a significant amount of organic matter, both the source of the organic fraction and its form in solution are unknown. These studies explore how the chemical characteristics of the molecules and surfaces in question affect heterogeneous interactions. The solubilities of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] and ethanol [CH3CH20H] in cold, aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have been measured by Knudsen cell studies. Henry's law solubility coefficients range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) M/atm for acetaldehyde, and from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) M/atm for ethanol under upper tropospheric conditions (210-240 K, 40-80 wt. % H2S04). The multiple solvation pathways (protonation, enolization, etc.) available to these compounds in acidic aqueous environments will be discussed. Preliminary results from the interaction of acetaldehyde with solutions of formaldehyde in sulfuric acid will be presented as well. The physical and chemical processes that affect organic uptake by aqueous aerosols will be explored, with the aim of evaluating organic species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  5. Experimental study on the physical and chemical properties of the deep hard brittle shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the hard brittle shale formation, rock composition, physical and chemical properties, mechanics property before and after interacting with fluid have direct relation with borehole problems, such as borehole wall collapse, mud loss, hole shrinkage. To achieve hard brittle shale micro-structure, physical–chemical properties and mechanics property, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD, cation exchange capacity experiment and hardness test are conducted. The result of laboratory experiments indicates that, clay mineral and quartz is dominated in mineral composition. In clay mineral, illite and illite/semectite mixed layers are abundant and there is no sign of montmorillonite. Value of cation exchange capacity (CEC ranges from 102.5–330 mmol/kg and average value is 199.56 mmol/kg. High value of CEC and content of clay mineral means hard brittle shale has strong ability of hydration. The image of XRD shows well developed micro-cracks and pores, which make rock failure easily, especially when fluid invades rock inside. Shale sample soaked with anti-high temperature KCL drilling fluid on shorter immersing time has stronger strength, whereas shale sample soaked with plugging and film forming KCL drilling fluid on longer immersing time has stronger strength.

  6. Effect of Humic Acid on Soil Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Munawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the treatment of pathogens disease in fish using chemicals is very limited because of the stress of toxic ions. A treatment of humic acid of 50-90 mg /L on a farmland has been able to reduce illness and death compared to a mixture of formaldehyde and blue-green methylene. Humic acid is suspected to be able to increase yield, through improved conditions and resistance to diseases, health, and cultural vitality, either by itself or combined with cation species toxic. Humic acid can balance the soil cation so that the soil pH reached 7-8, through a chelate of Al, Fe, Ca or exchanged with NH4, Na and K. Humic acids were extracted from compost plants with a weak base of 0.1 N NaOH and precipitated at pH 2. The concentration of AH 0- 400 ml was applied to three soil types with an area of 0.12 m2 and 15 cm thickness. The results showed that the application of 100-200 ml HA/0.12 m2 gave optimum yield in improving the physical-chemical characteristics of the soil embankment. Soil pH reached a value of 7-8, cation exchange to 60% saturated, and soil bulk density was reached in the range of 1.1- 0.97 g / cm3.This condition is suitable for fish or shrimp in the embankment.

  7. Mechanism of waste biomass pyrolysis: Effect of physical and chemical pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Oisik; Sarmah, Ajit K

    2015-12-15

    To impart usability in waste based biomass through thermo-chemical reactions, several physical and chemical pre-treatments were conducted to gain an insight on their mode of action, effect on the chemistry and the change in thermal degradation profiles. Two different waste biomasses (Douglas fir, a softwood and hybrid poplar, a hardwood) were subjected to four different pre-treatments, namely, hot water pre-treatment, torrefaction, acid (sulphuric acid) and salt (ammonium phosphate) doping. Post pre-treatments, the changes in the biomass structure, chemistry, and thermal makeup were studied through electron microscopy, atomic absorption/ultra violet spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, and thermogravimetry. The pre-treatments significantly reduced the amounts of inorganic ash, extractives, metals, and hemicellulose from both the biomass samples. Furthermore, hot water and torrefaction pre-treatment caused mechanical disruption in biomass fibres leading to smaller particle sizes. Torrefaction of Douglas fir wood yielded more solid product than hybrid poplar. Finally, the salt pre-treatment increased the activation energies of the biomass samples (especially Douglas fir) to a great extent. Thus, salt pre-treatment was found to bestow thermal stability in the biomass.

  8. Physical and chemical gels of lipid nanoparticles for controlled delivery of lipophilic drugs and proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couffin, Anne-Claude; Delmas, Thomas; Thomann, Jean-Sébastien; Cheibani, Ismail; Bayma, Eric; Heinrich, Emilie; Escudé, Marie; Courant, Thomas; Hoang, Antoine; Auzély, Rachel; Texier, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    The controlled delivery of drugs and biologicals (proteins, antibodies, DNA and derivatives) is a growing need to take the full benefit of new therapeutic strategies. However these new molecules or biomolecules display solubility issues, or high degradation rates once injected. Therefore, both suitable delivery materials for their encapsulation and protection from the surrounding environment, and smart delivery devices (such as micro-needles or implanted pumps) are necessary to achieve controlled delivery of these precious therapeutic agents. We have developed bio-inspired gel materials, based on lipid nanoparticles which act as reservoirs for lipophilic drugs. The lipid nanoparticles, termed lipidots™, are biocompatible, colloidally stable, non-immunogenic, and obtained from a cheap and simple solvent-free process. The particles can be assembled to form physical or chemical gels, with tunable rheological properties. Physico-chemical studies have been carried out to determine the limits of the stability domains for colloidal and gel formulations (choice of surfactants for nanoparticle surface, and composition ratios of lipids, surfactants and co-surfactants). In particular, it is demonstrated that lipid nanoparticles keep their integrity in the gels. Gels of lipidots™ could therefore constitute biocompatible materials for the efficient encapsulation and tuned delivery of lipophilic drugs and biomolecules.

  9. Temperature effect on physical and chemical properties of secondary organic aerosol from m-xylene photooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Cocker III

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and physical differences of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formed at select isothermal temperatures (278 K, 300 K, and 313 K are explored with respect to density, particle volatility, particle hygroscopicity, and elemental chemical composition. A transition point in SOA density, volatility, hygroscopicity and elemental composition is observed near 290–292 K as SOA within an environmental chamber is heated from 278 K to 313 K, indicating the presence of a thermally labile compound. No such transition points are observed for SOA produced at 313 K or 300 K and subsequently cooled to 278 K. The SOA formed at the lowest temperatures (278 K is more than double the SOA formed at 313 K. SOA formed at 278 K is less hydrophilic and oxygenated while more volatile and dense than SOA formed at 300 K or 313 K. The properties of SOA formed at 300 K and 313 K when reduced to 278 K did not match the properties of SOA initially formed at 278 K. This study demonstrates that it is insufficient to utilize the enthalpy of vaporization when predicting SOA temperature dependence.

  10. Disruption of biofilms from sewage pipes under physical and chemical conditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charbel Mahfoud; Antoine El Samrani; Rita Mouawad; Walid Hleihel; Rim El Khatib; Bruno S. Lartiges; Naim Ouaini

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms grown inside two sewage collecting pipes located in industrial and residential areas are studied. Bacterial biomass inside three layers of biofilms was evaluated. Biofilm cohesion under different mixing rate and ionic strength was also investigated. Effects of physical and chemical parameters in the biofilms were evaluated by monitoring turbidity, chemical and biochemical oxygen demands. Extracted organic matter from biofilms was partitioned to polar, aromatic and saturated fractions using activated silica column chromatography. Results revealed that bacterial biomass growth depending on biofilm thickness and stratification. The most loaded stratum in bacterial biomass was the sewage-biofilm interface stratum that represented 51% of the total bacterial biomass. Stirring rate and ionic strength of mono and bivalent salts showed a major influence in biofilm disruption. The stirring time enhanced the exchange dynamic and matter capture between biofilm fragments at the critical stirring rate 90 r/min. Sodium chloride showed the dispersing effect on biofilms in suspension, and decreased the BOD5 (biochemical oxygen demand) beyond the physiological salt concentration.

  11. Physical and chemical properties of the Martian soil: Review of resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, C. R.; Gooding, James L.; Banin, A.; Clark, Benton C.; Roush, Ted

    1991-01-01

    The chemical and physical properties of Martian surface materials are reviewed from the perspective of using these resources to support human settlement. The resource potential of Martian sediments and soils can only be inferred from limited analyses performed by the Viking Landers (VL), from information derived from remote sensing, and from analysis of the SNC meteorites thought to be from Mars. Bulk elemental compositions by the VL inorganic chemical (x ray fluorescence) analysis experiments have been interpreted as evidence for clay minerals (possibly smectites) or mineraloids (palagonite) admixed with sulfate and chloride salts. The materials contained minerals bearing Fe, Ti, Al, Mg and Si. Martian surface materials may be used in many ways. Martian soil, with appropriate preconditioning, can probably be used as a plant growth medium, supplying mechanical support, nutrient elements, and water at optimal conditions to the plants. Loose Martian soils could be used to cover structures and provide radiation shielding for surface habitats. Martian soil could be wetted and formed into abode bricks used for construction. Duricrete bricks, with strength comparable to concrete, can probably be formed using compressed muds made from martian soil.

  12. Chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Janaína G M S; Brehm, Feliciane Andrade; Moraes, Carlos Alberto Mendes; Santos, Carlos Alberto Dos; Vilela, Antônio Cezar Faria; Cunha, João Batista Marimon da

    2006-08-25

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) is a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Important elements to the industry such as, Fe and Zn are the main ones in EAFD. Due to their presence, it becomes very important to know how these elements are combined before studying new technologies for its processing. The aim of this work was to carry out a chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the EAFD. The investigation was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), X-ray mapping analysis via SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. By XRD the following phases were detected: ZnFe(2)O(4), Fe(3)O(4), MgFe(2)O(4), FeCr(2)O (4), Ca(0.15)Fe(2.85)O(4), MgO, Mn(3)O(4), SiO(2) and ZnO. On the other hand, the phases detected by Mössbauer spectroscopy were: ZnFe(2)O(4), Fe(3)O(4), Ca(0.15)Fe(2.85)O(4) and FeCr(2)O(4). Magnesium ferrite (MgFe(2)O(4)), observed in the XRD pattern as overlapped peaks, was not identified in the Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis.

  13. Hospital effluents management: Chemical, physical, microbiological risks and legislation in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, E; Bonetta, Si; Bertino, C; Lorenzi, E; Bonetta, Sa; Gilli, G

    2016-03-01

    Hospital wastewater (HWW) can contain hazardous substances, such as pharmaceutical residues, chemical hazardous substances, pathogens and radioisotopes. Due to these substances, hospital wastewater can represent a chemical, biological and physical risk for public and environmental health. In particular, several studies demonstrate that the main effects of these substances can't be neutralised by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). These substances can be found in a wide range of concentrations due to the size of a hospital, the bed density, number of inpatients and outpatients, the number and the type of wards, the number and types of services, the country and the season. Some hazardous substances produced in hospital facilities have a regulatory status and are treated like waste and are disposed of accordingly (i.e., dental amalgam and medications). Legislation is quite homogeneous for these substances in all industrial countries. Problems that have emerged in the last decade concern substances and microorganisms that don't have a regulatory status, such as antibiotic residues, drugs and specific pathogens. At a global level, guidelines exist for treatment methods for these effluents, but legislation in all major industrial countries don't contain limitations on these parameters. Therefore, a monitoring system is necessary for these effluents as well as for substances and pathogens, as these elements can represent a risk to the environment and public health.

  14. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties ofBiomass Burn Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Lewis, K.; Desyaterik, Yury; Wang, Z.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Arnott, W.P.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, M.K.

    2008-01-29

    Aerosols generated from burning different plant fuels were characterized to determine relationships between chemical, optical and physical properties. Single scattering albedo ({omega}) and Angstrom absorption coefficients ({alpha}{sub ap}) were measured using a photoacoustic technique combined with a reciprocal nephelometer. Carbon-to-oxygen atomic ratios, sp{sup 2} hybridization, elemental composition and morphology of individual particles were measured using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM/EDX). Particles were grouped into three categories based on sp2 hybridization and chemical composition. Measured {omega} (0.4-1.0 at 405 nm) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0-3.5) values displayed a fuel dependence. The category with sp{sup 2} hybridization >80% had values of {omega} (<0.5) and {alpha}{sub ap} ({approx}1.25) characteristic of light absorbing soot. Other categories with lower sp2 hybridization (20 to 60%) exhibited higher {omega} (>0.8) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0 to 3.5) values, indicating increased absorption spectral selectivity.

  15. Physical and Chemical Components of Cuba’s Rain: Effects on Air Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Préndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the physical and chemical components of rain affecting air quality in Cuba. Samples were obtained from pollution monitoring stations throughout Cuba. Different chemical analyses including elements and ions were conducted. Meteorological data was also included for the analysis. Results show that the pH was slightly basic for most stations, except those of the eastern region which exhibit pH values below 5.6. The major anthropogenic sources of ions are the burning of fossil fuel by power plants, cement factories, and nickel-processing industries and the burning of biomass through poor agricultural practices. The western region exhibited increased concentrations of NO3- and SO42- during the dry season, most likely due to the long-range transport of pollutants from the northeastern United States as well as local pollutants. Marine aerosols clearly influence Cuba’s rain. Only a small fraction of the potentially acidic ions contributes to the free acidity of Cuba’s rainwater, mainly due to the neutralizing capacity of some ions such as Cl-, Na+, Ca+2, and NH4+. The implementation of abatement techniques for SO2 and NOX and some elements emissions from major stationary sources will be an effective measure to improve air quality in Cuba.

  16. Physical and chemical properties of Red MSX Sources in the southern sky: HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Naiping; Li, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the physical and chemical properties of 18 southern Red Midcourse Space Experiment Sources (RMSs), using archival data taken from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy, the Australia Telescope Compact Array, and the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team Survey at 90 GHz. Most of our sources have simple cometary/unresolved radio emissions at 4.8 and/or 8.6GHz. The large number of Lyman continuum fluxes (NL) indicates they are probably massive O- or early B-type star formation regions. Archival IRAS infrared data are used to estimate the dust temperature, which is about 30 K of our sources. Then, the H2 column densities and the volume-averaged H2 number densities are estimated using the 0.87 mm dust emissions. Large-scale infall and ionized accretions may be occurring in G345.4881+00.3148. We also attempt to characterize the chemical properties of these RMSs through molecular line (N2H+ (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0)) observations. Most of the detected N2H+ and HCO+...

  17. Combined physical-chemical and aerobic biological treatments of wastewater derived from sauce manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, M A; González, I; Siles, J A; Berrios, M; Martín, A

    2013-04-01

    The viability of an integrated coagulation-flocculation and aerobic treatment for purifying wastewater derived from a sauce manufacturing industry was evaluated. The best coagulation-flocculation results were obtained at alkaline pH, showing the greatest turbidity removal efficiency (greater than 90%) and a total chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of approximately 80%, Additionally, experiments at alkaline pH reduce the reagent requirements (coagulant concentration of 0.4 mL/L and flocculant concentration of 4.0 mL/L) providing a consequent economic benefit as compared to experiments at neutral and acidic pH. Another set of experiments was conducted in a sequencing batch reactor to evaluate the aerobic biodegradability of the remnant dissolved organic matter. The effluent from the physical-chemical pre-treatment at alkaline pH again showed the highest biodegradability (76%), with a global COD total removal of 98%. The results showed that the combination of both techniques could be a viable alternative to efficiently treat wastewater derived from sauce manufacturing.

  18. Devulcanization of ground tire rubber: Physical and chemical changes after different microwave exposure times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Garcia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microwave devulcanization is known to be a promising and an efficient rubber recycling method which makes possible for the rubber to regain its fluidity, and makes it capable of being remolded and revulcanized. The focus of this work is to understand the physical and chemical changes that occur in the ground tire rubber after different microwave exposure periods. For this purpose chemical, thermal, rheological and morphological analyses were performed on the tire rubber, which contains natural rubber (NR and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR as polymeric material. The results showed that the microwave treatment promoted the breaking of sulfur cross-links and consequently increased the rubber fluidity. However, long periods of exposure led to degradation and modification of some properties. At nanoscale, the deformation of the devulcanized NR domain under stress was observed, and the morphology obtained appears to be a droplet dispersion morphology. The most exposed samples presented only one glass transition temperature, and from this it was concluded that the treatment may have played an important role in the compatibilization of the elastomeric blend. Based on the results, it is required to control the microwave exposure time and polymeric degradation in order to achieve a regenerated rubber with satisfactory properties.

  19. Mechanism of waste biomass pyrolysis: Effect of physical and chemical pre-treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Oisik [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman 99164-6120, WA (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Sarmah, Ajit K., E-mail: a.sarmah@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2015-12-15

    To impart usability in waste based biomass through thermo-chemical reactions, several physical and chemical pre-treatments were conducted to gain an insight on their mode of action, effect on the chemistry and the change in thermal degradation profiles. Two different waste biomasses (Douglas fir, a softwood and hybrid poplar, a hardwood) were subjected to four different pre-treatments, namely, hot water pre-treatment, torrefaction, acid (sulphuric acid) and salt (ammonium phosphate) doping. Post pre-treatments, the changes in the biomass structure, chemistry, and thermal makeup were studied through electron microscopy, atomic absorption/ultra violet spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, and thermogravimetry. The pre-treatments significantly reduced the amounts of inorganic ash, extractives, metals, and hemicellulose from both the biomass samples. Furthermore, hot water and torrefaction pre-treatment caused mechanical disruption in biomass fibres leading to smaller particle sizes. Torrefaction of Douglas fir wood yielded more solid product than hybrid poplar. Finally, the salt pre-treatment increased the activation energies of the biomass samples (especially Douglas fir) to a great extent. Thus, salt pre-treatment was found to bestow thermal stability in the biomass. - Highlights: • Pre-treatments reduce ash, extractives, alkalines and hemicellulose from biomass. • Torrefaction of Douglas fir yields more solid product than hybrid poplar. • Salt pretreatment significantly increases the activation energy of biomass. • Acid and salt pretreatment bestows thermal stability in biomass.

  20. Physical and chemical characterisation of crude meat and bone meal combustion residue: "waste or raw material?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deydier, Eric; Guilet, Richard; Sarda, Stéphanie; Sharrock, Patrick

    2005-05-20

    As a result of the recent bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) crisis in the European beef industry, the use of animal by-product is now severely controlled. Meat and bone meal (MBM) production can no longer be used to feed cattle and must be safely disposed of or transformed. Main disposal option is incineration, producing huge amounts of ashes the valorisation of which becomes a major concern. The aim of this work is to characterise MBM combustion residue in order to evaluate their physical and chemical properties to propose new valorisation avenues. The thermal behaviour of crude meat and bone meal was followed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (24 wt.%) inorganic residue was collected. The resulting ashes were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), particle size distribution, specific surface area (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) couple with energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX). Elemental analysis revealed the presence of chloride, sodium, potassium, magnesium with high level of phosphate (56 wt.%) and calcium (31 wt.%), two major constituents of bone, mainly as a mixture of Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 and Ca3(PO4)2 phases. The impact of combustion temperature (from 550 to 1000 degrees C) on the constitution of ashes was followed by TGA, XRD and specific surface measurements. We observed a strong decrease of surface area for the ashes with crystallisation of calcium phosphates phases without major changes of chemical composition.

  1. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Chemical and Physical Properties Progress in FY 2000 and FY 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, BA

    2002-04-17

    The purpose of this work was to provide chemical- and physical-property data addressing the technical risks of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process as applied specifically to the removal of cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site. As part of the overall Salt Processing Project, this effort supported decision-making in regards to selecting a preferred technology among three alternatives: (1) CSSX, (2) nonelutable ion-exchange with an inorganic silicotitanate material and (3) precipitation with tetraphenylborate. High risks, innate to CSSX, that needed specific attention included: (1) chemical stability of the solvent matrix, (2) radiolytic stability of the solvent matrix, (3) proof-of-concept performance of the proposed process flowsheet with simulated waste, and (4) performance of the CSSX flowsheet with actual SRS high-level waste. This body of work directly addressed the chemical-stability risk and additionally provided supporting information that served to plan, carry out, and evaluate experiments conducted by other CSSX investigators addressing the other high risks. Information on cesium distribution in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping served as input for flowsheet design, provided a baseline for evaluating solvent performance under numerous stresses, and contributed to a broad understanding of the effects of expected process variables. In parallel, other measurements were directed toward learning how other system components distribute in the flowsheet. Such components include the solvent components themselves, constituents of the waste, and solvent-degradation products. Upon understanding which components influence flowsheet performance, it was then possible to address in a rational fashion how to clean up the solvent and maintain its stable function.

  2. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Soy Proteins for New Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda Fernandez, Julio Cesar

    Despite of being environmentally friendly, biocompatible, rich in chemical functionality and abundant as residual materials, soy proteins (SPs) are used for low added value applications. In this work, SPs were studied and used as potentially useful biomacromolecules for different industrial applications with high added value. Initially the effect of acid hydrolysis of soy proteins as a potential route for subsequent surface modification was studied, finding that SP hydrolysates tend to form less aggregates and to adsorb at faster rates compared with unmodified SP; nevertheless, it was also found that the amount of protein adsorbed and water contact angle of the treated surface does not change significantly. Secondly, the gel forming properties of SPs were used to produce aerogels with densities in the order of 0.1 g/cm3. To improve their mechanical properties, the reinforcement of these materials with cellulose nanofibers was studied, obtaining composite aerogels with SP loadings as high as ca. 70% that display a compression modulus of 4.4 MPa, very close to the value obtained from the pure nanofibers aerogels. The composite materials gain moisture (up to 5%) in equilibrium with 50% RH air. Futhermore, their physical integrity is unchanged upon immersion in polar and non-polar solvents, exhibiting sorption rates dependent on the aerogel composition, morphology and swelling abilities. Finally, different soy protein based products and derivatives were used to enhance the dry strength properties of wood fibers in paper production. Experiments using soy flour, soy protein isolate, soy protein isolate hydrolysates, cationized soy flour, and soy flour combined with cationic starch and chitosan were done, obtaining satisfactory results when soy protein flour was utilized in combination with conventional treatments involving cationic polymers. The current results confirm the opportunity to valorize residual soy products that are underutilized today as alternatives to oil

  3. Mineralogical, chemical and physical study of potential buffer and backfill materials from ABM. Test Package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. (B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland))

    2011-07-15

    In the ABM experiment, three test packages with centre steel heaters surrounded by stacks of compacted bentonite rings of various clay materials were placed in boreholes in Aespoe tunnel. The first parcel was saturated with Aespoe groundwater and the heater was turned on simultaneously with the start of saturation. This parcel was excavated 30 months after its installation. Chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of the MX-80, Dep-CaN, Asha and Friedland clay samples from the ABM parcel 1 were analysed and compared to reference samples. Chemical analyses (ICP-AES, C, CO{sub 3}, S, water soluble SO{sub 4}, Fe2+/Fe3+), exchangeable cation analyses, mineralogical analyses (XRD, FTIR) and selective extractions were used to determine changes in the chemistry and mineralogy of ABM materials. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity measurements were performed both for extracted samples and for ground and recompacted samples. Major changes in exchangeable cation composition were observed in all samples originating from equilibration with Aespoe groundwater and interactions with equilibrated waters from neighbouring block materials. Some minor changes in chemical composition were observed as well. Increases in soluble sulphate content in the vicinity of the heater were thought to result from precipitation of sulphate salts. Decreases in sodium content and increases in calcium content were ascribed to changes in exchangeable cations. Interaction with iron was observed to occur only in the close vicinity (first few mm) of the heater. No significantly measureable change in mineralogical composition was seen in any of the studied materials. Extracted Dep-CaN samples showed a slight decrease in swelling pressure. However, when the material was ground, compacted and measured again the swelling pressure was fully recovered. No related change in hydraulic conductivities was observed. (orig.)

  4. An analysis of the physical, chemical, optical, and historical impacts of the 1908 Tunguska meteor fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Park, C.; Whitten, R. C.; Pollack, J. B.; Noerdlinger, P.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the physical characteristics and photochemical aftereffects of the 1908 Tunguska explosive cometary meteor, whose physical manifestations are consistent with a five million ton object's entry into the earth's atmosphere at 40 km/sec. Aerodynamic calculations indicate that the shock waves emanating from the falling meteor could have generated up to 30 million tons of nitric oxide in the stratosphere and mesosphere. A fully interactive one-dimensional chemical-kinetics model of atmospheric trace constituents is used to estimate the photochemical consequences of such a large NO injection. The 35-45% hemispherical ozone depletion predicted by the model is in keeping with the 30 + or - 15% ozone variation reported for the first year after the Tunguska fall. Attention is also given to the optical anomalies which followed the event for indications of NO(x)-O(x) chemiluminescent emissions, NO2 solar absorption, and meteoric dust turbidity, along with possible climate changes due to the nearly one million tons of pulverized dust deposited in the mesosphere and stratosphere by the meteor.

  5. Effects of particle size distribution on some physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savlak, Nazlı; Türker, Burcu; Yeşilkanat, Nazlıcan

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of particle size distribution on physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour for the first time. A pure triploid (AAA group) of Musa acuminata subgroup Cavendish (°Brix;0.2, pH;4.73, titratable acidity; 0.56g/100g malic acid, total solids; 27.42%) which was supplied from Gazipaşa, Antalya, Turkey from October 2014 to October 2015 was used. Size fractions of physical, functional and antioxidant properties. Particle size significantly effected color, water absorbtion index and wettability. L(∗) value decreased, a(∗) and b(∗) values decreased by increasing particle size (r(2)=-0.94, r(2)=0.72, r(2)=0.73 respectively). Particles under 212μm had the lowest rate of wettability (83.40s). A negative correlation between particle size and wettability (r(2)=-0.75) and positive correlation between particle size and water absorption index (r(2)=0.94) was observed.

  6. Mixed brush of chemically and physically adsorbed polymers under shear: Inverse transport of the physisorbed species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorino, C.; Müller, M.

    2014-01-01

    We study mixed brushes under shear flow by molecular dynamics simulation with an explicit solvent. The primary brush is formed by chemically grafting polymers to a solid substrate, the secondary brush is comprised of shorter, physically end-adsorbed molecules that can laterally diffuse. By virtue of the immobility of the grafted end-points of the primary brush, its individual macromolecules perform a cyclic motion. If there is a well defined solvent-brush interface, this cyclic motion of the primary brush molecules will collectively result in the reversal of the flow inside of the primary brush. This backflow, linear in the shear rate, gives rise to the transport of the shorter, physically end-adsorbed molecules in the opposite direction of the solvent flow. We discuss which conditions are necessary to observe this counter-intuitive phenomenon. Comparing Poiseuille and Couette flow we demonstrate that the magnitude of the local shear rate at the brush-liquid interface dictates the cyclic motion and concomitant inversion of transport but that these universal effects are independent of the type of driving the flow.

