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Sample records for chemical modelling ii

  1. Multidimensional chemical modelling, II. Irradiated outflow walls

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; Doty, Steven D; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bourke, Tyler L

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the high-mass star forming region AFGL 2591 reveal a large abundance of CO+, a molecule known to be enhanced by far UV (FUV) and X-ray irradiation. In chemical models assuming a spherically symmetric envelope, the volume of gas irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation is very small due to the high extinction by dust. The abundance of CO+ is thus underpredicted by orders of magnitude. In a more realistic model, FUV photons can escape through an outflow region and irradiate gas at the border to the envelope. Thus, we introduce the first 2D axi-symmetric chemical model of the envelope of a high-mass star forming region to explain the CO+ observations as a prototypical FUV tracer. The model assumes an axi-symmetric power-law density structure with a cavity due to the outflow. The local FUV flux is calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code taking scattering on dust into account. A grid of precalculated chemical abundances, introduced in the first part of this series of papers, is used to ...

  2. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: II. Model evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Rong; Yang Fuquan; Sloan, James J [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Trevor Scholtz, M, E-mail: sloanj@connect.uwaterloo.ca [ORTECH Environmental, 2395 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, ON, L5K 1B3 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Pesticides have adverse health effects and can be transported over long distances to contaminate sensitive ecosystems. To address problems caused by environmental pesticides we developed a multimedia multi-pollutant modeling system, and here we present an evaluation of the model by comparing modeled results against measurements. The modeled toxaphene air concentrations for two sites, in Louisiana (LA) and Michigan (MI), are in good agreement with measurements (average concentrations agree to within a factor of 2). Because the residue inventory showed no soil residues at these two sites, resulting in no emissions, the concentrations must be caused by transport; the good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations suggests that the model simulates atmospheric transport accurately. Compared to the LA and MI sites, the measured air concentrations at two other sites having toxaphene soil residues leading to emissions, in Indiana and Arkansas, showed more pronounced seasonal variability (higher in warmer months); this pattern was also captured by the model. The model-predicted toxaphene concentration fraction on particles (0.5-5%) agrees well with measurement-based estimates (3% or 6%). There is also good agreement between modeled and measured dry (1:1) and wet (within a factor of less than 2) depositions in Lake Ontario. Additionally this study identified erroneous soil residue data around a site in Texas in a published US toxaphene residue inventory, which led to very low modeled air concentrations at this site. Except for the erroneous soil residue data around this site, the good agreement between the modeled and observed results implies that both the US and Mexican toxaphene soil residue inventories are reasonably good. This agreement also suggests that the modeling system is capable of simulating the important physical and chemical processes in the multimedia compartments.

  3. Tier II Chemical Storage Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Facilities that store hazardous chemicals above certain quantities must submit an annual emergency and hazardous chemical inventory on a Tier II form. This is a...

  4. Biosorption of Cu (II onto chemically modified waste mycelium of Aspergillus awamori: Equilibrium, kinetics and modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKA VELKOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption potential of chemically modified waste mycelium of industrial xylanase-producing strain Aspergillus awamori for Cu (II removal from aqueous solutions was evaluated. The influence of pH, contact time and initial Cu (II concentration on the removal efficiency was evaluated. Maximum biosorption capacity was reached by sodium hydroxide treated waste fungal mycelium at pH 5.0. The Langmuir adsorption equation matched very well the adsorption equilibrium data in the studied conditions. The process kinetic followed the pseudo-firs order model.

  5. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks. II. Line diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, I.; Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W.-F.; Hogerheijde, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: In this paper, we explore the diagnostic power of the far-IR fine-structure lines of [Oi] 63.2 μm, 145.5 μm, [Cii] 157.7 μm, as well as the radio and sub-mm lines of CO J=1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 in application to disks around Herbig Ae stars. We aim at understanding where the lines originate from, how the line formation process is affected by density, temperature and chemical abundance in the disk, and to what extent non-LTE effects are important. The ultimate aim is to provide a robust way to determine the gas mass of protoplanetary disks from line observations. Methods: We use the recently developed disk code ProDiMo to calculate the physico-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and apply the Monte-Carlo line radiative transfer code Ratran to predict observable line profiles and fluxes. We consider a series of Herbig Ae type disk models ranging from 10-6 M_⊙ to 2.2 × 10-2 M_⊙ (between 0.5 and 700 AU) to discuss the dependency of the line fluxes and ratios on disk mass for otherwise fixed disk parameters. This paper prepares for a more thorough multi-parameter analysis related to the Herschel open time key program Gasps. Results: We find the [Cii] 157.7 μm line to originate in LTE from the surface layers of the disk, where The total emission is dominated by surface area and hence depends strongly on disk outer radius. The [Oi] lines can be very bright (>10-16 W/m2) and form in slightly deeper and closer regions under non-LTE conditions. For low-mass models, the [Oi] lines come preferentially from the central regions of the disk, and the peak separation widens. The high-excitation [Oi] 145.5 μm line, which has a larger critical density, decreases more rapidly with disk mass than the 63.2 μm line. Therefore, the [Oi] 63.2 μm/145.5 μm ratio is a promising disk mass indicator, especially as it is independent of disk outer radius for R_out>200 AU. CO is abundant only in deeper layers AV ⪆ 0.05. For too low disk masses (M_disk⪉10-4~M_⊙) the dust

  6. Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances. Applicability of EXAMS II as an advanced Water Quality Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs ACM; Burns LA

    1990-01-01

    In the cluster project "Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances methods are developed to systematically predict and assess the hazards for man and environment. After the basic screening of a substance has been carried out, a more extensive study can be performed using models adhered to the

  7. Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances. Applicability of EXAMS II as an advanced Water Quality Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs ACM; Burns LA

    1990-01-01

    In the cluster project "Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances methods are developed to systematically predict and assess the hazards for man and environment. After the basic screening of a substance has been carried out, a more extensive study can be performed using models adhered to the

  8. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. II. Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoi, A Y; Sheppard, T J; Pashov, D L; Kohanoff, J J; Paxton, A T

    2014-07-28

    A revised water model intended for use in condensed phase simulations in the framework of the self consistent polarizable ion tight binding theory is constructed. The model is applied to water monomer, dimer, hexamers, ice, and liquid, where it demonstrates good agreement with theoretical results obtained by more accurate methods, such as DFT and CCSD(T), and with experiment. In particular, the temperature dependence of the self diffusion coefficient in liquid water predicted by the model, closely reproduces experimental curves in the temperature interval between 230 K and 350 K. In addition, and in contrast to standard DFT, the model properly orders the relative densities of liquid water and ice. A notable, but inevitable, shortcoming of the model is underestimation of the static dielectric constant by a factor of two. We demonstrate that the description of inter and intramolecular forces embodied in the tight binding approximation in quantum mechanics leads to a number of valuable insights which can be missing from ab initio quantum chemistry and classical force fields. These include a discussion of the origin of the enhanced molecular electric dipole moment in the condensed phases, and a detailed explanation for the increase of coordination number in liquid water as a function of temperature and compared with ice--leading to insights into the anomalous expansion on freezing. The theory holds out the prospect of an understanding of the currently unexplained density maximum of water near the freezing point.

