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Sample records for chemical mutagens

  1. Mutagenic efficiency of radiations and chemical mutagens in inducing viable mutations in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were undertaken to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of radiations (gamma rays and fast neutrons) and chemical mutagens (EMS and NMU) in inducing viable mutations in rice. Radiations were more effective than chemical mutagens, the most effective being fast neutrons. Mutagenic efficiency when estimated on the basis of lethality was higher for radiations but when based on sterility was higher for chemical mutagens. Fast neutrons, more effective than gamma rays, were less efficient. NMU was more effective but less efficient than EMS. (author)

  2. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) I. comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of physical & chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic effectiveness usually means the rate of mutation as related to dose. Mutagenic efficiency refers to the mutation rate in relation to damage. Studies on comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of two physical (gamma rays and fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU and EMS) on two desi (G 130 & H 214), one kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345) chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) have been reported. The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 and 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 and 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU 0.01% 20h and 0.02% 8h) and EMS (0.1% 20h and 0.2% 8h). Results indicated that chemical mutagens, particularly NMU are not only more effective but also efficient than physical mutagens in inducing mutations in chickpea. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency showed differential behaviour depending upon mutagen and varietal type. Chemical mutagens were more efficient than physical in inducing cholorophyll as well as viable and total number of mutations. Among the mutagens NMU was the most potent, while in the physical, gamma rays were more effective. Out of four mutagens, NMU was the most effective and efficient in inducing a high frequency and wide spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in the M2 followed by fast neutrons. While gamma rays showed least effectiveness, EMS was least efficient mutagens. Major differences in the mutagenic response of the four cultivars were observed. The varieties of desi type were more resistant towards mutagenic treatment than kabuli and green seeded type

  3. Radiation-equivalent dose of chemical mutagens: problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation equivalent unit was intended as a means of comparing chemically-induced genetic effects with one another and with that of radiation. It was to be a unit of convenience with no absolute value. In this concept the fact that radiations and chemicals might act by different mechanisms is unimportant since only the effect is compared. Although dissimilarity of mechanism is of no consequence when comparing effects of different mutagens with the same end-point in the same species, it is important that the mechanism be similar when extrapolating to man from the effect of a given mutagen in another system. That is why mammalian systems are preferable to sub-mammalian systems for this purpose

  4. Relative mutagenic effects of ionizing radiations and alkylating chemicals in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were undertaken on the relative mutagenic effects of three ionizing radiations (X-rays, gamma rays, fast neutrons) and five alkylating chemicals (DES, EMS, MMS, NMH, MNNG) in rice. Observations on seed germination, seedling survival, seedling height, seed fertility and chlorophyll deficient chimeras were made in the M1 generation. The M2 generation was grown as M1 ear progenies. Chlorophyll mutation frequency, segregation percentage and mutant spectrum were estimated. The mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency were also worked out. Radiations were more effective than chemical mutagens. Mutagenic effectiveness decreased with increase in doses of mutagens. This was due to the failure of mutation frequency to increase proportionately with increase in mutagen doses. Mutagenic efficiency was higher for radiations when estimated on the basis of lethality and injury whereas, based on sterility, chemical mutagens were more efficient. Mutagenic efficiency also decreased with increase in doses of mutagens. The most effective as well as efficient radiation was fast neutrons. Among chemical mutagens the most effective was NMH whereas the most efficient was EMS. (author)

  5. Mutagens and carcinogens - Occurrence and role during chemical and biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Sorolla, A.; Oro, J.

    1981-01-01

    The roles of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances in early biologic evolution is examined, along with terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources of mutagens and carcinogens. UV solar radiation is noted to have served to stimulate prebiotic life while also causing harmful effects in plants and animals. Aromatic compounds have been found in meteorites, and comprise leukemogens, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and nitrasamine precursors. Other mutagenic sources are volcanoes, and the beginning of evolution with mutagenic substances is complicated by the appearance of malignancies due to the presence of carcinogens. The atmosphere of the Precambrian period contained both mutagens and early carcinogens and, combined with volcanic activity discharges, formed an atmospheric chemical background analogous to the background ionizing radiation. Carcinogenesis is concluded to be intrinsic to nature, having initiated evolution and, eventually, cancer cells.

  6. Combined effects of a chemical mutagen and radiation sterilized diet in mutagenicity and reproduction studies in the same mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible intensification of the mutagenic effect of cyclophosphamide (Endoxan) by the feeding of a radiation-sterilized diet (dose, 4.5 Mrad) was studied in 2000 NMRI/Han mice. In a dominant lethal test, males were pretreated with 100 mg Endoxan/kg body weight. The greatest sensitivity towards Endoxan was observed during the late-spermatid stage. No significant differences were detected between the control group (Endoxan plus non-irradiated diet) and the experimental group (Endoxan plus radiation-sterilized diet). In this test, radiation-sterilized feed showed no co-mutagenic effect when combined with Endoxan treatment. In a reproduction study of 7 months duration (continuous mating without lactation periods), the females were treated every 2 wk with 20 mg Endoxan/kg body weight. The decline in litter size with increasing number of litters (i.e. with advancing age of the females) was more pronounced after treatment with the chemical mutagen than in the untreated group. Increases in the frequency of abortions and in premature sterility resulted from Endoxan treatment. During the entire observation period, no effects from the intake of radiation-sterilized food were detected. (author)

  7. [Revision of th distribution of chromosome aberrations induced by chemical mutagens using the BUDR label].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebotarev, A N; Chernyshova, N A

    1990-08-01

    Cell distribution was analysed with the help of the BrDU label for the number of chromosome aberrations and breaks induced by one-center (thiophosphamide and phosphamide) and two-center (dipine and fotrine) mutagens at the stage G0 in the Ist mitosis of human lymphocytes harvested at different times of culturing (from 56 to 96 h). The comparison was made between the type of aberration distribution in cells and the dependence of their frequency on the harvesting point for various mutagens. Poisson aberration distribution in cells for two-center mutagens was found to correspond to their constant frequency observed at different times of harvesting. On the other hand, for one-center mutagens, a geometrical distribution of chromosome breaks corresponded to an exponential decrease in their frequency in time. It is suggested that two-center chemical mutagens and ionizing radiation cause largely short-live damages which are realized into chromosome aberrations rather quickly (during one cell cycle). One-center mutagens, however, cause such damages that the probability of their transformation into chromosome aberrations is decreasing rather slowly in time, under the exponential law, and their realization into chromosome aberrations can occur in subsequent cell cycle. PMID:2258036

  8. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  9. Suppressive effects of coffee on the SOS responses induced by UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens was strongly suppressed by instant coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. As decaffeinated instant coffee showed a similarly strong suppressive effect, it would seem that caffeine, a known inhibitor of SOS responses, is not responsible for the effect observed. The suppression was also shown by freshly brewed coffee extracts. However, the suppression was absent in green coffee-bean extracts. These results suggest that coffee contains some substance(s) which, apart from caffeine, suppresses SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens and that the suppressive substance(s) are produced by roasting coffee beans. (Auth.)

  10. Molecular dosimetry of the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extending previous work with E. coli and mammalian cells in culture, forward-mutation frequencies induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) were quantitatively compared in Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae under standardized conditions. Concomitantly, the actual dose to DNA was measured by determining the amount of radioactivity bound to DNA after treatment with tritium-labeled EMS. After exposure to EMS (2.5-50 mM), alkylation levels in N. crassa and S. cerevisiae were similar to those previously determined in E. coli and cultured mammalian cells. Consistently, there was a slightly less than proportional increase of the DNA alkylation level with the exposure concentration of the mutagen. Forward mutagenesis induced in yeast and N. crassa showed exponential kinetics with exponents of 1.5 and 2.6, respectively. These results are similar to those previously reported with E. coli, which differed from the results with cultured mammalian cells, where a linear dose-effect relationship between exposure and genetic effect was observed. These differences may reflect differences in the fate of EMS-induced adducts by cellular DNA repair systems, but are not due to initial differences in DNA alkylation levels. The fate and persistence of specific DNA adducts potentially responsible for pre-mutagenic changes are under investigation. (orig.)

  11. Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM David G. Nashab, Esra Mutluc, William T. Prestond, Michael D. Haysb, Sarah H. Warrenc, Charly Kingc, William P. Linakb, M. lan Gilmourc, and David M. DeMarinic aOak Ridge Institute for Science and Ed...

  12. Effect of gamma ray and some chemical mutagens sorghum for forage sorghum vulgare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation was carried out to study the effect of gamma ray doses (100, 200,400,600 and 800 Gry,DES and SA by concentration (0.25%, 0.75%, 0.10% and 1.5%), on yield components and chemical characteristics (Protein, ash, fiber and charbohydrate%) in the two varieties (Piper and Green Leaf), of Sorghum for forage during M1, M2 and M3 generations . The experiments was carried out in field belonging to the Atomic energy Authority, Inshas during 1990. 1991 and 1992 Seasons. The results of the study revealed that piper variety was better than Green leaf variety in most of the studied characters. Treatment by gamma ray was more effective in increasing means of the studied characters than the two chemical mutagens(DES and SA). The low doses of studied mutagens were more effective than the high doses in increasing the studied traits. Irradiation by Gamma-ray increased the variability in the studied traits than the both chemical mutagens. SO, it could be concluded that, it is better to use Gamma ray than the chemical mutagens in breeding program for sorghum. 18 tabs., 58 refs

  13. Dietary Exposure of Nigerians to Mutagens and Estrogen-Like Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyekhoetin Matthew Omoruyi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Food and drinking water are poorly delineated sources of human exposure to chemical food mutagens and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. In this study, we investigated the presence of mutagens and chemicals exhibiting estrogenic activity in the daily diet of Nigerians, using in vitro assays. Commercially processed foods or snacks and various brands of pure water sachets were extracted by solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction, respectively. Mutagenicity was determined by the conventional Ames test and two complementary assays on two strains of Salmonella (TA 100 and TA 98, while the estrogenic activity was assessed by a yeast bioluminescent assay, using two recombinant yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMAEREluc/ERα and S. cerevisiae BMA64/luc. A third of the food varieties investigated (chin-chin, hamburger, suya and bean cake were mutagenic in all three assays, either in the presence or absence of S9 mix. Of the packed water samples, five out of the sixteen investigated (31%, were found to be estrogenic, with estradiol and bisphenol A equivalents ranging from 0.79 to 44.0 ng/L and 124.2 to 1,000.8 ng/L, respectively. Hence, although the current situation in Nigeria does not appear to be substantially worse than, e.g., in Europe, regular monitoring is warranted in the future.

  14. The use of physical/chemical mutagens for crop improvements in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most research on the use of physical and chemical mutagens for crop improvement in Indonesia are carried out at the Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (Bataan). At the plant breeding section of this center, much progress has been achieved in term of facilities set-up (gamma irradiators, laboratory, greenhouse and experimental fields), manpower and expertise development. Mutation breeding activities were initially started in rice in 1972, in attempts to improve the protein content of rice grain. During this earlier time, researches on detecting more effective mutagen treatments, using physical and chemical mutagenesis, were conducted in different plant species. The use of chemical mutagens have recently been very limited and it tends to be abandoned simply because of its unpractical treatment procedures working with it and less effective results. Nowadays, most induced mutations in plant breeding are primarily dependent on the use of physical mutagen i.e. gamma irradiation which is emitted from Cobalt-60 source. The effective use of gamma irradiation in plant breeding has been proven by results of finding useful mutant varieties for the country level. Major achievements were the release of some mutant varieties by the Department of Agriculture of Indonesia. These mutant varieties included 6 varieties for rice, 3 for soybean, and 1 for mungbean. Meanwhile, some promising mutant lines of other important crops such as peanuts, sorghum, banana, onions etc. are now being investigated in the field experiments. The effective use of gamma irradiation seems to vary between crop species or varieties being investigated. Experiences on breeding food crops, restricted on self-pollinated crops, the effective dose treatments of gamma irradiation on the seed materials were found to vary between 10-30 Gy. Some experiment results on the use of physical and chemical mutagens for crop improvements are discussed here

  15. The use of physical/chemical mutagens for crop improvements in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeranto, H.; Manurung, Simon; Masrizal [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Jakarta (ID)] [and others

    2001-03-01

    Most research on the use of physical and chemical mutagens for crop improvement in Indonesia are carried out at the Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (Bataan). At the plant breeding section of this center, much progress has been achieved in term of facilities set-up (gamma irradiators, laboratory, greenhouse and experimental fields), manpower and expertise development. Mutation breeding activities were initially started in rice in 1972, in attempts to improve the protein content of rice grain. During this earlier time, researches on detecting more effective mutagen treatments, using physical and chemical mutagenesis, were conducted in different plant species. The use of chemical mutagens have recently been very limited and it tends to be abandoned simply because of its unpractical treatment procedures working with it and less effective results. Nowadays, most induced mutations in plant breeding are primarily dependent on the use of physical mutagen i.e. gamma irradiation which is emitted from Cobalt-60 source. The effective use of gamma irradiation in plant breeding has been proven by results of finding useful mutant varieties for the country level. Major achievements were the release of some mutant varieties by the Department of Agriculture of Indonesia. These mutant varieties included 6 varieties for rice, 3 for soybean, and 1 for mungbean. Meanwhile, some promising mutant lines of other important crops such as peanuts, sorghum, banana, onions etc. are now being investigated in the field experiments. The effective use of gamma irradiation seems to vary between crop species or varieties being investigated. Experiences on breeding food crops, restricted on self-pollinated crops, the effective dose treatments of gamma irradiation on the seed materials were found to vary between 10-30 Gy. Some experiment results on the use of physical and chemical mutagens for crop improvements are discussed here

  16. Integrated biological chemical approach for the identification of polyaromatic mutagens in surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    GALLAMPOIS Christine

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters are essential for human life, to supply of drinking water and as an important resource for agricultural, industrial and recreational activities. However, tonnes of pollutants enter these surface waters every year. Amongst the substances discharged into the environment, a large number are known to be mutagenic. Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is a tool to identify chemicals responsible for the observed toxic effects. It is based on a combination of chemical and biological analysi...

  17. Study of anti mutagenic and mutagenic effect of different chemicals on clinically isolated strains of pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was undertaken to study the effect of twelve different compounds to test their anti mutagenic and mutagenic activity against clinically isolated strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of these compounds was estimated by counting the number of rifampicin resistant colonies growing in a particular time in a compound. The results were interpreted by plotting graphs between 10g N/NO (Rif R Colonies/ ml) and time to estimate the forward mutation rat. The results revealed that acridine, Basic fuchsin, Caffeine, cycloheximide, Ethidium bromide and Histidine probably have an anti mutagenic effect, while Cysteine, folic acid, Ethyl methane, suplphonate, Manganous Chloride and N-nitrosodietylamine acted as mutagen. Ecoli was used as control through out the study. (author)

  18. Dimethylglycine and chemically related amines tested for mutagenicity under potential nitrosation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorn, A J

    1989-04-01

    Dimethylglycine (DMG) and the chemically related amino acids glycine, sarcosine (monomethylglycine) and betaine (trimethylglycine) were tested in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 after treatment with sodium nitrite under acidic conditions using a modified Ames Salmonella/microsome assay as reported by Colman et al. (1980). The increase in the number of revertants observed both with and without metabolic activation was also induced in the control mixtures without adding the amines. From the subsequent testing of the individual components of the mixtures, we concluded that non-consumed nitrite was responsible for the mutagenic responses observed in the different reaction mixtures, and not the amines themselves. There were no consistent indications of mutagenic activity of the DMG test mixture as compared to the control mixture which exhibited both consistent mutagenic activity and a toxic effect which was not increased by the addition of DMG. In fact, DMG seemed to decrease the toxicity of the control reaction solution to the Salmonella which was clearly observed at the higher doses. DMG cannot be considered mutagenic under the test conditions employed. The same can be said of the other amino acids as well. PMID:2468082

  19. Use of physical/chemical mutagens in plant breeding program in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Duy Quy; Nguyen Huu Dong; Bui Huy Thuy; Le Van Nha; Nguyen Van Bich [Agricultural Genetics Institute, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    Among more than 1870 new plant varieties formed by mutation breeding in the world, 44 varieties of different plants were formed by Vietnamese scientists. Research on induced mutation in Vietnam started in 1966, was promoted in Agricultural Institute, Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute, Institute of Food Crop Research, and Agriculture Universities, and has produced varieties of rice, maize, soybean, peanut, tomato, jujuba, green bean etc using physical and chemical mutagens: Irradiation with gamma rays or neutrons, and use of such chemicals as dimethylsulfate (DMS), diethylsulfate (DES), ethyleneimine (EI), N-nitrosomethylurea (NUM), N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU), and sodium azide (NaN{sub 3}). In the present report, the results of cytological and genetic effects in M1 plants, the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and morphological mutants, the mutants obtained and the genetic nature of the next generation are described, particularly for the case of rice. Radiation dose and dose rate used as mutagens are also reported. (S. Ohno)

  20. Use of physical/chemical mutagens in plant breeding program in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among more than 1870 new plant varieties formed by mutation breeding in the world, 44 varieties of different plants were formed by Vietnamese scientists. Research on induced mutation in Vietnam started in 1966, was promoted in Agricultural Institute, Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute, Institute of Food Crop Research, and Agriculture Universities, and has produced varieties of rice, maize, soybean, peanut, tomato, jujuba, green bean etc using physical and chemical mutagens: Irradiation with gamma rays or neutrons, and use of such chemicals as dimethylsulfate (DMS), diethylsulfate (DES), ethyleneimine (EI), N-nitrosomethylurea (NUM), N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU), and sodium azide (NaN3). In the present report, the results of cytological and genetic effects in M1 plants, the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and morphological mutants, the mutants obtained and the genetic nature of the next generation are described, particularly for the case of rice. Radiation dose and dose rate used as mutagens are also reported. (S. Ohno)

  1. Effects of gamma rays and chemical mutagens on quantitative characteristics of hemp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhatov, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of hemp plants produced by seeds irradiated with gamma rays (1 or 15 kR) or treated with chemical mutagens (soaking in 0.01% ethylenimine for 18 h or in 0.05% ethylmethanesulfonate for 12 h) showed the appearance of both positive and negative hereditary characteristics. Combination of the wider spectrum of mutant plants with those from appropriate breeding practices could lead to the development of new varieties of hemp with superior commercial characteristics.

  2. Induced genetic variability in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) II. Comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of physical and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of gamma rays and Ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) were studied in two desi (Pb2000 and C44), one kabuli (Pb1) and one desi x kabuli introgression line (CH40/91) of chickpea. The treatments included two doses each of gamma rays and EMS calculated on the basis of their LD30. The results revealed that EMS was almost seven times more effective and its efficiency was two times higher than that of gamma rays. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency were found to depend upon mutagen type and the genotype and both were higher at lower doses of EMS in three genotypes except in desi genotype C44. The overall trend of mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency in both gamma radiation and EMS was in the order i.e. CH40/91 greater than Pb2000 greater than Pb1 greater than C44. The introgression line desi x kabuli genotype was found to be most resistant towards mutagenic treatments than desi and kabuli types

  3. Chemical carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2008–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Konieczko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this paper is to present a concise but comprehensive information on the occurrence of carcinogenic or mutagenic agents in Polish enterprises and the number of workers exposed to those agents reported to the central register by employers. Objectives and responsibilities of the register, as well as the range and methods of data gathering are discussed. Material and Methods: Data concerning carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and technological processes reported to central register in 2008-2010 were analyzed. Results: In 2008-2010 more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances were reported to the register. Approximately 2500 plants reported above 150 000 per-person-exposures annually. Among all technological processes regarded as occupational carcinogens, hardwood dusts exposure (about 660 companies; 11 000-13 000 exposed workers each year and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs present in coal products (117-125 plantsl 3000 exposed per year were reported. Conclusions: The most widespread carcinogenic/mutagenic substances were: benzene, chromium(VI compounds: potassium dichromate and chromate, chromium(VI trioxide and other chromium compounds, ethylene oxide, asbestos, benzo[a]pyrene and gasoline. The highest number of men was exposed to particular PAHs and benzene , and the majority of women was exposed to benzene, potassium dichromate and chromate, acrylamide, ethylene oxide and gasoline. The lack of clear-cut definitione of occupational exposure to carcinogen creates a problem faced by employers in defining the accurate number of exposed workers. Med Pr 2013;64(2:181–192

  4. Induced mutagenesis of plasmid and chromosomal genes inserted into the plasmid DNA. II. Mutagenic action of chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the study of the mutagenic action of UV and γ-radiation on plasmid DNA in vitro, they investigated the induction of mutations under the influence of chemical mutagens on the same DNA of plasmid RSF2124, determining the synthesis of colicine E1 and resistance to ampicillin. The inactivating action of the mutagen was assessed from the yield of transformants resistant to the antibiotic and the mutagenic effect from the loss by colonies of transformants that were capable of releasing colicine into the external medium. In these experiments they mainly used chemical compounds whose mutagenic effect if well known in other systems (transforming and transfecting DNA, microbial viruses). As a result all mutagens tested for their activity were divided into four groups: first group, those exceeding the level of mutagenesis by more than 100-fold above the spontaneous background (hydroxylamine, O-methylhydroxylamine); second group, those exceeding it by a factor of 10 (UV radiation (λ = 254 nm), W-mutagenesis, ionizing radiation, nitrous acid, mitomycin C); third group, those exceeding it by a factor of <10 (indirect UV mutagenesis, nitrous acid, β-chloroethyldiethylamine hydrochloride, nitrosoguanidine); fourth group, no mutagenic effect (acridine orange, ethyl methane sulfonate, sodium azide, 0-β-diethylaminoethylhydroxylamine)

  5. Mutagenic Effects of Some Chemical Agents in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water soaked wheat cv. NW 1014 seeds were treated with aqueous solutions (1 per cent) of 6 chemicals, namely, acid slurry, sodium carbonate, tri-sodium phosphate, sodium tri-polyphosphate, carboxy methylcellulose and sodium sulphate for 22h. Out of these chemicals, tri-sodium phosphate and carboxy methylcellulose recorded the highest mutation frequency (1.15 per cent), followed by sodium sulphate (1.00 per cent), sodium carbonate (0.85 per cent), sodium tri-poly phosphate (0.65 per cent) and acid slurry (0.0 per cent) in the M2 generation. The highest number of mutants was observed for late heading (47), followed by dwarf stature (36), white spike (7) and high tillering (6) in the M2 generation. On the basis of the number of high yielding mutants (M5), the mutagenic efficiency of sodium carbonate may be placed at the top rank, followed by sodium sulphate, tri-sodium phosphate, sodium tri-poly phosphate and carboxy methyl cellulose. One type of macro mutant (white spiked) was induced by tri-sodium phosphate whereas sodium carbonate generated 3 types of macro-mutants (large flag leaf, club shape spike and small grain ). The studies reveal that all the chemicals, except acid slurry, may be used as mutagenic agents in wheat. (author)

  6. The effective use of physical and chemical mutagen in the induction of mutation for crop improvement in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rahim Harun [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2001-03-01

    The earliest work of induced mutations breeding program in Malaysia was reported in 1967. The project was carried out by Rubber Research Institute of Malaysia using x-radiation in an attempt to improve rubber trees for dwarfism and disease resistance. Subsequently, more efforts were taken up by the universities to promote the technology for genetic changes and creation of new genetic resources, particularly in crops that are not easily achievable through conventional techniques. Gamma radiation is always been used as physical mutagen, while ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) was a popular chemical mutagen used in induced mutation breeding in the country. Gamma rays is an effective mutagen to which more than 30 potential mutants were produced up to now through mutagenesis of several important food crops and ornamental plants. Although chemical mutagen such as EMS were reported being used, the result is not so convincing as compared to gamma radiation. Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) has initiated and promoted nuclear technique in mutation breeding for the improvement of importance food crops such as rice, legume and other potential crops for export, like fruit trees and ornamentals. Gamma radiation is the main source of mutagen used in mutation-breeding programme at MINT. The effectiveness of these two mutagens were verified with mutants derived through induced mutation breeding in the country which some mutant has shown outstanding improvement and released as new varieties and cultivars. This paper summarises and discuss the effects as well as achievement attained through the use of ionizing radiation and chemical mutagen in plant mutation breeding in Malaysia. (author)

  7. The effective use of physical and chemical mutagen in the induction of mutation for crop improvement in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earliest work of induced mutations breeding program in Malaysia was reported in 1967. The project was carried out by Rubber Research Institute of Malaysia using x-radiation in an attempt to improve rubber trees for dwarfism and disease resistance. Subsequently, more efforts were taken up by the universities to promote the technology for genetic changes and creation of new genetic resources, particularly in crops that are not easily achievable through conventional techniques. Gamma radiation is always been used as physical mutagen, while ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) was a popular chemical mutagen used in induced mutation breeding in the country. Gamma rays is an effective mutagen to which more than 30 potential mutants were produced up to now through mutagenesis of several important food crops and ornamental plants. Although chemical mutagen such as EMS were reported being used, the result is not so convincing as compared to gamma radiation. Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) has initiated and promoted nuclear technique in mutation breeding for the improvement of importance food crops such as rice, legume and other potential crops for export, like fruit trees and ornamentals. Gamma radiation is the main source of mutagen used in mutation-breeding programme at MINT. The effectiveness of these two mutagens were verified with mutants derived through induced mutation breeding in the country which some mutant has shown outstanding improvement and released as new varieties and cultivars. This paper summarises and discuss the effects as well as achievement attained through the use of ionizing radiation and chemical mutagen in plant mutation breeding in Malaysia. (author)

  8. A Review on Mutagenicity Testing for Hazard Classification of Chemicals at Work: Focusing on in vivo Micronucleus Test for Allyl Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Kyung-Taek; Kim, Soo-Jin

    2015-09-01

    Chemical mutagenicity is a major hazard that is important to workers' health. Despite the use of large amounts of allyl chloride, the available mutagenicity data for this chemical remains controversial. To clarify the mutagenicity of allyl chloride and because a micronucleus (MN) test had not yet been conducted, we screened for MN induction by using male ICR mice bone marrow cells. The test results indicated that this chemical is not mutagenic under the test conditions. In this paper, the regulatory test battery and several assay combinations used to determine the genotoxic potential of chemicals in the workplace have been described. Further application of these assays may prove useful in future development strategies of hazard evaluations of industrial chemicals. This study also should help to improve the testing of this chemical by commonly used mutagenicity testing methods and investigations on the underlying mechanisms and could be applicable for workers' health. PMID:26929826

  9. Application of chemical mutagens and radiation in breeding buckwheat for larger seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In 1974, seeds of the Viktoriya variety of buckwheat were treated with 20-30 krad gamma radiation and chemical mutagens in the Biophysics Department of the Kishinev Agricultural Institute. For the chemical mutagen treatment, we used N-ethylnitroso-urea NEH (0.025 and 0.012%), N-methylnitroso-urea NMH (0.01 and 0.005%), ethylenimine EI (0.01 and 0.005%), dimethyl sulphate DMS (0.01 and 0.005%) and 1.4-bis-diazoacetyl butane DAB (0.01 and 0.05%). Since some investigators think that different results are produced by changing the order of the treatment, we treated seeds with chemical mutagens before and after irradiation and this was followed by drying. A total of 2400 seeds were treated. Selection started with M2 seeds produced by M1 plants. The thousand seed weight of the best ones ranged from 40.7 to 47.8 g, which was 11.9-18.7 g heavier than the control. The large seed size thus selected was heritable. Since larger seeds are very important for the creation of high yielding varieties buckwheat, only families with these characteristics were selected for further work. We observed even some further increase in seed weight in the next generation. It was observed that when planting large seeds, after six days of growth the cotyledons were significantly larger than in the control plants. This characteristic was used in selecting for a high yielding large-seed variety of buckwheat. The plants were selected twice: once for development of large cotyledon leaves and the second time for plant yield. In the fourth generation, the families thus obtained continued to be studied in greenhouse experiments and the same time be propagated under field conditions. The seeds of these families were then combined and under the name Podolyanka in 1976 were subjected to competitive variety testing. Following the competitive variety testing the mutant variety Podolyanka was released in 1984. It is high yielding (2950 kg/ha), has a short vegetation period (matures 17-18 days

  10. Effective use of physical/chemical mutagens in crop hybrid breeding in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Luxiang; Wang Jing [Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Institute for Application of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2001-03-01

    Crop heterosis utilization was one of the greatest achievements in the agriculture production in the 20th century. It is proved that every breakthrough in crop hybrid breeding was predicated on the discovery or successful development of new heterosis germplasm. In recent years, in order to open up the scope and ways of using crop heterosis, it has been paid much close attention to apply mutation techniques to hybrid breeding. Useful tool materials like male sterile mutant lines, fertile restoration mutants in many crops have been obtained by effective use of physical/chemical mutagens. Brief introduction is made in this paper on the newest research improvement concerning the effective use of the techniques of mutation induction in China to create special useful genes, enrich the diversity of germplasm and promote the rapid development of crop hybrid breeding. (author)

  11. Effective use of physical/chemical mutagens in crop hybrid breeding in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crop heterosis utilization was one of the greatest achievements in the agriculture production in the 20th century. It is proved that every breakthrough in crop hybrid breeding was predicated on the discovery or successful development of new heterosis germplasm. In recent years, in order to open up the scope and ways of using crop heterosis, it has been paid much close attention to apply mutation techniques to hybrid breeding. Useful tool materials like male sterile mutant lines, fertile restoration mutants in many crops have been obtained by effective use of physical/chemical mutagens. Brief introduction is made in this paper on the newest research improvement concerning the effective use of the techniques of mutation induction in China to create special useful genes, enrich the diversity of germplasm and promote the rapid development of crop hybrid breeding. (author)

  12. A QSAR for the Mutagenic Potencies of Twelve 2-Amino-trimethylimidazopyridine Isomers: Structural, Quantum Chemical,and Hydropathic Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knize, M G; Hatch, F T; Tanga, M J; Lau, E V; Colvin, M E

    2005-04-23

    An isomeric series of heterocyclic amines related to one found in heated muscle meats was investigated for properties that predict their measured mutagenic potency. Eleven of the 12 possible 2-amino-trimethylimidazopyridine (TMIP) isomers were tested for mutagenic potency in the Ames/Salmonella test with bacterial strain TA98, and resulted in a 600-fold range in potency. Structural, quantum chemical and hydropathic data were calculated on the parent molecules and the corresponding nitrenium ions of all of the tested isomers to establish models for predicting the potency of the unknown isomer. The regression model accounting for the largest fraction of the total variance in mutagenic potency contains four predictor variables: dipole moment, a measure of the gap between amine LUMO and HOMO energies, percent hydrophilic surface, and energy of amine LUMO. The most important determinants of high mutagenic potency in these amines are: (1) a small dipole moment, (2) the combination of b-face ring fusion and N3-methyl group, and (3) a lower calculated energy of the {pi} electron system. Based on predicted potency from the average of five models, the isomer not yet synthesized and tested is expected to have a mutagenic potency of 0.84 revertants/{micro}g in test strain TA98.

  13. Inducing mutations in the mouse genome with the chemical mutagen ethylnitrosourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.G. Massironi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available When compared to other model organisms whose genome is sequenced, the number of mutations identified in the mouse appears extremely reduced and this situation seriously hampers our understanding of mammalian gene function(s. Another important consequence of this shortage is that a majority of human genetic diseases still await an animal model. To improve the situation, two strategies are currently used: the first makes use of embryonic stem cells, in which one can induce knockout mutations almost at will; the second consists of a genome-wide random chemical mutagenesis, followed by screening for mutant phenotypes and subsequent identification of the genetic alteration(s. Several projects are now in progress making use of one or the other of these strategies. Here, we report an original effort where we mutagenized BALB/c males, with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea. Offspring of these males were screened for dominant mutations and a three-generation breeding protocol was set to recover recessive mutations. Eleven mutations were identified (one dominant and ten recessives. Three of these mutations are new alleles (Otop1mlh, Foxn1sepe and probably rodador at loci where mutations have already been reported, while 4 are new and original alleles (carc, eqlb, frqz, and Sacc. This result indicates that the mouse genome, as expected, is far from being saturated with mutations. More mutations would certainly be discovered using more sophisticated phenotyping protocols. Seven of the 11 new mutant alleles induced in our experiment have been localized on the genetic map as a first step towards positional cloning.

  14. Effect of physical and chemical mutagens on morphological parameters in garlic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloves of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) were treated with various doses of gamma rays and different concentrations of ethylmethane sulphonate, diethyl sulphate and ethyleneimine. The effect of mutagens was studied in respect of morphological parameters such as sprouting, survival, sprout height, plant height, number and size of leaves, number of cloves and weight of bulb. In case of mutagen treatment the percentage of sprouting and survival as well as sprout height were found to be decreased with an increase in the dose/concentration of the mutagen. The effect of mutagen on leaf size and number was inhibitory. However, the number of cloves and weight of bulb were found to be increased at lower dose concentration of mutagens. (author)

  15. Modifying the effects of fast neutrons in rice seeds by post-treatment with chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormant rice seeds were exposed to 290-1160 rad of neutrons, dehulled and then soaked in buffered aqueous solutions of either 0.03M EMS or 0.005M MMS for 15h at 30 deg. C. The neutron plus EMS treatment did not affect seedling height and seedset as much as did the neutron plus MMS treatment, which caused marked reductions over those due to neutrons alone. The mutation frequency (Msp) in all neutron doses was slightly to markedly increased by EMS, and reduced by MMS. Neutrons + EMS was found to be an efficient mutagenic combination whereas neutrons + MMS was inefficient (Msp/I). Differences in the synergistic effects of these combined treatments may be due to the specific biological action of the chemicals as determined by their physical properties. An idea that the chemicals may have acted essentially as selective factors for survival of neutron-damage or mutated tiller initials is briefly discussed. (author). 26 refs, 3 tabs

  16. Modification of tolerance of oats to crown rust induced by chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of crown rust (Puccinia coronata) susceptible cultivated oats (Avena sativa) were treated with the mutagenic chemical ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS), and pure lines derived from these treated seeds were tested in later generations for the relative amount of reduction in yield and seed weight caused by crown rust infection. In the absence of crown rust, the yield of most of the treated lines was greatly reduced. The overall means of the treated lines for both yield and seed weight response to infection were significantly lower than the control, but 10 lines significantly exceeded the control for yield response and 15 exceeded it for seed weight response. Recurrent EMS treatment of once-treated lines rated as tolerant resulted in groups of lines that were more tolerant, on the average, than groups of lines from recurrently treated lines rated as susceptible. A few of the recurrently treated individual lines derived from tolerant parents had a higher degree of tolerance than their parental lines. EMS treatment of diploid (A. strigosa) and tetraploid (A. abyssinica) oats resulted in groups of lines showing significant genetic variance for response to crown rust, indicating that treatment had induced real genetic change. A few diploid lines were a little more tolerant than their control, but none of the tetraploid lines showed any consistent improvement. (author)

  17. Comparative effect of irradiation and metabolization of some chemical pollutants in animals based upon mutagenic/carcinogenic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have long been implicated as mutagens and carcinogens. The compounds selected for this study, 3,4-benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and 3-methylcholanterene (MC), were considered the most representative substances of this chemical group. Of the tested metabolites of the first, only 1,2 and 9-hydroxy-BP and diasteromers diolepoxi (7,8,9,10-cis and trans) proved mutagens. BP and MC in mammalian cells produced DNA lesions in the form of single-strand breaks and inhibition of semiconservative synthesis. They did not inhibit rejoining of DNA single-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation. BP and MC are both mutagens only after metabolic activation, as shown in host-mediated assay and by in-vitro test. In order to establish an equivalence, the effect of three chemicals were investigated: an alkylating agent, BP and MC, the latter requiring metabolic activation. Under the given experimental conditions, 1 rad appeared as equivalent to 55 ng of IOB-82 (a cytostatic), 115 ng of BP and 178 ng of MC. This concept could prove of great importance for evaluating the risks arising from chemical and physical pollutants in man's environment

  18. Quantitative analysis of the relative mutagenicity of five chemical constituents of tobacco smoke in the mouse lymphoma assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Heflich, Robert H; Dial, Stacey L; Richter, Patricia A; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying health-related biological effects, like genotoxicity, could provide a way of distinguishing between tobacco products. In order to develop tools for using genotoxicty data to quantitatively evaluate the risk of tobacco products, we tested five carcinogens found in cigarette smoke, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), cadmium (in the form of CdCl2), 2-amino-3,4-dimethyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (MeIQ) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), in the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA). The resulting mutagenicity dose responses were analyzed by various quantitative approaches and their strengths and weaknesses for distinguishing responses in the MLA were evaluated. L5178Y/Tk (+/-) 3.7.2C mouse lymphoma cells were treated with four to seven concentrations of each chemical for 4h. Only CdCl2 produced a positive response without metabolic activation (S9); all five chemicals produced dose-dependent increases in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity with S9. The lowest dose exceeding the global evaluation factor, the benchmark dose producing a 10%, 50%, 100% or 200% increase in the background frequency (BMD10, BMD50, BMD100 and BMD200), the no observed genotoxic effect level (NOGEL), the lowest observed genotoxic effect level (LOGEL) and the mutagenic potency expressed as a mutant frequency per micromole of chemical, were calculated for all the positive responses. All the quantitative metrics had similar rank orders for the agents' ability to induce mutation, from the most to least potent as CdCl2(-S9) > BaP(+S9) > CdCl2(+S9) > MeIQ(+S9) > 4-ABP(+S9) > NNK(+S9). However, the metric values for the different chemical responses (i.e. the ratio of the greatest value to the least value) for the different chemicals ranged from 16-fold (BMD10) to 572-fold (mutagenic potency). These results suggest that data from the MLA are capable of discriminating the mutagenicity of various constituents of cigarette smoke, and that quantitative analyses are available

  19. Effect of physical and chemical mutagens on seed germination and survival of seedling in Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry and healthy seeds of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var. Co-2 were irradiated with gamma rays at 10 KR, 20 KR, 30 KR, 40 KR and 50 KR. The percentage of seed germination was directly proportional to the dose given. The survival percentage decreased with higher doses. Concentration of EMS and NMU applied, ranged from 10 mM to 50 mM and 1 mM to 5 mM, respectively. The duration of soaking of seed was 4 hours in distilled water and 4 hours in mutagenic agents. In treated seeds, the percentage of germination and survival of seedlings decreased with an increase in concentration of these chemical mutagens. These observations are discussed in detail. (author). 11 refs

  20. Chemical Composition and in Vitro Antimicrobial and Mutagenic Activities of Seven Lamiaceae Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Martino

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Deeper knowledge of the potentiality of aromatic plants can provide results of economic importance for food and pharmacological industry. The essential oils of seven Lamiaceae species were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and assayed for their antibacterial, antifungal and mutagenic activities. Monoterpenes in the oils ranged between 82.47% (hyssop oil and 97.48% (thyme oil, being mainly represented by oxygenated compounds. The antibacterial activity was evaluated against six pathogenic and five non-pathogenic bacterial strains. Oregano and thyme oils showed the strongest antibacterial activity against the pathogenic ones. The antifungal activity was evaluated against six fungal strains of agrifood interest: the oils tested exhibited variable degrees of activity. Two Salmonella typhimurium strains were used to assess the possible mutagenic activity. No oil showed mutagenic activity. Data obtained let us hypothesise that the use of essential oils could be a viable and safe way to decrease the utilisation of synthetic food preservatives. Further research is needed to obtain information regarding the practical effectiveness of essential oils to prevent the growth of food borne and spoiling microbes under specific application conditions.

  1. Sister chromatid exchanges in the bone marrow cells of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in the bone marrow of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation doses and by the chemical mutagens, mitomycin C (MMC), cyclophosphamide (CP), and sulphonate-methylmethane (SMM), were studied. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of a simplified SCE in vivo detecting system developed in our laboratory and to compare the results obtained with those reported elsewhere. Simplification consisted in administering the amounts of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) necessary to observe the SCE, after first adsorbing the BrdU in activated carbon and then injecting it interperitoneally, into the rats. The results were a longer time in vivo ADN incorporation without convulsions in the rats, and a reduction in the time course as compared to other methods. We observed a basal rate of 3.6+-0.37 SCE/cell and that: 0.44 Gy of gamma radiation induced 7.7+-0.73 SCE/cell; 1.6 μg/g of MMC induced 8.1+-1.20 SCE/cell; 5 μg/g of CP induced 8.25+-1.5 SCE/cell, 40 μg/g of SMM induced 22.0+-5 SCE/cell and 380 μg/g of sulphonate-ethylmethane induced 8.6+-1.2 SCE/cell. This showed that all the agents were capable of inducing SCE in the bone marrow cells of rats in vivo under our conditions. We noted a greater induced efficiency for gamma radiation than the obtained by other investigators and a relatively similar efficiency in the case of chemical mutagens as reported in other studies. (author)

  2. Comparison of the mutagenic potential of 17 physical and chemical agents analyzed by the flow cytometry mutation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, C. Tenley [Cytomation GTX Inc., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Ross, Carley D. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Keysar, Stephen B. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Joshi, Dhanashree D. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Lim, Chang-Uk [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fox, Michael H. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States) and Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1618 (United States)]. E-mail: mfox@colostate.edu

    2006-12-01

    Several methods to assess genotoxicity of physical and chemical agents have been developed, most of which depend on growing colonies in selective medium. We recently published a new method for detecting mutations in the CD59 gene in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line that contains a single copy of human chromosome 11 (CHO A{sub L}). The assay is based on detecting the surface expression of CD59 with monoclonal antibodies using flow cytometry. The capabilities of this flow cytometry mutation assay (FCMA) to detect mutations from a wide variety of genotoxic agents are described here. There was a 400-fold separation between CD59{sup -} and CD59{sup +} populations based on fluorescence intensity. Small numbers of negative cells mixed in with positive cells were detected in a highly linear fashion. Mutation dose response curves over a dose range yielding 80% to 20% survival are shown for ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), mitomycin C (MMC) and lead acetate. EMS and lead acetate exhibited a threshold in response while MMC had a linear dose response over the full dose range. The mutant fraction was measured over time periods ranging up to 35 days following treatment. The mutant fraction peaked at different times ranging from 6 to 12 days after treatment. An additional 14 chemical and physical agents including point mutagens, heavy metals, ionizing and UV radiation, and DNA intercalators and cross linkers, were analyzed for mutagenic potential after doses giving 80% to 20% survival. The results presented here demonstrate the sensitivity and broad-ranging capability of the FCMA to detect mutations induced by a variety of genotoxic agents.

  3. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  4. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells

  5. Some factors determining the concentration of liver proteins for optimal mutagenicity of chemicals in the Salmonella/microsome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaveille, C; Kuroki, T; Brun, G; Hautefeuille, A; Camus, A M; Bartsch, H

    1979-12-01

    In plate assays in the presence of S. typhimurium TA100 and various amounts of liver 9000 X g supernatant (S9) from either untreated, phenobarbitone- (PB) or Aroclor-treated rats, the S9 concentration required for optimal mutagenicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB) depended both on the source of S9 and on the concentration of the test compound. In these assays, the water-soluble procarcinogen, dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) was mutagenic in S. typhimurium TA1530 only in the presence of a 35-fold higher concentration of liver S9 from PB-treated rats than that required for AFB, a lipophilic compound. In liquid assays, a biphasic relationship was observed in the mutagenicities in S. typhimurium TA100 of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and AFB and the concentration of liver S9. For optimal mutagenesis of BP, the concentration of liver S9 from rats treated with methylcholanthrene (MC) was 4.4% (v/v); for AFB it was 2.2% (v/v) liver S9 from either Aroclor-treated or untreated rats. At higher concentrations of S9 the mutagenicity of BP and of AFB was related inversely to the amount of S9 per assay. The effect of Aroclor treatment on the microsomemediated mutagenicity of AFB was assay-dependent: in the liquid assay, AFB mutagenicity was decreased, whereas in the plate assay it did not change or was increased. As virtually no bacteria-bound microsomes were detected by electron microscopy, after the bacteria had been incubated in a medium containing 1-34% (v/v) MC-treated rat-liver S9, it is concluded that, in mutagenicity assays, mutagenic metabolites generated by microsomal enzymes from certain pro-carcinogens have to diffuse through the assay medium before reaching the bacteria. Thus the mutagenicity of BP was dependent on both the concentration of rat-liver microsomes and that of total cytosolic proteins and other soluble nucleophiles such as glutathione. At a concentration of 4.4% (v/v) liver S9, the mutagenicity of BP was about 3.6 times higher than in assays containing a 4-fold higher

  6. Histological and genetic studies on the male sterile mutants of tomato induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this experiment was to test the radiosensitivity of the M1 generation, and to determine the inheritance and morphological characteristics of the male-sterile mutants in tomatoes. The results obtained are as follows: Radiation damage varied with the water content of the seeds. The least damage occurred in the range of 11.34 to 14.29 percent moisture. Four tomato cultivars were gamma irradiated. The cultivar Sekai-ichi was the most sensitive while the other responded similarly to each other. Chemical mutagen treatments caused greater damage to germination, to delayed flowering and to pollen fertility than did radiation. Pollen fertility and seeds per fruit in seedling gamma irradiated plants decreased as the dosage and dose rate increased. Five male-sterile mutants were found. Each was controlled by a single recessive gene. All five male-steriles were nonallelic. Floral sized of the male-sterile mutants were slightly smaller. Ovule fertility varied, usually being lower than normal type. Male sterility varied, usually being lower than normal type. Male sterility in 109-1ms strain was caused by unbalanced, insufficient nutrients being made available to the pollen-mother cells from the tapetal tissued. (author)

  7. Lycopersicon assays of chemical/radiation genotoxicity for the study of environmental mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William F; Owens, Elizabeth T

    2002-07-01

    From a literature survey, 21 chemicals are tabulated that have been evaluated in 39 assays for their clastogenic effects in Lycopersicon. Nineteen of the 21 chemicals are reported as giving a positive reaction (i.e. causing chromosome aberrations). Of these, five are reported positive with a dose response. In addition, 23 assays have been recorded for six types of radiation, all of which reacted positively. The results of 102 assays with 32 chemicals and seven types of radiation tested for the induction of gene mutations are tabulated, as well as 20 chemicals and/or radiation in combined treatments. The Lycopersicon esculentum (2n=24) assay is a very good plant bioassay for assessing chromosome damage both in mitosis and meiosis and for somatic mutations induced by chemicals and radiations. The Lycopersicon bioassay has been shown to be as sensitive and as specific an assay as other plant genotoxicity assays, such as Hordeum vulgare, Vicia faba, Crepis capillaris, Pisum sativum and Allium cepa and should be considered in further studies in assessing clastogenicity. Tests using L. esculentum can be made for a spectrum of mutant phenotypes of which many are identifiable in young seedlings. PMID:12088718

  8. Studying the synergistic damage effects induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR) with four chemical mutagens on human lymphocyte DNA using comet assay in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this investigation was to study the synergistic DNA damage effects in human lymphocytes induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR, SAR of 3 W/kg) with four chemical mutagens, i.e. mitomycin C (MMC, DNA crosslinker), bleomycin (BLM, radiomimetic agent), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent), and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, UV-mimetic agent). The DNA damage of lymphocytes exposed to RFR and/or with chemical mutagens was detected at two incubation time (0 or 21 h) after treatment with comet assay in vitro. Three combinative exposure ways were used. Cells were exposed to RFR and chemical mutagens for 2 and 3 h, respectively. Tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) were utilized as DNA damage indexes. The results showed no difference of DNA damage indexes between RFR group and control group at 0 and 21 h incubation after exposure (P > 0.05). There were significant difference of DNA damage indexes between MMC group and RFR + MMC co-exposure group at 0 and 21 h incubation after treatment (P 0.05). The experimental results indicated 1.8 GHz RFR (SAR, 3 W/kg) for 2 h did not induce the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects in vitro, but could enhance the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects induced by MMC and 4NQO. The synergistic DNA damage effects of 1.8 GHz RFR with BLM or MMS were not obvious

  9. Mutation induction in rice by radiation combined with chemical protectants and mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of the rice variety 'Dourado Precoce' were treated with different combinations of gamma rays, cysteine and EMS or gamma rays, cysteine and dES. Cysteine showed some protection against the effects of gamma radiation and combined gamma-ray + chemical treatments with regard to germination, seedling height and fertility. There are also indications of changes in the spectra of chlorophyll mutations. (author)

  10. Mutations induction on the characters of wheat by physical and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical and chemical mutagenesis induces variability on genetical materials and after selectivity can be obtained mutants with improved and positive features. Induced mutations were produced from ionizing radiation sources and chemical agents. Throughout several years were obtained improved features materials, comparing with parents. In the wheat C 178 from physical mutagenesis, was obtained the line MF/3 by consecutive radiations: 15 kR and 10 kR. This line had a plant height of 25 % shorter than parent and better production features. After an experimental work and field tests in the years 1988-1996 the line MK3 4/3(LBZxL1376) treated wth dMS 0.004M present a new cultivar with these characteristics: protein content 11.6 %, yield 6 % higher than control and good agronomic type. (authors)

  11. Targeting of chemical mutagens to differentiating B-lymphocytes in vivo: detection by direct DNA labeling and sister chromatid exchange induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, S.E.; Nanna, U.C.; Dietert, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo systems for analyzing mutagen interactions with a specific differentiating cell population are rare. Taking advantage of the unique anatomical features of the bursa of Fabricius in the chicken, the authors explored the possibility of targeting chemical mutagens to a defined differentiating cell population in the animal, namely, the B-lymphocytes series. Such cells are known to be the targets for the oncogene-activating avian leukosis virus. Targeting of chemicals to cells of the bursa was demonstrated by application of the DNA-specific fluorochrome 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to the anal lips of neonatal chicks. Bright nuclear fluorescence of cells in the bursa demonstrated to occur within minutes after the application of 500..mu..l of DAPI. DAPI labeling of nuclei was detected up to several days after a single application. No nuclear labeling was exhibited in cells of neighboring tissues. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)(10..mu..l) was applied to the anal lips of day-old chicks to study dose-response kinetics for mutagen targeting to DNA of dividing B-lymphocytes in the bursa. Since the mitotic index was found to be quite high (25-30%) in the bursa, chromosome analysis was used to assay for genome damage. Sister chromatid exchange frequencies of 3.9, 7.3, and 9.0 (baseline 2.5) per cell were obtained at MMS dosages per animal of 50 ..mu..g, 100..mu..g, and 200..mu..g, respectively. These results indicate the rapid and quantitative localization of DNA-binding chemicals to cells of the bursa, particularly the resident B-lymphocytes. The bursa should be a useful system for studying mutagen-DNA interactions in the differentiating B-lymphocyte and subsequent influences on the development of immunity and lymphoproliferative disease.

  12. Targeting of chemical mutagens to differentiating B-lymphocytes in vivo: detection by direct DNA labeling and sister chromatid exchange induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo systems for analyzing mutagen interactions with a specific differentiating cell population are rare. Taking advantage of the unique anatomical features of the bursa of Fabricius in the chicken, the authors explored the possibility of targeting chemical mutagens to a defined differentiating cell population in the animal, namely, the B-lymphocytes series. Such cells are known to be the targets for the oncogene-activating avian leukosis virus. Targeting of chemicals to cells of the bursa was demonstrated by application of the DNA-specific fluorochrome 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to the anal lips of neonatal chicks. Bright nuclear fluorescence of cells in the bursa demonstrated to occur within minutes after the application of 500μl of DAPI. DAPI labeling of nuclei was detected up to several days after a single application. No nuclear labeling was exhibited in cells of neighboring tissues. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)(10μl) was applied to the anal lips of day-old chicks to study dose-response kinetics for mutagen targeting to DNA of dividing B-lymphocytes in the bursa. Since the mitotic index was found to be quite high (25-30%) in the bursa, chromosome analysis was used to assay for genome damage. Sister chromatid exchange frequencies of 3.9, 7.3, and 9.0 (baseline 2.5) per cell were obtained at MMS dosages per animal of 50 μg, 100μg, and 200μg, respectively. These results indicate the rapid and quantitative localization of DNA-binding chemicals to cells of the bursa, particularly the resident B-lymphocytes. The bursa should be a useful system for studying mutagen-DNA interactions in the differentiating B-lymphocyte and subsequent influences on the development of immunity and lymphoproliferative disease

  13. Effect of chemical mutagens and carcinogens on gene expression profiles in human TK6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lode Godderis

    Full Text Available Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes, we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose-response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti- apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control.

  14. Rhizobium japonicum mutants induced by gamma rays and some chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous symbiotic mutants of R.japonicum were isolated after UV irradiation or nitrosoguanidine mutagensis. Cultures of R.japonicum GM 377 were irradiated with 0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 175, 200, 250 and 300 krad of gamma-rays. As for chemical mutagensis, cultures were treated with Sodium azide and colchicin at concentration of 1x10-6, 1x10-5, 5x10-5, 1x10-4, 5x10-4, 1x10-3 and 5x10-3 mol. Results revealed that gentamicin at concentration of 24.0 Mg/ml was able to kill all the populations of R.japonicum. Therefore, this concentration was used for mutants selection. However, numerous mutants at different freguencies were identified. The highest percentage of mutant was obtained with Sodium azide at 1x10-4 mol

  15. Proceedings of the 8th workshop on plant mutation breeding. Effective use of physical/chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Watanabe, Kazuo; Tano, Shigemitsu (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The Workshop on Plant Mutation Breeding of FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia), was held on 9-13 October 2000 in Hanoi, Vietnam. The Workshop was co-sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency (STA), the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (MOSTE of Vietnam) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD of Vietnam) in cooperation with the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF), National Institute of Agrobiological Resources (NIAR of Vietnam), the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Two Scientists, a Project Leader and an expert on methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding, participated from each of the member countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. Also attending the Workshop were, one participant from Korea, seven participants from both Japan and Vietnam. The number of the participants in the Workshop totalled about sixty people including guests and observers. Sixteen papers including eight invited papers on the current status of methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding in the participating countries were presented. Discussions were focused on the subject concerning 'Effective Use of Physical/Chemical Mutagens', as well as a detailed report on the current status of research in each participating country. In addition, the topics of developing a mutant breeding database, an information exchange for plant/crop mutation breeding, and more tightly bound international co-operative research in the near future were also high on the agenda. This proceeding compiles the invited and contributed papers that were submitted from the speakers. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the 8th workshop on plant mutation breeding. Effective use of physical/chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Workshop on Plant Mutation Breeding of FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia), was held on 9-13 October 2000 in Hanoi, Vietnam. The Workshop was co-sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency (STA), the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (MOSTE of Vietnam) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD of Vietnam) in cooperation with the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF), National Institute of Agrobiological Resources (NIAR of Vietnam), the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Two Scientists, a Project Leader and an expert on methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding, participated from each of the member countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. Also attending the Workshop were, one participant from Korea, seven participants from both Japan and Vietnam. The number of the participants in the Workshop totalled about sixty people including guests and observers. Sixteen papers including eight invited papers on the current status of methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding in the participating countries were presented. Discussions were focused on the subject concerning 'Effective Use of Physical/Chemical Mutagens', as well as a detailed report on the current status of research in each participating country. In addition, the topics of developing a mutant breeding database, an information exchange for plant/crop mutation breeding, and more tightly bound international co-operative research in the near future were also high on the agenda. This proceeding compiles the invited and contributed papers that were submitted from the speakers. (author)

  17. Protection against genetic hazards from environmental chemical mutagens: experience with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation protection, the recurrent theme is, and always has been, dose limitation whether it is for occupational workers, individual members of the public or the population as a whole. The key words are 'dose' and 'limitation'. The quantitative system of dose limitation has been achieved because of a number of conceptual developments in our understanding of the mechanism of radiation action, development of radiation dosimetry, the accumulation of a vast body of quantitative information on dose-effect relationships and the effects of various biological and physical variables that affect these relationships of data on patterns and levels of exposures likely to be encountered to make estimates of the effects expected to result from such exposures, and balancing of risks to society against the benefits derived, the latter a matter of informed judgement. The philosophy has always been to avoid all unnecessary exposures and to limit the necessary exposures (justified by the benefits expected) to as low a level as reasonably achievable, social and economic factors being taken into acccount. The introduction of the concept that the system of dose limitation to the population should be based on genetic risks has stressed the need for careful planning to ensure that our genetic heritage is not endangered. Transfer of this knowledge to the field of chemical protection is discussed. (Auth.)