  7. Physical, chemical and microbiological analysis of the water quality of Rawal Lake, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Hassan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available What better gift of nature would be than good quality water? In order to assess the quality of water of Rawal Lake, following research was carried out. Rawal lake is a source of drinking water supplied to many areas of Rawalpindi and Islamabad’ the capital city of Pakistan. Water of this lake is being highly polluted by the local communities alongside the lake through solid waste dumping. Samples of surface water were collected, tested and analyzed in the laboratory on the basis of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. The results showed uncertainties in many of the selected parameters. Microbiological analysis revealed high contamination of E. coli, fecal coliform and total coliform in the samples proving it unfit for drinking. It was found that the concentration of all physical parameters such as nitrates, chloride, pH and conductivity were within the normal limits. The level of heavy metals like lead, iron, chromium etc. was also found low. Turbidity at some points exceeded the maximum acceptable limit as per WHO statement.

  8. Physical and Chemical Stability of Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) Suspension Prepared at the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimi, Fanak; Baniasadi, Shadi; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza; Dehghan, Hanie; Zarghi, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the physical and chemical stability of a suspension of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) prepared in the hospital from commercially available MMF capsules and tablets. Extemporaneous pharmacy was used as a feasible method in this experimental study to prepare suspension form of MMF. Suspension formulations were prepared from both tablets and capsules forms of MMF. Thereafter the stability parameters such as pH, microbial control, thermal and physical stability and particle sizes were evaluated. The amount of MMF, in the suspension was measured at various time points by HPLC. The HPLC method showed that concentration of suspensions prepared from tablets and capsules were 49 mg/mL and 50 mg/mL at time 0, respectively. The effective amount of suspensions prepared from capsules was 101% at time 0, 100% after 7 days, 98% after 14 days, and less than 70% after 28 days. According to the obtained results in this study, capsule-based suspension was stable for as long as 14 days at 5°C. This formulation appears to be clinically acceptable and provides a convenient dosage form for pediatric patients and for adults during the early postoperative period.

  9. Physical and Chemical Properties of Seasonal Snow and the Impacts on Albedo in New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, A. C.; Albert, M. R.; Amante, J.; Dibb, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Snow albedo is critical to surface energy budgets and thus to the timing of mid-winter and vernal melt events in seasonal snow packs. Timing of these melt events is important in predicting flooding, understanding plant and animal phenology, and the availability of winter recreational activity. The state of New Hampshire experiences large spatial and temporal variability in snow albedo as a result of differences in meteorological conditions, physical snow structure, and chemical impurities in the snow, particularly highly absorptive black carbon (BC) and dust particles. This work focuses on the winters of 2012-2013 and 2013-2014, comparing three intensive study sites. Data collected at these sites include sub-hourly meteorological data, near daily measurements of snow depth, snow density, surface IR temperature, specific surface area (SSA) from contact spectroscopy, and spectrally resolved snow albedo using an ASD FieldSpec4 throughout the winter season. Additionally, snow samples were analyzed for black carbon content and other chemical impurities including Cl-, NO3-, NH4 , K , Na , Mg2+ , Ca2+ and SO42-. For each storm event at the three intensive sites, moisture sources and paths were determined using HYPLIT back trajectory modeling to determine potential sources of black carbon and other impurities in the snow. Storms with terrestrial-based paths across the US Midwest and Canada resulted in higher BC content than storms with ocean-based paths and sources. In addition to the variable storm path between sites and between years, the second year of study was on average 2.5°C colder than the first year, impacting duration of snow cover at each site and the SSA of surface snow which is sensitive to frequency of snow events and relies on cold temperatures to reduce grain metamorphism. Combining an understanding of storm frequency and path with physical and chemical attributes of the snow allows us to investigate snow albedo sensitivities with implications for

  10. Physical and chemical stability of expired fixed dose combination artemether-lumefantrine in uncontrolled tropical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Kimberly

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New artemisinin combination therapies pose difficulties of implementation in developing and tropical settings because they have a short shelf-life (two years relative to the medicines they replace. This limits the reliability and cost of treatment, and the acceptability of this treatment to health care workers. A multi-pronged investigation was made into the chemical and physical stability of fixed dose combination artemether-lumefantrine (FDC-ALU stored under heterogeneous, uncontrolled African conditions, to probe if a shelf-life extension might be possible. Methods Seventy samples of expired FDC-ALU were collected from private pharmacies and malaria researchers in seven African countries. The samples were subjected to thin-layer chromatography (TLC, disintegration testing, and near infrared Raman spectrometry for ascertainment of active ingredients, tablet integrity, and chemical degradation of the tablet formulation including both active ingredients and excipients. Results Seventy samples of FDC-ALU were tested in July 2008, between one and 58 months post-expiry. 68 of 70 (97% samples passed TLC, disintegration and Raman spectrometry testing, including eight samples that were post-expiry by 20 months or longer. A weak linear association (R2 = 0.33 was observed between the age of samples and their state of degradation relative to brand-identical samples on Raman spectrometry. Sixty-eight samples were retested in February 2009 using Raman spectrometry, between eight and 65 months post-expiry. 66 of 68 (97% samples passed Raman spectrometry retesting. An unexpected observation about African drug logistics was made in three batches of FDC-ALU, which had been sold into the public sector at concessional pricing in accordance with a World Health Organization (WHO agreement, and which were illegally diverted to the private sector where they were sold for profit. Conclusion The data indicate that FDC-ALU is chemically and

  11. Physical and chemical properties of ice residuals during the 2013 and 2014 CLACE campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupiszewski, Piotr; Weingartner, Ernest; Vochezer, Paul; Hammer, Emanuel; Gysel, Martin; Färber, Raphael; Fuchs, Claudia; Schnaiter, Martin; Baltensperger, Urs; Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Bigi, Alessandro; Toprak, Emre; Linke, Claudia; Klimach, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The shortcomings in our understanding and, thus, representation of aerosol-cloud interactions are one of the major sources of uncertainty in climate model projections. Among the poorly understood processes is mixed-phase cloud formation via heterogeneous nucleation, and the subsequent spatial and temporal evolution of such clouds. Cloud glaciation augments precipitation formation, resulting in decreased cloud cover and lifetime, and affects cloud radiative properties. Meanwhile, the physical and chemical properties of atmospherically relevant ice nuclei (IN), the sub-population of aerosol particles which enable heterogeneous nucleation, are not well known. Extraction of ice residuals (IR) in mixed-phase clouds is a difficult task, requiring separation of the few small, freshly formed ice crystals (the IR within such crystals can be deemed representative of the original IN) not only from interstitial particles, but also from the numerous supercooled droplets which have aerodynamic diameters similar to those of the ice crystals. In order to address the difficulties with ice crystal sampling and IR extraction in mixed-phase clouds, the new Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) has been designed and deployed at the Jungfraujoch field site. Small ice crystals are selectively sampled via the inlet with simultaneous counting, sizing and imaging of hydrometeors contained in the cloud by a set of optical particle spectrometers, namely Welas optical particle counters (OPC) and a Particle Phase Discriminator (PPD). The heart of the ISI is a droplet evaporation unit with ice-covered inner walls, resulting in removal of droplets using the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process, while transmitting a relatively high fraction of small ice crystals. The ISI was deployed in the winters of 2013 and 2014 at the high alpine Jungfraujoch site (3580 m.a.s.l) during the intensive CLACE field campaigns. The measurements focused on analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of IR and the

  12. Microbial, Physical and Chemical Drivers of COS and 18O-CO2 Exchange in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, L. K.; Boye, K.; Whelan, M.; Pang, E.; von Sperber, C.; Brueggemann, N.; Berry, J. A.; Welander, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of CO2 are potential tools for differentiating the contributions of photosynthesis and respiration to the balance of global carbon cycling. These processes are coupled at the leaf level via the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which hydrolyzes CO2 in the first biochemical step of the photosynthetic pathway (CO2 + H2O ⇌ HCO3- + H+) and correspondingly structural analogue COS (COS + H2O → CO2 + H2S). CA also accelerates the exchange of oxygen isotopes between CO2 and H2O leading to a distinct isotopic imprint [1]. The biogeochemical cycles of these tracers include significant, yet poorly characterized soil processes that challenge their utility for probing the carbon cycle. In soils, microbial CA also hydrolyze COS and accelerate O isotope exchange between CO2 and soil water. Soils have been observed to emit COS by undetermined processes. To account for these soil processes, measurements are needed to identify the key microbial, chemical, and physical factors. In this study, we survey COS and δ18O exchange in twenty different soils spanning a variety of biomes and soil properties. By comparing COS fluxes and δ18O-CO2 values emitted from moist soils we investigate whether the same types of CA catalyze these two processes. Additionally, we seek to identify the potential chemical drivers of COS emissions by measuring COS fluxes in dry soils. These data are compared with soil physical (bulk density, volumetric water content, texture), chemical (pH, elemental analysis, sulfate, sulfur K-edge XANES), and microbial measurements (biomass and phylogeny). Furthermore, we determine the abundance and diversity of CA-encoding genes to directly link CA with measured soil function. This work will define the best predictors for COS fluxes and δ18O-CO2 values from our suite of biogeochemical measurements. The suitability of identified predictor variables can be tested in follow-up studies and applied for modeling

  13. Predicting physical-chemical properties of compounds from molecular structures by recursive neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernazzani, Luca; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Mollica, Vincenzo; Sperduti, Alessandro; Starita, Antonina; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the potential of a recently developed neural network for structures applied to the prediction of physical chemical properties of compounds. The proposed recursive neural network (RecNN) model is able to directly take as input a structured representation of the molecule and to model a direct and adaptive relationship between the molecular structure and target property. Therefore, it combines in a learning system the flexibility and general advantages of a neural network model with the representational power of a structured domain. As a result, a completely new approach to quantitative structure-activity relationship/quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR/QSAR) analysis is obtained. An original representation of the molecular structures has been developed accounting for both the occurrence of specific atoms/groups and the topological relationships among them. Gibbs free energy of solvation in water, Delta(solv)G degrees , has been chosen as a benchmark for the model. The different approaches proposed in the literature for the prediction of this property have been reconsidered from a general perspective. The advantages of RecNN as a suitable tool for the automatization of fundamental parts of the QSPR/QSAR analysis have been highlighted. The RecNN model has been applied to the analysis of the Delta(solv)G degrees in water of 138 monofunctional acyclic organic compounds and tested on an external data set of 33 compounds. As a result of the statistical analysis, we obtained, for the predictive accuracy estimated on the test set, correlation coefficient R = 0.9985, standard deviation S = 0.68 kJ mol(-1), and mean absolute error MAE = 0.46 kJ mol(-1). The inherent ability of RecNN to abstract chemical knowledge through the adaptive learning process has been investigated by principal components analysis of the internal representations computed by the network. It has been found that the model recognizes the chemical compounds on the

  14. Removal mechanisms for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in wastewater treatment - physical means, biodegradation, and chemical advanced oxidation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-Hua; Kanjo, Yoshinori; Mizutani, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are pollutants with estrogenic or androgenic activity at very low concentrations and are emerging as a major concern for water quality. Within the past few decades, more and more target chemicals were monitored as the source of estrogenic or androgenic activity in wastewater, and great endeavors have been done on the removal of EDCs in wastewater. This article reviewed removal of EDCs from three aspects, that is, physical means, biodegradation, and chemical advanced oxidation (CAO).

  15. Alternative Processes for Water Reclamation and Solid Waste Processing in a Physical/chemical Bioregenerative Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tom D.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on alternative processes for water reclamation and solid waste processing in a physical/chemical-bioregenerative life support system are presented. The main objective is to focus attention on emerging influences of secondary factors (i.e., waste composition, type and level of chemical contaminants, and effects of microorganisms, primarily bacteria) and to constructively address these issues by discussing approaches which attack them in a direct manner.

  16. Chemical composition and physical quality characteristics of Ghanaian cocoa beans as affected by pulp pre-conditioning and fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene; Quao, Jennifer; Takrama, Jemmy; Budu, Agnes Simpson; Saalia, Firibu Kwesi

    2011-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to evaluate the effects of pod storage (as a means of pulp preconditioning) and fermentation on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of Ghanaian cocoa beans. A 4 × 2 full factorial design with factors as pod storage (0, 7, 14, 21 days) and cocoa treatment (fermented and unfermented) were conducted. Samples were analyzed for their chemical composition (moisture, crude fat, crude protein, ash and carbohydrate content) and mineral content using stan...

  17. Studies on the sea surface microlayer. II. The layer of sudden change of physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengbin; Liu, Liansheng; Liu, Chunying; Cai, Weijun

    2003-08-01

    Seawater samples of the sea surface microlayer were obtained from the ocean, coastal waters, and laboratory imitation experiments adopting glass plate, rotating drum, screen, and funnel samplers. The result was that surface microlayer samples of thickness 50 microm could be taken, not by the popular screen and funnel techniques, but by glass plate or rotating drum techniques. The layer of sudden change of physical and chemical properties in the surface microlayer was found at 50 microm below the sea-air interface. These physical and chemical properties included tens of physical and chemical parameters, such as concentrations of organic matter, nutrients, and dissolved trace metals, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand chlorophyll-a, surface tensions, and pH. Therefore, it was suggested that the layer of sudden change of physical and chemical properties in surface seawater should serve as a basis for defining the sea surface microlayer should, and be regarded as the practical operational thickness of the sea surface microlayer. The apparent sampling thickness of the sea surface microlayer from surface seawater should be 50+/-10 microm.

  18. Quantifying impacts of coupled chemical and physical heterogeneity on water quality evolution during Aquifer Storage and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, H.; Descourvieres, C.; Seibert, S.; Harris, B.; Atteia, O.; Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is an important water management option in water-scarce regions. During wet periods surplus water is injected into suitable aquifers for storage and later recovery. ASR sites are, however, also ideal natural laboratories that provide opportunities for studying coupled physical and geochemical processes and water quality evolution at field-scale under well-controlled hydrological conditions. In this study, we use reactive transport modelling to assess the impacts of physical and chemical heterogeneities on the water quality evolution during the injection of oxic surface water into the anoxic, pyrite-bearing Leederville aquifer in Perth, Western Australia. Physical heterogeneity was identified from geophysical well logs and time lapse temperature logs. Those data were used to define the spatial, depth-varying alternation of three lithofacies (sandstone, siltstone and clay). Chemical heterogeneity was incorporated through distinct chemical zones, based on data derived from a comprehensive pre-trial geochemical characterization and from dedicated laboratory respirometer experiments. Calibration of flow and conservative transport parameters was constrained by the spatially varying measured chloride breakthrough behavior. Subsequent reactive transport modeling discerned the key geochemical processes that affected the water quality evolution during ASR. Clearly identified processes included oxidation of pyrite, mineralization of sedimentary organic carbon, ion exchange, dissolution of calcite and precipitation of ferrihydrite and siderite. We use the calibrated model to analyze the individual and the combined effects of the physical and chemical heterogeneities on the chemical composition of the recovered water during ASR.

  19. Criterion for selection the optimal physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate powder used in investment casting process

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zielińska; J. Sieniawski; B. Gajecka

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4) modifiers produced by different companies and the influence of different types of modifiers on the grain size of high temperature creep resisting superalloys: Inconel 713C, René 77 and MAR-M 509.The first stage of the research work took over the investigations of physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate manufactured by three different companies: Remet, Mason Color and Permedia Lubl...

  20. The Ehrenfest force topology: a physically intuitive approach for analyzing chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Julio R; Jenkins, Samantha; Kirk, Steven R; Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W

    2013-11-07

    Modified ANO-RCC basis sets are used to determine twelve molecular graphs of the Ehrenfest force for H2, CH4, CH2O, CH3NO, C2H2, C2H4, C3H3NO, N4H4, H2O, (H2O)2, (H2O)4 and (H2O)6. The molecular graphs include all types of topological critical points and a mix of bonding types is chosen to include sigma-, π- and hydrogen-bonding. We then compare a wide range of point properties: charge density, trace of the Hessian, eigenvalues, ellipticity, stiffness, total local energy and the eigenvectors are calculated at the bond critical points (BCPs) and compared for the Ehrenfest, QTAIM and stress tensor schemes. QTAIM is found to be the only partitioning scheme that can differentiate between shared- and closed-shell chemical bond types. Only the results from the Ehrenfest force partitioning, however, are demonstrated to be physically intuitive. This is demonstrated for the water molecule, the water-dimer and the water clusters (H2O)4 and (H2O)6. In particular, both the stiffness and the trace of the Hessians of the appropriate quantities of the sigma-bond BCPs for the water clusters are found to depend on the quantum topology dimension of the molecular graph. The behavior of all the stress tensor point properties is found to be erratic. This is explained by the ambiguity in the theoretical definition of the stress tensor. As a complementary approach the Ehrenfest force provides a new indicator of the mixed chemical character of the hydrogen-bond BCP, which arises from the collinear donor sigma-bond donating a degree of covalent character to the hydrogen-bond. This indicator takes the form of the relative orientation of the shallowest direction of the Ehrenfest potential of the hydrogen-bond BCPs and the corresponding direction for the collinear sigma-bond BCP.

  1. Ontogenetic variation in chemical and physical characteristics of adaxial apple leaf surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringe, Katja; Schumacher, Christina F A; Schmitz-Eiberger, Michaela; Steiner, Ulrike; Oerke, Erich-Christian

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of plants to environmental factors often varies with developmental stage. It was hypothesized, that also the cuticle, the outer surface layer of plants is modified during ontogenesis. Apple plantlets, cv. Golden Delicious, were grown under controlled conditions avoiding biotic and abiotic stress factors. The cuticular wax surface of adaxial apple leaves was analyzed for its chemical composition as well as for its micromorphology and hydrophobicity just after unfolding of leaves ending in the seventh leaf insertion. The outer surface of apple leaves was formed by a thin amorphous layer of epicuticular waxes. Epidermal cells of young leaves exhibited a distinctive curvature of the periclinal cell walls resulting in an undulated surface of the cuticle including pronounced lamellae, with the highest density at the centre of cells. As epidermal cells expanded during ontogenesis, the upper surface showed only minor surface sculpturing and a decrease in lamellae. With increasing leaf age the hydrophobicity of adaxial leaf side decreased significantly indicated by a decrease in contact angle. Extracted from plants, the amount of apolar cuticular wax per area unit ranged from only 0.9 microgcm(-2) for the oldest studied leaf to 1.5 microgcm(-2) for the youngest studied leaf. Differences in the total amount of cuticular waxes per leaf were not significant for older leaves. For young leaves, triterpenes (ursolic acid and oleanolic acid), esters and alcohols were the main wax components. During ontogenesis, the proportion of triterpenes in total mass of apolar waxes decreased from 32% (leaf 1) to 13% (leaf 7); absolute amounts decreased by more than 50%. The proportion of wax alcohols and esters, and alkanes to a lesser degree, increased with leaf age, whereas the proportion of acids decreased. The epicuticular wax layer also contained alpha-tocopherol described for the first time to be present also in the epicuticular wax. The modifications in the chemical

  2. Chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Janaina G.M.S. [Laboratorio de Siderurgia/LASID, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS/PPGEM Centro de Tecnologia, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500 CEP, 91501-970 Caixa postal 15021, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: jana@ct.ufrgs.br; Brehm, Feliciane Andrade [Nucleo de Caracterizacao de Materiais/NucMat, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Moraes, Carlos Alberto Mendes [Nucleo de Caracterizacao de Materiais/NucMat, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Santos, Carlos Alberto dos [Nucleo de Educacao a Distancia, Universidade Estadual do Rio Grande do Sul, UERGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vilela, Antonio Cezar Faria [Laboratorio de Siderurgia/LASID, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS/PPGEM Centro de Tecnologia, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500 CEP, 91501-970 Caixa postal 15021, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Cunha, Joao Batista Marimon da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Campus do Vale, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2006-08-25

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) is a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Important elements to the industry such as, Fe and Zn are the main ones in EAFD. Due to their presence, it becomes very important to know how these elements are combined before studying new technologies for its processing. The aim of this work was to carry out a chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the EAFD. The investigation was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), X-ray mapping analysis via SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. By XRD the following phases were detected: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, FeCr{sub 2}O {sub 4}, Ca{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2.85}O{sub 4}, MgO, Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2} and ZnO. On the other hand, the phases detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy were: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Ca{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2.85}O{sub 4} and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnesium ferrite (MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}), observed in the XRD pattern as overlapped peaks, was not identified in the Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis.

  3. Emissions of Black Carbon Particles from Biomass Burning and Their Physical and Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y.; Sahu, L.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.; Zhao, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Wisthaler, A.; Huey, L. G.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Large amounts of aerosol, including black carbon (BC), are emitted from biomass burning. It is therefore important to understand the chemical composition, rate of emissions, and mixing state of aerosols generated by this combustion process to estimate the impacts of aerosols on climate. Thus far, these physical and chemical quantities have been compiled by combining the data from laboratory and field experiments, but the data from the Arctic region are still very limited. These parameters were measured by an SP2 instrument based on the laser-induced incandescence technique on board the NASA DC-8 during the ARCTAS campaign. Aircraft sampling was made in plumes emitted by wildfires in Canada and the USA, and in those transported over long distances from Russia. First, we extract biomass burning plumes using CH3CN and SO2 data. Then, we derived the slopes of the CO-CO2-CH3CN-aerosol correlations for each burning plume. Based on this, we derive the average CO/CO2, CH3CN/CO2, BC/CO2, and BC/CO ratios together with their variability in the plumes strongly influenced by forest fires over Siberia, California, and Canada. A similar analysis is made for light-scattering particles. Using these relationships, the transport efficiencies of BC particles from the boundary layer to the free troposphere are also estimated. It is found that the BC particles were thickly coated upon emission. From comparison with AMS measurements, the coating materials are found to be mainly composed of organic compounds. This indicates the importance of the enhanced light absorption by BC particles emitted by biomass burning.

  4. Physical and chemical modifications of surface properties lead to alterations in osteoblast behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorst, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Proper formation of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM), or osteoid, depends on the surface properties of pre-existing tissue and the aqueous chemical environment. Both of these factors greatly influence osteoblast migration, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium nodule production, important aspects when considering the biocompatibility of bone implants. By perturbing the physical and/or chemical micro-environment, it may be possible to elucidate effects on cellular function. To examine these factors, murine pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 subclones 4 and 24) were seeded on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates containing "wide" micro-patterned ridges (20 mum width, 30 mum pitch, & 2 mum height), "narrow" micro-patterned ridges (2 mum width, 10 mum pitch, 2 mum height), no patterns (flat PDMS), and standard tissue culture (TC) polystyrene as a control. Zinc concentration was adjusted to mimic deficient (0.23 muM), serum-level (3.6 muM), and zinc-rich (50 muM) conditions. It was found that cells exhibited distinct anisotropic migration in serum-level zinc and zinc-deficient media on the wide PDMS patterns, however this was disrupted under zinc-rich conditions. Production of differentiation effectors, activated metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and transforming growth factor - beta 1 (TGF-beta1), was increased with the addition of exogenous zinc. Early stage differentiation, via alkaline phosphatase, was modified by zinc levels on patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces, but not on flat PDMS or tissue culture polystyrene (TC). Late stage differentiation, visualized through calcium phosphate nodules, was markedly different at various zinc levels when the cells were cultured on TC substrates. This susceptibility to zinc content can lead to differences in bone mineral production on certain substrates if osteoblasts are not able to maintain and remodel bone effectively, a process vital to successful biomaterial integration.

  5. Physical and chemical characterizations of biochars derived from different agricultural residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jindo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biochar has received large attention as a strategy to tackle against carbon emission. Not only carbon fixation has been carried out but also other merits for agricultural application due to unique physical and chemical character such as absorption of contaminated compounds in soil, trapping ammonia and methane emission from compost, and enhancement of fertilizer quality. In our study, different local waste feed stocks (rice husk, rice straw, wood chips of apple tree (Malus Pumila and oak tree (Quercus serrata, in Aomori, Japan, were utilized for creating biochar with different temperature (400–800 °C. Concerning to the biochar production, the pyrolysis of lower temperature had more biochar yield than higher temperature pyrolysis process. On the contrary, surface areas and adsorption characters have been increased as increasing temperature. The proportions of carbon content in the biochars also increased together with increased temperatures. Infrared-Fourier spectra (FT-IR and 13C-NMR were used to understand carbon chemical compositions in our biochars, and it was observed that the numbers of the shoulders representing aromatic groups, considered as stable carbon structure appeared as the temperature came closer to 600 °C, as well as in FT-IR. In rice materials, the peak assigned to SiO2, was observed in all biochars (400–800 °C in FT-IR. We suppose that the pyrolysis at 600 °C creates the most recalcitrant character for carbon sequestration, meanwhile the pyrolysis at 400 °C produces the superior properties as a fertilizer by retaining volatile and easily labile compounds which promotes soil microbial activities.