  9. The Chemical Properties of Milky Way and M31 Globular Clusters: II. Stellar Population Model Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, M A; Strader, J; Forbes, D A; Proctor, R N; Barmby, P; Huchra, J P; Beasley, Michael A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Forbes, Duncan A.; Proctor, Robert N.; Barmby, Pauline; Huchra, John P.

    2004-01-01

    We derive ages, metallicities and [alpha/Fe] ratios from the integrated spectra of 23 globular clusters in M31, by employing multivariate fits to two stellar population models. In parallel we analyze spectra of 21 Galactic globular clusters in order to facilitate a differential analysis. We find that the M31 globular clusters separate into three distinct components in age and metallicity. We identify an old, metal-poor group (7 clusters), an old, metal-rich group (10 clusters) and an intermediate age (3-6 Gyr), intermediate-metallicity ([Z/H]~-1) group (6 clusters). This third group is not identified in the Galactic globular cluster sample. The majority of globular clusters in both samples appear to be enhanced in alpha-elements, the degree of enhancement being model-dependent. The intermediate age GCs appear to be the most enhanced, with [alpha/Fe]~0.4. These clusters are clearly depressed in CN with respect to the models and the bulk of the M31 and Milky Way sample. Compared to the bulge of M31, M32 and NGC...

  10. Application of Zr/Ti-Pic in the adsorption process of Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) using adsorption physico-chemical models and thermodynamics of the process; Aplicacao de Zr/Ti-PILC no processo de adsorcao de Cu(II), Co(II) e Ni(II) utilizando modelos fisico-quimicos de adsorcao e termodinamica do processo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Denis Lima; Airoldi, Claudio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica]. E-mail: dlguerra@iqm.unicamp.br; Lemos, Vanda Porpino; Angelica, Romulo Simoes [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPa), Belem (Brazil); Viana, Rubia Ribeiro [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Dept. de Recursos Minerais

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study how Zr/Ti-Pic adsorbs metals. The physico-chemical proprieties of Zr/Ti-Pic have been optimized with pillarization processes and Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) adsorption from aqueous solution has been carried out, with maximum adsorption values of 8.85, 8.30 and 7.78 x-1 mmol g{sup -1}, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models have been applied to fit the experimental data with a linear regression process. The energetic effect caused by metal interaction was determined through calorimetric titration at the solid-liquid interface and gave a net thermal effect that enabled the calculation of the exothermic values and the equilibrium constant. (author)

  11. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution by chemically modified sugarcane bagasse fly ash: isotherms, kinetics, and column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhavna; Mistry, Chirag; Shah, Ajay

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a common environmental problem all over the world. The purpose of the research is to examine the applicability of bagasse fly ash (BFA)-an agricultural waste of sugar industry used for the synthesis of zeolitic material. The zeolitic material are used for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal. Bagasse fly ash is used as a native material for the synthesis of zeolitic materials by conventional hydrothermal treatment without (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash (CZBFA)) and with electrolyte (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash in electrolyte media (ECZBFA)) media. Heavy metal ions Pb(II) and Cd(II) were successfully seized from aqueous media using these synthesized zeolitic materials. In this study, the zeolitic materials were well characterized by different instrumental methods such as Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, XRF, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic microphotographs. The presence of analcime, phillipsite, and zeolite P in adsorbents confirms successful conversion of native BFA into zeolitic materials. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) was achieved by batch sorption experiments, isotherms, and kinetic studies. These data were used to compare and evaluate the zeolitic materials as potential sorbents for the uptake of heavy metal ions from an aqueous media. The Langmuir isotherm correlation coefficient parameters best fit the equilibrium data which indicate the physical sorption. Pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion model matches best which indicates that the rate of sorption was controlled by film diffusion. The column studies were performed for the practical function of sorbents, and breakthrough curves were obtained, which revealed higher sorption capacity as compared to batch method. Synthesized zeolitic material (CZBFA and ECZBFA), a low-cost sorbent, was proven as potential sorbent for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal ions.

  12. Chemical Feature-Based Molecular Modeling of Urotensin-II Receptor Antagonists: Generation of Predictive Pharmacophore Model for Early Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhuti Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For a series of 35 piperazino-phthalimide and piperazino-isoindolinone based urotensin-II receptor (UT antagonists, a thoroughly validated 3D pharmacophore model has been developed, consisting of four chemical features: one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid (HBA_L, one hydrophobe (HY, and two ring aromatic (RA. Multiple validation techniques like CatScramble, test set prediction, and mapping analysis of advanced known antagonists have been employed to check the predictive power and robustness of the developed model. The results demonstrate that the best model, Hypo 1, shows a correlation (r of 0.902, a root mean square deviation (RMSD of 0.886, and the cost difference of 39.69 bits. The model obtained is highly predictive with good correlation values for both internal (r2=0.707 as well as external (r2=0.614 test set compounds. Moreover, the pharmacophore model has been used as a 3D query for virtual screening which served to detect prospective new lead compounds which can be further optimized as UT antagonists with potential for treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Multidimensional Chemical Modeling of Young Stellar Objects. II. Irradiated Outflow Walls in a High-Mass Star-Forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruderer, S.; Benz, A. O.; Doty, S. D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bourke, T. L.