  18. 59. Protectivc effect of melatonin on genetic damage by chemical mutagen and the influence on cell prolife-ration kenetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we observed the effect of melatonin on the frequency of sister chromatid exchange, micronucleus formation of binuclear cell in lymphocyte from human peripheral blood in vitro, micronucleus formation of mouse bone marrow polycychromatic erythrocyte in vivo, which were induced by chemical mutagen, and lymphocyte proliferation kenetics in vitro. Methods: ① Lymphocytes were cultured in vitro in the presence of 0.01,0.10,1.00 mmol/L melatonin, mitomycin C(MMC) (positive control), 0.5% ethanol (negative control)and 0.01,0.10,1.00 mmol/L melatonin plus MMC for 72 h at 37℃±1℃. Lymphocytes were examined for the frequence of SCE, mitotic index, cell proliferation cycle, cell cycle ratio and proliferation index. ② Lymphocytes were cultured in vitro in the presence of 0.01,0.10,1.00 mmol/L melatonin, mitomycin C(MMC) (positive control), 0.5% ethanol (negative control) and 0.01,0.10,1.00 mmol/L melatonin plus MMC for 44 h at 37℃±1℃. Then each culture was given cytochalasin B, which was cultured to 72 h. Binuclear lymphocytes were examined for the micronucleus rate. ③ The mice were administered with 0.1, 1.0,10.0 mg/kg*bw melatonin and distillated water (negative control) respectively for 7 d, then were given melatonin plus cyclophosphamide (CP) (positive control) for 2 d since the eighth day. The rate of micronulclei of mouse bone marrow polycychromatic erythrocyte was examined. Results: ① The frequences of sister chromatid exchange of lymphocytes which were cultured in the presence of 0.01,0.10,1.00 mmol/L melatonin compared with negative control exhibited no statistical significance. ② The SCE of cells treated with melatonin plus MMC compared with positive control were markedly decreased. ③ The mitotic indices of lymphocytes cultured in the presence of 0.10,1.00 mmol/L melatonin were lower than negative control. The proliferation index was significant lower than negative control only in the culture exposed to 1.00 mmol

  19. A robust method for assessing chemically induced mutagenic effects in the oral cavity of transgenic Big Blue® rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert R; Thompson, Chad M; Dinesdurage, Harshini R; Elbekai, Reem H; Suh, Mina; Rohr, Annette C; Proctor, Deborah M

    2015-08-01

    The Big Blue® (BB) in vivo mutation assay uses transgenic rodents to measure treatment-induced mutations in virtually any tissue. The BB assay can be conducted in rats or mice and is ideal for investigating tissue-specific mutagenic mode of action of tumor induction. Some tissues such as oral mucosa have not been thoroughly studied. Due to the small quantity and cartilaginous nature of oral cavity tissues, development of special prosection and DNA isolation methods was required to permit robust analysis of mutations in these tissues. Improved surgical methods permitted collection of adequate and reproducible quantities of tissue (∼45 mg gingiva/buccal and ∼30 mg gingiva/palate). Optimized DNA isolation methods included use of liquid nitrogen pulverization, homogenization, nuclei pelleting, digestion, and phenol/chloroform extraction, to yield sufficient quantities of DNA from these tissues. In preliminary optimization work, mutant frequency (MF) in tongue and gingiva was increased in rats exposed to the promutagen, benzo[a]pyrene, and the direct mutagen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. The oral cavity carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO; 10 ppm in drinking water; 28 days), was qualified as a positive control for mutagenesis in oral tissues since it caused significant increases in cII MFs in gingiva/palate (50.2-fold) and gingiva/buccal tissues (21.3-fold), but not in liver or bone marrow (0.9- and 1.4-fold, respectively). These results are consistent with the observation that 4-NQO primarily induces tumors in oral cavity. Results also demonstrate the utility of the BB rat mutation assay and optimized methods for investigation of oral cavity mutagenicity, and by extension, analysis of other small and cartilaginous tissues. PMID:25969955

  20. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. I. Chemical reduction and mitigation of mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Flora, Silvio; Camoirano, Anna; Micale, Rosanna T; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Marabotto, Elisa; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the reducing capacity of human gastric fluid from healthy individuals, under fasted and fed conditions, is critical for assessing the cancer hazard posed by ingested hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and for developing quantitative physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models used in risk assessment. In the present study, the patterns of Cr(VI) reduction were evaluated in 16 paired pre- and post-meal gastric fluid samples collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Human gastric fluid was effective both in reducing Cr(VI), as measured by using the s-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method, and in attenuating mutagenicity in the Ames test. The mean (±SE) Cr(VI)-reducing ability of post-meal samples (20.4±2.6μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid) was significantly higher than that of pre-meal samples (10.2±2.3μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid). When using the mutagenicity assay, the decrease of mutagenicity produced by pre-meal and post-meal samples corresponded to reduction of 13.3±1.9 and 25.6±2.8μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid, respectively. These data are comparable to parallel results conducted by using speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Cr(VI) reduction was rapid, with >70% of total reduction occurring within 1min and 98% of reduction is achieved within 30min with post-meal gastric fluid at pH2.0. pH dependence was observed with decreasing Cr(VI) reducing capacity at higher pH. Attenuation of the mutagenic response is consistent with the lack of DNA damage observed in the gastrointestinal tract of rodents following administration of ≤180ppm Cr(VI) for up to 90days in drinking water. Quantifying Cr(VI) reduction kinetics in the human gastrointestinal tract is necessary for assessing the potential hazards posed by Cr(VI) in drinking water. PMID:27404458

  1. The Role of Genotypes That Modify the Toxicity of Chemical Mutagens in the Risk for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Ann Gross-Davis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN (polycythemia vera; essential thrombocythemia; primary myelofibrosis is unknown, however they are associated with a somatic mutation—JAK2 V617F—suggesting a potential role for environmental mutagens. Methods: We conducted a population-based case-control study in three rural Pennsylvania counties of persons born 1921–1968 and residing in the area between 2000–2008. Twenty seven MPN cases and 292 controls were recruited through random digit dialing. Subjects were genotyped and odds ratios estimated for a select set of polymorphisms in environmentally sensitive genes that might implicate specific environmental mutagens if found to be associated with a disease. Results: The presence of NAT2 slow acetylator genotype, and CYP1A2, GSTA1, and GSTM3 variants were associated with an average 3–5 fold increased risk. Conclusions: Exposures, such as to aromatic compounds, whose toxicity is modified by genotypes associated with outcome in our analysis may play a role in the environmental etiology of MPNs.

  2. Experiments with mutagen treatments of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were carried out with rice and barley to study the effects of ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens on the basis of seedling growth reduction. The effects of the chemical mutagens ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) and diethyl sulphate (dES) were studied. A new method for the application of chemical mutagens in rice was developed. The radiosenstivity of dormant rice and barley seeds to gamma radiation and fast neutrons was compared. The dose required to produce 50% reduction in rice was 10 times higher with gamma radiations than with fast neutrons. This ratio for barely was 37:1. (author). 4 refs, 6 tabs

  3. Evaluation of the co-genotoxic effects of 1800 MHz GSM radiofrequency exposure and a chemical mutagen in cultured human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Anne; Freire, Maëlle; Bachelet, Christine; Collin, Alice; Levêque, Philippe; Pla, Simon; Debouzy, Jean-Claude

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the effect of a 1800 MHz radiofrequency GSM signal combined with a known chemical mutagen (4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide: 4NQO) on human THP1 cells. Comet and γ-H2AX assays were used to assess DNA damage. No heating of the cell cultures was noted during exposure (2 h). The exposure of cells to electromagnetic fields with SARs of 2 to 16 W/kg did not increase the DNA damage induced by 4NQO, whereas the number of DNA strand breaks increased with a temperature increase of at least 4 °C. In conclusion, no co-genotoxic effect of radiofrequency was found at levels of exposure that did not induce heating.

  4. Influence of single and combination treatments of physical and chemical mutagen on chlorophyll mutations in Finger Millet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma rays, ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and their combined treatments influenced differently in producing chlorophyll mutations. A good number of chlorophyll mutants with varied frequencies were recorded in M2 generation. The frequency of chlorophyll mutants was higher at lower doses of gamma rays, EMS and their combination treatments. The most frequently observed mutant was Albino type. The other chlorophyll mutants isolated were Xantha, Viridis, Striata and Tigrina. The frequency of tigrina and striata was lowest in variety A-404 and Hr-374, respectively. The efficiency and effectiveness was high at the lower doses of mutagens in both the varieties. EMS (0.2%) was more effective than the corresponding lower dose of gamma rays for both the varieties. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs

  5. Repair pathways in mammalian cells: Incision-ligation kinetics after UV, x-rays and mutagenic chemicals. Effects of 3-aminobenzamide and hydroxyurea + cytosine arabinoside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of DNA-damage involves the combined action of several enzyme functions. With regard to the incision step different pathways exist. In nucleotide excision repair an endonuclease recognizes the lesion, cuts the DNA strand and the faulty nucleotide is excised together with a number of undamaged nucleotides. This seems to be the process which operates in mammalian cells after exposure to UV and a number of chemicals which introduce so called bulky lesions in the DNA. After exposure to X-rays and simple alkylating chemicals such as methyl methanesulfonate. The first step involves the action of a glycosylase which only removes the damaged base. The incision is exercised by an endonuclease which recognises abasic sites. In this process, i.e. base excision repair, probably only the damaged nucleotide is exchanged. When the damaged piece of DNA has been removed one would imagine that, independently of the type of lesion initially present, the same types of enzymes could be used to close the gap in the strand, this seems, however, not to be the case. In this investigation the authors used 3-aminobenzamide (BA) or hydroxy urea (HU) combined with cytosine arabinoside (ara C) to study repair of damage induced by UV and a number of mutagenic chemicals. DNA strand breaks have been measured by the DNA-unwinding technique

  6. Development of an improved and early sowing potential variety of jute - binadeshipat-2 using chemical mutagen sodium azide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jute is the important agricultural and industrial resource of Bangladesh for earning foreign currency. Seeds of the widely cultivated variety, CVL-1 were treated with 4 mM to 20mM of sodium azide (NaN3). The treated seeds were grown in M1 to M10 generations. A single plant (selection number C-278) was selected from M2 segregating population on the basis of early sowing potential and late flowering. Ten fiber quality characters were tested and it was found that the fiber quality of the mutant had been improved. Hence, the mutagen sodium azide showed extra potentiality to induce fiber quality characters of jute. The strain C-278 was also tested through Preliminary, Advanced, Zonal Yield Trial and Farmers field trial at different locations of the jute growing area in Bangladesh. The field evaluation team of the National Seed Board (NSB) visited most of the trials and reported that at early sowing and overall performance of the strain C-278 was found best than that of the mother variety. Besides these the strain produced 7.5% and 20% higher fiber yield than the mother variety CVL-1 and a local cultivar, D-154, respectively. After evaluation of the Technical Committee of NSB recommended that the strain C-278 may be released as a variety. The National Seed Board released the strain C-278 as a National jute variety under the name Binadeshipat-2 for cultivation in Bangladesh

  7. Biological effects of mutagenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing body of evidence that mutagenic agents (biological, chemical and physical) play an important role in the etiology of human diseases. Mutations may occur in the germinal as well as in the somatic cells. Mutations of the germ cells may result on infertility or fertilization of damaged cells, the later leading to abortion or birth of a malformed fetus. Somatic-cells mutations may have various biological effects, depending on the period of the human life at which the mutation occurs. If it occurs during the prenatal life, a teratogenic or carcinogenic effect will be observed. If the somatic cell is damaged during the postnatal life, this will lead to neoplastic transformation. Therefore it is extremely important to know the mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic effects of various biological, chemical and physical agents in order to eliminate them from our environment. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  8. Mutagenicity of alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, M; Takahashi, Y; Wakabayashi, K; Sugimura, T

    1981-02-01

    The mutagenicities of evaporated residues of alcoholic beverages were tested by the Ames method with the modification of pre-incubation, by using Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and TA98. 12 of 13 brands of whisky were mutagenic to TA100 without S9 mix. Addition of S9 mix decreased or abolished these mutagenicities. 5 brands of brandy and 1 apple brandy were tested, and all showed a similar type of mutagenicity to that of whisky. A fraction of brand-K whisky, containing a major mutagen(s), eluted from XAD-2 column with water, gave 3800 revertants of TA100 per plate at a dose equivalent to 10 ml of whisky. PMID:7012607

  9. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  10. Mutagenicity potential of commercial broth cubes at varying concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, there has been a growing concern on the mutagenicity potential of environmental chemical systems. These environmental chemicals such as pesticides, food additives, synthetic drugs, water and atmospheric pollutants are possible causes of mutagenic activity. Meat products and some meat flavorings, were also reported to exhibit mutagenic activity. And since these products are normal part of the daily human diet, there is a need for extensive studies regarding the possible mutagenic activity associated with these products. This study aimed to evaluate the mutagenicity potential of commercial broth cubes at varying concentration. The researchers sought to answer the following questions: 1. Do beef, pork and chicken broth cubes exhibit mutagenic activity? 2. Are there significant differences in the mutagenic activity among the three samples? 3. Are these significant differences in the mutagenic activity exhibited by each of the samples compared to that of Mitomycin-C (positive control)? 4. Which of the sample of each specific concentration exhibit the greatest mutagenic activity? Three specific concentrations of beef, pork and chicken broth cubes were prepared and their mutagenicity potential was evaluated by using the Micronucleus test. The formation of micro nucleated polychromatic and micro nucleated normo chromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow cells of mice treated with these samples were detected using a Carl-Zeiss photo microscope. The statistical tool used to test the validity of the null hypothesis was analysis of variance using randomized complete block design and independent T- test. (author)

  11. Comparison of the mutagenicities of fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelroy, R A; Sklarew, D S; Downey, S P

    1981-11-01

    Chemical fractions from 4 shale oils including one produced in an above-ground retort (Paraho), 2 produced below ground by in situ method (Occidental and Geokinetics), and 1 produced by a simulated modified in situ process (Livermore), were tested for mutagenicity against Salmonella typhimurium TA98 in the Ames assay system. Their mutagenic activities were compared with 2 other complex materials: a high-boiling coal distillate (The Solvent Refined Coal Process I (SRC II) heavy distillate), and a crude petroleum (Prudhoe Bay). Each material was fractionated by Sephadex LH-20 partition chromatography and by acid-base solvent extraction to provide chemical fractions for bioassay. Mutagenic activity was detected in the coal liquid (and their fractions), but not in the natural crude oil nor in any of its fractions. The basic and tar fractions derived by solvent extraction, and the LH-20 methanol fractions contained most of the mutagenic activity recovered from the unfractionated material. The heavy distillate was approx. 10 times more active in the Ames assay than the most mutagenically active shale oil. The most mutagenically active of the shale oils was about 10 times more active than the least active shale oil. PMID:7035938

  12. Physical-chemical and microbiological characterization, and mutagenic activity of airborne PM sampled in a biomass-fueled electrical production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Corey A; Lemieux, Christine L; Long, Alexandra S; Kystol, Jørgen; Vogel, Ulla; White, Paul A; Madsen, Anne Mette

    2011-05-01

    Biomass combustion is used in heating and electric power generation in many areas of the world. Airborne particulate matter (PM) is released when biomass is brought to a facility, stored, and combusted. Occupational exposure to airborne PM within biomass-fueled facilities may lead to health problems. In March and August of 2006, airborne PM was collected from a biomass-fueled facility located in Denmark. In addition, source-specific PM was generated from straw and wood pellets using a rotating drum. The PM was analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, microbial components, mutagenic activity, and ability to generate highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) in cell-free aqueous suspensions. PM collected from the boiler room and the biomass storage hall had higher levels of mutagenic activity, PAHs and metals, and a higher hROS generating potential than the source specific PM. The mutagenic activity was generally more potent without S9 activation, and on the metabolically enhanced strain YG1041, relative to TA98. Significant correlations were found between mutagenicity on YG1041 (without S9) and PAH concentration and mutagenicity on YG1041 (with S9) and hROS generating ability. PM collected in March was more toxic than PM collected in August. Overall, airborne PM collected from the facility, especially that from the boiler room, were more toxic than PM generated from straw and wood chips. The results suggest that exposure to combustion PM in a biomass-fueled facility, which likely includes PM from biomass combustion as well as internal combustion vehicles, may contribute to an elevated risk of adverse health effects. PMID:20872826

  13. Physical‐chemical and microbiological characterization, and mutagenic activity of airborne PM sampled in a biomass‐fueled electrical production facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Corey A.; Lemieux, Christine L.; Long, Alexandra S.;

    2011-01-01

    Biomass combustion is used in heating and electric power generation in many areas of the world. Airborne particulate matter (PM) is released when biomass is brought to a facility, stored, and combusted. Occupational exposure to airborne PM within biomass‐fueled facilities may lead to health...... problems. In March and August of 2006, airborne PM was collected from a biomass‐fueled facility located in Denmark. In addition, source‐specific PM was generated from straw and wood pellets using a rotating drum. The PM was analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, microbial components......, mutagenic activity, and ability to generate highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) in cell‐free aqueous suspensions. PM collected from the boiler room and the biomass storage hall had higher levels of mutagenic activity, PAHs and metals, and a higher hROS generating potential than the source specific PM. The...

  14. Molecular and genetic mechanisms of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program is primarily concerned with elucidation of the nature of DNA lesions produced by environmental and energy related mutagens, their mechanisms of action, and their repair. The main focus is on actions of chemical mutagens and electromagnetic radiations. Synergistic interactions between mutagens and the mutational processes that lead to synergism are being investigated. Mutagens are chosen for study on the basis of their potential for analysis of mutation (as genetic probes), for development of procedures for reducing mutational damage, for their potential importance to risk assessment, and for development of improved mutagen testing systems. Bacterial cells are used because of the rapidity and clarity of scientific results that can be obtained, the detailed genetic maps, and the many well-defined mutand strains available. The conventional tools of microbial and molecular genetics are used, along with intercomparison of genetically related strains. Advantage is taken of tcollective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  15. Scanning electron-microscopic and X-ray-microanalytic observation of diesel-emission particles associated with mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particles formed by diesel combustion, which may contain various mutagenic chemicals like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), are analyzed in their morphology by scanning electron microscopy; their sulfur content is detected by X-ray microanalysis, and mutagenicity is tested with a Salmonella typhimurium bioassay. The authors find a close correlation between sulfur content and mutagenicity of PAH. (Auth.)

  16. Relative effectiveness of mutagens on amylase production in Aspergillus wentii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three physical mutagens (UV light and γ- and X-rays) and 3 chemical mutagens (N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, hydroxylamine and nitrous acid) were tested for their ability to produce mutants of A. wentii Wehmer (IMI 17295) having altered amylase activity. There was marked variation in amylase activity among the mutants, increase, decrease or complete absence of such activity was noticed. Nitrous acid was most effective in inducing high yielding amylase producing mutants. (author)

  17. Assessment of the Mutagenicity of Sediments from Yangtze River Estuary Using Salmonella Typhimurium/Microsome Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available Sediments in estuaries are of important environmental concern because they may act as pollution sinks and sources to the overlying water body. These sediments can be accumulated by benthic organisms. This study assessed the mutagenic potential of sediment extracts from the Yangtze River estuary by using the Ames fluctuation assay with the Salmonella typhimurium his (- strain TA98 (frameshift mutagen indicator and TA100 (baseshift mutagen indicator. Most of the sediment samples were mutagenic to the strain TA98, regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous metabolic activation (S9 induction by β-naphthoflavone/phenobarbital. However, none of the samples were mutagenic to the strain TA100. Thus, the mutagenicity pattern was mainly frameshift mutation, and the responsible toxicants were both direct (without S9 mix and indirect (with S9 mix mutagens. The mutagenicity of the sediment extracts increased when S9 was added. Chemical analysis showed a poor correlation between the content of priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the detected mutagenicity in each sample. The concept of effect-directed analysis was used to analyze possible compounds responsible for the detected mutagenic effects. With regard to the mutagenicity of sediment fractions, non-polar compounds as well as weakly and moderately polar compounds played a main role. Further investigations should be conducted to identify the responsible components.

  18. Mutagenic and chemical analyses provide new insight into enzyme activation and mechanism of the type 2 iron-sulfur l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao Lan; Grant, Gregory A

    2016-04-15

    The crystal structure of the Type 2 l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila (lpLSD), revealed a "tail-in-mouth" configuration where the C-terminal residue acts as an intrinsic competitive inhibitor. This pre-catalytic structure undergoes an activation step prior to catalytic turnover. Mutagenic analysis of residues at or near the active site cleft is consistent with stabilization of substrate binding by many of the same residues that interact with the C-terminal cysteine and highlight the critical role of certain tail residues in activity. pH-rate profiles show that a residue with pK of 5.9 must be deprotonated and a residue with a pK of 8.5 must be protonated for activity. This supports an earlier suggestion that His 61 is the likely catalytic base. An additional residue with a pK of 8.5-9 increases cooperativity when it is deprotonated. This investigation also demonstrates that the Fe-S dehydratases convert the enamine/imine intermediates of the catalytic reaction to products on the enzyme prior to release. This is in contrast to pyridoxyl 5' phosphate based dehydratases that release an enamine/imine intermediate into solution, which then hydrolyzes to produce the ketoamine product. PMID:26971469

  19. Mutagenic Activity of Indigofera truxillensis and I. suffruticosa Aerial Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Regina Calvo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigofera truxillensis and I. suffruticosa, are used as a source of indigo dye and to treat several diseases. The mutagenic activity of the methanolic extracts from aerial parts, glycerolipid, flavonoid and alkaloid fractions of the extract were evaluated by means of Salmonella/microsome assays using TA100, TA98, TA102 and TA97a strains. The methanolic extract of I. truxillensis showed mutagenic activity in the TA98 strain without S9 while glycerolipid fraction was devoid of activity. The flavonoid and alkaloid fractions of both plants showed mutagenicity. Chemical analysis of flavonoid fractions of I. truxillensis and I. suffruticosa resulted in the identification of kaempferol, quercetin and their derivatives. The alkaloid fraction of both the species contained indigo and indirubin and indigo was found mainly responsible for the mutagenic activity.

  20. Granuloma pouch assay for mutagenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, P

    1980-11-01

    The Granuloma Pouch Assay (GPA) is an animal model in which mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of a testcompound can be detected in rapidly dividing fibroblasts of a granulation tissue in adult male rats. Growth of this tissue was initiated with a small amount of croton oil at the inside wall of a subcutaneous air pouch on the back of the animals. The test compound can be injected either into the pouch (local) or administered by systemic routes. Alkali labile DNA-lesions, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, point mutations and tumor development in situ were determined. The comparison of mutation frequencies after local and systemic administration of testcompounds, provide an estimation of the pharmacokinetic characteristics and the mutagenic potency of the chemical. The local application route allows the detection of locally active mutagens and of compounds which require activation by P-448 dependent mono-oxygenases. Liver mediated proximate metabolites are detectable when they are transformed into ultimate carcinogens in extrahepatic cells whereas chemicals with a strong organ specific activity are not. PMID:7235991

  1. Mutagenic potential of water from rivers, lakes and seas; Mutagenes Potential von Wasser aus Fluessen, Seen und Meeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietz, B. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Umwelt- und Arbeitsmedizin; Pfeiffer, E.H. [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Hygiene

    2000-07-01

    Examinations of mutagenicity with the Salmonella/microsome test are reviewed that were carried out on surface waters. In surface waters mutagenicity could preferably be found after a concentration of the samples. Adsorption to XAD resins was used most frequently as a concentration method. It showed good results especially with large volumes of water. The extraction with organic solvents was performed with good results, too. Testing samples without concentration was tried only by some authors. Results of testing for the kind of mutagenicity were very heterogeneous. In surface waters frameshift mutagens that only take effect after metabolic transformation were most abundant. In the next rank of frequency were direct acting frameshiftmutagens. Every second sampling place showed basepairsubstituting mutagens. Mutagens that only take effect after metabolic transformation were more frequent, too. Studies using concentration by adsorption to XAD resins had positive testings for mutagenicity at an amount of 10 to 1250 ml extracted water. Today chemical characterisation is often added to mutagenicity testing. On the basis of the reviewed articles it can be concluded that in regions with human influence a load of mutagens has to be expected in every sample of survace water. (orig.) [German] Es werden Mutagenitaetsuntersuchungen mit dem Salmonella/Mikrosomen-Test nach Ames dargestellt, die an Oberflaechenwaessern durchgefuehrt worden sind. Ein mutagenes Potential konnte bevorzugt nach einer Probenanreicherung nachgewiesen werden. Als Anreicherungsmethode wurde die Adsorption an XAD-Harz oder andere Adsorbentien weitaus am haeufigsten verwendet. Sie liess sich auch bei grossen Probenvolumina sehr gut handhaben. Ebenfalls gute Ergebnisse lieferte die Extraktion der Wasserproben mit organischen Loesungsmitteln. Das Testen von Proben ohne Anreicherung wurde eher selten versucht. Die Testergebnisse zur Art der Mutagenitaet der verschiedenen Waesser waren sehr heterogen. In

  2. Mutagenic activity and heterocyclic amine content of the human diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knize, M.G.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Cunningham, P.L.; Felton, J.S.

    1993-01-15

    The mutagenic activity and the mass amount of heterocyclic amines responsible for the mutagenic activity have been measured in some cooked foods. Cooked meats are the predominant source of mutagenic activity in the diet with values ranging from 0 to 10,000 revertants per gram reported in the Ames/Salmonelia test with strain TA98. Several heterocyclic amines are present and have been quantified using solid-phase extraction followed by HPLC. Frying at higher temperatures and for longer times produces the greatest mutagenic response, and concomitantly, the largest amounts of heterocyclic amines. Most of the mutagenic activity in fried meat samples can be accounted for by MelQx, DiMelQx and IQ, although other heterocylic amines are present and PHIP mutagenic activity becomes significant at higher temperatures. Non-meat products such as baked breads can also form significant mutagenic activity, particularly when overcooked. Commercially prepared hamburgers made from meat substitutes such as tofu, wheat gluten or tempeh and fried at 210{degrees}C have up to 10% of the mutagenic activity of a fried beef patty cooked under the same conditions. When detected, amounts of heterocyclic amines in fried beef patties range from a total of 0.35 ng/g for commercial beef hamburgers to 142 ng/g for a beef patty cooked over a barbecue. Dietary intake is expected to have a large range, from less than one microgram per day to over 50 micrograms per day based on current knowledge of known heterocyclic amine chemicals and heterocyclic amine-containing foods.

  3. Mutagenicity assessment of produced water during photoelectrocatalytic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Nie, Xiangping; Sheng, Guoying; Zeng, Xiangying; Fu, Jiamo; Lin, Zheng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2007-03-01

    Oilfield produced water was treated by photocatalysis, electro-oxidation, and photoelectrocatalysis, respectively. The chemical composition and toxicity of the raw effluent and treated products were assessed by chemical and mutagenicity analysis. The raw effluent exhibited mutagenic activity in both strains of Salmonella typhimurium. The lowest concentration of the dichloromethane extract capable of inducing a positive response in strains TA98 and TA100 were as low as 4 and 5 microg/plate, respectively. All three technologies could detoxify direct-acting mutagenic organic pollutants efficiently, although they could not completely eliminate mutagenicity in the water after 60 min of treatment. At equivalent doses, photoelectrocatalysis exhibited the greatest capability to reduce genotoxicity, whereas photocatalysis was the least effective and did not cause appreciable change in mutagenicity. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that n-alkanes (259.4 ng/L) and phenolic compounds (2,501.4 ng/L) were the main organic constituents in the oilfield produced water. Thus, the results of both biological and chemical analysis indicate that photoelectocatalysis was the most effective technology for degradation of oilfield wastewater. PMID:17373504

  4. [The mutagenicity of caramel colors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutwinkel-Reich, M; von der Hude, W

    1985-12-01

    In the present study commercially available caustic and ammoniated caramel colours were tested for their mutagenic potential using the Ames assay. The test was performed using the standard test strains Salmonella typhimurium TA 1535, TA 1537, TA 98 and TA 100 with and without a metabolic activation system (S9-mix). Furthermore, a special preincubation procedure without metabolic activation system was applied. None of the tested caramel colours showed any mutagenic effect in the Ames test. PMID:4082782

  5. Entrepreneurship as Elixir and Mutagen

    OpenAIRE

    Lundmark, Erik; Westelius, Alf

    2014-01-01

    Metaphors are powerful tools for sensemaking, sensegiving, and theory development, but they are often concealed in academic writing. This paper uncovers two metaphors underlying entrepreneurship discourse and research—elixir and mutagen. The elixir metaphor is uncovered by examining critiques of entrepreneurship research, and serves as a compact description of problematic aspects entrepreneurship scholars should be mindful of. The mutagen metaphor is uncovered by examining evolutionary framew...

  6. Optimalization of mutagens doses in field bean (Vicia faba minor) breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article contains results of a laboratory experiment performed to determine the degree of stem and root length reduction in field bean seedlings grown from seeds treated with mutagens - physical (gamma-ray radiation and fast neutrons) and chemical ( N-nitroso-N-ethylurea - NEU and N-nitroso-N-methylurea - NMU). Among physical mutagens the largest reduction of stem and root length was caused by doses from 9 to 15 kR of gamma-ray radiation, while among chemical mutagens - by NEU at 0.050% and 0.075% concentration. All mutagens, except gamma-ray radiation, caused a larger reduction in root than in stem length. In most cases the degree of root and stem reduction increased with increasing mutagen dose. (author)

  7. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  8. DETECTION OF CARCINOGENICITY BASED ON MUTAGENICITY IN ARABIDOPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-seven synthetic chemicals plus two mycotoxins were tested for mutagenicity in an Arabidopsis embryo system. The results of this test, prokaryotic repair tests, bacterial mutation assays, eukaryotic cell systems, and in vivo tests were compared to the carcinogenicity classi...

  9. URINARY MUTAGENICITY AS A BIOMARKER OF COOKED-MEAT-ASSOCIATED MUTAGENS AND RISK FOR COLORECTAL ADENOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Mutagenicity as a Biomarker of Cooked-Meat-Associated Mutagens and Risk for Colorectal AdenomaIn a controlled feeding study involving 60 subjects, we have investigated urinary mutagenicity as a biomarker of exposure to cooked-meat-associated mutagens. In a separa...

  10. The detection and analysis of mutagens: Final report, 1968--1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our main objectives are: to develop and improve the Salmonella test for detecting environmental mutagens; to investigate the relationship between carcinogens and mutagens and to validate the Salmonella test for detecting carcinogens; to uncover significant unsuspected environmental mutagens/carcinogens; to investigate the theory of mutagenesis; to develop new methods for determining DNA damage by particular chemicals in individual people; to understand the role of oxygen radicals in DNA damage, cancer, and aging; and to investigate the role of anti-carcinogens in preventing DNA damage

  11. Analysis of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and Dipicryethane (DPE) for Mutagenicity by the Ames/Salmonella Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R; Felton, J

    2007-10-12

    The Ames/Salmonella assay, developed by Professor Bruce Ames at the University of California, Berkeley, is a rapid and sensitive assay for detecting mutagenicity of various chemical compounds (Maron and Ames, 1983). It is a widely accepted short-term assay for detecting chemicals that induce mutations in the histidine (his) gene of Salmonella typhimurium. This is a reverse mutation assay that detects the mutational reversion of his-dependent Salmonella to the his-independent counterpart. Thereby, mutagenic compounds will increase the frequency of occurrence of his-independent bacterial colonies. The assay utilizes the specific genetically constructed strains of bacteria either with or without mammalian metabolic activation enzymes (S9), Aroclor induced rat liver homogenate to assess the mutagenicity of different compounds. In this study, we will use the Ames/Salmonella assay to investigate the mutagenicity of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) from both Bofors and Pantex, and Dipicryethane (DPE).

  12. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. (National Institute of Health, Bethesda (USA)); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. (Microbiological Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  13. Mutation epidemiology and its prospects for detecting human germinal mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No germinal mutagen has been documented in man, with the possible exception of radiation. Nevertheless, results of studies in other species make it prudent and reasonable to believe that exposure of human germ cells to ionizing radiation and certain chemicals will cause mutations that will ultimately result in illness. The proliferation of test systems for mutagens in nonhuman species does not obviate but, in fact, presses the need for a demonstration of environmentally induced germinal mutation in human beings. Guidelines for protection from ionizing radiation in human beings have been largely extrapolated from observations in mice yet, the largest study of human populations exposed to a known mutagen of animals has, to date, shown that man may be more resistant than mice to genetic damage caused by the atomic bombs in Japan. The demonstration of what would seem an obvious biological conclusion - that what causes mutations in nonhuman species causes mutations in man - has been called ''one of the most difficult epidemiological issues ever faced by biomedical science''. Possible strategies have been considered repeatedly since the 1950s. At present, several large projects are under way to monitor certain manifestations of genetic damage, and formal protocols have been developed. Because the hazards of potential mutagens are world-wide and because it is difficult to gather sufficient number of exposed persons to detect significant changes in mutation rates, a WHO consultant group is developing protocols that, if accepted internationally, may provide answers

  14. Extending (Q)SARs to incorporate proprietary knowledge for regulatory purposes: A case study using aromatic amine mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Ernst; Amberg, Alexander; Beilke, Lisa D; Bower, David; Cross, Kevin P; Custer, Laura; Ford, Kevin A; Van Gompel, Jacky; Harvey, James; Honma, Masamitsu; Jolly, Robert; Joossens, Elisabeth; Kemper, Raymond A; Kenyon, Michelle; Kruhlak, Naomi; Kuhnke, Lara; Leavitt, Penny; Naven, Russell; Neilan, Claire; Quigley, Donald P; Shuey, Dana; Spirkl, Hans-Peter; Stavitskaya, Lidiya; Teasdale, Andrew; White, Angela; Wichard, Joerg; Zwickl, Craig; Myatt, Glenn J

    2016-06-01

    Statistical-based and expert rule-based models built using public domain mutagenicity knowledge and data are routinely used for computational (Q)SAR assessments of pharmaceutical impurities in line with the approach recommended in the ICH M7 guideline. Knowledge from proprietary corporate mutagenicity databases could be used to increase the predictive performance for selected chemical classes as well as expand the applicability domain of these (Q)SAR models. This paper outlines a mechanism for sharing knowledge without the release of proprietary data. Primary aromatic amine mutagenicity was selected as a case study because this chemical class is often encountered in pharmaceutical impurity analysis and mutagenicity of aromatic amines is currently difficult to predict. As part of this analysis, a series of aromatic amine substructures were defined and the number of mutagenic and non-mutagenic examples for each chemical substructure calculated across a series of public and proprietary mutagenicity databases. This information was pooled across all sources to identify structural classes that activate or deactivate aromatic amine mutagenicity. This structure activity knowledge, in combination with newly released primary aromatic amine data, was incorporated into Leadscope's expert rule-based and statistical-based (Q)SAR models where increased predictive performance was demonstrated. PMID:26879463

  15. Quantitative mammalian cell mutagenesis and mutagen screening: study with CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CHO/HGPRT system has been developed and defined for quantifying mutation induced by various physical and chemical agents at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In all direct-acting chemical mutagens studied, mutation induction increases linearly as a function of the concentration, with no apparent threshold. Some chemicals induce mutation at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The mutagenicity of ethyl methanesulfonate has been quantified as a function of exposure concentration x treatment time. The sensitive and quantitative nature of the system enables studies of the structure-activity (mutagenicity) relationships of various classes of chemicals, including alkylating agents, heterocyclic nitrogen mustards, and platinum compounds. When rat liver S9-mediated metabolic activation is present, procarcinogens such as benzo(a)pyrene, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and dimethylnitrosamine are mutagenic, whereas their noncarcinogenic structural analogues pyrene, fluorene, and dimethylamine are not. The system has been shown to be useful in determining the interactive effects between physical and chemical agents, and in screening for mutagenicity of fractionated organic mixtures and industrial chemicals in both liquid and gaseous state. For the system to be used successfully in routine screening, further studies should be directed toward the development of a metabolic activation system suitable for a broad spectrum of chemicals, a sensitive and reliable statistical method, and an experimental design to determine compounds with low mutagenicity. The system has been expanded for determination of mutagen-induced chromosome aberration, sister-chromatid exchange, and micronucleus formation in addition to gene mutation and cytotoxicity; it can also be used to study inhibition of DNA synthesis

  16. Outcrossing in mutagenically treated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classification by sexual reproductive systems is arbitrary in that exclusive autogamy or allogamy seldom occurs. Various mechanisms can promote a certain mating system; the adherence is, however, dependent on environmental conditions at the time of flowering. The rate of cross-pollination in autogamous plant species is generally low and its practical significance for breeding procedures is negligible. Outcrossing in mutagen-treated material, on the other hand, is reported to increase by induced sterility and is especially influenced by male sterility mutations. Although increased cross-pollination can be observed in mutagenically treated autogamous plants, a change in the breeding procedure towards the methodology applied for allogamous crop plants does not seem to be warranted in procedures with practical and applied objectives. Some plant species can be classified as facultatively allogamous. Their degree of outcrossing depends largely on environmental conditions. Extreme values of 5 and 60% have been reported in the field bean (Vicia faba). While to our knowledge results on the effects of mutagen treatments on the mating pattern have not been published, prerequisites for changes towards allogamy by the aid of induced mutations are shortly discussed. (author)

  17. Combined anaerobic–ozonation process for treatment of textile wastewater: Removal of acute toxicity and mutagenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punzi, Marisa, E-mail: marisa.punzi@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Filip [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Anbalagan, Anbarasan [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Svensson, Britt-Marie [School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, SE-291 88 Kristianstad (Sweden); Jönsson, Karin [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Mattiasson, Bo; Jonstrup, Maria [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • COD and UV absorbance were effectively reduced. • The treated effluents were non-toxic to Artemia salina and Vibrio fischeri. • The real textile wastewater was mutagenic. • Mutagenicity persisted after bio treatment and even more after a short ozonation. • Higher ozone doses completely remove mutagenicity. - Abstract: A novel set up composed of an anaerobic biofilm reactor followed by ozonation was used for treatment of artificial and real textile effluents containing azo dyes. The biological treatment efficiently removed chemical oxygen demand and color. Ozonation further reduced the organic content of the effluents and was very important for the degradation of aromatic compounds, as shown by the reduction of UV absorbance. The acute toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri and the shrimp Artemia salina increased after the biological treatment. No toxicity was detected after ozonation with the exception of the synthetic effluent containing the highest concentration, 1 g/l, of the azo dye Remazol Red. Both untreated and biologically treated textile effluents were found to have mutagenic effects. The mutagenicity increased even further after 1 min of ozonation. No mutagenicity was however detected in the effluents subjected to longer exposure to ozone. The results of this study suggest that the use of ozonation as short post-treatment after a biological process can be beneficial for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds and the removal of toxicity of textile wastewater. However, monitoring of toxicity and especially mutagenicity is crucial and should always be used to assess the success of a treatment strategy.

  18. Application of the Ames Mutagenicity Test to Food Processed by Physical Preservation Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An irradiated (380 krad) mixture of four fresh vegetables - leek, celery, carrot, and cauliflower - was examined for mutagenicity by the Ames mutagenicity test using four different histidine-deficient strains of Salmonellae. Water extracts were prepared from the irradiated and unirradiated vegetables - a freeze dried extract (FDE) and a boiled extract (BE). Several problems were overcome in the mutagenicity testing of a complex substance such as food which contains free histidine, different species of bacteria, and a mixture of low and high molecular weight chemicals. In addition, we eliminated an omission in the usual protocols of the Ames test by testing the positive mutagen controls in the presence and absence of the test samples, thus reducing the possible incidence of false negatives and false positives. The induction and expression of mutagenesis by sodium azide (SA) and ethidium bromide (EB) in TA 100 and TA 98 mutant strains, respectively, decreased with increasing amounts of FDE, while increasing levels of BE suppressed the number of revertants in TA 98 in the presence of EB, but exerted little influence on the mutagenicity of SA in TA 100. No difference was observed in the antimutagenic action between the irradiated and unirradiated vegetable extracts. Both the FDE and BE preparations suppressed the action of a frameshift mutagen, but with a base-pair mutagen only the FDE or uncooked vegetable extracts produced suppression. (author)

  19. Application of the Ames mutagenicity test to food processed by physical preservation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An irradiated (380 krad) mixture of four fresh vegetables - leek, celery, carrot, and cauliflower - was examined for mutagenicity by the Ames mutagenicity test using four different histidine-deficient strains of Salmonellae. Water extracts were prepared from the irradiated and unirradiated vegetables - a freeze dried extract (FDE) and a boiled extract (BE). Several problems were overcome in the mutagenicity testing of a complex substance such as food which contains free histidine, different species of bacteria, and a mixture of low and high molecular weight chemicals. In addition, we eliminated an omission in the usual protocols of the Ames test by testing the positive mutagen controls in the presence and absence of the test samples, thus reducing the possible incidence of false negatives and false positives. The induction and expression of mutagenesis by sodium azide (SA) and ethidium bromide (EB) in TA 100 and TA 98 mutant strains, respectively, decreased with increasing amounts of FDE, while increasing levels of BE suppressed the number of revertants in TA 98 in the presence of EB, but exerted little influence on the mutagenicity of SA in TA 100. No difference was observed in the antimutagenic action between the irradiated and unirradiated vegetable extracts. Both the FDE and BE preparations suppressed the action of a frameshift mutagen, but with a base-pair mutagen only the FDE or uncooked vegetable extracts produced suppression. (author)

  20. Combined anaerobic–ozonation process for treatment of textile wastewater: Removal of acute toxicity and mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • COD and UV absorbance were effectively reduced. • The treated effluents were non-toxic to Artemia salina and Vibrio fischeri. • The real textile wastewater was mutagenic. • Mutagenicity persisted after bio treatment and even more after a short ozonation. • Higher ozone doses completely remove mutagenicity. - Abstract: A novel set up composed of an anaerobic biofilm reactor followed by ozonation was used for treatment of artificial and real textile effluents containing azo dyes. The biological treatment efficiently removed chemical oxygen demand and color. Ozonation further reduced the organic content of the effluents and was very important for the degradation of aromatic compounds, as shown by the reduction of UV absorbance. The acute toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri and the shrimp Artemia salina increased after the biological treatment. No toxicity was detected after ozonation with the exception of the synthetic effluent containing the highest concentration, 1 g/l, of the azo dye Remazol Red. Both untreated and biologically treated textile effluents were found to have mutagenic effects. The mutagenicity increased even further after 1 min of ozonation. No mutagenicity was however detected in the effluents subjected to longer exposure to ozone. The results of this study suggest that the use of ozonation as short post-treatment after a biological process can be beneficial for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds and the removal of toxicity of textile wastewater. However, monitoring of toxicity and especially mutagenicity is crucial and should always be used to assess the success of a treatment strategy

  1. The influence of mutagenic agents on rice seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation on the influence of the physical and chemical mutagenic, gamma rays, ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) and dimethyl sulphonate (DMS) to oryza sativa var Pelita I/1 Rajalele, and Pelopor is done. Morphological observation on M-1, shows that the percentage of germination is high with the low dose, and the percentage decreases with the increase of dosage. The total production tillers per treated plants are generally higher than the controls. (author)

  2. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products.

    OpenAIRE

    Cognet, L; Courtois, Y; Mallevialle, J

    1986-01-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to samp...

  3. Human somatic, germinal and heritable mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the general process of variant formation rather than with the consequences of a specific variant being present. It focusses on mutational mechanisms, mutagens, and the method for detecting de novo mutants and estimating mutation rate. It is to human genetics much like disease causation and prevention medicine are to medicine as a whole. The word ''mutagenicity'' is used in the title and throughout the text to connote the causation of all classes of genetic damage. Mutagenicity and the corresponding words mutation, mutagen and mutagenesis can have multiple meaning, sometimes relating to gene mutation, sometimes to heritable mutation, and somtimes to all types of genetic damage. 38 refs., 1 tab

  4. Assessment of the mutagenic potential of Skadar Lake sediments using the salmonella microsomal assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perović Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic extracts of sediments from Skadar Lake (National park and protected RAMSAR site were investigated for their mutagenic potential using Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Five different concentrations of sediment extracts from five different sampling sites were assayed, and mutagenic results were obtained for both strains. These studies present a part of the EULIMNOS project and included a battery of bioassay testing and in situ investigations of microbial community structures of Skadar Lake sediments. The obtained results show mutagenic risk potential in five collected samples in the absence and presence of metabolic activation. Additional studies are required in order to identify and quantify the chemical compounds responsible for the mutagenic activity present in Skadar Lake sediments.

  5. Using of simultaneous phytotoxicity and mutagenicity test in assessing the risk of waste from landfill of gas generator Kalinovo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage of waste can have a negative impact on the environment by its chemical composition. During mutual chemical reactions a variety of hazardous compounds originates that seriously threaten human health. With increasing requirements to human health and environmental protection plant tests were introduced as very important and inexpensive indicators of mutagenicity and phytotoxicity. In this paper we present application of simultaneous test of mutagenicity and phytotoxicity on selected indicator plant species in conditions 'in situ'. Based on the observed results we conclude that the waste from generator gas in the repository Kalinovo has high toxicity and mutagenicity. (authors)

  6. 50. Mutagenicity Study of Meloxicam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The Meloxicam is a drug for diminishing inflammation and contraining ache, and has good curative effect on clinic. In order to ascertain the safety of it, mutagenicity of Meloxicam was studied by using Ames test、 chromosome test and micronuclus test. ①Ames test: Meloxicam at six concentrations of 5 000、2 000、200、20、2、0.2 μg/plate were studied by using TA97、TA98、TA100、TA102 bacterial plant

  7. ASSESMENT OF BIOCHEMICAL ATTRIBUTES OF PRAECITRULLUS FISTULOSUS TREATED WITH MUTAGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Khan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants are well known to have certain primary and secondary metabolites collectively are known as biochemicals that plays an important role for human health as their medicinal properties. The aim of present study was to enhance and evaluate biochemical profile of Praecitrullus fistulosus by induced mutagenesis to cause genetic variations, plant leaves were treated with different chemical and physical mutagens. Colchicine and Ethidium bromide were used as chemical mutagens. While Ultraviolet (UV rays and X- rays were used as physical mutagens for the treatment of seeds. After the eleventh week of their growth, methanol extracts of dried leaves were prepared and further analyzed for the estimation of biochemicals. It was observed that total carbohydrates, total Proteins, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity, reducing power, ascorbic Acid  and Chlorophyll a, were found significantly (p<0.05 higher in Colchicine 0.02% treated plants, while reducing sugars were significantly (p<0.05  increases in Colchicine 0.01% treated plants as compared to control plants. Total flavonoids, total flavonol, Chlorophyll b and Carotenoids were increases significantly (p<0.05 in plants treated with 0.05% Ethidium bromide while tannin content was increased significantly (p<0.05 in 0.10% Ethidium bromide treated plants as compared to the  control plants.

  8. Mutagenic effects of Pingyangmycin on rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutagenic effects of Pingyangmycin (PYM) on rice were studied by means of seed treatment with 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 μg/ml of PYM. The results showed that PYM could induce high frequency of chromosome aberrations, produce physiological damages of various degrees in terms of seed germination, seedling growth and spikelet fertility in M1 generation, and induce high frequency of chlorophyll-deficient mutation and mutation in plant height and heading date in M2 generation. With 15 μg/ml of treatment, the highest total mutation frequency, higher than that of the widely used chemical mutagen EMS, was reached. As induction of beneficial mutations was concerned, PYM was inferior to EMS in inducing early heading mutation, but superior to EMS in inducing short straw mutation

  9. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils. PMID:26643763

  10. Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CCRIS database contains chemical records with carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, tumor promotion, and tumor inhibition test results. CCRIS provides historical...

  11. Investigating the Mutagenic Effects of Three Commonly Used Pulpotomy Agents Using the Ames Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Samiei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. Methods: TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the presence and absence of enzymatic system found in rat liver S9 fraction. Negative controls were 1% dimethyl sulfoxide and water. The positive controls were sodium azide and 2-aminoanthracene. The number of colonies per plate was counted. The material was regarded mutagenic if the number of histidine revertant colonies was twice or more than the spontaneous revertant colonies (Ames mutagenicity ratio. Results: Ferric sulfate was found mutagenic in the concentrations prepared by addition of 50 μL of its 1 in 100 and 1 in 1000 times diluted solutions to the culture medium in the absence of S9 fraction (Ames test ratios of 2.8 and 2.2, respectively. Formocresol showed strong toxicity toward TA100 strain of S. typhimurium up to the concentration as low achieved using 1000 times diluted solution of the original preparation, particularly in the presence of S9 fraction. Ames assay failed to detect significant reverse mutations in all the concentrations of CEM cement. Conclusion: In contrast to formocresol and ferric sulfate, CEM cement is a less toxic and non-mutagenic agent.

  12. Investigating the Mutagenic Effects of Three Commonly Used Pulpotomy Agents Using the Ames Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Asgary, Saeed; Farajzadeh, Malak; Bargahi, Nasrin; Abdolrahimi, Majid; Kananizadeh, Usef; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. Methods: TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the presence and absence of enzymatic system found in rat liver S9 fraction. Negative controls were 1% dimethyl sulfoxide and water. The positive controls were sodium azide and 2-aminoanthracene. The number of colonies per plate was counted. The material was regarded mutagenic if the number of histidine revertant colonies was twice or more than the spontaneous revertant colonies (Ames mutagenicity ratio). Results: Ferric sulfate was found mutagenic in the concentrations prepared by addition of 50 µL of its 1 in 100 and 1 in 1000 times diluted solutions to the culture medium in the absence of S9 fraction (Ames test ratios of 2.8 and 2.2, respectively). Formocresol showed strong toxicity toward TA100 strain of S. typhimurium up to the concentration as low achieved using 1000 times diluted solution of the original preparation, particularly in the presence of S9 fraction. Ames assay failed to detect significant reverse mutations in all the concentrations of CEM cement. Conclusion: In contrast to formocresol and ferric sulfate, CEM cement is a less toxic and non-mutagenic agent. PMID:25789229

  13. 浸种温度与化学诱变剂对芝麻种子发芽的影响%Effects of Steeping Temperature and Chemical Mutagen on Seeds Germination of Sesame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳阳; 梅鸿献; 武轲; 郑永战; 张海洋

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the effects of steeping temperature and chemical mutagen on seeds germination of sesame,sesame seeds were pre-soaked in water under 4 ℃ and 25 ℃ for 24 h,and the impact of different concentrations and treatment time of EMS and NaN3 on the germination potential,germination rate,germination index and vigor index of sesame were studied. The results showed that the three sesame varieties pre-soaked in water under 4 ℃ could not germinate normally in the treatment of EMS for more than 4 h or beyond 10 g/L, while those pre-soaked in water under 25 ℃ could germinate normally by treatment with 10 g/L of EMS for 6 h or 15 g/L of EMS for 4 h. In the treatment of NaN3, three sesame varieties could germinate normally after pre-soaked at both of degrees. Notably, the germination rate of sesame seeds pre-soaked under 4 ℃ was less than 50. 0% by treatment with 6 mmol/L of NaN3 for 12 h,while the three sesame varieties had a germination rate above 69. 3% after pre-soaked under 25 ℃. When sesame seeds were pre-soaked in water under 4 ℃ , EMS and NaN3, in general, played better roles under the same treating combination of concentration and time duration. In addition, the sensitivity to the EMS varied greatly among different sesame varieties,while they had a close sensitivity to NaN3. In order to obtain the desirable mutations,it is recommended to select the application of 5 g/L of EMS for 8 h or 4 mmol/L of NaN3 for 12 h after the seeds pre-soaked in water under 4 ℃ for 24 h.%为了探讨浸种温度及化学诱变剂对芝麻种子发芽的影响,在不同浸种温度下,研究了甲基磺酸乙酯(EMS)和叠氮化钠(NaN3)不同(质量)浓度处理不同时间对芝麻种子发芽势、发芽率、发芽指数、活力指数的影响.结果表明,4℃浸种后,EMS处理时间超过4h或者EMS质量浓度大于10 g/L时,3个芝麻品种均不能正常发芽,而25℃浸种后,10 g/L EMS处理6h或15 g/L EMS处理4h,3个品种仍能正常发芽.4

  14. Studies on Potential Mutagenic and Genotoxic Activity of Setarud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Farzamfar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Setarud (IMODTM is a new herbal drug that has demonstrated immune modulating activity in preliminary investigations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mutagenicity and genotoxic properties of Setarud following the guidelines of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD for the Testing of Chemicals. Methods: Ames Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenesis assay was used to evaluate the ability of the drug and its metabolites to induce mutation in Salmonella tester strains. Setarud was applied in concentrations of 0.1-1000 µg/dish. The effect of the drug metabolites which were formed in the presence of rat liver microsomal fraction S9 was investigated using complete and incomplete microsomal activation mixtures, separately. Induction of dominant lethal mutations in spermatogenic stem cells of male mice was also assessed. Results: In the Ames test, the drug preparation did not cause a significant increase in the number of revertant bacterial colonies as compared with negative control meaning that Setarud within the tested range did not exhibit mutagenic activity. The level of post-implantation losses and as a result the number of lethal mutations in germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice treated with Setarud was not statistically higher than that of control. Conclusion: Under experimental conditions which were employed, the drug was not mutagenic or genotoxic.

  15. Alkaline azide mutagenicity in cowpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium azide is known as a potent mutagen in cereals and legumes. It is very effective in acidic medium in barley. Here an attempt is made to measure the effectiveness of sodium azide in alkaline medium (pH 7.4) on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., variety FS-68). Seeds pre-soaked in distilled water for 5 hours were treated with different concentrations (10-6, 10-5, 10-4 and 10-3M) of sodium azide (NaN3) for 4 hours at 28± 2 deg. C. Bottles were intermittently shaken, then the seeds were thoroughly washed in running tap water and subsequently planted in pots. The treatment caused significant biological damage such as reduction in seed germination, length of root and shoot, number of nodules and pods per plant and morphological leaf variations. Morphological, as well as chlorophyll mutants, were detected in M2

  16. Mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter results of oxidation treatments with chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and ultraviolet (UV), with respect to their effects on activity (Ames test) in drinking water supplies are reviewed. In addition, the authors present the preliminary results of a pilot plant study on the effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on mutagenicity. Furthermore, results of several carcinogenicity studies performed with organic drinking water concentrates are discussed in relation to the results of a Dutch carcinogenicity study with mutagenic drinking water concentrates

  17. Mutagens affect food and water biodeteriorating fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, R. R. M.; Lima, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Many areas of food mycology could be affected detrimentally by mutation of wild type fungi. Some of these will contact mutagens from pre-isolation to experimentation and the effect on fungi isolated from mycotoxin-contaminated food is assessed for the first time in this review. However, this mutagen issue is not considered by other authors in primary research papers, which is relevant to molecular biology techniques for gene sequencing, phylogenetics, diagnostics and myco...

  18. Mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium of some angelicin derivates proposed as new monofunctional agents for the photochemotherapy of psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of angelicin in derivatives were testet for their mutagenic activity with and without near-ultraviolet irradiation (NUV) in Salmonella typhimurium strains. After irradiation with NUV, the tested compounds induced different numbers of revertants in strain TA100, indicating that the mutational events involved are base substitutions. In the dark, 3 chemicals behaved as frame-shift mutagens causing reversion in strain TA98. (orig.)

  19. Hyper production of alkaline protease by mutagenized bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to augment the alkaline protease production from Bacillus subtilis by using chemical mutagen (MMS) and UV mutagenesis. A number of mutants were isolated which produce high levels of extra cellular proteases. Analysis of culture supernatants of these mutants had shown that the total amounts of proteolysis activity were increased from 1 to 2 fold over the wild strain. Clones showing promote response were further characterized by analyzing different parameters; like of Temperature, pH substrate concentration and incubation period, to study the activity of protease enzyme. (author)

  20. Evolutionary Ensemble for In Silico Prediction of Ames Test Mutagenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yao, Xin

    Driven by new regulations and animal welfare, the need to develop in silico models has increased recently as alternative approaches to safety assessment of chemicals without animal testing. This paper describes a novel machine learning ensemble approach to building an in silico model for the prediction of the Ames test mutagenicity, one of a battery of the most commonly used experimental in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests for safety evaluation of chemicals. Evolutionary random neural ensemble with negative correlation learning (ERNE) [1] was developed based on neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. ERNE combines the method of bootstrap sampling on training data with the method of random subspace feature selection to ensure diversity in creating individuals within an initial ensemble. Furthermore, while evolving individuals within the ensemble, it makes use of the negative correlation learning, enabling individual NNs to be trained as accurate as possible while still manage to maintain them as diverse as possible. Therefore, the resulting individuals in the final ensemble are capable of cooperating collectively to achieve better generalization of prediction. The empirical experiment suggest that ERNE is an effective ensemble approach for predicting the Ames test mutagenicity of chemicals.

  1. Linking mutagenic activity to micropollutant concentrations in wastewater samples by partial least square regression and subsequent identification of variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Christine; Sievers, Moritz; Ottermanns, Richard; Hollert, Henner; Brack, Werner; Krauss, Martin

    2015-11-01

    We deployed multivariate regression to identify compounds co-varying with the mutagenic activity of complex environmental samples. Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents with a large share of industrial input of different sampling dates were evaluated for mutagenic activity by the Ames Fluctuation Test and chemically characterized by a screening for suspected pro-mutagens and non-targeted software-based peak detection in full scan data. Areas of automatically detected peaks were used as predictor matrix for partial least squares projections to latent structures (PLS) in combination with measured mutagenic activity. Detected peaks were successively reduced by the exclusion of all peaks with lowest variable importance until the best model (high R(2) and Q(2)) was reached. Peaks in the best model co-varying with the observed mutagenicity showed increased chlorine, bromine, sulfur, and nitrogen abundance compared to original peak set indicating a preferential selection of anthropogenic compounds. The PLS regression revealed four tentatively identified compounds, newly identified 4-(dimethylamino)-pyridine, and three known micropollutants present in domestic wastewater as co-varying with the mutagenic activity. Co-variance between compounds stemming from industrial wastewater and mutagenic activity supported the application of "virtual" EDA as a statistical tool to separate toxicologically relevant from less relevant compounds. PMID:26070082

  2. Carcinogens, Teratogens and Mutagens: Their Impact on Occupational Health, Particularly for Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J. E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant women, especially those working in veterinary medicine, face occupational health/disease risks from mutagens, teratogens, and carcinogens. These hazards can be placed into three categories: physical, chemical, and biological. Each of these hazards is discussed with examples. (Author/JN)

  3. COMPARATIVE MUTAGENICITY OF HALOGENATED PYRIDINES IN THE 'SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM'/MAMMALIAN MICROSOME TEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA97, TA98, TA100, and TA102 was used to examine the potential mutagenicity and structure-activity of 16 mono- and dihalogenated pyridines. The chemical reactivity of the halopyridines suggests that nucleophilic displacement of halogens...

  4. AZO DYES ARE MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY DETECTED IN THE CRISTAIS RIVER WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if compounds from a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a Drinking Water T...

  5. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AZO DYES TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF THE CRISTAIS RIVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    To verify if compounds within the discharge of a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a ...

  6. The OSIRIS Weight of Evidence approach: ITS mutagenicity and ITS carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Harrie; Aldenberg, Tom; Batke, Monika; Escher, Sylvia; Klein Entink, Rinke; Kühne, Ralph; Marquart, Hans; Pauné, Eduard; Rorije, Emiel; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Kroese, Dinant

    2013-11-01

    Risk assessment of chemicals usually implies data evaluation of in vivo tests in rodents to conclude on their hazards. The FP7 European project OSIRIS has developed integrated testing strategies (ITS) for relevant toxicological endpoints to avoid unnecessary animal testing and thus to reduce time and costs. This paper describes the implementation of ITS mutagenicity and carcinogenicity in the public OSIRIS webtool. The data requirements of REACH formed the basis for these ITS. The main goal was to implement procedures to reach a conclusion on the adequacy and validity of available data. For the mutagenicity ITS a quantitative Weight of Evidence approach based on Bayesian statistics was developed and implemented. The approach allows an overall quality assessment of all available data for the five types of mutagenicity data requirements: in vitro bacterial mutagenicity, in vitro and in vivo chromosome aberration, in vitro and in vivo mammalian mutagenicity. For the carcinogenicity ITS a tool was developed to evaluate the quality of studies not conforming (entirely) to guidelines. In a tiered approach three quality aspects are assessed: documentation (reliability), study design (adequacy) and scope of examination (validity). The quality assessment is based on expert and data driven quantitative Weight of Evidence. PMID:23357514

  7. Mutagenicity of eluent by hot water extraction of various coals: Effect of chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunenori Nakajima; Hiroyuki Hasegawa; Satomi Nakamata; Hirokazu Takanashi; Akira Ohki [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan). Department of Bioengineering

    2008-10-15

    Six kinds of powdery coals (two bituminous coals, two sub-bituminous coals, and two lignites) were extracted by hot water, and the eluents obtained were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), absorbance at 260 nm (A260), and pH. The TOC in the eluents decreased in the order, lignites > sub-bituminous coals > bituminous coals. The eluents of lignite gave high A{sub 260}/TOC values and fairly low pH compared to other coals. Chemical structure of the organic matter eluted from coals was discussed with the aid of FTIR analysis. The coal eluents were analyzed by the Ames mutagenicity assay using Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and TA98 strains, and no mutagenicity was observed for all of the six coals. However, especially for the lignites, chlorination of the eluents produced an appreciable mutagenicity, and the expression of mutagenicity was dependent upon the type of coal. The mutagenicity was extinguished when metabolic activation (rat liver homogenate, +S9) was applied. 26 refs., 6 tabs.