  6. Physical-chemical requirements for the catalysis of substrates by lysosomal phospholipase A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M; Waite, M

    1983-12-10

    The catalytic properties of a 1440-fold purified preparation of lysosomal phospholipase A1 were examined. The preparation was at least 95% specific for the sn-1 position of neat phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The apparent specificity of the enzyme toward substrates was affected by three factors: the physical arrangement of molecules in the substrate aggregate, the charge on the lipid-water interface and the chemical structure of the substrate as it relates to the active site of the enzyme. Of various phospholipids tested in the absence of detergent PE was the preferred substrate, phosphatidylcholine (PC) was hydrolyzed at one-fifth the rate of PE, while phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) were degraded very slowly. Triton WR1339 stimulated the hydrolysis of PC, PI, PS, and PG but inhibited the hydrolysis of PE, with PG the preferred substrate at a 6:1 Triton/phospholipid ratio. The preference for PC over PE in detergent mixtures was attributed to the active site fit of the chemical structures of the substrate molecules. The enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed neat PE containing palmitic and oleic acids at position 1. A negative surface charge was required for the hydrolysis of PC and PE. Ca2+ stimulated the hydrolysis of PI, PS, and PG but inhibited the hydrolysis of PE. The inhibition of PE hydrolysis by Ca2+ was the result of an alteration in the surface charge of the PE vesicle. Chromatography of phospholipase A1 on concanavalin A-Sepharose resulted in a loss of activity toward acidic phospholipids which could be restored with Ca2+. Plasmalogen PE was found to inhibit the hydrolysis of diacyl-PE at the level of interfacial binding but not by competition for the active site of the enzyme. These results suggest that the hexagonal structure of PE represents a preferred physical form for catalysis by phospholipase A1, while the bilayer form is less readily attacked. Dispersion of the substrate in the inert detergent

  7. Tree species traits influence soil physical, chemical, and biological properties in high elevation forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Ayres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that plants often have species-specific effects on soil properties. In high elevation forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains, North America, areas that are dominated by a single tree species are often adjacent to areas dominated by another tree species. Here, we assessed soil properties beneath adjacent stands of trembling aspen, lodgepole pine, and Engelmann spruce, which are dominant tree species in this region and are distributed widely in North America. We hypothesized that soil properties would differ among stands dominated by different tree species and expected that aspen stands would have higher soil temperatures due to their open structure, which, combined with higher quality litter, would result in increased soil respiration rates, nitrogen availability, and microbial biomass, and differences in soil faunal community composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed soil physical, chemical, and biological properties at four sites where stands of aspen, pine, and spruce occurred in close proximity to one-another in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado. Leaf litter quality differed among the tree species, with the highest nitrogen (N concentration and lowest lignin:N in aspen litter. Nitrogen concentration was similar in pine and spruce litter, but lignin:N was highest in pine litter. Soil temperature and moisture were highest in aspen stands, which, in combination with higher litter quality, probably contributed to faster soil respiration rates from stands of aspen. Soil carbon and N content, ammonium concentration, and microbial biomass did not differ among tree species, but nitrate concentration was highest in aspen soil and lowest in spruce soil. In addition, soil fungal, bacterial, and nematode community composition and rotifer, collembolan, and mesostigmatid mite abundance differed among the tree species, while the total abundance of nematodes, tardigrades, oribatid mites, and prostigmatid

  8. A computational methodology for formulating gasoline surrogate fuels with accurate physical and chemical kinetic properties

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2015-03-01

    Gasoline is the most widely used fuel for light duty automobile transportation, but its molecular complexity makes it intractable to experimentally and computationally study the fundamental combustion properties. Therefore, surrogate fuels with a simpler molecular composition that represent real fuel behavior in one or more aspects are needed to enable repeatable experimental and computational combustion investigations. This study presents a novel computational methodology for formulating surrogates for FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) gasolines A and C by combining regression modeling with physical and chemical kinetics simulations. The computational methodology integrates simulation tools executed across different software platforms. Initially, the palette of surrogate species and carbon types for the target fuels were determined from a detailed hydrocarbon analysis (DHA). A regression algorithm implemented in MATLAB was linked to REFPROP for simulation of distillation curves and calculation of physical properties of surrogate compositions. The MATLAB code generates a surrogate composition at each iteration, which is then used to automatically generate CHEMKIN input files that are submitted to homogeneous batch reactor simulations for prediction of research octane number (RON). The regression algorithm determines the optimal surrogate composition to match the fuel properties of FACE A and C gasoline, specifically hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, density, distillation characteristics, carbon types, and RON. The optimal surrogate fuel compositions obtained using the present computational approach was compared to the real fuel properties, as well as with surrogate compositions available in the literature. Experiments were conducted within a Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) engine operating under controlled autoignition (CAI) mode to compare the formulated surrogates against the real fuels. Carbon monoxide measurements indicated that the proposed surrogates

  9. Influence of land cover changes on the physical and chemical properties of alpine meadow soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Taking the alpine cold meadow grassland in the southeastern part of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau as an example, this research deals with the characteristics of alpine meadow soil property changes, including soil nutrients, soil physical properties and soil moisture content under different land coverage conditions. With the degradation of grassland vegetation and the decline of vegetation coverage, soil compactness reduces, gravel content increases and bulk density increases. The originally dense root-system layer is gradually denuded, making the soil coarse and gravel. The change of the organic matter contents with the vegetation coverage change in the surface soil layer (0-20 cm) has shown an obvious cubic polynomial curve process. The organic matter contents increase rapidly when land coverage is above 60%, contrarily decreases on a large scale when land coverage is below 30%. Between 30%-60% of land coverage the organic matter contents remain stable. The total N and organic matter contents in soil have shown quite similar change regularity. Following this the mathematic equations are derived to describe such change processes. Moisture content in soil changes sharply with the vegetation coverage change. Soil moisture content change with the vegetation coverage change has shown a quadratic parabola process. Results have shown that organic matter content and the total N content of the alpine meadow soil decrease by 14890 kg/hm2 and 5505 kg/hm2 respectively as the vegetation coverage reduces from 90% to less than 30%. The heavy changes of soil physical and chemical properties with grassland degradation have made the recovery of alpine meadow ecological system impossible. The protection of alpine meadow vegetation is of vital importance to the maintenance of the regional soil environment and the regional ecological system.

  10. Physical and chemical characteristics of mucin secreted by pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javed; Mekkawy, Ahmed; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David L

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare disease with excess intraperitoneal mucin secretion. Treatment involves laparotomy, cytoreduction and chemotherapy that is very invasive with patients often acquiring numerous compromises. Hence a mucolytic comprising of bromelain and N-acetyl cystein has been developed to solubilise mucin in situ for removal by catherization. Owing to differences in mucin appearance and hardness, dissolution varies. Therefore the current study investigates the inter-mucin physical and chemical characteristics, in order to reformulate an effective mucolytic for all mucin. Method: PMP mucin, from the three categories (soft, semi hard and hard mucin) was solubilised and then various physical characteristics such as turbidity, density, kinematic viscosity were measured. The water content and the density of solid mucin were also determined. This was followed by the determination of sialic acid, glucose, lipid, Thiol (S-S and S-H) content of the samples. Lastly, the distribution of MUC2, MUC5B and MUC5AC was determined using western blot technique. Results: Both turbidity and kinematic viscosity and sialic acid content increased linearly as the hardness of mucin increased. However, density, hydration, protein, glucose, lipid and sulfhydryl and disulphide content decreased linearly as hardness of mucin increased. The distribution ratio of mucins (MUC2:MUC5B:MUC5AC) in soft mucin is 2.25:1.5:1.0, semi hard mucin is 1:1:1 and hard mucin is 3:2:1. Conclusion: The difference in texture and hardness of mucin may be due to cellular content, hydration, glucose, protein, lipids, thiol and MUC distribution. Soft mucin is solely made of glycoprotein whilst the others contained cellular materials. PMID:28138305

  11. Physical-chemical effects of irrigation with treated wastewater on Dusky Red Latosol soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Ribeiro Urbano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The current water crisis underlines the importance of improving water management. The use of effluent from secondary treatment in agriculture can reduce the discharge of effluent into natural bodies and provide nutrients to crops. This study evaluated the physical and chemical properties of a Dusky Red Latosol soil that had been irrigated with treated wastewater. Conducted at the Center of Agricultural Sciences (CCA of Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar, in Araras/São Paulo/Brazil, 18 undisturbed soil samples were collected and deposited on a constant-head permeameter in order to simulate the irrigation of five growth cycles of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L., organized in five different treatments and one control group. For each treatment 0.58 L, 1.16 L, 1.74 L, 2.32 L, and 2.90 L of treated wastewater and distilled water were applied . The treated wastewater came from a domestic waste treatment plant. After the water filtered through the soil, samples of treated wastewater were collected for analyses of electrical conductivity (EC, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, turbidity, pH, Na, K, Mg, P and Ca and, in the soil the granulometry, complete fertility, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat. The Ksat decreased, but did not alter the infiltration of water and nutrients in the soil. The concentration of nutrients in the soil increased, including Na, which raises the need for monitoring soil’s salinity. In conclusion, the application of wastewater did not cause damage to the physical properties of the soil, but resulted in a tendency towards salinization.

  12. Synthesis and Physical and Chemical Properties of Hypergolic Chemicals such as N,N,N-Trimethylhydrazinium and 1-Ethyl-4-Methyl-1,2,4-Triazolium Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Seok Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypergolic chemicals N,N,N-trimethylhydrazinium iodide, [TMH]+[I]−, and 1-ethyl-4-methyl-1,2,4-triazolium iodide, [EMT]+[I]− were firstly synthesized by nucleophilic substitution (SN2. The successful synthesis of hypergolic chemicals [TMH]+[I]− and [EMT]+[I]− was confirmed by IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy and, GC-mass spectrometry. Subsequently the hypergolic chemicals [TMH]+[X]− (X = CN−, N3−, NO3−, NO2−, ClO4−, AlCl4− were prepared via an ion exchange reaction from [TMH]+[I]− and [EMT]+[I]−, respectively. After that, a mixture of hypergolic chemicals was prepared by dissolving the synthesized hypergolic chemicals in 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine (HOCH2CH2NHNH2. The physical and chemical properties of the mixture such as decomposition temperature (Td, density (d, viscosity (η, and decomposition energy (ΔHd was then evaluated to determine suitability for use as liquid rocket fuels. The ignition delay (ID time of the mixture of hypergolic chemicals with [TMH]+[N3]− and [TMH]+[CN]− using H2O2 as an oxidizer was determined as 55.6 ms and 97.4 ms; respectively. The ID time of the mixture of hypergolic chemicals with [EMT]+[N3]−; [EMT]+[CN]−; [EMT]+[AlCl4]−; and [EMT]+[I]− using H2O2 as an oxidizer was also determined as 18.0 ms; 32.6 ms; 27.6 ms; and 7.96 ms; respectively. The synthesized mixture of hypergolic chemicals could thus be used as a rocket propellant liquid fuel.

  13. Physical chemical properties of sludges of a chemical treatment of boilers feed water and ways of their utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Krasnenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Water is a necessary process for TPP power plant operation. To the power station, in the production of electricity and heat as a result of the preparation of large amounts of water to compensate for losses associated with the release of process steam for production, produce large quantities of waste water treatment - water treatment chemical sludge (WTCS.

  14. Effect of chemical and physical factors to improve the germination rate of Echinacea angustifolia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanren, Duan; Bochu, Wang; Wanqian, Liu; Jing, Chen; Jie, Lian; Huan, Zhao

    2004-09-01

    Seeds of Echinacea angustifolia are known for their deep dormancy. In this paper, we studied the responses of E. angustifolia seeds to some chemical and physical factors, such as scarification, chilling (5 degrees C) period, light and applied BA (6-benzylaminopurine), GA3 (gibberellic acid) and sound stimulation. When the seed coat layers were removed, the germination rate grew up from 6 to 20% (incubated in light) and the mean time germination (MTG) was reduced from 18 to 6.6 days. On the basis of layers-removed, chilling and continuous light gave significantly higher germination rate (up to 70%). Compare the data of seeds chilled by 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 days, the maximum germination rate (up to 70%) achieved at 18-days chilling treatment. Further increases in the chilling period could slightly improve germination. Exogenous application of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 mg/L GA3 or BA in the previous pretreatment increased germination to 78, 90 and 84% or 76, 86 and 84%, respectively. Obviously, the best concentration of GA or BA is 0.3 mg/L. And the GA3 or BA treatment shortened the MTG to about 4 days. The influence of sound stimulation was also tested in the experiment. The result showed that one 100 dB and 1000 Hz sound wave (sine-wave) was beneficial to the germination of E. angustifolia seeds.

  15. Effects of Green Banana Flour on the Physical, Chemical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangılar, Filiz

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, possible effects of the addition of banana flour at different mass fractions (1 and 2%) are investigated on physical (overrun, viscosity), chemical (dry matter, fat and ash content, acidity, pH, water and oil holding capacity and colour), mineral content (Ca, K, Na, P, S, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Ni) and sensory properties of ice cream. Fibre--rich banana pieces were found to contain 66.8 g per 100 g of total dietary fibre, 58.6 g per 100 g of which were insoluble dietary fibre, while 8.2 g per 100 g were soluble dietary fibre. It can be concluded from these results that banana is a valuable dietary fibre source which can be used in food production. Flour obtained from green banana pulp and peel was found to have significant (pice creams. Sulphur content increased while calcium content decreased in ice cream depending on banana flour content. Sensory results indicated that ice cream sample containing 2% of green banana pulp flour received the highest score from panellists.

  16. STUDENT AWARD FINALIST: Plasma Acid: A Chemically and Physically Metastable Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shainsky, Natalie; Dobrynin, Danil; Ercan, Utku; Joshi, Suresh; Brooks, Ari; Ji, Haifeng; Fridman, Gregory; Cho, Young; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gennady

    2011-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge applied to the surface of a liquid creates a chemically and physically metastable substance. The properties and lifetime of the substance depend on the treatment conditions such as gas atmosphere and liquid medium used, treatment dose, and other parameters. When deionized water is used, the metastable substance becomes a strong oxidizer. We show that direct exposure of deionized water to neutral and charged species produced in plasma creates a strong oxidizer and acidic substance in this water which, for the lack of a better term, we termed plasma acid. Plasma acid can remain stable for relatively long time and its oxidizing power may be linked to the significant lowering of its pH. We report experiments that demonstrate plasma acid's metastability. We also show that observed pH of as low as 2.0 cannot be completely accounted for by the production of nitric acid; and that the conjugate base derived from superoxide is at least partly responsible for both, lowering of the pH and increase in the oxidizing power of the solution.

  17. Physical and chemical properties of some imported woods and their degradation by termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Rashmi R; Sundararaj, R

    2013-01-01

    The influence of physical and chemical properties of 20 species of imported wood on degradation of the wood by termites under field conditions was studied. The wood species studied were: Sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) (from two countries), Camphor, Dryobalanops aromatic C.F.Gaertner (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), Beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart (Fagales: Fagaceae), F. sylvatica L. (from two countries), Oak, Quercus robur L., Ash, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl (Lamiales: Oleaceae), F. excelsior L., Padauk, Pterocarpus soyauxii Taubert (Fabales: Fabaceae), (from two countries), Jamba, Xylia dolabrifiormis Roxburgh, Shorea laevis Ridley (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), S. macoptera Dyer, S. robusta Roth, Teak, Tectona grandis L.f. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) (from five countries), and rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis Müller Argoviensis (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae) from India. The termites present were: Odontotermes horni (Wasmann) (Isoptera: Termitidae), O. feae, O. wallonensis, and O. obeus (Rambur). A significant conelation was found between density, cellulose, lignin, and total phenolic contents of the wood and degradation by termites. The higher the density of the wood, the lower the degradation. Similarly, higher amount of lignin and total phenolic contents ensured higher resistance, whereas cellulose drives the termites towards the wood.

  18. The physical and chemical properties of the polyvinylalcohol/polyvinylpyrrolidone/hydroxyapatite composite hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yahui; Bai, Tongchun; Wang, Fei

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogel of polyvinylalcohol (PVA)/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/hydroxyapatite (HA) was prepared by a repeated freezing and thawing technique. The effect of HA on the hydrogel was evaluated by comparing the physical and chemical properties of PVA/PVP/HA and PVA/PVP hydrogels. By using theoretical models, the information about the swelling kinetics and the dehydration kinetics have been obtained. From the analysis of structure, mechanical properties, and molecular interaction, the application of PVA/PVP/HA hydrogel as a biomaterial has been evaluated. Relative to PVA/PVP, the PVA/PVP/HA hydrogel is of denser network structure, lower water content, larger storage modulus, and higher dehydration activation energy. These results reveal that, as HA fills in the hydrogel, the molecular interaction is enhanced, the free space of network is compressed, and the diffusion activation energy of water is increased. In spite of its water content being decreased, it is still in the range of meeting the requirement of bio-application. When the hydrogel is subjected to external forces, the matrix will transfer the load to the HA powder, thus enhance the strength of the hydrogel. For application in bio-materials, HA will still have osteoinductivity because its crystalline structure is not interrupted in PVA/PVP/HA hydrogel environment.

  19. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J., Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents an exploration of the relationships between biomass feedstocks and the conversion processes that utilize them. Specifically, it discusses the effect of the physical and chemical structure of biomass on conversion yields, rates, and efficiencies in a wide variety of available or experimental conversion processes. A greater understanding of the complex relationships between these conversion systems and the production of biomass for energy uses is required to help optimize the complex network of biomass production, collection, transportation, and conversion to useful energy products. The review of the literature confirmed the scarcity of research aimed specifically at identifying the effect of feedstock properties on conversion. In most cases, any mention of feedstock-related effects was limited to a few brief remarks (usually in qualitative terms) in the conclusions, or as a topic for further research. Attempts to determine the importance of feedstock parameters from published data were further hampered by the lack of consistent feedstock characterization and the difficulty of comparing results between different experimental systems. Further research will be required to establish quantitative relationships between feedstocks and performance criteria in conversion. 127 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  1. Physical and chemical characteristics of products from the torrefaction of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Lee, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyoung-Woo; Lee, Jae-Won

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the characteristics of torrefied yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) depending on reaction time (30 min) and temperature (240-280 °C). The thermogravimetric, grindability and calorific value of torrefied biomass were analyzed. As the torrefaction temperature increased, the carbon content of torrefied biomass increased from 49.50% to 54.42%, while the hydrogen and oxygen contents decreased from 6.09% to 5.65% and 28.71% to 26.61%, respectively. The highest calorific value was 1233 kJ/kg when torrefaction was performed at 280 °C for 30 min. An overall increase in energy density and decrease in mass and energy yield was observed with the increase in torrefaction temperature. The analysis of thermal decomposition demonstrated that the hemicelluloses contained in torrefied biomass decreased with increasing torrefaction temperature, whereas cellulose and lignin were only slightly affected. The grindability of torrefied biomass was significantly improved when torrefaction was performed at high temperature. Torrefaction of yellow poplar improved the chemical and physical fuel properties of the biomass.

  2. Soymilk plain beverages: correlation between acceptability and physical and chemical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Moreira Terhaag

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to relate the physical and chemical characteristics of soymilk plain beverages to its sensory acceptance. Five commercial products and a new product formulated based on the less accepted sample were used. The overall acceptance was evaluated by 102 assessors using a 10-point hybrid hedonic scale. The hedonic scores ranged from 3.8 (sample E to 7.0 (A. Most assessors (55% preferred sample A, which was viscous (26.6 cp, dark (L* = 77.7, and slightly acidic (pH = 6.6. Sample C, which had lower solid content and higher acidity, was preferred by 29% of the assessors. These two beverages showed the greatest commercial potential of the products analyzed. The least-accepted sample (E, preferred by 8% of the assessors, had a lighter color (L* = 96.8, lower viscosity (13.5 cp, higher lipid content (2.2 g/100 g, and less protein (1.68 g/100 g than the other products evaluated. A reformulation of the least preferred product (E with the addition of maltodextrin and also vanilla and milk flavors increased its acceptance, yielding an average score of 7.2. Overall, it was observed that a soymilk plain beverage with higher viscosity, darker color, and higher protein content best meets consumer expectations.

  3. Physical and chemical analyzis of chardonnay wine with different periods of skin contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriboni Pedro Pohlmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic precursors are precisely in the skin of grapes and nearby cells, and therefore there is a greater expression of the varietal aromas and aromatic precursors when the wine passes through this skin contact, as well as changes in product color. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of Chardonnay wine that has gone through different periods of skin contact. Chardonnay grapes, grown in vineyards located in the town of Bagé, in Campanha Gaúcha, were de-stemmed, crushed and a sulfur dioxide (50 mg/L−1 was addeded. The experimental design was a 4 × 3 factorial of 4 treatments with 3 repetitions: T1, the wine obtained directly from pressing machine; T2, skin contact for 2 days; T3, skin contact for 4 days and T4, skin contact for 6 days. After the end of malolactic fermentation wines went under − 2∘C for the tartaric stabilization. There were analyzed the variables alcohol, total acidity, volatile acidity, total polyphenols, glycerol, gluconic acid and 420, 520 and 620 colors by infrared spectroscopy method by Fourier transform and the means were compared by 5% Tukey test. There was a significant differencein variables alcohol, volatile acidit, glucanic acid and color index of 420 nm (yellow.

  4. Spatial-temporal variance of reclamation soil physical and chemical character in opencast mine region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ye-cui; LI Xin-ju; FANG Yu-dong; LIU Xue-ran; ZHONG Wei-jing

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the effects of soil compaction, and soil physical and chemical characteristics after land reclamation, selected lands that were reclaimed after 1, 2, 3, 4,and 5 a, respectively, in the Majiata Mine of the Shendong Open Pit; tested the effects of soil compaction; and collected soil samples from 5 different depths, which are 0~7.62,7.62~15.24, 15.24~22.86, 22.86~30.48, and 30.48~38.10 cm, respectively. The results show that: ① Land reclamation leads to soil compaction. The lowest effect of soil compaction is in the top layer and the highest one at the depth of 20-30 cm; ② The bulk density of reclaimed soil is higher than that of undisturbed soil; this declines with the reclamation and nearly reaches the level of undisturbed soil after 5-year reclamation; ③The content of reclaimed soil nutrients is lower than that of undisturbed soil. The lowest one is in the soil dumping site, which reaches the level of undisturbed soil after 5-year reclamation; ④ The pH value of reclaimed soil is lower than that of undisturbed soil. The highest one is in the soil dumping site; this declines with the reclamation.

  5. The effect of chemical, physical and enzymatic treatments on the dewatering of tar sands tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theriault, Y.; Masliyah, J.H.; Fedorak, P.M.; Vazquez-Duhalt, R.; Gray, M.R. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    Fine tailings (with solids {lt} 106{mu}m) from hot-water extraction of the Athabasca tar sands were subjected to thermal, physical, chemical and enzymatic treatments in an attempt to modify the dewatering characteristics of the solid particles. A low-speed centrifuge at circa 1500 relative centrifugal force for 15 h was used to accelerate the sedimentation of the solids, and allowed comparison of the ultimate concentration of solids after the various treatments. Fine tailings were subjected to thermal treatment, sonication and modification of the water chemistry. Although the rate of sedimentation was affected by these treatments, the ultimate volume fraction of solids after centrifuging was about 0.3 (50-55 wt% solids). Extraction of the tailings to remove bitumen, humins and other organic components also failed to change the ultimate solids concentration. Oxidation of the organic material in the tailings by hydrogen peroxide in Fenton`s reagent, and enzymatic oxidation with lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, cytochrome c, horseradish peroxidase and cowpea peroxidase gave no significant effect on the volume fraction of solids in the sediment after centrifugation. The observation that all of these treated samples gave an ultimate volume fraction of solids of about 0.3 indicated that bitumen, adsorbed organic matter and salts had little effect on the ultimate dewatering of tailings. 26 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Chemical and physical considerations of the use of nuclear fuel spikants for deterrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, J. E.

    1978-10-01

    One proposed method of inhibiting the diversion of nuclear fuel for clandestine purposes is to add to the fuel a highly gamma-active material of such intensity that remote handling equipment is necessary in all stages of handling and reprocessing. This is called spiking for deterrence. The present work sought to identify candidate spikants and identify potential materials problems that might occur as the result of incorporation of these spikants with the fuel. Potential spikants were identified and thermodynamic analysis was performed to determine their chemical and physical states. Phase relationships between spikants (and their decay products) and the fuel constituents were surveyed. According to criteria defined in this report, /sup 60/Co, /sup 106/Ru, and /sup 144/Ce appear to have the greatest potential as spikants. Cerium should be present as the oxide, soluble in the fuel, while cobalt and ruthenium should be present in the metallic state with very low solubility in the fuel. Experimental work on the distribution of fission products and their interactions with cladding was also surveyed to provide information on the distribution of spikants in the fuel and describe the probable effects of spikants on the fuel. Cobalt, ruthenium, and cerium should not present any problems due to reaction with stainless steel cladding.

  7. CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF THREE MAIN WATER COURSES BASIN RIVER TURVO SUJO - MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rosa dos Santos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The land use and activities undertaken in a watershed define the water’s quantity and quality. This study aimed to characterize the chemical, physical and biochemical of three main streams of the river basin Turvo Sujo (ribeirão São Bartolomeu e rios Turvo Sujo e Turvo Limpo, and to determine the deoxygenation rate (K1 and reaeration (K2 for these waterways. Were used in the work four sampling points which were collected the water samples. The results of dissolved oxygen are favorable for the aerobic aquatic life development; in São Bartolomeu the concentration of dissolved oxygen in water was the one with the lowest of the streams evaluated, none of the samples showed high levels of sedimentable solids and solids, only samples 1 and 3 showed high levels of BOD5, water courses 1 and 3 had higher values of K1 because they have higher concentrations of organic matter, and the stream 1 was presented the value of K2 higher. According to the results of alkalinity, acidity and hydrogen potential, samples of water from three streams studied can be considered slightly alkaline. The three streams studied have great facilities reaeration of oxygen due to low depths and creating more turbulence in the surface.

  8. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on Physical and Chemical Properties of Ready-to-eat Bologna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayca Gedikoglu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quality and safety of ready-to-eat meat products can be altered by antimicrobial agents such as lactates, diacetates and citrates. This project evaluated the effect of Ional (1.5, 2.5, 3.5%, Ional LC (1.5, 2.5, 3.5% and Optiform SD4 (2.5% compared to a control on selected physical and chemical characteristics of ready-to-eat vacuum-packaged bologna slices stored less than 4°C for up to 112 days of retail display. Water activity (aw, expressible moisture (WHC, pH, fat and moisture content, cooking yield, texture profile analysis, puncture test, Hunter color values were evaluated. Addition of antimicrobials decreased pH. Product with Optiform SD4 (2.5% had the highest cooking yield. Bologna formulated with Optiform SD4 (2.5% had the highest springiness and hardness values after control and the highest puncture value. Water activity was not significantly different (p>0.05 between treatments. Furthermore, day of display had no significant effect on aw. L and a values were not significantly different between treatments, except for Ional LC (3.5% compared to the control. Overall, treatments with Ional (1.5%, (2.5% and Optiform SD4 (2.5% were most effective for preserving the quality of the bologna (s. Also, the highest levels of antimicrobial agents had a detrimental effect on the quality of ready-to-eat bolognas.