    2009-07-01

    Observations of the high-mass star-forming region AFGL 2591 reveal a large abundance of CO+, a molecule known to be enhanced by far-ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray irradiation. In chemical models assuming a spherically symmetric envelope, the volume of gas irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation is very small due to the high extinction by dust. The abundance of CO+ is thus underpredicted by orders of magnitude. In a more realistic model, FUV photons can escape through an outflow region and irradiate gas at the border to the envelope. Thus, we introduce the first two-dimensional axisymmetric chemical model of the envelope of a high-mass star-forming region to explain the CO+ observations as a prototypical FUV tracer. The model assumes an axisymmetric power-law density structure with a cavity due to the outflow. The local FUV flux is calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code taking scattering on dust into account. A grid of precalculated chemical abundances, introduced in the first part of this series of papers, is used to quickly interpolate chemical abundances. This approach allows us to calculate the temperature structure of the FUV-heated outflow walls self-consistently with the chemistry. Synthetic maps of the line flux are calculated using a raytracer code. Single-dish and interferometric observations are simulated and the model results are compared to published and new JCMT and Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations. The two-dimensional model of AFGL 2591 is able to reproduce the JCMT single-dish observations and also explains the nondetection by the SMA. We conclude that the observed CO+ line flux and its narrow width can be interpreted by emission from the warm and dense outflow walls irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation.

  14. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Vinicius M. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Muratov, Eugene [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, A.V. Bogatsky Physical–Chemical Institute NAS of Ukraine, Odessa 65080 (Ukraine); Fourches, Denis [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole [ILS/Contractor supporting the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM), P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Andrade, Carolina H. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  15. Origin of central abundances in the hot intra-cluster medium - II. Chemical enrichment and supernova yield models

    CERN Document Server

    Mernier, François; Pinto, Ciro; Kaastra, Jelle S; Kosec, Peter; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Mao, Junjie; Werner, Norbert; Pols, Onno R; Vink, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    The hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is rich in metals, which are synthesised by supernovae (SNe) and accumulate over time into the deep gravitational potential well of clusters of galaxies. Since most of the elements visible in X-rays are formed by type Ia (SNIa) and/or core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae, measuring their abundances gives us direct information on the nucleosynthesis products of billions of SNe since the epoch of the star formation peak (z~2-3). In this study, we compare the most accurate average X/Fe abundance ratios (compiled in a previous work from XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS observations of 44 galaxy clusters, groups, and ellipticals), representative of the chemical enrichment in the nearby ICM, to various SNIa and SNcc nucleosynthesis models found in the literature. The use of a SNcc model combined to any favoured standard SNIa model (deflagration or delayed-detonation) fails to reproduce our abundance pattern. In particular, the Ca/Fe and Ni/Fe ratios are significantly underestimated by the model...

  16. Chemical speciation of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II binary complexes of l-methionine in 1,2-propanediol-water mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Padma Latha

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical speciation of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II complexes of L-methionine in 0.0-60 % v/v 1,2-propanediol-water mixtures maintaining an ionic strength of 0.16 M at 303 K has been studied pH metrically. The active forms of ligand are LH2+, LH and L-. The predominant species detected are ML, MLH, ML2, ML2H, ML2H2 and MLOH. Models containing different numbers of species were refined by using the computer program MINIQUAD 75. The best-fit chemical models were arrived at based on statistical parameters. The trend in variation of complex stability constants with change in the dielectric constant of the medium is explained on the basis of electrostatic and non-electrostatic forces.

  17. Origin of central abundances in the hot intra-cluster medium. II. Chemical enrichment and supernova yield models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernier, F.; de Plaa, J.; Pinto, C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kosec, P.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Mao, J.; Werner, N.; Pols, O. R.; Vink, J.

    2016-11-01

    The hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is rich in metals, which are synthesised by supernovae (SNe) and accumulate over time into the deep gravitational potential well of clusters of galaxies. Since most of the elements visible in X-rays are formed by type Ia (SNIa) and/or core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae, measuring their abundances gives us direct information on the nucleosynthesis products of billions of SNe since the epoch of the star formation peak (z 2-3). In this study, we compare the most accurate average X/Fe abundance ratios (compiled in a previous work from XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS observations of 44 galaxy clusters, groups, and ellipticals), representative of the chemical enrichment in the nearby ICM, to various SNIa and SNcc nucleosynthesis models found in the literature. The use of a SNcc model combined to any favoured standard SNIa model (deflagration or delayed-detonation) fails to reproduce our abundance pattern. In particular, the Ca/Fe and Ni/Fe ratios are significantly underestimated by the models. We show that the Ca/Fe ratio can be reproduced better, either by taking a SNIa delayed-detonation model that matches the observations of the Tycho supernova remnant, or by adding a contribution from the "Ca-rich gap transient" SNe, whose material should easily mix into the hot ICM. On the other hand, the Ni/Fe ratio can be reproduced better by assuming that both deflagration and delayed-detonation SNIa contribute in similar proportions to the ICM enrichment. In either case, the fraction of SNIa over the total number of SNe (SNIa+SNcc) contributing to the ICM enrichment ranges within 29-45%. This fraction is found to be systematically higher than the corresponding SNIa/(SNIa+SNcc) fraction contributing to the enrichment of the proto-solar environnement (15-25%). We also discuss and quantify two useful constraints on both SNIa (i.e. the initial metallicity on SNIa progenitors and the fraction of low-mass stars that result in SNIa) and SNcc (i.e. the effect of

  18. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  19. Quantifying the uncertainties of chemical evolution studies. II. Stellar yields

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, D; Tosi, M; Matteucci, F

    2010-01-01

    This is the second paper of a series which aims at quantifying the uncertainties in chemical evolution model predictions related to the underlying model assumptions. Specifically, it deals with the uncertainties due to the choice of the stellar yields. We adopt a widely used model for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and test the effects of changing the stellar nucleosynthesis prescriptions on the predicted evolution of several chemical species. We find that, except for a handful of elements whose nucleosynthesis in stars is well understood by now, large uncertainties still affect the model predictions. This is especially true for the majority of the iron-peak elements, but also for much more abundant species such as carbon and nitrogen. The main causes of the mismatch we find among the outputs of different models assuming different stellar yields and among model predictions and observations are: (i) the adopted location of the mass cut in models of type II supernova explosions; (ii) the adopted strength ...