  8. Light-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella TA102 and genotoxicity/cytotoxicity in human T-cells by 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine: a chemical used in the manufacture of dyes and pigments and in tattoo inks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DCB, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, is used primarily as an intermediate in the manufacture of diarylide yellow or azo red pigments for printing ink, textile, paint, and plastics. It is also used in tattoo inks. In this article, we investigate light-induced toxicity of DCB in both bacteria and human Jurkat T-cells. DCB itself is not toxic or mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA102, but is photomutagenic at concentrations as low as 2 μM and phototoxic at concentrations >100 μM when bacteria are exposed to DCB and light at the same time (1.2 J/cm2 of UVA and 2.1 J/cm2 of visible light). Furthermore, DCB is both photocytotoxic and photogenotoxic to human Jurkat T-cells. Under a light irradiation dose of 2.3 J/cm2 of UVA and 4.2 J/cm2 of visible light, it causes the Jurkat T-cells to become nonviable in a DCB dose-dependent manner and the nonviable cells reaches 60% at DCB concentrations higher than 50 μM. At the same time, DNA fragmentation is observed for cells exposed to both DCB and light, determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (alkaline comet assay). As much as 5% (average) DNA fragmentation was observed when exposed to 200 μM DCB and light irradiation. This suggests that DCB can penetrate the cell membrane and enter the cell. Upon light activation, DCB in the cells can cause various cellular damages, leading to nonviable Jurkat T-cells. It appears, the nonviable cells are not caused solely by fragmentation of cellular DNA, but by other damages such as to proteins and cell membranes, or DNA alkylation. Therefore, persons exposed to DCB through environmental contamination or through tattoo piercing using DCB-containing inks must not only concern about its toxicity without exposing to light, but also its phototoxicity

  9. Mutagenic decomposition products of nitrosated 4-chloroindoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N K; Nguyen, T T; Taghizadeh, K; Wishnok, J S; Tannenbaum, S R

    1992-01-01

    4-Chloro-6-methoxyindole, a constituent of fava beans, forms a potent direct-acting mutagen, 4-chloro-6-methoxy-2-hydroxy-1-nitrosoindolin-3-one oxime, when nitrosated. In order to better understand the properties of this mutagen, we have studied a readily-available analog, 4-chloro-2-hydroxy-1-nitrosoindolin-3-one oxime, prepared by nitrosation of 4-chloroindole. This analog is also mutagenic, and both mutagens decompose rapidly at neutral or higher pH to yield in each case a new, less potent mutagen which then reacts further to form a nonmutagenic final product. The two products arising from 4-chloro-2-hydroxy-1-nitrosoindolin-3-one oxime, on the basis of comparison of spectroscopic and chromatographic evidence with that from authentic standards, are 4-chloro-N-nitrosodioxindole and 4-chloroisatin; those arising from 4-chloro-6-methoxy-2-hydroxy-1-nitrosoindolin-3-one oxime appear to be the corresponding 6-methoxy analogs. The interplay of these pathways with respect to net biological activity, especially under gastric conditions, remains to be described. PMID:1489931

  10. Mutagenicity assessment of acrylate and methacrylate compounds and implications for regulatory toxicology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, F R; Vogt, Barbara; Waite, Maureen; Deskin, Randy

    2008-04-01

    Esters of acrylic acid and methacrylic acid, more commonly known as acrylates and methacrylates, respectively, are key raw materials in the coatings and printing industry, with several of its chemical class used in food packaging. The results of over 200 short-term in vitro and in vivo mutagenicity studies available in the open literature have been evaluated. Despite differences in acrylate or methacrylate functionality or in the number of functional groups, a consistent pattern of test response was seen in a typical regulatory battery of mutagenicity tests. No evidence of point mutations was observed when acrylic acid or over 60 acrylates and methacrylates were investigated in Salmonella bacterial tests or in hprt mutation tests mammalian cells, and no evidence of a mutagenic effect was seen when tested in whole animal clastogenicity and/or aneuploidy (chromosomal aberration/micronucleus) studies. Consistent with the in vivo testing results, acrylic acid exhibited no evidence of carcinogenicity in chronic rodent cancer bioassays. In contrast, acrylic acid and the entire acrylate and methacrylate chemical class produced a consistently positive response when tested in the mouse lymphoma assay and/or other in vitro mammalian cell assays designed to detect clastogenicity. The biological relevance of this in vitro response is questioned based on the non-concordance of in vitro results with those of in vivo studies addressing the same mutagenic endpoint (clastogenicity). Thus, in short-term mutagenicity tests, the acrylates and methacrylates behave as a single chemical category, and genotoxicity behavior of a similar chemical can be predicted with confidence by inclusion within this chemical class, thus avoiding unnecessary testing. PMID:18346829

  11. Studies on Mutagenicity and Teratogenicity of Sarafloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jian-zhong; SHEN Chuan; XIAO Xi-long; LI Jun-suo; LIU Jin-feng; ZHANG Su-xia; ZHOU Zong-can; FU Juan-ling

    2002-01-01

    Wistar rats and closed Kunming strain mice were selected to study the genetic toxicity of sarafloxacin. The results indicated that sarafloxacin had no significant toxic effect of an excreted mutagen in S. typhimurium strains, and did not induce significantly higher percentages of polyehromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCE) in mice. No significant mutagenic activity was observed in dominant lethal assay.At 5 and 50mg/kg b.w. , sarafloxacin did not produce significant effects on the reproductive parameters of litters and fetal growth, and did not induce the teratogenic effects on fetuses. Sarafloxacin induced some toxic effects on body length and skeletal growth in fetuses of 500mg/kg b.w., but had no significant dose - response relationship among the administered dosages of sarafloxacin. The results of the genetic toxicology above indicated that no evidence showing sarafloxacin was mutagenic and potentially teratogenic for animals.

  12. STUDY OF MUTAGENICITY OF VIRAL VECTOR IN TUMOR GENETHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贺书; 李殿俊; 刘旭; 李大林

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe the mutagenicity of retrovirus and adenovirus as transgenic vectors to evaluate the safety of transgenic tumor cells as tumor vaccines. Methods: Cells were cultured together with the virus. Then DNA and supernatant were tested for mutagenicity by means of genetic toxicological laboratory technique. Results: The results indicated that DNA and supernatant of transgenic cells had no mutagenicity through both in vivo and in vitro tests. Conclusion: The modified virus had no mutagenicity as a transgenic vector.

  13. Some problems in the evaluation of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical compounds in ever-increasing variety and kind are constantly being introduced into the human environment. Some of these may adversely affect the genetic material. Such effects deserve attention not only for reasons of protecting the genetic constitution of future generations, but are also of prime and direct concern to the present in view of the striking concordance between the carcinogenic and mutagenic potential of most chemicals. That is, recent results with microbial assay systems and with Drosophila have convincingly demonstrated that the great majority of compounds capable of producing malignant transformation, are also effective in inducing genetic changes in the form of heritable mutations. A task of immediate concern thus becomes one of how such genetic and carcinogenic hazards can be avoided and how adequate regulations to minimize exposure should be formu

  14. Influence of particulate trap oxidizers on emission of mutagenic compounds by diesel automobiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, R E; Devillez, G; Smith, L R

    1989-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are known to contain mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals. The aim of this study was to determine whether, and to what extent, catalytic particulate trap oxidizers on light-duty diesel engines may reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic chemicals into the environment. Exhaust particles were collected from Mercedes Benz and Volkswagen diesel automobiles, equipped with or without the manufacturer's exhaust traps, while running on a chassis dynamometer under specified load conditions. Exhaust particles were collected from a dilution tunnel onto 20" X 20" Teflon-coated fiberglass filters. Mutagenesis tests of dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of the particles were conducted using the Ames Salmonella bacterial test system. The mutation rate was calculated in terms of histidine revertants per mile of travel during a set of standard test cycles. With both vehicles the traps produced an 87-92% reduction in the total amount of particulate material collected by the filters. There was no significant change in the specific mutagenic activity (revertants per microgram of DCM particle extract) with or without the traps. These studies support the notion that installation of exhaust traps which reduce particulate emission on diesel-powered vehicles will also reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic and carcinogenic materials into the environment. PMID:2473105

  15. Mutagenic, Anti-Mutagenic and Cytotoxic Activities of Artediffusin (Tehranolide), in vitro, extracted from Artemisia diffusa

    OpenAIRE

    Mahboubeh Taherkhani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Artediffusin is a sesquiterpene lactone with an endoperoxide group which has been isolated from Artemisia diffusa. Artemisia has always been of great botanical and pharmaceutical interest and is useful in traditional medicines for the treatment of a variety of diseases and complaints. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the cytotoxic, mutagenic and anti-mutagenic activities of Artediffusin (Tehranolide) extracted from Artemisia diffusa. Methods: Cytotoxicity was meas...

  16. URINARY MUTAGENICITY AND COLORECTAL ADENOMA RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractWe investigated urinary mutagenicity and colorectal adenoma risk in a clinic-based, case-control study of currently nonsmoking cases (n = 143) and controls (n = 156). Urinary organics were extracted by C18/methanol from 12-h overnight urine samples, and mutagenici...

  17. Mutagenic, Anti-Mutagenic and Cytotoxic Activities of Artediffusin (Tehranolide, in vitro, extracted from Artemisia diffusa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Taherkhani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Artediffusin is a sesquiterpene lactone with an endoperoxide group which has been isolated from Artemisia diffusa. Artemisia has always been of great botanical and pharmaceutical interest and is useful in traditional medicines for the treatment of a variety of diseases and complaints. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the cytotoxic, mutagenic and anti-mutagenic activities of Artediffusin (Tehranolide extracted from Artemisia diffusa. Methods: Cytotoxicity was measured using a modified MTT assay on normal human lymphocytes and cancer cells. The mutagenic and anti-mutagenic activities of Artediffusin were evaluated using the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with and without metabolic activation S9. Results: 28μg/ml concentration of Artediffusin inactivated 77.73±0.78% of HeLa cells activity and 5600µg/ml concentration of Artediffusin inactivated 28.79±1.82% of lymphocytes activity. The maximum percentage of anti-mutagenic activity of Artediffusin was observed in the strain of S. typhimurium TA98, with the presence of metabolic activation S9. Conclusion: Artediffusin may be exploited as a natural anti-cancer and anti-mutagenic agent with low adverse side effects.

  18. Handbook of mutagenicity test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of 39 chapters. Some of the titles are: Bacillus subtilis repair test, Induced reversion using human adenovirus, The fluctuation test in bacteria, Chemical mutagenesis with diploid human fibroblasts, The specific locus test in the mouse, The bone marrow micronucleus test, and Sperm morphology in testing in mice

  19. Enhanced response of the Salmonella mutagenicity test to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray-induced reversions in the Ames Salmonella tester strain TA2638 have been studied for their dependence on a number of experimental parameters. It is shown that exposure to ionizing radiations soon after plating is not the procedure that yields results which correspond to those obtained in the standard utilization of the test with chemical mutagens. The ability to detect mutants is improved by irradiation 6 hr after the beginning of the incubation of the plated bacteria. This procedure has the double advantage of a markedly increased ratio of radiation-induced to spontaneous revertants and of resulting in substantial insensitivity to fluctuations in the number of bacteria initially plated. The reversion-doubling dose so obtained is 1.3 Gy; i.e., it is sufficiently small to disregard inactivation of the bacteria

  20. Sensitive hepatocyte-mediated assay for the metabolism of nitrosamines to mutagens for mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.A.; Huberman, E.

    1980-02-01

    A sensitive cell-mediated assay has been developed for testing mutagenesis in Chinese hamster V79 cells by carcinogenic nitrosamines. Mutations were characterized by resistance to ouabian and 6-thioguanine. Since V79 cells do not metabolize nitrosamines, mutagenesis in the V79 cells was tested in the presence of primary hepatocytes capable of metabolizing nitrosamines. The hepatocytes were isolated after collagenase and hyaluronidase digestion of liver slices. All seven liver carcinogens of the nine tested nitrosamines exhibited a mutagenic response in this cell-mediated assay. The potent liver carcinogens nitrosodimethylamine, nitrosodiethylamine, nitrosoethylmethylamine, and nitrosodipropylamine could be detected with doses as low as 1 ..mu..m. The noncarcinogenic nitrosodiphenylamine was not mutagenic. Nitrosomethoxymethylamine was the only nitrosamine that exhibited mutagenic activity in the absence of hepatocytes, and this activity was diminished in the presence of hepatocytes. It is suggested that the use of hepatocytes prepared by the slicing method for carcinogen metabolism and mutable V79 cells offers a highly sensitive assay for determining the mutagenic potential of carcinogenic nitrosamines and probably of other classes of hazardous chemicals occurring in the environment.

  1. Mutagenic interactions between near-ultraviolet (365 nm) radiation and alkylating agents in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutagenic interaction between near-ultrviolet (365 nm) radiation and the alkylting agents ehtyl methanesulponate (EMS) and methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was studied in a repair-component and an excision-deficient stram of Escherichia coli. Near-UV raditation modified the metabolic response of of exposure to these chemicals and either reduced or increased their mutagenic efficiency. Based on these results, an experimental model was formulated to explain the mutagenic interactions that occur between near-UV and various agents that induce prototrophic reverants cia error-prone repair of DNA. According to this model, low doses of near-UV provoke conditions for mutation frequency decline (MFI) and lead to a mutagenic antagonism. With increasing near-Uv doses, damage to constitutive error-free repairs system increases, favouring the error-prone system and inhibiting the MFD. Under these conditions there will be a progressive decrease in antagonism until at high doses an enhancement of mutation frequency (positive interaction) will occur. (orig.)

  2. MULTISTEP MUTAGENIC STRAIN IMPROVEMENT IN ASPERGILLUS CARBONARIUS TO ENHANCE PECTINASE PRODUCTION POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabika Akbar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pectinase is one of the most important commercially synthesised enzyme having its application in several industrial sectors like food and beverages, fruit clarifications etc. A.carbonarius has the capacity to produce Exo-pectinase 50 U/ml by submerged fermentation process as per the previous study. The present study describes the improvement of previously identified fungal strain Aspergillus carbonarius for enhancement of pectinase production by inducing mutations using physical and chemical mutagens. Aiming to increase the potentiality in pectinase production, the parental strain was treated for three times with four mutagens - UV irradiation, Colchicine, Hydrogen peroxide and Ethidium bromide to obtain mutants. Mutants were selected based on higher enzyme activity, improved growth rates and varied morphology with increased pectinase production. All the surviving mutants were assessed quantitatively after first mutagenic treatment. The stability of the best mutants was tested by repeating the exposures for two times to obtain 3rd generation mutants. These mutants were tested quantitatively to assess the pectinase production. Of all the best mutants E8 showed maximum activity producing 65U/ml pectinase enzyme compared to wild and sister mutants. The wild strain of A. carbonarius is a low pectinase producing organism as per literature. This strain was successfully mutated to increase the productivity rate to 1.8 fold in comparison to wild strain. This overproduction and strain stability may be due to repeated mutagenic treatments.

  3. Investigations on potential co-mutagenic effects of formaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speit, Günter, E-mail: guenter.speit@uni-ulm.de; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Duong, Giang; Bausinger, Julia

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A549 cells were exposed to formaldehyde in combination with various mutagens. • Formaldehyde did not affect the induction and removal of DNA damage (comet assay). • Formaldehyde did not affect the induction of micronuclei by the mutagens tested. • The expression of the O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase was not affected. - Abstract: The genotoxicity and mutagenicity of formaldehyde (FA) has been well-characterized during the last years. Besides its known direct DNA-damaging and mutagenic activity in sufficiently exposed cells, FA at low concentrations might also enhance the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of other environmental mutagens by interfering with the repair of DNA lesions induced by these mutagens. To further assess potential co-mutagenic effects of FA, we exposed A549 human lung cells to FA in combination with various mutagens and measured the induction and removal of DNA damage by the comet assay and the production of chromosomal mutations by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN assay). The mutagens tested were ionizing radiation (IR), (±)-anti-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), N-nitroso-N-methylurea (methyl nitrosourea; MNU) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). FA (10–75 μM) did not enhance the genotoxic and mutagenic activity of these mutagens under the test conditions applied. FA alone and in combination with MNU or MMS did not affect the expression (mRNA level) of the gene of the O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) in A549 cells. The results of these experiments do not support the assumption that low FA concentrations might interfere with the repair of DNA damage induced by other mutagens.

  4. Space mutagenic effect of Trichoderma reesei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slant mycelia cultured with or without mutagenic agent diethyl sulfate (DS) and spores of Trichoderma reesei were loaded in the 18th returning satellite. Systematical screening showed that the life cycle and morphology of some strains had changed after space flight. After selection and domestication, 3 mutant strains with high cellulose enzyme activity were isolated. The cellulose enzyme productivities of the mutants were significantly increased more than 50%, and the mutant were generically stable. (authors)

  5. Mutagenic and cytotoxic activities of benfuracarb insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu

    2016-08-01

    Benfuracarb is a carbamate insecticide used to control insect pests in vegetables and it has anti-acetylcholinesterase activity lower than other carbamates. Cytotoxic effects of benfuracarb were evaluated by using root growth inhibition (EC50), mitotic index (MI), and mitotic phase determinations on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa and mutagenic effects were determined in Salmonella typhymurium Ames test by TA98 and TA100 strains with and without metabolic activation. In Allium test, 1 % DMSO was used as negative control group and 10 ppm MMS was used as positive control group. 75 ppm concentration of benfuracarb was found as EC50. In MI and mitotic phases determination study, 37.5, 75 and 150 ppm doses of benfuracarb were used. Dose-dependent cytotoxic activity was found by root growth inhibition and MI studies. It was identified that mitotic inhibition activity of benfuracarb was higher than 10 ppm MMS. In Ames test, mutagenic activity was not observed and over 200 µg/plate of benfuracarb was determined as cytotoxic to S. typhymurium strains. Benfuracarb can be called as "mitotic inhibitor" but not called as mutagen. PMID:25381170

  6. Exploratory research on mutagenic activity of coal-related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warshawsky, D.; Schoeny, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The following samples were found to be mutagenic for strains TA1538, TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium: ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16, and ETTM-17. ETTM-13 was marginally mutagenic for TA1537. ETTM-14 was slightly mutagenic for TA1537, TA1538, and TA98. Mutagenicity by all samples was demonstrated only in the presence of hepatic enzyme extracts (S9) which provided metabolic activation. ETTM-11 was shown to be the most mutagenic sample assayed thus far; specific activity was 2.79 x 10/sup 4/ TA98 revertants/mg sample. Fractionation by serial extractions with increasingly polar organic solvents was done at least 2 x with ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16 and ETTM-17. For some samples highly mutagenic fractions were observed.

  7. Evaluating the mutagenicity of the water-soluble fraction of air particulate matter: A comparison of two extraction strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Isabel C; Oliveira, Ivo F; Franklin, Robson L; Barros, Silvia B M; Roubicek, Deborah A

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have focused on assessing the genotoxic potential of the organic fraction of airborne particulate matter. However, the determination of water-soluble compounds, and the evaluation of the toxic effects of these elements can also provide valuable information for the development of novel strategies to control atmospheric air pollution. To determine an appropriate extraction method for assessing the mutagenicity of the water-soluble fraction of PM, we performed microwave assisted (MW) and ultrasonic bath (US) extractions, using water as solvent, in eight different air samples (TSP and PM10). Mutagenicity and extraction performances were evaluated using the Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA98 and TA100, followed by chemical determination of water-soluble metals. Additionally, we evaluated the chemical and biological stability of the extracts testing their mutagenic potential and chemically determining elements present in the samples along several periods after extraction. Reference material SRM 1648a was used. The comparison of MW and US extractions did not show differences on the metals concentrations, however positive mutagenic responses were detected with TA98 strain in all samples extracted using the MW method, but not with the US bath extraction. The recovery, using reference material was better in samples extracted with MW. We concluded that the MW extraction is more efficient to assess the mutagenic activity of the soluble fraction of airborne PM. We also observed that the extract freezing and storage over 60 days has a significant effect on the mutagenic and analytical results on PM samples, and should be avoided. PMID:27258903

  8. Effect of mutagens on seed germination in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of chilli variety CO-2 (Coimbatore-2) were irradiated with gamma rays ranging from 10 kR to 35 kR at an interval of 5 kR and the effect on seed germination, seedling survival, percent lethality and seedling injury were studied. Lower doses were stimulative, while higher doses had inhibitory effect on seed germination and seedling survival. The highest percentage of seed germination (37.5) and seedling survival (31.3) was recorded at 10 kR as compared to 28 percent of germination and 3.3 percent seedling survival in control. Percent lethality (9.6%) and seedling injury (6.5%) were comparatively low than the lethality percentage and seedling injury of the higher dose treatments. In chemical mutagen treatments, the maximum seed germination (54.5%) and seedling survival (51.2%), seedling lethality (0.97%) and seedling injury (1.37%) were obtained in the treated seeds of EMS at 0.5% concentration followed by 39.5% seed germination and 30.0% seedling survival, seedling lethality (3.8%) and seedling injury (3.06%) of MMS. The stimulative effect of seed germination is more in chemical mutagens than the physical mutagen. There was a proportionate decrease in germination percentage and seedling survival with an increase in dose/concentration of both the chemicals. (author)

  9. 16. Inhibition of DNA adduct formation and mutagenic action of Trp-P-2 by chlorophyllin-chitosan in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Food that humans eat every day contains mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds such as heterocyclic amines. Food also contains antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic agents. It is of great interest to seek edible, safe chemicals that could prevent the genotoxic actions of some components in food. Recently, a new antimutagenic compound,

  10. Mutation induction in mangosteen : Response of explants to mutagens

    OpenAIRE

    Phrommee, V.; Te-chato, S.

    1999-01-01

    Young purplish red leaves of mangosteen raised in two-phase medium and calli were collected and treated with two mutagens, gamma rays and ethylethane sulfonate (EMS). After treating with both mutagens, leaves and calli were cultured onto callus induction medium to evaluate the effect of mutagens on percent leaf forming callus and survival percentage of callus. The results showed that an increament of EMS caused decreased in survival rate of calli. The concentration that inhibited 50%growth of...

  11. Bacterial and human cell mutagenicity study of some C[sub 18]H[sub 10] cyclopenta-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with fossil fuels combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, A.L.; Longwell, J.P.; Marr, J.A.; Monchamp, P.A.; Thilly, W.G. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Mulder, P.P.Y.; Boere, B.B.; Cornelisse, J.; Lugtenburg, J. (Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands))

    1993-06-01

    A number of isomeric C[sub 18]H[sub 10] polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), thought to be primarily cyclopenta-fused PAHs, are produced during the combustion and pyrolysis of fossil fuels. To determine the importance of their contributions to the total mutagenic activity of combustion and pyrolysis samples in which they are found, we characterized reference quantities of four C[sub 18]H[sub 10] CP-PAHs: benzol [ghi] fluoranthene (BF), cyclopenta [cd] pyrene (CPP), cyclopent [hi] acephenanthrylene (CPAP), and cyclopent [hi] acaenthrylene (CPAA). Synthesis of CPAA and CPAP is described. The availability of reference samples of these isomers also proved to be an essential aid in the identification of the C[sub 18]H[sub 10] species often found in combustion and pyrolysis samples. Chemical analysis of selected combustion and pyrolysis samples showed that CPP was generally the most abundant C[sub 18]H[sub 10] isomer, followed by CPAP and BF. CPAA was detected only in pyrolysis products from pure PAHs. We tested the four C[sub 18]H[sub 10] PAHs for mutagenicity in a forward mutation assay using S. typhimurium. CPP, BF, and CPAA were roughly twice as mutagenic as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), whereas CPAP was only slightly active. These PAHs were also tested for mutagenic activity in human cells. In this assay, CPP and CPAA were strongly mutagenic but less active than BaP, whereas CPAP and BF were inactive at the dose levels tested. Also, the bacterial and human cell mutagenicity of CPAA and CPAP were compared with the mutagenicity of their monocyclopenta-fused analogs, aceanthrylene and acephenanthrylene. Although the mutagenicities of CPAP and acephenanthrylene are similar, the mutagenic activity of CPAA is an order of magnitude greater than that of aceanthrylene.

  12. Antitumoral, mutagenic and (antiestrogenic activities of tingenone and pristimerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana P. M. Gomes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer constitutes the second main mortality cause in the world, after cardiovascular diseases. In spite of the progresses in the chemotherapeutics treatments, many patients fail chemotherapy, mainly because of side effects or multi-drugs resistance, proving the need and importance of the research for new molecules with anticancer activity, more effective and with smaller adverse effects. Various compounds derived from plant secondary metabolites are commonly used in the chemotherapy against cancer and the natural products play an important role in the research for new molecules. Among several molecules of natural origin evaluated by MTT assay in murine tumor cell lines [breast (LM3 and lung (LP07] the quinona-methide triterpenes tingenone and pristimerin showed marked cytotoxic activity presenting IC50 around 2 and 5 µM respectively. The structure-activity relationship suggests that rings A and B containing an α, ß-unsaturated carbonyl group are essential for the observed cytotoxic activity. The interaction between these positions and acetylcisteyne residues suggests a probable mechanism of action. The in vitro mutagenic activity was also evaluated by the Salmonella microsome assay (Ames test for pristimerin and tingenone with and without metabolic activation (S9 in the strains TA98, TA97a, TA100 and TA102, none of which showed mutagenic potential in any strains. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities were also studied by the e-screen assay in MCF-7 cells with negative results. The present data point to the importance of pristimerin and tingenone as representative of an emerging class of potential anticancer chemicals.

  13. Role of certain plant natural products or gamma radiation in the control of mutagenic activity of some heterocyclic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to use ames test to evaluate the antimutagenic effect of some natural products on the lever microsomes extracted from rats and incubated with some chemical mutagens (heterocyclic compounds). Male swiss albino rats (120-140 g) were used as the source of liver microsomes. Three natural products (Nigella extract, garlic powder and sesame oil) were used to evaluate their antimutagenic activities on six heterocyclic amines. All the tested natural products exhibited their antimutagenic activities when added to the investigated heterocyclic compounds and the most effective product was nigella sativa. another group of rats was exposed to gamma-radiation (6.5 Gy) for testing the validity of ames test in quantitating mutagenicity using liver microsomes of irradiated rats. Liver microsomes from irradiated rats showed to lose ability for metabolic activation needed for heterocyclic amines to exert their mutagenic effect on salmonella typhimurium

  14. Enhanced sensitivity to mutagens - EMS, MH, SM by pre-soaking - A taxometric study based on M1 parameters in finger millet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-soaking seeds before treatment enhances sensitivity to many chemical mutagens; but little work has been done with maleic hydrazide (MH), a chromosome breaking agent and preferential inducer of micromutation and streptomycin (SM), a cytoplasmic mutagen. In the present investigation on pre-soaking (PS) effects in finger millet (Eleusine coracana, Gaertn), we included these two mutagens, besides one commonly used mutagen, EMS to determine a common effective PS range usingM1seedling traits. Since differentM1parameters, mutagens and their doses showed different peaks of response, we adopted a taxometric approach using all characters together. Combinations of chemicals, doses and sixM1seedling attributes gave 48 characters for the numerical classification of PS periods (0, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 h) as OTUs. Dendrogram from the similarity matrix using UPGMA clustering showed two clusters : (1) Cl. 1 of three OTUs (0, 8 and 10 h PS) and (2) Cl.2 of four OTUs(12-18h PS).We considered 12-18h as effective PS range and 0-10h as ineffective for all kinds of mutagens. The effective range would contain the major peak of sensitivity; the ineffective range might show a small peak. We confirmed these inferences with SM induced albinism as an indicator of plastid mutations. Higher doses shifted the peak within the effective range towards lower PS and low dose towards longer PS. Taxometrics could be usefully adopted in mutagenesis studies. (author)

  15. Modulation of Mutagenicity of Various Mutagens by Shrimp Flesh and Skin Extracts in Salmonella Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mehrabian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many mutagens and carcinogens may act through the generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in cells that maybe related to cancer. The carotenoid astaxanthin-the red pigment for the attractive coloration in the skin and flesh of shrimp-has attracted considerable interest in recent years because of its superior antioxidative activity to most of the hydrophobic antioxidants. According to the important role of carotenoids in human health, the main carotenoid pigment in flesh and by-products of the different shrimp species from penaeidae family-Astaxanthin-was extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography using silica gel, subsequently. The identifications were confirmed by fourier transform infrared (ET-IR spectroscopy. The effect of these extracts on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity induced by Sodium Azide and potassium permanganate was investigated in bacterial assay system, i.e., the Ames test with salmonella typhimurium TA100, TA104. These strains have a certain mutation in their histidin operon, which are related to the external histidin source. Such a mutation can be reversed through contact with a diagnostic mutagen, but in shrimp extracts prevented from effect of this mutagen in which, after repeated test series under standardized condition, the anticarcinogenic effect of flesh and skin of shrimp was proven and the shrimp skin showed stronger anticarcinogenic effect in comparison with shrimp flesh. Different shrimp species from penaeidae family indicated similar antricariongenic effects.

  16. Quantitative mammalian cell mutagenesis and a preliminary study of the mutagenic potential of metallic compounds. [Cell system used was CHO/HGPRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsie, A.W.; Johnson, N.P.; Couch, D.B.; San Sebastian, J.R.; O' Neill, J.P.; Forbes, N.L.

    1978-01-01

    We have defined a set of stringent conditions required to quantify specific gene mutation in a mammalian cell system, CHO/HGPRT. Greater than 98% of the 6-thioguanine (TG)-resistant variants were shown to be deficient in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The sensitive and quantitative nature of this assay was utilized to study the structure-activity (mutagenicity) relationship of various classes of chemicals. Mutagenicity as determined in the CHO/HGPRT assay, appears to correlate well (76/83 (92%)) with the reported animal carcinogenicity of 108 chemicals studied. The system also appears to be suitable for studying the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of metallic compounds. We found that cis-dichlorodiammine Pt(II) (cis-Pt(NH/sub 3/)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/) (cis-DDP), one of the widely used inorganic antitumor agents, is cytotoxic and mutagenic. Mutagenicity of cis-DDP correlates with its binding to DNA. However, trans-DDP, (Pt(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/)Cl/sub 2/, and K/sub 2/(PtCl/sub 4/) exhibit greatly reduced biological activities. Among 14 other metals studied, we found that carcinogenic metallic compounds, such as MnCl/sub 2/, NiCl/sub 2/, and BeSO/sub 4/ are mutagenic, while non-carcinogenic compounds such as MgCl/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ are not. Determination of metal mutagenicity is apparently complicated by the ionic composition of the medium. This may account in part for varying results in studies of the mutagenicity of other metallic compounds. Further refinement of the assay conditions, especially with respect to the ionic environment necessary for quantifying mutagenesis of each metallic agent, is in progress.

  17. Mutagenicity profile of atmospheric particulate matter in a small urban center subjected to airborne emission from vehicle traffic and sugar cane burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Debora Kristina M; Kummrow, Fábio; Cardoso, Arnaldo A; Morales, Daniel A; Umbuzeiro, Gisela A

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is genotoxic and recently was classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. PM chemical composition varies depending on source and atmospheric conditions. The Salmonella/microsome assay is the most used mutagenicity test and can identify the major chemical classes responsible for observed mutagenicity. The objective of this work was to characterize the mutagenicity of PM samples from a countryside city, Limeira, Brazil, which is influenced by heavy traffic and sugar cane biomass burning. Six samples of total PM were collected. Air mass backward trajectories were calculated. Organic extracts were assayed using the Salmonella/microsome microsuspension mutagenicity assay using TA98, YG1041, and TA1538, with and without metabolic activation (S9). YG1041 was the most sensitive strain and mutagenicity reached 9,700 revertants per m(3) without metabolic activation. Potency for TA1538 was higher than TA98, indicating that this strain should be considered in air mutagenicity studies. The increased response to YG1041 relative to TA98, and the decreased response with S9, suggests that nitroaromatics are the major contributors. Limeira is among the most mutagenic cities in the world. High mutagenicity in Limeira seems to occur when the air mass from the area of sugarcane production is mixed with air from the region impacted by anthropogenic activities such as traffic. An increase in the formation of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may result from longer contact time between the aromatic compounds and the atmosphere with high NOx and ozone concentration, although more studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26289646

  18. Mutagenic and carcinogenic effect of sulfur-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments with metaphase plates from blood lymphocytes, conducted during rats' lifetime, a study was made of the mutagenic effect of 35S. Various tumors were diagnosed in the experimental animals after their death. The competitive analysis of the number of stable cytogenetic changes in lymphocytes of the experimental animals at the remote times and tumor occurrence has revealed a highly positive correlation between these indices. Both effects were severest at the highest absorbed 35S dose of less than 10 cGy

  19. In vivo evaluation of the mutagenic potential and phytochemical characterization of oleoresin from Copaifera duckei Dwyer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Luis Maistro

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the chemical constituents of Copaifera duckei oleoresin and used dermal application to Wistar rats to evaluated its possible mutagenic and cytotoxic activities on peripheral blood reticulocytes and bone marrow cells. Chemical characterization of the oleoresin revealed the presence of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, an unidentified neutral diterpene and diterpene acids. To evaluate mutagenicity evaluation the rats were treated with 10, 25 and 50% of the LD50 dose of the oleoresin for three consecutive days and peripheral blood collected after 0, 24, 48 and 72 h for micronucleus analysis. The rats were humanly sacrificed 24 hours after the last treatment and chromosome preparations made using standard techniques. At the three concentrations and the three time intervals tested we found that there were no statistically significant differences in either the mean number of micronucleated reticulocytes (MNRETs or the number of chromosomal aberrations as to the negative control. However, at 25 and 50% of the LD50 dose of the oleoresin there was a significant decrease in the mitotic index (MI as compared to the negative control. Under our experimental conditions, C. duckei V11 oleoresin produced no mutagenic effects on bone marrow cells or in peripheral reticulocytes as assessed by chromosome aberrations and the micronucleus test respectively, but showed cytotoxic activity at high doses.

  20. 51. Mutagenicity Study of Cyclophoshpamide on Human Sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Whether Cyclophoshpamide(CP) has mutagenicity on germ cell or not is paid close attention to. This paper studied the mutagenicity of CP on germ cell by adopting human sperm chromosome and micronuclus in two-cell embryo. Semen samples obtained from healthy male were liquefied、dealed with Ca2+, and exposed to four

  1. Mutagenicity of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A series of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties, with configuration D-galacto, D-gluco and D-manno, was synthesized and characterized. → The quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties revealed potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. → The N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. → We suggest that quaternary ammonium salts may be more hazardous than previously supposed. - Abstract: Quaternary ammonium salts are widely used in industrial, agricultural, healthcare and domestic applications. They are believed to be safe compounds, with little or no health hazard to humans. However, in this report, we demonstrate that a series of newly synthesized quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties reveal potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. D-Gluco- and D-galacto-derivatives were found to have a higher mutagenic potential than D-manno-derivatives. Among the former groups of compounds, the N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. These results suggest that the safety of quaternary ammonium salts may be lower than previously supposed, indicating a need for testing such compounds for their mutagenicity.

  2. Mutagenicity of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmochowska, Barbara [Department of Carbohydrate Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Piosik, Jacek; Woziwodzka, Anna [Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, 80-822 Gdansk (Poland); Sikora, Karol; Wisniewski, Andrzej [Department of Carbohydrate Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, 80-822 Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} A series of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties, with configuration D-galacto, D-gluco and D-manno, was synthesized and characterized. {yields} The quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties revealed potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. {yields} The N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. {yields} We suggest that quaternary ammonium salts may be more hazardous than previously supposed. - Abstract: Quaternary ammonium salts are widely used in industrial, agricultural, healthcare and domestic applications. They are believed to be safe compounds, with little or no health hazard to humans. However, in this report, we demonstrate that a series of newly synthesized quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties reveal potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. D-Gluco- and D-galacto-derivatives were found to have a higher mutagenic potential than D-manno-derivatives. Among the former groups of compounds, the N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. These results suggest that the safety of quaternary ammonium salts may be lower than previously supposed, indicating a need for testing such compounds for their mutagenicity.

  3. The mutagenicity of Gramoxone (paraquat) on different eukaryotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Abidin Salam, A Z; Hussein, E H; el-Itriby, H A; Anwar, W A; Mansour, S A

    1993-10-01

    The possible mutagenicity of the herbicide Gramoxone was evaluated using five different living systems: Allium cepa, Vicia faba, yeast, Drosophila melanogaster and human lymphocytes. The results indicate that Gramoxone has mutagenic activity at the cytological level in Allium cepa, Vicia faba and human lymphocytes. All doses were effective in inducing chromosomal abnormalities and a clear dose-response relationship was observed in the various cytological tests. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities revealed that this herbicide displays clastogenic and turbagenic activities. At the gene mutation level Gramoxone induced gene conversion at the trp-5 locus and reversion at the ilv locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In Drosophila melanogaster, Gramoxone proved to be mutagenic to germ cells and induced a high frequency of sex-linked recessive lethals (SLRL). At the protein level, Gramoxone had detectable mutagenic effects on the genetic background of two enzymes, Adh and Est-6. Gramoxone should be considered a mutagenic herbicide. PMID:7692291

  4. Discerning Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exhaust particles from the combustion of traditional diesel fuel have been shown to lead to increases in adverse health effects such as impaired lung function, respiratory distress, and cardiovascular disease. This has resulted in an effort to find alternative fuels, such as soy...

  5. Characterization and validation of an in silico toxicology model to predict the mutagenic potential of drug impurities*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov [Science and Research Staff, Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993–0002 (United States); Cross, Kevin P. [Leadscope, Inc., 1393 Dublin Road, Columbus, OH, 43215–1084 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Control and minimization of human exposure to potential genotoxic impurities found in drug substances and products is an important part of preclinical safety assessments of new drug products. The FDA's 2008 draft guidance on genotoxic and carcinogenic impurities in drug substances and products allows use of computational quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR) to identify structural alerts for known and expected impurities present at levels below qualified thresholds. This study provides the information necessary to establish the practical use of a new in silico toxicology model for predicting Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of drug impurities and other chemicals. We describe the model's chemical content and toxicity fingerprint in terms of compound space, molecular and structural toxicophores, and have rigorously tested its predictive power using both cross-validation and external validation experiments, as well as case studies. Consistent with desired regulatory use, the model performs with high sensitivity (81%) and high negative predictivity (81%) based on external validation with 2368 compounds foreign to the model and having known mutagenicity. A database of drug impurities was created from proprietary FDA submissions and the public literature which found significant overlap between the structural features of drug impurities and training set chemicals in the QSAR model. Overall, the model's predictive performance was found to be acceptable for screening drug impurities for Salmonella mutagenicity. -- Highlights: ► We characterize a new in silico model to predict mutagenicity of drug impurities. ► The model predicts Salmonella mutagenicity and will be useful for safety assessment. ► We examine toxicity fingerprints and toxicophores of this Ames assay model. ► We compare these attributes to those found in drug impurities known to FDA/CDER. ► We validate the model and find it has a desired predictive

  6. Characterization and validation of an in silico toxicology model to predict the mutagenic potential of drug impurities*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control and minimization of human exposure to potential genotoxic impurities found in drug substances and products is an important part of preclinical safety assessments of new drug products. The FDA's 2008 draft guidance on genotoxic and carcinogenic impurities in drug substances and products allows use of computational quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR) to identify structural alerts for known and expected impurities present at levels below qualified thresholds. This study provides the information necessary to establish the practical use of a new in silico toxicology model for predicting Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of drug impurities and other chemicals. We describe the model's chemical content and toxicity fingerprint in terms of compound space, molecular and structural toxicophores, and have rigorously tested its predictive power using both cross-validation and external validation experiments, as well as case studies. Consistent with desired regulatory use, the model performs with high sensitivity (81%) and high negative predictivity (81%) based on external validation with 2368 compounds foreign to the model and having known mutagenicity. A database of drug impurities was created from proprietary FDA submissions and the public literature which found significant overlap between the structural features of drug impurities and training set chemicals in the QSAR model. Overall, the model's predictive performance was found to be acceptable for screening drug impurities for Salmonella mutagenicity. -- Highlights: ► We characterize a new in silico model to predict mutagenicity of drug impurities. ► The model predicts Salmonella mutagenicity and will be useful for safety assessment. ► We examine toxicity fingerprints and toxicophores of this Ames assay model. ► We compare these attributes to those found in drug impurities known to FDA/CDER. ► We validate the model and find it has a desired predictive performance.

  7. Factors influencing mutagenic mode of action determinations of regulatory and advisory agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastmond, David A

    2012-04-28

    The determination of whether a chemical induces cancer through a mutagenic or genotoxic mechanism frequently plays an important role in evaluating the risks associated with low dose exposure. Although various approaches are employed for making mode of action decisions, a systematic investigation to identify the major factors that influence these determinations has not been performed. To accomplish this, over 40 chemical risk assessments conducted by U.S. or international regulatory agencies and organizations were reviewed to identify components that had played a significant role, either directly or indirectly, in the decision-making process. The major factors identified included the chemical properties of the agent, its metabolites and degradation products; its metabolism and toxicokinetics; genotoxic effects seen in vivo, particularly in the target organ; structural or metabolic similarities to known mutagenic or nonmutagenic chemicals; characteristics of the tumors induced in the animal bioassays; and the origin of the observed effects. The quality of the data, the specific genotoxic endpoint and its sensitivity to assay conditions and toxicity were also important considerations. In all cases, the authoritative groups used a weight-of-evidence approach and, in most cases where evaluations were conducted by more than one authoritative body, similar conclusions were reached. In summary, a critical evaluation of the data as well as expert judgment is necessary in reaching mechanism of action conclusions. These determinations should be made within the broader context of evaluating the chemical's overall toxicity and carcinogenicity. PMID:22561946

  8. Comparative mutagenicity assessment of aerosols in emissions from biofuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Suparna; Swain, Abhay Kumar; Venkataraman, Chandra

    This study was designed to determine the mutagenicity in extracts of aerosols generated from biofuel combustion in household cooking devices commonly used in India. Wood, dung cake and biofuel briquette were used as fuel in various stoves, including both traditional and improved stoves made of mud, fired clay and metal. The combustion aerosols of particle diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) were collected, and their organic extracts were tested for mutagenicity using the Ames Assay test with TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium and studies were performed both with and without metabolic activation to account for direct and indirect acting mutagens. The measured mutagenicity emission factors, i.e., number of revertants per kg of fuel burnt, indicate that wood demonstrates significantly lower mutagenicity compared to dung cake and briquette. No significant stove effect was observed across all the fuels studied. The contribution of direct-acting mutagens was found to be greater than 70% in all cases. Such a high relative contribution of direct-acting mutagenicity has not been previously reported for biomass combustion aerosols.

  9. A methodology for assessing the impact of mutagens on aquatic ecosystems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessments of impacts of hazardous agents (i.e., chemical and physical mutagens) on human health have focused on defining the effects of chronic exposure on individuals, with cancer being the main effect of concern. In contrast, impacts on ecosystems have traditionally been gauged by the assessment of near-term organism mortality, which is clearly not a useful endpoint for assessing the long-term effects of chronic exposures. Impacts on individual organisms that affect the long-term survival of populations are much more important but are also more difficult to define. Therefore, methods that provide accurate measures of sub-lethal effects that are linked to population survival are required so that accurate assessments of environmental damage can be made and remediation efforts, if required, can be initiated. Radioactive substances have entered aquatic environments as a result of research and production activities, intentional disposal, and accidental discharges. At several DOE sites, surface waters and sediments are contaminated with radioactive and mutagenic materials. The accident at the Chernobyl power station in the former Soviet Union (FSU) has resulted in the contamination of biota present in the Kiev Reservoir. This documents presents a methodology which addresses the effects of a direct-acting mutagen (radiation) on aquantic organisms by applying sensitive techniques for assessing damage to genetic material

  10. Induction of transposon TN1 translocation under the action of different mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration of ampicillin transposon Tn1 under normal conditions in Escherichia coli cells proceeds with low frequency (10-4 transpositions for cell). The low transposition frequency is conditioned by the transposition repression, realized by the gene-repressor in transposon structure and, probably, by other regulating genes of the bacterium-host. E. coli cell treatment by physical and chemical mutagens resulted in induction of translocation of ampicillin transposon Tn1 from plasmid RP4 into other replicons. Mitomycin C and ultraviolet radiation produced stronger inducing effect as compared to nitroso-guanidine (NG). The effect of the given mutagens on transposition Tn1 correlated with their activating capacity with respect to inducible SOS-functions of E coli. The mutation of rec A didn't influence on spontaneous Tn1 transposition, but blocked completely the induction of transposition process under mutagen effect. The relationship of inducible transposition with SOS-functions in E. coli cells, controlled by recA and lexA genes, as well as the possible role of the process in genetic microorganism variability are discussed in the paper

  11. Micronucleus test and erythropoiesis: effect of cobalt on the induction of micronuclei by mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y; Shimizu, H; Nagae, Y; Fukumoto, M; Okonogi, H; Kadokura, M

    1993-01-01

    The micronucleus test is used widely as an in vivo short-term assay for potential carcinogens. In the present study, results of the micronucleus test were affected by cobalt dichloride pretreatment. Cobalt dichloride was used to induce erythropoietin, a growth factor for erythropoiesis. The increase in mutagen-induced micronucleus response following cobalt pretreatment, therefore, may have been due to a change in the rate of erythropoiesis. The greatest interaction between cobalt pretreatment and mutagen treatment for the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE) occurred when mice were injected with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) 12-24 hr after pretreatment with cobalt dichloride and killed 30 hr later. Increased sensitivity of the micronucleus test was attributable to the administration of mutagen during the differentiation and multiplication of erythroblast, which is presumed to have been accelerated by pretreatment with cobalt dichloride. An increased induction of MPCE in the bone marrow by two chemicals--benzo(a)pyrene, 2-naphthylamine--was also observed following pretreatment with cobalt dichloride. PMID:8359151

  12. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  13. mutagenic treatments and selection in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the present study was carried out through the three subsequent winter seasons of 1980/1981,1981/1982 and 1982/1983 at the experimental research center, faculty of agriculture , university of cairo, at giza and at the experimental farm belonging to the egyptian energy establishment, inshas. this investigation included two experiments . the first experiment was conducted to study the effect of gamma rays and Ems. on yield and yield components of four genotypes of chickpea. the second experiment was designed to study the effect of selection through the mutagenic treatments.the materials used consisted of four chickpea genotypes, three of them (i.e giza 1, Nec 1055 and Nec 1046) are kabuli type and the fourth (Family 88) is desi type

  14. Mutagenic mechanism on ion implantation of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam implantation, as a new mutation technique, has been widely used in mutation breeding, and great achievements have been attained in agriculture and fermentation industry. The mechanism underlying ion beam induced mutagenic effects has been the topic of research in recent years. In this paper, we focus on the initial physical process of ion implantation into organisms, discussing that energy deposit, mass deposit and charge transfer of the implanted ions into target organisms are the main contributions to the bio-effects. Recent advances in the study of transferring of damaging signals in plant sample are also included. It has been observed that targeted ion implantation of shoot apical meristem (SAM) of Arabidopsis embryos induces damage of root apical meristem (RAM), indicating a long distant bystander effect in intact organism. Further studies showed that generation of reactive oxygen species upon ion implantation and auxin-dependent transcription processes could play important roles in the observed bystander effect. (author)

  15. Mutagenic effects of ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of Stevia were implanted by 75 keV nitrogen and carbon ions with various doses. The biological effects in M1 and mutation in M2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam dose. The rate of cells with chromosomal aberration was lower than that induced with γ-rays. Frequency of the mutation induced by implantation of N+ and C+ ions were higher than those induced by γ-rays. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and in M2 useful mutation induced by implantation of C+ ion was higher than those induced by implantation of N+ ion. Mutagenic effects Feng1 x Riyuan and Riyuan x Feng2 by implantation of N+ and C+ were higher than that of Jining and Feng2

  16. Mutagenic effects of ion implanted rice seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of rice were implanted with 15∼30 keV N+, H+, Ar+ ion beam of various doses. The biological effects in M1 and mutation in M2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam could induce the variation on the chromosome structure and inhibit mitosis in root tip cell. The chromosomal aberration rate of cells tended to be increased with increase of implanted ion dose. Compared with 60Co γ-rays, ion implantation induced lower rate of cells with chromosome aberration. However, there was a similar inhibitory effect on mitosis between ion beam and γ-rays. The electrophoretic banding patterns of peroxidase enzymes were altered by both mutagens and varied. Frequency of the chlorophyll mutation implanted by ion beam was higher than that induced by γ-rays. Mutation frequencies of heading date and plant height were similar between ion beam implanting and γ-rays irradiation. (11 tabs., 2 figs.)

  17. A novel QSAR model of Salmonella mutagenicity and its application in the safety assessment of drug impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Antoni; Prous, Josep; Mora, Oscar [Prous Institute for Biomedical Research, Rambla de Catalunya, 135, 3-2, Barcelona 08008 (Spain); Sadrieh, Nakissa [Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States); Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov [Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    As indicated in ICH M7 draft guidance, in silico predictive tools including statistically-based QSARs and expert analysis may be used as a computational assessment for bacterial mutagenicity for the qualification of impurities in pharmaceuticals. To address this need, we developed and validated a QSAR model to predict Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of pharmaceutical impurities using Prous Institute's Symmetry℠, a new in silico solution for drug discovery and toxicity screening, and the Mold2 molecular descriptor package (FDA/NCTR). Data was sourced from public benchmark databases with known Ames assay mutagenicity outcomes for 7300 chemicals (57% mutagens). Of these data, 90% was used to train the model and the remaining 10% was set aside as a holdout set for validation. The model's applicability to drug impurities was tested using a FDA/CDER database of 951 structures, of which 94% were found within the model's applicability domain. The predictive performance of the model is acceptable for supporting regulatory decision-making with 84 ± 1% sensitivity, 81 ± 1% specificity, 83 ± 1% concordance and 79 ± 1% negative predictivity based on internal cross-validation, while the holdout dataset yielded 83% sensitivity, 77% specificity, 80% concordance and 78% negative predictivity. Given the importance of having confidence in negative predictions, an additional external validation of the model was also carried out, using marketed drugs known to be Ames-negative, and obtained 98% coverage and 81% specificity. Additionally, Ames mutagenicity data from FDA/CFSAN was used to create another data set of 1535 chemicals for external validation of the model, yielding 98% coverage, 73% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 81% concordance and 84% negative predictivity. - Highlights: • A new in silico QSAR model to predict Ames mutagenicity is described. • The model is extensively validated with chemicals from the FDA and the public domain.

  18. A novel QSAR model of Salmonella mutagenicity and its application in the safety assessment of drug impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As indicated in ICH M7 draft guidance, in silico predictive tools including statistically-based QSARs and expert analysis may be used as a computational assessment for bacterial mutagenicity for the qualification of impurities in pharmaceuticals. To address this need, we developed and validated a QSAR model to predict Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of pharmaceutical impurities using Prous Institute's Symmetry℠, a new in silico solution for drug discovery and toxicity screening, and the Mold2 molecular descriptor package (FDA/NCTR). Data was sourced from public benchmark databases with known Ames assay mutagenicity outcomes for 7300 chemicals (57% mutagens). Of these data, 90% was used to train the model and the remaining 10% was set aside as a holdout set for validation. The model's applicability to drug impurities was tested using a FDA/CDER database of 951 structures, of which 94% were found within the model's applicability domain. The predictive performance of the model is acceptable for supporting regulatory decision-making with 84 ± 1% sensitivity, 81 ± 1% specificity, 83 ± 1% concordance and 79 ± 1% negative predictivity based on internal cross-validation, while the holdout dataset yielded 83% sensitivity, 77% specificity, 80% concordance and 78% negative predictivity. Given the importance of having confidence in negative predictions, an additional external validation of the model was also carried out, using marketed drugs known to be Ames-negative, and obtained 98% coverage and 81% specificity. Additionally, Ames mutagenicity data from FDA/CFSAN was used to create another data set of 1535 chemicals for external validation of the model, yielding 98% coverage, 73% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 81% concordance and 84% negative predictivity. - Highlights: • A new in silico QSAR model to predict Ames mutagenicity is described. • The model is extensively validated with chemicals from the FDA and the public domain. • Validation tests

  19. A contribution to the study on the mutagenicity of atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a review of the literature, the genotoxic hazards of atmospheric pollutants at various locations (rural sites, motorway tolls, paint shops...) were evaluated by in vitro mutagenicity assays (Ames' test and SOS chromo-test) and analytical methods (gas chromatography and mass spectrometry). Instrumentation and procedures were developed for the sampling of volatile organic pollutants: adsorption on XAD2 followed by acetone extraction of the compounds trapped. A comparative study allowed to assess the relative mutagenic action of the volatile organic compounds and to establish a mutagenicity scale. (author)

  20. Effect of mutagen combined action on Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii cells. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect was investigated of single and combined actions of alkylnitrosourea derivatives (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) and UV-radiation on the survival of cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation following mutagen activity. In particular, the single phases were investigated of the total lethal effect, i.e., the death of cells before division and their death after division. The most pronounced changes in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation were noted in cell death before division. In dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens, the effect of the combined action on the survival of cells changed from an additive (alkylnitrosourea + UV-radiation) to a protective effect (UV-radiation + alkylnitrosourea). (author)

  1. How stable are the mutagenic tautomers of DNA bases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovarets’ O. O.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the lifetime of the mutagenic tautomers of DNA base pairs through the investigation of the physicochemical mechanisms of their intramolecular proton transfer. Methods. Non-empirical quantum chemistry, the analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. Physicochemical character of the transition state of the intramolecular tautomerisation of DNA bases was investigated, the lifetime of mutagenic tautomers was calculated. Conclusions. The lifetime of the DNA bases mutagenic tautomers by 3–10 orders exceeds typical time of DNA replication in the cell (~103 s. This fact confirms that the postulate, on which the Watson-Crick tautomeric hypothesis of spontaneous transitions grounds, is adequate. The absence of intramolecular H-bonds in the canonical and mutagenic tautomeric forms determine their high stability

  2. Mutagenicity of comfrey (Symphytum Officinale) in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Guo, L; Fu, P P; Heflich, R H; Chen, T

    2005-03-14

    Comfrey is a rat liver toxin and carcinogen that has been used as a vegetable and herbal remedy by humans. In order to evaluate the mechanisms underlying its carcinogenicity, we examined the mutagenicity of comfrey in the transgenic Big Blue rat model. Our results indicate that comfrey is mutagenic in rat liver and the types of mutations induced by comfrey suggest that its tumorigenicity results from the genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the plant. PMID:15726100

  3. Mutagenicity of comfrey (Symphytum Officinale) in rat liver

    OpenAIRE

    MEI, N.; Guo, L.; Fu, P P; Heflich, R H; Chen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Comfrey is a rat liver toxin and carcinogen that has been used as a vegetable and herbal remedy by humans. In order to evaluate the mechanisms underlying its carcinogenicity, we examined the mutagenicity of comfrey in the transgenic Big Blue rat model. Our results indicate that comfrey is mutagenic in rat liver and the types of mutations induced by comfrey suggest that its tumorigenicity results from the genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the plant.

  4. Mutagenicity assessment of aerosols in emissions from domestic combustion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canha, Nuno; Lopes, Isabel; Vicente, Estela Domingos; Vicente, Ana M; Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Almeida, Susana Marta; Alves, Célia A

    2016-06-01

    Domestic biofuel combustion is one of the major sources of regional and local air pollution, mainly regarding particulate matter and organic compounds, during winter periods. Mutagenic and carcinogenic activity potentials of the ambient particulate matter have been associated with the fraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their oxygenated (OPAH) and nitrogenated (NPAH) derivatives. This study aimed at assessing the mutagenicity potential of the fraction of this polycyclic aromatic compound in particles (PM10) from domestic combustion by using the Ames assays with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. Seven biofuels, including four types of pellets and three agro-fuels (olive pit, almond shell and shell of pine nuts), were tested in an automatic pellet stove, and two types of wood (Pinus pinaster, maritime pine, and Eucalyptus globulus, eucalypt) were burned in a traditional wood stove. For this latter appliance, two combustion phases-devolatilisation and flaming/smouldering-were characterised separately. A direct-acting mutagenic effect for the devolatilisation phase of pine combustion and for both phases of eucalypt combustion was found. Almond shell revealed a weak direct-acting mutagenic effect, while one type of pellets, made of recycled wastes, and pine (devolatilisation) presented a cytotoxic effect towards strain TA100. Compared to the manually fired appliance, the automatic pellet stove promoted lower polyaromatic mutagenic emissions. For this device, only two of the studied biofuels presented a weak mutagenic or cytotoxic potential. PMID:26893179

  5. Studies on mutagenicity of irradiated sugar solutions in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated sugar solutions are mutagenic towards Salmonella typhimurium, the effect being dose-dependent up to 2.0 Mrad. At all doses, ribose solution exhibited greater mutagenicity than did sucrose solution. The mutagenic effect was observed only in dividing cells and appears to be directly related to the growth rate. A larger proportion of revertants was observed after incubation with irradiated sugar solution for a period of 4 h than for 24 h. Irradiation of the sugar solutions in the frozen conditions was effective in completely preventing the development of mutagenic potential. Post-irradiation storage of the sugar solutions for a prolonged period (25 weeks) also minimized their mutagenic effect. The irradiated sugar solutions gave rise to both missense and frame-shift (addition as well as deletion) types of mutation; ribose was more effective in inducing the latter type. The irradiated sugar solutions failed to show a mutagenic response in the host-mediated assay with mice as the mammalian host

  6. Anti-mutagenic activity of Salvia merjamie extract against gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Khalid Mashay

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is an anti-cancer drug with clinically uses in the treatment of various neoplasms, including breast, ovarian, non-small cell lung, pancreaticand cervical cancers, T-cell malignancies, germ cell tumours, and hepatocellular carcinomas. However, it has also been reported to have many adverse effects. Naturally occurring anti-mutagenic effects, especially those of plant origin, have recently become a subject of intensive research. The present study was therefore designed to investigate the anti-mutagenic effects of Salvia merjamie (Family: Lamiaceae) plant extracts against the mutagenic effects of gemcitabine. The anti-mutagenic properties of Salvia merjamie were tested in Inbred SWR/J male and female mice bone marrow cells. The mice were treated in four groups; a control group treated with 30 mg/kg body weight gemcitabine and three treatment groups, each with 30 mg/kg body weight gemcitabine together with, respectively, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight Salvia merjamie extract. Chromosomal aberration and mitotic index assays were performed with the results demonstrating that Salvia merjamie extract protects bone marrow cells in mice against gemcitabine induced mutagenicity. This information can be used for the development of a potential therapeutic anti-mutagenic agents. PMID:25743821

  7. Development of resistance to Puccinia graminis avenae in Avena sativa by mutagen treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of over seven million M2 oat plants derived from irradiated and chemical mutagen treated seeds (about 50,000) or low-level chronically irradiated growing plants produced no new sources of useful resistance. However, preliminary results indicate that the gene Pg-16 has been transferred from the tetraploid Avena barbata L. to the hexaploid A. sativa L. by irradiation of disomic alien addition lines and monosomic alien substitution lines. This gene is highly effective and confers resistance to all but two of the known races of stem rust occurring in North America. (author)

  8. ABSENCE OF MUTAGENICITY IN THE URINE OF AUTOPSY SERVICE WORKERS EXPOSED TO FORMALDEHYDE: FACTORS INFLUENCING MUTAGENICITY TESTING OF URINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of exposure to autopsy workers to formaldehyde using urinary mutagenicity testing with Salmonella typhimurium. A matched control group was also studied. Additional studies including the recovery of histidine from urine samples, the determination of h...