  9. Physical-Chemical Characterization and Formulation Considerations for Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Harsh; Mohapatra, Sarat; Munt, Daniel J; Chandratre, Shantanu; Dash, Alekha

    2016-06-01

    Pure glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) (lipid) and different batches of GMO commonly used for the preparation of GMO-chitosan nanoparticles were characterized by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), cryo-microscopy, and cryo-X-ray powder diffraction techniques. GMO-chitosan nanoparticles containing poloxamer 407 as a stabilizer in the absence and presence of polymers as crystallization inhibitors were prepared by ultrasonication. The effect of polymers (polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Eudragits, hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), polyethylene glycol (PEG)), surfactants (poloxamer), and oils (mineral oil and olive oil) on the crystallization of GMO was investigated. GMO showed an exothermic peak at around -10°C while cooling and another exothermic peak at around -12°C while heating. It was followed by two endothermic peaks between 15 and 30 C, indicative of GMO melting. The results are corroborated by cryo-microscopy and cryo-X-ray. Significant differences in exothermic and endothermic transition were observed between different grades of GMO and pure GMO. GMO-chitosan nanoparticles resulted in a significant increase in particle size after lyophilization. MDSC confirmed that nanoparticles showed similar exothermic crystallization behavior of lipid GMO. MDSC experiments showed that PVP inhibits GMO crystallization and addition of PVP showed no significant increase in particle size of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) during lyophilization. The research highlights the importance of extensive physical-chemical characterization for successful formulation of SLN.

  10. Microbial, physical and chemical properties of irrigation water in rice fields of Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reche, Maria Helena L R; Machado, Vilmar; Saul, Danilo A; Macedo, Vera R M; Marcolin, Elio; Knaak, Neiva; Fiuza, Lidia M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis of microbiological, physical and chemical parameters related to the quality of the water used in rice fields in Southern Brazil. Data were collected during three consecutive crop years, within structure of a comprehensive monitoring program. The indicators used were: potential hydrogen, electrical conductivity, turbidity, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, total and fecal coliforms. Principal Component and Discriminant Analysis showed consistent differences between the water irrigation and drainage, as the temporal variation demonstrated a clear reduction in the concentration of most of the variables analyzed. The pattern of this reduction is not the same in the two regions - that is, the importance of each of the different variables in the observed differentiation is modified in two locations. These results suggested that the variations in the water quality utilized for rice irrigation was influenced by certain specific aspects of each rice region in South Brazilian - such as anthropic action or soil/climate conditions in each hydrographic basin.

  11. BIOGENIC AMINE CONTENT AND CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL FEATURES OF ITALIAN FORMAGGIO DI FOSSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rea

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Formaggio di Fossa is an Italian traditional cheese of the Montefeltro area (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions characterized by a particular step of ripening that is carried out into pits (infossamento borne in the sandstone. Since the XIV century, the inhabitants were used to set food, especially cereals and cheese, into pits to preserve them during winter and to protect them from invaders. The aim of the present work is to study physical and chemical features of this product with particular reference to the presence of the most important biogenic amines ( -Phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine and spermidine, compared with a control cheese fully ripened in factory. Formaggio di Fossa showed higher values of Aw, pH, humidity, proteins, pH 4,6-soluble nitrogen (NCN and water soluble nitrogen (NPN and much lower amounts of fat. Much higher amounts of total biogenic amines were detected in Formaggio di Fossa than in control cheese, where their concentration was very low. Cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine were the most concentrated biogenic amines. Nevertheless, thyramine was present at levels suggested as compatible with GMPs. Histamine was detected at low amounts, far from potentially toxic levels.

  12. Byproducts of orange extraction: influence of different treatments in fiber composition and physical and chemical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria de Mello Andrade

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we evaluated the variability in fiber content and physical and chemical parameters of byproducts from orange juice extraction. Five different treatments and two drying methods were evaluated. The results indicate that drying by lyophilization was better than that drying in an oven. The pH ranged from approximately 3.47 to 3.96. The variation in moisture values was 9.22% ± 0.02 to 18.48 ± 0.52%. The total dietary fiber content in the resulting flours ranged from 42.44% to 62.74%. The soluble and insoluble dietary fiber contents differed among the samples, ranging from 5.04% to 19.95% for the first fiber type, and 23.96% to 57.70% for the second. In conclusion, three treatments, associated with freeze-drying, showed promising results in the development of fiber-rich product. However, some modifications are needed, as well as further analysis, to guarantee the benefits of these products for human health. This study contributes to the possible application of industrial byproducts.

  13. Chemical and physical characteristics of local lecithin in comparison with some other food emulsifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shattory, Y.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and physical characteristics of local lecithin and other food emulsifiers (Emulfuid E, Triodan R 90, Panodan 150 and Glycerol mono stéarate were studied. The characteristics of these emulsifiers studied were solubility, hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB, stability index (SI, fatty acid composition and infrared spectrum. The results obtained showed that Emulfuid E and local lecithin were mixture of lecithins and phosphatidyl ethanol-amine. In addition, Triodan R 90 was a polyglycerol ester of ricinoleic acid, Panodan 150 was a blend of mono and diglycerides, and G.M.S. was a monoglycerol ester of stearic acid.

    Se estudiaron las características químicas y físicas de lecitina local y otros emulsionantes alimentarios (Emulfuid E, Triodan R 90, Panodan 150 y Monoestearato de glicerol. Las características de estos emulsionantes estudiados fueron solubilidad, balance hidrófilo-lipófilo (HLB, índice de estabilidad (SI, composición en ácidos grasos y espectros de infrarrojo. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que Emulfuid E y lecitina local fueron mezclas de lecitinas y fosfatidil etanolamina. Por otro lado, Triodan R 90 fue ester poliglicerídico del ácido ricinoleico, Panodan 150 una mezcla de mono y diglicéridos y G.M.S. un éster monoglicerídico del ácido esteárico.

  14. Physical, morphological and chemical characteristics, oil recovery and fatty acid composition of Balanites aegyptiaca Del. kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A M; Wolf, W; Spiess, W E L

    2002-01-01

    Balanites aegyptiaca Del. kernels were chemically, physically and morphologically characterized. Crude oil (49.0%) and crude protein (32.4%) were the two major constituents of the kernels. Phytic acid content was relatively high compared to other legumes. In contrast, antitryptic activities of the kernel flours were very low. Sapogenin contents of the full fat, defatted and testa flours were 1.5, 2.7 and 3.0%, respectively. The hardness of the kernel was found to be about 10.4 x 10(5) N/m2, which was somewhat high. The morphological structure of the kernel using a scanning electron microscope revealed that the protein matrix was embedded in a lake of oil droplets. Oil recovery, as a function of pressing time, pressure, temperature and particle size was investigated. With increasing temperature up to 70 degrees C at 400 bar, for 120 min, an oil recovery of 79.4% was obtained. Using an expeller at 115 degrees C, about 85% of the kernel oil was recovered. The reduction of particle size had a negative effect on oil recovery under the same conditions. The fatty acid composition was not affected by the pressing temperature up to 115 degrees C. The total amount of the unsaturated fatty acids was found to be up to 74.8% (50 degrees C) and 75.1% (115 degrees C) of the total fatty acids content.

  15. Physical and physico-chemical traits of red pitaya during ripeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatiane Padilha de Menezes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increase of exotic fruit consumption worldwide, the cultivation of dragon fruit has been favored. To increase the agronomic potential of the culture, knowledge aiming the increase of fruit quality is necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical-chemical and pyhisical characteristics of dragon fruit during maturation, in order to define the best harvest point. Fresh weight, longitudinal and transverse diameter, skin color, flesh firmness, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, ratio and flesh pH were evaluated. A completely randomized design was carried out, represented by harvest time (days after anthesis. In each evaluation time, seven fruits were harvested, representing the replications, being one fruit per parcel. The averages of each evaluation time were subjected to polynomial evaluation, being selected according to the significance of F test and the coefficient of determination. The best dragon fruit harvest time was observed 41 days after anthesis. At this stage, fruits presented higher weight and higher red skin color intensity, lower flesh firmness, higher contents of total soluble solids and lower acidity.

  16. Effect of different alkali treatments on the chemical composition, physical properties, and microstructure of pidan white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianwei; Jiang, Aimin; Chen, Mingtsao; Ockerman, Herbert W; Chen, Jiaojiao

    2015-04-01

    Changes in chemical composition, physical property and microstructure of pidan white treated with 4.5 % NaOH or 5.5 % KOH were monitored during pickling up to 4 weeks, and followed by aging for another 2 weeks. As the pickling and ageing times increased, moisture content of pidan white decreased and salt content increased for both (4.5 % NaOH and 5.5 % KOH) treatments (P alkalinity and pH of pidan white treated with 4.5 % NaOH increased as pickling proceeded, but decreased during ageing for both pickling treatments (P hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and chewiness than those treated with 4.5 % NaOH. After ageing, higher springiness, elastic modulus (G') and viscous modulus (G") were generally found in pidan white treated with 5.5 % KOH (P < 0.05). As the pickling time increased, lower L*, b* values and higher a* value were observed in pidan white from both treatments (P < 0.05). As visualized by scanning electron microscope, the aggregation of egg proteins took place in pidan white gels, irrespective of pickling treatments used. Nevertheless, closer and more orderly protein aggregates with denser network were founded in pidan white treated with 5.5 % KOH.

  17. Sensitivity of two garden pea genotypes to physical and chemical mutagens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavka Kalapchieva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A study on the sensitivity of two breeding lines of garden pea to mutagenic agents was carried out in the Maritsa Vegetable Crops Research Institute, Plovdiv. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity of the Pisum sativum L. genotypes to physical and chemical mutagens. In the experiment, the pea seeds were irradiated single or combined with 60Co gamma rays (40, 80, 100, 200 and 400 Gy and Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2 %. Visible morphological changes of the stems and leaves were observed in plant of M1 generation, such as shorter stems, double petiole, clover-shaped leaves and a couple of tendrils. Single treatments with 100 Gy 60Co induced the highest mutation frequency M.F. = 7.69 for line 88-7, and М.F. = 2.11 for line 97-3, reported in M2 generation. Higher doses or combined gamma rays and EMS treatments induced more efficiently mutations. Line 88-7 was selected for further mutagenic treatment due to the higher sensitivity assessed.

  18. [Physical, chemical and microbiological quality of concentrated orange juices made in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, R M; Hernández, P

    1996-03-01

    Concentrated fruit juices are a very attractive type of product because of the many advantages they offer for reductions in packing, transportation and storage costs, and in addition, they offer the possibility of consumption outside harvesting time. Due to their potential in the international market, it is necessary to evaluate if they are accomplishing the quality requirements, and to know the different factors that can affect their stability. For this purpose, samples of national products were analyzed for physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics; the diacetyl test was performed as a measure of the sanitary conditions under processing. The samples analyzed comply with the national standards established by the Comision Venezolana de Normas Industriales (COVENIN N(o) 2395-86 Concentrados de frutas para consumo directo). It is advisable to determine the zero tolerant yeasts population because this type of microorganisms are responsible for spoilage whenever cold storage is interrupted, and because they can not be detected by the official procedures used to detect yeasts.

  19. Predicting Salmonella populations from biological, chemical, and physical indicators in Florida surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEgan, Rachel; Mootian, Gabriel; Goodridge, Lawrence D; Schaffner, Donald W; Danyluk, Michelle D

    2013-07-01

    Coliforms, Escherichia coli, and various physicochemical water characteristics have been suggested as indicators of microbial water quality or index organisms for pathogen populations. The relationship between the presence and/or concentration of Salmonella and biological, physical, or chemical indicators in Central Florida surface water samples over 12 consecutive months was explored. Samples were taken monthly for 12 months from 18 locations throughout Central Florida (n = 202). Air and water temperature, pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), turbidity, and conductivity were measured. Weather data were obtained from nearby weather stations. Aerobic plate counts and most probable numbers (MPN) for Salmonella, E. coli, and coliforms were performed. Weak linear relationships existed between biological indicators (E. coli/coliforms) and Salmonella levels (R(2) Salmonella levels (R(2) Salmonella levels. The lack of good correlations between biological indicators and Salmonella levels and between physicochemical indicators and Salmonella levels shows that the relationship between pathogens and indicators is complex. However, Escherichia coli provides a reasonable way to predict Salmonella levels in Central Florida surface water through logistic regression.

  20. Microbial, physical and chemical properties of irrigation water in rice fields of Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA HELENA L.R. RECHE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis of microbiological, physical and chemical parameters related to the quality of the water used in rice fields in Southern Brazil. Data were collected during three consecutive crop years, within structure of a comprehensive monitoring program. The indicators used were: potential hydrogen, electrical conductivity, turbidity, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, total and fecal coliforms. Principal Component and Discriminant Analysis showed consistent differences between the water irrigation and drainage, as the temporal variation demonstrated a clear reduction in the concentration of most of the variables analyzed. The pattern of this reduction is not the same in the two regions - that is, the importance of each of the different variables in the observed differentiation is modified in two locations. These results suggested that the variations in the water quality utilized for rice irrigation was influenced by certain specific aspects of each rice region in South Brazilian - such as anthropic action or soil/climate conditions in each hydrographic basin.

  1. Physical and chemical data for ground water in the Michigan basin, 1986-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, G.T.; Baltusis, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected from 459 wells located in the Michigan basin as part of a Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. Data on the physical and chemical characteristics of 476 ground-water samples from these wells represent ground-water characteristics in the Berea Sandstone, Coldwater Shale, Marshall Sandstone, Michigan Formation, Bayport Limestone, Saginaw Formation, Grand River Formation, and glacial deposits. Ground-water samples were measured in the Geld for specific conductance, temperature, and alkalinity. Analyses of ground water for concentrations of dissolved oxygen, ferrous iron, total iron, and sulfide were also done in the field. Additional laboratory analysis provided data on eight major and 18 minor inorganic constituents. Twenty-one samples were analyzed for tritium, 140 samples were analyzed for carbon-13, and 19 samples were analyzed for carbon-14. The stable-isotope ratio of deuterium to hydrogen was determined for 408 samples; the ratio of oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 was determined for 433 samples; and the ratio of sulfur-34 to sulfur-32 was determined for 20 samples. Sixteen samples were analyzed for the unstable isotopes of uranium; 13 samples were analyzed for radium-226; and the ratio of radium-228 to radium-226 was determined for 13 samples.

  2. Physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical compatibility of aluminum nitride insulator coatings for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1996-04-01

    The blanket system is one of the most important components in a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of various concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water, and helium. Based on the requirements for an electrically insulating coating on the first-wall structural material to minimize the MHD pressure drop during the flow of liquid metal in a magnetic field, AlN was selected as a candidate coating material for the Li self-cooled blanket concept. This report discusses the results from an ongoing study of physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical compatibility of AlN electrical insulator coatings in a liquid Li environment. Details are presented on the AlN coating fabrication methods, and experimental data are reported for microstructures, chemistry of coatings, pretreatment of substrate, heat treatment of coatings, hardness data for coatings, coating/lithium interactions, and electrical resistance before and after exposure to lithium. Thermodynamic calculations are presented to establish regions of stability for AlN coatings in an Li environment as a function of O concentration and temperature, which can aid in-situ development of AlN coatings in Li.

  3. Determination of some physical and chemical changes in fruits of Hass avocado cultivar during harvesting time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman BAYRAM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of avocado has increasingly attracted the attention of producers in Turkey recently. Hass is one of the most important avocado cultivars produced in the world and Turkey. The aim of this study was to determine the most suitable fruit maturity standards for Hass cultivar by analyzing some physical and chemical parameters. The study was conducted at the two harvest periods from October to June in 2010-11 and 2012-13 years with 15-20 days intervals. Fruit weights changed from 106.73 g to 196.50 g in 2010-11 and from 98.45 g to 157.81 g in 2012-13 harvest periods. Dry weight of fruits increased from 19.60% to 36.45% and from 19.23% to 38.28% and oil content increased from 6.43% to 22.06% and from 6.47% to 24.86% depending on the harvest period in 2010-11 and 2012-13 respectively. There was a very high positive relationship between dry weight and oil content of fruit, but a significant negative correlation was found between fruit flesh and seed weight. As a result of this study; the optimal harvest period of Hass cultivar was determined to be from January to June in terms of fruit dry weight and oil content in Antalya conditions.

  4. Physical and chemical environments of abnormal vitrinite reflectance evolution in the sedimentary basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Nansheng; WANG Weixiao; XIE Mingju

    2007-01-01

    Based on the tested data of pressure and vitrinitere flectance of some wells in sedimentary basins, abnormal high pressure is regarded as not the only factor to retard the increase of vitrinite reflectance (Ro). Apart from the types of the organic matter, the physical environment (temperature and pressure) and chemical environment (fluid compositionand inorganic elements) will result in the abnormal vitrinite reflectance values in the sedimentary basins. This paper tested trace elements and vitrinite reflectance data from the the abnormal high pressure and normal pressure strata pro-files, respectively, and found that the acidic and lower salinity starta are favorable for the increase of Ro. By discussing the corresponding relationship between the contents of some trace elements in the mudstone and the vitrinite reflectance values, the typical trace elements were found to suppress and/or catalyze the vitrinite reflectance of organic matter, while the elements of Ca, Mn, Sr, B, Ba and P may result in the retardation of Ro. However, elements of Fe, Co, Zn, Ni and Rb may catalyze the organic matter maturation. This study is conductive to the organic maturation correction, oil and gas assessment and thermal history reconstruction by the paleothermometry.

  5. Converting STEM Doctoral Dissertations into Patent Applications: A Study of Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, and Chemical Engineering Dissertations from CIC Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkovich, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral candidates may request short-term embargoes on the release of their dissertations in order to apply for patents. This study examines how often inventions described in dissertations in chemical engineering, chemistry, physics, and mathematics are converted into U.S. patent applications, as well as the relationship between dissertation…

  6. Physical and chemical characterization of biochars produced from coppiced wood of thirteen tree species for use in horticultural substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven-year-old coppiced shoots from thirteen species of native and non-native trees and shrubs were harvested, dried, and were pyrolyzed to produce biochars for potential use in horticultural substrates. Several chemical and physical characteristics of the biochars were determined. There were slight...

  7. Permanence/Durability of the Book-VII. Physical and Chemical Properties of Book Papers, 1507 - 1949.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow (W.J.) Research Lab., Richmond, VA.

    In 1975 the W. J. Barrow Research Laboratory, Inc., under the sponsorship of the Council on Library Resources, began a series of studies on the chemical and physical properties of book papers between 1507 and 1949. Their testing and review of the literature were concerned with book paper durability and permanence, reasons for decline in…

  8. A review of the chemical and physical mechanisms of the storage stability of fast pyrolysis bio-oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, J.P.

    1999-01-27

    Understanding the fundamental chemical and physical aging mechanisms is necessary to learn how to produce a bio-oil that is more stable during shipping and storage. This review provides a basis for this understanding and identifies possible future research paths to produce bio-oils with better storage stability.

  9. Laboratory simulations of the transformation of peas as a result of heat treatment: changes of the physical and chemical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braadbaart, F.; Boon, J.J.; Veld, H.; David, P.; Bergen, P.F. van

    2004-01-01

    The residues of heated organic remains, usually called carbonized or charred remains, are ubiquitous in the archaeological record and are often used to interpret certain aspects of past ways of living. This study focuses on the physical and chemical alterations, both as a function of temperature and

  10. Advances in chemical physics, advancing theory for kinetics and dynamics of complex, many-dimensional systems clusters and proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Berry, R Stephen; Leitner, David M; Rice, Stuart A; Berry, R Stephen Stephen; Leitner, David M M

    2011-01-01

    This series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Volume 145 in the series continues to report recent advances with significant, up-to-date chapters by internationally recognized researchers.

  11. Physical-Chemical Factors Affecting the Low Quality of Natural Water in the Khibiny Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Maksimova, Viktoriia; Belkina, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    One peculiarity of the Khibiny Massif is its spatial location. Rising over 1000 m above the surrounding hilly land and thus obstructing the passage of air masses, it promotes condensation and accumulation of surface and underground water. Annual precipitation here amounts to 600-700 mm in the valleys and up to 1600 mm on mountainous plateaus. Using this water for drinking and household purposes is problematic due to excess Al and F concentrations and high pH values. Now it is known that in its profile, the Massif is represented by three hydrogeological subzones: the upper (aerated), medium and lower ones. The upper subzone spreads throughout the Massif and is affected by the local drainage network and climatic conditions. The medium subzone is permanently saturated with underground water flowing horizontally to sites of discharge at the level of local river valleys and lakes. The fissure-vein water in the lower subzone is confined to tectonic fractures and faults in the so far underexplored, deeper parts of the Massif. Being abundant, this water ascends under high pressure. At places, water has been observed spurting from as deep as 700 m, and even 960 m. In the latter case, the temperature of ascending water was higher than 18 centigrade (Hydrogeology of the USSR, V. 27, 1971). This work was undertaken to reveal the nature of the low quality of water in the Khibiny by using physical-chemical modeling (software package Selector, Chudnenko, 2010). Processes of surface and underground water formation in the Khibiny were examined within a physical-chemical model (PCM) of the "water-rock-atmosphere-hydrogen" system. In a multi-vessel model used, each vessel represented a geochemical level of the process interpreted as spatiotemporal data - ξ (Karpov, 1981). The flow reactor consisted of 4 tanks. In the first tank, water of the Kuniok River (1000 L) interacted with atmosphere and an organic substance. The resulting solution proceeded to tanks 2-4 containing with

  12. Field-effect-based multifunctional hybrid sensor module for the determination of both (bio-)chemical and physical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoening, Michael J.; Poghossian, Arshak; Schultze, J. Walter; Lueth, Hans

    2002-02-01

    Sensor systems for multi-parameter detection in fluidics usually combine different sensors, which are designed to detect either a physical or (bio-)chemical parameter. Therefore, such systems include a more complicated fabrication technology and measuring set-up. In this work, an ISFET (ion-sensitive field-effect transistor), which is well known as a (bio-)chemical sensor, is utilized as transducer for the detection of both (bio-)chemical and physical parameters. A multifunctional hybrid module for the determination of two (bio-)chemical parameters (pH, penicillin concentration) and three physical parameters (temperature, flow velocity and flow direction) using only two sensor structures, an ion generator and a reference electrode, is realized and its performance has been investigated. Here, a multifunctionality of the sensor system is achieved by means of different sensor arrangements and/or different operation modes. A Ta2O5-gate ISFET was used as transducer for all sensors. A novel time-of-flight type ISFET-based flow-velocity (flow rate) and flow-direction sensor using in-situ electrochemical generation of chemical tracers is presented. Due to the fast response of the ISFET (usually in the millisecond range), an ISFET-based flow sensor is suitable for the measurement of the flow velocity in a wide range. With regard to practical applications, pH measurements with this ISFET were performed in rain droplets.

  13. Differentiation of chemical reaction activity of various carbon nanotubes using redox potential: Classification by physical and chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Shuji; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Castranova, Vincent; Porter, Dale W; Yanagisawa, Takashi; Saito, Naoto; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-12-01

    The present study systematically examined the kinetics of a hydroxyl radical scavenging reaction of various carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs and MWCNTs), and carbon nano peapods (AuCl3@DWCNT). The theoretical model that we recently proposed based on the redox potential of CNTs was used to analyze the experimental results. The reaction kinetics for DWCNTs and thin MWCNTs agreed well with the theoretical model and was consistent with each other. On the other hand, thin and thick MWCNTs behaved differently, which was consistent with the theory. Additionally, surface morphology of CNTs substantially influenced the reaction kinetics, while the doped particles in the center hollow parts of CNTs (AuCl3@DWCNT) shifted the redox potential in a different direction. These findings make it possible to predict the chemical and biological reactivity of CNTs based on the structural and chemical nature and their influence on the redox potential.

  14. Review: Physical, physical chemistries, chemical and sensorial characteristics of the several fruits and vegetables chips by low-temperature vacuum frying machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD DWI SETYAWAN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Setyawan AD, Sugiyarto, Solichatun, Susilowati A. 2013. Review: Physical, physical chemistries, chemical and sensorial characteristics of the several fruits and vegetables chips by low-temperature vacuum frying machine. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 84-100. Frying process is one of the oldest cooking methods and most widely practiced in the world. Frying process is considered as a dry cooking method because the process does not involve water. In frying process, oil conduction occurs at high temperature pressing water out of food in the form of bubbles. Fried foods last longer due to reduced water levels lead less decomposition by microbes, even fried foods can be enhanced nutritional value and quality of appearance. Food frying technology can extend the shelf life of fruits and vegetables and frying oil enhances the flavors of the products, however, improper frying oil can have harmful effects on human health. Vacuum frying is a promising technology that may be an option for the production of novel snacks such as fruit and vegetable crisps that present the desired quality and respond to new health trends. This technique fry food at a low temperature and pressure so that the nutritional quality of the food is maintained and the quality of the used oil does not quickly declined and became saturated oils that are harmful to human health. This technique produces chips that have physical, physico-chemical, chemical, and sensory generally better than conventional deep-fat frying methods.