  20. Redox zone II. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the Aespoe island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorge; Changbing Yang; Guoxiang Zhang [Univ. Da Coruna (Spain)

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behaviour and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by Banwart et al. Later, Banwart presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by Molinero who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulphate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of Molinero and extends the preliminary microbial model of Zhang by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfaphe concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility

  1. Chemical models of interstellar gas-grain processes. II - The effect of grain-catalysed methane on gas phase evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul D.; Charnley, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    The effects on gas phase chemistry which result from the continuous desorption of methane molecules from grain surfaces are studied. Significant and sustained enhancements in the abundances of several complex hydrocarbon molecules are found, in good agreement with their observed values in TMC-1. The overall agreement is, however, just as good for the case of zero CH4 desorption efficiency. It is thus impossible to determine from the models whether or not the grain-surface production of methane is responsible for the observed abundances of some hydrocarbon molecules.

  2. Chemical kinetics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  3. Chemical experiment through the microscope. II. ; Chemical garden. Kenbikyo wo shiyoshita kagaku jikken. II. ; Chemical garden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninomiya, A.

    1991-06-10

    This report describes the result of observation on chemical garden through the microscope. After putting some 2-3ml sodium silicate solution with fixed concentration into a cistern made of acrylic, various kinds of metallic salt with crystal size smaller than 2mm are added. The cistern is then placed on the stage of the microscope at an angle of 30{degree} to investigate buds growing from crystals of metallic salt specimens. Adopted concentrations of sodium silicate solution are 5%, 20%, and 50%. As a result, at the tips of growing buds, active motions of buds and increase of silicate in each kind of metal as reactive product are observed. In general, silicate concentration in the same metal increases conspicuously with lower concentration of sodium silicate solution. Moreover, it can be considered that the reason why chemical garden can be observed is not only because of difference in water pressure but also an important factor, the thickness of membranes at the tips of buds. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Modelling of simultaneous mass and heat transfer with chemical reaction using the Maxwell-Stefan theory II. Non-isothermal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Krishna, R.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1995-01-01

    In Part I a general applicable model has been developed which calculates mass and heat transfer fluxes through a vapour/gas-liquid interface in case a reversible chemical reaction with associated heat effect takes place in the liquid phase. In this model the Maxwell-Stefan theory has been used to

  5. Microscopic Models for Chemical Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Malyshev, Vadim A.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an infinite particle system dynamics, which includes stochastic chemical kinetics models, the classical Kac model and free space movement. We study energy redistribution between two energy types (kinetic and chemical) in different time scales, similar to energy redistribution in the living organisms. One example is considered in great detail, where the model provides main formulas of chemical thermodynamics.

  6. Microscopic Models for Chemical Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, V A

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an infinite particle system dynamics, which includes stochastic chemical kinetics models, the classical Kac model and free space movement. We study energy redistribution between two energy types (kinetic and chemical) in different time scales, similar to energy redistribution in the living cell. One example is considered in great detail, where the model provides main formulas of chemical thermodynamics.

  7. Microscopic Models for Chemical Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    We introduce an infinite particle system dynamics, which includes stochastic chemical kinetics models, the classical Kac model and free space movement. We study energy redistribution between two energy types (kinetic and chemical) in different time scales, similar to energy redistribution in the living cell. One example is considered in great detail, where the model provides main formulas of chemical thermodynamics.

  8. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Chemical distribution of H II regions towards the Galactic anticentre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M.; Mampaso, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The study of the radial variations of metallicity across the Galactic disc is a powerful method for understanding the history of star formation and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. Although several studies about gradients have been performed so far, the knowledge of the Galactic antincentre is still poor. Aims: This work aims to determine accurately the physical and chemical properties of a sample of H ii regions located at RG > 11 kpc and to study the radial distribution of abundances in the outermost part of the Galaxy disc. Methods: We carried out new optical spectroscopic observations of nine H ii regions with the William Herschel Telescope covering the spectral range from 3500 Å to 10 100 Å. In addition, we increased the sample by searching the literature for optical observations of regions towards the Galactic anticentre, re-analysing them to obtain a single sample of 23 objects to be processed in a homogeneous and consistent manner. The total sample distribution covers the Galactocentric radius from 11 kpc to 18 kpc. Results: Emission line ratios were used to determine accurate electron densities and temperatures of several ionic species in 13 H ii regions. These physical parameters were applied to the spectra to determine direct total chemical abundances. For those regions without direct estimations of temperature, chemical abundances were derived by performing tailor-made photoionisation models and/or by using an empirical relation obtained from radio recombination and optical temperatures. We performed weighted least-squares fits to the distribution of the derived abundances along the Galactocentric distances to study the radial gradients of metallicity across the outermost part of the MW. The distributions O/H, N/H, S/H, and Ar/H towards the anticentre can be represented by decreasing linear radial gradients, while in the case of N/O abundances the radial distribution is better fitted with a two-zone model. The He/H radial gradient is

  10. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  11. Removal of Copper(II and Zinc(II Ions From Aqueous Solution by Chemical Treatment of Coal Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Sočo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical modifications of coal fly ash (CFA treated with HNO3 or ammonium acetate (AcNH4 or NaOH or sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDTC as an adsorbent for the removal of copper(II and zinc(II ions from aqueous solution. The morphology of fly ash grains before and after modification was examined via X-ray diffraction (XRD and images of scanning electron microscope (SEM. Adsorption of copper(II and zinc(II ions was conducted under batch process at different duration, concentrations and temperature of the suspension. Equilibrium experiments shows that the selectivity of CFA-NaOH nanoparticles towards Cu(II ions is greater than that of Zn(II ions, which is related to their hydrated ionic radius and first hydrolysis equilibrium constant. The adsorption isotherms were described by Langmuir and Freundlich models. Kinetic data revealed that the adsorption fits well by the pseudo-second-order rate model with high regression coefficients. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the immobilization Cu(II and Zn(II ions onto CFA-NaOH is a spontaneous process. Results demonstrated that the treating coal fly ash with alkaline solution was a promising way to enhance Cu(II and Zn(II ions adsorption.