  9. Mutagenic activity in disinfected waters and recovery of the potent bacterial mutagen "MX" from water by XAD resin adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Peter; Wondergem, Erik; Kronberg, Leif

    Chlorination of humic water generated mutagenic activity in the Ames test. The formation of the potent bacterial mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mutagenic activity were favoured by acidic chlorination conditions and high chlorine doses. Chlorinated humic waters from different locations differed slightly in the level of mutagenicity as well as in the proportion of activity derived from MX. Chlorination of an industrially polluted surface water with a low content of humic material generated an approximately equal level of mutagenicity (per mg of DOC) as that of chlorinated humic water, but only a minor part (26%) of the activity could be explained by the presence of MX. The mutagenicity and the amount of MX generated were substantially lower when using combined treatment methods (ClO2+Cl2, O3+Cl2) or when substituting chlorine by monochloramine or chlorine dioxide. The recovery of MX by XAD adsorption from water acidified to pH 2 was found to be quantitative.

  10. Human mutagens: evidence from paternal exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of inherited mutations as a cause of human disease has been established clearly through examples of well-defined genetic anomalies, such as Down syndrome and retinoblastoma. Furthermore, it is suspected that environmental contaminants induce mutations resulting in increased risk for such defects in subsequent generations of persons exposed. The present lack of direct evidence for induced inherited genetic disorders in human beings hampers the development of risk estimation techniques for extrapolation from animal models. The most extensive prospective epidemiologic studies of inherited genetic effects have involved survivors of atomic bomb detonations and patients treated with cancer chemotherapy. In neither case has a significant elevation in inherited genetic effects or cancer been detected in the offspring of exposed individuals. Epidemiologic studies of subjects receiving chronic exposure may be confounded by the effect of maternal exposure during pregnancy. Consideration of only paternal exposure can minimize the confounding influence of teratogenicity, enhancing the resolving power of studies for inherited effects. Using this approach, retrospective (case-control) studies of childhood cancer patients have provided limited but suggestive evidence for inheritance of induced effects. Endpoints, such as congenital malformations and spontaneous abortion following paternal exposure, can also be considered as indicators of heritable mutagenic effects. For example, there is limited evidence suggesting that paternal exposure to anaesthetic gases may cause miscarriage and congenital abnormalities as a result of induced male germ cell mutations. 104 references

  11. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.; Amirtayev, K. G.; Tokarova, B.; Bonev, M.

    The peculiarities and mechanisms of the mutagenic action of γ-rays and heavy ions on bacterial cells have been investigated. Direct mutations in the lac-operon of E. coli in wild type cells and repair deficient strains have been detected. Furthermore, the induction of revertants in Salmonella tester strains was measured. It was found that the mutation rate was a linear-quadratic function of dose in the case of both γ-rays and heavy ions with LET up to 200 keV/μm. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) increased with LET up to 20 keV/μm. Low mutation rates were observed in repair deficient mutants with a block of SOS-induction. The induction of SOS-repair by ionizing radiation has been investigated by means of the ``SOS-chromotest'' and λ-prophage induction. It was shown that the intensity of the SOS-induction in E. coli increased with increasing LET up to 40-60 keV/μm.

  12. Vinyl carbamate epoxide, a major strong electrophilic, mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of vinyl carbamate and ethyl carbamate (urethane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K K; Liem, A; Stewart, B C; Miller, J A

    1993-03-01

    Vinyl carbamate epoxide (VCO) was found to possess strong electrophilic, mutagenic and carcinogenic activities. It reacted with water at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4 (phosphate buffer) to form glycolaldehyde and several related reducing compounds; none of these products were mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium TA1535. Under these conditions VCO had a half-life (determined chemically and mutagenically) of approximately 10.5 min. This half-life was progressively lowered by increasing concentrations of chloride ion (liver, serum and isotonic levels). This ion reacted with VCO to form chloroacetaldehyde. VCO also reacted with other nucleophiles such as glutathione, DNA and its constituent guanine and adenine bases. The purine adducts formed by VCO in DNA in vitro and in vivo were released by weak acid treatment and consisted of 7-(2'-oxoethyl)guanine and N2,3-ethenoguanine as major products with 1,N6-ethenoadenine as a minor product. VCO was a strong direct mutagen in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 and TA100 but was only weakly active in the TA98 mutant. VCO was a stronger initiator of carcinogenesis in the skin of CD-1 mice and in the liver of infant male B6C3F1 mice than its metabolic precursors vinyl carbamate (VC) and ethyl carbamate (EC). Unlike VC and EC, VCO was a strong complete carcinogen in the skin of CD-1 mice and induced papillomas and carcinomas following repetitive administration of sub-ulcerogenic doses. VCO also exhibited some carcinogenic activity in the lungs of mice and in the s.c. and mammary tissue of female Sprague-Dawley rats. These data and those from other recent studies support the conclusion that VCO is a major strong electrophilic, mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of EC and VC in the mouse. PMID:8453720

  13. Characterization and Quantification of Compounds in the Hydroalcoholic Extract of the Leaves from Terminalia catappa Linn. (Combretaceae and Their Mutagenic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Mininel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia is a genus of Combretaceous plants widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Thus, the aim of this study was to quantify the majority compounds of the hydroalcoholic extract (7 : 3, v/v of the leaves from T. catappa by HPLC-PDA, chemically characterize by hyphenated techniques (HPLC-ESI-IT-MSn and NMR, and evaluate its mutagenic activity by the Salmonella/microsome assay on S. typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100, and TA102. The quantification of analytes was performed using an external calibration standard. Punicalagin is the most abundant polyphenol found in the leaves. The presence of this compound as a mixture of anomers was confirmed using HPLC-PDA and 1H and 13C NMR. Mutagenic activity was observed in strains TA100 and TA97a. As the extract is a complex mixture of punicalagin, its derivatives, and several other compounds, the observed mutagenicity may be explained in part by possible synergistic interaction between the compounds present in the extract. These studies show that mutagenic activity of T. catappa in the Ames test can only be observed when measured at high concentrations. However, considering the mutagenic effects observed for T. catappa, this plant should be used cautiously for medicinal purposes.

  14. Mutagenic effect of boronophenylalanine and borocaptate in neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the mutagenic effect in BNCT, CHO cells were incubated for 2 hours or 20 hours in culture medium with borocaptate sodium (BSH: Na2B12H11SH), or boronophenylalanine (BPA) prior exposure to neutrons from the heavy water facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) and the occurrence of mutations at the HPRT locus was measured. The mutagenicity of BSH and BPA was almost similar to the mutagenicity of 10B-boric acid at the same 10B concentration when cells were irradiated by iso-survival neutron dose. Pre-incubation to BSH for 20 hours caused an increase both in the cell killing effect and mutagenic effect in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) compared with pre-incubation to BSH for 2 hours. However, pre-incubation to BPA for 20 hours caused an increase in the cell killing effect but induced a decrease in mutagenic effect in BNCT compared with pre-incubation to BPA for 2 hours. (author)

  15. Utilization of Mutagenic Treatments for Improving Barley Disease Resistance to Powdery Mildew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program aims to improve barley (Hordeum vulgar L.) resistance to powdery mildew (Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordi) using mutation induction technique via physical and chemical mutagens. Grains of two local cultivars were treated with gamma rays (150, 250 GY) at a dose rate of 9.02 Rad/ Sec alone or with the concentrations of chemical mutagens, i.e.,EMS (4 and 8 mM), MH (10 and 20 mM) for two hours. After mass selection for the resistance in M2, the two cultivars were varied in their responses to the fifteen treatments. In M3 generation, the frequencies of plant resistance were increased at 20 mM of MH, 8 mM of EMS or 250 GY with either of them for the cultivar G124. However, the same trend was also found at 10 mM of MH, 250GY alone and with 4 or 8 mM EMS for cultivar G125. Moreover, eight mutants were selected from the progenies of M4 plants and evaluated in M5 generation. These mutants are characterized by highly disease resistance and high yield components, one of them has been characterized by non crytics and awnless .The desirable mutants should go to further evaluation for grain yield and grain quality in subsequent generations. (author)

  16. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of permethrin in mice: micronuclei analysis in peripheral blood erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Gislaine Cristina; de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Araujo, Andrea Mendez; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo

    2012-12-01

    Pyrethroids such as permethrin are synthetic compounds widely used in the agriculture of many countries to combat plagues and in domestic products, such as acaricides. Not so long ago these chemicals were characterized as non-toxic for non-target organisms; however, recent studies have showed that these compounds could present toxic potential for many organisms. In this sense, this study presents genotoxic and mutagenic potential of permethrin administered intraperitoneally in mice under artificial conditions by the use of micronucleus assay in the peripheral blood of these animals. The mice were divided into five groups: group I = negative control (distilled water), group II = positive control (cyclophosphamide), group III = 30% of permethrin LD(50) (96 mg/kg), group IV = 50% of permethrin LD(50) (160 mg/kg), and group V = 80% of permethrin LD(50) (256 mg/kg). The peripheral blood was collected 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Results showed that all the tested permethrin dosages presented genotoxic and mutagenic effects 24 h after treatment, which would contradict the classification of this chemical product as moderately toxic, i.e., unable to cause damages to the cell DNA. PMID:22965619

  17. Mutagenicity studies on alcohol extracts from gamma-irradiated potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alcohol extracts freshly prepared from gamma-irradiated potatoes were examined for their mutagenic activity in bacterial and mammalian cell systems. Negative results were obtained from all following test systems: Mutation assays with Salmonella typhimurium His- strains such as TA 100, TA 98, TA 1535, TA 1537, and streptomycin-dependent mutant (SM sup(d)) strain, TA 100 - 10, inductests with Escherichia coli strains, K 12 GY 5027 and K 12 C600, chromosomal aberration tests with Chinese hamster cells in culture, as well as micronucleus tests in mice. In addition, no difference in the mutagenic activities was found between extracts prepared from the irradiated and the unirradiated potatoes, suggesting that no mutagenic substance was produced in potatoes following gamma-irradiation. (author)

  18. Sources of mutagenic activity in urban fine particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples were collected during the winter of 1984-1985 in the cities of Albuquerque, New Mexico and Raleigh, North Carolina as part of a US Environmental Agency study to evaluate methods to determine the emission sources contributing to the mutagenic properties of extractable organic matter (EOM) present in fine particles. Data derived from the analysis of the composition of these fine particles served as input to a multi-linear regression (MLR) model used to calculate the relative contribution of wood burning and motor vehicle sources to mutagenic activity observed in the extractable organic matter. At both sites the mutagenic potency of EOM was found to be greater (3-5 times) for mobile sources when compared to wood smoke extractable organics. Carbon-14 measurements which give a direct determination of the amount of EOM that originated from wood burning were in close agreement with the source apportionment results derived from the MLR model

  19. Sources of mutagenic activity in urban fine particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples were collected during the winter of 1984-1985 in the cities of Albuquerque, NM and Raleigh NC as part of a US Environmental Protection Agency study to evaluate methods to determine the emission sources contributing to the mutagenic properties of extractable organic matter (EOM) present in fine particles. Data derived from the analysis of the composition of these fine particles served as input to a multi-linear regression (MLR) model used to calculate the relative contribution of wood burning and motor vehicle sources to mutagenic activity observed in the extractable organic matter. At both sites the mutagenic potency of EOM was found to be greater (3-5 times) for mobile sources when compared to wood smoke extractable organics. Carbon-14 measurements which give a direct determination of the amount of EOM that originated from wood burning were in close agreement with the source apportionment results derived from the MLR model

  20. Determining effective radiation mutagen dose for garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to get database for future garlic mutation breeding studies. For this aim, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 Gy doses of Cs137 (gamma-ray) were applied on garlic cloves as a physical mutagen. 50 cloves were used for each dose. Sixty days after treatment, germination rate and shoot development of cloves were determined. The Effective Mutagen Dose (ED50) was calculated by regression analyses. According to the results, 4.455 Gy dose was found to be effective as ED50. (author)

  1. Improved mutagen-testing systems in mice. Progress report, 1 June 1976--31 August 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported from studies on the production of chromosomal inversion by chemical treatment or irradiation of sperm in mice and to detect inversions by observing high frequencies of first meiotic anaphase bridges of their sons or by using chromosomal banding techniques to detect inverted segments cytologically. For each new inversion, which is either of considerable length or which has particularly useful experimental properties, we will determine its linkage group, mark it genetically, if possible, or place it with a genetically marked homologous chromosome, and study its cytological, physiological, and anatomical effects. The inversions are being used to construct recessive lethal testing systems for estimating mutational loads in populations exposed to radiation or either proved or potential chemical mutagens, to mark and maintain induced lethals for analysis of their potential dominant effects on fitness, and to study other basic problems in mammalian genetics

  2. 40 Years of the Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: Implications for 21st Century Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay was developed and introduced by Bruce Ames and colleagues in 1971. Since then, it has become the standard assay for hazard identification of mutagens worldwide. It is a first-tier test for mutagenic activity in the pharmaceutical and chemi...

  3. REVIEW OF THE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM MUTAGENICITY OF BENZIDINE, BENZIDINE ANALOGUES, AND BENZIDINE-BASED DYES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mutagenicity of benzidine analogues (including benzidine-based dyes) was reviewed with a primary emphasis on evaluating results of the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. Many of these amines are mutagenic in tester strains TA98 and TA100 but require exogenous mammalian ...

  4. 61. STUDY ON MUTAGENICITY OF PENICILLIUM DIGITATUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum (P. digitatum) is a pathogenic fungus mildewed fruits and its process products. There were some events of poisoning on the clinic because fruits and its process products mildewed by the fungi are eaten. A lot of reports were about the study on acute poisoning on this hand. But there were few reports about the study on genetoxicity, and therefor we determined the mutagenicity of P. digitatum with different methods to provide scientific basis for prevent the effect of human genetoxicity. METHODS: ① The preparation of extract from P. digitatum: Preponderant fungus separated from mildewed fruits was incubated in the Czapak's medium for two weeks, and then it was extracted with CHCL2 and evaporated. It was dissolved by dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) for use. ② Bacterial reverse mutation assay: The assay was without S9 mix. E. coli ND-160 strain was used in the assay. The assay set up negative control, positive control and test group, The test group contained four concentrations (3.125 mg/plate, 6.25 mg/plate, 12.5 mg/plate and 25 mg/plate). ③ Micronucleus assay of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) in mice bone marrow. The assay was individed into negative control group (0.9% NaCl, 20 ul/mice), positive control group (cyclophosphamide, CP, 30 mg/kg B.W.) and test group (extract, 250 mg/kg B.W.). ④ Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay in primary cells of lung and liver of rat. Fresh cells separated from lung and liver were incubated. There were three groups in the test. They were negative control group SO, 1%(v/v)], positive control group (10-7 mol/L 3-MC for lung cell; 10-7 mol/L HN2. HCL for liver cell). The radioactivity of cells that were treated was detected. The result showed unscheduled incorporation index, and the index represented the level of UDS. ⑤ Mutation assay in E. coli K12 infA gene. Using E. coli K12 strain as mutation target, partial infA gene was amplified by PCR, and the overlapping fragments were cloned into PGEN-T vector

  5. Mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity evaluation of biodegraded textile effluent by fungal ligninolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Iqbal, Munawar; Hu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Colored effluents from the textile industry have led to severe environmental pollution, and this has emerged as a global issue. The feasibility of ligninolytic enzymes for the detoxification and degradation of textile wastewater was investigated. Ganoderma lucidum crude ligninolytic enzymes extract (MnP 717.7, LiP 576.3, and Laccase 323.2 IU/mL) was produced using solid-state culture using wheat bran as substrate. The biodegradation treatment efficiency was evaluated on the basis of degradation and detoxification of textile effluents. Standard bioassays were employed for mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity evaluation before and after biodegradation. The degradation of Masood Textile, Kalash Textile, Khyber Textile and Sitara Textile effluents was achieved up to 87.29%, 80.17%, 77.31% and 69.04%, respectively. The biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids and total organic carbon were improved considerably as a result of biodegradation of textile effluents, which were beyond the permissible limits established by the National Environmental Quality Standards before treatment. The cytotoxicity (Allium cepa, hemolytic, Daphnia magna and brine shrimp), mutagenicity (Ames TA98 and TA100) and phytotoxicity (Triticum aestivum) tests revealed that biodegradation significantly (P < 0.05) detoxifies the toxic agents in wastewater. Results revealed that biodegradation could possibly be used for remediation of textile effluents. However, detoxification monitoring is crucial and should always be used to evaluate the bio-efficiency of a treatment technique. PMID:27191553

  6. Analysis of EMS Mutagenized Soybean by Combination of DOP-PCR and GS-FLX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) has been commonly used to induce mutations for various organisms because it led to irreversible mutations with a high level of frequency. With relatively few individuals, saturated mutagenized populations could be generated by chemical mutagens. Since high-throughput sequencing instruments, such as GS-20 or GS-FLX from Roche/454 Life Sciences are now available, characterization of nucleic acids and massive mutant analysis are more feasible. Due to the requirement of sequence information and high cost for designing primers, degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) instead of direct sequencing was used for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) survey. In this study, we screen point mutation in soybean mutants generated by EMS mutagenesis using a combination of DOP-PCR methodology and GS-FLX. Four different modified DOP-PCR primers were used for amplifying genomic DNA of three soybean genotypes, Sinpaldalkong 2, SS2-2 and 25-1-1. Then, nucleotide sequences of these amplified PCR products were analyzed by GS-FLX. Different number and length of contigs and singlets were constructed depending on soybean genotypes and nucleotide identity, after sequences were trimmed and aligned. With 100% in identity, average 1,100 contigs and 7,000 singlets were formed in each soybean genotype. In order to survey sequence polymorphisms, POLYBAYES was used with base quality consideration. A total of 1,187 putative SNPs were detected, and these polymorphisms should be reconfirmed by direct sequencing after a homology search against GenBank databases. (author)

  7. Analysis of EMS mutagenized soybean by combination of DOP-PCR and GS-FLX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) causing point mutations were commonly used to induce mutations for various organisms because this leaded to irreversible mutations with high level of frequency. With relatively few individuals, saturated mutagenized populations could be generated by chemical mutagens. Since high-throughput sequencing instruments, such as GS-20 or GS-FLX from Roche/454 Life Sciences, are now available, characterization of nucleic acids and massive mutant analysis are more feasible. Due to the requirement of sequence information and high cost for designing primers, degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) instead of direct sequencing was used for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) survey. In this study, we screen point mutation in soybean mutants generated by EMS mutagenesis using combination of DOP-PCR methodology and GS-FLX. Four different modified DOP-PCR primers were used for amplifying genomic DNA of three soybean genotypes, Sinpaldalkong 2, SS2-2 and 25-1-1. And then, nucleotide sequences of these amplified PCR products were analyzed by GS-FLX. Different number and length of contigs and singlets were constructed depending on soybean genotypes and nucleotide identity, after sequences were trimmed and aligned. With 100% in identity, average 1,100 contigs and 7,000 singlets were formed in each soybean genotype. In order to survey sequence polymorphisms, POLYBAYES was used with base quality consideration. A total of putative 1,187 SNPs were detected and these polymorphisms should be reconfirmed by direct sequencing after homology search against GenBank databases. (author)

  8. 28. Annual Meeting of the European Environmental Mutagen Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 28th Annual Meeting of the European Environmental Mutagen Society took place in Salzburg from September 7th till September 11th, 1998. A lot of presentations also dealt with many radiation effects on cells, chromosomal aberrations and genetic effects caused by radioactive irradiation. In vivo and in vitro experiments concerning radiation injuries and carcinomas are analyzed. (Cecil)

  9. Mutagenicity of Diesel and Soy Biodiesel Exhaust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagenicity Of Diesel And Soy Biodiesel Exhaust Particles E Mutlua,b' SH Warrenb, PP Matthewsb, CJ Kingb, B Prestonc, MD Haysb, DG Nashb,ct, WP Linakb, MI Gilmourb, and DM DeMarinib aUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC bU.S. Environmental Agency, Research Triangle Pa...

  10. Flavonoids and alkenylbenzenes: mechanisms of mutagenic action and carcinogenic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Woude, van der H.; Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Schutte, M.E.; Alink, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mechanisms of mutagenic action and the carcinogenic risk of two categories of botanical ingredients, namely the flavonoids with quercetin as an important bioactive representative, and the alkenylbenzenes, namely safrole, methyleugenol and estragole. For quercetin a

  11. Adverse reproductive outcomes from exposure to environmental mutagens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim; Binková, Blanka; Dejmek, Jan; Perreault-Darney, S.; Rubeš, J.; Selevan, S. G.; Topinka, Jan

    Bangkok : Organizing Committee, 1998, s. 59. [International Conference on Environmental Mutagens in Human Populations. Bangkok (TH), 29.11.1998-04.12.1998] R&D Projects: GA MŽP ZZ/340/1/97 Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality

  12. Mutagenic treatments towards increasing the frequency of day-neutral mutations and standardization of procedures for tissue culture, in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various chemical mutagens and gamma radiation have been used on single dormant eyes and true seeds with a view to finding effective mutagenic treatment for the induction of day-length neutral mutants in potato using an effective screening technique for the isolation of day-length neutral mutants. Sodium meta bisulphite (SMS) was found to be an efficient mutagen in inducing mutations for this trait in true seeds although the same concentrations, when used for treating the single tuber eyes proved lethal. Pre-soaking the seeds for 24 hrs prior to treatment with 0.0025M SMS gave highest frequency of the mutants followed by 48 hrs presoaking, indicating a sensitive stage during the cell cycle in true seeds. Other mutagen treatments gave different frequencies of mutations. The highest frequency of day-length neutral mutants was observed when seeds irradiated with 40 Kr of gamma radiation were treated with 0.05M hydrazinium dichloride solution. Screening procedures have also been standardised with the development of synethetic media for the isolation of biochemical mutants at the true seed level. Initial efforts have yielded mutants resistant to LD100 doses of ethionine. Another aspect of the study was to develop a proper potato callus culture technique. A medium has been developed to produce and maintain callus from potato leaf strips. Efforts on the regeneration of shoot and roots from callus, have so far lead to differentiation of callus to form roots. The ultimate aim of these studies is to develop plantlets from single cell which would form the units of mutation induction and isolation. (author)

  13. Genotoxicity studies in semiconductor industry. 1. In vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity studies of waste samples resulting from plasma etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, R.; Huettner, E.M.; Merten, H.; Raabe, F. (Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany))

    1993-07-01

    Solid waste samples taken from the etching reactor, the turbo pump, and the waste air system of a plasma etching technology line in semiconductor production were studied as to their genotoxic properties in a bacterial repair test, in the Ames/Salmonella microsome assay, in the SOS chromotest, in primary mouse hepatocytes, and in Chinese hamster V79 cell cultures. All three waste samples were found to be active by inducing of unscheduled DNA-synthesis in mouse hepatocytes in vitro. In the bacterial rec-type repair test with Proteus mirabilis, waste samples taken from the turbo pump and the vacuum pipe system were not genotoxic. The waste sample taken from the chlorine-mediated plasma reactor was clearly positive in the bacterial repair assay and in the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli. Mutagenic activity was demonstrated for all samples in the presence and absence of S9 mix made from mouse liver homogenate. Again, highest mutagenic activity was recorded for the waste sample taken from the plasma reactor, while samples collected from the turbo pump and from the waste air system before dilution and liberation of the air were less mutagenic. For all samples chromosomal damage in V79 cells was not detected, indicating absence of clastogenic activity in vitro. Altogether, these results indicate generation of genotoxic and mutagenic products as a consequence of chlorine-mediated plasma etching in the microelectronics industry and the presence of genotoxins even in places distant from the plasma reactor. Occupational exposure can be expected both from the precipitated wastes and from chemicals reaching the environment with the air stream.

  14. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  15. Evaluation of the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of phytotherapic and homeopathic solutions of Euphorbia tirucalli Lineu (Aveloz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Holandino

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Euphorbia tirucalli Lineu, commonly known as Aveloz, is a very common plant found in tropical regions [1]. The ingestion or contact with its latex causes symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea, pallor, skin irritation, hepatotoxicity as well as carcinogenesis [2]. Moreover, the Aveloz latex is also responsible for a few important activities against some infectious and neoplastic diseases. Aveloz latex phytochemical composition may vary according to seasonal aspects and geographic location [3], and it is used either orally or topically in traditional medicine. Popularly known as an antitumoral agent (breast, prostate, lung, kidney, it is used not only in Brazil, but in several other countries. According to the literature, the latex could have a dual behaviour, activating or inhibiting tumoral events [3-6]. However, there are few reports discussing these mechanisms. Besides, the mutagenic and genotoxic potentials of phytochemical and homeopathic Aveloz have not yet been described. Several experimental methods have been used to evaluate the mutagenic and genotoxic effects, such as Inductest, the Ames test and the chromotest. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of Aveloz latex and Aveloz phytotherapic and homeopathic solutions. Methodology: In this study, Aveloz 5 and 30cH are prepared according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [7], from Aveloz latex collected in the Center for Natural Products Research (NPPN at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro [8]. The Aveloz phytochemical solution was prepared following the doses used in folk medicine: 2 drops diluted in 250ml of water and 2 drops diluted in 25 ml of water. All test solutions were submitted to the following methodologies: (a Inductest: assesses the ability of physical or chemical agents to promote lysogenic induction as a response to DNA damage in lysogenic bacteria; (b The Ames test: uses indicator strains of Salmonella

  16. Counteracting quasispecies adaptability: extinction of a ribavirin-resistant virus mutant by an alternative mutagenic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Perales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction promoted by mutagen-induced elevation of mutation rates of viruses, may meet with the problem of selection of mutagen-resistant variants, as extensively documented for standard, non-mutagenic antiviral inhibitors. Previously, we characterized a mutant of foot-and-mouth disease virus that included in its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase replacement M296I that decreased the sensitivity of the virus to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Replacement M296I in the viral polymerase impedes the extinction of the mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus by elevated concentrations of ribavirin. In contrast, wild type virus was extinguished by the same ribavirin treatment and, interestingly, no mutants resistant to ribavirin were selected from the wild type populations. Decreases of infectivity and viral load of the ribavirin-resistant M296I mutant were attained with a combination of the mutagen 5-fluorouracil and the non-mutagenic inhibitor guanidine hydrocloride. However, extinction was achieved with a sequential treatment, first with ribavirin, and then with a minimal dose of 5-fluorouracil in combination with guanidine hydrochloride. Both, wild type and ribavirin-resistant mutant M296I exhibited equal sensitivity to this combination, indicating that replacement M296I in the polymerase did not confer a significant cross-resistance to 5-fluorouracil. We discuss these results in relation to antiviral designs based on lethal mutagenesis. CONCLUSIONS: (i When dominant in the population, a mutation that confers partial resistance to a mutagenic agent can jeopardize virus extinction by elevated doses of the same mutagen. (ii A wild type virus, subjected to identical high mutagenic treatment, need not select a mutagen-resistant variant, and the population can be extinguished. (iii Extinction of the mutagen-resistant variant can be achieved by a sequential treatment of a

  17. Pollen genetic markers for detection of mutagens in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To utilize and exploit pollen for in situ mutagen monitoring, screening and toxicology, the range of genetic traits in pollen must be identified and analyzed. To be useful for the development of mutagen detection systems proteins should be: (1) activity stainable or immunologically identifiable in the pollen, (2) the products of one to three loci; and (3) gametophytic and nuclear in origin. Several proteins, including alcohol dehydrogenase in maize, which meet these criteria are discussed. The waxy locus in barley and maize which controls starch deposition for pollen screening and mutant detection. Thirty waxy mutant lines, induced by sodium azide and gamma-rays are characterized for spontaneous and induced reversion frequencies, allelism, karyotype, amylose content, and UDPglucose glucosyltransferase (waxy gene product) activity. Twelve mutant alleles are being mapped by recombinant frequencies

  18. Enhanced production of protease by mutagenized strain of aspergillus oryzae in solid substrate fermentation of rice bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral protease activity of parent strain of Aspergellus oryzae was enhanced by UV and chemical mutagenization with ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS). After screening, a hyper producing strain was isolated and found effective for tile production of neutral protease as compared to the parent strain of Aspergellus oryzae. Solid substrate fermentation was carried out in 250ml conical flask with 45 % initial moisture contents at a temperature of 30 deg. C for 72 flours. Under the optimum conditions maximum yield of neutral protease obtained was 662.61+-0.36 U/gds, Almost all the organic nitrogen supplements favored the enzyme production while sucrose proved as a best carbon source. (author)

  19. QSAR screening of 70,983 REACH substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the ChemScreen project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev;

    2015-01-01

    The ChemScreen project aimed to develop a screening system for reproductive toxicity based on alternative methods. QSARs can, if adequate, contribute to the evaluation of chemical substances under REACH and may in some cases be applied instead of experimental testing to fill data gaps for...... were used to reach overall predictions of substances with potential effects with the following result: 6.5% genotoxic carcinogens, 16.3% mutagens, 11.5% developmental toxicants. These results are similar to findings in earlier QSAR and experimental studies of chemical inventories, and illustrate how...... QSAR predictions may be used to identify potential genotoxic carcinogens, mutagens and developmental toxicants by high-throughput virtual screening....

  20. Behavioral screening for cocaine sensitivity in mutagenized zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Darland, Tristan; Dowling, John E.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of addiction could be greatly aided by using forward genetic manipulation to lengthen the list of candidate genes involved in this complex process. Here, we report that zebrafish exhibit cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. In a pilot screen of 18 F2 generation families of mutagenized fish, we found three with abnormally low responses to cocaine. This behavior was inherited by the F3 generation in a manner that suggests th...

  1. Differences in mutagenic and recombinational DNA repair in enterobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of recombinational DNA repair and inducible mutagenic DNA repair has been examined in Escherichia coli and 11 related species of enterobacteria. Recombinational repair was found to be a common feature of the DNA repair repertoire of at least 6 genera of enterobacteria. This conclusion is based on observations of (i) damage-induced synthesis of RecA-like proteins, (ii) nucleotide hybridization between E. coli recA sequences and some chromosomal DNAs, and (iii) recA-negative complementation by plasmids showing SOS-inducible expression of truncated E. coli recA genes. The mechanism of DNA damage-induced gene expression is therefore sufficiently conserved to allow non-E. coli regulatory elements to govern expression of these cloned truncated E. coli recA genes. In contrast, the process of mutagenic repair, which uses umuC+ umuD+ gene products in E. coli, appeared less widespread. Little ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis to rifampicin resistance was detected outside the genus Escherichia, and even within the genus induced mutagenesis was detected in only 3 out of 6 species. Nucleotide hybridization showed that sequences like the E. coli umuCD+ gene are not found in these poorly mutable organisms. Evolutionary questions raised by the sporadic incidence of inducible mutagenic repair are discussed

  2. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

    2009-03-15

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  3. Evaluation of Mutagenicity of Three Eugenol-Containing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narlan Sumawinata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eugenol containing materials are still widely used, both by the lay people or by the dentist. Professionally it is used to relieve dental pain by placing it in the cavity, or as a mixture for temporary filling, temporary cementation, and root canal sealer. Eugenol, however, is also known to be toxic to the tissue, and aflatoxin, a substance known to be mutagenic, has been found in material labeled as clove oil. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety of these materials, in particular the mutagenicity. The materials tested were imported eugenol material (95.8% eugenol and local eugenol material (99.5%, both used by dentists and clove-oil material (6.8% eugenol used by the lay people. These materials were assayed in Ames test using Salmonella typhimarium TA 1535 and TA 1537 strain without S-9 mixture. It was shown that all revertants were below the negative control of the test. It was concluded that neither the eugenol used by the dentist nor the clove oil used for suppressing the dental pain by the lay people showed mutagenicity to Salmonella typhimurium TA 1535 and TA 1537 strain.

  4. The pH dependence of the mutagenicity of methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate (MBC) towards Aspergillus nidulans (Eidam) Winter and Cladosporium cucumerinum Ellis & Arth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirenberg, H I; Speakman, J B

    1981-01-01

    The ability of methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate (MBC) to induce point mutations to carboxin and MBC resistance in Aspergillus nidulans (Eidam) Winter and Cladosporium cucumerinum Ellis & Arth. was dependent upon the pH value of the agar medium into which it had been incorporated. The relevance of this in relation to testing chemicals for a possible mutagenic activity with microorganisms is discussed. PMID:7010148

  5. Mutagenic screening of some commonly used medicinal plants in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintonwa, Alade; Awodele, Olufunsho; Afolayan, Gbenga; Coker, Herbert A B

    2009-09-25

    The uses of medicinal plants have always been part of human culture. The World Health Organization estimates that up to 80% of the world's population relies on traditional medicinal system for some aspect of primary health care. However, there are few reports on the toxicological properties of most medicinal plants especially, their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Therefore, this research is to determine the mutagenic potentials of Morinda lucida [Oruwo (Root)], Azadirachta indica [Dongoyaro (Leaf)], Terapluera tetraptera [Aridan (Fruit)], Plumbago zeylanica [Inabiri (Root)], Xylopia aethiopica [Erunje (Fruit)], Newbouldia laevis [Akoko (Leaf)], Alstonia boonei [Ahun (Bark)], Enantia chlorantha [Awopa (Bark)], and Rauvolfia vomitoria [Asofeyeje (Root)] using the Allium cepa Linn. model and the modified Ames assay. Allium cepa model was used to determine the mean root length, mitotic index and chromosomal aberrations effects of these plants on onion bulbs using 0.1, 1, 5 and 10mg/ml concentration of the plant extracts. The modified Ames test which is a modification of the standard Ames test as described by Ames et al. [Ames, B.N., McCann, J., Yamasaki, E., 1975. Methods for detecting carcinogens and mutagens with the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity test. Mutation Research 31, 347-364] was done using Escherichia coli (0157:H7) that has the phenotypic characteristics of glucose and lactose fermentation, motile, urease negative, indole positive and citrate negative. The results obtained from Allium cepa assay showed increasing root growth inhibition with increased concentration, decreasing mitotic index with increased concentration and chromosomal aberrations. The modified Ames test showed an alteration in the biochemical characteristics of Escherichia coli (0157:H7) for all plants except Rauvolfia vomitoria and Plumbago zeylanica. Three of the medicinal plants altered at least three of the normal biochemical characteristics thus demonstrating mutagenic

  6. Salmonella mutagenicity assessment of airborne particulate matter collected from urban areas of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, differing in anthropogenic influences and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tatiana S; Gotor, Gemma N; Beltrami, Laiana S; Nolla, Celia G; Rocha, Jocelita A V; Broto, Francesc P; Comellas, Lluis R; Vargas, Vera M F

    2010-09-30

    Urban areas are both major sources and major targets of air pollution. The atmospheric environment receives diverse chemical substances, including genotoxic agents that may affect human health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the atmospheric quality in two urban areas in Rio Grande do Sul State (Brazil), under the influence of greater (Site 1) or lesser (Site 2) anthropogenic sources. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of environmental interest were quantified and the Salmonella/microsome assay was used for the measurement of mutagenicity. Organic compounds extracted from the airborne particulate matter were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect PAHs of interest (known or possible carcinogens). The organic extracts were also tested for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in the Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA98, TA100, YG1021 and YG1024, with or without S9 activation. At Site 1, benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (IP) were found at higher concentrations and mutagenicity (revertants per μg extract) varied from 1.0±0.25 (TA98, no S9) to 5.2±0.45 (TA98, S9). At Site 2, BghiP and IP were present in larger amounts and the mutagenic responses ranged from 0.6 to 3.7 revertants per μg (both in TA98, S9). The occurrence of BghiP and IP may be related to vehicular emissions. These and the other PAHs studied, as well as the nitro compounds, may contribute to the mutagenicity found in these airborne particles. PMID:20643224

  7. Retrospective analysis of the mutagenicity/genotoxicity data of the cosmetic ingredients present on the Annexes of the Cosmetic EU legislation (2000-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Gamze; Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Pauwels, Marleen; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the mutagenicity/genotoxicity of cosmetic ingredients at the regulatory level, usually a battery of three in vitro tests is applied. This battery, designed to be very sensitive, produces a high number of positive results, imposing the need for in vivo follow-up testing to clear the substance under study. In Europe, the use of experimental animals has become impossible for cosmetic ingredients due to the implementation of animal testing and marketing bans. Consequently, the possibility to 'de-risk' substances with positive in vitro results disappear and potentially safe cosmetic substances will be lost for the EU market unless currently used in vitro assays can be adapted or new non-animal mutagenicity/genotoxicity studies become available. Described strategies to improve the specificity of existing in vitro assays include optimisation of the used cell type and cytotoxicity assay and lowering of the applied top concentration. A reduction of the number of tests in the battery from three to two also has been suggested. In this study, the performance of the 'standard' in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity testing battery is analysed for a number of cosmetic ingredients. We composed a database with toxicological information on 249 cosmetic ingredients, mainly present on the Annexes of the European cosmetic legislation. Results revealed that the in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity tests showed a low specificity for the cosmetic ingredients concerned, comparable to the specificity published for chemicals. Non-confirmed or 'misleading' positive results amounted up to 93% for the in vitro test batteries. The cell type and top concentrations did not have a major impact on the specificity. With respect to cytotoxicity determinations, different end points were used, potentially leading to different testing concentrations, suggesting the need for a consensus in this matter. Overall, the results of this retrospective analysis point to an urgent need of better regulatory

  8. Evaluation of the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of a living nosode compounded with Influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Leitao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The influenza virus has been responsible for contagious respiratory diseases with high mortality rates [1]. Some drugs have been used to treat human influenza. However, these drugs cause many common side effects and induce the appearance of resistant viral strains [2]. The impact caused by the influenza virus has motivated the development of new approaches for the prevention and control of influenza [3]. Therefore, a new homeopathic medicine was developed using, as a starting point, the infectious influenza virus [4]. This belongs to a group called living nosodes [5]. However, its mutagenic and genotoxic potentials, especially when used in low dilutions, has not yet been evaluated and it is important because this biotherapic is prepared from living microorganisms. Different methods can be used to detect mutagenic and genotoxicic effects. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of influenza A living nosode at different homeopathic potencies. Methodology: 1 ml of purified viral suspension was diluted in 9 ml of sterile distilled water. This sample was submitted to 100 mechanical succussions (approximately 3 Hz, using Autic® Brazilian machine, originating the first dilution, named decimal (1x. 1 ml of this solution was diluted in 9 ml of solvent and was submitted to 100 sucussions, generating biotherapic 2x. This procedure was successively repeated, according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, to obtain the biotherapic 30x [6]. By the same technique, water vehicle was prepared until 30x potency to be used as control. All samples were prepared in sterile and under aseptic conditions, using laminar flow cabinet, class II, and were stored in the refrigerator (8ºC. The samples 1x, 6x, 12x, 18x, 24x and 30x and water 30x (vehicle control were analysed by: the Inductest, which assesses the ability of physical or chemical agents to promote lysogenic induction as a reflection of damage

  9. Structural and biochemical impact of C8-aryl-guanine adducts within the NarI recognition DNA sequence: influence of aryl ring size on targeted and semi-targeted mutagenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sproviero, Michael; Verwey, Anne M.R.; Rankin, Katherine M.; Witham, Aaron A.; Soldatov, Dmitriy V.; Richard A. Manderville; Fekry, Mostafa I.; Sturla, Shana J.; Sharma, Purshotam; Wetmore, Stacey D.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical mutagens with an aromatic ring system may be enzymatically transformed to afford aryl radical species that preferentially react at the C8-site of 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG). The resulting carbon-linked C8-aryl-dG adduct possesses altered biophysical and genetic coding properties compared to the precursor nucleoside. Described herein are structural and in vitro mutagenicity studies of a series of fluorescent C8-aryl-dG analogues that differ in aryl ring size and are representative of auth...

  10. Characterization of mutagenic activity in grain-based coffee-substitute blends and instant coffees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, M.A.E.; Knize, M.G.; Felton, J.S.; Jagerstad, M.

    1994-06-01

    Several grain-based coffee-substitute blends and instant coffees showed a mutagenic response in the Ames/Salmonella test using TA98, YG1024 and YG1O29 with metabolic activation. The beverage powders contained 150 to 500 TA98 and 1150 to 4050 YG1024 revertant colonies/gram, respectively. The mutagenic activity in the beverage powders was shown to be stable to heat and the products varied in resistance to acid nitrite treatment. Characterization of the mutagenic activity, using HPLC-and the Ames test of the collected fractions, showed the coffee-substitutes and instant coffees contain several mutagenic compounds, which are most likely aromatic amines.

  11. Contribution of woodsmoke and motor vehicle emissions to ambient aerosol mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple linear regression form of receptor modeling has been used to determine the sources of the mutagenicity of fine-particle ambient aerosol samples collected during the winter in a residential area of Albuquerque, NM. Virtually all the mutagenicity (Salmonella typhimurium TA98 + S9) could be accounted for by woodsmoke and motor vehicle emissions. Woodsmoke was found to be the greater contributor to the average ambient concentrations of both extractable organ is and mutagenicity. The mutagenic potency (revertants per microgram) of extractable organics traced to motor vehicles, however, was 3 times greater than that with a woodsmoke origin. The results were confirmed by 14C measurements

  12. Preliminary assessment of mutagenic and anti-mutagenic potential of some aminoalkanolic derivatives of xanthone by use of the Vibrio harveyi assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoczyńska, Karolina; Waszkielewicz, Anna Maria; Marona, Henryk

    2014-07-01

    The Vibrio harveyi assay was used to evaluate mutagenic and anti-mutagenic effects of four new aminoalkanolic derivatives of xanthone with anticonvulsant activity, to select the potentially safe compounds for further in vivo studies in animal models. The study showed that at a concentration of 40 ng/ml the test compounds were not mutagenic. Additionally, two of the investigated compounds, namely the (R,S)-N-methyl-1-amino-2-propanol derivative of 6-methoxyxanthone (compound III) and the (R)-N-methyl-2-amino-1-butanol derivative of 7-chloroxanthone (compound IV) were strong inhibitors of the mutagenicity induced by 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) in V. harveyi strains BB7M and BB7XM. The inhibition percentages for compound IV were 49 (in BB7M) and 69 (in BB7XM), whereas for compound III these percentages were 47 (in BB7M) and 42 (in BB7XM), respectively. The present study demonstrates that four bioactive derivatives of xanthone display no mutagenic activity in the V. harveyi assay. In addition, compounds III and IV demonstrated considerable anti-mutagenic activity in this test. Based on the results obtained here, these compounds could be selected for further studies in animal models, while compounds III and IV should be tested further for their anti-mutagenic properties. PMID:24769486

  13. Reproducibility of microbial mutagenicity assays. I. Tests with Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli using a standardized protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Salmonella/microsome test developed by Ames and his coworkers has been widely used in the evaluation of chemicals for genotoxic potential. Although the value of this assay is well recognized, there have been no comprehensive studies on the interlaboratory reproducibility of the method using a standardized protocol. A program was therefore initiated to compare the results obtained in four laboratories from testing a series of coded mutagens and nonmutagens using a standardized protocol. Additional objectives of this study were to compare male Fisher 344 rat, B6C3F1 mouse, and Syrian hamster liver S-9 preparations for the activation of chemicals; to compare Aroclor 1254-induced liver S-9 from all three species with the corresponding non-induced liver S-9's; and to compare the response of Escherichia coli WP-2 uvrA with the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains recommended by Ames. Since a primary use of in vitro microbial mutagenesis tests is the identification of potential carcinogens by their mutagenicity, the authors decided to compare the animal species and strains used by the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program (NCI/NTP) for animal carcinogenicity studies

  14. mutagenic treatments and selection under drought conditions in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    this study was carried out in 2002/2003,2003/2004 and 2004/2005 seasons at the fields and laboratories of nuclear research center, inshas, egypt in an attempt to induce drought tolerant mutants in the egyptian bread wheat cultivars sids 1 and sakha 93 via gamma rays and EMS mutagens , variability parameters, heritability and genetic advance from selection in M2 and M3 bulks derived via these mutagens were estimated and yield superiority of the new induced mutants over parent cultivars and M2 bulks were evaluated under water-stress and non-stress conditions. significant differences were observed among M2 and among M3 bulks as well as among M3 families selected under water stress or non-stress for all studied traits. irradiation and EMS mutagens succeeded to induce new variability measured by increases in means, ranges, PCV and GVC parameters in many M2 and M3 bulks under stress and non-stress, comparing induced M2 with M3 bulks , for superiority in studied genetic parameters including heritability in board sense (hb2)and expected genetic advance (G A) from selection indicated that there were 3 common superior bulks in both M2 and M3 generations (Sd-RAD-1, Sd -RAD-3 and Sd -EMS-1) under non-stress, while under water stress there were two common superior bulks (Sd-EMS-3 and Sk-RAD-2).superiority of these induced bulks qualified them for predicting to achieve genetic improvement in grain yield via selection under drought stress and non-stress conditions

  15. Evaluation of Mutagenicity of Three Eugenol-Containing Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Narlan Sumawinata

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol containing materials are still widely used, both by the lay people or by the dentist. Professionally it is used to relieve dental pain by placing it in the cavity, or as a mixture for temporary filling, temporary cementation, and root canal sealer. Eugenol, however, is also known to be toxic to the tissue, and aflatoxin, a substance known to be mutagenic, has been found in material labeled as clove oil. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety of these materials, in par...

  16. Cloning of Salmonella typhimurium DNA encoding mutagenic DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, S M; Sedgwick, S G

    1989-01-01

    Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli is encoded by the umuDC operon. Salmonella typhimurium DNA which has homology with E. coli umuC and is able to complement E. coli umuC122::Tn5 and umuC36 mutations has been cloned. Complementation of umuD44 mutants and hybridization with E. coli umuD also occurred, but these activities were much weaker than with umuC. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the composition of the cloned fragment is different from the E. coli umuDC operon. Therefore, ...

  17. A nonparametric approach to the statistical analysis of mutagenicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahrendorf, J; Mahon, G A; Schumacher, M

    1985-01-01

    A nonparametric statistical method for analysing count data from mutagenicity tests is proposed. This method does not make any stringent assumptions on the variation of the data. It requires only one ranking of the observations and the calculation of a resulting test statistic. The significance of this statistic can be assessed by approximation to the standard normal distribution or tables of critical values calculated by the authors. The method also includes a descriptive component through a series of K-1 estimates of a trend in a K group experiment. Several examples are discussed to illustrate the proposed method. PMID:3974612

  18. Cholesterol epoxide is a direct-acting mutagen.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Sevanian; Peterson, A R

    1984-01-01

    A 24-hr treatment of V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts with 12.4 microM cholesterol 5 alpha, 6 alpha-epoxide induced 8-azaguanine-resistant mutants at frequencies 4.6- to 11.8-fold higher than the spontaneous mutation rate. We show that cholesterol epoxide, which is produced by in vivo cholesterol oxidation, is a weak direct-acting mutagen. Cholesterol epoxide was found to be accumulated by cells and transformed to cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol, which was more toxic and a more p...

  19. How to assess the mutagenic potential of cosmetic products without animal tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter

    2009-08-01

    Animal experiments (in vivo tests) currently play a key role in genotoxicity testing. Results from in vivo tests are, in many cases, decisive for the assessment of a mutagenic potential of a test compound. The Seventh Amendment to the European Cosmetics Directive will, however, ban the European marketing of cosmetic/personal care products that contain ingredients that have been tested in animal experiments. If genotoxicity testing is solely based on the currently established in vitro tests, the attrition rate for chemicals used in cosmetic products will greatly increase due to irrelevant positive in vitro test results. There is urgent need for new and/or improved in vitro genotoxicity tests and for modified test strategies. Test strategies should consider all available information on chemistry of the test substance/the chemical class (e.g. SAR, metabolic activation and dermal adsorption). Test protocols for in vitro genotoxicity tests should be sensitive and robust enough to ensure that negative results can be accepted with confidence. It should be excluded that positive in vitro test results are due to high cytotoxicity or secondary genotoxic effects which may be thresholded and/or only occur under in vitro test conditions. Consequently, further research is needed to establish the nature of thresholds in in vitro assays and to determine the potential for incorporation of mode of action data into future risk assessments. New/improved tests have to be established and validated, considering the use of (metabolically competent) primary (skin) cells, 3D skin models and cells with defined capacity for metabolic activation (e.g. genetically engineered cell lines). The sensitivity and specificity of new and improved genotoxicity tests has to be determined by testing a battery of genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals. New or adapted international guidelines will be needed for these tests. The establishment of such a new genotoxicity testing strategy will take time and the

  20. Mutagenicity assessment of aerosols in emissions from wood combustion in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) extracts of fine particles (PM2.5) collected from combustion of seven wood species and briquettes were tested for mutagenic activities using Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. The woods were Pinus pinaster (maritime pine), Eucalyptus globulus (eucalypt), Quercus suber (cork oak), Acacia longifolia (golden wattle), Quercus faginea (Portuguese oak), Olea europea (olive), and Quercus ilex rotundifolia (Holm oak). Burning experiments were done using woodstove and fireplace, hot start and cold start conditions. A mutagenic response was recorded for all species except golden wattle, maritime pine, and briquettes. The mutagenic extracts were not correlated with high emission factors of carcinogenic PAHs. These extracts were obtained both from two burning appliances and start-up conditions. However, fireplace seemed to favour the occurrence of mutagenic emissions. The negative result recorded for golden wattle was interesting, in an ecological point of view, since after confirmation, this invasive species, can be recommended for domestic use. - Highlights: ► Both woodstove and fireplace, either with a cold or hot start, produce emissions with mutagenic potential. ► The high level of carcinogenic PAHs in combustion emissions was not correlated with mutagenicity. ► The golden wattle, an invasive species, produced no mutagenic emissions. - Wood smoke from fireplace burning of dominant forest species displayed strong mutagenic activity without a significant correlation with carcinogenic PAHs emission factors.

  1. Gamma radiation/H2O2 treatment of a nonylphenol ethoxylates: Degradation, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Munawar; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad

    2015-12-15

    Gamma radiation/H2O2 treatment of nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEO) was performed and treatment effect was evaluated on the basis of degradation, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC), and toxicity reduction efficiencies. The radiolytic by-products were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. Low mass carboxylic acids, aldehyde, ketone, and acetic acid were identified as the by-products of the NPEO degradation. NPEO sample irradiated to the absorbed dose of 15 kGy/4.58% H2O2 showed more than 90% degradation. Allium cepa (A. cepa), brine shrimp, heamolytic tests were used for cytotoxicity study, while mutagenicity was evaluated through Ames test (TA98 and TA100 strains) of treated and un-treated NPEO. The reductions in COD and TOC were greater than 70% and 50%, respectively. Gamma radiation/H2O2 treatment revealed a considerable reduction in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. A. cepa, heamolytic and shrimp assays showed cytotoxicity reduction up to 68.65%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. The mutagenicity reduced up to 62%, 74%, and 79% (TA98) and 68%, 78%, and 82% (TA100), respectively of NPEO-6, NPEO-9, and NPEO-30 irradiated to the absorbed dose of 15 kGy/4.58% H2O2. NPEO-6 detoxified more efficiently versus NPEO-9 and NPEO-30 and results showed that Gamma radiation/H2O2 treatment has the potential to mineralize and detoxify NPEO. PMID:26143198

  2. Mutagenic effects of β-rays on rice (oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutagenic effects of 14C and some other mutagenic factors were compared, and the relationships between mutagenic effects of 14C and treated stages, doses and methods were studied with different rice varieties as test materials. The mutation rates of heading date and plant height were observed in M2. The results showed that the mutagenic effects of 14C were better than those of other mutagenic factors tested. It is most effective for inducing early-maturing mutation to treat plants with the doses of 333 x 104 Bq/plant at the stage of pollen mother cell formation; but for dwarf mutation , they were treated with 74 x 104 Bq/plant at the stage of pistil and stamen formation to pollen mother cell formation. As a best treating method, Na214CO3 solution was injected to plant bases

  3. Genetically Modified Vibrio harveyi Strains as Potential Bioindicators of Mutagenic Pollution of Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Agata; Jasiecki, Jacek; Bogdan, Adam; Szpilewska, Hanna; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2000-01-01

    For biodetection of mutagenic pollution of marine environments, an organism naturally occurring in these habitats should be used. We found that marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may be an appropriate bioindicator of mutagenic pollution. For positive selection of mutants, we developed a simple method for isolation of V. harveyi mutants resistant to neomycin. We constructed genetically modified V. harveyi strains that produce significantly more neomycin-resistant mutants upon treatment with low concentrations of mutagens than the wild-type counterpart. The sensitivity of the mutagenicity test with the V. harveyi strains is at least comparable to (if not higher than) that of the commonly used Ames test, which uses Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Therefore, we consider that the V. harveyi strains described in this report could be used as potential bioindicators of mutagenic pollution of marine environments. PMID:10653723

  4. Genetically modified Vibrio harveyi strains as potential bioindicators of mutagenic pollution of marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyz, A.; Jasiecki, J.; Bogdan, A.; Szpilewska, H.; Wegrzyn, G.

    2000-02-01

    For biodetection of mutagenic pollution of marine environments, an organism naturally occurring in these habitats should be used. The authors found that marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may be an appropriate bioindicator of mutagenic pollution. For positive selection of mutants, they developed a simple method for isolation of V. harveyi mutants resistant to neomycin. The authors constructed genetically modified V. harveyi strains that produce significantly more neomycin-resistant mutants upon treatment with low concentrations of mutagens than the wild-type counterpart. The sensitivity of the mutagenicity test with the V. harveyi strains is at least comparable to (if not higher than) that of the commonly used Ames test, which uses Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Therefore, the authors consider that the V. harveyi strains described in this report could be used as potential bioindicators of mutagenic pollution of marine environments.