  15. Complex, dynamic combination of physical, chemical and nutritional variables controls spatio-temporal variation of sandy beach community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Cisneros, Kelly; Smit, Albertus J; Laudien, Jürgen; Schoeman, David S

    2011-01-01

    Sandy beach ecological theory states that physical features of the beach control macrobenthic community structure on all but the most dissipative beaches. However, few studies have simultaneously evaluated the relative importance of physical, chemical and biological factors as potential explanatory variables for meso-scale spatio-temporal patterns of intertidal community structure in these systems. Here, we investigate macroinfaunal community structure of a micro-tidal sandy beach that is located on an oligotrophic subtropical coast and is influenced by seasonal estuarine input. We repeatedly sampled biological and environmental variables at a series of beach transects arranged at increasing distances from the estuary mouth. Sampling took place over a period of five months, corresponding with the transition between the dry and wet season. This allowed assessment of biological-physical relationships across chemical and nutritional gradients associated with a range of estuarine inputs. Physical, chemical, and biological response variables, as well as measures of community structure, showed significant spatio-temporal patterns. In general, bivariate relationships between biological and environmental variables were rare and weak. However, multivariate correlation approaches identified a variety of environmental variables (i.e., sampling session, the C∶N ratio of particulate organic matter, dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, various size fractions of photopigment concentrations, salinity and, to a lesser extent, beach width and sediment kurtosis) that either alone or combined provided significant explanatory power for spatio-temporal patterns of macroinfaunal community structure. Overall, these results showed that the macrobenthic community on Mtunzini Beach was not structured primarily by physical factors, but instead by a complex and dynamic blend of nutritional, chemical and physical drivers. This emphasises the need to recognise ocean-exposed sandy

  16. Chemical and physical characteristics of corn silages and their effects on in vitro disappearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, G; Mertens, D R

    2005-12-01

    Estimating the available energy in corn silage provides a unique challenge because the silage contains variable proportions of grain and stover, each of which can differ in availability due to chemical composition and physical form. The objectives of this study were to investigate relationships among chemical components and their relationships with in vitro disappearance of ground and unground dried silages, and to quantify minimally fragmented starch in corn silage and investigate its impact and that of mean particle size (MPS) on in vitro disappearance of unground silages. Thirty-two corn silages were selected to provide diversity in dry matter, protein, fiber, and MPS. Detergent fibers were highly correlated with each other and with nonfiber carbohydrates, and were used to develop prediction equations between these constituents. Sieves with apertures > or =4.75 mm were used to isolate intact kernels and large kernel fragments, which were collected and analyzed to measure minimally fragmented starch (Starch>4.75). Dividing Starch>4.75 by total starch defined the proportion of minimally fragmented starch (Starch>4.75/Total), which ranged from 9 to 100% with a mean of 52%. Starch>4.75/Total was positively correlated with MPS (r = 0.46). The inverse of Starch>4.75/Total is an index of kernel fragmentation. Silages were prepared as whole material or ground to pass through a 4- or 1-mm screen of a cutter mill. In vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) was greater for ground than for whole samples (71.7 and 61.2%, respectively). Increased IVDMD for ground samples was attributed to greater in vitro neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and neutral detergent solubles (NDS) disappearances. The IVDMD of ground samples was related to NDF and acid detergent lignin (R2 = 0.80). The IVDMD of whole corn silage was related to acid detergent lignin, Starch>4.75, MPS, and dry matter. When IVDMD was partitioned into in vitro digestible NDS (IVdNDS) and in vitro digestible NDF, the IVd

  17. Physical-chemical and microbiological stability of biotherapy Candida albicans RC in different potencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Garcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral Candidiasis is an opportunist fungal infection, with high incidence in HIV and immunosuppressed patients and Candida albicans is the most common causing agent. In some cases, it can evolve to resistant injuries to antifungal conventional therapy. According to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopeia (BHP [1], biotherapic medicines are prepared from chemically undefined biological products. Biotherapics created by Brazilian doctor Roberto Costa (RC have a different homeopathic compounding technique, as its dynamization starts from the ethiologic agent of the illness in its alive form, which present higher capability to stimulate the host immunological system [2,3]. Aim: The goal of this study was evaluate the physical-chemical and microbiological stability of Candida albicans RC potencies under different conditions of storage. Methodology: To prepare the biotherapics, one part of Candida albicans yeast suspension (109 cell/ml was diluted in 9 parts of sterile distillated water. After preparing this 1:10 dilution, the sample was undergone 100 succussions, resulting in the first decimal dilution (1x. Then, one part of this solution was diluted in 9 parts of sterile distillated water and submitted to 100 succussions, generating the 2x. This process was successively repeated following BHP, until 30x. Water 30x was prepared by the same technique, as control. All the solutions were prepared in aseptic and sterile conditions. Biotherapics 6x, 12x, 18x, 24x, 30x and water 30x were storage under refrigeration (2 to 8°C and at room temperate (25°C during 8 weeks. Every 15 days, the following parameters were analyzed: pH, electrical conductivity, UV absorbance (260 and 280 nm. Microbiological analyses were performed after 3 weeks by colony forming unit (CFU method [4]. Results: The preliminary analyses performed at times zero, 15, 30 and 45 days suggest that electrical conductivity of these solutions tend to increase

  18. Chemical and Physical Reactions of Wellbore Cement under CO2 Storage Conditions: Effects of Cement Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchko, B. G.; Strazisar, B. R.; Huerta, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Dzombak, D. A.; Thaulow, N.

    2008-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 into geologic formations requires long-term storage and low leakage rates to be effective. Active and abandoned wells in candidate storage formations must be evaluated as potential leakage points. Wellbore integrity is an important part of an overall integrated assessment program being developed at NETL to assess potential risks at CO2 storage sites. Such a program is needed for ongoing policy and regulatory decisions for geologic carbon sequestration. The permeability and integrity of the cement in the well is a primary factor affecting its ability to prevent leakage. Cement must be able to maintain low permeability over lengthy exposure to reservoir conditions in a CO2 injection and storage scenario. Although it is known that cement may be altered by exposure to CO2, the results of ongoing research indicate that cement curing conditions, fluid properties, and cement additives play a significant role in the rate of alteration and reaction. The objective of this study is to improve understanding of the factors affecting wellbore cement integrity for large-scale geologic carbon sequestration projects. Due to the high frequency use of additives (pozzolan) in wellbore cement, it is also essential to understand the reaction of these cement-pozzolan systems upon exposure to CO2 under sequestration conditions (15.5 MPa and 50°C). Laboratory experiments were performed to determine the physical and chemical changes, as well as the rate of alteration of commonly used pozzolan-cement systems under simulated sequestration reservoir conditions, including both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine. The rate of alteration of the cement-pozzolan systems is considerably faster than with neat cement. However, the alteration of physical properties is much less significant with the pozzolanic blends. Permeability of a carbonated pozzolanic cement paste remains sufficiently small to block significant vertical migration of CO2 in a wellbore. All of the

  19. Different physical and chemical pretreatments of wheat straw for enhanced biobutanol production in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumangalah Thirmal, Yaser Dahman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to increase butanol product yields using wheat straw as the biomass. First this study examined different pretreatment and saccharification processes to obtain the maximum sugar concentration. Three different physical and chemical pretreatment methods for the wheat straws were examined in the present work in comparison with physical pretreatment alone as a reference. This included water, acidic, and alkaline pretreatment. For all cases, physical pretreatment represented by 1 mm size reduction of the straws was applied prior to each pretreatment. Results showed that 13.91 g/L glucose concentration was produced from saccharification with just the physical pretreatment (i.e., no chemical pretreatment. This represented ~5-20 % lower sugar release in saccharification compared to the other three pretreatment processes. Saccharification with acid pretreatment obtained the highest sugar concentrations, which were 18.77 g/L glucose and 12.19 g/L xylose. Second this study produced butanol from simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF using wheat straw hydrolysate and Clostridium beijerinckii BA101. Water pretreatment was applied to separate lignin and polysaccharides from the wheat straw. Physical pretreatment was applied prior to water pretreatment where, wheat straw was grounded into fine particles less than 1 mm size. Another experiment was conducted where physical pretreatment was applied alone prior to SSF (i.e. no chemical pretreatment was applied. Both processes converted more than 10% of wheat straw into butanol product. This was 2% higher than previous studies. The results illustrated that SSF with physical pretreatment alone obtained 2.61 g/L butanol.

  20. Physical, chemical, and thermal interactions in the Pleasant Bay Layered Gabbro-Diorite Intrusion, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, K.; Algeo, J.

    2012-12-01

    density differences together with field measurements of pipe radii and spacing. Rapid solidification of the gabbro along its lower contact accompanied by an increase in viscosity slowed down the ascent of the pipes and ultimately arrested them in their present state. Petrographic analyses of samples taken across the gabbro-diorite contacts and pipe-gabbro contacts indicate significant differences in the occurrence and abundance of hydrous phases, notably biotite and hornblende, between the chilled gabbro contacts and bulk of the gabbro, the underlying diorite, and the pipes. SEM-EDS analyses also reveal changes in mineral compositions within a few mm of the pipe-gabbro and gabbro-diorite contacts (e.g. drop in plagioclase An content in chilled gabbro surrounding pipes). These observations suggest transfer of water from the diorite and/or pipes into anhydrous gabbro as well as physical transfer of crystals across these boundaries. Quantifying the mineral and chemical differences along the pipe-gabbro and gabbro-diorite contacts in the context of the timescales of R-T instability and solidification reveal the in situ rates of physical and chemical exchange between these magmas. (Special thanks to Dr. Robert Wiebe for assistance with fieldwork, and to Dr. Chris Daniel for assistance with SEM analyses.)

  1. Physical-chemical hydrodynamics of the processes of sorption-membrane technology of LRW treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander D Efanov; Pyotr N Martynov; Yuri D Boltoev; Ivan V Yagodkin; Nataliya G Bogdanovich; Sergey S Skvortsov; Alexander R Sokolovsky; Elena V Ignatova; Gennady V Grigoriev; Vitaly V Grigorov [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after A.I. Leypunsky Bondarenko sq. 1, 249033, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Liquid radioactive NPP waste is generated, when radioactive water is collected and mixed from various routine and non-routine process measures being performed in accordance with the operating regulations of reactor units with water coolant. The main sources of LRW are the primary loop water coolant, deactivation, regeneration and rinse waters, waste laundry and showers water producing the initial averaged LRW as well as spent fuel element cooling pond water and water of biological protection tanks. LRW handling can be substantially advanced, in particular, through development and introduction of the non-conventional sorption-membrane technology of NPP LRW treatment, being developed at SSC RF IPPE. This technology makes use of natural inorganic sorbents (tripolite, zeolite, ion-exchange materials) and filtering nano-structured metallic and ceramic membranes (titanium, zirconium, chromium and other or their oxides, carbides and nitrides). The efficiency of the sorption membrane technology is associated just with the investigation of the physical-chemical processes of sorption, coagulation and sedimentation under the conditions of forced and free convection occurring in LRW. Besides, it is necessary to take into consideration that the hydrodynamics of the flows of LRW being decontaminated by membrane filtration depends on the structure and composition of the porous composition pare 'nano-structured membrane-substrate'. Neglecting these peculiarities can result in drastic reduction of the time of stable LRW filtration, reduction of the operability resource of filtration systems or in quick mechanical destruction of porous materials. The paper presents the investigation results on: -the effect of the convection flows being generated by air bubbling or LRW stirring by agitator on the static sorption conditions (sorption time, medium pH, sorbent dispersity, sorbent concentration in liquid medium) and on the efficiency of

  2. Integration of an innovative biological treatment with physical or chemical disinfection for wastewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Marco; Del Moro, Guido; Levantesi, Caterina; Luprano, Maria Laura; Di Iaconi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    In the present paper, the effectiveness of a Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor (SBBGR) and its integration with different disinfection strategies (UV irradiation, peracetic acid) for producing an effluent suitable for agricultural use was evaluated. The plant treated raw domestic sewage, and its performances were evaluated in terms of the removal efficiency of a wide group of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. The SBBGR resulted really efficient in removing suspended solids, COD and nitrogen with an average effluent concentration of 5, 32 and 10 mg/L, respectively. Lower removal efficiency was observed for phosphorus with an average concentration in the effluent of 3 mg/L. Plant effluent was also characterized by an average electrical conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio of 680 μS/cm and 2.9, respectively. Therefore, according to these gross parameters, the SBBGR effluent was conformed to the national standards required in Italy for agricultural reuse. Moreover, disinfection performances of the SBBGR was higher than that of conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants and met the quality criteria suggested by WHO (Escherichia colitreatment by SBBGR removed 3.8±0.4 log units of Giardia lamblia, 2.8±0.8 log units of E. coli, 2.5±0.7 log units of total coliforms, 2.0±0.3 log units of Clostridium perfringens, 2.0±0.4 log units of Cryptosporidium parvum and 1.7±0.7 log units of Somatic coliphages. The investigated disinfection processes (UV and peracetic acid) resulted very effective for total coliforms, E. coli and somatic coliphages. In particular, a UV radiation and peracetic acid doses of 40 mJ/cm(2) and 1 mg/L respectively reduced E. coli content in the effluent below the limit for agricultural reuse in Italy (10 CFU/100 mL). Conversely, they were both ineffective on C.perfringens spores.

  3. Chemical and Physical Properties of Bulk Aerosols within Four Sectors Observed during TRACE-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Fuelberg, E.; Hudgins, C. H.; Kiley, C. M.; Russo, R.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical aerosol data collected on the DC-8 during TRACE-P were grouped into four sectors based on back trajectories. The four sectors represent long-range transport from the west (WSW), regional circulation over the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (SE Asia), polluted transport from Northern Asia with substantial sea salt at low altitudes (NNW) and a substantial amount of dust (Channel). WSW has generally low mixing ratios at both middle and high altitudes, with the bulk of the aerosol mass due to non-sea-salt water-soluble inorganic species. Low altitude SE Asia also has low mean mixing ratios in general, with the majority of the aerosol mass comprised of non-sea-salts, however, soot is also relatively important m this region. "w had the highest mean sea salt mixing ratios, with the aerosol mass at low altitudes (a km) evenly divided between sea salts, mm-sea-salts, and dust. The highest mean mixing ratios of water-soluble ions and soot were observed at the lowest altitudes (a km) in the Channel sector. The bulk of the aerosol mass exported from Asia emanates h m Channel at both low and midaltitudes, due to the prevalence of dust compared to other sectors. Number densities show enhanced fine particles for Channel and NNW, while their volume distributions are enhanced due to sea salt and dust Low-altitude Channel exhibits the highest condensation nuclei ((34) number densities along with enhanced scattering coefficients, compared to the other sectors. At midaltitudes (2-7 km), low mean CN number densities coupled with a high proportion of nonvolatile particles (265%) observed in polluted sectors (Channel and NNW) are attributed to wet scavenging which removes hygroscopic CN particles. Low single scatter albedo m SE Asia reflects enhanced soot

  4. Bread Wheat Quality: Some Physical, Chemical and Rheological Characteristics of Syrian and English Bread Wheat Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Abboud; Brennan, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    The relationships between breadmaking quality, kernel properties (physical and chemical), and dough rheology were investigated using flours from six genotypes of Syrian wheat lines, comprising both commercially grown cultivars and advanced breeding lines. Genotypes were grown in 2008/2009 season in irrigated plots in the Eastern part of Syria. Grain samples were evaluated for vitreousness, test weight, 1000-kernel weight and then milled and tested for protein content, ash, and water content. Dough rheology of the samples was studied by the determination of the mixing time, stability, weakness, resistance and the extensibility of the dough. Loaf baking quality was evaluated by the measurement of the specific weight, resilience and firmness in addition to the sensory analysis. A comparative study between the six Syrian wheat genotypes and two English flour samples was conducted. Significant differences were observed among Syrian genotypes in vitreousness (69.3%–95.0%), 1000-kernel weight (35.2–46.9 g) and the test weight (82.2–88.0 kg/hL). All samples exhibited high falling numbers (346 to 417 s for the Syrian samples and 285 and 305 s for the English flours). A significant positive correlation was exhibited between the protein content of the flour and its absorption of water (r = 0.84 **), as well as with the vitreousness of the kernel (r = 0.54 *). Protein content was also correlated with dough stability (r = 0.86 **), extensibility (r = 0.8 **), and negatively correlated with dough weakness (r = −0.69 **). Bread firmness and dough weakness were positively correlated (r = 0.66 **). Sensory analysis indicated Doumah-2 was the best appreciated whilst Doumah 40765 and 46055 were the least appreciated which may suggest their suitability for biscuit preparation rather than bread making.

  5. Gamma radiation influence in physical and chemical characteristics of Bacaba Oil (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Hugo Maia; Santos, Camila Oliveira dos; Cruz, Luis Paulo Adami, E-mail: hmaiaf@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Palmas, TO (Brazil); Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de, E-mail: adriana.souza@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFGO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia

    2015-07-01

    The bacaba (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.) is a fruit originating from the Amazon forest, and its oil has similarity to the fatty acid composition of olive oil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of bacaba oil submitted to gamma radiation in the of 5, 10 and 15 kGy. The extracted oil was irradiated at doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy, and then the physical and chemical analysis were carried out: acid value, peroxide value, iodine value, refractive index, specific gravity, saponification value, coefficient specific extinction at 232 and 270 nm and color. Was possible to evidence that radiation promoted decrease in acidity of the oil 26.67%, 27.27% and 9.09%, respectively, at the doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy, in relation to oil which has not gone through the process (standard). The values of specific gravity, refractive index and saponification value, have not changed, but the result of peroxides were significantly affected, increasing by 51.99%, 100.44% and 89.40% values relative to the standard. It was also observed a significant increase in K232 and K270 values, suggesting increased oxidation products, conjugated dienes and trienes. The oil color has been affected by the doses, generating a product with a more yellowish color and increased brightness. That way, from the analysis, it concluded that the use of gamma radiation at the doses used were not sufficient to make it, in the short term, unsafe for consumption, but changed substantially oil color. (author)

  6. Frictional melting dynamics in the upper conduit: A chemical answer to a complex physical question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henton De Angelis, S.; Lavallee, Y.; Kendrick, J. E.; Hornby, A.; von Aulock, F. W.; Clesham, S.; Hirose, T.; Perugini, D.

    2013-12-01

    During volcanic eruptions the generation of frictional heat along the walls of the shallow conduit leads to melting of the rocks along the slip interface. Frictional melting has previously been described as a process out of thermodynamic equilibrium, but upon slip and mingling of the melt batches, homogeneity can be achieved, and may have an h important rheological control on the dynamics of slip. To test melt homogenization in the frictional melt zones of volcanic conduits we performed constant-rate slip experiments under controlled stress conditions using a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus. Volcanic dome samples from three different volcanoes (Volcán De Colima, Soufrière Hills Volcano and Santiaguito Volcano) were investigated. Each sample was subjected to a stress of 1 MPa and slip rate of 1 m/s. For each sample set 5 experiments were conducted: 1) experiment stopped at the onset of melting; 2) experiment stopped on the formation of a full melt layer; 3) experiment stopped after 5m of slip at steady state conditions; 4) experiment stopped after 10m of slip at steady state conditions; 5) experiment stopped after 15m of slip at steady state conditions. We analyzed the resulting proto-melt zones using micron sized X-ray spectroscopy in the high-brightness synchrotron beamline I18 (at Diamond Light Source UK). Particular focus was given to the concentration variance analysis of Rare Earth Elements as their mobilities can be used to precisely quantify the degree and timescale of homogenisation involved during frictional melting. This study refines our understanding of the chemical process of melting and mixing which carry important consequences for the rheological control on the physical dynamics of slip.

  7. Physical-chemical and microbiological changes in Cerrado Soil under differing sugarcane harvest management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Caio TCC

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane cultivation plays an important role in Brazilian economy, and it is expanding fast, mainly due to the increasing demand for ethanol production. In order to understand the impact of sugarcane cultivation and management, we studied sugarcane under different management regimes (pre-harvest burn and mechanical, unburnt harvest, or green cane, next to a control treatment with native vegetation. The soil bacterial community structure (including an evaluation of the diversity of the ammonia oxidizing (amoA and denitrifying (nirK genes, greenhouse gas flow and several soil physicochemical properties were evaluated. Results Our results indicate that sugarcane cultivation in this region resulted in changes in several soil properties. Moreover, such changes are reflected in the soil microbiota. No significant influence of soil management on greenhouse gas fluxes was found. However, we did find a relationship between the biological changes and the dynamics of soil nutrients. In particular, the burnt cane and green cane treatments had distinct modifications. There were significant differences in the structure of the total bacterial, the ammonia oxidizing and the denitrifying bacterial communities, being that these groups responded differently to the changes in the soil. A combination of physical and chemical factors was correlated to the changes in the structures of the total bacterial communities of the soil. The changes in the structures of the functional groups follow a different pattern than the physicochemical variables. The latter might indicate a strong influence of interactions among different bacterial groups in the N cycle, emphasizing the importance of biological factors in the structuring of these communities. Conclusion Sugarcane land use significantly impacted the structure of total selected soil bacterial communities and ammonia oxidizing and denitrifier gene diversities in a Cerrado field site in Central Brazil

  8. The composition-explicit distillation curve technique: Relating chemical analysis and physical properties of complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Thomas J; Ott, Lisa S; Lovestead, Tara M; Huber, Marcia L

    2010-04-16

    The analysis of complex fluids such as crude oils, fuels, vegetable oils and mixed waste streams poses significant challenges arising primarily from the multiplicity of components, the different properties of the components (polarity, polarizability, etc.) and matrix properties. We have recently introduced an analytical strategy that simplifies many of these analyses, and provides the added potential of linking compositional information with physical property information. This aspect can be used to facilitate equation of state development for the complex fluids. In addition to chemical characterization, the approach provides the ability to calculate thermodynamic properties for such complex heterogeneous streams. The technique is based on the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. The analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. By far, the most widely used analytical technique we have used with the ADC is gas chromatography. This has enabled us to study finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this special issue of the Journal of Chromatography, specifically dedicated to extraction technologies, we describe the essential features of the advanced distillation curve metrology as an analytical strategy for complex fluids.

  9. Optical, physical and chemical characteristics of Australian Desert dust aerosols: results from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Keywood

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the major components of the world's aerosol mix, having a number of impacts within the Earth system. However, the climate forcing impact of mineral dust is currently poorly constrained, with even its sign uncertain. As Australian deserts are more reddish than those in the northern hemisphere, it is important to better understand the physical, chemical and optical properties of this important aerosol. We have investigated the properties of Australian desert dust at a site in SW Queensland, which is strongly influenced by both dust and biomass burning aerosol. Three years of ground-based monitoring of spectral optical thickness has provided a statistical picture of gross aerosol properties. In November 2006 we undertook a field campaign which collected 4 sets of size-resolved aerosol samples for laboratory analysis – both ion beam analysis and ion chromatography.

    The aerosol optical depth data showed a weak seasonal cycle with an annual mean of 0.06±0.03. The Angstrom coefficient showed a stronger cycle, indicating the influence of the winter-spring burning season in Australia's north. Size distribution inversions showed a bimodal character, with the coarse mode assumed to be mineral dust, and the fine mode a mixture of biomass burning and marine biogenic material. Ion Beam Analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of all filter samples, although elemental ratios were considered the most reliable output. Scatter plots showed that Fe, Al and Ti were well correlated with Si, and Co reasonably well correlated, with the Fe/Si ratio higher than the crustal average, as expected. Scatter plots for Ca, Mn and K against Si showed clear evidence of a second population, which in some cases could be identified with a particular sample day or size fraction. Ion Chromatography was used to quantify water soluble ions for 2 of our sample sets, showing the importance of marine influences on both fine (biogenic and

  10. Occurrence of non extractable pesticide residues in physical and chemical fractions of two soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Kostas; Semple, Kirk; Jones, Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Soils are considered to be a significant sink for organic contaminants, including pesticides, in the environment. Understanding the distribution and localisation of aged pesticide residues in soil is of great importance for assessing the mobility and availability of these chemicals in the environment. This study aimed to characterise the distribution of radiolabeled herbicide isoproturon and the radiolabeled insecticides diazinon and cypermethrin in two organically managed soils. The soils were spiked and aged under laboratory conditions for 17 months. The labile fraction of the pesticides residues was recovered in CaCl2 (0.01M) and then subjected to physical size fractionation using sedimentation and centrifugation steps, with >20μm, 20-2μm and 2-0.1μm soil factions collected. Further, the distribution of the pesticide residues in the organic matter of the fractionated soil was investigated using a sequential alkaline extraction (0.1N NaOH) into humic and fulvic acid and humin. Soil fractions of 20-2μm and 2-0.1μm had the largest burden of the 14C-residues. Different soil constituents have different capacities to form non-extractable residues. Soil solid fractions of 20-2 µm and pesticide residues than the coarser fraction (>20 µm). Fulvic acid showed to play a vital role in the formation and stabilisation of non-extractable 14C-pesticide residues in most cases.Assessment of the likelihood of the pesticide residues to become available to soil biota requires an understanding of the structure of the SOM matrix and the definition of the kinetics of the pesticide residues in different SOM pools as a function of the time.

  11. Bread Wheat Quality: Some Physical, Chemical and Rheological Characteristics of Syrian and English Bread Wheat Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abboud Al-Saleh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between breadmaking quality, kernel properties (physical and chemical, and dough rheology were investigated using flours from six genotypes of Syrian wheat lines, comprising both commercially grown cultivars and advanced breeding lines. Genotypes were grown in 2008/2009 season in irrigated plots in the Eastern part of Syria. Grain samples were evaluated for vitreousness, test weight, 1000-kernel weight and then milled and tested for protein content, ash, and water content. Dough rheology of the samples was studied by the determination of the mixing time, stability, weakness, resistance and the extensibility of the dough. Loaf baking quality was evaluated by the measurement of the specific weight, resilience and firmness in addition to the sensory analysis. A comparative study between the six Syrian wheat genotypes and two English flour samples was conducted. Significant differences were observed among Syrian genotypes in vitreousness (69.3%–95.0%, 1000-kernel weight (35.2–46.9 g and the test weight (82.2–88.0 kg/hL. All samples exhibited high falling numbers (346 to 417 s for the Syrian samples and 285 and 305 s for the English flours. A significant positive correlation was exhibited between the protein content of the flour and its absorption of water (r = 0.84 **, as well as with the vitreousness of the kernel (r = 0.54 *. Protein content was also correlated with dough stability (r = 0.86 **, extensibility (r = 0.8 **, and negatively correlated with dough weakness (r = −0.69 **. Bread firmness and dough weakness were positively correlated (r = 0.66 **. Sensory analysis indicated Doumah-2 was the best appreciated whilst Doumah 40765 and 46055 were the least appreciated which may suggest their suitability for biscuit preparation rather than bread making.

  12. Evolution of chemical-physical parameters and rheological characteristics of Sarda and Maltese goat dry hams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Mazzette

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Sardinia, goat farming is a very important resource. Sarda and Maltese breed are reared mainly for milk production and for suckling kids meat, while meat from adult goats is undervalued. The use of adult goat meat to obtain ripened ham will contribute to safeguard the Sardinian goat supply chain. The aim of the present study was to characterize Sarda and Maltese goat dry ham in order to evaluate the quality of autochthonous goat breed meat. Chemical-physical characteristics were determined dur-ing the production stages, while the rheological and colour parameters and the composition of the goat ham were determined at the end of ripening. The pH evolution during processing were similar to other cured meat products, e.g. sheep hams, even though the values were high, especially in the products from Sarda breed. The aw value regularly decreased during processing. Colour parameters (L*, a*, b* in the hams from Maltese goat breed were significantly (P<0.05 higher than in those from Sarda. The Sarda goat ham showed a significantly lower percentage of moisture (42% vs 52%, an higher protein content (44.35% vs 34.19%, while no differences were pointed out in the total fat content. Among the ham rheological properties, hardness parameters showed higher levels (13850.22±7589.92 vs 11073.99±6481.31, respectively in Sarda and Maltese hams in comparison to similar products from pork and sheep, while adhesiveness value was lower. The results show that the quality parameters of goat ripened hams are affected mainly by the charac-teristics of the goat meat, in relation on the breed and the breeding system, and, less, by the traditional technology.