  12. Miniature free-piston homogeneous charge compression ignition engine-compressor concept - Part II: modeling HCCI combustion in small scales with detailed homogeneous gas phase chemical kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichlmayr, H.T.; Kittelson, D.B.; Zachariah, M.R. [The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States). Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    Operational maps for crankshaft-equipped miniature homogeneous charge compression ignition engines are established using performance estimation, detailed chemical kinetics, and diffusion models for heat transfer and radical loss. In this study, radical loss was found to be insignificant. In contrast, heat transfer was found to be increasingly significant for 10, 1, and 0.1 W engines, respectively. Also, temperature-pressure trajectories and ignition delay time maps are used to explore relationships between engine operational parameters and HCCI. Lastly, effects of engine operating conditions and design on the indicated fuel conversion efficiency are investigated. (author)

  13. Chemical Evolution models of Local Group galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, M P

    2003-01-01

    Status quo and perspectives of standard chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies are summarized, discussing what we have learnt from them, what we know we have not learnt yet, and what I think we will learn in the near future. It is described how Galactic chemical evolution models have helped showing that: i) stringent constraints on primordial nucleosynthesis can be derived from the observed Galactic abundances of the light elements, ii) the Milky Way has been accreting external gas from early epochs to the present time, iii) the vast majority of Galactic halo stars have formed quite rapidly at early epochs. Chemical evolution models for the closest dwarf galaxies, although still uncertain so far, are expected to become extremely reliable in the nearest future, thanks to the quality of new generation photometric and spectroscopic data which are currently being acquired.

  14. Volcanic lake systematics II. Chemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, J.C.; Pasternack, G.B.; Rowe, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    A database of 373 lake water analyses from the published literature was compiled and used to explore the geochemical systematics of volcanic lakes. Binary correlations and principal component analysis indicate strong internal coherence among most chemical parameters. Compositional variations are influenced by the flux of magmatic volatiles and/or deep hydrothermal fluids. The chemistry of the fluid entering a lake may be dominated by a high-temperature volcanic gas component or by a lower-temperature fluid that has interacted extensively with volcanic rocks. Precipitation of minerals like gypsum and silica can strongly affect the concentrations of Ca and Si in some lakes. A much less concentrated geothermal input fluid provides the mineralized components of some more dilute lakes. Temporal variations in dilution and evaporation rates ultimately control absolute concentrations of dissolved constituents, but not conservative element ratios. Most volcanic lake waters, and presumably their deep hydrothermal fluid inputs, classify as immature acid fluids that have not equilibrated with common secondary silicates such as clays or zeolites. Many such fluids may have equilibrated with secondary minerals earlier in their history but were re-acidified by mixing with fresh volcanic fluids. We use the concept of 'degree of neutralization' as a new parameter to characterize these acid fluids. This leads to a classification of gas-dominated versus rock-dominated lake waters. A further classification is based on a cluster analysis and a hydrothermal speedometer concept which uses the degree of silica equilibration of a fluid during cooling and dilution to evaluate the rate of fluid equilibration in volcano-hydrothermal systems.

  15. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis Part II: evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ochoa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009 in which measurements of trace gases and particles, at a remote, high altitude mountain site, 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of the air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor mixing ratio (WMR, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and acyl peroxy nitrate (APN are simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. Comparisons between the model and measurements are also evaluated for particle size distributions (PSDs of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM. The model predictions of the diurnal trends in temperature, WMR and trace gases were generally well correlated; 13 of the 18 correlations were significant at a confidence level of <0.01. Less satisfactory were the average hourly differences between model and measurements that showed predicted values within expected, natural variation for only 10 of the 18 comparisons. The model performed best when comparing with the measurements during periods when the air originated from the east. In that case all six of the parameters being compared had average differences between the model and measurements less than the expected standard deviation. For the cases when the air masses are from the southwest or west northwest, only two of the comparisons from each case showed differences less than the expected standard deviation. The differences appear to be a result of an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer predicted by the model and too much dilution. There also is more O3 being produced, most likely by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources than is predicted by the model.

    The measured and modeled PSD compare very well with respect to their general shape and the diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log

  16. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  17. Comparison of adsorption of Cd(II and Pb(II ions on pure and chemically modified fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sočo Eleonora

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates chemical modifications of coal fly ash (FA treated with HCl or NH4HCO3 or NaOH or Na2edta, based on the research conducted to examine the behaviour of Cd(II and Pb(II ions adsorbed from water solution on treated fly ash. In laboratory tests, the equilibrium and kinetics were examined applying various temperatures (293 - 333 K and pH (2 - 11 values. The maximum Cd(II and Pb(II ions adsorption capacity obtained at 293 K, pH 9 and mixing time 2 h from the Langmuir model can be grouped in the following order: FA-NaOH > FA-NH4HCO3 > FA > FA-Na2edta > FA-HCl. The morphology of fly ash grains was examined via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and images of scanning electron microscope (SEM. The adsorption kinetics data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order rate model but showed a very poor fit for the pseudofirst order model. The intra-particle model also revealed that there are two separate stages in the sorption process, i.e. the external diffusion and the inter-particle diffusion. Thermodynamics parameters such as free energy, enthalpy and entropy were also determined. A laboratory test demonstrated that the modified coal fly ash worked well for the Cd(II and Pb(II ion uptake from polluted waters.

  18. A new quantum chemical approach to the magnetic properties of oligonuclear transition-metal complexes: application to a model for the tetranuclear manganese cluster of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Orio, Maylis; Petrenko, Taras; Zein, Samir; Bill, Eckhard; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Messinger, Johannes; Neese, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The reliable correlation of structural features and magnetic or spectroscopic properties of oligonuclear transition-metal complexes is a critical requirement both for research into innovative magnetic materials and for elucidating the structure and function of many metalloenzymes. We have developed a novel method that for the first time enables the extraction of hyperfine coupling constants (HFCs) from broken-symmetry density functional theory (BS-DFT) calculations on clusters. Using the geometry-optimized tetranuclear manganese complex [Mn(4)O(6)(bpy)(6)](4+/3+) as a model, we first examine in detail the calculation of exchange coupling constants J through the BS-DFT approach. Complications arising from the indeterminacy of experimentally fitted J constants are identified and analyzed. It is found that only the energy levels derived from Hamiltonian diagonalization are a physically meaningful basis for comparing theory and experiment. Subsequently, the proposed theoretical scheme is applied to the calculation of (55)Mn HFCs of the Mn(III,IV,IV,IV) state of the complex, which is similar to the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II of oxygenic photosynthesis. The new approach performs reliably and accurately, and yields calculated HFCs that can be directly compared with experimental data. Finally, we carefully examine the dependence of HFC on the J value and draw attention to the sensitivity of the calculated values to the exchange coupling parameters. The proposed strategy extends naturally to hetero-oligonuclear clusters of arbitrary shape and nuclearity, and hence is of general validity and usefulness in the study of magnetic metal clusters. The successful application of the new approach presented here is a first step in the effort to establish correlations between the available spectroscopic information and the structural features of complex metalloenzymes like OEC.