  5. Evaluation of in vivo mutagenicity of hydroquinone in Muta™ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mariko; Masumori, Shoji; Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Ono, Atsushi; Honma, Masamitsu; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Hirose, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is used in skin bleaching agents, hair dyes, and finger nail treatments. Many skin-lightening cosmetics that contain HQ are currently marketed in Japan. Concerns have been expressed regarding health risks to the general population because the carcinogenicity of HQ was previously suggested in animal studies. HQ induced hepatocellular adenomas and forestomach hyperplasias in mice and renal tubular cell adenomas in male rats. In the present study, the lacZ transgenic mutation assay was conducted according to OECD test guideline 488 to determine whether mutagenic mechanisms were involved in HQ-induced carcinogenesis. Male Muta™ mice were repeatedly administered HQ orally at dosages of 0, 25, 50, 100, or 200mg/kg bw/day for 28 days. Body weight gain was decreased in all treatment groups. No significant differences were observed in mutant frequencies in the liver, stomach, lung, or kidney between HQ-treated mice and the concurrent negative controls, whereas the significant induction of mutations was noted in the positive control, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. These results suggest that a mutagenic mechanism is not responsible for HQ-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25435360

  6. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  7. Toxicity and mutagenic activity of some selected Nigerian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowemimo, A A; Fakoya, F A; Awopetu, I; Omobuwajo, O R; Adesanya, S A

    2007-09-25

    The toxicity and mutagenic potential of most African plants implicated in the management of cancer have not been investigated. The ethanolic extracts of selected Nigerian plants were subsequently studied using the brine shrimp lethality tests, inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of chromosomal aberrations in vivo in rat lymphocytes. Morinda lucida root bark, Nymphaea lotus whole plant and Garcinia kola root were active in the three test systems. Bryophyllum calycinum whole plant, Annona senegalensis root, Hymenocardia acida stem bark, Erythrophleum suaveolens leaves and Spondiathus preussii stem bark were toxic to brine shrimps and caused chromosomal damage in rat lymphocytes. Ficus exasperata leaves, Chrysophyllum albidum root bark and Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves were non-toxic to all the three test systems. Chenopodium ambrosioides whole plant was non-toxic to brine shrimps and rat lymphocyte chromosomes but showed inhibition in the conventional telomerase assay indicating a possible selectivity for human chromosomes. The result justified the use of the first eight plants and Chenopodium ambrosioides in the management of cancer in south west Nigeria although they appear to be non-selective and their mode of action may be different from plant to plant. All these plants except Chenopodium ambrosioides are also mutagenic and cytotoxic. PMID:17707603

  8. Molecular basis for the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation. Research accomplishments (1968 to present)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier work on the chemical basis of mutagenesis led to certain chemical generalities sufficient to explain how certain mutagens such as uv light and hydroxylamine functioned in information transfer systems (replicative, transcriptive and translational). When such modifications were applied to biologically active DNA in a controlled manner biological expression was non-stoichiometric because much of the damage was removed from the DNA by repair systems. Our efforts were then directed to these systems which led to: (1) the isolation, purification and characterization of endonucleases responsible for the first and controlling step in DNA repair - referred to as incision in both M. luteus and E. coli. The biological role of these enzymes was inferred in appropriate mutants; (2) the isolation, purification and characterization of exonucleases responsible for the removal or excision of damaged nucleotides in M. luteus and human placental trophoblasts; (3) the repair of uv damaged biologically active transforming and transfecting DNAs by purified endonucleases, exonucleases, DNA polymerase I and polynucleotide ligase from M. luteus and E. coli; (4) the characterization of the dual gene control for incision phenomenon in M. luteus and E. coli; and (5) isolation, purification and characterization of repair enzymes from human placenta

  9. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons; Antimutagenesis de moduladores quimicos contra el dano inducido por neutrones termicos de reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamentos de Materiales Radiactivos, de Biologia, del Reactor y Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of new derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione with anti-epileptic activity, by use of the Vibrio harveyi mutagenicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pękala, Elżbieta; Liana, Piotr; Kubowicz, Paulina; Powroźnik, Beata; Obniska, Jolanta; Chlebek, Iwona; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-12-12

    The Vibrio harveyi test was used to evaluate mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of nineteen new derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione (compounds 1-19) with antiepileptic activity. Four V. harveyi strains were used: BB7 (wild type) and the genetically modified strains BB7M, BB7X and BB7XM (i.e. strains with additional mucA and mucB genes, UV hypersensitivity, and UV hypersensitivity with plasmid pAB91273, respectively). None of the derivatives of 2-ethyl-2-methylsuccinic acid (compounds 1-7) had mutagenic activity against the tester strains of V. harveyi, but this set had strong or moderate antimutagenic activity against 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO) in the tester strains BB7, BB7X, and BB7M. This antimutagenic activity ranged from 51% to 67%, through 51-66% to 71-83% for V. harveyi BB7, BB7X and BB7M strains, respectively. Mutagenic activities in the group of 2,2-diphenyl-succinic acid derivatives (compounds 8-19) were variable and depended on the tester strain used. Compounds 8-19 were devoid of mutagenic properties against BB7 (wild-type strain). Among this group only compound 9, with the fluorine substituent in position 2 of the aromatic system, was devoid of mutagenic potential against all tester strains. The compounds in this group (8-19) demonstrated strong antimutagenic activity only against strain BB7 (inhibition ranging from 51% to 71%). We conclude that there are various mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione. Moreover, our studies have proven that the V. harveyi test can be applied for primary mutagenicity and antimutagenicity assessment of these new compounds. PMID:24060509

  11. Samplings of urban particulate matter for mutagenicity assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of a specific program relating to the evaluation of mutagenic activity of urban particulate matter, an experimental arrangement has been developed to sample aerosuspended particles from the external environment carried indoor by means of a fan. Instrumentation was placed directly in the air flow to minimize particle losses, and consisted of total filter, collecting particles without any size separation; cascade impactor, fractioning urban particulate to obtain separate samples for analyses; an optical device, for real time monitoring of aerosol concentration, temperature and relative humidity sensors. Some of the samples obtained were analysed to investigate: particle morphology, aerosol granulometric distributions, effect of relative humidity on collected particulate, amount of ponderal mass compared with real time optical determinations. The results obtained are reported here, together with some considerations about carbonaceous particles, in urban areas mainly originated from diesel exhausts, their degree of agglomeration and role to vehiculate substances into the human respiratory

  12. Mutagenic effect of radiations of various LET on Salmonella cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regularities of mutagenic effect of heavy charged particles of helium, deuterium ions and protons on various strains of Salmonella typhimurium were studied. Linear dose dependences of mutation frequency in the range of low doses were revealed. A conclusion was made that mutation process at low dose irradiation is determined in various teststrains of Salmonella typhimurium by certain premutation injuries. Quite a different picture is observed in mutation process in case of high dose irradiation where effect of inducible SOS-repair is distinctly manifested. Not only spectra of primary DNA injuries but probability of their fixation into mutation can change with the increase of LET. If fixation probability doesn't change with LET increase for replicative mutagenesis which make basis contribution to linear component of dose dependence of mutation frequency the probability of fixation is increased for reparative mutagenesis. It accounts for increase of values of relative genetic efficiency with LET increase. 7 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Comparative genotoxic effects of the cooked-food-related mutagens Trp-P-2 and IQ in bacteria and cultured mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.H.; Carrano, A.V.; Salazar, E.; Felton, J.S.; Hatch, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a major study to evaluate the mutagenicity of chemicals produced during the cooking of foods, we examined the responses of bacteria and cultured Chinese hamster cells to the compounds Trp-P-2 (3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-b)indole) and IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline), constituents identified in cooked beef and fish. In the Ames/Salmonella tester strain TA1538, both compounds were confirmed to be extremely potent mutagens that were active at levels below 1 ng/plate in the presence of hamster-liver S9 microsomal fraction. 50-fold higher doses of both compounds were required for mutagenicity in the uvr/sup +/ tester strain TA1978. Trp-P-2 also behaved as a strong mutagen in CHO cells using the standard exogenous activation with hamster-liver S9 fraction. At concentrations below 1 ..mu..g/ml it produced dose-dependent increases in cell killing, mutations at the hprt and aprt loci, sister-chromatid exchanges, and chromosomal aberrations. An excision-repair-deficient strain was about 2-fold more sensitive than the normal CHO cells with respect to these genotoxic effects of Trp-P-2. IQ had unexpectedly weak activity for all genetic endpoints in the CHO cells, and it produced clear-cut responses only in the repair-deficient cells and only above a concentration of 10 ..mu..g/ml. The toxicity that was observed with IQ was not affected by the repair capacity of the cells and was not associated with chromosomal aberrations, indicating that damage to cellular structures other than nuclear DNA was likely the predominant pathway for cell killing. 38 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  14. A study of possible mutagenicity of irradiated onion powder by salmonella/mammalian-microsome tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test was applied to detect possible mutagenicity of onion powder irradiated with 5 and 10 kGy, resp., using 60Co gamma radiation source. Aqueous extracts and pepsin/pancreatin digests equivalent to 50 and 20 mg of onion powder per plate, resp., were tested with and without the rat liver microsomal fraction, with Salmonella typhimurium mutant strains TA 100, TA 1535, TA 98, TA 1537 and TA 1538. Within the limitations of the experimental conditions applied, no mutagenicity of irradiated onion powder was demonstrable. (author)

  15. Reproductive health control of the families with mutagenic exposures after Chernobyl disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to estimate the additional genetic risk (hazard) of mutagenic radiation for evacuated families in relatively ecologically favorable region. The reproductive characteristics, birth defects prevalence and antropometric data compare was held among newborns for 130 families before and after mutagenic exposure, when they were evacuated from radiation polluted region. The study results indicated no evidence of low-dose radiation exposure impact on realization of additional mutagenic burden in the liquidators and evacuees families through the extent of reproductive losses and CM

  16. Effect of smoking on the chromosome aberrations induced by environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberration frequencies have increasingly been used for the study of various occupational and environmental exposures. Factors related to environmental in mutagens influence translocation yield. Smoking has impact on the translocation yield and is the most influential factor among the environmental mutagens to increase cancer incidence. In order to know how environmental mutagens affect the induction of translocations caused by smoking we analyzed translocations in the lymphocytes of smokers and nonsmokers in a large city, Beijing, a high natural background radiation area (HBRA) and in its control area (CA), remote villages in the south of China. The results of our analyses are reviewed in this presentation

  17. Impact of environmental exposures on the mutagenicity/carcinogenicity of heterocyclic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from overcooked foods and are highly mutagenic in most short-term test systems. One of the most abundant of these amines, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats. Human dietary epidemiology studies suggest a strong correlation between either meat consumption or well-done muscle meat consumption and cancers of the colon, breast, stomach, lung and esophagus. For over 20 years our laboratory has helped define the human exposure to these dietary carcinogens. In this report we describe how various environmental exposures may modulate the risk from exposure to heterocyclic amines, especially PhIP. To assess the impact of foods on PhIP metabolism in humans, we developed an LC/MS/MS method to analyze the four major PhIP urinary metabolites following the consumption of a single portion of grilled chicken. Adding broccoli to the volunteers' diet altered the kinetics of PhIP metabolism. At the cellular level we have found that PhIP itself stimulates a significant estrogenic response in MCF-7 cells, but even more interestingly, co-incubation of the cells with herbal teas appear to enhance the response. Numerous environmental chemicals found in food or the atmosphere can impact the exposure, metabolism, and cell proliferation response of heterocyclic amines

  18. Impact of Environmental Exposures on the Mutagenicity/Carcinogenicity of Heterocyclic Amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Bennett, L M; Malfatti, M A; Colvin, M E; Kulp, K S

    2003-12-19

    Carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from overcooked foods and are highly mutagenic in most short-term test systems. One of the most abundant of these amines, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats. Human dietary epidemiology studies suggest a strong correlation between either meat consumption or well-done muscle meat consumption and cancers of the colon, breast, stomach, lung and esophagus. For over 20 years our laboratory has helped define the human exposure to these dietary carcinogens. In this report we describe how various environmental exposures may modulate the risk from exposure to heterocyclic amines, especially PhIP. To assess the impact of foods on PhIP metabolism in humans, we developed an LC/MS/MS method to analyze the four major PhIP urinary metabolites following the consumption of a single portion of grilled chicken. Adding broccoli to the volunteers' diet altered the kinetics of PhIP metabolism. At the cellular level we have found that PhIP itself stimulates a significant estrogenic response in MCF-7 cells, but even more interestingly, co-incubation of the cells with herbal teas appear to enhance the response. Numerous environmental chemicals found in food or the atmosphere can impact the exposure, metabolism, and cell proliferation response of heterocyclic amines.

  19. Immunological detection and quantification of DNA components structurally modified by alkylating carcinogens, mutagens and chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection and quantification of defined reaction products of chemical mutagens and carcinogens (and of many cancer chemotherapeutic agents) with DNA require highly sensitive analytical techniques. The exceptional capability of immunoglobulins to recognize subtle alterations of molecular structure (especially when monoclonal antibodies are used to maximize specificity), outstanding sensitivity of immunoanalysis by high-affinity antibodies, and the fact that radioactively-labelled agents are not required suggest the utility of a radioimmunoassay to recognize and quantitate alkylated DNA products. We have recently developed a set of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (secreted by mouse x mouse as well as by rat x rat hybridomas; antibody affinity constants, 109 to > 1010 lmol) specifically directed against several DNA alkylation products with possible relevance in relation to both mutagenesis and malignant transformation of mammalian cells. These alkylation products include 06-N-butyldeoxyguanosine, and 04-ethyldeoxythymidine. When used in a radioimmunassay, an antibody specific for 06-ethyldeoxyguanosine, for example, will detect this product at an 06-ethyldeoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine molar ratio of approx. 3 x 10-7 in a hydrolysate of 100 ug of DNA. The limit of detection can be lowered further if the respective alkyldeoxynucleosides are separated by HPLC from the DNA hydrolysate prior to the RIA. The anti-alkyldeoxynucleoside monoclonal antibodies can also be used to visualize, by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy combined with electronic image intensification, specific alkylation products in the nuclear DNA of individual cells, and to localize structurally modified bases in double-stranded DNA molecules by transmission electron microscopy

  20. Evaluation of the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of homeopathic Candida albicans solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Santos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida spp is naturally found in humans’ flora of skin, gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and, in general, up to 75% of the population does not have any symptom [1]. However, oral candidiasis is very common among HIV patients and patients undergoing chemotherapy. The treatment of oral candidiasis is necessary once the disease causes discomfort and dysphagia, resulting in poor nutrition, slow recovery, and prolonged hospital stay [2,3]. Preliminary results obtained by our group with a new biotherapic prepared from Candida albicans (Candida 30x showed a great potential to reduce the candida yeast adhesion rate when the epithelial cells were pre-treated. This study is currently being developed with the evaluation of mutagenic and genotoxic potentials of several homeopathic solutions. Aims: The goal of this study was to assess the genotoxic and mutagenic potentials of different homeopathic potencies of C. albicans. Methodology: One part of C. albicans yeast obtained from Brazilian patient’s blood [4] was diluted in 9 parts of sterile water. This sample was submitted to 100 mechanical succussions (approximately 3 Hz, using Autic® Brazilian machine, originating the first dilution (1x. Then, 1 ml of this solution was diluted in 9 ml of solvent, submitted to 100 succussions, obtaining 2x potency. This procedure was successively repeated to obtain 30x potency, according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [5]. By the same technique, water vehicle was prepared until 30x to be used as control. All samples were prepared in sterile and aseptic conditions, using laminar flow cabinet, class II and were stored in the refrigerator (8ºC. The samples 1x, 6x, 12x, 18x, 24x and 30x of C. albicans and water 30x (vehicle control were analysed by: the Inductest, which assesses the ability of physical or chemical agents to promote lysogenic induction as a reflection of damage in DNA

  1. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of opthalmic solution preservatives and UVA radiation in L5178Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four preservatives used in ophthalmic solutions were tested for toxic and mutagenic potential in mouse lymphoma cells with and without exposure of cells to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. The preservatives tested were benzalkonium chloride (BAK), chlorhexidine, thimerosal and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Cell survival and mutagenesis were measured using the L5178Y mouse lymphoma (TK+/-) system. Cells were exposed to varying amounts of preservatives for 1 h at 370C, and aliquots irradiated with UVA radiation (during exposure to preservative). Cells were then assayed for survival, and mutagenesis at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. In concentrations commonly found in ophthalmic solutions, BAK, chlorhexidine, and thimerosal were toxic to cells, and thimerosal was slightly mutagenic. When cells were exposed to preservative and UVA radiation, chlorhexidine was mutagenic and the mutagenic activity of thimerosal was enhanced. (author)

  2. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of opthalmic solution preservatives and UVA radiation in L5178Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withrow, T.J.; Brown, N.T.; Hitchins, V.M.; Strickland, A.G. (Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (USA). Center for Devices and Radiological Health)

    1989-09-01

    Four preservatives used in ophthalmic solutions were tested for toxic and mutagenic potential in mouse lymphoma cells with and without exposure of cells to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. The preservatives tested were benzalkonium chloride (BAK), chlorhexidine, thimerosal and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Cell survival and mutagenesis were measured using the L5178Y mouse lymphoma (TK{sup +/-}) system. Cells were exposed to varying amounts of preservatives for 1 h at 37{sup 0}C, and aliquots irradiated with UVA radiation (during exposure to preservative). Cells were then assayed for survival, and mutagenesis at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. In concentrations commonly found in ophthalmic solutions, BAK, chlorhexidine, and thimerosal were toxic to cells, and thimerosal was slightly mutagenic. When cells were exposed to preservative and UVA radiation, chlorhexidine was mutagenic and the mutagenic activity of thimerosal was enhanced. (author).

  3. MUTAGENICITY IN SALMONELLA OF SULFUR-CONTAINING POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HETEROCYCLES AND THEIR DIHYDRODIOL DERIVATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASH) are common constituents of cigarette smoke, fossil fuel-derived materials, and their combustion byproducts. Many PASH are known mutagens and carcinogens. However, unlike their nonsulfur-containing counterparts, relatively little is k...

  4. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particle extracts: influence of driving cycle and environmental temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C R; Dutcher, J S; Brooks, A L; McClellan, R O; Marshall, W F; Naman, T M

    1982-01-01

    General Motors and Volkswagen diesel passenger cars (1980 and 1981 model year) were operated on a climate controlled chassis dynomometer and the particulate portion of the exhaust was collected on high volume filters. Dichloromethane extracts of the exhaust particles (soot) collected while the cars were operated under simulated highway, urban and congested urban driving cycles were assayed for mutagenicity in Salmonella strains TA-98 and TA-100. Driving pattern did not significantly influence the mutagenic potency of the exhaust particle extracts or estimates of the amount of mutagenicity emitted from the exhaust despite large differences in particle emission rates and extractable fraction of the particles. Mutagenicity of extracts of exhaust particles collected while the vehicles were operated at test chamber temperatures of 25, 50, 75 and 100 degrees F were also very similar. The results suggest that driving pattern and environmental temperature do not significantly alter the emission of genotoxic combustion products from the exhaust. PMID:6193022

  5. Strong mutagenic effects of diesel engine emissions using vegetable oil as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenger, Juergen; Bruening, Thomas [Institute of the Ruhr University Bochum, Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Institutions for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Krahl, Juergen [University of Applied Sciences Coburg, Coburg (Germany); Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schroeder, Olaf [Institute for Technology and Biosystems Engineering, Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL), Braunschweig (Germany); Emmert, Birgit; Westphal, Goetz; Mueller, Michael; Hallier, Ernst [University of Goettingen, Department of Occupational and Social Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Diesel engine emissions (DEE) are classified as probably carcinogenic to humans. In recent years every effort was made to reduce DEE and their content of carcinogenic and mutagenic polycyclic aromatic compounds. Since 1995 we observed an appreciable reduction of mutagenicity of DEE driven by reformulated or newly designed fuels in several studies. Recently, the use of rapeseed oil as fuel for diesel engines is rapidly growing among German transportation businesses and agriculture due to economic reasons. We compared the mutagenic effects of DEE from two different batches of rapeseed oil (RSO) with rapeseed methyl ester (RME, biodiesel), natural gas derived synthetic fuel (gas-to-liquid, GTL), and a reference diesel fuel (DF). The test engine was a heavy-duty truck diesel running the European Stationary Cycle. Particulate matter from the exhaust was sampled onto PTFE-coated glass fibre filters and extracted with dichloromethane in a soxhlet apparatus. The gas phase constituents were sampled as condensates. The mutagenicity of the particle extracts and the condensates was tested using the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Compared to DF the two RSO qualities significantly increased the mutagenic effects of the particle extracts by factors of 9.7 up to 59 in tester strain TA98 and of 5.4 up to 22.3 in tester strain TA100, respectively. The condensates of the RSO fuels caused an up to factor 13.5 stronger mutagenicity than the reference fuel. RME extracts had a moderate but significant higher mutagenic response in assays of TA98 with metabolic activation and TA100 without metabolic activation. GTL samples did not differ significantly from DF. In conclusion, the strong increase of mutagenicity using RSO as diesel fuel compared to the reference DF and other fuels causes deep concern on future usage of this biologic resource as a replacement of established diesel fuels. (orig.)

  6. Intakes of red meat, processed meat, and meat-mutagens increase lung cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Tram Kim; Cross, Amanda J; Consonni, Dario; Randi, Giorgia; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Caporaso, Neil E.; Sinha, Rashmi; Subar, Amy F.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Red and processed meat intake may increase lung cancer risk. However, the epidemiologic evidence is inconsistent and few studies have evaluated the role of meat-mutagens formed during high cooking temperatures. We investigated the association of red meat, processed meat, and meat-mutagen intake with lung cancer risk in Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), a population-based case-control study. Primary lung cancer cases (n=2101) were recruited from 13 hospitals within the ...

  7. Human urinary mutagenicity after wood smoke exposure during traditional temazcal use

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Alexandra S.; Lemieux, Christine L; Yousefi, Paul; Ruiz-Mercado, Ilse; Lam, Nicholas L.; Orellana, Carolina Romero; White, Paul A.; SMITH, KIRK R.; Holland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    In Central America, the traditional temazcales or wood-fired steam baths, commonly used by many Native American populations, are often heated by wood fires with little ventilation, and this use results in high wood smoke exposure. Urinary mutagenicity has been previously employed as a non-invasive biomarker of human exposure to combustion emissions. This study examined the urinary mutagenicity in 19 indigenous Mayan families from the highlands of Guatemala who regularly use temazcales (N = 32...

  8. Mutagenic specificity of solar UV light in nucleotide excision repair-deficient rodent cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sage, E.; Lamolet, B; Brulay, E; Moustacchi, E; Chteauneuf, A; Drobetsky, E A

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in the cellular processing of carcinogenic DNA photoproducts induced by defined, environmentally relevant portions of the solar wavelength spectrum, we have determined the mutagenic specificity of simulated sunlight (310-1100 nm), UVA (350-400 nm), and UVB (290-320 nm), as well as of the "nonsolar" model mutagen 254-nm UVC, at the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) locus in NER-deficient (ERCC1) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell...

  9. Mutagenic, antimutagenic, cytotoxic, and apoptotic activities of extracts from Pituranthos tortuosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, Afef; Skandrani, Ines; Kilani, Soumaya; Neffati, A; Sghaier, Mohamed Ben; Bouhlel, Ines; Boubaker, Jihed; Ammar, Rebaï Ben; Mahmoud, Amor; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2008-01-01

    Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities against direct acting mutagens, nifuroxazide (NF) and sodium azide (SA), and indirect acting mutagen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) of extracts prepared from aerial parts of Pituranthos tortuosus were investigated in bacterial assay systems (i.e., the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium TA100, TA98, TA1538, TA1535, and the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ 37). It was found that all extracts obtained from P. tortuosus decreased the mutagenicity induced by AFB1 (10 microg/assay), SA (1.5 microg/assay), and NF (20 microg/assay). Ethyl acetate, acetone, methanol, and total oligomer flavenoid extracts exhibited the highest inhibition level of mutagenicity induced by the indirect mutagen AFB1. In addition, antiproliferative and apoptotic properties of these extracts have also been reported using two leukemia cell lines, L1210 and K562. The results revealed that all extracts showed a significant cytotoxic effect on these cell lines, and the effect was greater in the presence of human K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, whereas they do not induce apoptosis. PMID:18161507

  10. 32P-postlabelling analysis of DNA adducted with urinary mutagens from smokers of black tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, M; Castegnaro, M; Malaveille, C; Talaska, G; Vineis, P; Kadlubar, F; Bartsch, H

    1990-08-01

    In order to characterize the tobacco-derived mutagens excreted in the urine of tobacco smokers, 32P-postlabelling techniques were used to examine DNA adducts formed from these mutagens with calf thymus DNA in the presence of a metabolic activation system (rat liver S9, Aroclor 1254-induced, with or without acetyl coenzyme A). Using either nuclease P1 or butanol extraction procedures, four-six and three spots, respectively, were reproducibly found on the autoradiograms in the case of the urine extract from two smokers of black tobacco. Using the urinary extract from a non-smoker, only three faint spots were detected after nuclease P1 enrichment. DNA adducts produced in smokers' urine were then compared with those formed by four N-hydroxyarylamines, N-hydroxy-2-amino-3,8-dimethyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, N-hydroxy-2-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, N-hydroxy-2-naphthylamine and N-hydroxy-4-aminobiphenyl. Visual inspection revealed that none of the reference aromatic amines contributed to the adduct pattern produced by the urinary mutagen(s). However, primary aromatic amines are mainly implicated as urinary mutagens because: (i) they produce frameshift mutations in Salmonella typhimurium strains, (ii) they are easily extractable with blue cotton and (iii) their mutagenicity is abolished by a nitrite treatment procedure for deamination. PMID:2387016

  11. The metabolic activation of 2-naphthylamine to mutagens in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S; Smith, J; Manson, D; Gorrod, J W; Ioannides, C

    1986-01-01

    The mutagenicity of 2-naphthylamine and its major metabolites in the Ames test was determined in the absence and presence of activation systems derived from rats and hamsters. In the absence of an activation system only N-hydroxy-2-naphthylamine and 2-nitrosonaphthalene were mutagenic. In the presence of activation systems derived from control and 3-methylcholanthrene-treated hamsters and Arochlor 1254-treated rats only 2-naphthylamine exhibited a mutagenic response while its hydroxy-derivatives and 2-acetamidonaphthalene were devoid of mutagenicity. Pretreatment of rats with 3-methylcholanthrene or Arochlor 1254 enhanced the mutagenicity of 2-naphthylamine while treatments with phenobarbitone, safrole and clofibrate had no significant effect. In the hamster treatment with only 3-methylcholanthrene increased the mutagenicity of 2-naphthylamine. It is concluded that the metabolic activation of 2-naphthylamine proceeds via N-hydroxylation which is preferentially catalysed by the 3-methylcholanthrene inducible forms of cytochrome P-450, whereas ring-hydroxylation appears to be a deactivation pathway. PMID:3800318

  12. In vivo cytogenetic effects of the cooked-food-related mutagens Trp-P-2 and IQ in mouse bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkler, J.L.; Carrano, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    Sister-chromatid exchange and chromosomal aberrations were measured in vivo in mouse bone marrow following intraperitoneal injection of the cooked food mutagens, 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-b)indole (Trp-P-2), and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (IQ). Trp-P-2 produced a significant positive dose response for both endpoints while IQ produced only a weak but significant sister-chromatid exchange response. The relative potency of these two chemicals is similar to that seen in mammalian cells in vitro but opposite to their potency in Salmonella.

  13. A descriptive mutagenicity assessment of tretinoin in Allium sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is primarily designed to assess the mutagenicity of tretinoin by applying the Allium test. Furthermore, it has the following objectives: to evaluate the macroscopic abnormalities caused by tretinoin based on root length and root form parameters; to investigate whether tretinoin can induce aberrances in cell division such as the formation of micronucleus, anaphase bridges, early anaphase, C-metaphase, sticky chromosome, stretched chromosome, vagrant chromosome and precocious chromosome; to determine the variation in the aberrations in the different concentration of tretinoin. Procedure: eight hundred equal-sized garlic bulbs were immersed in various concentrations of tretinoin and in tap water as control. These were divided into two groups. Six hundred bulbs were evaluated for macroscopic parameters while the remaining two hundred bulbs were fixed for microscopic observations. The Allium test set-ups were placed in the plant laboratory of UP-Manila. The were harvested on the third and on the fifth day. The fixed roots were examined in the Cytogenetics Laboratory of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The data gathered for macroscopic parameter was statistically tested using Complete Randomized Design and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference. The microscopic abnormalities were determined descriptively for every concentration. Findings: analysis of macroscopic and microscopic parameters showed that: according to the analyses of variances, the number of roots, the root length and the number of root forms such as straight, bent, bulbous and tapered were not equal in all concentrations. However, the difference in the number of curled roots was not significant.; the root length distinctly showed the toxicity effect of tretinoin. The growth or the length of roots decreases as the tretinoin concentration increases; the mitotic abnormalities observed in the garlic cells include micronucleus, anaphase bridges, early anaphase. C-metaphase, sticky

  14. Mutagenic action of UV radiation on lambda prophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lethal and mutagenic effects of UV radiation on a thermoinducible prophage lambda cI857 were studied in the wild-type cells of Escherichia coli K12 and in 9 repair-deficient mutants: uvrA6, uvrD3, uvrE502, polA1, recA13, lexA102, recB21recC22sbcB15, recB21recC22sbcB15recF143 and recB21recC22sbcB15recL152. After UV irradiation, lysogenic cells were submitted to thermal induction either immediately or after 90 min incubation in broth at 320. We scored for temperature-independent c-mutants of lambda phage that formed clear plaques at 320. After immediate thermoinduction (ITI) of prophage the phenomena were similar to W-reactivation (WR) and W-mutagenesis (WM) of UV-irradiated extracellular lambda phage infecting UV-irradiated host cells. In the wild-type host a shoulder was manifested on survival curves, and the frequency of c mutations significantly increased, attained a sharp maximum at 120 J/m2 and subsequently decreased. The mutagenic action on prophage remained normal in uvrA, uvrD, polA and recBCsbcB mutants, but was strongly reduced in uvrE-, recBC-sbcB-recF- and recBC-sbcB-recL- lysogens. After delayed thermoinduction (DTI) of prophage in the wild-type host, survival increased, but mutation frequency declined (in comparison with ITI). DTI had the same effects in repair-deficient mutants recBCsbcB, uvrD and polA. The delay in thermoinduction of prophage had no effect on the uvrA- lysogen but a slight effect in uvrE- and recBC-sbcB- recF- hosts. In the recBC-sbcB-recL- lysogen the delay in prophage induction had an opposite, i.e. stimulating, effect on UV mutagenesis. In recA- or lexA- hosts the prophage yielded no c mutants after either ITI or DTI. (orig.)

  15. Mutagenic effects on indica rice carried by satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dried seeds of four indica rice varieties were carried into space by satellite Shijia No.8, the mutagenic effects of space condition on the seeds vigor and agronomic traits in the SP1 generation, and on the agronomic traits, amylose conent and bacterial resistance in the SP2 generation were studied. The results showed that the space condition slightly damaged rice seeds, with the physiological damage rate of germination rate, bud length, plant height and seed-setting rate in the SP1 ranged from 0 to 26.9%. Different varieties responded differently to the space conditions, and the order from strong to weak was Gui 99, Hanghui 7, R998, Jinhang 138. Compared with the control, no trait showed segregation in the SP1 generation. Some traits appeared larger segregation in the SP2 generation, and the mutants of plant height, number of tillers, weight of grain, amylose content and bacterial blight resistance were isolated in the SP2 generation, and these mutation traits could be inherited the SP3 generation. Space conditions not only produced mutants of rice agronomic traits, but also produced mutants of rice quality and disease resistance. (authors)

  16. ININ support to plant breeding using physical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1974-1986 it was offered 171 irradiation services studies, multiplication and essays of yields in 32 different cultivations. The specialized personnel of the ININ has provided 31 advices about planning, experimental design and selection methods for such activities also it has realized studies over potato, sorghum, wheaten and broad beam from 1974. With the purpose for knowing the behavior of mutants, and segregative populations in several ecological niches, the ININ has ceded biological material to 10 institutions in some regions of the country. With the objective to achieve that the institutions which realize genetic improvement in Mexico use collaterally the ionizing radiations as mutagenic agent, the ININ with other participating institutions, has started an extension task throughout of country by means of activities such as: organization for annual meeting for knowing the advances of works of institutions that are using the irradiation for provoking mutagenesis. Conferences for investigators and professors to spread the own methodology. Imparting actualization courses for students of plant breeding. Finally the realization of courses for specialists with the backing of FAO/OIEA. (Author). 6 refs, 8 figs

  17. Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli: Pt. 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV light was unable to induce rifampicin-resistant mutations at 430C in Escherichia coli ER11 and dnaE486. Although DnaE486 gene product is inactive at 430C, these bacteria contain the pcbA1 mutation which allows DNA replication provided DNA polymerase I is functional. The experiments were carried out under conditions where full expression of rifampicin-resistant mutations could occur so that the lack of induced mutations cannot be ascribed to an effect of incubation at 430C on mutation expression. UV-mutability at 43(0)C was restored by the presence of the dnaE+ allele on a plasmid. It is concluded that functional DnaE protein is essential for UV mutagenesis. The dnaE486 mutation also blocked the induction at 430C of mutations induced by UV plus delayed photoreversal, a procedure that has been postulated to reflect an early misincorporation step in the UV mutagenic process. (Author)

  18. Removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti and mutagenicity with chlorine dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jin-long; CUI Fu-yi; QU Bo; ZHU Gui-bing

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops leukarti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it cannot be effectively inactivated by the conventional drinking water treatment process. In order to tackle this problem, a study of removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a waterworks was performed. The results showed that Mesocyclops leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation combined with the conventional drinking water treatment process.Higher oxidizability and molecular state of chlorine dioxide in water is the key to the inactivation of Mesocyclops leukarti. The chlorite, disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide, was stable at 0.45 mg/L, which is lower than that critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination showed that the quantity of organic substance in the water treated by chlorine dioxide obviously decreased. Ames test further revealed that the mutagenicity was reduced by chlorine dioxide with respect to prechlorine. The propagation ofMesocyclops leukarti can be inactivated effectively and safely by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation.

  19. Studies on the possible mutagenicity of irradiated diets in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent protocols for the safety evaluation of processed foods have recommended the inclusion of tests to assess genetic damage. A nutritionally adequate diet containing items of both plant and animal origin and which had been irradiated (0.20 and 2.5 Mrad) to enable long term storage, has been tested for mutagenicity in mice and rats using the dominant lethal test. In the case of rats, males from the third successive generation of rats maintained on the irradiated whole diet was repeatedly paired with untreated virgin females for a week at a time. With mice, the males were fed the irradiated whole diet for 8 weeks and then paired for four consecutive weeks with batches of untreated virgin females. In all these studies there was no evidence of any increase in pre- and/or post-implantation loss arising from the feeding of irradiated whole diet. The frequency of females with dead implants and the pregnancy rate also remained unaltered. As assessed by dominant lethal test, the comsumption of feed exposed to even sterilising doses of gamma radiation is not associated with any genetic hazard. (author)

  20. Mutagenic activity of heavy metals in soils of wayside slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, A. I.; Kalaev, V. N.; Prosvirina, Yu. G.; Goryainova, S. A.

    2007-08-01

    The genotoxic properties of soils polluted with heavy metals were studied on two wayside slopes covered with trees in the city of Voronezh. The nucleolar test in cells of the apical meristem of Zebrina pendula Schnizl. roots was used. The genotoxic effect of the soils was revealed according to the increased number of 2-and 3-nucleolar cells (from 41 to 54% and from 19 to 23% in the upper part of the first and second slopes, respectively; in the control, their number was 18 and 7%). The mean number of nucleoli per cell increased from 1.7 to 1.95 in the experiment and 1.31 in the control. The increased vehicle emissions, especially when cars go up the slopes (mainly in the upper and middle parts), correlated with the elevated heavy metal (Pb, Cu, Cd, and Zn) contents in the soil. The mutagenic substances may be removed to the Voronezh Reservoir, where they may be accumulated in some living organisms.

  1. Mutagenic effects of nitrogen and carbon ions on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of stevia were implanted by 60∼100 keV nitrogen ion and 75 keV carbon ion with various doses. The biological effects in M1 and mutation in M2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure and inhibited mitosis action in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with the increase of ion beam energy and dose. Energy effects of mitosis were presented between 75 keV and 60, 100 keV. As compared with γ-rays, the effects of ion beam were lower on chromosomal aberration but were higher on frequency of the mutation. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and M2 useful mutation induced by implantation of carbon ion was higher than those induced by implantation of nitrogen ion. Mutagenic effects of Feng1 x Ri Yuan and of Ri Yuan x Feng2 are higher than that of Ji Ning and Feng2

  2. Formaldehyde in dentistry: a review of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.B.; Chestner, S.B.

    1981-09-01

    For many years there has been controversy over the value of antimicrobial drugs for intracanal dressings in endodontics. Formocresol, a formaldehyde compound, has evolved as the preferred drug for routine endodontic procedures, as well as pediatric endodontics. The increase in the use of formaldehyde has been complicated by the introduction of paraformaldehyde pastes for filling root canals. Neither of these formulas has ever been standardized. The doses are arbitrary, and the common dose of formocresol has been shown to be many times greater than the minimum dose needed for effect. The efficacy of paraformaldehyde pastes is questionable and remains clouded by inconclusive evidence, conflicting research, inadequate terminology, and a lack of convincing statistical evidence. The clinical use and delivery of formocresol and paraformaldehyde pastes remain arbitrary and unscientific. Formaldehyde has a known toxic mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. Many investigations have been conducted to measure the risk of exposure to formaldehyde; it is clear that formaldehyde poses a carcinogenic risk in humans. There is a need to reevaluate the rationale underlying the use of formaldehyde in dentistry particularly in light of its deleterious effects.

  3. Rapid changes in peat fly ash mutagenicity after release into the atmosphere: a controlled dilution bag study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantunen, M.J.; Liimatainen, A.; Ramdahl, T.; Itkonen, A.

    1986-07-01

    Effects of moisture condensation on fly ash mutagenicity, when the effluent of a peat-fired power plant is dispersed into cold and humid air, were investigated. A 140-m/sup 3/ flow- type dilution bag was used to dilute flue gas collected after the electrostatic precipitator with ambient air and to age this mixture for approximately 2 min. Fly ash was sampled by size fractionating aerosol samplers pre- and postdilution. Organics were extracted from the samples, fractionated by semipreparative high-performance liquid chromatography, and assayed for mutagenicity by the Ames method (TA98 and TA100 with and without S9). The smallest particles were the most mutagenic in both pre-and postdilution samples. Mutagenicity of the fly ash increased strongly in the dilution bag. This was most pronounced in the medium- and low-polarity organic fractions. In the predilution samples most of the mutagenicity was found in the most polar fraction. Postdilution of this fraction showed a modest increase for TA98 and TA98 + S9 but not for TA100 or TA100 + S9. Direct mutagenicity and mutagenicity with activation were comparable. In the postdilution samples most of the mutagenicity was found in the nonpolar and medium polarity fractions. The mutagenicity of the nonpolarity and medium polarity fractions increased strongly after aging 2 min in the mixing bag. In these fractions predilution mutagenicity with and without activation was comparable. Following dilution and aging the mutagenicity with activation increased to a much greater extent than the direct mutagenicity. 21 references.

  4. Organic mutagens and drinking water in the Netherlands : a study on mutagenicity of organic constituents in drinking water in The Netherlands and their possible carcinogenic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Several mutagenic and carcinogenic organic compounds have been detected in Dutch surface waters and in drinking water prepared from these surface waters. Although the levels of these compounds in drinking- and surface water are relatively low, in general below μg per litre, it appeared that organic

  5. Breeding of Hordeum Vulgare L. via chemical and physical Mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted under field conditions to compare for yield, yield components and some agronomic traits, of four selective mutants that have been obtained by using chemical mutagen (Sodium Azide) and physical mutagen ( Gamma ray, 20 KG) and their parent Arivate and Numar. The results show that the selective mutants have a high degree of genetic stability and exceeded their parents in some agronomic parameters. There fore, the two best selective mutants were accepted for registration and release under the name of Barrak and Amel as a new varieties by Nacional Committee for Registration and Release of Agricultural varieties

  6. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  7. Mutagenicity induced by the hydroalcoholic extract of the medicinal plant Plathymenia reticulata Benth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Della Torre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plathymenia reticulata Benth has an anti-inflammatory effect and is capable of neutralizing the neuromuscular blockade induced by Bothrops jararacussu or Crotalus durissus terrificus venoms, probably by precipitating venom proteins (an effect caused by plant tannins. The present study aimed to evaluate the mutagenic activity of P. reticulata by using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay (Ames test and the micronucleus test in CHO-K1 cells. P. reticulata extract concentrations of 2.84, 5.68, 11.37, and 19.90 mg/plate were assayed by the Ames test using TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 bacterial strains, with (+S9 and without (-S9 metabolic activation. Concentrations of 5, 1.6 and 0.5 μg/mL of P. reticulata extract were used for the micronucleus test. P. reticulata extract was mutagenic to TA98 (-S9 and showed signs of mutagenic activity in TA97a and TA102 (both -S9 strains. Micronucleus test CBPI values showed that the endogenous metabolic system increased the number of viable cells when compared to the non-activated samples and the micronucleus frequency increased when the cells were treated in the absence of S9. We concluded that P. reticulata extract may present direct mutagenic properties.

  8. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of particulate matter MP2,5, in Pamplona, North Santander, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Montañez, Mónica Liseth

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the mutagenic and genotoxic activities of particulate material (MP2,5 collected in Pamplona, Norte de Santander, Colombia.Materials and methods: MP2,5 was monitored by means of a Partisol 2025 sequential air sampler with Plus Palmflex quartz filters. The latter were subjected to two extraction procedures: Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane-acetone; and ultrasonic extraction using dichloromethane, acetone and dichloromethane/ acetone mix. The mutagenic and genotoxic activities were determined for each extract.Results: This is the first study conducted in Colombia that reports the mutagenic and genotoxic activities associated with particulate matter (MP2,5 taken from vehicular emissions in Pamplona, Norte de Santander. The mutagenic assay determined by the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 showed a high direct mutagenic activity in the analyzed extracts. On the other hand, the genotoxic activity, determined by means of the comet assay, was high too.Conclusion: Particulate material (MP2,5 present in air samples in Pamplona (northeastern Colombia is a risk factor for the exposed population because it can directly induce mutations and also cause genotoxic damage.

  9. Antioxidant, mutagenic, and antimutagenic activities of Tragopogon longirostis var. longirostis, an edible wild plant in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Sarac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The ethanolic extract of Tragopogon longirostis var. longirostis, a wild edible plant in Anatolia was isolated, and its antioxidant, mutagenic, and antimutagenic properties were investigated. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activity (AA was determined by the inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical, total AA, and phenolic compounds. The mutagenic and antimutagenic activities were investigated by Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test. Results: The IC 50 value for DPPH radicals was 7.84 ± 0.603 mg/mL. The total AA increased with an increase in the concentration of the extracts (1, 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg/mL, containing linoleic acid emulsion. The total phenolic content was 284.71 ± 5.6 mg gallic acid equivalent/g extract. The results showed that the ethanolic extract can be considered safe, because it does not have any mutagenic effect at the tested concentrations. As a result, the ethanolic extract of the leaves exhibited antimutagenic effects at 2.5, 0.25, and 0.025 mg/plate concentrations. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study of the antioxidant, mutagenic, and antimutagenic activities of T. longirostis var. longirostis. These activities are an important topic in the food industry, as well as in the medical field.

  10. Cashew (Anacardium occidentale apple juice lowers mutagenicity of aflatoxin B1 in S. typhimurium TA102

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amélia Melo Cavalcante

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cashew (Anacardium occidentale is a medicinal plant native to Brazil and also yields a nutritious fruit juice. Its large pulpy pseudo-fruit, referred to as the cashew apple, contains high concentrations of vitamin C, carotenoids, phenolic compounds and minerals. Natural and processed cashew apple juice (CAJ/cajuina are amongst the most popular juices in Brazil, especially in the north-east. Both juices have antioxidant potential and suppress mutagenicity of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study we evaluated the inhibitory effects of CAJ/cajuina on Aflatoxin B1(AFB1-induced mutation, using the Salmonella/microsome assay with the experimental approaches of pre-, co- and post-treatments. Both CAJ/cajuina suppress AFB1-induced mutagenesis in strain TA102 when applied in co- and in post-treatment. Possible mechanisms for anti-mutagenicity in co-treatment are (a interaction with S9 enzymes, (b metabolization to non-mutagenic compounds of AFB1 or (c inactivation of S9 potential. Total suppression of AFB1 mutagenicity was observed in co-treatment with both CAJ and cajuina. Post-treatment anti-mutagenicity of both juices suggests a modulation of activity of error-prone DNA repair. CAJ/cajuina may be considered promising candidates for control of genotoxicity of AFB1 and may thus be considered as health foods with anti-carcinogenic potential. This promising characteristic warrants further evaluation with in vivo studies.

  11. Wholesomeness studies on gamma-irradiated smoked fish using short-term mutagenicity assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the mutagenicity potential of wood-smoked mackerel (Rastrelliger sp.) was investigated. Smoked fish were irradiated with dose of 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 KGy, and tested for mutagenic activity using the Salmonella plate incorporation assay, host-mediated assay, and micronucleus test. The DMSO extract of unirradiated smoked fish was found to be mutagenic, without metabolic activation in Salmonella strains TA 100 and TA 104, both sensitive to base-pair substitution mutations. Strains TA 98 and TA 97 which are sensitive to frameshift mutations showed no mutagenic activity towards the same DMSO extract. The observed response towards the Salmonella strains was not affected by irradiation in the range of radiation doses studied. The presence of protamutagens in the DMSO extract of unirradiated smoked fish was not detected using the host-mediated assay. In another in-vivo test however, the same DMSO extract induced the formation of micronuclei in the bonemarrow cells of mice. Gamma irradiation up to a dose of 8.0 KGy did not affect the observed mutagenicity of wood-smoked fish. (author)

  12. Assessment of diphenylcyclopropenone for photochemically induced mutagenicity in the Ames assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, M.G.; Connor, T.H.; Henkin, J.; Wilkin, J.K.; Matney, T.S.

    1987-10-01

    The photochemical conversion of diphenylcyclopropenone to diphenylacetylene has recently been reported. Diphenylcyclopropenone is used in the treatment of alopecia areata and is nonmutagenic in a limited Ames assay. We examined diphenylcyclopropenone and diphenylacetylene, as well as synthetic precursors of diphenylcyclopropenone--dibenzylketone and alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzylketone--for mutagenicity against TA100, TA98, TA102, UTH8413, and UTH8414. All compounds were nonmutagenic except alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzylketone, which was a potent mutagen in TA100 with and without S-9 activation. The effect of photochemical activation of diphenylcyclopropenone in the presence of bacteria demonstrated mutagenicity in UTH8413 (two times background) at 10 micrograms/plate with S-9 microsomal activation. 8-Methoxypsoralen produces a mutagenic response in TA102 at 0.1 microgram/plate with 60 seconds of exposure to 350 nm light. In vitro photochemically activated Ames assay with S-9 microsomal fraction may enhance the trapping of short-lived photochemically produced high-energy mutagenic intermediates. This technique offers exciting opportunities to trap high-energy intermediates that may play an important role in mutagenesis. This method can be applied to a variety of topically applied dermatologic agents, potentially subjected to photochemical changes in normal use.

  13. Energy-related pollutants in the environment: use of short-term tests for mutagenicity in the isolation and identification of biohazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epler, J L; Larimer, F W; Rao, T K; Nix, C E; Ho, T

    1978-12-01

    In an effort to gather information on the potential genetic hazards of existing or proposed energy-generating or -conversion systems, we have begun a correlated analytical and genetic analysis of a number of technologies. The work is divided into two phases: one deals with known compounds expected to occur in the environment through energy production, conversion, or use; the other deals with actual samples from existing or experimental processes. To approach the problems of coping with and testing large numbers of compounds, we set up a form of the "tier system." Operating units utilizing Salmonella, Escherichia coli, yeast, human leukocytes, mammalian cells, and Drosophila have been initiated. Various liquid-liquid extraction methods and column chromatographic separations have been applied to crude products and effluents from oil-shale, coal-liquefaction, and coal-gasification processes. Mutagenicity of the various fractions is assayed by means of reversion of histidine-requiring auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium; comparative studies are carried out with the other genetic systems. In order to incorporate metabolic activation of these fractions and compounds, rat liver homogenates (S-9) are used in the various assays. Results implicate chemicals occurring in the basic (ether-soluble) and the neutral fractions as potential genetic hazards. Chemical constituents of these fractions (identified or predicted) were tested individually for their mutagenic activity. PMID:367762

  14. Mutagenic potency in Salmonella typhimurium of organic extracts of soil samples originating from urban, suburban, agricultural, forest and natural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, Benoit; Le Curieux, Frank; Belkessam, Laurence; Laboudigue, Agnès; Marzin, Daniel

    2008-05-31

    The purpose of the present work was to assess the mutagenic potency of soil samples presumably not contaminated by industrial wastes and discharges. A set of 51 soil samples was collected from areas considered as not contaminated by a known industrial activity: 11 urban samples (collected in cities), 15 suburban samples (collected in villages), 7 agricultural samples, and 18 forest or natural samples. Each soil sample was collected at the surface (0-5cm deep), dried, sieved (2mm), homogenized before organic extraction (dichloromethane/acetone 1/1 (v/v), 37 degrees C, 4h, soil/solvent ratio 1/2, m/v), solvent exchange to DMSO and sterilizing filtration. The micro-method adaptation of the standard bacterial mutagenicity test on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 was performed with and without a metabolic activation system (rat-liver homogenate S9), and thus detected the effect of pro-mutagens and direct mutagens, respectively. The use of a pre-incubation method increased the sensitivity of the assay. The results obtained showed a wide range of effect levels, from no effect to clear mutagenicity. In particular, the extract of all 11 urban soil samples demonstrated mutagenic activity, while the extracts of 10 of the 15 suburban samples showed mutagenicity. On the other hand, the extract of only one of the 7 agricultural samples studied induced mutations, and none of the 18 natural or forest-soil samples investigated produced mutagenic extracts. These findings seem to indicate the crucial influence of the diffuse pollution originating from different human activities on the mutagenic potency of urban soil samples. These findings make it possible to classify the soils according to their mutagenic potency. No clear correlation was found between the mutagenicity detected in soil extracts and the measured polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of the soils investigated. PMID:18440855

  15. An investigation into pharmaceutically relevant mutagenicity data and the influence on Ames predictive potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarren Patrick

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In drug discovery, a positive Ames test for bacterial mutation presents a significant hurdle to advancing a drug to clinical trials. In a previous paper, we discussed success in predicting the genotoxicity of reagent-sized aryl-amines (ArNH2, a structure frequently found in marketed drugs and in drug discovery, using quantum mechanics calculations of the energy required to generate the DNA-reactive nitrenium intermediate (ArNH:+. In this paper we approach the question of what molecular descriptors could improve these predictions and whether external data sets are appropriate for further training. Results In trying to extend and improve this model beyond this quantum mechanical reaction energy, we faced considerable difficulty, which was surprising considering the long history and success of QSAR model development for this test. Other quantum mechanics descriptors were compared to this reaction energy including AM1 semi-empirical orbital energies, nitrenium formation with alternative leaving groups, nitrenium charge, and aryl-amine anion formation energy. Nitrenium formation energy, regardless of the starting species, was found to be the most useful single descriptor. External sets used in other QSAR investigations did not present the same difficulty using the same methods and descriptors. When considering all substructures rather than just aryl-amines, we also noted a significantly lower performance for the Novartis set. The performance gap between Novartis and external sets persists across different descriptors and learning methods. The profiles of the Novartis and external data are significantly different both in aryl-amines and considering all substructures. The Novartis and external data sets are easily separated in an unsupervised clustering using chemical fingerprints. The chemical differences are discussed and visualized using Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps trained on chemical fingerprints, mutagenic substructure

  16. Influence of caffeine on chromosome lesions induced by chemical mutagens and radiation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modifying influence of caffeine on γ-ray induced chromosome lesions was studied by chromosome aberration anaysis. Caffeine was applied as a pre- and post-treatment agent following seed (G1) and root meristem (G2 and S) irradiation of C.capillaris. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in G1 was changed neither by post- nor by pre-treatment with caffeine. This fact proves the lack of caffeine modifying effect. Applied as a post-treatment agent caffeine enhances considerably the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in root meristem cells. This is especially valid for G2 irradiated cells, while in S cells no synergistic effect was established between induced chromosome lesions and caffeine. The enhancement of chromosome aberration frequency produced in G2 shows a clearly manifested dependence on the time (moment) of caffeine application post irradiation. Most considerable enhancement was obtained following post-treatment with caffeine immediately after irradiation. In the following intervals - 15 and 30 min - it decreases progressively, while after 60, 180 and 300 min no enhancing effect is observed. The probable causes for the manifestation and the lack of synergistic effect between chromosome lesions induced in the various mitotic cycle phases and caffeine are discussed. (author)

  17. Mutation induction in mungbean, blackgram, chickpea and lentil using chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Grain legumes cultivated in Bangladesh have narrow genetic bases. Seeds of four species were treated with sodium azide (NaN3) and EMS to create genetic variability. Phenotypically deviant types were selected in M2. The mungbean mutants were synchronous, early, bushy, erect and disease tolerant. Maximum frequency of variants occurred in the treatment with 0.75 mM of NaN3. The blackgram mutants were dwarf, bushy, trailing, synchronous and prolific podded. 1.0 mM NaN3 and 2% EMS concentrations produced the highest frequency of mutants. The chickpea mutants included broad-leaved, white flowered, erect, dwarf, bushy, early and chlorophyll-deficient types. White-flower mutants were reasonably free from wilt disease. The 0.4 mM concentration of NaN3 produced the highest frequency of mutants. In lentil, late flowering mutants were predominant. Some plants with increased number of pods were selected. Maximum frequency of mutants were obtained from 0.50 mM concentration of NaN3. (author)

  18. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using EPA’s Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC), we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with different concentrations of these criteria pol...

  19. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using a 14.3-m3 Teflon-lined smog chamber with 120 UV bulbs to simulate solar radiation, we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with differ...

  20. Evaluation of winter rye (Secale cereale L.) and triticale after using physical and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It was decided to induce mutations separately in rye and triticale to obtain forms resistant to lodging. Seeds of rye cv. 'Dankowskie Zlote' and triticale cv. 'Lasko' were irradiated with fast neutrons and treated with MNH, rye cv. 'LAD 2T80' was treated with only MNH. The mutant selection was made in M3 and the progenies were evaluated with regard to plant height. In total, 226 changed forms were found, most of them shorter than the control. Some of them should be useful as a source of resistance to lodging. (author)

  1. Induction of cytoplasmic male sterility by gamma-ray and chemical mutagens in sugar beets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male sterile plants appeared in the population of N cytoplasm sugar beet strains, H-19 and H-2002, when their dry seeds were exposed to 50 kR gamma-ray, and the male sterility was maintained up to the M4 generation through the mother plants. Cytoplasmic inheritance was confirmed by the reciprocal crossings between plants with normal phenotype from gamma-strains (progeneis of the male mutants which transmitted male sterility through the mother plants) and H-19 or H-1001. The crossing experiments suggested that various kinds of cytoplasm were induced by gamma-ray irradiation, and that different nuclear genes were responsible for the respective cytoplasms. A specific relationship between the pollen restoring genes and the sterile cytoplasms was established, and was named ''one set of pollen restoring genes for one cytoplasm''. It is probable that the cytoplasmic mutation occurred in normal cytoplasm strains and the specific combination between the altered cytoplasm and the recessive nuclear gene produced male sterility. Ethyl methane sulphonate, ethidium bromide, acriflavine and streptomycin were also effective in inducing cytoplasmic mutation in sugar beets. (Kaihara, S.)

  2. Mutagenicity tests of irradiated onions by Escherichia coli mutants in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprout inhibition of onion bulbs can be effectively accomplished by low doses of radiation. However, wholesomeness data on irradiated onions, particularly with respect to their mutagenic activity, are still insufficient for evaluation. The authors have therefore examined the mutagenic activity of irradiated onions in bacterial systems. Because onion bulbs contain a considerable amount of free amino acids, indicator strains were used carrying the marker for mutagenicity other than the amino acid requirement. The results on irradiated onions are described. Tests are used with solid and liquid media, assaying for the streptomycin (SM) dependence in a strain having a tetracycline (TC)-resistance factor, as well as DNA repair tests using two sets of indicator strains. (Auth.)

  3. AN INVESTIGATION OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SOME 9- SUBSTITUEDPHENANTHRENE DERIVATIVES WITH AMES / SALMONELLA / MICROSOME TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap KUTLU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three different 9-Substituted phenantrene derivatives that were synthesized to be used as basic matter for drugs were tested for their mutagenic potency in strains TA 98 and TA 100 ofSalmonella typhimurium by using Ames test. Therefore, both strains were tested in the absence or presence of S9 metabolic activation, for five different doses of each test substances in two paralel independent experiments. In the absence of metabolic activation, while only one of the compounds were causing frame-shift mutations, two of them were determined to induce base pair substitution mutations. In the presence of metabolic activation, while two of the compounds were mutagenic for TA 98, base pair substitution mutations were not detected for any of the substances. Each of the compoundstested were found to be mutagenic for at least one strain in the presence or absence of S9.

  4. Mutagenicity test using Vibrio harveyi in the assessment of water quality from mussel farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yolanda; Suárez, Pilar; Alonso, Ana; Longo, Elisa; San Juan, Fuencisla

    2013-05-15

    This work analyses the mutagenicity of seawater from mussel farms using the Vibrio harveyi mutagenicity test and its relationship with the accumulated pollutants and the development of gonadal neoplasia in mussels. Histological disorders identified as germinoma were observed in the gonad of Mytilus galloprovincialis during the period of study. The prevalence of this pathology is significantly correlated with certain levels of pollutants accumulated in mussels, mainly of PAHs and PCBs, whose toxic equivalents were calculated as EROD induction equivalency. The mutagenicity and toxicity of the water surrounding mussel's farms is clearly correlated with the pollutants accumulated and with the neoplasia prevalence in mussels. Such correlations are corroborated by a multivariate analysis. Our results conclude with the utility of V. harveyi test as an optimal and rapid method in the monitoring of the quality of the water from mussel farms and as a tool to control the risks of pollution on mussel production and its safety for human food. PMID:23510693

  5. Basic mechanisms for mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a difficult task to compare radiation with chemicals on the molecular level because there is only limited information on lesions which remain after DNA repair processes and which are responsible for late effects. Repair mechanisms, interaction of chemicals with DNA or DNA repair processes, as well as cellular model systems with and without excision repair are described. (author)

  6. Development and application of human cell lines engineered to metabolically activate structurally diverse environmental mutagens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, C. I.; Langenbach, Robert; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gelboin, Harry V.; Penman, B. W.

    1993-03-01

    Cytochromes P450 are responsible for the mutagenic/carcinogenic activation of many environmental promutagens/procarcinogens. These enzymes are present at highest concentrations in liver in vivo but are markedly absent in tester organisms for most in vitro mutagenicity test systems. Two approaches have been used to supply needed metabolic activation, incorporation of an extracellular activating system, usually derived from a rodent liver and introduction of activating enzymes into the target cell. The latter approach appears to result in a more sensitive testing system because of the close proximity of the activating enzymes and the target DNA. Human cell lines have been developed which stably express human cytochromes P450 and other cDNAs which have been introduced individually or in combination. The resulting cell lines are exquisitely sensitive to exposure to promutagens and procarcinogens. Mutagenicity is measured at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and thymidine kinase (tk) gene loci. The most versatile cell line, designated MCL-5, stably express five cDNAs encoding all of the human hepatic P450s known to be principally responsible for known human procarcinogen activation. The induction of mutation is observed in MCL-5 cells upon exposure to ng/ml levels of model compounds such as nitrosamines, aflatoxin B1 and benzo(a)pyrene. A lower volume mutagenicity assay has been developed for use with samples available in limited amounts. Human lymphoblast mutation assays have been used to screen for mutagenic activity sediment samples from a polluted watershed. Two sediment samples were found to have mutagenic activity to human lymphoblasts.