  13. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  14. Review: Efficiency of physical and chemical treatments on the inactivation of dairy bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marta Guglielmotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages can cause great economic losses due to fermentation failure in dairy plants. Hence, physical and chemical treatments of raw material and/or equipment are mandatory to maintain phage levels as low as possible. Regarding thermal treatments used to kill pathogenic bacteria or achieve longer shelf-life of dairy products, neither low temperature long time (LTLT nor high temperature short time (HTST pasteurization were able to inactivate most lactic acid bacteria (LAB phages. Even though most phages did not survive 90ºC for 2 min, there were some that resisted 90ºC for more than 15 min (conditions suggested by the International Dairy Federation, IDF, for complete phage destruction. Among biocides tested, ethanol showed variable effectiveness in phage inactivation, since only phages infecting dairy cocci and Lactobacillus helveticus were reasonably inactivated by this alcohol, whereas isopropanol was in all cases highly ineffective. In turn, peracetic acid has consistently proved to be very fast and efficient to inactivate dairy phages, whereas efficiency of sodium hypochlorite was variable, even among different phages infecting the same LAB species. Both alkaline chloride foam and ethoxylated nonylphenol with phosphoric acid were remarkably efficient, trait probably related to their highly alkaline or acidic pH values in solution, respectively. Photocatalysis using UV light and TiO2 has been recently reported as a feasible option to industrially inactivate phages infecting diverse LAB species. Processes involving high pressure were barely used for phage inactivation, but until now most studied phages revealed high resistance to these treatments. To conclude, and given the great phage diversity found on dairies, it is always advisable to combine different anti-phage treatments (biocides, heat, high pressure, photocatalysis, rather than using them separately at extreme conditions.

  15. Corn silage management I: effects of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing on chemical and physical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Robutti, J L; Swift, M; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2002-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing of whole plant corn on chemical and physical characteristics, particle size, pack density, and dry matter recovery. In the first experiment, hybrid 3845 whole plant corn was harvested at hard dough, one-third milkline, and two-thirds milkline with a theoretical length-of-cut of 6.4 mm. In the second experiment, hybrids 3845 and Quanta were harvested at one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline, and blackline stages of maturity with a theoretical length-of-cut of 12.7 mm. At each stage of maturity, corn was harvested with and without mechanical processing by using a John Deere 5830 harvester with an onboard kernel processor. The percentage of intact corn kernels present in unprocessed corn silage explained 62% of variation in total tract starch digestibility. As the amount of intact kernels increased, total tract starch digestibility decreased. Post-ensiled vitreousness of corn kernels within the corn silage explained 31 and 48% of the variation of total tract starch digestibility for processed and unprocessed treatments, respectively. For a given amount of vitreous starch in corn kernels, total tract starch digestibility was lower for cows fed unprocessed corn silage compared with processed corn silage. This suggests that processing corn silage disrupts the dense protein matrix within the corn kernel where starch is embedded, therefore making the starch more available for digestion. Particle size of corn silage and orts that contained corn silage was reduced when it was processed. Wet pack density was greater for processed compared with unprocessed corn silage.

  16. Temperature effects on ash physical and chemical properties. A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Úbeda, Xavier; Martin, Deborah

    2010-05-01

    Fire temperatures have different impacts on ash physical and chemical properties that depend mainly of the specie affected and time of exposition. In a real prescribed or wildland fire, the temperatures produce ash with different characteristics. Know the impacts of a specific temperature or a gradient on a certain element and specie is very difficult in real fires, especially in wildland fires, where temperatures achieve higher values and the burning conditions are not controlled. Hence, laboratory studies revealed to be an excellent methodology to understand the effects of fire temperatures in ash physical and chemical. The aim of this study is study the effects of a temperature gradient (150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500 and 550°C) on ash physical and chemical properties. For this study we collected litter of Quercus suber, Pinus pinea and Pinus pinaster in a plot located in Portugal. The selected species are the most common in the ecosystem. We submitted samples to the mentioned temperatures throughout a time of two hours and we analysed several parameters, namely, Loss on Ignition (LOI%), ash colour - through the Croma Value (CV) observed in Munsell color chart - CaCO3, Total Nitrogen (TN), Total Carbon (TC), C/N ratio, ash pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC), extractable Calcium (Ca2+), Magnesium (Mg2+), Sodium (Na+), Potassium (K+), Aluminium (Al3+), Manganese (Mn2+), Iron (Fe2+), Zinc (Zn2+), Total Phosphorous (TP), Sulphur (S) and Silica (SiO2). Since we considered many elements, in order to obtain a better explanation of all dataset, we applied a Factorial Analysis (FA), based on the correlation matrix and the Factors were extracted according to the Principle Components method. To obtain a better relation between the variables with a specific Factor we rotated the matrix according to the VARIMAX NORMALIZED method. FA identified 5 Factors that explained a total of 95% of the variance. We retained in each Factor the variables that presented an eigenvalue

  17. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical.

  18. The effect of cyclodextrins on chemical and physical stability of glucagon and characterization of glucagon/gamma-CD inclusion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilainen, Laura; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen; Wimmer, Reinhard; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Järvinen, Tomi; Jarho, Pekka

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of cyclodextrin (CD) complexation on the chemical and physical stability of a polypeptide hormone glucagon and to study the interactions between glucagon and gamma-cyclodextrin molecules in inclusion complexes. The chemical stability of glucagon at pH 2.0 was studied with HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS/MS. The physical stability of glucagon at pH 2.5 was studied by measuring the turbidity (A(405 nm)) and viscosity (Ostwald capillary viscosimeter) of the samples. The structure of glucagon/gamma-CD complexes at pH 2.5 was studied with 2D-NMR. The presence of various CDs increased the chemical half-life of glucagon at pH 2.0 (37 degrees C, 0.01 M HCl, ionic strength 0.15) and prolonged the lag-time before aggregation at pH 2.5 (0.9% (w/v) NaCl in 3.2 mM HCl). The NMR studies showed that the side chains of all the aromatic amino acid residues (Phe6, Tyr10, Tyr13, Phe22, Trp25) and leucines (Leu14 and Leu26) of glucagon interacted with the cavities of the gamma-CD molecules. The present study shows that glucagon forms inclusion complexes with cyclodextrins in acidic solution, resulting in an improvement in its chemical and physical stability.

  19. Microsensors for in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological characterization of mixed waste. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thundat, T.G.; Warmack, R.J.; Dabestani, R.; Britt, P.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Brown, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    'A widespread need exists for portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for characterization of mixed wastes, groundwater, contaminated solids, and process streams. None of the currently available technologies offer a clear path to the development of sensors that are miniature, cost-effective, selective, highly sensitive with a wide dynamic range, and have the ability to work in air or liquid while providing chemical, physical, and radiological information. The objective of this research program is to conduct the fundamental research necessary to develop microcantilever-based micromechanical sensors for in-situ characterization of groundwater, sediments, and mixed wastes. Chemical selectivity will be achieved by coupling surface modification chemistry with molecular recognition agents. Physical measurements of adsorption (absorption) induced deflection (bending) and resonance frequency variation of microcantilevers can be achieved with extreme precision resulting in ppb-ppt sensitivity. Good progress has been made in the first nine months of this project. Progress has been made in three focus areas: radiation detection, detection of heavy metals in water, modification of microcantilever surfaces for chemical selectivity, and pH measurement.'

  20. Novel flame retardants: Estimating the physical-chemical properties and environmental fate of 94 halogenated and organophosphate PBDE replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianming; Sühring, Roxana; Serodio, Daniela; Bonnell, Mark; Sundin, Nils; Diamond, Miriam L

    2016-02-01

    In the wake of the listing by the Stockholm Convention of PBDEs, an increasing number of "novel" flame retardants (NFRs) are being used in products. The properties that make for desirable flame retardants can also lead to negative health effects, long environmental residence times and an affinity for organic matrices. While NFRs are currently in use, little information is available regarding their physical-chemical properties and environmental fate. In this study, 94 halogenated and organophosphate NFRs were evaluated for their persistence and long-range transport potential. Physical-chemical properties (namely liquid sub-cooled vapor pressure P(l) and solubility S(l), air-water (K(AW)), octanol-water (K(OW)), and octanol-air (K(OA)) partition coefficients) of the NFRs were predicted using three chemical property estimation tools: EPI Suite, SPARC and Absolv. Physical-chemical properties predicted using these tools were generally within 10(2)-10(3) for compounds with molecular weight physical-chemical properties of compounds with >800 g/mol, and/or the presence of a heteroatom and/or a polar functional group could deviate by up to 10(12). According to the OECD P(OV) and LRTP Screening Tool, up to 40% of the NFRs have a persistence and/or long range transport potential of medium to high level of concern and up to 60% have persistence and or long range transport potential similar to the PBDEs they are replacing. Long range transport potential could be underestimated by the OECD model since the model under-predicts long range transport potential of some organophosphate compounds.

  1. Monitoring of chemical and physical characteristics of stone surfaces by a portable spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaiti, Mara; Benvenuti, Marco; Costagliola, Pilar; Di Benedetto, Francesco; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Garfagnoli, Francesca; Lombardi, Luca; Moretti, Sandro; Pecchioni, Elena; Vettori, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    A portable radiometer (ASD-FieldSpec FP Pro spectroradiometer), which continuously and rapidly acquires punctual reflectance spectra in the 350-2500 nm spectral range, has been recently proposed as non-destructive and non-invasive technology for detecting gypsum and other materials (inorganic as well as organic) on surfaces of historical buildings [1,2,3]. The instrument, which is also capable to quantitatively assess physical changes of the surfaces (i. e. color changes), has the potentialities to be used for monitoring the state of conservation of stone surfaces through the monitoring of the relative abundance of some components considered precursor symptoms of decay. The increase of gypsum or the decrease of the relative abundance of organic materials used as protective materials allows, in fact, to control and detect the chemical attack of carbonate surfaces, as well as the efficacy and durability of protective treatments. Although the relative abundance of any compound is theoretically related to the signal intensities of its spectral signature, a quantitative analysis is often compromised by some factors such as the grain dimension of crystals [2 4]. However the monitoring of critical areas may give useful information on the progression of decay provided that the same areas are investigated. The spectroradiometer can operate both in natural light conditions and by a contact probe with fixed illumination and geometry of shot; in this study the second condition was preferred since the same operative conditions can be maintained for all the measurements during the monitoring. Aim of this work was to find an easy to use and accurate system for repositioning the spectroradiometer probe in the same small areas of interest during the long-term monitoring. Two systems (theodolite and distance measuring laser) have been tested and their accuracy has been evaluated on some Florentine historical buildings (Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore and Basilica of San Miniato

  2. Carbonado: Physical and chemical properties, a critical evaluation of proposed origins, and a revised genetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Stephen E.

    2014-03-01

    Carbonado-diamond is the most controversial of all diamond types and is found only in Brazil, and the Central African Republic (Bangui). Neither an affinity to Earth's mantle, nor an origin in the crust can be unequivocally established. Carbonado-diamond is at least 3.8 Ga old, an age about 0.5 Ga older than the oldest diamonds yet reported in kimberlites and lamproites on Earth. Derived from Neo- to Mid-Proterozoic meta-conglomerates, the primary magmatic host rock has not been identified. Discovered in 1841, the material is polycrystalline, robust and coke-like, and is best described as a strongly bonded micro-diamond ceramic. It is characteristically porous, which precludes an origin at high pressures and high temperatures in Earth's deep interior, yet it is also typically patinated, with a glass-like surface that resembles melting. With exotic inclusions of highly reduced metals, carbides, and nitrides the origin of carbonado-diamond is made even more challenging. But the challenge is important because a new diamondiferous host rock may be involved, and the development of a new physical process for generating diamond is possibly assured. The combination of micro-crystals and random crystal orientation leads to extreme mechanical toughness, and a predicable super-hardness. The physical and chemical properties of carbonado are described with a view to the development of a mimetic strategy to synthesize carbonado and to duplicate its extreme toughness and super-hardness. Textural variations are described with an emphasis on melt-like surface features, not previously discussed in the literature, but having a very clear bearing on the history and genesis of carbonado. Selected physical properties are presented and the proposed origins, diverse in character and imaginatively novel, are critically reviewed. From our present knowledge of the dynamic Earth, all indications are that carbonado is unlikely to be of terrestrial origin. A revised model for the origin of

  3. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) on roll compacted ribbons and tablets--multivariate mapping of physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souihi, Nabil; Nilsson, David; Josefson, Mats; Trygg, Johan

    2015-04-10

    Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) is an attractive technique within the pharmaceutical industry, where tools are continuously in demand to assess the quality of the intermediate and final products. The present paper demonstrates how NIR-CI in combination with multivariate methods was utilized to spatially map physical properties and content of roll compacted ribbons and tablets. Additionally, extracted textural parameters from tablet images were correlated to the design parameters of the roll compaction process as well as to the physical properties of the granules. The results established the use of NIR-CI as a complementary nondestructive tool to determine the ribbon density and map the density distribution across the width and along the length of the ribbons. For the tablets, the compaction pressure developed during compression increased with the lateral distance from the center. Therefore, NIR-CI can be an effective tool to provide information about the spatial distribution of the compaction pressures on the surface of the tablet. Moreover, low roll compaction roll force correlated to a heterogeneous type of texture in the API chemical image. Overall, texture analysis of the tablets enabled efficient investigation of the spatial variation and could be used to advance process understanding. Finally, orthogonal projections to latent structures (O2PLS) model facilitated the understanding of the interrelationships between textural features, design parameters and physical properties data by separately joint and unique variations.

  4. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  5. Development of an in vitro system simulating bucco-gastric digestion to assess the physical and chemical changes of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebler, C; Lecannu, G; Belleville, C; Devaux, M-F; Popineau, Y; Barry, J-L

    2002-09-01

    The release of nutrients from solid food depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of substrates, and on dynamic physiological events including pH, gastric emptying and enzymatic secretion. Our laboratory has developed an in vitro digestive system mimicking mouth and stomach processes to determine physical and chemical changes of bread during digestion. To simulate oral-phase digestion, bread was minced and subjected to in vitro amylase digestion, releasing 219 +/- 11 g oligosaccharides/kg total carbohydrate. During the gastric phase, bread proteins, which are converted into insoluble aggregated proteins during breadmaking, were emptied in various states of peptic digestion: undigested aggregated proteins and degraded proteins of intermediate and low molecular weight. The mean particle size of ground bread decreased progressively to the end of the gastric digestion (from 292 to 109 microm). The in vitro digestive system proved to be a useful tool for understanding the dynamic digestion of various food components held within the structure of a food matrix.

  6. Effects of xanthan, guar, carrageenan and locust bean gum addition on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Zeynep Ozben; Yılmaz, Ismail; Demirci, Ahmet Şukru

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of xanthan gum, guar gum, carrageenan and locust bean gum on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs. Meatball samples were produced with three different formulations including of 0.5, 1, and 1.5% each gum addition and gum added samples were compared with the control meatballs. Physical and chemical analyses were carried out on raw and cooked samples separately. Moisture contents of raw samples decreased by addition of gums. There were significant decreases (p gum when compared with control. Ash contents and texture values increased with gum addition to meatballs. Meatball redness decreased with more gum addition in raw and cooked meatball samples, which means that addition of gums resulted in a lighter-coloured product. According to sensory analysis results, locust bean gum added (1%) samples were much preferred by the panelists.

  7. Selected Physical, Chemical, and Biological Data for 30 Urbanizing Streams in the North Carolina Piedmont Ecoregion, 2002-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, E.M.; Moorman, Michelle; Cuffney, Thomas F.; McMahon, Gerard; Harned, Douglas A.

    2007-01-01

    This report provides summarized physical, chemical, and biological data collected during a study of the effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment study. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of streams across a gradient of urban intensity. Thirty sites were selected along an urbanization gradient that represents conditions in the North Carolina Piedmont ecoregion, including the cities of Raleigh, Durham, Cary, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point, Asheboro, and Oxford. Data collected included streamflow variability, stream temperature, instream chemistry, instream aquatic habitat, and collections of the algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. In addition, ancillary data describing land use, socioeconomic conditions, and urban infrastructure were compiled for each basin using a geographic information system analysis. All data were processed and summarized for analytical use and are presented in downloadable data tables, along with the methods of data collection and processing.

  8. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  9. Chemical composition and physical quality characteristics of Ghanaian cocoa beans as affected by pulp pre-conditioning and fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene; Quao, Jennifer; Takrama, Jemmy; Budu, Agnes Simpson; Saalia, Firibu Kwesi

    2013-12-01

    Investigations were conducted to evaluate the effects of pod storage (as a means of pulp preconditioning) and fermentation on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of Ghanaian cocoa beans. A 4 × 2 full factorial design with factors as pod storage (0, 7, 14, 21 days) and cocoa treatment (fermented and unfermented) were conducted. Samples were analyzed for their chemical composition (moisture, crude fat, crude protein, ash and carbohydrate content) and mineral content using standard analytical methods. The physical qualities of the beans were analyzed for their proportions of cocoa nibs, shells and germ. Fermentation and increasing pod storage resulted in significant (P cocoa beans. Proportion of cocoa nibs also increased from with increasing pod storage and fermentation whiles reductions in shell content and no appreciable changes in germ proportions were noted.

  10. Suitability of Gray Water for Hydroponic Crop Production Following Biological and Physical Chemical and Biological Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Harper, Lynn D.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Greene, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    The water present in waste streams from a human habitat must be recycled in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) to limit resupply needs and attain self-sufficiency. Plants play an important role in providing food, regenerating air, and producing purified water via transpiration. However, we have shown that the surfactants present in hygiene waste water have acute toxic effects on plant growth (Bubenheim et al. 1994; Greene et al., 1994). These phytotoxic affects can be mitigated by allowing the microbial population on the root surface to degrade the surfactant, however, a significant suppression (several days) in crop performance is experienced prior to reaching sub-toxic surfactant levels and plant recovery. An effective alternative is to stabilize the microbial population responsible for degradation of the surfactant on an aerobic bioreactor and process the waste water prior to utilization in the hydroponic solution (Wisniewski and Bubenheim, 1993). A sensitive bioassay indicates that the surfactant phytotoxicity is suppressed by more than 90% within 5 hours of introduction of the gray water to the bioreactor; processing for more than 12 hours degrades more than 99% of the phytotoxin. Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is a physical / chemical method for water purification which employees sequential distillation steps to separate water from solids and to volatilize contaminants. The solids from the waste water are concentrated in a brine and the pure product water (70 - 90% of the total waste water volume depending on operating conditions) retains non of the phytotoxic effects. Results of the bioassay were used to guide evaluations of the suitability of recovered gray water following biological and VCD processing for hydroponic lettuce production in controlled environments. Lettuce crops were grown for 28 days with 100% of the input water supplied with recovered water from the biological processor or VCD. When compared with the growth of plants

  11. Physical-chemical characteristics of an eco-friendly binder using ternary mixture of industrial wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Anh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the physical-chemical characteristics of paste and mortar with an eco-friendly binder named as SFC cement, produced by a ternary mixture of industrial waste materials of ground granulated blast furnace slag (S, Class F fly ash (FFA, and circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ash (CFA. To trigger the hydration, the CFA, which acted as an alkaline-sulfate activator, was added to the blended mixture of slag and FFA. The water to binder ratio (W/B, curing regime, and FFA addition significantly affected the engineering performances and shrinkage/expansion of the SFC pastes and mortars. The SFC mortars had higher workability than that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC. With similar workability, the SFC mortars had compressive strengths and expansions comparable to OPC mortars. The main hydration products of the hardened SFC cement were ettringite (AFt and C-S-H/C-A-S-H. The transformation of the AFt to the monosulfates was observed as the hydration time increased.Este trabajo estudia las características fisicoquímicas de pastas y morteros con un ligante eco-amigable llamado cemento SFC, producido por una mezcla ternaria de materiales a partir de residuos industriales tales como escorias granuladas de alto horno (S, ceniza volante clase F (FFA, y cenizas volantes de combustión en lecho fluidizado circulante (CFA. Para desencadenar la hidratación, el CFA que actuó como un activador alcalino-sulfato se añadió a la mezcla combinada de escoria y FFA. La relación de agua/ligante (W/B, el tipo de curado, y la adición de FFA afectaron significativamente a las prestaciones mecánicas así como a la retracción/expansión de pastas y morteros de SFC. Los morteros SFC presentaron una trabajabilidad mayor que los correspondientes de cemento de Portland (OPC. Con una trabajabilidad similar, los morteros SFC presentaron resistencias mecánicas y expansión comparables a los morteros de OPC. Los principales productos de hidratación del

  12. Preparation and Determination of the Physical and Chemical Properties of Margarine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habazin, S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is one of the most basic needs of the human body. It ensures the introduction of substances needed to sustain life of the organism, its growth and proper development. In the food pyramid, fats together with carbohydrates are at the very top. One source of fat in human nutrition is margarine. Margarine comprises at least 82 % vegetable fats and 16 % water. The remainder consists of lecithin, sugar, salt, colours, and vitamins.The margarine production process involves hydrogenation of vegetable fats, assembling the margarine mixture, emulsifying, crystallization and packing.The objective of this study was to show that margarine could be prepared in a school laboratory under conditions that are applicable for such laboratory. Meaning:a In a school laboratory at normal pressure and at elevated temperature with nickel as catalyst, i.e. without the use of an autoclave, carry out the reaction of hydrogenation soybean and palm oil in order to obtain a vegetable fat that is the basic ingredient of margarine. During the preparation of margarine, the hydrogenation reaction was carefully monitored by determining the iodine value.b Preparation of margarine obtained from vegetable fats.c Determination and comparison of selected physical and chemical properties of the product with the same properties of several types of margarines available on the market. The following properties were determined:– Melting point, in order to obtain composition of fat phase and determine suitability for humanuse.– Acid value, as an indicator of the amount of free fatty acids that influence the taste.– Peroxide value, for insight into the oxidative stability of fats.This work has shown that it is possible to make vegetable fat in a school lab by hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Unlike the industrial process of hydrogenation carried out under a pressure of 0.36 to 2 atm, which takes about two hours, our reaction was carried out at atmospheric pressure but with a

  13. Effect of solvents on the chemical and physical properties of ionic polymer-metal composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Zamani, Shahram; Tor, Yitzhak

    2006-05-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) consist of a perfluorinated ionomer membrane (usually Nafion® or Flemion®) plated on both faces with a noble metal such as gold or platinum and neutralized with a certain amount of counterions that balance the electrical charge of anions covalently fixed to the backbone ionomer. IPMCs are electroactive materials with potential applications as actuators and sensors. Their electrical-chemical-mechanical response is dependent on the cations used, the nature and the amount of solvent uptake, the morphology of the electrodes, the composition of the backbone ionomer, the geometry and boundary conditions of the composite element, and the magnitude and spatial and time variation of the applied potential. With water as the solvent, the applied electric potential must be limited to less than 1.3 V at room temperature, to avoid electrolysis. Moreover, water evaporation in open air presents additional problems. These and related factors limit the application of IPMCs with water as the solvent. We present the results of a series of tests on both Nafion- and Flemion-based IPMCs with ethylene glycol, glycerol, and crown ethers as solvents. IPMCs with these solvents have greater solvent uptake and can be subjected to relatively high voltages without electrolysis. They can be actuated in open air for rather long time periods, and at low temperatures. They may be good actuators when high-speed actuation is not necessary. In addition, their slow response in open air allows direct observation of the physical characteristics of the cathode and anode surfaces of a cantilever during actuations. This can provide additional clues for unraveling the underpinning micromechanisms of their actuation. Remarkably, solvents are found to have profound effects on the nature of the IPMCs' actuation. For example, Nafion-based IPMCs in Li+ form show very small back relaxation when hydrated, but extensive back relaxation with all other solvents that we have

  14. Relationship between soil oxidizable carbon and physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of umbric ferralsols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Adriano Marques

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Umbric Ferralsols with thick umbric epipedons (> 100 cm thickness in humid Tropical and Subtropical areas is a paradox since the processes of organic matter decomposition in these environments are very efficient. Nevertheless, this soil type has been reported in areas in the Southeast and South of Brazil, and at some places in the Northeast. Aspects of the genesis and paleoenvironmental significance of these Ferralsols still need a better understanding. The processes that made the umbric horizons so thick and dark and contributed to the preservation of organic carbon (OC at considerable depths in these soils are of special interest. In this study, eight Ferralsols with a thick umbric horizon (UF under different vegetation types were sampled (tropical rain forest, tropical seasonal forest and savanna woodland and their macromorphological, physical, chemical and mineralogical properties studied to detect soil characteristics that could explain the preservation of high carbon amounts at considerable depths. The studied UF are clayey to very clayey, strongly acidic, dystrophic, and Al-saturated and charcoal fragments are often scattered in the soil matrix. Kaolinites are the main clay minerals in the A and B horizons, followed by abundant gibbsite and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The latter was only found in UFs derived from basalt rock in the South of the country. Total carbon (TC ranged from 5 to 101 g kg-1 in the umbric epipedon. Dichromate-oxidizable organic carbon represented nearly 75 % of TC in the thick A horizons, while non-oxidizable C, which includes recalcitrant C (e.g., charcoal, contributed to the remaining 25 % of TC. Carbon contents were not related to most of the inorganic soil variables studied, except for oxalate-extractable Al, which individually explained 69 % (P < 0.001 of the variability of TC in the umbric epipedon. Clay content was not suited as predictor of TC or of the other studied C forms. Bulk

  15. Integration of an innovative biological treatment with physical or chemical disinfection for wastewater reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sanctis, Marco, E-mail: marco.desanctis@ba.irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute, CNR, Via F. De Blasio 5, 70123 Bari (Italy); Del Moro, Guido [Water Research Institute, CNR, Via F. De Blasio 5, 70123 Bari (Italy); Levantesi, Caterina; Luprano, Maria Laura [Water Research Institute, CNR, Via Salaria Km 29.600, 00015 Monterotondo, RM (Italy); Di Iaconi, Claudio [Water Research Institute, CNR, Via F. De Blasio 5, 70123 Bari (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    In the present paper, the effectiveness of a Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor (SBBGR) and its integration with different disinfection strategies (UV irradiation, peracetic acid) for producing an effluent suitable for agricultural use was evaluated. The plant treated raw domestic sewage, and its performances were evaluated in terms of the removal efficiency of a wide group of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. The SBBGR resulted really efficient in removing suspended solids, COD and nitrogen with an average effluent concentration of 5, 32 and 10 mg/L, respectively. Lower removal efficiency was observed for phosphorus with an average concentration in the effluent of 3 mg/L. Plant effluent was also characterized by an average electrical conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio of 680 μS/cm and 2.9, respectively. Therefore, according to these gross parameters, the SBBGR effluent was conformed to the national standards required in Italy for agricultural reuse. Moreover, disinfection performances of the SBBGR was higher than that of conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants and met the quality criteria suggested by WHO (Escherichia coli < 1000 CFU/100 mL) for agricultural reuse. In particular, the biological treatment by SBBGR removed 3.8 ± 0.4 log units of Giardia lamblia, 2.8 ± 0.8 log units of E. coli, 2.5 ± 0.7 log units of total coliforms, 2.0 ± 0.3 log units of Clostridium perfringens, 2.0 ± 0.4 log units of Cryptosporidium parvum and 1.7 ± 0.7 log units of Somatic coliphages. The investigated disinfection processes (UV and peracetic acid) resulted very effective for total coliforms, E. coli and somatic coliphages. In particular, a UV radiation and peracetic acid doses of 40 mJ/cm{sup 2} and 1 mg/L respectively reduced E. coli content in the effluent below the limit for agricultural reuse in Italy (10 CFU/100 mL). Conversely, they were both ineffective on C.perfringens spores. - Highlights: • SBBGR system showed high

  16. Understanding the physical and chemical properties of carbon-based granular fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, David J.