  19. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Habib

    2016-01-05

    We outline a strategy for chemical kinetic model reduction under uncertainty. We present highlights of our existing deterministic model reduction strategy, and describe the extension of the formulation to include parametric uncertainty in the detailed mechanism. We discuss the utility of this construction, as applied to hydrocarbon fuel-air kinetics, and the associated use of uncertainty-aware measures of error between predictions from detailed and simplified models.

  20. Multidimensional thermal-chemical cookoff modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.; Gartling, D.K.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1994-08-01

    Multidimensional thermal/chemical modeling is an essential step in the development of a predictive capability for cookoff of energetic materials in systems subjected to abnormal thermal environments. COYOTE II is a state-of-the-art two- and three-dimensional finite element code for the solution of heat conduction problems including surface-to-surface thermal radiation heat transfer and decomposition chemistry. Multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated into COYOTE II using an operator-splitting methodology; rate equations are solved element-by-element with a modified matrix-free stiff solver, CHEMEQ. COYOTE II is purposely designed with a user-oriented input structure compatible with the database, the pre-processing mesh generation, and the post-processing tools for data visualization shared with other engineering analysis codes available at Sandia National Laboratories. As demonstrated in a companion paper, decomposition during cookoff in a confined or semi-confined system leads to significant mechanical behavior. Although mechanical effect are not presently considered in COYOTE II, the formalism for including mechanics in multidimensions is under development.

  1. The electronic structure of the adducts of nickel(II) and cobalt(II) acetylacetonate with 2,2ʹ-dipyridyl by the method of quantum chemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarov, A. A.; Korochentsev, V. V.; Vovna, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    The electronic structure of the nickel(II) and cobalt(II) bis-acetylacetonate with the additional 2,2ʹ-dipyridyl ligand is investigated using density functional theory calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Additional ligand effect on geometry, charges, electronic structure and X-ray photoelectron spectrum is studied. Our calculations show that the electron-donating ability of the 2,2ʹ-dipyridyl ligand is low. The computed data is compared with experimental data.

  2. Adsorption behavior of Cu(II) and Co(II) using chemically modified marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, Rauf; Esmaeili, Hossein; Abbasi, Mohsen; Rezakazemi, Mashallah; Mesbah, Mohammad

    2017-08-28

    In this study, brown algae-modified biomass Padina sanctae crucis was used for copper (Cu(II)) and cobalt (Co(II)) heavy metal ions adsorption in synthetic wastewater. The effects of solution pH and adsorption efficiency for Cu(II) and Co(II) removal from aqueous solutions were studied. In order to study the kinetic behavior of adsorption, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic models, liquid film penetration, and Ritchie second-order models were used. The results showed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was able to describe adsorbent behavior in comparison to the other models. Moreover, in order to study adsorbent equilibrium behavior, Langmuir and Freundlich isothermal models were used. Based on the Langmuir model, the adsorption capacity of Co(II) and Cu(II) was determined and their values were 13.73 and 13.996 mg/g, respectively. It was shown that both metal ions adsorption process is favorable and adsorption is physical. In this research, thermodynamic parameters were also studied in order to determine Gibbs free energy for both metal ions which were negative, indicating that metal ions adsorption process is spontaneous and the degree of self-adsorption increases as temperature increases.

  3. Physico-Chemical Study of Barium (II) Dipivaloylmethanate Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotova, N.; Igumenov, I.; Mamatyuk, V.; Sidorenko, G.

    1995-01-01

    A physico-chemical research of bis-(dipivaloylmethanato)baryum(II) (Ba(thd)2) has been carried out from the point of its use in CVD process as a precursor (thermal stability, immunity to external effects and etc.). The optimal conditions for synthesis, purification and storage have been found. It has been shown, that the sublimated product presents a mixture of several modifications with the main phase of a composition Ba4(th)8. At a lowered pressure the sublimated product is preserved withou...

  4. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  5. Thermodynamics of natural selection II: Chemical Carnot cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric

    2008-05-21

    This is the second in a series of three papers devoted to energy flow and entropy changes in chemical and biological processes, and to their relations to the thermodynamics of computation. In the first paper of the series, it was shown that a general-form dimensional argument from the second law of thermodynamics captures a number of scaling relations governing growth and development across many domains of life. It was also argued that models of physiology based on reversible transformations provide sensible approximations within which the second-law scaling is realized. This paper provides a formal basis for decomposing general cyclic, fixed-temperature chemical reactions, in terms of the chemical equivalent of Carnot's cycle for heat engines. It is shown that the second law relates the minimal chemical work required to perform a cycle to the Kullback-Leibler divergence produced in its chemical output ensemble from that of a Gibbs equilibrium. Reversible models of physiology are used to create reversible models of natural selection, which relate metabolic energy requirements to information gain under optimal conditions. When dissipation is added to models of selection, the second-law constraint is generalized to a relation between metabolic work and the combined energies of growth and maintenance.

  6. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium stellar spectroscopy with 1D and 3D models - II. Chemical properties of the Galactic metal-poor disk and the halo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergemann, Maria; Collet, Remo; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We have analysed high-resolution spectra of 328 stars and derived Mg abundances using non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) spectral line formation calculations and plane-parallel model stellar atmospheres derived from the mean stratification of 3D hydrodynamical surface convection simulations....../Fe] ratios close to solar even at [Fe/H] ~ -2. This is at variance with results of classical abundance analyses based on local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and 1D model stellar atmospheres, which argue for a constant elevated [Mg/Fe] in metal-poor stars of the Galactic thick disk and halo....