  7. Intervarietal differences in response of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) to different mutagenic treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For much of the past century, mutagenesis has gained popularity in plant genetics research as a means of inducing novel genetic variation. Induced mutations have been applied for the past 40 years to produce mutant cultivars in sunflower by changing plant characteristics that significantly increase plant yield and quality. The present study was focused on generating baseline data to elucidate the role of genotypic differences in the response of sunflower to induced mutagenesis with the aim of expanding the applicability of the use of induced mutant stocks in the genetic improvement of the crop and in its functional genomics. The strategy adopted was to estimate the optimal treatment conditions (doses of mutagens) through relating the extent of damage in seedling progeny to the exposure levels of the initiating propagules to mutagens. Seeds of fifteen elite sunflower genotypes of commonly used as breeding stocks and grown on commercial scales were treated with a range of mutagens: gamma rays (γ rays); fast neutrons and with ethyle-methane-sulphonate (EMS) at different treatment doses. The three mutagenic agents affected seedling height, reducing it with increasing dosage. Based on the mutagen damage on seedling height, the 50% and 30% damage indices (D50 and D30, respectively) were estimated for the 15 sunflower genotypes for the three mutagens. The D50 (D30) values for the sunflower lines ranged from 120 to 325Gy (5 to 207Gy) for gamma irradiation; 9 to 21Gy (0.1 to 10Gy) for fast neutrons and 0.69 to 1.55% (0.01 to 0.68%) concentration of EMS. (author)

  8. Intervarietal Differences in Response of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) to Different Mutagenic Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For much of the past century, mutagenesis has gained popularity in plant genetics research as a means of inducing novel genetic variation. Induced mutations have been applied for the past 40 years to produce mutant cultivars in sunflower by changing plant characteristics that significantly increase plant yield and quality. The present study was focused on generating baseline data to elucidate the role of genotypic differences in the response of sunflower to induced mutagenesis with the aim of expanding the applicability of the use of induced mutant stocks in the genetic improvement of the crop and in its functional genomics. The strategy adopted was to estimate the optimal treatment conditions (doses of mutagens) through relating the extent of damage in seedling progeny to the exposure levels of the initiating propagules to mutagens. Seeds of 15 elite sunflower genotypes commonly used as breeding stocks and grown on commercial scales were treated with a range of mutagens: Gamma-rays (γ rays); fast neutrons and with ethyle-methane-sulphonate (EMS) at different treatment doses. The three mutagenic agents affected seedling height, reducing it with increasing dosage. Based on the mutagen damage on seedling height, the 50% and 30% damage indices (D50 and D30, respectively) were estimated for the 15 sunflower genotypes for the three mutagens. The D50 (D30) values for the sunflower lines ranged from 120 to 325Gy (5 to 207Gy) for gamma irradiation; 9 to 21Gy (0.1 to 10Gy) for fast neutrons and 0.69 to 1.55% (0.01 to 0.68%) concentration of EMS. (author)

  9. Use of four short-term tests to evaluate the mutagenicity of municipal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M. (Illinois State Univ., Normal); Plewa, M.J.; Brockman, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    Some ways in which four short-term tests may be used to evaluate the mutagenicity of drinking water were explored by testing raw and treated water from Lake Bloomington, which serves the town of Bloomington, Illinois (population, 44,000). The water was collected from February 1976 to October 1977 and was concentrated by evaporation or by use of XAD-2 resin. The water was tested for the ability to induce reverse mutation in a prokaryote, Salmonella typhimurium; forward mutation in a mold, Neurospora crassa; mitotic gene conversion in a yeast, Sccharomyces cerevisiae; and reverse mutation in maize, Zea mays. Because of the large number of water samples (54) and the limited amounts of the samples, it was not possible to test all samples in all four tests by all the protocols. Thus, the sensitivities of the four tests to potential mutagens in the water samples could not be rigorously compared. However, the results do show that lake and tap water samples collected during 1976 were toxic but not mutagenic in N. crassa and neither toxic nor genotoxic in S. cerevisiae; lake water collected during 1977 was mutagenic in one line of Z. mays and slightly mutagenic in S. typhimurium strain TA1536 in the presence of rat liver S9. The results suggest that tests that detect a variety of genetic end points should be used when testing complex mixtures such as drinking water. The advantages and disadvantages of the tests and protocols are discussed in terms of their applicability to the study of the mutagenicity of drinking water.

  10. Intrinsic mutagenic properties of 5-chlorocytosine: A mechanistic connection between chronic inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Freudenthal, Bret D; Yau, Emily; Singh, Vipender; Chang, Shiou-chi; Li, Deyu; Delaney, James C; Wilson, Samuel H; Essigmann, John M

    2015-08-18

    During chronic inflammation, neutrophil-secreted hypochlorous acid can damage nearby cells inducing the genomic accumulation of 5-chlorocytosine (5ClC), a known inflammation biomarker. Although 5ClC has been shown to promote epigenetic changes, it has been unknown heretofore if 5ClC directly perpetrates a mutagenic outcome within the cell. The present work shows that 5ClC is intrinsically mutagenic, both in vitro and, at a level of a single molecule per cell, in vivo. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, we have quantified the mutagenic and toxic properties of 5ClC, showing that this lesion caused C→T transitions at frequencies ranging from 3-9% depending on the polymerase traversing the lesion. X-ray crystallographic studies provided a molecular basis for the mutagenicity of 5ClC; a snapshot of human polymerase β replicating across a primed 5ClC-containing template uncovered 5ClC engaged in a nascent base pair with an incoming dATP analog. Accommodation of the chlorine substituent in the template major groove enabled a unique interaction between 5ClC and the incoming dATP, which would facilitate mutagenic lesion bypass. The type of mutation induced by 5ClC, the C→T transition, has been previously shown to occur in substantial amounts both in tissues under inflammatory stress and in the genomes of many inflammation-associated cancers. In fact, many sequence-specific mutational signatures uncovered in sequenced cancer genomes feature C→T mutations. Therefore, the mutagenic ability of 5ClC documented in the present study may constitute a direct functional link between chronic inflammation and the genetic changes that enable and promote malignant transformation. PMID:26243878

  11. Chemical and biological stability of solvent refined coal liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Weimer, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Stability studies performed on seventeen SRC samples in boiling point from ambient to 850/sup 0/F showed that the major chemical composition of the materials as monitored by high resolution gas chromatography did not change under the storage conditions of the repository, which were 4/sup 0/C, in inert containers, under a nitrogen atmosphere, in the dark. Samples were monitored after two years of storage. It was also found from microbial mutagenicity studies that after four years in the repository there was no significant change in the biological activity of any of the SRC materials. Samples stored under various parameters of air versus nitrogen atmosphere and ambient light versus darkness at room temperature and -20/sup 0/C for one year showed there was no significant differences in the chemical composition of any of the samples. There was evidence, however, that trace components such as amino-PAH degraded at room temperature, in the light, under an air atmosphere since the microbial mutagenicity of samples stored under these conditions for one year decreased significantly. Both the chemical composition and mutagenicity of FOB samples changed when stored diluted in methylene chloride, in the light, under an air atmosphere at room temperature. After one year of storage under these conditions, the microbial mutagenicity was eliminated. Storage of SRC-II FOB at increased temperatures of 60/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C showed significant changes in chemical composition due to volatility effects. The microbial mutagenicity of the FOB samples was completely eliminated after storage at 60/sup 0/C for 32 weeks and 100/sup 0/C for 26 weeks. It appears that the amino-PAH and phenolic materials are the most susceptible components to degradation in the complex SRC materials. 23 references, 29 figures, 50 tables.

  12. 2D/3D-QSAR comparative study on mutagenicity of nitroaromatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaodong; LIN Zhifen; YIN Daqiang; LIU Shushen; WANG Liansheng

    2005-01-01

    Nitroaromatics are typical toxic organic pollutants and are ubiquitous in environment with diverse structures. They are widely used in many industries and formed during many natural and anthropogenic processes. Most of these pollutants are potentially carcinogenic and the assessment and prediction of the mutagenicity of nitroaromatics are of great interest. In this paper the structure-mutagenicity relationships of 219 nitroaromatics are investigated by molecular orbital theory based classic structure-activity relationships and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA). A comparison is undertaken in respect of the interpretation of mechanism and predictive ability for these two categories of QSAR approaches and highly predictive QSAR models have been developed.

  13. Influence of mutagens on enzymes of germinating seeds of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the enzymes amylases, protease and phosphatases were studied in cotton during germination. The seeds were treated with 100-500 Gy of gamma rays, 10-50 mM of EMS, CA and SA in two cultivated varieties viz.. MCU 5 and MCU 11. Activity pattern of amylases, protease and phosphatases in treated seeds were significantly altered from controls. The alteration were positively correlated with increasing dose/concentration of mutagens up to 300 Gy of gamma rays and 30 mM of EMS, CA and SA. The present study pave the ways to discuss the importance of the enzymes and mutagens in germination of cotton seeds. (author)

  14. Mutagenicity testing with transgenic mice. Part I: Comparison with the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test

    OpenAIRE

    Wahnschaffe U; Bitsch A; Kielhorn J; Mangelsdorf I

    2005-01-01

    Abstract As part of a larger literature study on transgenic animals in mutagenicity testing, test results from the transgenic mutagenicity assays (lacI model; commercially available as the Big Blue® mouse, and the lacZ model; commercially available as the Muta™Mouse), were compared with the results on the same substances in the more traditional mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. 39 substances were found which had been tested in the micronucleus assay and in the above transgenic mouse system...

  15. Fluoro-A-85380 demonstrated no mutagenic properties in in vivo rat micronucleus and Ames tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential mutagenic properties (micronucleus and the Ames tests) of fluoro-A-85380 (2-fluoro-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine) were evaluated as a mandatory pre-clinical step. No statistically significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes was found in animals treated at any dose tested. No biologically significant increase in the mean number of revertants was noted in all the Salmonella typhimurium strains tested with fluoro-A-85380. Therefore, fluoro-A-85380 demonstrated no mutagenic properties using these two tests

  16. Mutation research with ionizing radiations and chemicals using drosophila: problems, results and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of mutagenesis studies with Drosophila are examined in order to inquire the extent to which the genetic responses to ionizing radiations and to chemical mutagens share common features, to identify those findings that may have validity beyond the confines of this species, and to assess the contributions and implications of Drosophila results to the problems of mutagenicity testing and of the evaluation of genetic hazards to man from exposure to environmental chemicals. The results obtained in the studies permit the estimation of X-irradiation equivalent doses of EMS for the induction of sex-linked recessive lethals and specific locus mutations in mature spermatozoa. (Auth.)

  17. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    features of energy transfer of the radiations that affect the character of induced DNA damage, and the efficiency inducible and constitutive cell repair systems. The growth of relative biological efficiency of heavy charged particles is determined by the growth of the damage yield of the DNA participating in the formation of radiation-induced effects, and higher efficiency of inducible repair systems. It was established that the LET value ( L max) for which the maximum (according to the applied irradiation criteria) coefficients of relative biological efficiency are observed varies depending on the character of the registered radiation induced effect. It was demonstrated that for gene mutations and induction of precision excision of mobile elements the values of L max are realized in a LET range of ≈20 keV/μm. For lethal effects of irradiation and induction of deletion mutations the value of L max is ≈ 100 and 50 keV/μm, respectively. The differences in the L max for the studied radiation gene effectis are determined by the different type of DNA damage participating in the mutation process. A molecular model of the formation of gene mutations in Escherichia coli cells under the action of ionizing radiation was proposed. Basic DNA radiation damage and main repair ways were considered in the framework of this model. The basis is the idea of the decisive role of mutagenic, error-prone, branch of SOS repair in fixing premutation DNA damage into point mutations. It was demonstrated that the central mechanism in this process is the formation of an inducible multi-enzymatic complex including the DNA polymerase V (Umu C), RecA-protease, SSB proteins, subunits of DNA polymerase III, performing erroneous DNA synthesis on the damaged matrix. A mathematical model of induction of gene mutations under ultraviolet cell irradiation was developed based on the molecular model.

  18. Mutagenic studies on the effect of Aldicarb "Temik" and vitamin C as antioxidant agent on the white rat:(Chromosomal aberrations and Micronucleus tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma M. Hamam* and Ihab H. Foda

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Widespread contamination of the environment due to increased and frequently indiscriminate usage of insecticides during the last two decades has aroused much concern over the possibility of their radiominetic effect. Evidence accumulating over the years emphasized the indisputable link between certain insecticides, chromosomal damage and possibility of gene mutation. There is a wide variety of insecticides, among which the carbamates. Their chemical relationship to ethyl carbamate makes them worthy of study for their possible deleterious effect on biological system. The main object of the present study is to evaluate the mutagenic effect of a carbamate insecticide" Aldicarb" alone and in combination of vitamin C as an antioxidant agent to decrease their mutagenicity. Male albino rats were tested orally for 48 hours , two doses of aldicarb were used in absence and in the presence of viamin C (1/4 and 1/10 LD50. The obtained data showed highly significant increase in the micronucleus (PCEM and in chromosomal aberrations in rat bone marrow cells at the two doses of aldicarb compared to control group. (P< 0.0001. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus decreased in rats treated with aldicarb and vitamin C than in aldicarb treated group. From these results we concluded that cytogenetic effect of aldicarb might be decreased by the usage of vitamin as an antioxidant agent.

  19. Diesel exhaust particles are mutagenic in FE1-MutaMouse lung epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Cohn, Corey Alexander; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    The particulate phase of diesel engine exhaust is likely carcinogenic. However, the mechanisms of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) induced mutagenicity/carcinogenicity are still largely unknown. We determined the mutant frequency following eight repeated 72 h incubations with 37.5 or 75 microg...

  20. Mutagenicity of algal metabolites of benzo(a)pyrene for Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism and growth effects of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were studied using a freshwater green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum. Algal cultures were incubated under gold light with BaP added at concentrations of 40, 160, 400, and 1200 μg/liter for the periods of 1-4 days. The metabolites and BaP were identified and quantified from ethyl acetate extracts of both algal cells and incubation medium. The ethyl acetate extracts were evaluated for genotoxicity using a micro-volume Salmonella typhimurium forward mutation assay with resistance to 8-azaguanine for selection. This assay detected the presence of small quantities of BaP and was particularly sensitive to the mutagenicity of BaP diols. Of those extracts prepared from algae and medium from cultures exposed to 400 μg BaP/liter (10 μg/25 ml culture), only algal cell extracts from one day's growth were mutagenic. In cultures exposed to 1200 μg BaP/liter (30 μg/25 ml culture), mutagenic materials were produced or persisted in both algae and media throughout the 4-day incubation. The observed mutagenic response can be attributed in part to the presence of unmetabolized BaP or to BaP diols

  1. Mutagenic activation of CL64,855, an anti-Trypanosoma cruzi nitroderivant, by bacterial nitroreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morais Jr. Marcos Antonio de

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available CL64,855 is a nitroimidazole-thiodiazole derivate with high anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity. CL64,855-induced mutagenesis in the Salmonella/microsome test was detected by TA98 and TA98dnp6 strains, but not by the nitroreductase I-deficient TA98nr strain. The lack of mutagenic response of TA98nr was connected with its extreme resistance to the killing effect of the drug. Presence of S9 mix did not restore mutagenic activity of CL64,855 to the TA98nr strain. Additionally, CL64,855 was reduced in vitro by the nitroreductase I-proficient TA98 strain, mainly in the presence of oxygen, but not by the TA98nr strain. Mutagenic activity was detected in serum samples of treated guinea pigs by nitroreductase-proficient strains TA98 and TA98dnp6, but not by nitroductase-deficient strain TA98nr. In the case of urine, mutagenic activity was observed with all three tested strains, suggesting an in vivo metabolic activation of the drug by a distinct metabolic pathway.

  2. PATTERN RECOGNITION ANALYSIS OF A SET OF MUTAGENIC ALIPHATIC N-NITROSAMINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A set of 21 mutagenic aliphatic N-nitrosamines were subjected to a pattern recognition analysis using ADAPT software. Four descriptors based on molecular connectivity, geometry and sigma charge on nitrogen were capable of achieving a 100% classification using the linear learning ...

  3. [In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall goals of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. We are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologists who administer radionuclides

  4. Short-term mutagenicity test systems for investigating the genetic toxicity of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of short-term tests for mutagenicity/carcinogenicity as alternatives to the long-term animal feeding tests in the study of genetic toxicology of irradiated foods is discussed in this review. Results of local studies on the toxicological safety of irradiated foods are also presented. (author)

  5. In vitro anti-inflammatory, mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of ethanolic extract of Clerodendrum paniculatum root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravaree Phuneerub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clerodendrum paniculatum L. (Family Verbenaceae has been used as an antipyretic and anti-inflammatory drug in traditional Thai medicine. This present study investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory, mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of the ethanolic extract of C. paniculatum (CPE dried root collected from Sa Kaeo Province of Thailand. Murine macrophage J774A.1 cells were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS to evaluate nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 production in the anti-inflammatory test while the mutagenic and antimutagenic potential was performed by the Ames test. The outcome of this study displayed that the CPE root significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO, TNF-α, and PGE 2 production in macrophage cell line. In addition, the CPE root was not mutagenic toward Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 and TA100 with and without nitrite treatment. Moreover, it inhibited the mutagenicity of nitrite treated 1-aminopyrene on both strains. The findings suggested the anti-inflammatory and antimutagenic potentials of CPE root.

  6. MUTAGENICITY OF TEFLON-COATED GLASS FIBER FILTERS: A POTENTIAL PROBLEM AND SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teflon-coated glass fiber filters, used in studies of airborne particulate matter, were tested for mutagenic activity using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome (Ames) assay. For each sample, eight blank filters were simultaneously extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), and the extr...

  7. Molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using bacteria as a model, the molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of uv radiation is being studied. Attention is focused on the mechanism of action of uv-1 specific endonucleases in the repair of damaged DNA. The isolation and identification of similar enzymes in human cells are being conducted concurrently

  8. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED FRACTIONAL AND SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY OF AUTOMOBILE AND FORKLIFT DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Many pulmonary toxicity studies of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have used anautomobile-generated sample (A-DEP) whose mutagenicity has not been reported. In contrast,rnany inutagenicity studies of DEP have used a forklift-generated sample (SRM ...

  9. SYBR Gold and SYBR Green II are not mutagenic in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Kirill I; Lesovaya, Ekaterina A; Yakubovskaya, Marianna G; Belitsky, Gennady A

    2010-06-17

    Favorable photo-physical properties and high affinity to nucleic acids make new fluorescent cyanine dyes of the SYBR-type particularly useful for DNA and RNA visualization. The growing popularity of SYBR-type dyes is also explained by the fact that removal of the dye from the nucleic acids by ethanol precipitation is more efficient and less time-consuming than the phenol-chloroform extraction applied for the widely used phenanthridine DNA stain, ethidium bromide. To evaluate the safety of nucleic acid staining by SYBR Gold and SYBR Green II we compared the mutagenicity of these compounds, with characteristics corresponding to those of ethidium bromide, by use of the Salmonella/mammalian microsome reverse-mutation assays (Ames test). SYBR Green II and SYBR Gold did not show mutagenicity either in frame-shift or in base-substitution indicator strains, TA98 and TA100, respectively. These results were observed both in the presence and in the absence of supernatant from a rat-liver homogenate S9. Mutagenicity of these stains was not observed although their toxic concentration was reached. Toxic effects of SYBR Green II and SYBR Gold were seen approximately at the same molar concentrations as reported previously for SYBR Green I. As expected, ethidium bromide revealed strong mutagenicity with a maximum increase of 60-fold above the vehicle controls in the frame-shift indicator strain TA98 in the presence of rat-liver S9 extract. Thus, SYBR Gold and SYBR Green II do not show mutagenicity in our tests, even at toxic doses, and these DNA stains represent safer alternatives to ethidium bromide for nucleic acid visualization. PMID:20403457

  10. Atypical Role for PhoU in Mutagenic Break Repair under Stress in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Gibson

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of mutagenesis activated by stress responses drive pathogen/host adaptation, antibiotic and anti-fungal-drug resistance, and perhaps much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli, repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs by homologous recombination is high fidelity in unstressed cells, but switches to a mutagenic mode using error-prone DNA polymerases when the both the SOS and general (σS stress responses are activated. Additionally, the σE response promotes spontaneous DNA breakage that leads to mutagenic break repair (MBR. We identified the regulatory protein PhoU in a genetic screen for functions required for MBR. PhoU negatively regulates the phosphate-transport and utilization (Pho regulon when phosphate is in excess, including the PstB and PstC subunits of the phosphate-specific ABC transporter PstSCAB. Here, we characterize the PhoU mutation-promoting role. First, some mutations that affect phosphate transport and Pho transcriptional regulation decrease mutagenesis. Second, the mutagenesis and regulon-expression phenotypes do not correspond, revealing an apparent new function(s for PhoU. Third, the PhoU mutagenic role is not via activation of the σS, SOS or σE responses, because mutations (or DSBs that restore mutagenesis to cells defective in these stress responses do not restore mutagenesis to phoU cells. Fourth, the mutagenesis defect in phoU-mutant cells is partially restored by deletion of arcA, a gene normally repressed by PhoU, implying that a gene(s repressed by ArcA promotes mutagenic break repair. The data show a new role for PhoU in regulation, and a new regulatory branch of the stress-response signaling web that activates mutagenic break repair in E. coli.

  11. Randomized controlled trial of dietary intervention: association between level of urinary phenolics and anti-mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaveille, Christian; Fiorini, Laura; Bianchini, Monica; Davico, Laura; Bertinetti, Sabrina; Allegro, Giovanni; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Vineis, Paolo

    2004-07-11

    We have undertaken a randomized trial to confirm the ability of a class of phenolics, flavonoids, to increase urinary anti-mutagenicity in smokers. Ninety heavy smokers were recruited and randomly assigned to three groups, who were given three different diets. One diet was rich in flavonoids, but not based on supplementation ('flavonoid'), one was a normal iso-caloric diet with an adequate administration of fruit and vegetables ('normal'), and one was based on supplementation of flavonoids in the form of green tea and soy products ('supplement'). The urinary anti-mutagenicity-as inhibiting effect of the urinary extracts on the mutations induced by MeIQx-was measured in Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 in the presence of liver S9 from male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with Aroclor 1254. The amount of total phenolics in the urinary extracts was measured by use of spectrometric analysis. We found that important dietary modifications can be achieved through special recipes and instructions given by a cook during an intensive course. The intervention was focused on increasing the flavonoid intake, and it was successful in that respect. In fact, differences in flavonoid intake were appreciated mainly between the first group (normal diet) and the other two (flavonoid-rich and supplemented diet), suggesting that dietary modification can be as effective as supplementation. However, both urinary anti-mutagenicity and the amounts of urinary phenolics did not change as a consequence of the trial. These results suggest that only a small fraction of urinary phenolics is influenced by dietary changes in the intake of flavonoids, and that most urinary anti-mutagens and phenolics are metabolites of dietary flavonoids, whose formation is more affected by the activity and diversity of bacterial flora in the colon than by the quantity and type of intake. A strong correlation was found between urinary phenolics and anti-mutagenicity in all the groups involved in the trial. Such correlation

  12. Mutagenicity of γ-irradiated oxygenated and deoxygenated solutions of 2-deoxy-D-ribose and D-ribose in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solutions of 2-deoxy-D-ribose and D-ribose were γ-irradiated under different experimental conditions and tested for mutagenicity, with and without preincubation, in Salmonella typhimurium. The irradiated sugar solutions were mutagenic in the tester strains TA 100 and TA 98. Except for malonaldehyde (MDA), which is not mutagenic in the concentrations produced radiolytically, the relative mutagenicities of the individual radiolytic products are unknown. With irradiated solutions of 2-deoxy-D-ribose, a relationship was found between the level of non-MDA aldehydes and the mutagenicity in TA 100. Heating the irradiated solutions of 2-deoxy-D-ribose resulted in a temperature-dependent reduction fo the mutagenicity. Autoclaved, non-irradiated solutions of 2-deoxy-D-ribose were not mutagenic in the Salmonella test. (orig.)

  13. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van acrylonitril met microorganismen Drosophila melanogaster en L5178Y muize-lymfoomcellen

    OpenAIRE

    Voogd CE; van der Stel JJ; Verharen HW; Kramers PGN; Mout HCA; Knaap AGAC; Langbroek PG

    1985-01-01

    Acrylonitril was mutageen bij 5 mmol/l in de fluctuatietest zonder metabolische activering ; in gasfase werd bij 0,5 mmol/l lucht een mutagene werking gevonden. Deze stof was ook mutageen in de Ames-test voor Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 (15 mmol/plaat) met metabolische activering doch niet met de stammen TA98 en TA100. In de gasfase werd in de Ames-test geen mutagene werking gevonden, groeiremming trad op bij ca. 0,1 mmol/l lucht. Met acrylonitril werd geen mutagene werking gevonden op Dros...

  14. Stability of mutagenic tautomers of uracil and its halogen derivatives: the results of quantum-mechanical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovorun D.M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate using the quantum-mechanical methods uracil (Ura intramolecular tautomerisation and the effect of the thymine (Thy methyl (Me group substitution by the halogen on that process. Methods. Non-empirical quantum mechanic, analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. For the first time it has been established that the substitution of thymine Me-group for the halogen (Br, F, Cl has practically no effect on the main physico-chemical characteristics of intramolecular tautomerisation. At the same time, the energy of Ura tautomerisation increases for 3,08 kcal/mol in comparison with corresponding value for Thy under standard conditions. Conclusions. So, Thy, unlike Ura, is obviously able, as a canonical DNA nucleotide base, to provide together with Ade, Gua and Cyt an acceptable mutability degree of the genome from the point of view of its adaptation reserve. Mutagenic action of the Ura halogen derivatives is not directly associated with their tautomerisation.

  15. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Mutagenicity of Lewisite in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D. L.; Sass, E. J.; Fritz, L. K.; Sasser, L. B.

    1989-07-31

    The mutagenic potential of lewisite was evaluated in the standard plate incorporation method and by the preincubation modification of the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay with tester strains TA97, TA98, TAlOO and TA102. All strains were tested with activation (20 and 50 {micro}l/ plate) and without activation. The lewisite was screened initially for toxicity with TA98 over a range of concentrations from 0.01 to 250 {micro}g of material per plate. However, concentrations selected for mutagenicity testing were adjusted to a range of 0.001 to 5 {micro}g/plate because of the sensitivity of tester strain TA102, which exhibited cytotoxicity at 0.01 ug/plate. No mutagenic response was exhibited by any of the strains in either method used. All other tester strains showed evidence of cytoxicity (reduction in mutagen response or sparse background lawn) at 5.0 {micro}g/plate or lower.

  16. Responses of the L5178Y mouse Lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, D B; Brown, A G; Howgate, S; McBride, D; Riach, C; Caspary, W J

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk+/tk- mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay using procedures based upon those described by McGregor et al. (McGregor DB, Martin R, Cattanach P, Edwards I, McBride D, Caspary WJ (1987): Environ Mol Mutagen 9:143-160). Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 micrograms/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde, o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds. Chemical not identified as mutagens were N-4-acetylaminofluorene, chlorpheniramine maleate, chloropropamide, 1,4-dioxane, endrin, ethylene glycol, iron dextran, methapyrilene, sodium(2-ethylhexyl)alcohol PMID:1902415

  17. Guidelines of Italian CCTN for classification of some effects of chemical substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucci, N. [ISPESL, Monteporzio Catone, Rome (Italy). Dip. di Medicina del Lavoro; Camoni, I. [Ist. Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Applicata

    1996-03-01

    Definitions of the categories and the criteria for the classification of chemical substances on the basis of their potential carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic-reproductive effects, elaborated by the Italian National Advisory Toxicological Committee (CCTN) in 1994. Besides all the allocations effected by the CCTN in the period 1977-1995 are reported, updated according to these criteria.

  18. Micronuclei frequency in children exposed to environmental mutagens: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neri, Monica; Fucic, Aleksandra; Knudsen, Lisbeth E;

    2003-01-01

    selected from the HUMN database. An effect of chronic and infectious diseases on MN levels has been reported by various authors. Most studies describing the effect of exposure to genotoxic agents (ionizing radiation, chemicals, drugs, environmental tobacco smoke) found an increase of MN in exposed children....... The limited number of published papers indicates that the conduct of properly designed studies on the effect of environmental pollutants in children may be difficult. This review confirmed the usefulness of MN assay in biomonitoring studies conducted in children, revealing that in many circumstances...

  19. Use of orbitrap-MS/MS and QSAR analyses to estimate mutagenic transformation products of iopamidol generated during ozonation and chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Taku; Hashizuka, Masahiro; Kuriyama, Taisuke; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2016-04-01

    The effects of two water purification processes (ozonation, and chlorination after ozonation) on the mutagenicity of a solution containing iopamidol (X-ray contrast medium) were investigated by using the Ames assay. No mutagenicity was observed during ozonation. In contrast, mutagenicity was induced by the ozone-treated iopamidol-containing solution after subsequent chlorination, indicating that mutagenic transformation-products (TPs) were generated. Ten of 70 peaks detected on the LC/MS total ion chromatogram (TIC) of the ozone-treated iopamidol-containing solution after chlorination had a positive correlation (r(2) > 0.6) between their peak areas and the observed mutagenicity, suggesting that TPs detected as these peaks may induce mutagenicity. To narrow down the possible contributors to the observed mutagenicity, we compared the areas of the peaks on the TIC-charts with and without chlorination. Of the ten peaks, six were also detected in the ozone-treated iopamidol-containing solution without chlorination, which did not induce mutagenicity, indicating that these peaks were not related to the observed mutagenicity. Accurate m/z values and MS/MS analysis with an orbitrap MS of the remaining four peaks revealed that two of them represented the same TP in the negative and positive ion modes. The three remaining TPs were assessed in four quantitative structure-activity relationship models for predicting Ames mutagenicity. At least one model predicted that two of the three TPs were mutagenic, whereas none of the models predicted that the other TP was a mutagen, suggesting that the former TPs, estimated as N1-acetyl-5-amino-6-chloro-2-iodobenzene-1,3-dicarboxamide and 3-hydroxy-2-{3-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)carbonyl]-2,4,6-triiodo-5-nitrobenzoyl}amino)propanoic acid, could be the candidate compounds that contributed to the observed mutagenicity. PMID:26807944

  20. Induction of bacterial antibiotic resistance by mutagenic halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lu; Yu, Xin; Xu, Qian; Ye, Chengsong

    2015-10-01

    Halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) raise concerns regarding their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity threatening public health. However, environmental consequence of their mutagenicity has received less attention. In this study, the effect of halogenated N-DBPs on bacterial antibiotic resistance (BAR) was investigated. After exposure to bromoacetamide (BAcAm), trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) or tribromonitromethane (TBNM), the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to both individual and multiple antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, polymyxin B, rifampin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin + gentamicin and ciprofloxacin + tetracycline) was increased, which was predominantly ascribed to the overexpression of efflux pumps. The mechanism of this effect was demonstrated to be mutagenesis through sequencing and analyzing antibiotic resistance genes. The same induction phenomena also appeared in Escherichia coli, suggesting this effect may be universal to waterborne pathogens. Therefore, more attention should be given to halogenated N-DBPs, as they could increase not only genotoxicological risks but also epidemiological risks of drinking water. PMID:26114900

  1. Mutagenic potential of a 193-nm excimer laser on fibroblasts in tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to concerns regarding possible DNA damage by far ultraviolet radiation during excimer laser corneal surgery, the mutagenic potential of an argon fluoride excimer laser (193 nm) on BALB/3T3 mouse fibroblasts grown in tissue culture was investigated. The cumulative incidence of anaplastic transformation after subablative radiant exposures from 3.5 mJ/cm2/pulse to 13.4 mJ/cm2/pulse was 3.6% of all cell cultures. The incidence of anaplastic transformation in nonirradiated controls was 4.2%. Transformation after exposure to x-ray radiation (60.9 rad) was 98.8%. The difference between the incidence of transformation of nonirradiated controls or excimer-treated cultures compared with x-ray radiation-treated cells was significant P less than 0.0001 (chi square test). In this standard cell line, 193-nm laser energy does not appear to have substantial mutagenic potential

  2. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van methylmethacrylaat met L5178Y muize-lymfoomcellen

    OpenAIRE

    Knaap, van der, J.A.; A.G.A.C.; Langebroek; P G

    1986-01-01

    Methylmethacrylaat of methacrylzure-methyl-ester bleek geen mutagene werking te hebben in de genmutatie test met L5178Y muize-lymfoomcellen, in afwezigheid van een systeem voor metabole activering (S9), bij concentraties van 3,0 ml/l (28,2 mmol/l) en lager. Ook in aanwezigheid van S9 bij concentraties van 1,5 ml/l (14,1 mmol/l) en lager werd geen mutagene werking gevonden. Cytotoxische effecten werden gevonden vanaf 2,0 ml/l (18,8 mmol/l) zonder S9 en vanaf 1,0 ml/l (9,4 mmol/l) met S9. De on...

  3. Mutagenic and genotoxic potential of direct electric current in Escherichia coli and Salmonella thyphimurium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marina das Neves; Cardoso, Janine Simas; Leitão, Alvaro Costa; Quaresma, Carla Holandino

    2016-05-01

    Direct electric current has several therapeutic uses such as antibacterial and antiprotozoal action, tissues scarring and regeneration, as well as tumor treatment. This method has shown promising results in vivo and in vitro, with significant efficacy and almost no side effects. Considering lack of studies regarding direct electric current mutagenic and/or genotoxic effects, the present work evaluated both aspects by using five different bacterial experimental assays: survival of repair-deficient mutants, Salmonella-histidine reversion mutagenesis (Ames test), forward mutations to rifampicin resistance, phage reactivation, and lysogenic induction. In these experimental conditions, cells were submitted to an approach that allows evaluation of anodic, cathodic, and electro-ionic effects generated by 2 mA of direct electric current, with doses ranging from 0.36 to 3.60 Coulombs. Our results showed these doses did not induce mutagenic or genotoxic effects. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:234-243, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018544

  4. Mutagenic activity of some coal-derived humic compounds evaluated by the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, F; Ponzanelli, I; Barale, R; Loprieno, N

    1996-07-10

    Two coal-derived humic substances (Sulcis and South Africa, Eniricerche, Italy) have been evaluated for their mutagenic activity on TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium strains, either in presence or in absence of metabolic activation (S9). Both compounds showed no effect on the two strains, as observed with natural humic acid (Fluka). After chlorination, coal-derived humic acids induced a strong dose-related increase in the number of revertants on TA100 without S9, whose extent was directly proportional to the chlorination ratios. Such effect was completely suppressed when a sodium thiosulfate solution (10%) was added at the end of the chlorination period (about 90 h). The analogies with natural humic acid mutagenicity are discussed. PMID:8700175

  5. Mutagenic activity of some coal-derived humic compunds evaluated by the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacchi, F.; Ponzanelli, I.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Pisa (Italy). Dipt. Scienze dell`Ambiente e del Territorilo

    1996-07-10

    Two coal-derived humic substances were evaluated for their mutagenic activity on TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium strains, either in the presence or absence of metabolic activation (S9). Both compounds showed no effect on the two strains, as observed with natural humic acid (Fluka). After chlorination, coal-derived humic acids induced a strong dose-related increase in the number of revertants on TA100 without S9, whose extent was directly proportional to the chlorination ratios. Such effect was completely suppressed when a sodium thiosulphate solution (10%) was added at the end of the chlorination period (about 90 h). The analogies with natural humic acid mutagenicity are discussed. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. Influence of mutagenic factors on the epidermis of tomatillo, currant tomato and tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal features of control, 16 treated and 7 mutants of Physalis ixocarpa BROT. (tomatillo), Lycopersicon esculentum MILL. (tomato) and L. pimpinellifolium MILL. (currant tomato) were studied. Although the distribution, ontogenesis and mature structure of stomata in control as well as in treated and mutant plants were similar, the mutagens reduced the stomatal abnormalities which were abundant (60%) in P. ixocarpa. Maximum rectification was found after combined treatment with gamma radiation (5.16 C kg-1 [=20 kR]) +1% dimethyl sulfate. Methyl ethanesulfonate, gamma radiation and gamma radiation + DMS caused an increase in epidermal cell size irrespective of the leaf size but in DMS and diethyl sulfate treated plants, a close negative correlation between leaf size and epidermal cell size was observed. The size and frequency of stomata were also affected, the large leaf usually showed high frequency and small size stomata. The data reveal that mutagens affect the epidermal structures differently. (author)

  7. City air pollution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other mutagens: occurrence, sources and health effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Larsen, J.C.;

    1996-01-01

    The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), mutagens and other air pollutants was investigated in a busy street in central Copenhagen and in a park area adjacent to the street. The winter concentration of benzo(a)pyrene was 4.4+/-1.2 ng/m(3) in the street air and 1.4+/-0.6 ng/m(3) in...... the city park. The atmospheric concentrations of PAH decreased in the order of: street > city background air similar to suburbs > village > open land. The traffic contribution of PAH to street air was estimated to be 90% on working days and 60% during weekends and its contribution to city background...... air was estimated to be 40%. Four different approaches to evaluate the health effects are discussed. The direct effect of PAH air pollution, and other mutagens, is considered to be a maximum of five lung cancer cases each year out of one million people....

  8. The lethal and mutagenic action of solar radiation on the model microbiological test-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using model microbiological ob ects - phage T4, Escherichia coli bacterii and Aspergillus nidulans fUngUs-ascomycetis, lethal mutagenous and recombinogenous effect of solar radiation are studied. Considerable lethal effect of solar radiation on T4 phage and E. coli and the increase in the mUtation frequency in E. coli and A. nidUlans are observed. Recombination effect of solar radiation is demonstrated on diploid strain of A. nidulans. It is shown that systems of excision and post-replicative reparation take part in the correction of injUries induced by solar light. A considerable role of ultraviolet range (260-320 nm) of solar radiation in the induction of lethal and mutageneous effects in all objects investigated is found

  9. Analysis of mutagenic effects induced by carbon beams at different LET in a red yeast strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate inactive and mutagenic effects of carbon beam at different LET, the inactivation cross section and mutation cross section induced by carbon beams of different LET values were investigated in a red yeast strain Rhodotorula glutinis AY 91015. It was found that the maximum inactivation cross section of 4.37μm2, which was very close to the average nucleus cross section, was at LET of 120.0 keV/μm. The maximum mutation cross section was at LET of 96.0 keV/μm. Meanwhile, the highest mutagenicity of carbon ion was found around 58.2 keV/μm. It implied that the most efficient LET to induce mutation in survival yeasts was 58.2 keV/μm, which corresponded to energy of 35 MeV/u carbon beam. The most effective carbon beam to induce inactivation and mutation located at different energy region. (authors)

  10. Hygienic quality and mutagenicity of minced meats and patties treated by ionizing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the microbial safety of minced beef, minced pork, beef patties and pork patties irradiated with gamma ray or electron beam at an absorbed dose from 5 to 20 kGy. Also, the mutagenicity of minced beef, minced pork and patties treated with irradiation at 50 kGy was evaluated by Ames test (Salmonella typhimurium reversion assay). The results of the total aerobic bacteria of the minced beef, minced pork and patties showed that the sterilization effect of gamma irradiation was superior to that of electron beam irradiation. The results from Ames test showed that all samples were negative in the bacterial reversion assay with S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100. Also, no mutagenicity was detected in the assay, both with and without metabolic activation

  11. Mutagenic action of γ-rays on isolated plasmid DNA of Escherichia Coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A purified and drief DNA of plasmid pKO482 (galK+) is 10 times more resistant to the inactivating action of 60Co-γ-rays than that of lambda phage. γ-irradiation of the plasmid DNA induces forward mutations of galK, the frequency of which increases linearly with the dose. The efficiency of the mutagenic action of γ-rays on the plasmid galK locus is 10-12 per 1 rad and per 1 base pair. The mutagenic effect of γ-M radiation but slightly depends upon bacterial recA+ gene and and upon the SOS-repair system induced by UV-irradiation of the recipient cells. It is assumed that the premutational lesions induced in the purified DNA by the direct effect of γ-radiation are fixed into mutations by misreplication

  12. Mutagenic effects of chromium trioxide on root tip cells of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晓薇

    2004-01-01

    In this study on the mutagenic effects of different concentrations of chromium trioxide (CrO3) on Vicia faba root tip, micronucleus assay and chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the mitotic indexes, micronucleus rate and chromosome aberration rate of Viciafaba root tip cells. The results showed that the effects of CrO3 concentration on the mitotic indexes were complicated. CrO3 increases the micronucleus rate of Vicia faba root tip cells. It was found that within certain range of CrO3 concentration the micronucleus rate increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3, but that the micronucleus rate decreased at higher level of CrO3 and that CrO3 also caused various types of chromosome aberration at a rate which increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3. We concluded that CrO3 has significant mutagenic effect on Viciafaba root tip cells.

  13. Mutagenic effects of chromium trioxide on root tip cells of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晓徽

    2004-01-01

    In this study on the mutagenic effects of different concentrations of chromium trioxide (CrO3) on Vicia faba root tip, micronucleus assay and chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the mitotic indexes, micronucleus rate and chromosome aberration rate of Vicia faba root tip cells. The results showed that the effects of CrO3 concentration on the mitotic indexes were complicated. CrO3 increases the micronucleus rate of Vicia faba root tip cells. It was found that within certain range of CrO3 concentration the micronucleus rate increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3, but that the micronucleus rate decreased at higher level of CrO3 and that CrO3 also caused various types of chromosome aberration at a rate which increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3. We concluded that CrO3 has significant mutagenic effect on Vicia faba root tip cells.

  14. Safety Evaluation of Turmeric Polysaccharide Extract: Assessment of Mutagenicity and Acute Oral Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekaran Chinampudur Velusami; Srinivasa Rao Boddapati; Srikanth Hongasandra Srinivasa; Edwin Jothie Richard; Joshua Allan Joseph; Murali Balasubramanian; Amit Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Curcuma longa Linn. (Zingiberaceae) commonly known as turmeric has long been used for centuries as a spice and household remedy. The present study was carried out to assess the possible mutagenic potential and acute oral toxicity of polysaccharide extract of turmeric rhizome (NR-INF-02) using standard tests. The standard battery of in vitro genotoxicity tests, bacterial reverse mutation test (BRMT), chromosome aberration (CA), and micronucleus (MN) tests were employed to assess the possible m...

  15. Polyamines stimulate the formation of mutagenic 1,N 2-propanodeoxyguanosine adducts from acetaldehyde

    OpenAIRE

    Theruvathu, Jacob A.; Jaruga, Pawel; Nath, Raghu G.; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Brooks, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    Alcoholic beverage consumption is associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal cancer. Acetaldehyde (AA), the first metabolite of ethanol, is a suspected human carcinogen, but the molecular mechanisms underlying AA carcinogenicity are unclear. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that polyamines could facilitate the formation of mutagenic α-methyl-γ-hydroxy-1,N 2-propano-2′-deoxyguanosine (Cr-PdG) adducts from biologically relevant AA concentrations. We found that Cr-PdG addu...

  16. Meat and Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the Agricultural Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Koutros, Stella; Cross, Amanda J.; Sandler, Dale P.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Ma, Xiaomei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Alavanja, Michael C. R.; Sinha, Rashmi

    2008-01-01

    Meats cooked at high temperatures, such as pan-frying or grilling, are a source of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We prospectively examined the association between meat types, meat cooking methods, meat doneness, and meat mutagens and the risk for prostate cancer in the Agricultural Health Study. We estimated relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for prostate cancer using Cox proportional hazards regression, using age as the underlying t...

  17. 53BP1 mediates productive and mutagenic DNA repair through distinct phosphoprotein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, E.; Wong, N.; Chen, H.-T.;

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) protein 53BP1 protects DNA ends from excessive resection in G1, and thereby favors repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) as opposed to homologous recombination (HR). During S phase, BRCA1 antagonizes 53BP1 to promote HR. The pro-NHEJ and antirecombinase functions...... productive CSR and suppresses mutagenic DNA repair through distinct phosphodependent interactions with RIF1 and PTIP. © 2013 Elsevier Inc....

  18. Toxicity and mutagenicity of low-metallic automotive brake pad materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malachova, Katerina; Kukutschova, Jana; Rybkova, Zuzana; Sezimova, Hana; Placha, Daniela; Cabanova, Kristina; Filip, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Organic friction materials are standardly used in brakes of small planes, railroad vehicles, trucks and passenger cars. The growing transportation sector requires a better understanding of the negative impact related to the release of potentially hazardous materials into the environment. This includes brakes which can release enormous quantities of wear particulates. This paper addresses in vitro detection of toxic and mutagenic potency of one model and two commercially available low-metallic automotive brake pads used in passenger cars sold in the EU market. The model pad made in the laboratory was also subjected to a standardized brake dynamometer test and the generated non-airborne wear particles were also investigated. Qualitative "organic composition" was determined by GC/MS screening of dichloromethane extracts. Acute toxicity and mutagenicity of four investigated sample types were assessed in vitro by bioluminescence assay using marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and by two bacterial bioassays i) Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium His(-) and ii) SOS Chromotest using Escherichia coli PQ37 strain. Screening of organic composition revealed a high variety of organic compounds present in the initial brake pads and also in the generated non-airborne wear debris. Several detected compounds are classified by IARC as possibly carcinogenic to humans, e. g. benzene derivatives. Acute toxicity bioassay revealed a response of bacterial cells after exposure to all samples used. Phenolic resin and wear debris were found to be acutely toxic; however in term of mutagenicity the response was negative. All non-friction exposed brake pad samples (a model pad and two commercial pad samples) were mutagenic with metabolic activation in vitro. PMID:27179608

  19. Pattern recognition analysis of a set of mutagenic aliphatic N-nitrosamines.

    OpenAIRE

    Nesnow, S; Langenbach, R; Mass, M J

    1985-01-01

    A set of 21 mutagenic aliphatic N-nitrosamines were subjected to a pattern recognition analysis using ADAPT software. Four descriptors based on molecular connectivity, geometry and sigma charge on nitrogen were capable of achieving a 100% classification using the linear learning machine or iterative least squares algorithms. Three descriptors were capable of a 90.5% and two descriptors of a 85.7% overall correct classification. Three of the four descriptors were each capable of classifying 15...

  20. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, 1978-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current progress in studies on the mutagenic effect of 3H incorporated into the DNA of Drosophila melanogaster is reported. It was shown that selected 3H precursors incorporated into DNA are metabolized. The forms (metabolites) of tritium found in the DNA molecules and the mutation frequencies resulting therefrom were identified. An alcohol dehydrogenase system was developed for recovering mutations that is capable of distinguishing between base changes and chain breakage events that may lead to the formation of deletions

  1. Use of mutagenous factors in the breeding of vegetatively propagated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given is a review of the literature and authors data on using mutagenous factors with different nature to breed some new and useful forms of plants reproduced vegetatively. The problem history and prospects of the practical application of the method are stated. In particular the data on ionizing radiation use in fruit crop selection to breed mutation forms (effect on buds, pollen, seeds etc.) are presented

  2. A comprehensive survey of the mutagenic impact of common cancer cytotoxics

    OpenAIRE

    Szikriszt, Bernadett; Póti, Ádám; Pipek, Orsolya; Krzystanek, Marcin; Kanu, Nnennaya; Molnár, János; Ribli, Dezső; Szeltner, Zoltán; Tusnády, Gábor E.; Csabai, István; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles; Szüts, Dávid

    2016-01-01

    Background Genomic mutations caused by cytotoxic agents used in cancer chemotherapy may cause secondary malignancies as well as contribute to the evolution of treatment-resistant tumour cells. The stable diploid genome of the chicken DT40 lymphoblast cell line, an established DNA repair model system, is well suited to accurately assay genomic mutations. Results We use whole genome sequencing of multiple DT40 clones to determine the mutagenic effect of eight common cytotoxics used for the trea...

  3. Performance of mutagen treated Jatropha curcas (Petro-crop) on alkali soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the user land development programme, seeds of Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaces) were treated with 6, 12, 18 and 24 krad of gamma rays and sown in randomised block design on different grades of alkali soils. Wide range of variability could be detected in mutagen treated population. Results indicate that suitable strains of J. curcas can be isolated through mutation breeding programme for utilisation of user land. (author)

  4. Dose-repetition increases the mutagenic effectiveness of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in mouse spermatogonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hitotsumachi, S; Carpenter, D A; Russell, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to maximize the mutagenic effectiveness of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia, advantage was taken of the fact that these cells can accumulate mutations from repeated doses given over relatively long time periods. Repeated doses (100 mg/kg) of ethylnitrosourea injected intraperitoneally into male mice at weekly intervals were found to allow adequate survival and fertility with total dosages of 300 and 400 mg/kg. The specific-locus mutation frequencies at these dos...

  5. Mutation induction in mangosteen : Effect of mutagens on biochemical and histological changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Phrommee, V.; Te-chato S.

    1999-01-01

    Nodular calli induced from young red leaves raised in vitro were brought to irradiation with various doses of gamma rays and soaking in ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) at various concentrations. Treated calli were examined histologically and biochemically in order to determine an optimum dose of both mutagens. Irradiation of calli twice with gamma rays at 40 grays caused more damage to epidermal cells than the other doses and 0.5% EMS. However, double irradiation followed by application of EMS at...

  6. Data in support of the mutagenic potential of the isoflavone irilone in cultured V79 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Scheffler; Annette E. Albrecht; Esch, Harald L.; Leane Lehmann

    2015-01-01

    The isoflavone irilone is found in human plasma after ingestion of red clover-based dietary supplements, but information allowing safety assessment is rare. Here, data in support of the mutagenic potential of irilone in cultured V79 cells [1] are presented. These data include (i) a quantitative assessment of irilone in the culture medium during the cell culture experiments, (ii) changes in the mutation spectrum in cDNA of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of irilone-tre...

  7. Genotoxicity and Mutagenicity of Suspended Particulate Matter of River Water and Waste Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Reifferscheid

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended particulate matter of samples of river water and waste water treatment plants was tested for genotoxicity and mutagenicity using the standardized umu assay and two versions of the Ames microsuspension assay. The study tries to determine the entire DNA-damaging potential of the water samples and the distribution of DNA-damaging substances among the liquid phase and solid phase. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the bioassays are compared.

  8. [Mutagenic occurrence in teleoginae of Rhipicephalus sanguineus from intradomiciliary environment at Rio de Janeiro city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués; Borsoi, Ana Beatriz Pais

    2009-01-01

    From material collected by into a residence house at Rio de Janeiro city, using an aspirator machine during four continues hours in all house, it was captured 1,284 Rhipicephalus sanguineus including 289 females; one of them showed a mutagenic alteration like an asymmetry of opistosome, and monstrosity like a two anus. The first register of this phenomenon in R. sanguineus is reported. PMID:19602319

  9. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Echinodorus macrophyllus (chapéu-de-couro) extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo S. Vidal; Adriana M. Alves; Ricardo M. Kuster; Claudia Lage; Leitão, Alvaro C.

    2010-01-01

    Echinodorus macrophyllus, commonly known as chapéu-de-couro, is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat inflammation and rheumatic diseases. In this work, we used short-term bacterial assays based on the induction of SOS functions to examine the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of an aqueous extract of E. macrophyllus leaves. Whole extract and an ethyl acetate fraction showed similar genotoxicity and caused an ~70-fold increase in lysogenic induction. The extract also gave a positive re...

  10. Estrogenic and mutagenic activities of Crotalaria pallida measured by recombinant yeast assay and Ames test

    OpenAIRE

    Boldrin, Paula Karina; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; Höhne, Ana Paula Oliveira; de Camargo, Mariana Santoro; Espanha, Lívia Greghi; Nogueira, Catarine Haidê; Melo, Maria do Socorro F; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Background Crotalaria pallida Ailton is a plant belonging to the Fabaceae family, popularly known as “rattle or rattlesnake” and used in traditional medicine to treat swelling of the joints and as a vermifuge. Previous pharmacological studies have also reported anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifungal activities. Nevertheless, scientific information regarding this species is scarce, and there are no reports related to its possible estrogenic and mutagenic effects. Thus, the purpose of ...

  11. Mutagenic and cancerogenic effects of environmental pollutants, in particular ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors states that at the present state of knowledge, increased incidences of mutations and cancer resulting from coal-fired and nuclear power plant operation cannot be measured. Of course, it is difficult to detect increased mutation rates in humans; therefore, a cancerogenic and/or mutagenic effect of fission product and pollutant release cannot be excluded. Quantitative methods must be developed to determine the effects of pollutants on humans. The author presents a method he himself has developed. (HP)

  12. Genotoxicity and Mutagenicity of Suspended Particulate Matter of River Water and Waste Water Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Georg Reifferscheid; Oepen, Britta v.

    2002-01-01

    Suspended particulate matter of samples of river water and waste water treatment plants was tested for genotoxicity and mutagenicity using the standardized umu assay and two versions of the Ames microsuspension assay. The study tries to determine the entire DNA-damaging potential of the water samples and the distribution of DNA-damaging substances among the liquid phase and solid phase. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the bioassays are compared.

  13. Synthesis and tritium labeling of the food mutagens IQ and methyl-IQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, A.L.; Rapoport, H. (California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1985-03-01

    The mutagens found in cooked meat, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)-quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (Methyl-IQ), have been synthesized by unambiguous methods that allow for the preparation of sufficient quantities of material for biological studies. These methods avoid difficult separations of regioisomeric mixtures of products and incorporate specific high level tritium labeling, effected by hydrogenolysis of the appropriately substituted 5-bromo precursors.

  14. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of cola and grape flavored soft drinks in bone marrow cells of rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Düsman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large consumption of soft drinks in Brazil and worldwide in recent years and considering that some of the components present in their composition pose potential risks to human health, the aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of specific cola and grape-flavored soft drink brands. Bone marrow cells of Wistar rats were initially treated by gavage with one single dose of Cola or Grape soft drink, which was next offered ad libitum (instead of water for 24 hours. A negative control treatment was performed by administering one single dose of water and a positive control administering cyclophosphamide intraperitoneally. Statistical analysis showed that the Cola and Grape soft drinks studied were not cytotoxic. However, the Cola soft drink proved mutagenic in this experiment treatment time. Therefore, this study serves as a warning about the consumption of Cola-flavored soft drink and for the need for further subchronic and chronic studies on soft drinks in order to evaluate the long term mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of these substances.

  15. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Ames tester strains of Salmonella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutation and killing induced by X radiation and 60Co γ radiation were studied in six different histidine-requiring auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium. Strain TA100, which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions, and strains TA2637 and TA98, which are sensitive to frameshifts, carry the pKM101 plasmid and exhibit significantly higher radiation-induced mutations compared to their plasmidless parent strains TA1535, TA1537, and TA1538, respectively. Among the plasmid-containing strains, TA98 and TA2637 are much more sensitive to the mutagenic action of radiation than is TA100 based on a comparison with their respective spontaneous mutation rates; however, no uniformity was observed in the responses of the strains to the lethal action of ionizing radiation. The following conclusions are consistent with these observations: (1) the standard Ames Salmonella assay correctly identifies ionizing radiation as a mutagenic agent; (2) frameshift-sensitive parent strains are more sensitive to the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation than is the only strain studied that is sensitive to base-pair substitutions; and (3) enhancement of mutagenesis and survival is related to plasmid-mediated repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation and does not involve damage induced by Cerenkov-generated uv radiation which is negligible for our irradiation conditions

  16. Assessment of imidacloprid-induced mutagenic effects in somatic cells of Swiss albino male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Preeti; Kumar, Vinod; Sikka, Anil K

    2016-10-01

    Pesticides are being used for plant protection to increase food protection and to reduce insect-borne diseases worldwide. Exposure to the pesticides may cause genotoxic effects on both the target and nontarget organisms, including man. Therefore, the mutagenicity evaluation of such pesticides has become a priority area of research. Imidacloprid (IMI), a neonicotinoid insecticide, is widely used in agriculture either alone or in combination with other insecticides. A combined approach employing micronucleus test (MNT) and chromosomal aberrations assay (CA) was utilized to assess the mutagenicity of imidacloprid in bone marrow of Swiss albino male mice. IMI suspension was prepared in 3% gum acacia and administered at doses of 5.5, 11 and 22 mg/kg body weight for 7, 14 and 28 days to mice. IMI treatment resulted in a dose and time-dependant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei per cell and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells. A statistically significant increase in chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei/cell was found only after daily treatment of IMI at highest selected dose (22 mg/kg body weight) for longest selected time period (28 days) compared to the control group. Thus, daily exposure of imidacloprid at a dose level of 22 mg/kg body weight for 28 days caused mutagenic effects on the somatic cells of Swiss albino male mice. PMID:26823062

  17. Exhaust gas emissions and mutagenic effects of modern diesel fuels, GTL, biodiesel and biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schroeder, Olaf [Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: axel.munack@vti.bund.de; Krahl, Juergen [Coburg Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany); Buenger, Juergen [University of Bochum (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Biodiesel can be used alone (B100) or blended with petroleum diesel in any proportion. The most popular biodiesel blend in the U.S.A. is B20 (20% biodiesel, 80% diesel fuel), which can be used for Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) compliance. In the European Union, the use of biofuel blends is recommended and was introduced by federal regulations in several countries. In Germany, biodiesel is currently blended as B5 (5% biodiesel) to common diesel fuel. In 2008, B7 plus three percent hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) as well is intended to become mandatory in Germany. To investigate the influence of blends on the emissions and possible health effects, we performed a series of studies with several engines (Euro 0, III and IV) measuring regulated and non-regulated exhaust compounds and determining their mutagenic effects. Emissions of blends showed an approximate linear dependence on the blend composition, in particular when regulated emissions are considered. However, a negative effect of blends was observed with respect to mutagenicity of the exhaust gas emissions. In detail, a maximum of the mutagenic potency was found in the range of B20. From this point of view, B20 must be considered as a critical blend, in case diesel fuel and biodiesel are used as binary mixtures. (author)

  18. Potential benefits of sequential inhibitor-mutagen treatments of RNA virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Perales

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral strategy consisting of virus extinction associated with enhanced mutagenesis. The use of non-mutagenic antiviral inhibitors has faced the problem of selection of inhibitor-resistant virus mutants. Quasispecies dynamics predicts, and clinical results have confirmed, that combination therapy has an advantage over monotherapy to delay or prevent selection of inhibitor-escape mutants. Using ribavirin-mediated mutagenesis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV, here we show that, contrary to expectations, sequential administration of the antiviral inhibitor guanidine (GU first, followed by ribavirin, is more effective than combination therapy with the two drugs, or than either drug used individually. Coelectroporation experiments suggest that limited inhibition of replication of interfering mutants by GU may contribute to the benefits of the sequential treatment. In lethal mutagenesis, a sequential inhibitor-mutagen treatment can be more effective than the corresponding combination treatment to drive a virus towards extinction. Such an advantage is also supported by a theoretical model for the evolution of a viral population under the action of increased mutagenesis in the presence of an inhibitor of viral replication. The model suggests that benefits of the sequential treatment are due to the involvement of a mutagenic agent, and to competition for susceptible cells exerted by the mutant spectrum. The results may impact lethal mutagenesis-based protocols, as well as current antiviral therapies involving ribavirin.

  19. Mutagenic, antimutagenic and antioxidant potency of leaf extracts from Nitraria retusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Jihed; Skandrani, Ines; Bouhlel, Ines; Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Neffati, Aicha; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2010-01-01

    Four extracts were prepared from the leaves of Nitraria retusa; methanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform and hexane extracts. An assay for the ability of these extracts to prevent mutations induced by various oxidants in Salmonella typhimurium TA102 and TA 104 strains was conducted. These extracts from leaf parts of N. retusa showed no mutagenicity either with or without the metabolic enzyme preparation (microsome fraction). The highest protection against methylmethanesulfonate induced mutagenicity was observed with chloroform and methanol extracts with inhibition percentages of 44.93% (at 50 microg/plate in the presence of TA102 strain) and 38% (at 10 microg/plate in the presence of TA104 strain), respectively. Whereas Hexane and chloroform extracts reduced the mutagenicity induced by 2-aminoanthracene by 83.4% (using the S. typhimurium TA104 assay system) and 65.3% (using the S. typhimurium TA 102 assay system), respectively. Antioxidant activity of N. retusa extracts was determined by the ability of each extract to protect plasmid DNA against strand scission induced by hydroxyl radicals. Chloroform extract exhibited the highest ability to protect plasmid DNA against hydroxyl radical induced DNA damages and exhibited the highest antioxidant capacity, with 0.95mM trolox equivalent when tested by the ferric reducing/antioxidant method. PMID:20510330

  20. 54. The Study on the Mutagenicity of Organic Extracts from Fish Raised in Water Containing Effluent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    objective: To assess the cytogenetic toxicological safety of fish raised in water containing effluent. Methods: Three experimental groups of fish were raised in water that contained effluent. Both fish samples and water samples were collected and analyzed. One group of fish raised in YuQiao reservoir (The source of drinking-water for Tianjin) and a reservoir water sample were collected at the same time as the clean control group. The mutagenicity of organic extracts of the fish was detected using the mice bone marrow micronucleus test and the mutagenicity of the water samples was detected using the micronucleus test of vicia faba root tip cells. Results: The results of the mice bone marrow micronucleus test on organic extracts of the fish showed that the micronucleus rates of the three experimental groups were significantly higher than that of the negative control group (peanut oil) and the clean control group (P0.05) Conclusions: The results indicate that the water containing effluent and the fish raised in this kind of water contain some kinds of organic mutagenic compounds, which might have some potentially hazardous effects on human beings through the food chains.