    Coal and oil have been used as fuel sources for centuries, but the way they have been used has not fundamentally changed: coal is ground into pieces then burned, and oil is distilled into various liquid fractions that are then burned. This dissertation explores newer methods of utilizing those fuel sources. Coal gasification is the process where coal is heated in a low oxygen environment so that the solid carbon is converted into a mixture of gaseous products. But some aspects of gasification, such as the role of catalysts and the structural evolution of coal particles throughout the reaction, remain unclear. These aspects were studied by analyzing, ex situ, the physical and chemical changes of coal feedstock samples extracted from a fluidized bed gasifier at various times throughout gasification. The changes in feed particle composition and size distribution composition showed that the gasification reaction rate was slower than the gas diffusion rates inside the coal particle at a typical catalytic gasification temperature of 800oC. Detailed composition analysis of samples with and without added catalyst showed that the catalyst increased the overall reaction rate by promoting the dissociative oxidation of the coal by gas phase oxidants, which provided more active sites for carbon-carbon bond breakage. The conclusions drawn from studying the feedstock can be combined with the data from in situ analysis of the gasification reactor to provide a fuller picture of the gasification process. Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a carbonaceous solid produced during oil distillation. Though petcoke could be an important energy source, its use is hindered by practical and environmental concerns. Producing a slurry with petcoke and water has been studied as an alternative method for utilizing petcoke, but the effective use of petcoke slurries requires that they have low viscosity while remaining stable against settling of the particles due to gravity. These rheological properties

  17. Growth of thick MgB{sub 2} films by impinging-jet hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamborn, D.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wilke, R.H.T.; Li, Q. [Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xi, X. [Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16801 (United States); Snyder, D.W. [Applied Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Redwing, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16801 (United States)

    2008-01-18

    Thick MgB{sub 2} films are grown using a novel impinging-jet hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition process. An increased amount of the boron source gas generates high growth rates. Superconducting properties of the thick films are comparable to previous results from other processes, which indicate that this is a promising new process for MgB{sub 2} deposition for coated conductor applications, such as wires and tapes for MRI magnets. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Effect of pineapple cropping on soil chemical and physical changes in Tha-yang soil series, Petchaburi province

    OpenAIRE

    Isuwan, A.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of pineapple cropping on chemical and physical property changes of Tha-yang soil series, located on Tumbon Nong-ya-plong, Amphor Nong-yaplong,Petchaburi province. The experimental treatments were the different pineapple cropping soil ages arranged in a completely randomized design, consisting of undisturbed soil (year 0) and pineapple croppingsoil ages of 1, 4 and 8 years with 4 replications each. Soil samples were separated according to ...

  19. Extraction of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from anaerobic granular sludges: comparison of chemical and physical extraction protocols

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted with nine different extraction protocols from four different types of anaerobic granular sludge were studied. The efficiency of four physical (sonication, heating, cationic exchange resin (CER), and CER associated with sonication) and four chemical (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, ethanol, formaldehyde combined with heating, or NaOH) EPS extraction methods was compared to a control extraction protocols (i.e., centr...

  20. Note: Reaction of bacteria associated with fish spoilage to chemical and physical stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirby, R.; Silva, da M.; Capell, C.; Vaz-Pires, P.; Luten, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    A cocktail made up of six bacteria isolated from fish was subjected to various heats (30 °C and 60 °C, 20 s) and chemical preservative stresses, alone and in combination. The chemical preservatives tested were potassium sorbate (PS, 1Œ trisodium phosphate (TSP, 10€and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP

  1. Chemical and physical processes for integrated temperature control in microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Rosanne M.; Dodge, Arash; Van Dedem, Gijs W. K.; De Rooij, Nico F.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are a promising new tool for studying and optimizing (bio)chemical reactions and analyses. Many (bio)chemical reactions require accurate temperature control, such as for example thermocycling for PCR. Here, a new integrated temperature control system for microfluidic devices is

  2. The effect of physical and chemical treatment on nano-zeolite characterization and their performance in dimethyl ether preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa M. Solyman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME was investigated using physically and chemically modified H-Mordenite and H-Beta zeolites as catalysts. Physical modification was carried out using ultrasonic wave’s energy, while chemical modification was performed through impregnation in aluminum nitrate followed by calcination. The produced solid catalysts were evaluated as selective catalysts for the dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether at 100–250 °C performed at three different contact times. Chemical and structural characterizations of the solid catalysts were identified using XRD, FT-IR, TEM, SEM and NH3-TPD. Ultrasonication physical mixing of solids proved as useful tool of preparation, producing fine reordered crystals of nanocomposite zeolites with novel morphology. The newly ordered crystals were distinguished by their frame work structure, acidic properties, crystal and particle sizes, unit cell volume, pore opening, and favorable catalytic activity of 100% selectivity to DME at 200 °C for all contact times studied. The effects of Al2O3 on the dispersion and interaction within the nano-zeolite crystals and hence on the catalytic dehydration of methanol were verified as the major influence toward utmost selectivity.

  3. Stone crayfish in the Czech Republic: how does its population density depend on basic chemical and physical properties of water?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlach P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The stone crayfish (Austropotamobius torrentium Schrank is one of the two native crayfish species in the Czech Republic. The populations as well as physical and chemical parameters of water (pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, undissolved particles, NH3, NH4+, NO2−, NO3−, phosphorus, Ca2+ and SO42 −  of 33 streams were examined to find the ecological plasticity of this crayfish and some relations between these parameters and population densities. The mentioned parameters often significantly varied at the sites. Two approaches were applied to find relations between these parameters and observed abundance. At first, the observed streams were compared using RDA (streams  ×  physical-chemical parameters. No significance was found while testing relationship between the streams grouped along the 1st axis of model and the observed abundances of stone crayfish. However, some correlations between abundance and conductivity, calcium, nitrates and sulphates were found using polynomial regression. These relationships are explicable in terms of mutual correlations, underlying geology and other factors which affect abundances. In conclusion, A. torrentium is able to inhabit waters with a large range of physical and chemical parameters of the water without any fundamental influence on population densities. Water properties play an indisputable role as limiting ecological factors at uncommon concentrations, but population densities are probably influenced much more by the types of habitats, habitat features, predation and other ecological factors.

  4. Physical and chemical properties of selected agricultural byproduct-based activated carbons and their ability to adsorb geosmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chilton; Losso, Jack N; Marshall, Wayne E; Rao, Ramu M

    2002-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate selected physical and chemical properties of agricultural byproduct-based activated carbons made from pecan shells and sugarcane bagasse, and compare those properties to a commercial coal-based activated carbon as well as to compare the adsorption efficiency of these carbons for geosmin. Comparison of the physical and chemical properties of pecan shell- and bagasse-based carbons to the commercial carbon, Calgon Filtrasorb 400, showed that pecan shell carbon, but not the bagasse carbon, compared favorably to Filtrasorb 400, especially in terms of surface area, bulk density, ash and attrition. A carbon dosage study done in a model system showed the amount of geosmin adsorbed to be greater for Filtrasorb 400 and the bagasse-based carbon at low carbon concentrations than for the pecan shell carbons, but geosmin adsorption was similar in all carbons at higher carbon dosages. Application of the Freundlich isotherm model to the adsorption data showed that carbons made by steam activation of pecan shells or sugarcane bagasse had geosmin adsorption characteristics most like those of the commercial carbon. In terms of physical, chemical and adsorptive properties, steam-activated pecan shell carbon most resembled the commercial carbon and has the potential to replace Filtrasorb 400 in applications involving removal of geosmin from aqueous environments.

  5. Effect of pineapple cropping on soil chemical and physical changes in Tha-yang soil series, Petchaburi province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuwan, A.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of pineapple cropping on chemical and physical property changes of Tha-yang soil series, located on Tumbon Nong-ya-plong, Amphor Nong-yaplong,Petchaburi province. The experimental treatments were the different pineapple cropping soil ages arranged in a completely randomized design, consisting of undisturbed soil (year 0 and pineapple croppingsoil ages of 1, 4 and 8 years with 4 replications each. Soil samples were separated according to the soil level, namely Top-soil (0-15 cm. and Sub-soil (15-30 cm. for chemical and physical evaluation. The results showedthat soil chemical properties such as pH, OM, CEC, exchangeable Ca and Mg were decreased significantly (in both Top- and Sub-soil level, whereas available P and S were increased significantly in the 4-year soilsamples when compared with undisturbed soil. However, soil physical properties were not significantly different among cropping age treatments, except for clay particle in Top-soil which increased in the 4-year soil samples when compared with the 1-year soil samples and undisturbed soil. The results revealed thatpineapple cropping notably reduced soil fertility. As a result, soil resource management and plant nutrient management strategies must be carefully planned and implemented for sustainable pineapple production.

  6. Chemical and physical transformations of aluminosilicate clay minerals due to acid treatment and consequences for heterogeneous ice nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Sarah K; Schill, Gregory P; Lyktey, Nicholas A; Veghte, Daniel P; Tolbert, Margaret A; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-09-25

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the largest contributors to global ice nuclei, but physical and chemical processing of dust during atmospheric transport can alter its ice nucleation activity. In particular, several recent studies have noted that sulfuric and nitric acids inhibit heterogeneous ice nucleation in the regime below liquid water saturation in aluminosilicate clay minerals. We have exposed kaolinite, KGa-1b and KGa-2, and montmorillonite, STx-1b and SWy-2, to aqueous sulfuric and nitric acid to determine the physical and chemical changes that are responsible for the observed deactivation. To characterize the changes to the samples upon acid treatment, we use X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. We find that the reaction of kaolinite and montmorillonite with aqueous sulfuric acid results in the formation of hydrated aluminum sulfate. In addition, sulfuric and nitric acids induce large structural changes in montmorillonite. We additionally report the supersaturation with respect to ice required for the onset of ice nucleation for these acid-treated species. On the basis of lattice spacing arguments, we explain how the chemical and physical changes observed upon acid treatment could lead to the observed reduction in ice nucleation activity.

  7. Increasing significance of advanced physical/chemical processes in the development and application of sustainable wastewater treatment systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wim RULKENS

    2008-01-01

    The awareness of the problem of the scarcity of water of high quality has strongly changed the approach of wastewater treatment. Currently, there is an increasing need for the beneficial reuse of treated wastewater and to recover valuable products and energy from the wastewater. Because microbiological treatment methods are, only to a limited part, able to satisfy these needs, the role and significance of physical/chemical pro-cesses in wastewater treatment are gaining more and more interest. The specific future role and aim of the various physical/chemical treatment processes can be categorized in five groups: improvement of the perform-ance of microbiological treatment processes, achieve-ment of the high quality required for reuse of the effluent, recovery of valuable components and energy from the wastewater for beneficial reuse, desalination of brackish water and seawater, and treatment of con-centrated liquid or solid waste residues produced in a wastewater treatment process. Development of more environmentally sustainable wastewater treatment chains in which physical/chemical processes play a cru-cial role, also requires application of process control and modeling strategies. This is briefly introduced by the elaboration of treatment scenarios for three specific wastewaters.

  8. Study of Meat Physical-Chemical Composition of Three Trout Breeds Farmed in Salmonid Exploitations from Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Emilian NISTOR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For all trout breeds, especially regarding brown trout, data from local and foreign literature consulted are less conclusive and sometimes controversial in terms of physical-chemical composition of trout meat, so our research represents a first for Romanian literature and aims to bring new information to enrich it.Our research aimed to evaluate the physical-chemical composition of the meat gathered from brook, rainbow and brown trout breed, by analyzing 50 individuals, 10 individuals in each batch (F1, F2, C1 C2 and I1, from two trout farms from Moldova, being determine the pH of meat, dry matter, content in proteins, lipids, ash and water/protein ratio for all three trout breeds. The obtained values for pH at warm ranged between 6.91 at batch F1, and 7.09 for batch I1. As regarding the pH at cold, this one had and descendant evolution ranging between: 6.78 for trout from batch F1 respectively a value of 6.88 for individuals from batch I1. The obtained values were between 23.95 and 27.12 for dry matter. Content in proteins recorded the best values (19.21% at individuals from batch F2, and content in lipids oscillated between 4.14% and 5.62%. The obtained values regarding physical-chemical composition highlighted that all trout breeds have a good nutritional value.

  9. Influence of physical and chemical factors during foraging and culture of the symbiont fungus in Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANDRA S. VERZA; LUIZ C. FORTI; JULIANE F. S. LOPES; ROBERTO S.CAMARGO; CARLOS A. O. MATOS

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of physical and chemical factors on transport and use of substrate for Atta sexdens rubropilosa workers. Three types of rectangular fragments were used to study the physical influence factors: filter paper with paraffin, filter paper without paraffin and polyester film. To study the chemical factors, some fragments were impregnated with organic extract of orange albedo, others were soaked with soybean oil and for the remaining ones nothing was applied. The following parameters were evaluated: (i) attractiveness of substrate for transport and number of loading workers per treatment; (ii) foraged material incorporation; (iii) rejection by numbers of fragments deposited in the garbage or beside the fungus garden. All the polyester film fragments carried out to the fungus garden were subsequently rejected. We verified that chemical factors of the substrate were more quickly detected by the workers, whereas physical factors were used as a criterion in the decision-making to reject or accept the substrate collected:

  10. Rapid Hydrogen Peroxide release from the coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding and in response to chemical and physical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoza-Zvuloni, Rachel; Schneider, Avi; Sher, Daniel; Shaked, Yeala

    2016-02-15

    Corals make use of different chemical compounds during interactions with prey, predators and aggressors. Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is produced and released by a wide range of organisms as part of their defense against grazers or pathogens. In coral reefs, the large fluxes and relatively long half-life of H2O2, make it a potentially important info-chemical or defense molecule. Here we describe a previously unstudied phenomenon of rapid H2O2 release from the reef-building coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding on zooplankton and in response to chemical and physical stimuli. Following stimuli, both symbiotic and bleached corals were found to rapidly release H2O2 to the surrounding water for a short period of time (few minutes). The H2O2 release was restricted to the site of stimulus, and an increase in physical stress and chemical stimuli concentration resulted in elevated H2O2 release. Omission of calcium (a key regulator of exocytotic processes) from the experimental medium inhibited H2O2 release. Hence we suggest that H2O2 is actively released in response to stimuli, rather than leaking passively from the coral tissue. We estimate that at the site of stimulus H2O2 can reach concentrations potentially high enough to deter predators or motile, potentially pathogenic, bacteria.

  11. Investigation of chemical and physical properties of carbon nanotubes and their effects on cell biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used for a variety of applications from nanocircuits, to hydrogen storage devices, and from designing optical fibers to forming conductive plastics. Recently, their functionalization with biomolecules led to exciting biological and biomedical applications in drug delivery or bioimaging. However, because of CNTs interactions with biological systems and their ability to translocate and persist into the circulatory and lymphatic systems and biological tissues, concerns about CNTs intrinsic toxicity have risen. It is thus necessary to develop and implement sensitive analysis technologies that allow investigation of CNTs toxicity upon uptake into a biological system. This thesis provides a comprehensive guide of experiments that have been performed during my Ph.D. tenure at West Virginia University in the Department of Chemical Engineering, in the group of Prof. Cerasela Zoica Dinu. Briefly: Chapter one presents a systematic study of the CNTs physical and chemical properties and how these properties are changed upon exposure to chemical agents normally used during their cleaning and purification processes. Also, this chapter shows how acid oxidation treatment leads to improved CNTs biocompatibility. Specifically, by incubating CNTs in a strong acid mixture we created a user-defined library of CNTs samples with different characteristics as recorded using Raman energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, or solubility tests. Systematically characterized CNTs were subsequently tested for their biocompatibility in relation to human epithelial cells or enzymes. Such selected examples are building pertinent relationships between CNTs biocompatibility and their intrinsic properties by showing that acid oxidation treatment lowers CNTs toxicity making CNTs feasible platforms to be used for biomedical applications or the next generation of biosensors. (Publication: Chenbo Dong, Alan S Campell, Reem Eldawud, Gabriela Perhinschi, and

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  13. Literature review of physical and chemical pretreatment processes for lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, P.F.H.; Huijgen, W.; Bermudez, L.; Bakker, R.

    2010-01-01

    Different pretreatment technologies published in public literature are described in terms of the mechanisms involved, advantages and disadvantages, and economic assessment. Pretreatment technologies for lignocellulosic biomass include biological, mechanical, chemical methods and various combinations

  14. Optical, physical and chemical characteristics of Australian continental aerosols: results from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radhi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the major components of the world's aerosol mix, having a number of impacts within the Earth system. However, the climate forcing impact of mineral dust is currently poorly constrained, with even its sign uncertain. As Australian deserts are more reddish than those in the Northern Hemisphere, it is important to better understand the physical, chemical and optical properties of this important aerosol. We have investigated the properties of Australian desert dust at a site in SW Queensland, which is strongly influenced by both dust and biomass burning aerosol.

    Three years of ground-based monitoring of spectral optical thickness has provided a statistical picture of gross aerosol properties. The aerosol optical depth data showed a clear though moderate seasonal cycle with an annual mean of 0.06 ± 0.03. The Angstrom coefficient showed a stronger cycle, indicating the influence of the winter-spring burning season in Australia's north. AERONET size distributions showed a generally bimodal character, with the coarse mode assumed to be mineral dust, and the fine mode a mixture of fine dust, biomass burning and marine biogenic material.

    In November 2006 we undertook a field campaign which collected 4 sets of size-resolved aerosol samples for laboratory analysis – ion beam analysis and ion chromatography. Ion beam analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of all filter samples, although elemental ratios were considered the most reliable output. Scatter plots showed that Fe, Al and Ti were well correlated with Si, and Co reasonably well correlated with Si, with the Fe/Al ratio somewhat higher than values reported from Northern Hemisphere sites (as expected. Scatter plots for Ca, Mn and K against Si showed clear evidence of a second population, which in some cases could be identified with a particular sample day or size fraction. These data may be used to attempt to build a signature of soil in this

  15. Physical and chemical characteristics of Terrace Reservoir, Conejos County, Colorado, May 1994 through May 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogner, Robert W.; Edelmann, Patrick; Walton-Day, Katherine

    1997-01-01

    Terrace Reservoir receives drainage of low-pH, metal-enriched water from mineralized areas, including the Summitville Mine, within the AlamosaRiver Basin. Drainage from the Summitville Mine has contributed a substantial part of the metal load to Terrace Reservoir. From May 1994 through May 1995, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of Terrace Reservoir.Terrace Reservoir was thermally stratified from about mid-May through August 1994. Thermal stratification was absent from September\\x111994through March 1995. During periods of stratification, underflow of the Alamosa River was predominant, and residence times of the underflow were shortened by 40 to 75\\x11percent of the theoretical residence times for a well-mixed reservoir. Transport and deposition of suspended solids in Terrace Reservoir varied spatially and temporally. Most of the suspended solids were deposited in Terrace Reservoir. The concentration of dissolved oxygen in the reservoir varied little spatially or temporally and generally was within a few tenths of the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the inflow. The pH of water in the reservoir generally ranged from about 4.0 to about 7.0, depending on date, depth, and location. The largest pH values were measured during May. A markeddecrease of about 1.5\\x11pH units occurred at site T5 in the reservoir about mid-June. The pH of the reservoir remained at or below 5.5 from mid-June through November. Dissolved-metal concentrations varied spatially and temporally in response to several factors, which included inflow characteristics, reservoir stratification and mixing, inflow-routing and flow-through patterns, residence times, sedimentation, dissolved oxygen, and pH.Inflow chemistry is the dominant controlling factor of metal chemistry within Terrace Reservoir.During periods of stratification, large vertical variations in metal

  16. PREPARATION OF CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CONJUGATES OF SELF-ASSEMBLING NANOPARTICLES WITH CELL-PENETRATING PEPTIDE AND DOXORUBICIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhadyra Sagykyzy Shagyrova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Nano-sized carriers can help to reduce toxicity and improve clinical efficacy of drugs. Virus-like particles (VLPs are biocompatible and biodegradable self-assembling nanoparticles, which show great promise as carriers for substances for targeted delivery and controlled release. Either chemical conjugation of physical incorporation without formation of covalent bonds is possible to load substances of interest into VLPs.Objectives: To produce VLPs from recombinant viral capsid protein (HBcAg and test feasibility of methods of formation of chemical and physical conjugates of VLPs with substances of pharmacological interest.Methods: Virus-like particles composed from recombinant hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg were produced by recombinant expression in E.coli and purified by successive centrifugation through sucrose gradients. Peptide transportan 10 was synthesized and used for carbodiimide (EDC-mediated conjugation to VLPs. Doxorubicin (DOX was loaded into the nucleic acid-containing VLPs to form physical conjugate.Results: VLPs with chemically attached moieties of cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 were produced. The conjugate was examined in SDS-PAGE to confirm presence of conjugation products. Conjugation efficiency (molar ration peptide/protein in the conjugate reaches 0.5:1 (i.e. 50% of protein chains have one attached peptide moiety. The nucleic acid-containing VLPs can be loaded with the DOX forming stable non-covalent physical conjugate.Conclusion: Recombinantly expressed VLPs allow easy attaching of small molecules making them a convenient platform to develop drug carriers.

  17. Physical vs. Chemical Weathering Controls of Soils' Capacity to Store Carbon: Hillslope Transects under Different Climatic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Wackett, A.; Amundson, R.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Soil C storage is balanced by photosynthetic production and microbial decomposition of organic matter (OM). Recently, this view has been expanded to account for the effects of physical erosion of OM in determining soil C storage. In parallel, the focus on OM quality as a primary determinant of C turnover has shifted to OM-mineral interactions. These recent advances necessitates our ability to discern how physical erosion, which controls the production, breakdown, and removal of colluvial soils, and chemical weathering, which generates secondary phyllosilicate and iron oxides, independently and collaboratively affect soils' capacity to store C. Here we present soil organic C contents and storages as a function of soil properties that are controlled by physical vs. chemical weathering processes. The study site includes two hillslopes under different climates in SW Australia. The wetter site has continuous canopy of eucalyptus, while the drier site is covered by grasses with scattered eucalyptus overstorey. The two hillslope transects share similar granodiorite parent materials and denudation rates. Bioturbation-driven soil creep appears equally effective at both sites. In eroding areas, chemical weathering has created greater mineral surface area in the soils of wetter site, while physical soil production and erosion resulted in forming the eroding soils of similar thicknesses at both sites. In the drier site, however, vegetation density varies significantly with topography-dependent soil moisture, which appears to have resulted in a soil toposequence where impacts of localized overland-flow erosion is evident through soil mineral surface area, texture, and C contents. These soil properties, in contrast, are largely homogeneous across the wetter hillslope transect presumably because of the lack of localized overland-flow erosion. As a result, at the depositional areas, the drier site exhibits greater or similar soil C storages, which sharply contrasts with the

  18. Effects of a Wildfire on Selected Physical, Chemical and Biochemical Soil Properties in a Pinus massoniana Forest in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xue

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pinus massoniana forests bordering South China are often affected by wildfires. Fires cause major changes in soil properties in many forest types but little is known about the effects of fire on soil properties in these P. massoniana forests. Such knowledge is important for providing a comprehensive understanding of wildfire effects on soil patterns and for planning appropriate long-term forest management in these forests. Changes in soil physical properties, carbon, nutrients, and enzymes were investigated in a P. massoniana forest along a wildfire-induced time span consisting of an unburned soil, and soils 0, one, four, and seven years post-fire. Soil (0–10 cm was collected from burned and unburned sites immediately and one, four, and seven years after a wildfire. The wildfire effects on soil physical and chemical properties and enzyme activities were significantly different among treatment variation, time variation, and treatment-by-time interaction. Significant short-term effects on soil physical, chemical, and biological properties were found, which resulted in a deterioration of soil physical properties by increasing soil bulk density and decreasing macropores and capillary moisture. Soil pH increased significantly in the soil one-year post-fire. Carbon, total nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, and available N and P increased significantly immediately and one year after the wildfire and decreased progressively to concentrations lower than in the unburned soil. Total potassium (K and exchangeable K increased immediately after the wildfire and then continuously decreased along the burned time-span. Urease, acid phosphatase, and catalase activities significantly decreased compared to those in the unburned soil. In fire-prone P. massoniana forests, wildfires may significantly influence soil physical properties, carbon, nutrients, and enzyme activity.

  19. Morphological, physical and chemical evaluation of the Vascugraft arterial prosthesis: comparison of a novel polyurethane device with other microporous structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; King, M W; Guidoin, R; Therrien, M; Pezolet, M; Adnot, A; Ukpabi, P; Vantal, M H

    1994-06-01

    In this study the morphology, physical properties, surface chemical characteristics and microstructure of the Vascugraft arterial prosthesis have been investigated. This is a novel microporous polyurethane device, recently developed by the company Braun-Melsungen AG in Germany for use as a small calibre arterial substitute. This comparative study included two other synthetic grafts: the Mitrathane prosthesis, a hydrophilic prototype polyetherurethane urea graft with closed internal pores, and the commercially successful expanded polytetrafluoroethylene reinforced Goretex prosthesis with an open microporous structure. The Vascugraft prosthesis contains a network of fused microfibres of varying thickness and orientation which provide open and communicating pores similar in size to those in the Goretex material. In addition, they extend from one side of the graft wall to the other. As well as having superior longitudinal and radial compliance to the reinforced Goretex device, the Vascugraft prosthesis has more than adequate bursting and suture retention strengths. Through the use of contact angle measurements, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and molecular weight analysis by size exclusion chromatography, the surface of the Vascugraft prosthesis has been shown to be uniquely hydrophobic, as well as containing carbonate groups within an aliphatic polyesterurethane polymer. In addition, variations in micro-phase separation structure of hard and soft segment domains between different sizes and batches of product are marginal. Because of the interesting physical and chemical properties, it is recommended that in vitro biocompatibility and biostability studies be undertaken prior to using the prosthesis in animal or clinical trials.