  7. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malpica Galassi, Riccardo

    2017-03-06

    A general strategy for analysis and reduction of uncertain chemical kinetic models is presented, and its utility is illustrated in the context of ignition of hydrocarbon fuel–air mixtures. The strategy is based on a deterministic analysis and reduction method which employs computational singular perturbation analysis to generate simplified kinetic mechanisms, starting from a detailed reference mechanism. We model uncertain quantities in the reference mechanism, namely the Arrhenius rate parameters, as random variables with prescribed uncertainty factors. We propagate this uncertainty to obtain the probability of inclusion of each reaction in the simplified mechanism. We propose probabilistic error measures to compare predictions from the uncertain reference and simplified models, based on the comparison of the uncertain dynamics of the state variables, where the mixture entropy is chosen as progress variable. We employ the construction for the simplification of an uncertain mechanism in an n-butane–air mixture homogeneous ignition case, where a 176-species, 1111-reactions detailed kinetic model for the oxidation of n-butane is used with uncertainty factors assigned to each Arrhenius rate pre-exponential coefficient. This illustration is employed to highlight the utility of the construction, and the performance of a family of simplified models produced depending on chosen thresholds on importance and marginal probabilities of the reactions.

  8. Physico-chemical study of barium (II) dipivaloylmethanate nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotova, N.E. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Igumenov, I.K. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Mamatyuk, V.I. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Sidorenko, G.V. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry

    1995-06-01

    A physico-chemical research of bis-(dipivaloylmethanato)barium(II) (Ba(thd){sub 2}) has been carried out from the point of its use in CVD processes as a precursor (thermal stability, immunity to external effects and etc.). The optimal conditions for synthesis, purification and storage have been found. It has been shown, that the sublimated product presents a mixture of several modifications with the main phase of a composition Ba{sub 4}(thd){sub 8}. At a lowered pressure the sublimated product is preserved without decomposition for a long time. In the air it is a monomer of a composition Ba(thd){sub 2}*2H{sub 2}O, decomposing in the course of time with forming a free ligand or a diketone (C{sub 8}H{sub 21}O{sub 2}) depending on the way of purification of the initial compound. (orig.).

  9. Modeling Chemical Interaction Profiles: II. Molecular Docking, Spectral Data-Activity Relationship, and Structure-Activity Relationship Models for Potent and Weak Inhibitors of Cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 Isozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Demchuk

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Polypharmacy increasingly has become a topic of public health concern, particularly as the U.S. population ages. Drug labels often contain insufficient information to enable the clinician to safely use multiple drugs. Because many of the drugs are bio-transformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes, inhibition of CYP activity has long been associated with potentially adverse health effects. In an attempt to reduce the uncertainty pertaining to CYP-mediated drug-drug/chemical interactions, an interagency collaborative group developed a consensus approach to prioritizing information concerning CYP inhibition. The consensus involved computational molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR, and structure-activity relationship (SAR models that addressed the clinical potency of CYP inhibition. The models were built upon chemicals that were categorized as either potent or weak inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isozyme. The categorization was carried out using information from clinical trials because currently available in vitro high-throughput screening data were not fully representative of the in vivo potency of inhibition. During categorization it was found that compounds, which break the Lipinski rule of five by molecular weight, were about twice more likely to be inhibitors of CYP3A4 compared to those, which obey the rule. Similarly, among inhibitors that break the rule, potent inhibitors were 2–3 times more frequent. The molecular docking classification relied on logistic regression, by which the docking scores from different docking algorithms, CYP3A4 three-dimensional structures, and binding sites on them were combined in a unified probabilistic model. The SDAR models employed a multiple linear regression approach applied to binned 1D 13C-NMR and 1D 15N-NMR spectral descriptors. Structure-based and physical-chemical descriptors were used as the basis for developing SAR models by the decision forest method. Thirty-three potent inhibitors

  10. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: II. Molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship, and structure-activity relationship models for potent and weak inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 isozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Yunfeng; McPhail, Brooks; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Fowler, Bruce A; Beger, Richard D; Demchuk, Eugene

    2012-03-15

    Polypharmacy increasingly has become a topic of public health concern, particularly as the U.S. population ages. Drug labels often contain insufficient information to enable the clinician to safely use multiple drugs. Because many of the drugs are bio-transformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, inhibition of CYP activity has long been associated with potentially adverse health effects. In an attempt to reduce the uncertainty pertaining to CYP-mediated drug-drug/chemical interactions, an interagency collaborative group developed a consensus approach to prioritizing information concerning CYP inhibition. The consensus involved computational molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR), and structure-activity relationship (SAR) models that addressed the clinical potency of CYP inhibition. The models were built upon chemicals that were categorized as either potent or weak inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isozyme. The categorization was carried out using information from clinical trials because currently available in vitro high-throughput screening data were not fully representative of the in vivo potency of inhibition. During categorization it was found that compounds, which break the Lipinski rule of five by molecular weight, were about twice more likely to be inhibitors of CYP3A4 compared to those, which obey the rule. Similarly, among inhibitors that break the rule, potent inhibitors were 2-3 times more frequent. The molecular docking classification relied on logistic regression, by which the docking scores from different docking algorithms, CYP3A4 three-dimensional structures, and binding sites on them were combined in a unified probabilistic model. The SDAR models employed a multiple linear regression approach applied to binned 1D ¹³C-NMR and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectral descriptors. Structure-based and physical-chemical descriptors were used as the basis for developing SAR models by the decision forest method. Thirty-three potent inhibitors and 88 weak

  11. [Studies on the chemical constituents from Inula cappa (II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi-lei; Yang, Jun-shan; Liu, Jian-xun

    2007-01-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the root of Inula cappa. The compounds were isolated and purified by recrystallization and chromatography with silica gel column and Sephadex LH-20 column. Their structures were identified by physico-chemical properties and spectral analysis. Seven compounds were isolated as scopolin (I), octacosanoic acid (II), tritriacontane (III), (2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2'R)-2'-hydroxydocosanosylamino]-octadecane-1,3,4-triol(IV),(2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2'R)-2'-hydroxytricosanosylamino]-octadecane-1,3,4-triol(V), (2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2'R)-2'-hydroxytetracosanosylamino]-octadecane-1,3,4-triol(VI), (2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2'R)-2'-hydroxypentacosanosylamino]-octadecane-1,3,4-triol(VIII), (2S,3S,4R,8E)-2-[(2'R)-2'-hydroxyhexacosanosylamino]-octadecane-1,3,4-triol(VIII). All compounds were isolated from Inula cappa for the first time.