  1. Evaluation of extracellular products and mutagenicity in cyanobacteria cultures separated from a eutrophic reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W.-J. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hung Kuang University, 34 Chung Chie Road, Sha-Lu, Taichung, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: huangwj@sunrise.hk.edu.tw; Lai, C.-H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hung Kuang University, 34 Chung Chie Road, Sha-Lu, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.-L. [Environmental Toxin and Analysis Laboratory, Hung Kuang University, 34 Chung Chie Road, Sha-Lu, Taichung, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: octling@yahoo.com.tw

    2007-05-15

    The algal extracellular products (ECPs) in three cultures of cyanobacteria species (Anabaena, Microcystis, and Oscillatoria) dominating the eutrophic reservoir populations and their toxins have been investigated in the present work. Using gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution electron-impact mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) and high performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) techniques, more than 20 compounds were found in the algal culture (including cells and filtrates) extracts. The main identified ECPs were classified to polysaccharides, hydrocarbons, and aldehydes. Odor causing substances such as trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol (geosmin) and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB)were also found in the algal cultures. The potential mutagenicity of the algal suspensions was also studied with the Ames test. The organic extracts of the algal suspension from the axenic cultures were mutagenicity in TA98 without S9 mix and in TA100 with and without S9 mix. The results indicate that the ECPs of three algae species dominating the eutrophic reservoir were mutagenic clearly in the bacterial test.

  2. Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using potential energy methods. Progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broyde, S.; Shapiro, R.

    1993-09-01

    Our objective has been to elucidate on a molecular level, at atomic resolution, the structures of DNAs modified by highly mutagenic aromatic amines and hydrocarbons. The underlying hypothesis is that DNA replicates with reduced fidelity when its normal right-handed B-structure is altered, and one result is a higher mutation rate. This change in structure may occur normally at a low incidence but it may be enhanced greatly after covalent modification by a mutagenic substance. The methods that we use to elucidate structures are computational, but we keep in close contact with experimental developments, and we incorporate data from NMR studies in our calculations when they are available. X-ray and low resolution spectroscopic studies have not succeeded in producing atomic resolution views of mutagen and carcinogen-oligonucleotide adducts. Even the high resolution NMR method cannot alone yield molecular views, though it does so in combination with our computations. The specific methods that we employ are minimized potential energy calculations using the torsion angle space molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations of static structures with solvent and salt can be carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a medium that mimics aspects of the natural aqueous environment of the cell.

  3. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent. PMID:26710178

  4. In vitro mutagenicity of the plasmacytomagenic agent pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, K; Potter, M; Bornkamm, G W; Janz, S

    1997-02-26

    Pristane is known to induce a distinct type of B-cell-derived malignant lymphoma, plasmacytoma, after administration into the peritoneal cavity of genetically susceptible BALB/cAnPt mice. Since the mechanism of pristane-induced plasmacytoma development is poorly understood, we chose to examine the possibility that pristane is mutagenic in rodent cells and decided to use bacteriophage lambda-derived lacI/lacZ genes as target/reporter to quantitate mutagenesis. Here we show that in vitro exposure to micromolar amounts of pristane, delivered as an inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin, resulted in 1.7-fold and 6.2-fold increases of mutant frequencies over controls in a cell line of rat fibroblasts and primary mouse B lymphocytes, respectively. We conclude that pristane can be mutagenic to mammalian cells, yet are currently unable to explain the mechanism of mutagenicity. It is suggested that B-cell mutagenesis contributes to the plasmacytomagenic activity of pristane in vivo. PMID:9065804

  5. Safety Evaluation of Turmeric Polysaccharide Extract: Assessment of Mutagenicity and Acute Oral Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran Chinampudur Velusami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa Linn. (Zingiberaceae commonly known as turmeric has long been used for centuries as a spice and household remedy. The present study was carried out to assess the possible mutagenic potential and acute oral toxicity of polysaccharide extract of turmeric rhizome (NR-INF-02 using standard tests. The standard battery of in vitro genotoxicity tests, bacterial reverse mutation test (BRMT, chromosome aberration (CA, and micronucleus (MN tests were employed to assess the possible mutagenic activity of NR-INF-02 (Turmacin. The results showed no mutagenic effect with NR-INF-02 up to a dose of 5000 µg/mL in BRMT. The results on CA and MN tests revealed the non clastogenic activity of NR-INF-02 in a dose range of 250.36 to 2500 µg/mL with and without metabolic activation (S9. In acute oral toxicity study, NR-INF-02 was found to be safe up to 5 g/kg body weight in Wistar rats. Overall, results indicated that polysaccharide extract of C. longa was found to be genotoxically safe and also exhibited maximum tolerable dose of more than 5 g/kg rat body weight.

  6. Mutagenicity and Immune Toxicity of Emulsion-type Sausage Cured with Plasma-treated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Sung, Nak-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Cold plasma has been developed to reduce microbial contamination and to improve safety of food and medical products. In addition, the technology can be used in the manufacture of sausages without addition of nitrite. To be applied in food industry commercially, the new technology should be safe and efficient. However, toxicological test of plasma-treated food is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the mutagenicity and immune toxicity of the meat products cured with plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source. Emulsion sausages were prepared with no nitrite (control), sodium nitrite (SCS), and PTW (SCP). For a mutagenicity test, the Ames test was performed with the sausage samples. For immune toxicity test, 8-wk-old female Balb/c mice were given free access to the sausages in order to evaluate the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level. As a result, no mutagenicity was detected in the sausages by the Ames test. The serum TNF-α values were less than 10 pg/mL in mice after feeding control and treated samples for 32 d, indicating that no inflammatory response was occurred by feeding the sausages made by PTW. Therefore, the present study opens the possibility of using plasma-treated water as a nitrite source without any toxicity.

  7. Mutagenicity and Immune Toxicity of Emulsion-type Sausage Cured with Plasma-treated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yong, Hae In; Kim, Hanwool; Lim, Younggap; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Jo, Cheorun

    2016-01-01

    Cold plasma has been developed to reduce microbial contamination and to improve safety of food and medical products. In addition, the technology can be used in the manufacture of sausages without addition of nitrite. To be applied in food industry commercially, the new technology should be safe and efficient. However, toxicological test of plasma-treated food is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the mutagenicity and immune toxicity of the meat products cured with plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source. Emulsion sausages were prepared with no nitrite (control), sodium nitrite (SCS), and PTW (SCP). For a mutagenicity test, the Ames test was performed with the sausage samples. For immune toxicity test, 8-wk-old female Balb/c mice were given free access to the sausages in order to evaluate the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level. As a result, no mutagenicity was detected in the sausages by the Ames test. The serum TNF-α values were less than 10 pg/mL in mice after feeding control and treated samples for 32 d, indicating that no inflammatory response was occurred by feeding the sausages made by PTW. Therefore, the present study opens the possibility of using plasma-treated water as a nitrite source without any toxicity. PMID:27621690

  8. Composition and mutagenicity of PAHs associated with urban airborne particles in Córdoba, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet assay and micronucleous test were used to assess the genotoxicity of organic compounds associated with particulate material collected in the city of Córdoba, Argentina. Samples were collected on fiber glass filters and their organic extracts were analyzed by GC-MS. These extracts were used for the comet assay on human lymphocytes and for the MCN test with Tradescantia pallida. The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as some of their nitro derivates were higher during winter. Their composition suggested that their main emission sources were gasoline and diesel vehicles. We observed genotoxic effects of these organic extracts due to the presence of both direct and indirect acting mutagens. We found a good agreement between the two test systems employed, which encourages the further use of plant bioassays for air pollution monitoring, especially in developing countries, due to their flexibility, low cost and efficiency. -- Highlights: •PAHs and nitro-PAHs were higher during winter and fall seasons. •Concentrations of PAHs were below the daily potential dose of carcinogenic PAH. •The comet assay revealed that indirect mutagens were more abundant than direct ones. •The MCN test and the comet assay demonstrated the presence of human carcinogens. -- Capsule: Indirect mutagens were more abundant during winter and fall, in agreement with the higher concentrations of PAHs and nitro-PAHs being associated with atmospheric particles

  9. Mutagenicity testing with transgenic mice. Part I: Comparison with the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahnschaffe U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As part of a larger literature study on transgenic animals in mutagenicity testing, test results from the transgenic mutagenicity assays (lacI model; commercially available as the Big Blue® mouse, and the lacZ model; commercially available as the Muta™Mouse, were compared with the results on the same substances in the more traditional mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. 39 substances were found which had been tested in the micronucleus assay and in the above transgenic mouse systems. Although, the transgenic animal mutation assay is not directly comparable with the micronucleus test, because different genetic endpoints are examined: chromosome aberration versus gene mutation, the results for the majority of substances were in agreement. Both test systems, the transgenic mouse assay and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, have advantages and they complement each other. However, the transgenic animal assay has some distinct advantages over the micronucleus test: it is not restricted to one target organ and detects systemic as well as local mutagenic effects.

  10. Evaluation of extracellular products and mutagenicity in cyanobacteria cultures separated from a eutrophic reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The algal extracellular products (ECPs) in three cultures of cyanobacteria species (Anabaena, Microcystis, and Oscillatoria) dominating the eutrophic reservoir populations and their toxins have been investigated in the present work. Using gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution electron-impact mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) and high performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) techniques, more than 20 compounds were found in the algal culture (including cells and filtrates) extracts. The main identified ECPs were classified to polysaccharides, hydrocarbons, and aldehydes. Odor causing substances such as trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol (geosmin) and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB)were also found in the algal cultures. The potential mutagenicity of the algal suspensions was also studied with the Ames test. The organic extracts of the algal suspension from the axenic cultures were mutagenicity in TA98 without S9 mix and in TA100 with and without S9 mix. The results indicate that the ECPs of three algae species dominating the eutrophic reservoir were mutagenic clearly in the bacterial test

  11. Biological effects of radiation and chemical agents with special regard to repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reasonably certain that the introduction or increase of pollutants in the environment can augment mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. These effects are operationally definable, but the genetic organization and the underlying mechanisms of DNA repair, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are so complex as to make the extrapolation of results from mutagenicity test data to carcinogenicity somewhat uncertain. The subject is reviewed. Recent discoveries in gene organization and expression include overlapping genes in bacteriophages, split genes, processing of RNA and splicing, translocation of genes in eukaryotes, inactivation of the X-chromosome in mammals, etc. Apart from the genetic regulation, plasmids, insertion sequences and mutators can additionally affect mutation frequency. Cancers due to gene mutations, viruses, chemicals and physical agents are known. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved. The value of mutagenicity test data is beyond question, but in view of the extraordinary complexities encountered our extrapolations will be more sound if the data have the underpinning of basic information. (author)

  12. Screening tests for determination of cytotoxic agent, mutagens and carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegelberg, T.; Koerdel, W.; Goertz, T.; Thriemer, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is supposed that chemical substances are the primary factors responsible for the development of tumors and genetic damages. From this results the urgend demand to examine at least the frequently applied and suspicious substances on possibly health-affecting effects. The performance of these examinations with experimental animals requires a lot of time and financial support and has increasingly been criticised in public with regard to protection of animals. Experience gained in the U.S.A. revealed that the carcinogenicity test of one single substance performed with animal experiments takes approximately 3 years and costs about 300,000 Dollars. Therefore the application of cell cultures for such examinations and tests has been postulated and discussed for several years. Cell cultures require only little space and generally the observed effects develop after only a short time. Objectification and statistical assessment (due to high cell amounts per test) can be performed without any problems.

  13. Chemical and biological characterization of urban particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne particulate matter has been collected on glass fiber filter by high volume sampling in the Goeteborg urban area. The samples were, after extraction with respect to organic components, tested for biological effect in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay, affinity to the cytosol TCDD receptor and toxicity towards a mammalian cell system and analysed chemically for selected polycyclic aromatic compounds. A series of samples collected simultaneously at a street level location and a rooftop site showed that most parameters associated with the organic compounds adsorbed to airborne particulate matter has similar concentrations at the two levels. The differences observed for the mutagenic effect in different strains and conditions showed that the rooftop samples had a different composition compared to the street samples indicating that atmospheric transformations have occurred. Chemical fractionation of representative samples showed that the distribution of mutagenic activity among different fractions is dissimilar to the distribution obtained in the fractionation of both gasoline and diesel engine exhaust particles. Partial least squares regression analysis showed qualitatively that diesel exhaust is a major source of airborne particulate mutagenic activity and source apportionment with chemical mass balance and multilinear regression corroborated this quantitatively. The multilinear regression analysis gave the result that the airborne activity in Salmonella TA90-S9 originated to 54±4% from diesel exhaust and to 26±3% from gasoline exhaust. The contribution is more equal for the activity measured with TA98+S9. The usefulness of short-term bioassays as an addition to chemical analysis of airborne particulate matter depends on whether only polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are major carcinogens, as has been suggested in the literature, or whether also other polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) are of importance. (au)

  14. Mutagenic Analysis of Water in The Areas with High-incidence of Esophageal Cancer%部分食管癌高发区水的诱变性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋悦红; 韩建英; 谭家驹; 周舫

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析部分食管癌高发区各种水的致突变性及致癌性.方法 采用蚕豆根尖细胞微核试验作为化学致突变物、致癌物的初筛试验.结果 各种类型的水样诱发的蚕豆根尖细胞微核率分别为:煤矿排污水 14.42‰,红旗渠水8.62‰,河水8.34‰,深机井水2.81‰,自来水3.96‰.结论 煤矿排污水诱变性最高,其次是红旗渠水源水和浊漳河水,而林州市深机井水和自来水诱变性较低.提示,饮用高诱变水可能是食管癌的危险因素之一.%[Objective]To analyze the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of all kinds of water in the areas with high-incidence of esophageal cancer.[Methods]Micronucleus test in Vicia faba root tips cell was adopted for primary screening test of chemical mutagens and carcinogens.[Results]The rate of Vicia faba root tip micronucleus caused by different types of water samples wasl4.42‰ of coal mine waste water, 8.62‰ of Red Flag Canal water, 8.34‰ of river water, 2.81‰ of deep phreatic water, 3.96‰ of tap water, respectively.[Conclusion]Mutagenicity of coal mine waste water is the highest, followed by the Red Flag Canal source water and water of Zhuozhang River.The mutagenicity of deep phreatic water and tap water in LinZhou City is much lower, It indicates that drinking the high mutagenicity water may be a of the risk factor of esophageal cancer.

  15. Investigation of the mutagenic effects of aluminium trioxide implants on embrions in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelić Obrad

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Several diseases as well as trauma can affect the composition and integrity of periodontal tissues loading eventually to the destruction of connective tissue matrix and cells, loss of attachment and resorption of alveolar bone often followed by tooth loss. Replacement of the missing tooth could then be provided by endosseous dental implants healing in a form of osseo -or fibrosseal integration to the alveolar bone. Aluminium oxide ceramics, a form, of endosseous implant, allows osseointegration type of healing and has demonstrated excellent biocompatibility. However, potential aluminium toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders and for this reason we examined the reproductive and mutagenic effect of aluminium trioxide ceramic implant in experimental mice. 720 female and 45 fertile male BALB-cAn NCR mice were included in the study. 3 experimental groups of fertile male mice (15 for each group were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of aluminium trioxide (I g/kg of body weight, group I, with ethyl-methane-sulphonate as a positive control (200 mg/kg, group II and with Tween-80 (10 ing/kg as negative control, Group III. Each of the labeled male mice fertilized previously uncoupled female mice during 8 weeks (a pair per week to facilitate appropriate pre-and post-meiotic conditions of spermatogenesis to occur. Female mice were sacrificed with cervical dislocation at day 13 after fertilization. Immediately upon sacrifice the uterus was removed and the number of alive and healthy, or alive but mutated and/or dead embryos was computed to determine the dominant lethal of mutagenic effects. Animals treated with aluminium trioxide demonstrated similar effects on the reproductive and mutagenic capacity as the negative control, whereas the animals treated as positive controls exhibited significantly reduced reproductive and mutagenic capacity. Collectively, we concluded that aluminium trioxide has a very low

  16. [Notion of threshold in mutagenesis: implications for mutagenic and carcinogenic risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzin, D

    2007-11-01

    During years, it has been widely admitted in the scientific community that there was no threshold in mutagenesis: a compound was or not a mutagen. The meaning of such a proposition was that a risk existed at all exposure level, because, at least theoretically, one molecule is sufficient to cause the formation of a DNA adduct which is able to induce a mutation. However, works carried out in the last few years have shown that in the case of some specific mechanisms of mutagenesis, a threshold could be demonstrated essentially in the case of compounds that do not react directly with DNA. Several types of thresholds exist, and the simple statistical threshold is not sufficient in terms of risk assessment. A biological threshold that is consistent with a mechanism of action of the mutagen should be established. Amongst these mechanisms, we can mention some mechanism with a demonstrated threshold: effects of aneugens, effects of topoisomerases inhibitors, effects of DNA polymerases inhibitors, effects of compounds with a different metabolism at high doses compared to low doses. On the contrary, for some mechanisms, the demonstration of the mechanism is suspected, but not totally demonstrated. It is the case of compounds which induce nucleotides pool imbalance or compounds which are DNA repair inhibitors. In some cases, when a redundancy exists in the repair of damages, like oxidative DNA damage, a threshold is suspected. Some authors even recently proposed the possibility of a threshold in the case of alkylating agents. The majority of mutagenic thresholds were demonstrated in vitro, however some mechanisms were demonstrated in vivo, for example in the case of micronucleus induction by hypo or hyperthermia in rodents bone marrow. The use of threshold in risk assessment requires the use of the most sensitive endpoint for example, non disjunction in the case of aneugens, confusing factors like apoptosis should be eliminated and species sensitivities should be taken into

  17. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of emerging edible plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, G C; Chen, H Y; Peng, H H

    2001-11-01

    This study evaluates the toxic, mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of emerging edible plants that are consumed as new leafy vegetables in Taiwan. Among eight plant extracts, only the extracts of Sol (Solanum nigrum L.) showed cytotoxicity to Salmonella typhimurium TA100 in the absence of S9 mix. The toxicity of extracts from different parts of the Sol plant, such as leaf and stem, immature fruit and mature fruit, towards S. typhimurium TA100 and human lymphocytes was also assayed. The immature fruit extracts of Sol exhibited strong cytotoxicity with dose dependence and induced significant DNA damage in human lymphocytes based on the comet assay. However, no mutagenicity was found in eight plant extracts to TA98 or TA100 either with or without the S9 mixture. Sol and Sec [Sechium edule (Jacq.) Swartz] extracts showed the strongest inhibitory effect towards the mutagenicity of 2-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) in S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100; the ID(50) was less then 1 mg/plate. Cra [Crassocephalum creidioides (Benth.) S. Moore] extracts also expressed moderate antimutagenic activities towards IQ and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) either in TA98 or in TA100; the ID(50) was 1.63-2.41 mg/plate. The extracts from Bas (Basella alba L.), Bou (Boussingaultia gracilis Miers var. pseudobaselloides Bailey), Cen (Centella asiatica L. Urban), Cor (Corchorus olitorius L.) and Por (Portulaca oleracea L.) showed weak to moderate inhibition of mutagenicity of IQ. However, the potential antimutagenicity of these plant extracts towards B[a]P was weaker than that towards IQ. For a direct mutagen, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO), only the Sol extracts showed strong inhibitory effects in the TA100 system. The antimutagenic activity of water extracts of Sec was partly reduced by heating at 100 degrees C for 20 min. The heat-stable antimutagens in Sec extracts could be produced in the plant extract preparation process. Fractions with molecular weights above 30,000 showed the

  18. Progressive Increase in Disinfection Byproducts and Mutagenicity from Source to Tap to Swimming Pool and Spa Water: Impact of Human Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Eric J; DeMarini, David M; Ravuri, Sridevi A; Liberatore, Hannah K; Cuthbertson, Amy A; Thompson-Klemish, Alexis; Byer, Jonathan D; Schmid, Judith E; Afifi, Mehrnaz Z; Blatchley, Ernest R; Richardson, Susan D

    2016-07-01

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples from seven sites, we report the first integrated mutagenicity and comprehensive analytical chemistry of spas treated with chlorine, bromine, or ozone, along with pools treated with these same disinfectants. Gas chromatography (GC) with high-resolution mass spectrometry, membrane-introduction mass spectrometry, and GC-electron capture detection were used to comprehensively identify and quantify DBPs and other contaminants. Mutagenicity was assessed by the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. More than 100 DBPs were identified, including a new class of DBPs, bromoimidazoles. Organic extracts of brominated pool/spa waters were 1.8× more mutagenic than chlorinated ones; spa waters were 1.7× more mutagenic than pools. Pool and spa samples were 2.4 and 4.1× more mutagenic, respectively, than corresponding tap waters. The concentration of the sum of 21 DBPs measured quantitatively increased from finished to tap to pool to spa; and mutagenic potency increased from finished/tap to pools to spas. Mutagenic potencies of samples from a chlorinated site correlated best with brominated haloacetic acid concentrations (Br-HAAs) (r = 0.98) and nitrogen-containing DBPs (N-DBPs) (r = 0.97) and the least with Br-trihalomethanes (r = 0.29) and Br-N-DBPs (r = 0.04). The mutagenic potencies of samples from a brominated site correlated best (r = 0.82) with the concentrations of the nine HAAs, Br-HAAs, and Br-DBPs. Human use increased significantly the DBP concentrations and mutagenic potencies for most pools and spas. These data provide evidence that human precursors can increase mutagenic potencies of pools and spas and that this increase is associated with increased DBP concentrations. PMID:27124361

  19. Dietary phenolics as anti-mutagens and inhibitors of tobacco-related DNA adduction in the urothelium of smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaveille, C; Hautefeuille, A; Pignatelli, B; Talaska, G; Vineis, P; Bartsch, H

    1996-10-01

    Human urine is known to contain substances that strongly inhibit bacterial mutagenicity of aromatic and heterocyclic amines in vitro. The biological relevance of these anti-mutagens was examined by comparing levels of tobacco-related DNA adducts in exfoliated urothelial cells from smokers with the anti-mutagenic activity in corresponding 24-h urine samples. An inverse relationship was found between the inhibition of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-mutagenicity by urine extracts in vitro and two DNA adduct measurements: the level of the putatively identified N-(deoxyguanosine-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl adduct and the total level of all tobacco-smoke-related carcinogen adducts including those probably derived from PhIP. Urinary anti-mutagenicity in vitro appears thus to be a good indicator of the anti-genotoxicity exerted by substances excreted in urine, that protect the bladder mucosal cells (and possibly other cells) against DNA damage. These substances appear to be dietary phenolics and/or their metabolites because (i) the anti-mutagenic activity of urine extracts (n = 18) was linearly related to their content in phenolics; (ii) the concentration ranges of these substances in urine extracts were similar to those of various plant phenols (quercetin, isorhamnetin and naringenin) for which an inhibitory effect on the liver S9-mediated mutagenicity of PhIP was obtained; (iii) treatment of urines with beta-glucuronidase and arylsulfatase enhanced both anti-mutagenicity and the levels of phenolics in urinary extracts; (iv) urinary extracts inhibited noncompetitively the liver S9-mediated mutagenicity of PhIP as did quercetin, used as a model phenolics. Several structural features of the flavonoids were identified as necessary for the inhibition of PhIP and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxiline mutagenicity. Fractionation by reverse-phase HPLC and subsequent analysis of two urinary extracts, showed the presence of several anti-mutagenic

  20. Effect of mutagens on seed germination in Gloriosa superba LINN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of Gloriosa superba were irradiated with gamma rays ranging from (1 kR to 35 kR) at an interval of 5 kR. Lower doses (1 kR and 5 kR) were stimulative while higher doses had inhibitory effect on seed germination. The highest percentage of germination was 29.5 and it was observed at 5 kR as compared to 24 per cent in control. Various concentrations of EMS (0.25 to 1 per cent) and dES (0.05 to 1 per cent) were used for duration of 4 hours. In the treated seeds the maximum percentage of germination was 23 and 17.5 per cent at 0.25 EMS and 0.05 per cent dES respectively. Whereas in control it was 25 per cent. There was proportionate decrease in germination percentage with an increase in concentration of both the chemicals. (author). 3 tables, 3 figs., 38 refs

  1. The mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of the traditional phytoestrogen-rich herbs, Pueraria mirifica and Pueraria lobata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Cherdshewasart

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pueraria mirifica is a Thai phytoestrogen-rich herb traditionally used for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Pueraria lobata is also a phytoestrogen-rich herb traditionally used in Japan, Korea and China for the treatment of hypertension and alcoholism. We evaluated the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of the two plant extracts using the Ames test preincubation method plus or minus the rat liver mixture S9 for metabolic activation using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 as indicator strains. The cytotoxicity of the two extracts to the two S. typhimurium indicators was evaluated before the mutagenic and antimutagenic tests. Both extracts at a final concentration of 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg/plate exhibited only mild cytotoxic effects. The plant extracts at the concentrations of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/plate in the presence and absence of the S9 mixture were negative in the mutagenic Ames test. In contrast, both extracts were positive in the antimutagenic Ames test towards either one or both of the tested mutagens 2-(2-furyl-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl-acrylamide and benzo(apyrene. The absence of mutagenic and the presence of anti-mutagenic activities of the two plant extracts were confirmed in rec-assays and further supported by a micronucleus test where both plant extracts at doses up to 300 mg/kg body weight (equivalent to 16 g/kg body weight plant tuberous powder failed to exhibit significant micronucleus formation in rats. The tests confirmed the non-mutagenic but reasonably antimutagenic activities of the two plant extracts, supporting their current use as safe dietary supplements and cosmetics.

  2. Nitrite and hypochlorite treatments in determination of the contributions of IQ-type and non-IQ-type heterocyclic amines to the mutagenicities in crude pyrolyzed materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, M.; Negishi, C.; Makino, R.; Sato, S.; Yamaizumi, Z.; Hirayama, T.; Sugimura, T.

    1985-12-01

    The mutagenic heterocyclic amines Glu-P-2, MeA alpha C and Phe-P-1, which possess a 2-aminopyridine structure in their molecule (non-IQ-type mutagens), were found to be inactivated by nitrite treatment under acidic conditions, as observed previously with Trp-P-1, Trp-P-2, Glu-P-1 and A alpha C. In contrast, MeIQx, 4,8- and 7,8-DiMeIQx, which were originally isolated from fried beef or heated model mixtures of creatinine, amino acids and glucose, and which have a 2-aminoimidazole moiety in their molecules (IQ-type mutagens), were very resistant to nitrite treatment like IQ and MeIQ. Both types of mutagenic heterocyclic amines were completely inactivated by treatment with hypochlorite. This differential inactivation of mutagenic heterocyclic amines by nitrite and hypochlorite was used in determination of the contributions of IQ-type and non-IQ-type mutagens to the total mutagenicities of various pyrolyzed materials. The percentage contributions of IQ-type mutagens to the mutagenicities of broiled sardine, fried beef, broiled horse mackerel, cigarette smoke condensate and albumin tar were 88, 75, 48, 6 and 4, respectively.

  3. Studies on mutagenic effects and mechanism of winter wheat irradiated by proton. Pt.1: Mutagenic effects of proton irradiation on wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of 5 wheat varieties were irradiated by 2-9 MeV protons with various doses. The mutagenic effects in M1 and M2 were studied. The results showed that the biological damage become higher with the increasing of the dose. The biological damage increased with the increasing of the energy when the energy was lower than 6 MeV and decreased when the energy was higher than 6 MeV. There were chlorophyll stripped deficiency in M1 generation, which were seldom found in γ-ray treatment. Wider mutational spectrum and higher useful mutation frequencies were observed in M2 generation by proton than by γ-ray treatment. Also the earlier earing mutation type appeared more frequently. The appropriate energy of proton treatment was 4 MeV and the range of appropriate doses were 1.4 x 1010-3.7 x 1010 P/cm2

  4. [Biological, chemical, and radiation factors in the classification of medical waste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, N V; Korotkova, G I; Orlov, A Iu; Kadyrov, D E

    2011-01-01

    The current classification of medical waste does not consider the sanitary-and-chemical hazard of epidemiologically dangerous and extremely dangerous medical waste (classes B and C). According to the results of the studies performed, the authors propose the improved classification of medical waste, which makes it possible to take into account not only infectious, radiation, and toxicological, but also sanitary-and-chemical hazards (toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and biological activity) of medical waste. PMID:21901883

  5. Heterocyclic aromatic amines and their contribution to the bacterial mutagenicity of the particulate phase of cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Ewald; Meisgen, Thomas; Diekmann, Joerg; Conroy, Lynda; Stabbert, Regina

    2016-01-22

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) rank among the strongest known mutagens. Approximately 30 HAAs have been found in cooked foods (broiled, fried, and grilled) and several HAAs have been characterized as animal carcinogens. Nine HAAs have also been reported to be constituents of cigarette smoke (CS) raising concerns that HAAs might contribute significantly to the known carcinogenicity of CS. As HAAs are found predominantly in the total particulate matter (TPM) of CS, an improved method for the quantification of HAAs in TPM is reported allowing detection and quantification of 8 HAAs in a single run. The mutagenic potency of these HAAs and that of TPM from the reference cigarette 2R4F was determined in the Salmonella Reverse Mutation Assay (Ames assay) with tester strain TA98 and a metabolic activation system. The 8 HAAs, when applied together in the Ames assay, showed a clear sub-additive response. Likewise, the combination of HAAs and TPM, if at all, gave rise to a slight sub-additive response. In both cases, however, the sub-additive response in the Ames assay was observed at HAA doses that are far above the amounts found in CS. The contribution of the individual HAAs to the total mutagenic activity of TPM was calculated and experimentally confirmed to be approximately 1% of the total mutagenic activity. Thus, HAAs do not contribute significantly to the bacterial in vitro mutagenicity of CS TPM. PMID:26724587

  6. Effect of mutagens on the quality characters and disease resistant genes of diploid cotton (Gossypium arboreum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In both M1 and M2 plant height decreased with the increase in dose for both the mutagens. The 15 Krad and 0.15M EMS doses increased 122.7 and 128.3 gm seed cotton yield as compared to control respectively while all other doses of both mutagens decreased the yield of seed cotton. The EMS dose 0.10 M drastically decreased 184 gm seed cotton yield as compared to control. There was no larger effect of both mutagens on GOT % whereas staple length was slightly increased and micronaire value decreased as compared to control for all the doses of both mutagens. It was observed in M2 that mutation dose 10 Krad increased 165.6 gm seed cotton yield as compared to control but slight reduction in GOT % was observed. In M2 GOT were increased 3.5 % with 15 Krad and 3.6 % with EMS 0.10 M as compared to control. There were no larger effects for both mutagens in case of staple length, micronaire and uniformity ratio for all the doses as compared to control. respectively. In both M1 and M2 no plant was observed susceptible to cotton leaf curl virus and bacterial blight diseases of cotton

  7. Chemical analysis and mutational assay of distilled oils from the H-coal direct liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Samples from the H-Coal process, a catalytic, single-stage, coal liquefaction technology, were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. For these investigations, a blend of light and heavy H-Coal process oils was fractionally distilled into 50/sup 0/F boiling point cuts. The chemical analyses and biological testing results presented in this status report deal primarily with the blended material and the distillate fractions boiling above 650/sup 0/F. Results from the microbial mutagenicity assays indicated that onset of biological activity in the crude materials occurred above 700/sup 0/F. Similar trends have been observed for Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) I, SRC II, Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) and Exxon EDS process materials. After chemical class fractionation, the primary source of microbial mutagenicity of the crude boiling point cuts was the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) fractions. Amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino-PAH) were present at sufficient concentration levels in the N-PAC fractions to account for the observed mutagenic responses. In general, the chemical composition of the H-Coal materials studied was similar to that of other single-stage liquefaction materials. The degree of alkylation in these materials was determined to be greater than in the SRC and less than in the EDS process distillate cuts. 13 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  8. INDUCTION OF MUTATIONS BY CHEMICAL AGENTS AT THE HYPOXANTHINE-GUANINE PHOSPHORIBOSYL TRANSFERASE LOCUS IN HUMAN EPITHELIAL TERATOMA CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Induction of 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance by chemical mutagens was examined in a line of cells derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma cell clone. The cells, designated as P3 cells, have a stable diploid karyotype with 46(XX) chromosomes, including a translocation betwee...

  9. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  10. Topology of evolving, mutagenized viral populations: quasispecies expansion, compression, and operation of negative selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierra Saleta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular events and evolutionary forces underlying lethal mutagenesis of virus (or virus extinction through an excess of mutations are not well understood. Here we apply for the first time phylogenetic methods and Partition Analysis of Quasispecies (PAQ to monitor genetic distances and intra-population structures of mutant spectra of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV quasispecies subjected to mutagenesis by base and nucleoside analogues. Results Phylogenetic and PAQ analyses have revealed a highly dynamic variation of intrapopulation diversity of FMDV quasispecies. The population diversity first suffers striking expansions in the presence of mutagens and then compressions either when the presence of the mutagenic analogue was discontinued or when a mutation that decreased sensitivity to a mutagen was selected. The pattern of mutations found in the populations was in agreement with the behavior of the corresponding nucleotide analogues with FMDV in vitro. Mutations accumulated at preferred genomic sites, and dn/ds ratios indicate the operation of negative (or purifying selection in populations subjected to mutagenesis. No evidence of unusually elevated genetic distances has been obtained for FMDV populations approaching extinction. Conclusion Phylogenetic and PAQ analysis provide adequate procedures to describe the evolution of viral sequences subjected to lethal mutagenesis. These methods define the changes of intra-population structure more precisely than mutation frequencies and Shannon entropies. PAQ is very sensitive to variations of intrapopulation genetic distances. Strong negative (or purifying selection operates in FMDV populations subjected to enhanced mutagenesis. The quantifications provide evidence that extinction does not imply unusual increases of intrapopulation complexity, in support of the lethal defection model of virus extinction.

  11. Studies on the Mutagenicity and Teratogenicity of Kuianchun and Its Potential Carcinogenicity Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jian-ping; ZHANG Li; CAO Sui-zhong; ZHOU Li-xia; ZHOU Xue-hui; LIU Zong-ping; WEI Chun-mei; MIAO Xiao-lin; WEI Zeng-quan

    2002-01-01

    Kuianchun is a newly synthesized antibacterial and growth-promoting drug. This paper selected a battery of three short-term tests, including Ames test, micronucleus test and sperm abnormality test, to detect the mutagenicity of Kuianchun. The carcinogenicity prediction and battery selection method (CPBS method) was used to determine the probability of carcinogenicity of Kuianchun based upon the results of shortterm tests mentioned above. In addition, traditional teratogenic test was selected to study teratogenicity of Kuianchun. In Ames test, Kuianchun showed mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 in the absence and presence of microsomal metabolic activation system (S9-mix). However, the mutagenicity was reduced by the addition of S9-mix. In micronucleus test, Kuianchun was administered intra-peritoneally to male mouse 30 hours and 6 hours before they were killed respectively. The result indicated that there was no significant difference on the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in the mouse bone marrow induced by Kuianchun compared with the negative contrast (50% DMSO) (P > 0.05). In sperm abnormality test, Kuianchun was administered through a gastric incubation to male mouse as a suspension in 2% Tween-80. The dosage levels were 450, 750, 1000 and 1500mg/kg per day for 5 days. The result indicated that the percentage of abnormal sperms induced by Kuianchun was not significant compared with the negative contrast (P>0.05). In traditional teratogenic test, Kuianchun was given orally to pregnant mouse at 1/30,1/20 and 1/15 LDs0 during 6 - 15days of pregnancy period (the LD50 = 9000mg/kg). No toxicity was found either on mother and embryo in mouse, and teratogenic effects were also not observed at all tested dosages. The probability of carcinogenicity of Kuianchun is 23.8 % (θ = 0.238). The result demonstrated that Kuianchun is a non-carcinogen.

  12. Modulation of genotoxicity of oxidative mutagens by glycyrrhizic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhjit Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The chemopreventive effects of certain phytoconstituents can be exploited for their use as functional foods, dietary supplements and even as drugs. The natural compounds, acting as anti-genotoxic and free radical scavenging compounds, may serve as potent chemopreventive agents. These can inhibit DNA modulatory activities of mutagens and help preventing pathological processes. Objectives: Present study on Glycyrrhiza glabra L., a promising medicinal plant, widely used in traditional medicine, focused on the bioassay-guided fractionation of its extracts for the isolation of certain phytochemicals with anti-genotoxic potential against oxidative mutagens. Materials and Methods: The methanol extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra rhizomes was subjected to column chromatography, and isolated fraction was evaluated for its anti-genotoxic and antioxidant potential using SOS chromotest, Comet assay, and DPPH radical scavenging assay. Results: GLG fraction, which was characterized as Glycyrrhizic acid, inhibited the genotoxicity of oxidative mutagens viz., H 2 O 2 and 4NQOquite efficiently. In SOS chromotest, using E.coli PQ37 tester strain, it inhibited induction factor induced by H 2 O 2 and 4NQO by 75.54% and 71.69% at the concentration of 121.46 μM,respectively. In Comet assay, it reduced the tail moment induced by H 2 O 2 and 4NQO by 70.21% and 69.04%, respectively, at the same concentration in human blood lymphocytes. The isolated fraction also exhibited DPPH free radical scavenging activity and was able to scavenge 85.95% radicals at a concentration of 120 μM. Conclusion: Glycyrrhizic acid is a potential modulator of genotoxins as well as efficient scavenger of free radicals.

  13. Induced mutagenesis of plasmids and chromosomal genes inserted into plasmid DNA 1. Mutagenic effects of irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of two physical agents: UV- and γ-radiation has been considered in comparison. DNA of RSF2124 plasmid, determining colcine synthesis and ampicillin resistance, was used as a model. Mutagenous effect is taken into account according to the appearance of Col--mutants, which are not capable of colicine synthesis. Lethal effect is determined according to ampicillin marker inactivation. After reisolation of plasmid DNA from mutant transformant, new traits and antibiotic resistance are preserved during subsequent transformations and reseedings of transformed colonies, which proves mutational nature of the transformations. Under short-wave UV irradiation (lambda=254 nm) of RSF2124 DNA a clear mutagenous effect is detected: relative amount of Col--mutants at the optimum for mutagenesis doses increased by a factor of 10. Under conditions of W-reactivation (additional UV-irradiation of recipient cells of wild C600 type) of lethal injuries an increase in mutagenous effect was observed, which is reliable for 95%. A distinct increase in mutagenesis (approximately by a factor of 4) is observed during UV-irradiation in small doses of only one recipient cell (a so-called indirect UV-mutagenesis). Thus, according to its ability to W- and indirect UV-mutagenesis plasmid DNA behaves as DNA of moderate phages, which can testify to their evolution relationship. Treatment of plasmid DNA with acridine orange before UV-irradiation protected only from lethal injuries. γ-irradiation of 60Co at inactivation approximately 10-2 increased by an order the yield of Col--mutants. The presence of the plasmid in a cell did not affect its UV-resistance

  14. Mutagenicity screening of reaction products from the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of phenolic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, I.J.; Aitken, M.D.; Ball, L.M.; Heck, P.E. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Phenol-oxidizing enzymes such as peroxidases, laccases, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of a wide range of phenolic pollutants. Although the use of these enzymes in waste-treatment applications has been proposed by a number of investigators, little information exists on the toxicological characteristics of the oxidation products. The enzymes chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase were used in this study to catalyze the oxidation of phenol, several mono-substituted phenols, and pentachlorophenol. Seventeen reaction mixtures representing selected combinations of enzyme and parent phenol were subjected to mutagenicity screening using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay; five selected mixtures were also incubated with the S9 microsomal preparation to detect the possible presence of promutagens. The majority of reaction mixtures tested were not directly mutagenic, and none of those tested with S9 gave a positive response. Such lack of mutagenicity of enzymatic oxidation products provides encouragement for establishing the feasibility of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation as a waste-treatment process. The only positive responses were obtained with reaction products from the lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. Clear positive responses were observed when strain TA100 was incubated with 2-nitrophenol reaction-product mixtures, and when strain TA98 was incubated with the 4-nitrophenol reaction mixture. Additionally, 2,4-dinitrophenol was identified as a reaction product from 4-nitrophenol, and preliminary evidence indicates that both 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrophenol are produced from the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol. Possible mechanism by which these nitration reactions occur are discussed.

  15. Genome editing. The mutagenic chain reaction: a method for converting heterozygous to homozygous mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, Valentino M; Bier, Ethan

    2015-04-24

    An organism with a single recessive loss-of-function allele will typically have a wild-type phenotype, whereas individuals homozygous for two copies of the allele will display a mutant phenotype. We have developed a method called the mutagenic chain reaction (MCR), which is based on the CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing system for generating autocatalytic mutations, to produce homozygous loss-of-function mutations. In Drosophila, we found that MCR mutations efficiently spread from their chromosome of origin to the homologous chromosome, thereby converting heterozygous mutations to homozygosity in the vast majority of somatic and germline cells. MCR technology should have broad applications in diverse organisms. PMID:25908821

  16. Comparison of BTX Profiles and Their Mutagenicity Assessment at Two Sites of Agra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyoma Singla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the concentrations of three volatile organic compounds (VOCs, namely, acronym for benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX were assessed because of their role in the tropospheric chemistry. Two representative sites, a roadside and a petrol pump, were chosen for sample collection. VOCs were collected using SKC-activated charcoal tubes and SKC personal sampler and characterized by gas chromatograph using flame ionization detector. Among BTX, benzene had the highest concentration. At the roadside, mean concentration of benzene, toluene, o-,m-xylene, and p-xylene were 14.7 ± 2.4 μgm−3, 8.1 ± 1.2 μgm−3, 2.1 ± 0.8 μgm−3, and 5.1 ± 1.2 μgm−3, respectively. At the petrol pump, the mean concentrations of benzene, toluene, o-,m-xylene and p-xylene were 19.5 ± 3.7 μgm−3, 12.9 ± 1.1 μgm−3, 3.6 ± 0.5 μgm−3 and 11.1 ± 1.5 μgm−3, respectively, and were numerically higher by a fraction of 2. Monthly variation of BTX showed maximum concentration in winter. Inter-species ratios and inter-species correlation indicated traffic as the major source of BTX. Extracts of samples were positive in both Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 without metabolic activation suggesting the presence of direct mutagens in ambient air that can cause both frame-shift and base-pair mutation. The mutagenic response was greater for TA100 than TA98 suggesting greater activity for base-pair mutagenicity than frame-shift mutagenicity and was found to be statistically significant.

  17. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural: assessment of mutagenicity, DNA-damaging potential and reactivity towards cellular glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzowski, C; Glaab, V; Samimi, E; Schlatter, J; Eisenbrand, G

    2000-09-01

    5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural (HMF), a common product of the Maillard reaction, occurs in many foods in high concentrations, sometimes exceeding 1 g/kg (in certain dried fruits and caramel products). The toxicological relevance of this exposure has not yet been clarified. Induction of aberrant colonic crypt foci had been reported for HMF, in vitro studies on genotoxicity/mutagenicity have given controversial results. To elucidate the toxic potential of HMF, cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion), growth inhibition (SRB assay), mutagenicity (HPRT assay), DNA damage (single-cell gel electrophoresis) and depletion of cellular glutathione were investigated in mammalian cells. Genotoxicity (SOS repair) was monitored in Salmonella typhimurium (umu assay). HMF induced moderate cytotoxicity in V79 cells (LC(50): 115 mM, 1 hr incubation) and in Caco-2 cells (LC(50): 118 mM, 1 hr incubation). Growth inhibition was monitored following 24 hr of incubation (V79, IC(50): 6.4 mM). DNA damage was detectable neither in these cell lines nor in primary rat hepatocytes up to the cytotoxic threshold concentration (75% absolute viability). Likewise, in primary human colon cells, obtained from biopsy material, DNA damage was not measurable. At 120 mM, already exhibiting some reduction in cell viability, HMF was weakly mutagenic at the hprt-locus in V79 cells (mutants/10(6) cells: HMF 120 mM: 16 vs control: 3). Intracelluar glutathione was depleted by HMF (>/=50 mM) in V79 cells, in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 and in primary rat hepatocytes down to approximately 30% of control (120 mM). Genotoxicity was observed with HMF in the umu assay without external activation (16 mM: 185 rel. umu units, %, P<0.001). The genotoxic potential was not altered by addition of rat liver microsomes. By comparison, the natural flavour constituent (E)-2-hexenal (HEX) was already cytotoxic, mutagenic and depleted glutathione at about 1000-fold lower concentrations. It induced DNA damage in

  18. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van vinylchloride met microorganismen en L5178Y muize-lymfoomcellen

    OpenAIRE

    Voogd CE; van der Stel JJ; Verharen HW; van Bruchem MC; Knaap AGAC; Langebroek PG

    1986-01-01

    Vinylchloride was mutageen voor Klebsiella pneumoniae in de fluctuatietest zonder metabolische activering bij 0,02 en 0,037 mol/1 lucht (resp. 1,5 en 2,3 g/l lucht). Vinylchloride is duidelijk mutageen voor Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 bij concentraties vanaf 0,0005 mol/l lucht en voor Salmonelle typhimurium TA100 bij concentraties vanaf 0,013 mol/l lucht. Met Salmonella typhimurium TA98 werd tot een concentratie van 0,037 mol/l lucht geen mutagene werking gevonden. Het effect van metabolisc...

  19. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van 2,3-epoxypropylmethacrylaat met L5178Y muizelymfoomcellen

    OpenAIRE

    Knaap, van der, J.A.; A.G.A.C.; Langebroek; P G

    1985-01-01

    2,3-epoxypropylmethacrylaat of glycidylmethacrylaat bleek een mutagene werking te hebben in een genmutatie test met L5178Y muize-lymfoomcellen (vanaf 0.05 ml/l of 0,38 mmol/l), zowel in aan- als afwezigheid van een systeem voor metabolische activering (S9). Cytotoxische effecten werden gevonden, vanaf 0,1 ml/l (0,75 mmol/l) met S9 en vanaf 0,03 ml/l (0,23 mmol/l) zonder S9

  20. Mutagenic properties of the 8-amino-2'-deoxyguanosine DNA adduct in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    X. Tan; Suzuki, N; Johnson, F; Grollman, A P; Shibutani, S

    1999-01-01

    The DNA adduct 8-amino-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-amino-dG) is found in liver DNA of rats treated with the hepatocarcinogen 2-nitropropane. Site-specifically modified oligodeoxynucleotides were used to explore the mutagenic potential of 8-amino-dG in simian kidney (COS-7) cells. Oligodeoxynucleotides (5'-TCCTCCTX1G2CCTCTC and 5'-TCCTCCTG1X2CCTCTC, X = dG or 8-amino-dG) with the lesion positioned at codon 60 or 61 of the non-coding strand of the human c-Ha- ras1 gene were inserted into single-strand...

  1. Evaluation of the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of saponins from Hedera colchica K. Koch

    OpenAIRE

    Mshvildadze, V.; De Méo, M.; Dumenil, G; Dekanosidze, G.; Kemertelidze, E.; Elias, R; Balansard, G. (ed.)

    2014-01-01

    Note portant sur l'auteur Note portant sur l'auteur Note portant sur l'auteur Note portant sur l'auteur Note portant sur l'auteur Note portant sur l'auteur Note portant sur l'auteur Introduction Hedera colchica K. Kock. (Araliaceae) is an endemic plant in Georgia. The leaves of this plant are used in traditional medicine as bronchospasmolitic, secretolytic and anti-inflammatory remedies. (Sakartvelos Floras, 1984; Rastitllnie and col., 1988) The mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of 7 mon...

  2. Chromosomal aberrations suggestive of mutagen-related leukemia after 21 years of therapeutic radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 68-year-old woman with acute myelomonocytic leukemia, who was treated annually for 21 consecutive years by therapeutic low-dose radon gas radiation because of spondyloarthritis, is described. The karyotype of the malignant clone was 45,XX, -17, -18,del(5)(q15q33), +t(17;18)(q11.2q23). In 45% of the metaphases, the modal number was between hyperdiploid to near tetraploid. Double minute chromosomes were demonstrated in 60% of the cells. These chromosomal aberrations are suggestive of mutagen-related leukemia

  3. Lethal and mutagenic effects of 532 nm pico-second laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the lethal effect of pulse laser (second harmonic Nd+3:YAG laser of 532 nm, pulse length 3.3x10-11 s, peak intensity from 4x1012 to 1x1014 W/m2) on HeLa cells at the phases of active and stationary growth, and lethal and mutagenic effects of this radiation on E. coli cells. As was shown, HeLa cells at both growth phases and E. coli cells exhibited low sensitivity to laser radiation at λ=532 nm

  4. Analysis of mutagenic and carcinogenic risks: nitrates, nitrites, N-Nitroso compounds. Comparison with radioactive risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report comes within the scope of the general studies on mutagenic and carcinogenic agents other than ionizing radiations. Through feeding, way of life and working activities, man is exposed to genotoxic risks of N-nitroso compounds (NNC). In spite of differences in the molecular modes of action, there exists some analogy between the effects of radiation exposures and those of NNC: DNA is the target in either instance. Unlike radiations, NNC are alkylating agents. The whole activation process of carcinogens arises from mechanisms leading to DNA repair

  5. Study of the mutagenic potential of low power microwaves by direct DNA analyzis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man is constantly exposed to electromagnetic radiation which is a constituent part of the biosphere. Due to the technological progress and numerous man-made sources such as those used in industry, traffic, medicine, defence, communication network as well as some home appliances, the character of the natural electromagnetic field has altered significantly. These sources of nonionizing radiation cause atmospheric pollution similar to the pollution from various industrial sources. Unambiguous detection of the mutagenic potential of these radiations is necessary for genetic well being of future generations. (author)

  6. Isolated and combat mutagenic effect of radiation and asbestos in mice micronuclear test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated and combined mutagenic effects (ME) of radiation (γ-irradiation, 0.5 or 2 Gy) and asbestos (ip. 10 mg/mice) in mice are studied. Antioxidant activity and malonic dialdehyde concentration in blood serum as possible mechanism of ME and its possible modification are also investigated. For the ME the micronuclei incidence in polychromatic bone marrow erythrocytes was scored. It is shown that the reciprocal modification (potentiation) of both radiation and asbestos ME was established for combination radiation, 2 Gy + asbestos, the additivity - for combination radiation, 0.5 Gy + asbestos

  7. Use of the mouse spot test to investigate the mutagenic potential of triclosan (Irigasan DP300)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.; Montgomery, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Triclosan, a chlorophenoxyphenol used in several commercial products, was tested in the mouse in vivo somatic mutation test (spot test) by intraperitoneal injection on day 9.25 or 10.25 postconception. Although the dose range tested overlapped the toxic, the frequency of presumed somatic mutations was not significantly greater in the experimental groups than in the methanol-injected controls; and the results rule out with 95% confidence a spot incidence 5 or more times greater than the control incidence. These findings fail to confirm the claim by Fahrig et al. (1978) that triclosan is mutagenic in the spot test.

  8. Bacterial Metabolism in Humans of the Carcinogen IQ to the Direct Acting Mutagen Hydroxy-IQ

    OpenAIRE

    Van Tassell, R L; Carman, R. J.; Kingston, D. G. I.; Wilkins, T D

    2011-01-01

    7-hydroxy-IQ is the major product of the bacterial metabolism of IQ, a potent dietary carcinogen. Yet, unlike IQ, hydroxy-IQ is directly active in the salmonella/microsomal mutagenicity assay. Two subjects consumed a meal of fried meats containing IQ but no detectable hydroxy-IQ. Hydroxy-IQ was isolated from the subjects’ faeces collected within 30 h following the fried meat meal; it was absent from the subjects’ faeces before and after the meal. This is the first evidence that hy...

  9. Physical and chemical mutagenesis on a mycophagous nematode Aphelenchoides composticola (M.T. Franklin, 1957)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical mutagens as EMS, acriflavine, acridine, colchicine, nitrous acide and physical mutagens, such as X rays, have been used on the gonochoric mycophagous Nematode Aphelenchoides composticola. They show a nematicid activity due, to their toxicity on treated Nematodes and to the induction of lethal mutations affecting particularly early stages of gametogenesis. They produce abnormal strains dwarfs or giants (up to 25% of the population). Concentrations of chemical mutagens varying from 0.2 to 0.5% correspond to the optimal production of abnormalities. Similar results were obtained by irradiation near to 2000r. The action of the mutagens shows some differences: EMS and X rays generally produce dwarfs, whereas acriflavine, acridine, colchicine or nitrous acid induced only giants. Abnormal strains appear: in the F1, generation by X rays or acridine treatments; in the F2 or F3 generation by acriflavine, colchicine, nitrous acid or EMS action. The abnormal strains could be either variants or mutants and from these we select: four dwarfs B, C, D, E, induced by EMS 0.5% for 24 hours appearing in the F3 generation; or dwarf F induced by irradiation of 1500r appearing in the F1 generation. All these selected mutants are autosomal recessive single factors D and C controlled by two alleles of the some locus

  10. In vitro cytogenetic studies of organic chemicals found as contaminants in spacecraft cabin atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J.

    1986-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed during spaceflight to organic chemical contaminants in the spacecraft cabin atmosphere. Toxic exposures may cause lesions in the cellular DNA which are subsequently expressed as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE). Analysis of SCE is a sensitive short-term assay technique to detect and quantitate exposures to DNA-damaging (mutagenic) substances. The increase in SCE incidence over baseline (control) levels is generally proportional to the concentration of the mutagen and to the duration of exposure. Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) was chosen for this study since it occurred as an atmospheric contaminant in ten of the first 12 STS flights, and has been reported to have toxic and mutagenic effects in various test systems. Glutaraldehyde was chosen because relatively few data are available on the toxicity or mutagenicity of this common biological fixative, which is carried on STS flights for use in biological experiments. The BHK-21 baby hamster kidney cell line was the in vitro test system used in this study. Neither dichloromethane (10 ppm to 500 ppm) nor glutaraldehyde (1 ppm to 10 ppm) increased SCE levels following 20-hour exposure of BHK-21 cells to the test chemicals.

  11. Mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of aqueous extract of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) on meristematic cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicidade, I; Lima, J D; Pesarini, J R; Monreal, A C D; Mantovani, M S; Ribeiro, L R; Oliveira, R J

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds present in rosemary were found to have antioxidant properties, anticarcinogenic activity, and to increase the detoxification of pro-carcinogens. The aim of the study was to determine the effect the aqueous extract of rosemary (AER) on mutagenicity induced by methylmethane sulfonate in meristematic cells of Allium cepa, as well as to describe its mode of action. Anti-mutagenicity experiments were carried out with 3 different concentrations of AER, which alone showed no mutagenic effects. In antimutagenicity experiments, AER showed chemopreventive activity in cultured meristematic cells of A. cepa against exposure to methylmethane sulfonate. Additionally, post-treatment and simultaneous treatment using pre-incubation protocols were the most effective. Evaluation of different protocols and the percent reduction in DNA indicated bioantimutagenic as well desmutagenic modes of action for AER. AER may be chemopreventive and antimutagenic. PMID:25501210

  12. Inhibition of mutagenicity of food-derived heterocyclic amines by sulphoraphene--an isothiocyanate isolated from radish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishu; Singla, A K; Kaur, I P

    2003-02-01

    The naturally derived isothiocyanate, sulphoraphene [4-isothiocyanato-(1R)-(methylsulphinyl)-1-(E)-butene], isolated from seeds of radish ( Raphanus sativus L., Cruciferae) was investigated for its antigenotoxic effects against a battery of cooked food mutagens (heterocyclic amines) in the Ames Salmonella/reversion assay using Salmonella typhimurium TA98 (frame-shift mutation sensitive) and TA100 (base -pair mutation sensitive) bacterial strains in the presence of Aroclor 1254 induced rat liver S9. Results of the present in vitro anti-mutagenicity studies using the base-pair mutation sensitive strain TA100, strongly suggest that sulphoraphene is a potent inhibitor of the S9-mediated mutagenicity of all the tested heterocyclic amines (60 - 75 % inhibition at a dose of 500 nmol/plate). PMID:12624832

  13. Differential effects of chronic alcohol administration to rats on the activation of aromatic amines to mutagens in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C M; Ioannides, C

    1986-05-01

    Male Wistar albino rats were maintained on alcohol-containing liquid diets for 4 weeks. Hepatic post-mitochondrial preparations derived from these animals were more efficient than control in activating 4-aminobiphenyl and 2-aminofluorene to mutagens in the Ames test. The alcohol-induced enhancement in mutagenicity was not inhibited by dimethylsulphoxide indicating that the generation of hydroxyl radicals is not involved. The activation of 2-naphthylamine was not affected by the treatment with alcohol but the mutagenicities of 2-aminoanthracene, benzo[a]pyrene and 3-methylcholanthrene were inhibited. The same treatment markedly increased hepatic microsomal aniline p-hydroxylase and ethoxyresorufin O-de-ethylase activities and to a lesser extent benzphetamine N-demethylase and microsomal levels of total cytochromes P-450. It is concluded that chronic alcohol administration to rats modulates the metabolic activation of pre-carcinogens to their reactive intermediates presumably by causing the redistribution of cytochrome P-450 isozymes. PMID:3009048

  14. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF MUTAGENIC EXTRACTS OF AQUEOUS CHLORINATED HUMIC ACID. A COMPARISON OF THE BYPRODUCTS TO DRINKING WATER CONTAMINANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formation of mutagenic compounds as a result of aqueous chlorination of humic acids has been demonstrated. Solvent extracts responding positively to the Ames test were analyzed by GC/MS in an attempt to identify the mutagenic components. Aliquots of the chlorinated humic solution...