  20. Soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period: influence on soil chemical and physical properties and on sugarcane productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roniram Pereira da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The planting of diversified crops during the sugarcane fallow period can improve the chemical and physical properties and increase the production potential of the soil for the next sugarcane cycle. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period on soil chemical and physical properties and productivity after the first sugarcane harvest. The experiment was conducted in two areas located in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil (21º 14' 05'' S, 48º 17' 09'' W with two different soil types, namely: an eutroferric Red Latosol (RLe with high-clay texture (clay content = 680 g kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol (RLa with clayey texture (clay content = 440 g kg-1. A randomized block design with five replications and four treatments (crop sequences was used. The crop sequences during the sugarcane fallow period were soybean/millet/soybean, soybean/sunn hemp/soybean, soybean/fallow/soybean, and soybean. Soil use was found not to affect chemical properties and sugarcane productivity of RLe or RLa. The soybean/millet/soybean sequence improved aggregation in the acric Latosol.

  1. Field Trial Assessment of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Responses of Soil to Tillage Intensity, Fertilization, and Grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Gil, Silvina; Becker, Analia; Oddino, Claudio; Zuza, Mónica; Marinelli, Adriana; March, Guillermo

    2009-08-01

    Soil microbial populations can fluctuate in response to environmental changes and, therefore, are often used as biological indicators of soil quality. Soil chemical and physical parameters can also be used as indicators because they can vary in response to different management strategies. A long-term field trial was conducted to study the effects of different tillage systems (NT: no tillage, DH: disc harrow, and MP: moldboard plough), P fertilization (diammonium phosphate), and cattle grazing (in terms of crop residue consumption) in maize ( Zea mays L.), sunflower ( Heliantus annuus L.), and soybean ( Glycine max L.) on soil biological, chemical, and physical parameters. The field trial was conducted for four crop years (2000/2001, 2001/2002, 2002/2003, and 2003/2004). Soil populations of Actinomycetes, Trichoderma spp., and Gliocladium spp. were 49% higher under conservation tillage systems, in soil amended with diammonium phosphate (DAP) and not previously grazed. Management practices also influenced soil chemical parameters, especially organic matter content and total N, which were 10% and 55% higher under NT than under MP. Aggregate stability was 61% higher in NT than in MP, 15% higher in P-fertilized soil, and also 9% higher in not grazed strips, bulk density being 12% lower in NT systems compared with MP. DAP application and the absence of grazing also reduced bulk density (3%). Using conservation tillage systems, fertilizing crops with DAP, and avoiding grazing contribute to soil health preservation and enhanced crop production.

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  5. Correlation of Chemical and Physical Test Data for the Environmental Ageing of Tefzel (ETFE). Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, G. J.; Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    In a similar approach to that used for the previously issued correlation report for Coflon (CAPP/M.10), this report aims to identify any correlations between mechanical property changes and chemical/morphological changes for Tefzel, using information supplied in other MERL and TRI project reports. Differences identified with Coflon behaviour will be of scientific interest as well as appropriate to project applications, as Tefzel and Coflon are chemical isomers. Owing to the considerable chemical resistance of Tefzel, much of its testing so far has been based on mechanical properties. Where changes have occurred, chemical analysis can now be targeted more effectively. Relevant test data collated here include: tensile modulus and related properties, permeation coefficients, % crystallinity, some crack growth resistance measurements, and other observations where significant. Fluids based on methanol and amine (Fluid G), a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide gases plus an aqueous amine solution (Fluid F), and an aromatic oil mix of heptane, cyclohexane, toluene and 1-propanol (Fluid I) have affected Tefzel to varying degrees, and are discussed in some detail herein.

  6. Correlation of Chemical and Physical Test Data for the Environmental Ageing of Tefzel (ETFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, G. J.; Campion, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    In a similar approach to that used for the previously issued correlation report for Coflon (CAPP/M.10), this report aims to identify any correlations between mechanical property changes and chemical/morphological changes for Tefzel, using information supplied in other MERL and TRI project reports (plus latest data which will be included in final reports for Phase 1). Differences identified with Coflon behaviour will be of scientific interest as well as appropriate to project applications, as Tefzel and Coflon are chemical isomers. Owing to the considerable chemical resistance of Tefzel, much of its testing so far has been based on mechanical properties. Where changes have occurred, chemical analysis can now be targeted more effectively. Relevant test data collated here include: tensile modulus and related properties, permeation coefficients, % crystallinity, and other observations where significant. Fluids based on methanol and amine (Fluid G), a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide gases plus an aqueous amine solution (Fluid F), and an aromatic oil mix of heptane, cyclohexane, toluene and I-propanol (Fluid 1) have affected Tefzel to varying degrees, and are discussed in some detail herein.

  7. Physical and chemical properties of dust produced in a N2-CH4 RF plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouni, F.; Adande, G.; Thissen, R.; Alcouffe, G.; Szopa, C.; Schmitz-Afonso, I.; Laprévote, O.; Quirico, E.; Brissaud, O.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.

    2008-09-01

    Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated using a Capacitively Coupled Plasma discharge produced in a N2-CH4 mixture. The produced solid particles are analysed ex-situ. Chemical properties are deduced from: elemental composition, FTIR and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Optical properties are deduced from reflectivity in visible and IR range.

  8. Control of Chemical Equilibrium by Solvent: A Basis for Teaching Physical Chemistry of Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Craig, Colleen F.; Fialkov, Yuriy; Prezhdo, Victor V.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates that the solvent present in a system can highly alter and control the chemical equilibrium of a system. The results show that the dipole moment and polarizibility of a system can be highly altered by using different mixed solvents.

  9. Physical, microscopic and chemical characterisation of industrial rye and wheat brans from the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal-Eldin, A; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies show inverse relationship between intake of wholegrain cereals and several chronic diseases. Components and mechanisms behind possible protective effects of wholegrain cereals are poorly understood. Objective: To characterise commercial rye bran preparations, c...... variation in the chemical composition of industrially produced rye brans calls for the need of standardisation of this commodity, especially when used as a functional ingredient in foods....

  10. Chemical and physical properties of Paulownia elongata biochar modified with oxidants for horticultural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of biochar with oxidants such as acids and hydrogen peroxide has been shown to alter porosity, increase adsorption of chemicals, and introduce functional groups on the biochar surfaces, all of which are desirable for their use in horticultural applications. Biochar was produced from the py...

  11. Chemical and physical analyses of firn and firn air : from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaspers, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Important information about the past global climate is preserved in the Antarctic ice. This information becomes available from studying ice cores, where the change in the chemical composition of the past atmosphere is stored. Although ice cores can provide valuable information over a large time spa

  12. Physical Chemistry for the Chemical and Biological Sciences (by Raymond Chang)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, Andrew

    2001-05-01

    This book does offer an alternative approach to physical chemistry that is particularly well suited for those who want to pursue a course of study more focused on the biological sciences. It could also be an excellent choice for schools that mainly serve preprofessional programs or for schools that have split physical chemistry tracks to independently serve the B.S. and B.A. degrees. Since the book focuses on single-variable mathematics, schools that require only one year of calculus for their chemistry degree could also think about adopting it. However, in general, the use of the text as a drop-in replacement for physical chemistry for the B.S. degree is questionable owing to its lack of focus on quantum mechanics and its implications for spectroscopy.

  13. Effect of chemical and physical doping with iodine on the optical and dielectric properties of poly(vinyl chloride)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghamaz, N. A.; Ghaly, H. A.

    2016-03-01

    Iodination of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was prepared by addition of I2 or I- through physical adsorption and chemical modification techniques forming (PVC-I2) (composite I) and (PVC-I-) (composite II), respectively. Investigations were performed using TGA, DSC, FTIR, UV-vis absorbance analyses and ac conductivity measurements. The activation energy of decomposition, ΔEd, was found to be 215.15 kJ/mole and 43.1 kJ/mole for PVC and composite II, respectively. Both direct and indirect optical transitions near the absorption edge are observed. Addition of I2 or I- decreases the optical energy gap for PVC. The chemical replacement of Cl- ion in PVC matrix with I- ion in composite II increases the electrical conductivity by two orders. A possible conduction mechanisms are suggested.

  14. Effects of chemical-physical pre-treatment processes on hemp fibres for reinforcement of composites and textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Thygesen, Anders; Bohn, Vibeke

    2006-01-01

    Retted hemp fibres were treated using chemical-physical pre-treatments and the material was characterised chemically in order to evaluate the effect of the pre-treatments, respectively, wet oxidation (WO), hydrothermal treatment (HT) and steam explosion (STEX). Process variables were addition...... of base and oxidant. These treatments were performed to make fibres that are useful as reinforcement in composite materials and for textiles. All pre-treatments tested increased the content of cellulose in the fibres by degrading and dissolving non-cell wall material (NCWM, e.g., pectin and waxes), lignin......, the pre-treatments gave fibre colours ranging from white to dark brown. Alkaline wet oxidation produced the brightest fibres with potential for use in textiles. Use of retted fibres in the pre-treatment resulted in fibres with high cellulose content (86-90%) of potential as reinforcement in composite...

  15. Characterization of traditional Istrian dry-cured ham by means of physical and chemical analyses and volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Nives; Petrović, Marinko; Vidaček, Sanja; Petrak, Tomislav; Medić, Helga

    2011-08-01

    The aroma-active compounds of Istrian dry-cured ham were investigated by using headspace-solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Samples of biceps femoris were also evaluated by measuring physical and chemical characteristics: moisture, protein, fat, ash and NaCl content, a(w) value; colour: L*, a*, b* and oxidation of fat: TBARS test. About 50 volatile compounds were identified and quantified which belonged to several classes of chemical: 5 alcohols, 8 aldehydes, 7 alkanes, 1 ketone, 2 esters, 9 monoterpenes and 15 sesquiterpenes. Except volatile compounds derived from lipolysis and proteolysis the most abundant constituents were terpenes (62.97; 41.43%) that originate from spices added in the salting phase of the production process.

  16. RESEARCH OF UV-PROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF FERULIC ACID AS PART OF OINTMENT COMPOSITIONS WITH DIFFERENT PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Abisalova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetics with the ability to neutralize harmful influence of ultraviolet rays on skin are quite in demand. UV filters in creams composition are divided into two groups: physical and chemical. Antioxidants are used as chemical UV filters. The article presents the results of ferulic acid testing as UV filter in ointment bases with lipophile, hydrophile and lipophilic and hydrophilic properties. The dependence of ferulic acid efficiency from the base type where it was applied was established. The results received are correlated with data about release rate of ferulic acid received in vitro. Ointment bases with such emulsifiers as cetyl alcohol, base emulsifier and Olivem 1000 have the most signified UV protective effect of ferulic acid.

  17. Influence of thermal pretreatment on physical and chemical properties of kitchen waste and the efficiency of anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yiying; Li, Yangyang; Li, Jinhui

    2016-09-15

    The effects of thermal pretreatment at moderate temperatures (70, 80 and 90 °C) and high temperatures (120, 140 and 160 °C) over heating durations of 10-120 min on the physical and chemical properties of kitchen waste and on anaerobic digestion were investigated. The results show that thermal pretreatment significantly enhances the solubilisation of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand, crude proteins, crude fats and volatile fatty acids) and their biodegradability during subsequent anaerobic digestion. High temperature and long heating duration are beneficial for the release and reduction of organic compounds, and the efficiency of subsequent anaerobic digestion is improved markedly under these conditions. Moreover, both the methane production rate and methane yield were observed to increase significantly at moderate treatment temperatures when the anaerobic digestion time was longer than 50 h.

  18. Using ANN to predict E. coli accumulation in coves based on interaction amongst various physical, chemical and biological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Mohanty, B. P.; Lesikar, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    The accumulation of Escherichia Coli (E. coli) in canals, coves and streams is the result of a number of interacting processes operating at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Fate and transport of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by different physical, chemical, and biological processes. Various models developed to quantify each of these processes occurring at different scales are not so far pooled into a single predictive model. At present, very little is known about the fate and transport of E. coli in the environment. We hypothesize that E. coli population heterogeneity in canals and coves is affected by physical factors (average stream width and/ depth, secchi depth, flow and flow severity, day since precipitation, aquatic vegetation, solar radiation, dissolved and total suspended solids etc.); chemical factors (basic water quality, nutrients, organic compounds, pH, and toxicity etc.); and biological factors (type of bacterial strain, predation, and antagonism etc.). The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) examine the interactions between E. coli and various coupled physical, chemical and biological factors; (2) examine the interactions between E. coli and toxic organic pollutants and other pathogens (viruses); and (3) evaluate qualitatively the removal efficiency of E. coli. We suggest that artificial neural networks (ANN) may be used to provide a possible solution to this problem. To demonstrate the application of the approach, we develop an ANN representing E. coli accumulation in two polluted sites at Lake Granbury in the upper part of the Brazos River in North Central Texas. The graphical structure of ANN explicitly represents cause- and-effect relationship between system variables. Each of these relationships can then be quantified independently using an approach suitable for the type and scale of information available. Preliminary results revealed that E. coli concentrations in canals show seasonal variations regardless of change

  19. THE EFFECT OF STORAGE ON PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FISH WASTE ACIDIFIED USING FERMENTED VEGETABLES WASTE EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sulistiyanto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fish waste (“ikan rucah” is part of discarded fishing product, which is composed by non-foodcategorized fish (NFC-fish. Quality of NFC-fish meal that was made by dipping in extract of fermentedvegetable’s waste has been reported better than commercial fish meal, but the effect after storingremained in question. Experiment was conducted to study the effect of different time of storing onphysic-organoleptical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the acidified NFC-fish meal thatwas made by dipped in extract of fermented vegetable’s waste (FVW-exctract. The NFC-Fish wassoaked in the FVW-exctract by the ratio 1:1 (w/v for 4 hours, and then it was dripped out and dried. Thedried fish was ground passed through 20 mesh, kept into plastic bags and stored at the room temperature(23-25 °C and 70-80% RH for 0, 1, 2 and 4 months. Physic-organoleptical, chemical and biologycalcharacteristics were parameters observed. Experiment was conducted by completely randomized design(CRD. Data were analysed by the GLM of SAS. Actual number of moisture, crude protein, extractether, and proteolytic bacteria of fish meal were significantly influenced by time of storing (P<0.05.Dipping NFC-fish in the FVW-exctract effectively maintain the physical characteristics, pH, moisture,crude protein, extract ether and the number of proteolytic bacteria of fish meal up to 2 months ofstorage. Dipping NFC-fish in the FVW-exctract provide better characteristics on physical, chemical andmicrobiologycal than the commercial fish meal at the same condition of storage.

  20. Physical and chemical characterisation of PM emissions from two ships operating in European Emission Control Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moldanová

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of particulate matter (PM from shipping contribute significantly to the anthropogenic burden of PM. The environmental effects of PM from shipping include negative impact on human health through increased concentrations of particles in many coastal areas and harbour cities and the climate impact. The PM emitted by ship engines consists of organic carbon (OC, elemental or black carbon (EC/BC, sulphate, inorganic compounds containing V, Ni, Ca, Zn and other metals and associated water. The chemical composition and physical properties of PM vary with type of fuel burned, type of engine and engine operation mode. While primary PM emissions of species like V, Ni and Ca are supposed to be determined by composition of fuel and lubricant oil, emissions of particulate OC, EC and sulphate are affected both by fuel quality and by operation mode of the engine. In this paper a number of parameters describing emission factors (EFs of gases and of particulate matter from ship engines were investigated during 2 on-board measurement campaigns for 3 different engines and 3 different types of fuels. The measured EFs for PM mass were in the range 0.3 to 2.7 g/kg-fuel with lowest values for emissions from combustion of marine gas oil (MGO and the highest for heavy fuel oil (HFO. Emission factors for particle numbers EF(PN in the range 5 × 1015–1 × 1017 #/kg-fuel were found, the number concentration was dominated by particles in the ultrafine mode and ca. 2/3 of particles were non-volatile. The PM mass was dominated by particles in accumulation mode. Main metal elements in case of HFO exhaust PM were V, Ni, Fe, Ca and Zn, in case of MGO Ca, Zn and P. V and Ni were typical tracers of HFO while Ca, Zn and P are tracers of the lubricant oil. EC makes up 10–38% of the PM mass, there were not found large differences between HFO and MGO fuels. EC and ash elements make up 23–40% of the PM mass. Organic matter makes up 25–60% of the PM. The measured EF

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  2. Production induced boiling and cold water entry in the Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoir indicated by chemical and physical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, M.A.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical and physical data suggest that the relatively shallow, western part of the Cerro Prieto reservoir is bounded below by low permeability rocks, and above and at the sides by an interface with cooler water. There is no continuous permeability barrier around or immediately above the reservoir. Permeability within the reservoir is dominantly intergranular. Mixture with cooler water rather than boiling is the dominant cooling process in the natural state, and production causes displacement of hot water by cooler water, not by vapour. Local boiling occurs near most wells in response to pressure decreases, but no general vapour zone has formed. ?? 1984.

  3. Salvinorin A: A Mini Review of Physical and Chemical Properties Affecting Its Translation from Research to Clinical Applications in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Edward; Liu, Renyu

    2014-01-01

    Salvinorin A is a potent and selective agonist of kappa opioid receptors in the brain. Recent studies in several animal models have revealed that Salvinorin A has anti-addiction, anti-depression properties and exhibits pronounced neuroprotective effects against hypoxia/ischemia induced brain damage, and have raised interest in potential clinical applications in several acute pathologies involving oxygen deficiency in the brain. This review focuses on the chemical and physical properties of Salvinorin A and their impact on development of a rational formulation to enable its translation from a research compound to a novel therapeutic agent.

  4. Production induced boiling and cold water entry in the Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoir indicated by chemical and physical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, M.A. (DSIR, Wellington, New Zealand); Truesdell, A.H.; Manon, A.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical and physical data suggest that the relatively shallow western part of the Cerro Prieto reservoir is bounded below by low permeability rocks, and above and at the sides by an interface with cooler water. There is no continuous permeability barrier around or immediately above the reservoir. Permeability within the reservoir is dominantly intergranular. Mixture with cooler water rather than boiling is the dominant cooling process in the natural state, and production causes displacement of hot water by cooler water, not by vapor. Local boiling occurs near most wells in response to pressure decreases, but no general vapor zone has formed.

  5. Physical and chemical treatment of end of life panels: An integrated automatic approach viable for different photovoltaic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnanelli, Francesca; Moscardini, Emanuela; Granata, Giuseppe; Abo Atia, Thomas; Altimari, Pietro; Havlik, Tomas; Toro, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Different kinds of panels (Si-based panels and CdTe panels) were treated according to a common process route made up of two main steps: a physical treatment (triple crushing and thermal treatment) and a chemical treatment. After triple crushing three fractions were obtained: an intermediate fraction (0.4-1mm) of directly recoverable glass (17%w/w); a coarse fraction (>1mm) requiring further thermal treatment in order to separate EVA-glued layers in glass fragments; a fine fraction (panels and Cd-Te panels with an overall recycling rate of 91%.

  6. Words or Pictures: A Comparison of Written and Pictorial Explanations of Physical and Chemical Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaygun, Sevil; Jones, Loretta L.

    2014-01-01

    The features of a concept or principle an individual chooses to highlight in an explanation or description may be related to the medium of communication used. Different aspects of understanding can be revealed through words and through drawings. This two-part exploratory study examined the differences between explanations of physical and chemical…

  7. The Nature of Students' Chemical Reasoning Employed in Scientific Argumentation in Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, A.; Stanford, C.; Cole, R.; Towns, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent science education reform efforts have emphasized scientific practices in addition to scientific knowledge. Less work has been done at the tertiary level to consider students' engagement in scientific practices. In this work, we consider physical chemistry students' engagement in argumentation and construction of causal explanations.…

  8. Physical and Chemical Properties of the Copper-Alanine System: An Advanced Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, John J.

    1977-01-01

    An integrated physical-analytical-inorganic chemistry laboratory procedure for use with undergraduate biology majors is described. The procedure requires five to six laboratory periods and includes acid-base standardizations, potentiometric determinations, computer usage, spectrophotometric determinations of crystal-field splitting…

  9. Capabilities for measuring physical and chemical properties of rocks at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W.B. (comp.)

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Geophysics Group of the Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has experimental equipment that measures a variety of physical properties and phase equilibria and kinetics on rocks and minerals at extreme pressures (to 500 GPa) and temperatures (from 10 to 2800 K). These experimental capabilities are described in this report in terms of published results, photographs, and schematic diagrams.

  10. Physics of the Chemical Asymmetry of the Cell Membrane: Implications in Gene Regulation and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Omran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Signalling proteins are key regulators of basic cell physiology and tissues morphogenesis. Whilst signalling proteins are paramount for the cell to function optimally, their down regulation or inhibition is also central to tune the cell and its environment. One process involved in this tuning mechanism is membrane budding, otherwise known as endocytosis. The origin of the physical force driving the budding process and endocytosis has been the subject of much controversy. After two decades the budding process is now well described and it is acknowledged that fundamental principles from soft matter physics are at play. This opens a new window for understanding gene regulations, pharmacokinetic and multi drug resistance in cancer. This review recalls the first steps that have led to a better understanding of cell biology through the use of physics and; how the use of physics has shed light in areas of cell biology, cancer and pharmacology. It is, therefore, not a review of the many enzymes involved in membrane vesiculation and membrane curvature; it is more of an historical account.

  11. Chemical and physical data from bottle casts in the North/South Atlantic Ocean from 07 June 1961 to 05 December 1989 (NODC Accession 0000305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salinity, temperature, chemical, and physical data were collected using bottle casts in the North/South Atlantic Ocean from June 7, 1961 to December 5, 1989. Data...

  12. Physical and chemical data collected from bottle casts in the Atlantic Ocean from ALBATROS and other platforms from 21 July 1965 to 17 February 1988 (NODC Accession 0000409)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts in the Atlantic Ocean from ALBATROS, ARGUS, ATLANT, and other platforms from 21 July 1965 to 17 February...

  13. Physical, chemical, and other data from the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Deepwater project from 01 August 1999 to 01 August 2002 (NODC Accession 0002207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and other data were collected using trawl, SeaWifs and other instruments from the GYRE from the Gulf of Mexico. Data were collected from August...

  14. Chemical, physical, and salinity data from bottle and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution from 14 May 1957 to 18 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000266)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, and salinity data were collected from multiple ships from May 14, 1957 to December 18, 1999. Data were collected from the IFREMER, ORSTOM, and...

  15. Catalogue of methods of calculation, interpolation, smoothing, and reduction for the physical, chemical, and biological parameters of deep hydrology (CATMETH) (NODC Accession 7700442)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The document presents the methods, formulas and citations used by the BNDO to process physical, chemical, and biological data for deep hydrology including...

  16. Physical, chemical, and other data collected using moored bottle casts at the Coastal waters of California from 01 August 1999 to 01 October 1999 (NODC Accession 0000220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, physical, chemical, and other data were collected using moored bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of California from the SAMPSON from August...

  17. Physical and chemical data collected from AXBT and bottle casts from AIRCRAFT in Mediterranean Sea from 30 September 1985 to 31 July 1992 (NODC Accession 9600058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using AXBT and bottle casts in the Mediterranean Sea from AIRCRAFT. Data were collected from 30 September 1985 to 31 July...

  18. Physical, chemical and optical data collected from CTD casts and other instruments in southwestern Lake Michigan, 1/30/1998 - 10/24/2002 (NODC Accession 0002064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical and optical data were collected with CTD casts in southwestern Lake Michigan from January 30, 1998 to October 24, 2002. Dr. Russel L. Cuhel of the...

  19. Physical and chemical properties and adsorption type of activated carbon prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ru-Ling

    2007-08-25

    Activated carbon was prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation at six different NaOH/char ratios. The physical properties including the BET surface area, the total pore volume, the micropore ratio, the pore diameter, the burn-off, and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation as well as the chemical properties, namely elemental analysis and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), were measured. The results revealed a two-stage activation process: stage 1 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 0-1, surface pyrolysis being the main reaction; stage 2 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 2-4, etching and swelling being the main reactions. The physical properties of stage 2 activated carbons were similar, and specific area was from 1478 to 1887m(2)g(-1). The results of reaction mechanism of NaOH activation revealed that it was apparently because of the loss ratio of elements C, H, and O in the activated carbon, and the variations in the surface functional groups and the physical properties. The adsorption of the above activated carbons on phenol and three kinds of dyes (MB, BB1, and AB74) were used for an isotherm equilibrium adsorption study. The data fitted the Langmuir isotherm equation. Various kinds of adsorbents showed different adsorption types; separation factor (R(L)) was used to determine the level of favorability of the adsorption type. In this work, activated carbons prepared by NaOH activation were evaluated in terms of their physical properties, chemical properties, and adsorption type; and activated carbon PKN2 was found to have most application potential.

  20. Physical and chemical properties and adsorption type of activated carbon prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, R.-L. [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National United University, Miao-Li 360, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: trl@nuu.edu.tw

    2007-08-25

    Activated carbon was prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation at six different NaOH/char ratios. The physical properties including the BET surface area, the total pore volume, the micropore ratio, the pore diameter, the burn-off, and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation as well as the chemical properties, namely elemental analysis and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), were measured. The results revealed a two-stage activation process: stage 1 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 0-1, surface pyrolysis being the main reaction; stage 2 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 2-4, etching and swelling being the main reactions. The physical properties of stage 2 activated carbons were similar, and specific area was from 1478 to 1887 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. The results of reaction mechanism of NaOH activation revealed that it was apparently because of the loss ratio of elements C, H, and O in the activated carbon, and the variations in the surface functional groups and the physical properties. The adsorption of the above activated carbons on phenol and three kinds of dyes (MB, BB1, and AB74) were used for an isotherm equilibrium adsorption study. The data fitted the Langmuir isotherm equation. Various kinds of adsorbents showed different adsorption types; separation factor (R {sub L}) was used to determine the level of favorability of the adsorption type. In this work, activated carbons prepared by NaOH activation were evaluated in terms of their physical properties, chemical properties, and adsorption type; and activated carbon PKN2 was found to have most application potential.