  15. Phenotypic and biochemical profile changes in calendula (Calendula officinalis L.) plants treated with two chemical mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nashar, Y I; Asrar, A A

    2016-01-01

    Chemical mutagenesis is an efficient tool used in mutation-breeding programs to improve the vital characters of the floricultural crops. This study aimed to estimate the effects of different concentrations of two chemical mutagens; sodium azide (SA) and diethyl sulfate (DES). The vegetative growth and flowering characteristics in two generations (M1 and M2) of calendula plants were investigated. Seeds were treated with five different concentrations of SA and DES (at the same rates) of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 ppm, in addition to a control treatment of 0 ppm. Results showed that lower concentrations of SA mutagen had significant effects on seed germination percentage, plant height, leaf area, plant fresh weight, flowering date, inflorescence diameter, and gas-exchange measurements in plants of both generations. Calendula plants tended to flower earlier under low mutagen concentrations (1000 ppm), whereas higher concentrations delayed flowering significantly. Positive results on seed germination, plant height, number of branches, plant fresh weight, and leaf area were observed in the M2-generation at lower concentrations of SA (1000 ppm), as well as at 4000 ppm DES on number of leaves and inflorescences. The highest total soluble protein was detected at the concentrations of 1000 ppm SA and 2000 ppm DES. DES showed higher average of acid phosphatase activity than SA. Results indicated that lower concentrations of SA and DES mutagens had positive effects on seed germination percentage, plant height, leaf area, plant fresh weight, flowering date, inflorescence diameter, and gas-exchange measurements. Thus, lower mutagen concentrations could be recommended for better floral and physio-chemical performance. PMID:27173326

  16. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van acrylamide met microorganismen, Drosophila melanogaster en L5178Y muize-lymfoomcellen

    OpenAIRE

    Voogd CE; van der Stel JJ; Verharen HW; Kramers PGN; Mout HCA; Knaap AGAC; Langebroek PG

    1984-01-01

    Met acrylamide is met Klebsiella pneumoniae ur-pro- geen mutagene werking gevonden bij 141 mmol/l (10 g/liter) of minder. Met de Salmonella typhimurium stammen TA 100, TA 1535, TA 102, TA 98 en TA 1537 is geen mutagene werking aangetoond bij 100 mg per plaat of minder, zowel met als zonder metabolische activering. Met Drosophila melanogaster is met een injectie van 0,2 mul van een 40 of 50 mmol/l acrylamideoplossing een geringe doch niet significante verhoging van de mutatiefrequentie gevonde...

  17. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van methacrylonitril met micro- organismen, Drosophila melanogaster en L5178Y muize-lymfoomcellen

    OpenAIRE

    Voogd CE; van der Stel JJ; Verharen HW; Kramers PGN; Mout HCA; Knaap AGAC; Langebroek PG

    1985-01-01

    Met methacrylonitril is bij concentraties t/m 5 mmol/l (336 mg/l) lucht, behoudens een geringe verhoging bij 2 mmol/l, en 100 mmol/l (6,71 g/l) bouillon geen mutagene werking gevonden met Klebsiella pneumoniae. Met de Salmonella typhimurium stammen TA 98, TA 100, TA 1530 TA 1535 en TA 1950 is bij concentraties tot 1 mmol/l (67,1 mg/l) lucht en 1,19 mmol (0,8 g) per selectieplaat geen mutagene werking gevonden. Met Drosophila melanogaster is bij injectie van 0,2 mu-l van 300 mmol/l methacrylon...

  18. Stimulation of germination of conidium Aspergillus niger, a citric acid producer, under the action of mutagenic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of low doses of various mutagens, namely, 2% cyclophosphane solution (30 min), 1% thiophosphamide solution (30 min), 0.05% nitrosomethylurea solution (30 and 60 min), γ-rays (10 krads) and UV-rays (10000 erg/mm2) stimulates germination of conidium Aspergillus niger, a citric acid producer. At the above-mentioned doses of mutagens, a minor quantity of morphological varieties are formed, and the variability value of acid production by Asp. niger is maintained at the spontaneous level

  19. Mutagenic effects of synchrotron soft X-ray with resonance energy of Nk irradiation on Rhizopus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic effects, such as mortality, colony morphology, culture characteristic of Rhizopus oryzae irradiated by synchrotron soft X-ray, were studied preliminarily. The results show that the mutagenic effects of synchronous radiation soft-X ray on Rhizopus oryzae AS 3.3461 strain were obvious. Mortality curve appeared 'addle' shape and the lowest lethal rate was shown with dose of 0.72 kGy. Difference of colony morphology from original strain was observed. Lag phase of inocula shortened by 3h. Quantity of L-lactic acid and LDH specific activity increased by 25.6% and 95.8%, respectively, whereas ADH specific activity reduced 77.7%. (authors)

  20. Responses of the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.G.; Howgate, S.; McBride, D.; Riach, C. (Inveresk Research International Limited, Musselburgh (Scotland)); Caspary, W.J. (National Inst. of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk{sup +}/tk{sup {minus}} mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 {mu}g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds.

  1. Protective Effect of Prolactin against Methylmercury-Induced Mutagenicity and Cytotoxicity on Human Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Carmem Silva-Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury exhibits cytotoxic and mutagenic properties as a result of its effect on tubulin. This toxicity mechanism is related to the production of free radicals that can cause DNA damage. Methylmercury (MeHg is one of the most toxic of the mercury compounds. It accumulates in the aquatic food chain, eventually reaching the human diet. Several studies have demonstrated that prolactin (PRL may be differently affected by inorganic and organic mercury based on interference with various neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of PRL secretion. This study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of PRL on human lymphocytes exposed to MeHg in vitro, including observation of the kinetics of HL-60 cells (an acute myeloid leukemia lineage treated with MeHg and PRL at different concentrations, with both treatments with the individual compounds and combined treatments. All treatments with MeHg produced a significant increase in the frequency of chromatid gaps, however, no significant difference was observed in the chromosomal breaks with any treatment. A dose-dependent increase in the mitotic index was observed for treatments with PRL, which also acts as a co-mitogenic factor, regulating proliferation by modulating the expression of genes that are essential for cell cycle progression and cytoskeleton organization. These properties contribute to the protective action of PRL against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of MeHg.

  2. Sensitivity to ehter anasthesia and to. gamma. -rays in mutagen-sensitive strains of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamo, Sumiko; Nakashima-Tanaka, Eiji (Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai (Japan). Department of Life Sciences); Megumi, Tsuneo (Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan). Radiation Center)

    1990-01-01

    An ether-resistant strain of Drosophila melanogaster, Eth-29, has previously been found to be radiosensitive. Some mutagen-sensitive strains are known to be hypersensitive to X-rays in larvae. The correlation between sensitivities to ether anesthesia and to {gamma}-rays was examined in adult flies of 12 mutagen-sensitive strains and 6 control strains. A wide variation in sensitivities to ether anesthesia, {gamma}-ray knock-down and {gamma}-ray lethality was demonstrated. No correlation between DNA-repaor capacity and ether sensitivity or {gamma}-ray knock-down sensitivity was shown. Only mei-9 and mus201, which are deficient in excision repair, as well as Eth-29 were found to be sensitive to {gamma}-ray lethality. These findings indicate that the targets for ehter anesthesia, knock-down and lethality may be different. Lethality appears to be caused by DNA damage, while the othe 2 endpoints appear not to be related to DNA damage. (author). 14 refs.; 3 tabs.

  3. Effects of mutagen application of sodium azide and gamma radiation in rice seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of mutagen application of sodium azide and gamma radiation in rice seeds. Upland rice seeds, variety Dourado Precoce, were treated with gamma-rays and sodium azide(SA). Biological effects of these treatments were studied in the M1 and M2 generations. Survival number, seedling height, plant fertility and chlorophyill mutation frequencies based on mutations per 100 M1 panicles and mutants per 100 M2 seedlings were analysed. Among these characters, plant fertility was the most sensitive for mutagen treatments, and higher doses of gamma-rays or higher concentrations of sodium azide reduced significantly fertility of M1 plants. The same effect as increase of concentration of sodium azide was observed when the acidity of buffer solution was increased, or when seeds were pre-treated in distilled water. The maximum chlorophyll mutation frequencies were obtained in sodium azide treatments: 40.74% in the M1 panicles and 10.67% in the M2 seedlings, in comparison with the maximum frequenies in gamma-irradiation of 10.39% in the M1 panicles and 1.73% in the M2 seedlings. (Author)

  4. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes for the analysis of chromosome aberrations in mutagen tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on exposed individuals, and on cultured cells, have shown that the human peripheral blood lymphocyte is an extremely sensitive indicator of both in vivo and in vitro induced chromosome structural change. These changes in chromosome structure offer readily scored morphological evidence of damage to the genetic material. Although problems exist in the extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation, the lymphocyte offers several advantages as a test system. The types of chromosome damage which can be cytologically distinguished at metaphase can be divided into two main groups: chromosome type and chromatid type. The circulating lymphocyte is in the G/sub 0/ or G/sub 1/ phase of mitosis and exposure to ionising radiations and certain other mutagenic agents during this stage produces chromosome-type damage where the unit of breakage and reunion is the whole chromosome (i.e. both chromatids at the same locus). However, cells exposed to these agents while in the S or G/sub 2/ stages of the cell cycle, after the chromosome has divided into two sister chromatids, yield chromatid-type aberrations and only the single chromatid is involved in breakage or exchange. Other agents (e.g. some of the alkylating agents) will usually produce only chromatid-type aberrations in cells in cycle although the cells are exposed to the mutagen whilst in G/sub 1/

  5. Mutagenic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic properties of tobacco smoke produced by cigarillos available on the Canadian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, W S; Trivedi, A H; Momin, R A; Wagstaff, W G; Lauterbach, J H

    2011-11-01

    Cigarillos (aka little cigars) have been increasing in popularity unlike cigarettes; but relatively little is known about the toxicology of the mainstream smoke (MSS) from such products. Therefore, the objective of this work was to compare the toxicological properties of the MSS (Health Canada Intensive smoking conditions) from a range of cigarillo products with the toxicological properties of MSS of cigarettes. Three in vitro assays were used to evaluate the toxicities of the MSS total particulate matter (TPM): (1) mutagenicity using Ames assay with Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100 with S9 metabolic activation (+S9); (2) cytotoxicity using the Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay with CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary) cells; and (3) genotoxicity using the micronucleus assay with CHO cells and short-term exposures (3-h ± S9). The Ames assay (TA100+S9) and the NRU assay were also applied to the gas/vapour phase of the MSS that passed through the Cambridge pad. On a per-milligram-nicotine basis, the preferred way of comparing toxicities of different types of tobacco products, the MSS from cigarillos was not less toxic, and in some cases more toxic (TPM fraction TA98+S9, NRU), than the MSS from cigarettes. Thus, our findings support our prior work on smoke mutagenicity that showed MSS from cigarillos was not less toxic than MSS from cigarettes. PMID:21821091

  6. The Hermes transposon of Musca domestica and its use as a mutagen of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung M; Evertts, Adam G; Levin, Henry L

    2009-11-01

    Transposon mutagenesis allows for the discovery and characterization of genes by creating mutations that can be easily mapped and sequenced. Moreover, this method allows for a relatively unbiased approach to isolating genes of interest. Recently, a system of transposon based mutagenesis for Schizosaccharomyces pombe became available. This mutagenesis relies on Hermes, a DNA transposon from the house fly that readily integrates into the chromosomes of S. pombe. The Hermes system is distinct from the retrotransposons of S. pombe because it efficiently integrates into open reading frames. To mutagenize S. pombe, cells are transformed with a plasmid that contains a drug resistance marker flanked by the terminal inverted repeats of Hermes. The Hermes transposase expressed from a second plasmid excises the resistance marker with the inverted repeats and inserts this DNA into chromosomal sites. After S. pombe with these two plasmids grow 25 generations, approximately 2% of the cells contain insertions. Of the cells with insertions, 68% contain single integration events. The protocols listed here provide the detailed information necessary to mutagenize a strain of interest, screen for specific phenotypes, and sequence the positions of insertion. PMID:19450689

  7. Cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of solutions exposed to cold atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Daniela; Heslin, Caitlin; Cullen, Patrick J.; Bourke, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of aqueous solutions to atmospheric plasmas results in the generation of relatively long-lived secondary products such as hydrogen peroxide which are biologically active and have demonstrated anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity. The use of plasma-activated solutions in applications such as microbial decontamination or anti-cancer treatments requires not only adequate performance on target cells but also a safe operating window regarding the impact on surrounding tissues. Furthermore the generation of plasma-activated fluids needs to be considered as a by-stander effect of subjecting tissue to plasma discharges. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assays using mammalian cell lines were used to elucidate the effects of solutions treated with di-electric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma. Plasma-treated PBS inhibited cell growth in a treatment time-dependent manner showing a linear correlation to the solutions’ peroxide concentration which remained stable over several weeks. Plasma-treated foetal bovine serum (FBS) acting as a model for complex bio-fluids showed not only cytotoxic effects but also exhibited increased mutagenic potential as determined using the mammalian HPRT assay. Further studies are warranted to determine the nature, causes and effects of the cyto- and genotoxic potential of solutions exposed to plasma discharges to ensure long-term safety of novel plasma applications in medicine and healthcare. PMID:26908060

  8. Bacterial mutagenicity tests on irradiated foods (fish-meat cake, wiener and orange juice)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the shallow radiation of a food can be effectively accomplished for sterilizing fish-meat products (0.3 Mrad/hr, 2 hr), wiener (0.3 Mrad/hr, 2 hr) and oranges (0.5 eV, 150 Krad), using the low doses of gamma-ray and/or cathode-ray irradiation in place of bactericidal agents. However, the results of mutagenicity on irradiated fish-meat products, wiener or oranges have been insufficient for publication. We examined, therefore, the mutagenic response of the extracts prepared with several organic solvents and distilled water such as: 70% methanol for fish-meat cake; chloroform-methanol mix (2:1) and distilled water for wiener; as well as acetone and methanol for orange juice, after the similar irradiation conditions described above, on streptomycin dependence of the Salmonella typhimurium TA100 SMsup(d) strain developed by Dr. T. Kada. Our results obtained by the use of this bacterial indicator showed no significant differences between any irradiated and unirradiated samples with or without S9 mixture taken from PCB-induced rat livers. The data showed only a killing effect with all samples used in this study. (author)

  9. Screening for the familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 R3500W by mutagenic primers PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯纪安; 冯铮

    2002-01-01

    Objective A method combining the mutagenic primers PCR and restriction enzyme digestion was designed to facilitate the detection of gene mutation in familial defective apolipoprotein B-1O0 R3500W. Methods A pair of primer was designed and a mismatch nucleotide was introduced in its upstream primer. A segment of target DNA including the possibly mutated nucleotide was amplified by PCR and the products were digested by restriction enzyme Nco 1. To overcome the potential false negative results due to improper digestion conditions, a segment of DNA with Ncol cut size was added as reference.Results The target sequence was successfully amplified by PCR, producing a 144 bp DNA fragment as expected. When incubated with Ncol, the enzyme could digest the DNA, producing a 114 bp segment,only if it was amplified from the mutated gene, but not from the normal allele. This difference in length of DNA could be separated by electrophoresis on a 2 %agarose gel. Thus we successfully detected two carriers of heterozygous FDB R3500W in 162 hypercholesterolemic patients. Conclusions Mutagenic primers PCR can be used to detect the gene mutation of apo B-100 R3500W, two cases were detected among 162patients with hypercholesterolemia. It suggests that this mutation is not rare in mainland China.

  10. Mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of fumes from heated cooking oils produced in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Tai-An; Ko, Ying-Chin [Graduate Institute of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical College, Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu, Pei-Fen [Department of Industrial Safety and Hygiene, Tajen Junior College of Pharmacy, Ping-Tung (Taiwan, Province of China); Wang, Li-Fang [School of Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical College, Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China); Lee, Huei [Department of Biochemistry, Chung San Medical and Dental College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Lee, Chien-Hung [School of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical College, Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1997-11-28

    According to epidemiologic studies, exposure of women to fumes from cooking oils appears to be an important risk factor for lung cancer. Fume samples from three different commercial cooking oils frequently used in Taiwan were collected and analyzed for mutagenicity in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were extracted from the samples and identified by HPLC chromatography. Extracts from three cooking oil fumes were found to be mutagenic in the presence of S9 mix. All samples contained dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DB(a,h)A) and benz(a)anthracene (B(a)A). Concentration of DB(a,h)A and B(a)A were 1.9 and 2.2 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in fumes from lard oil, 2.1 and 2.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in soybean oil, 1.8 and 1.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in peanut oil, respectively. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was identified in fume samples of soybean and peanut oil, in concentrations of 19.6 and 18.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, in this order. These results provide experimental evidence and support the findings of epidemiologic observations, in which women exposed to the emitted fumes of cooking oils are at increased risk of contracting lung cancer

  11. Examination of Mutagenic Effects of GAL-57 Herbicide (Bentazone+Dicamba Using Mouse Micronucleus Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Karan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A micronucleus test was run to investigate mutagenic potential of the herbicide GAL-57, a formulated mixture of bentazone and dicamba.The test was applied to mice of both sexes (strain: CRL: NMRI BR and the herbicide (product was administered by gavage at 2000 mg/kg rate, twice within 24 hs. Cyclophosphamide (positive control was administered at 60 mg/kg, while distilled water as a solvent was negative control. The animals were sacrificed 24 hs after second treatment, their bone marrow cells isolated from femur, and effects evaluated.The data acquired showed that repeated treatment of mice with GAL-57 caused neither biological nor significant statistical increase in the number of micronuclei in treated animals. At the same time, the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of animals treated with cyclophosphamide (positive control showed a significant statistical increase. The results suggest that the herbicide product tested did not show any mutagenic activity under the conditions of mouse micronucleus test.

  12. 42. The Report of Antimutagenicity and Mutagenicity of 7 Kinds Natrual Edible Plants and Vegetables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: With improvement of living standard, environmental quality become more and more seriously damaged. While the SOS bacterioplage induction methed is nearly a high-speed and reliable method to detect genetic toxins. The SOS syndronous test make an improvement on the above method. On the one hand, we are reducing the environmental pollution, on the other hand, we are attempt to find antimugens and some ways against cancer. Using the natrual edible plants against mutage and cancer is one of the important topic on preventing carcinogenic factors. The study examed 7 kinds natrual edible plants and vegetables. Method: We adopted the test of the Antimutagenicity and mutagenicity with S9 (rat liver microsomal enzymes system) and without S9 and repeat test. Result: The results showed all samples had no mutagenicity. Scallion seed, sweet potato and pomegranate peel were antimutagens against Mitomicy(MMC) with S9 and without S9. They are well worth of devoloping and using further. Pea seedling, crowndaisy chrysanthemum. alon and romaine had no antimutagenicity with and without S9. The people can eat usually.

  13. Induction of bacterial antibiotic resistance by mutagenic halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) raise concerns regarding their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity threatening public health. However, environmental consequence of their mutagenicity has received less attention. In this study, the effect of halogenated N-DBPs on bacterial antibiotic resistance (BAR) was investigated. After exposure to bromoacetamide (BAcAm), trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) or tribromonitromethane (TBNM), the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to both individual and multiple antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, polymyxin B, rifampin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin + gentamicin and ciprofloxacin + tetracycline) was increased, which was predominantly ascribed to the overexpression of efflux pumps. The mechanism of this effect was demonstrated to be mutagenesis through sequencing and analyzing antibiotic resistance genes. The same induction phenomena also appeared in Escherichia coli, suggesting this effect may be universal to waterborne pathogens. Therefore, more attention should be given to halogenated N-DBPs, as they could increase not only genotoxicological risks but also epidemiological risks of drinking water. - Highlights: • The halogenated N-DBPs could induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. • Both individual and multiple resistances could be induced. • Efflux mechanism played an important role in the induced antibiotic resistance. • The halogenated N-DBPs induced bacterial antibiotic resistance via mutagenesis. • Effects of N-DBPs on antibiotic resistance may be universal to waterborne pathogens. - Halogenated N-DBPs could increase antibiotic resistance, even multidrug resistance via mutagenesis, contributing to the enrichment of antibiotic resistant bacteria in drinking water

  14. Recent perspectives on the relations between faecal mutagenicity, genotoxicity and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGratz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is an essential component of the genesis of colonic cancer. Gut microbial products and food components are thought to be principally responsible for the damage that initiates disease progression. Modified Ames tests and Comet assays have been developed for measuring mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Their relevance to oncogenesis remains to be confirmed, as does the relative importance of different mutagenic and genotoxic compounds present in faecal water and the bacteria involved in their metabolism. Dietary intervention studies provide clues to the likely risks of oncogenesis. High-protein diets lead to increases in N-nitroso compounds in faecal water and greater DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay, for example. Other dietary interventions, such as non-digestible carbohydrates and probiotics, may lead to lower faecal genotoxicity. In order to make recommendations to the general public, we must develop a better understanding of how genotoxic compounds are formed in the colon, how accurate the Ames and Comet assays are, and how diet affects genotoxicity.

  15. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Echinodorus macrophyllus (chapéu-de-couro extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo S. Vidal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinodorus macrophyllus, commonly known as chapéu-de-couro, is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat inflammation and rheumatic diseases. In this work, we used short-term bacterial assays based on the induction of SOS functions to examine the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of an aqueous extract of E. macrophyllus leaves. Whole extract and an ethyl acetate fraction showed similar genotoxicity and caused an ~70-fold increase in lysogenic induction. The extract also gave a positive result in the SOS chromotest with an increase of 12-fold in β-Galactosidase enzymatic units. There was a strong trend towards base substitutions and frameshifts at purine sites in the mutations induced by the extract in Escherichia coli (CC103 and CC104 strains and Salmonella typhimurium test strains (22-fold increase in histidine revertants in TA98 strain. Since reactive oxygen species may be implicated in aging process and in degenerative diseases, we used antioxidant compounds as catalase, thiourea and dipyridyl in the lysogenic induction test. All this compounds were able to reduce the induction factor observed in the treatment with chapéu-de-couro, thus suggesting that the genotoxicity and mutagenicity were attributable to the production of reactive oxygen species that targeted DNA purines.

  16. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING for directed enzyme evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonzalez-Perez

    Full Text Available Approaches that depend on directed evolution require reliable methods to generate DNA diversity so that mutant libraries can focus on specific target regions. We took advantage of the high frequency of homologous DNA recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to develop a strategy for domain mutagenesis aimed at introducing and in vivo recombining random mutations in defined segments of DNA. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING is a one-pot random mutagenic method for short protein regions that harnesses the in vivo recombination apparatus of yeast. Using this approach, libraries can be prepared with different mutational loads in DNA segments of less than 30 amino acids so that they can be assembled into the remaining unaltered DNA regions in vivo with high fidelity. As a proof of concept, we present two eukaryotic-ligninolytic enzyme case studies: i the enhancement of the oxidative stability of a H2O2-sensitive versatile peroxidase by independent evolution of three distinct protein segments (Leu28-Gly57, Leu149-Ala174 and Ile199-Leu268; and ii the heterologous functional expression of an unspecific peroxygenase by exclusive evolution of its native 43-residue signal sequence.

  17. Radiation-induced mutagenicity in repair deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if there is a relationship between DNA double-strand break repair and mutagenicity the authors utilized two x-ray sensitive mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells along with the parental line K1. The two mutant lines xrs-5 and xrs-6, which have different DSB repair capabilities, were used to determine cell killing and 6-thioguanine resistance (6TG/sup r/) mutation frequencies induced by either x-rays of α-particles, x-ray survival data indicated the two mutant lines have similar sensitivity and are 5-7 fold more sensitive than the parental line K1. The mutant lines are also sensitive to α-particles but to a lesser extent. The authors' 6TG mutation data indicated that the two mutant lines are hypermutable. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in mutant cell population than in parental K1 cells. Their results support the notion that repair of DSB play an important role in the expression of radiation-induced cell killing and mutagenicity

  18. Organ-targeted mutagenicity of nitrofurantoin in Big Blue transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillardet, Philippe; Arrault, Xavier; Michel, Valérie; Touati, Eliette

    2006-09-01

    Nitrofurans are widely used in human medicine, as nitrofurantoin and nifuroxazide, still prescribed for long-term antimicrobial prophylaxis of urinary tract and gastrointestinal infection in humans respectively. Recent experiments in mammals, as well as reports mentioning toxic effects in humans associated with a long-term use, specially in the case of nitrofurantoin, raised the need for reevaluating their genotoxicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether these two compounds induce a mutagenic effect in the Big Blue transgenic mouse mutation assay. Mice were orally treated either with nitrofurantoin or nifuroxazide for five consecutive days and sacrificed 3 weeks later. In order to optimize the genotoxic response, the doses used for each compound were 25-fold higher as the posology in humans. They corresponded to 50% of the highest doses tolerated by mice. The mutant frequency was determined from kidney, lung, bladder, caecum, colon, small intestine, spleen and stomach. A weak mutagenic response of nitrofurantoin-treated mice specifically in the kidney was observed. As in the case of other nitrofuran compounds, the mutation spectra determined from treated samples exhibited slightly more GC-->TA transversions as compared with untreated conditions. These data are relevant to the targeted action of nitrofurantoin as a urinary antimicrobial agent. No significant increase of mutants was detected in the case of nifuroxazide-treated mice whatever the organs analysed. PMID:16895946

  19. Investigation of the mutagenic potential of cold atmospheric plasma at bactericidal dosages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxhammer, V; Li, Y F; Köritzer, J; Shimizu, T; Maisch, T; Thomas, H M; Schlegel, J; Morfill, G E; Zimmermann, J L

    2013-04-30

    In the past few years, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has evolved into a new tool in the fight against nosocomial infections and antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The products generated by the plasma-electrons, ions, reactive species and UV light-represent a 'lethal cocktail' for different kinds of pathogen, which opens up possible applications in hygiene and medicine. Nevertheless, to ensure the safe usage of CAP on skin (e.g., to treat wounds or skin diseases) several pre-clinical in vitro studies have to be performed before implementing clinical trials on humans. In the study presented here, inactivation experiments with Escherichia coli were carried out to identify the necessary plasma dosage for a 5 log reduction: with a small hand-held battery-operated CAP device, these disinfection properties were achieved after application during 30s. This and higher plasma dosages were then used to analyze the mutagenicity induced in V79 Chinese hamster cells-to furthermore define a 'safe application window'-with the HPRT (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutation assay. The results show that a CAP treatment of up to 240 s and repeated treatments of 30s every 12h did not induce mutagenicity at the Hprt locus beyond naturally occurring spontaneous mutations. PMID:23416235

  20. Mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter from the urban area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Maria Ferrão Vargas

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter collected from three different sites within the urban area of Porto Alegre, Brazil, was investigated using a Salmonella/microsome assay. Samples were extracted by sonication, sequentially, with cyclohexane (CX, and dichloromethane (DCM, for a rough fractionation by polarity. The different fractions were tested for mutagenicity using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, with and without metabolic activation (S9 mix fraction, and TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6, without metabolic activation. Mutagenic response was observed for frameshift strain TA98 in assays with and without metabolization for two sites (sites 2 and 3, which had considerable risk of environmental contamination by nonpolar (CX and/or moderately polar (DCM compounds. However, the values of revertants/m3 (rev/m3 were highest on the site subject to automobile exhaust (site 3 in assays without (9.56 rev/m3 and with metabolization (5.08 rev/m3. Maximum mutagenic activity was detected in the moderately polar fraction, decreasing after metabolization. Nevertheless, the nonpolar fractions (CX gave higher mutagenic activity in the presence of metabolization than in the absence of the S9 mix fraction. The responses observed for TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 strains suggest the activity of nitrocompounds.Foi investigada a atividade mutagênica de material particulado de amostras de ar coletadas em três diferentes locais dentro da área urbana da cidade de Porto Alegre, Brasil, através do ensaio Salmonella/microssoma. As amostras foram extraídas, em ultra-som, por fracionamento seqüencial de acordo com a polaridade, utilizando os solventes ciclohexano (CX e diclorometano (DCM. As diferentes frações foram testadas para mutagenicidade com as linhagens de Salmonella typhimurium TA98, em presença e ausência de ativação metabólica, e TA98NR e TA98/1,8-DNP6 em ausência de metabolização. Observou-se resposta mutagênica positiva, do tipo erro

  1. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  2. Comparative effects in rats of intact wheat bran and two wheat bran fractions on the disposition of the mutagen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat bran protects against mutations and cancer, but contains different plant cell types that are likely to have different protective effects. We previously described the production and chemical characterisation of an aleurone-rich fraction (ARF) and a pericarp-rich fraction (PRF) from wheat grain. We compared these with whole bran (WB), fed to rats as 10% of a high fat AIN-76 diet. All bran-supplemented diets increased faecal bulk, in the order PRF > WB > ARF. PRF increased the activity of NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase only in the forestomach, whereas ARF and WB enhanced levels of glutathione S-transferase in the duodenum. ARF but not PRF was digested and fermented, and also encouraged bacterial growth. Rats were gavaged with the radioactive mutagen 14C-labelled IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline), and effects of the brans on plasma radioactivity measured. Compared with the control diet, all bran-supplemented diets reduced the concentration of radioactivity in plasma, in the order ARF > PRF > WB. All brans increased faecal elimination of radioactivity, but only ARF and PRF enhanced urinary radioactivity. These data suggest that wheat bran may reduce mutation and cancers through direct adsorption and enhanced elimination of a dietary mutagen and/or its metabolites, and that wheat bran enriched in pericarp or aleurone cell walls may exert protective effects through different mechanisms.

  3. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and mutagenicity in bus drivers and mail carriers exposed to urban air pollution in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Wallin, Håkan; Binderup, Mona Lise; Dybdahl, Marianne; Autrup, Herman; Loft, Steffen; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2004-01-01

    assay with Salmonella tester strain YG1021 and S9 mix. The N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) phenotype was used as a biomarker for susceptibility to mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds. RESULTS: Bus drivers excreted more 1-hydroxypyrene in urine than did mail carriers. The differences were slightly smaller when...

  4. Mutagenic effect of gamma rays, ethyl methanesulphonate and their combination in top-onion (Allium cepa var. viviparum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulbils of top onion plant were subjected to mutagenic treatments with gamma rays and/or ethyl methanesulphonate to induce wide spectrum of variability in quantitative traits. The present study was undertaken to observe phenotypic/chromosomal changes due to induced mutations. (author). 2 refs., 1 tab

  5. Toxicity, mutagenicity, and behavioral effects of β-CIT, a ligand for dopamine transporter exploration by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cocaine analog β-CIT is one of the most used compounds for SPET examination of the dopamine transporter in drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. However, the toxicity of this agent has not yet been studied. We report here acute toxicity, mutagenicity, and effect on locomotor activity of β-CIT. Acute toxicity experiments were performed in mice and rats. The LD50 values were about 20 mg and 5 mg for mice and rats, respectively. There was no sex difference. The mutagenicity was evaluated using the Ames' test. No mutagenic effect was observed for β-CIT. Effects on locomotor activity were measured in mice using the open-field test. β-CIT increased locomotion (+65%) when injected at a dose of 0.312 mg/kg; the maximal increase (+205%) was observed at a dose of 1.25 mg/kg; at higher doses, the effect was decreased slightly. These pharmacological findings are in agreement with an inhibitory effect of β-CIT at the dopamine transporter. We conclude that with no mutagenic effects and LD50 more than 6 orders of magnitude higher than the routinely used doses in PET or SPET, it can be assumed that β-CIT can be safely used as a radioligand in humans

  6. 5. MUTAGEN SENSITIVITY AND DNA REPAIR CAPACITY (DRC) AS RISK FACTORS FOR NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@An alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay has been standardised by which mutagen sensitivity and DNA repair capacity (DRC) can be measured in cryopreserved peripheral blood lymphocytes following induction and repair of DNA damage induced by bleomycin. In an ongoing case-control study, we have applied this assay to Caucasian

  7. The induction of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo by alpha-particle irradiation in whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ting; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-08-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated distant/abscopal bystander effects in A. thaliana seeds and embryos; the postembryonic development of bystander tissues, such as root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, were inhibited significantly by localized irradiation with microbeam protons and low-energy ions. In the present study, we further investigated radiation-induced bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in A. thaliana plants using homologous recombination (HR) and the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. We found that alpha-particle irradiation of distal primary roots of young seedlings resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of HR in the aerial plants; the increased induction of HR occurred in every true leaf over the course of rosette development. Moreover, we also found that localized alpha-particle irradiation of roots induced a short-term up-regulated expression of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene in the nonirradiated aerial plants. These results suggested the existence of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in plants. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of localized root irradiation on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander tissues, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the bystander mutagenic effects in plants. PMID:20681789

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF EMISSIONS FROM ASPHALT FORMULATIONS WITH AND WITHOUT CRUMB-RUBBER MODIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    INVESTIGATION OF THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF EMISSIONS FROM ASPHALT FORMULATIONS WITH AND WITHOUT CRUMB-RUBBER MODIFICATIONLarry D. Olsen', Virginia S. Houk2, Sarah H. Warren2, Larry D. Claxton2, Kevin W. Hanley', Aubrey K. Miller3, Gregory A Burr', Daniel Almaguer', Grego...

  9. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  10. SCREENING COMPLEX HAZARDOUS WASTES FOR MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY USING A MODIFIED VERSION OF THE TLC/SALMONELLA ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten complex hazardous wastes were tested for mutagenic activity using a modified version of the TLC/Ames assay developed by Bjorseth et al. (1982). This fractionation/bioassay scheme couples thin layer chromatography (TLC) with the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome (Ames) assay for ...

  11. MUTAGENIC COMPOUNDS GENERATED FROM THE CHLORINATION OF DISPERSE AZO-DYES AND THEIR PRESENCE IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the disinfection of water for human usage is necessary, the formation of toxic disinfection by-products (DBPs) does occur. Recent discovery of a novel class of mutagenic DBPs, PBTA (2-phenylbenzotriazole) derivatives, demonstrates that textile effluents have the potentia...

  12. Microsomal biotransformation of benzo[ghi]perylene, a mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon without a "classic" bay region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Karl L; Grupe, Stefanie

    2005-04-01

    Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), e.g., benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), possess a bay region comprising an ortho-fused benzene ring. Benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) represents the group of PAHs lacking such a "classic" bay region and hence cannot be metabolically converted like BaP to bay region dihydrodiol epoxides considered as ultimate mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolites of PAH. BghiP exhibits bacterial mutagenicity in strains TA98 (1.3 his(+)-revertant colonies/nmol) and TA100 (4.3 his(+)-revertant colonies/nmol) of Salmonella typhimurium after metabolic activation by the postmitochondrial hepatic fraction of CD rats treated with 3-methylcholanthrene. Inhibition of microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) with 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propene oxide raised the bacterial mutagenicity of BghiP in TA98 almost 4-fold indicating arene oxides as ultimate mutagens. To confirm this assumption, the biotransformation of BghiP was elucidated. Incubation of BghiP with liver microsomes of CD rats treated with Aroclor 1254 yielded 17 ethyl acetate extractable metabolic products. Twelve metabolites were identified by a combination of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and biochemical methods. The microsomal biotransformation of BghiP proceeds by two pathways: Pathway I starts with the monooxygenase attack at the 7-position leading to the 7-phenol, which is transformed to the 7,8- and 7,10-diphenols followed by oxidation to the 7,8- and 7,10-quinones. On pathway II, the K regions of BghiP are successively converted to arene oxides yielding the indirectly identified 3,4-oxide and the 3,4,11,12-bisoxides. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the 3,4-oxide leads to the trans-3,4-dihydrodiol, which is oxidized to the 3,4-quinone. Similarly, the trans-3,4-trans-11,12-bisdihydrodiols and the trans-3,4-dihydrodiol 11,12-quinone are generated from the 3,4,11,12-bisoxides. The trans-3,4-dihydrodiol and the trans-3,4-trans-11,12-bisdihydrodiols are preferentially formed as R,R and R,R,R,R enantiomers

  13. The equidosimetric approach to comparing the action of radioactive and chemical pollutions on natural populations of hydrobionts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the equidosimetric assessment of ionizing radiation and chemical pollutants, it is proposed to compare effects in mutagenically equivalent doses (i.e., those inducing the equal number of cells with chromosome aberrations) by using such criteria as the distribution of chromosome aberrations in cells and the number of aberrations per aberrant cell. On the basis of this approach, the equidosimetric assessment of radioactive and chemical pollution in two water bodies from the ChNPP zone is made

  14. Two nitro derivatives of azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide: Electronic properties and their relation to mutagenic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostojić, Bojana D., E-mail: bostojic@chem.bg.ac.rs; Đorđević, Dragana S.

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Molecular properties of nitro isomers of azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide are investigated. • Stability, ionization potential, electron affinity, and polarizability are determined. • High quality DFT methods are employed. • Nitroreduction, oxidation, and polarizability are not crucial for mutagenicity. • Dipole moment and electronic charge distribution are important for characterization. - Abstract: The equilibrium geometries, relative energies, IR and Raman spectra, vertical ionization potentials (IP), vertical electron affinities (EA), dipole moments (μ), electronic dipole polarizabilities (α), and molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) of two species that show very high mutagenicity, 1-nitro-6-azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide (1-N-6-ABPO) and 3-nitro-6-azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide (3-N-6-ABPO), are investigated by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional with different basis sets. The 3-N-6-ABPO isomer was estimated to be much more mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium tester strain TA98 (396 000 revertants/nmol) than 1-N-6-ABPO (36 100 revertants/nmol) (Fukuhara et al., 1992). The results show that for both isomers the structural, energetic, and vibrational properties are similar. The orientation of the nitro group with respect to the plane of the aromatic system as well as the nitroreduction and oxidation reaction and polarizability seem not be important for the determination of different mutagenic behavior of these isomers. However, the dipole moment of 3-N-6-ABPO is about 3 times that of 1-N-6-ABPO. The larger dipole moment and the different electronic charge distribution of 3-N-6-ABPO compared to 1-N-6-ABPO imply stronger electrostatic and inductive molecular interactions so that the active site of the enzyme involved in the mutagenic activation can more effectively bind 3-N-6-ABPO compared to 1-N-6-ABPO.

  15. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of (−-hinokinin a trypanosomicidal compound measured by Salmonella microsome and comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende Flávia Aparecida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan (−-hinokinin (HK was derived by partial synthesis from (−-cubebin, isolated from the dry seeds of the pepper, Piper cubeba. Considering the good trypanosomicidal activity of HK and recalling that natural products are promising starting points for the discovery of novel potentially therapeutic agents, the aim of the present study was to investigate the (anti mutagenic∕ genotoxic activities of HK. Methods The mutagenic∕ genotoxic activities were evaluated by the Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100 and TA102, and the comet assay, so as to assess the safe use of HK in the treatment of Chagas’ disease. The antimutagenic ∕antigenotoxic potential of HK were also tested against the mutagenicity of a variety of direct and indirect acting mutagens, such as 4- nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPD, sodium azide (SA, mitomycin C (MMC, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF, by the Ames test, and doxorubicin (DXR by the comet assay. Results The mutagenicity∕genotoxicity tests showed that HK did not induce any increase in the number of revertants or extent of DNA damage, demonstrating the absence of mutagenic and genotoxic activities. On the other hand, the results on the antimutagenic potential of HK showed a strong inhibitory effect against some direct and indirect-acting mutagens. Conclusions Regarding the use of HK as an antichagasic drug, the absence of mutagenic effects in animal cell and bacterial systems is encouraging. In addition, HK may be a new potential antigenotoxic ∕ antimutagenic agent from natural sources. However, the protective activity of HK is not general and varies with the type of DNA damage-inducing agent used.

  16. Comparative Studies of the (Anti Mutagenicity of Baccharis dracunculifolia and Artepillin C by the Bacterial Reverse Mutation Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aparecida Varanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Baccharis dracunculifolia is a plant native from Brazil, commonly known as ‘Alecrim-do-campo’ and ‘Vassoura’ and used in alternative medicine for the treatment of inflammation, hepatic disorders and stomach ulcers. Previous studies reported that artepillin C (ArtC, 3-{4-hydroxy-3,5-di(3-methyl-2-butenylphenyl}-2(E-propenoic acid, is the main compound of interest in the leaves. This study was undertaken to assess the mutagenic effect of the ethyl acetate extract of B. dracunculifolia leaves (Bd-EAE: 11.4–182.8 µg/plate and ArtC (0.69–10.99 µg/plate by the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100 and TA102, and to compare the protective effects of Bd-EAE and ArtC against the mutagenicity of a variety of direct and indirect acting mutagens such as 4-nitro-O-phenylenediamine, sodium azide, mitomycin C, benzo[a]pyrene, aflatoxin B1, 2-aminoanthracene and 2-aminofluorene.The mutagenicity test showed that Bd-EAE and ArtC did not induce an increase in the number of revertant colonies indicating absence of mutagenic activity. ArtC showed a similar antimutagenic effect to that of Bd-EAE in some strains of S. typhimurium, demonstrating that the antimutagenic activity of Bd-EAE can be partially attributed to ArtC. The present results showed that the protective effect of whole plant extracts is due to the combined and synergistic effects of a complex mixture of phytochemicals, the total activity of which may result in health benefits.

  17. Genetic toxicity studies of organic chemicals found as contaminants in spacecraft cabin atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Joseph, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed during spaceflight to organic chemical contaminants in the spacecraft cabin atmosphere. Toxic exposures may cause lesions in the cellular DNA which are subsequently expressed as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE). Analysis of SCE is a sensitive short term assay techinque to detect and quantitate exposures to DNA damaging (mutagenic) substances. The increase in SCE incidence over baseline (control) levels is generally proportional to the concentration of the mutagen and to the duration of exposure. The BHK-21 baby hamster kidney cell line was the in vitro test system used. Test organics were added to the culture media for 18 hrs, in concentrations ranging from one to 20 ppm. Acetaldehyde and carbon disulfide were chosen for this study since they have occurred as atmospheric contaminants in many of the STS flights, and have been reported to have toxic and mutagenic effects in various test systems. Glutaraldehyde was chosen because few data are available on the mutagenicity of this common fixative, which is carried on STS flights for use in biological experiments. Acetaldehyde was a very strong inducer of SCE at concentrations of 2 ppm and above. Glutaraldehyde and carbon disulfide failed to induce SCE.

  18. The mutagenic chain reaction: a method for converting heterozygous to homozygous mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, Valentino M.; Bier, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    An organism with a single recessive loss-of-function allele will typically have a wild-type phenotype while individuals homozygous for two copies of the allele will display a mutant phenotype. Here, we develop a method that we refer to as the mutagenic chain reaction (MCR), which is based on the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system for generating autocatalytic mutations to generate homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We demonstrate in Drosophila that MCR mutations efficiently spread from their chromosome of origin to the homologous chromosome thereby converting heterozygous mutations to homozygosity in the vast majority of somatic and germline cells. MCR technology should have broad applications in diverse organisms. PMID:25908821

  19. The ability of two cooked food mutagens to induce aberrant crypt foci in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, E.; Meyer, Otto A.; Thorup, I.

    1997-01-01

    azoxymethane (AOM) (5 mg/kg body weight) and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH-2HCI) (20 mg/kg body weight), respectively, one dose a week for two weeks, Animals were killed after four and 10 weeks, After four weeks only the mice dosed with IQ and PhIP had aberrant crypt foci, A much higher number of...... induced a higher percentage of medium or large sized aberrant crypt foci than PhIP or IQ, The interpretation of the aberrant crypt foci as precursor lesions for colon cancer in the PhIP and IQ mice is difficult because PhIP and IQ have not been reported to be colonic carcinogens, If cooked food mutagens...... such as IQ or PhIP are to be used as initiators in the aberrant crypt foci test, the use of rats may be preferable....

  20. Morphology Dependent Photocatalytic Activity of α-MoO3 Nanostructures Towards Mutagenic Acridine Orange Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The morphological evolutions of orthorhombic molybdenum oxide nanostructures with high crystalline nature have been successfully synthesized by combining low-temperature sol-gel and annealing processes. Strong influence of gelation temperature is a factor facilitated to control the material morphology. Morphological transformations like nanospheres, nanoplatelets, mixtures of hexagonal platelets, and one-dimensional nanobars were obtained. The possible morphological formation mechanism has been proposed as a self-assemble process of nucleation and a mechanism for particle growth by Ostwald ripening. The as-prepared nanostructures were recognized as photocatalysts for the degradation of Acridine Orange under Ultra Violet light. The obtained mixed morphology (hexagonal nanoplatelets and nanobars) showed a high photocatalytic property to degrade mutagenic Acridine Orange dye. Moreover, they could be easily recycled without changing the photocatalytic activity due to their 1-Dimensional and 2-Dimensional nanostructure property. PMID:26369043

  1. Mutagenic effects of Brassica napus by 12C6+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of Brassica napus were irradiated by 12C6+ ion beams with 30, 90, and 180 Gy, and the mutagenic effects of M1 generation were investigated. In comparison to the control group, the irradiated seeds showed positive changes in emerged seedling rate, plant height and blooming rate, with obvious inhibitive effects on pollen vitality, 1000-seed weight and seed oil content. The 30 Gy irradiation group outperformed the others in pods per plant and seed yield per plant. By means of RAPD method, the results showed specific bands, such as increasing bands, flawing bands and bands with different fluorescence intensity were observed in 13 primers selected. The variation rates under 30 Gy, 90 Gy and 180 Gy 12C6+ irradiation were 22.1%, 23.7% and 36.2%, respectively. The research is valuable to the application of 12C6+ heavy ion beam in improving Brassica napus breeding. (authors)

  2. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall goal of our research was to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we studied hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologists who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second and third years was on measurements of: (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201; (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99; (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists; and (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The completed work has been published and is described below in more detail

  3. Ultraviolet reactivation of herpes simplex virus in mutagenic and inducible in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus on uv-irradiated Vero cells was increased over that on unirradiated cells. A time period between irradiation of the host cells and infection with virus was needed to achieve maximum reactivation. In parallel experiments in which the frequencies of occurrence of the forward mutation in the thymidine kinase gene of the virus were measured, growth of herpes simplex virus on uv-irradiated cells yielded progeny virus that had higher frequencies of TK- mutants than did progeny from infections of control cells. The time course of development of this mutagenic effect was the same as that for the development of the uv-reactivation capacity. Furthermore, development of the uv reactivation could be blocked by inhibition of protein synthesis. These results suggest that an ''error-prone'' inducible uv-reactivation phenomenon exists in mammalian cells

  4. The mutagenic action of UV-light irradiation on aspergillus terreus in relation to antibacterial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four strains of cellulolytic fungi (i.e Penicillium oxalicum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus and Trichoderma longibrachiatum) were tested for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and antibiotic action. these fungi were cultured on Czapek Dox's media with different cellulosic substrates. A. terreus. exhibited the highest cellulolytic activity and the highest level of anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. and Escherichia Coli, Ultraviolet light as a mutagenic treatment for A.terreus was investigated. Two treated isolates U.30.12 and U.60.10 were obtained after the treatment at dose 30 and 60 min., respectively with a higher antibiotic activity in comparison with the wild isolate. A compound of fifteen carbon atom of terrecylic acid was isolated from ethyl acetate extract using spectroscopic analysis

  5. A comprehensive survey of the mutagenic impact of common cancer cytotoxics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szikriszt, Bernadett; Poti, Adam; Pipek, Orsolya;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Genomic mutations caused by cytotoxic agents used in cancer chemotherapy may cause secondary malignancies as well as contribute to the evolution of treatment-resistant tumour cells. The stable diploid genome of the chicken DT40 lymphoblast cell line, an established DNA repair model...... system, is well suited to accurately assay genomic mutations. Results: We use whole genome sequencing of multiple DT40 clones to determine the mutagenic effect of eight common cytotoxics used for the treatment of millions of patients worldwide. We determine the spontaneous mutagenesis rate at 2.3 x 10......-10 per base per cell division and find that cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide induce extra base substitutions with distinct spectra. After four cycles of exposure, cisplatin induces 0.8 mutations per Mb, equivalent to the median mutational burden in common leukaemias. Cisplatin-induced mutations...

  6. Mutagenicity and Induction of Drug—metabolizing Enzyme Activity by LPG Combustion Particulates in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINXue-Jun; LIUJun-Zhuo; 等

    1994-01-01

    Methylene chloride extracts of particulates from liquefied petroleum gas(LPG)combustion appliance were studied by using Ames test,micronucleus test and inducibility of pulmonary and hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase(AHH)and glutathione S-transferase(GST)in rats.The extracts showed mutagenicity for Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 and its derivatives TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 with or without S9 mix.The revertants in strains TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 were less than 40%and 50% of than in strain TA98 without S9 mix,respectively.Positive results were obtained in mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay.Intratracheal instillation of the extracts led to increase in pulmonary(but not hepatic)AHH and GST activities in rats.In was seen that AHH was more sensitive than GST to induction by the extracts.

  7. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Jaskowiak, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  8. Study on Mutagenic Breeding of Bacillus Subtilis and Properties of Its Antifungal Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Yao, Jianming

    2004-08-01

    Bacillus subtitles JA isolated by our laboratory produced a large amount of antifungal substances, which had strong inhibitory activity against various plant pathogenic fungi, such as Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum and so on. Ion beam implantation as a new mutagenic methods was applied in our studay. After B. subtitles JA was implanted by N+ ions, a strain designated as B. subtitles JA-026 was screened and obtained, which had a higher ability to produce those antifungal substances. A series of experiments indicated that the antifungal substances were thermostable and partially sensitive to proteinases K and tryproteinase. When the fermentating broth was fractionated with ammonium sulphate of a final saturation of 70%, the precipitate-enhanced inhibitory activity while the supernatant lost this activity. It appeared that the antifungal substances were likely to be protein.

  9. Further characterization of chinese hamster mutagen sensitive mutants using calicheamycin and neocarcinostatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To further characterize mutagen sensitive Chinese hamster V79 mutant cell lines two new radiomimetic agents i.e. calicheamycin (CAL) and neocarcinostatin (NCS) were used. Whereas X-rays produces a variety of non-specific lesions in the DNA, mainly single strand breaks (SSB), CAL induces only double strand breaks (DSB) at sequence specific sites (TCCT). NCS, on the other hand, causes SSB and to a much lesser extent apurinic sites at AGC sequences in the DNA. The obtained results demonstrate in most of the mutants and expected parallelism between X-ray sensitivity and sensitivity to the antitumor antibiotics CAL and NCS. Furthermore, enhanced sensitivities for chromosomal aberrations are overall and not due to specific types of aberrations. At present an explanation for the recorded chromosomal hypo-sensitivity of V-H1 cells for NCS awaits further experimentation. (authors)

  10. EMS induced mutagenicity in pollen mother cells of Sesbania Pea (Sesbania cannabina Poir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girjesh Kumar and Nitisha Srivastava

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutagenic effect of EMS on pollen mother cells of Sesbania cannabina has been investigated in the present cytogeneticalobservation. The progenies were obtained from seeds treated with four different time durations (1, 3, 5, and 7 hours of 0.5%solution of ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS. Study revealed various types of chromosomal aberrations at different doses ofEMS. Increase in chromosomal aberrations was dose dependent manner. Pollen mother cells of Sesbania cannabina exhibited anincreased incidence of chromosomal bridges, unorientation, laggards and precocious movement etc. at each dose of treatment.Anaphasic and telophasic bridges were major abnormalities and found to be highest at 3 hr dose of treatment. Anaphasic bridgeswere more prominent than telophasic bridges and percentages of different types of bridges at anaphase and telophase were alsostudied and scored.

  11. Study on Mutagenic Breeding of Bacillus Subtilis and Properties of Its Antifungal Substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘静; 姚建铭

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus subtitles JA isolated by our laboratory produced a large amount of antifungal substances, which had strong inhibitory activity against various plant pathogenic fungi,such as Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum and so on. Ion beam implantation as a new mutagenic methods was applied in our studay. After B. Subtitles JA was implanted by N+ ions,a strain designated as B. Subtitles JA-026 was screened and obtained, which had a higher ability to produce those antifungal substances. A series of experiments indicated that the antifungal substances were thermostable and partially sensitive to proteinases K and tryproteinase. When the fermentating broth was fractionated with ammonium sulphate of a final saturation of 70%,the precipitate-enhanced inhibitory activity while the supernatant lost this activity. It appeared that the antifungal substances were likely to be protein.

  12. Bench and Full Scale Study of Removal Effect and Mutagenicity on Mesocyclops Leukarti with Chlorine Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jin-long; YANG Wei; LIU Yan-an; LIN Tao

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops Leukarti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it can not be effectively inactivated by the conventional process in drinking waterworks for its special surface structure. In this paper, a study of removal efficiency on Mesocyclops Leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a drinking waterworks was performed.Bench scale results showed that chlorine dioxide is more effective against Mesocyclops Leukarti. And Mesocyclops Leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation cooperated with the conventional process during the full scale study. The chlorite, by-preduct of prechlorine dioxide, was constant at 0.45 mg/L after filtration, which was lower than the critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination and Ames test showed that the quantity of organics and the mutagenicity in the water treated by chlorine dioxide is obviously less than that of prechlorination.

  13. Description of Phaseolus vulgaris L. aborting embryos from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS mutagenized plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silué, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the embryos abortion process and the inheritance of the embryos abortion trait in Phaseolus vulgaris plants deficient in seed development. These plants were isolated within the second generation of an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS TILLING population of P. vulgaris cv. 'BAT93'. Mutant embryos show abnormalities mainly in suspensors, shoot apical meristem (SAM and cotyledons from the globular to the cotyledon stages and abort before maturity compared to those observed in wild-type samples. Mutant embryos show also hyperhydricity and contain low amount of chlorophyll. Genetic analyses of F1, F2 and F3 populations from the crosses carried out between the mutagenized plants with aborting embryos and the wild-type plants indicated that the embryo abortion phenotype is maternally inherited and controlled by a single recessive gene. These Phaseolus mutant plants with aborting embryos constitute a valuable material for plant embryogenesis studies.

  14. Study on mutagenic breeding of bacillus subtilis and properties of its antifungal substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus subtilis JA isolated by our laboratory produced a large amount of antifungal substances, which had strong inhibitory activity against various plant pathogenic fungi, such as Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum and so on. Ion beam implantation as a new mutagenic methods was applied in our study. After B. subtilis JA was implanted by N+ ions, a strain designated as B. Subtilis JA-026 was screened and obtained, which had a higher ability to produce those antifungal substances. A series of experiments indicated that the antifungal substances were thermostable and partially sensitive to proteinases K and tryproteinase. When the fermentating broth was fractionated with ammonium sulphate of a final saturation of 70%, the precipitate enhanced inhibitory activity while the supernatant lost this activity. It appeared that the antifungal substances were likely to be protein. (authors)

  15. Preliminary study on mutagenic effects of heavy ions irradiation on maize inbred lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study mutagenic effects of different heavy ions irradiation on maize inbred lines,corn seeds of Zheng58, Lu9801, Jinxiang4C-1, CSR24001, 308 and 478 were irradiated with 12C6+ and 36Ar18+ ions. The experimental results showed that the germination rate and planting percent were different after irradiation. The wettish seeds had higher sensibility to heavy ion irradiation. The leaf type of the plant appeared visible changes in M1 generation. In M2 generation, great changes had taken place in economic traits, many of which are beneficial mutation. Some beneficia1 mutation could be stably inherited in M3 generation. From the above, it can be predicted that heavy ions irradiation is an effective means of genetic improvement of maize. (authors)

  16. Studies on acute toxicity and mutagenicity of 60Co irradiated pollens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute toxicity test showed that the oral LD50 values were >21500 mg/kg for male and female mice, indicating that irradiated pollens belong to low toxicity grade or practically non-toxic. Mutagenicity were studied in three short-term tests. Ames test showed that irradiated pollens did not induce mutation towards strains TA99, TA97, TA100 and TA102. Micronucleus test in the bone marrow cells indicated that the percentage of polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei in exposed groups had no significant difference in comparison with the controlled ones. Chromosomal test for reproduction cells showed that the increase of chromosomal aberration rate was not observed. All the above results suggest that irradiated pollens are safe for human consumption

  17. Physical and chemical mutagenesis of early mutant of indica restorers in ''WA'' (wild abortion) hybrid rice system and genetic analysis of mutants in heterosis utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four indica restorers in the wild abortion hybrid rice system were treated with physical and chemical mutagens, and the mutation frequency in the M2 generation and the correlation between the heading date of the mutants and other characters were investigated

  18. Use of chemical mutagen for induction of useful genetic variation in different oil seed rape (brassica napus L.) cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre soaked seeds for 16 hrs of oil seed Rape cvs. Tower and Wester were treated with 1-3% concentrations of ethylene methane sulphonate (EMS) for 4 hrs with the objective to generate variation in characters of importance such as, early maturity, semi dwarf stature, lodging resistance and different yield components. After post washing (4 hrs) the seeds were filter dried and planted directly in the field as M1. Selection for desirable mutants was carried out in M2 and a number of mutants with desirable traits were selected during 1990-91. The mutants were tested for stability of the selected traits in plant to progenies in M3/M4 during 1992 and 1993. The stable 17 mutants were evaluated for yield and other agronomic characters in M5, in preliminary yield trials, during 1993-94. Eleven mutants exhibited early maturity and high yield potential than parent and local commercial variety. The promising mutants will be further tested in yield trials in future for confirmation of results. (author)

  19. Bioassay-Directed Fractionation and Sub-fractionation for Mutagenicity and Chemical Analysis of Diesel Exhaust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several types of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) have been used for toxicology studies, including a high-organic automobile DEP (A-DEP) from Japan, and a low-organic forklift DEP developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (N-DEP). However, these DEPs were no...

  20. The roles of different excision-repair mechanisms in the resistance of Micrococcus luteus to UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. luteus mutants showing increased sensitivity to both UV and 4-NQO were isolated after the treatment of parental ATCC4698 strain with MNNG. The mutants were also highly sensitive to mitomycin C, cis-platinum, 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus near-UV and angelicin plus near-UV in various degrees. With regard to host-cell reactivation ability the mutants fell into two groups. The hcr- mutants lacked the ability to reactivate UV-damaged N6 phage and were resistant to X-rays. The incision of DNA did not occur during incubation after the treatment with angelicin plus near-UV in the hcr- mutants, whereas it occurred in the parental strain. The facts indicate that the hcr- mutants are defective in the incision mechanism which has a wide substrate specificity, similar to the UVRABC nuclease of E. coli. On the other hand, the incision of DNA and the removal of UV-induced thymine dimers from DNA occurred in the hcr- mutants as well as in the parental strain, which is ascribed to the UV endonuclease activity. (Auth.)