  12. Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Venot, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Chemical Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Joshua; Fox, William P.; Varazo, Kristofoland

    2007-01-01

    In beginning chemistry classes, students are taught a variety of techniques for balancing chemical equations. The most common method is inspection. This paper addresses using a system of linear mathematical equations to solve for the stoichiometric coefficients. Many linear algebra books carry the standard balancing of chemical equations as an…

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Chemical Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Joshua; Fox, William P.; Varazo, Kristofoland

    2007-01-01

    In beginning chemistry classes, students are taught a variety of techniques for balancing chemical equations. The most common method is inspection. This paper addresses using a system of linear mathematical equations to solve for the stoichiometric coefficients. Many linear algebra books carry the standard balancing of chemical equations as an…

  15. High-Frequency (1)H NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb(II) Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vícha, Jan; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2016-10-17

    The role of relativistic effects on (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides is investigated by using fully relativistic DFT calculations. The stability of possible Pb(II) hydride isomers is studied together with their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, which are predicted in the high-frequency region, up to 90 ppm. These (1)H signals are dictated by sizable relativistic contributions due to spin-orbit coupling at the heavy atom and can be as large as 80 ppm for a hydrogen atom bound to Pb(II). Such high-frequency (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Pb(II) hydride resonances cannot be detected in the (1)H NMR spectra with standard experimental setup. Extended (1)H NMR spectral ranges are thus suggested for studies of Pb(II) compounds. Modulation of spin-orbit relativistic contribution to (1)H NMR chemical shift is found to be important also in the experimentally known Sn(II) hydrides. Because the (1)H NMR chemical shifts were found to be rather sensitive to the changes in the coordination sphere of the central metal in both Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides, their application for structural investigation is suggested.

  16. Biosorption of copper (II) from chemical mechanical planarization wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Leah C; Ogden, Kimberly L

    2003-11-01

    Copper Chemical Mechanical Planarization (Cu-CMP) is a critical step in integrated circuit (IC) device manufacturing. CMP and post-CMP cleaning processes are projected to account for 30-40% of the water consumed by IC manufacturers in 2003. CMP wastewater is expected to contain increasing amounts of copper as the industry switches from Al-CMP to Cu-CMP causing some IC manufacturers to run the risk of violating discharge regulations. There are a variety of treatment schemes currently available for the removal of heavy metals from CMP wastewater, however, many introduce additional chemicals to the wastewater, have large space requirements, or are expensive. This work explores the use of microorganisms for waste treatment. A Staphylococcus sp. of bacteria was isolated and studied to determine the feasibility for use in removing copper from Cu-CMP wastewater. A model Cu-CMP wastewater was developed and tested, as well as actual Cu-CMP wastes. Continuous-flow packed column experiments were performed to obtain adsorption data and show copper recovery from the waste. A predictive, empirical model was used to accurately describe Cu removal. Additionally, the immobilized cells were regenerated, allowing for the concentration and potential recovery of copper from the wastewater.

  17. Chemical reactor modeling multiphase reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Modeling closes the gap between Chemical Reaction Engineering and Fluid Mechanics.  The second edition consists of two volumes: Volume 1: Fundamentals. Volume 2: Chemical Engineering Applications In volume 1 most of the fundamental theory is presented. A few numerical model simulation application examples are given to elucidate the link between theory and applications. In volume 2 the chemical reactor equipment to be modeled are described. Several engineering models are introduced and discussed. A survey of the frequently used numerical methods, algorithms and schemes is provided. A few practical engineering applications of the modeling tools are presented and discussed. The working principles of several experimental techniques employed in order to get data for model validation are outlined. The monograph is based on lectures regularly taught in the fourth and fifth years graduate courses in transport phenomena and chemical reactor modeling, and in a post graduate course in modern reactor m...

  18. Modeling Microscopic Chemical Sensors in Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, Tad

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based microscopic robots could provide accurate in vivo measurement of chemicals in the bloodstream for detailed biological research and as an aid to medical treatment. Quantitative performance estimates of such devices require models of how chemicals in the blood diffuse to the devices. This paper models microscopic robots and red blood cells (erythrocytes) in capillaries using realistic distorted cell shapes. The models evaluate two sensing scenarios: robots moving with the cells past a chemical source on the vessel wall, and robots attached to the wall for longer-term chemical monitoring. Using axial symmetric geometry with realistic flow speeds and diffusion coefficients, we compare detection performance with a simpler model that does not include the cells. The average chemical absorption is quantitatively similar in both models, indicating the simpler model is an adequate design guide to sensor performance in capillaries. However, determining the variation in forces and absorption as cells...

  19. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  20. River water quality modelling: II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanahan, P.; Henze, Mogens; Koncsos, L.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. EPA QUAL2E model is currently the standard for river water quality modelling. While QUAL2E is adequate for the regulatory situation for which it was developed (the U.S. wasteload allocation process), there is a need for a more comprehensive framework for research and teaching. Moreover......, and to achieve robust model calibration. Mass balance problems arise from failure to account for mass in the sediment as well as in the water column and due to the fundamental imprecision of BOD as a state variable. (C) 1998 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  2. Effects of systematic error, estimates and uncertainties in chemical mass balance apportionments: Quail Roost II revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Hanumara, R. Choudary; Rahn, Kenneth A.; Currie, Lloyd A.

    The Quail Roost II synthetic data set II was used to derive a comprehensive method of estimating uncertainties for chemical mass balance (CMB) apportionments. Collinearity-diagnostic procedures were applied to CMB apportionments of data set II to identify seriously collinear source profiles and evaluate the effects of the degree of collinearity on source-strength estimates and their uncertainties. Fractional uncertainties of CMB estimates were up to three times higher for collinear source profiles than for independent ones. A theoretical analysis of CMB results for synthetic data set II led to the following general conclusions about CMB methodology. Uncertainties for average estimated source strengths will be unrealistically low unless sources whose estimates are constrained to zero are included when calculating uncertainties. Covariance in source-strength estimates is caused by collinearity and systematic errors in source specification and composition. Propagated uncertainties may be underestimated unless covariances as well as variances of estimates are included. Apportioning the average aerosol will account for systematic errors only when the correct model is known, when measurement uncertainties in ambient and source-profile data are realistic, and when the source profiles are not collinear.

  3. Chemical equilibrium modeling of detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, Laurence E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bastea, Sorin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Energetic materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Energetic materials are commonly divided into high explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics. We will focus on high explosive (HE) materials here, although there is a great deal of commonality between the classes of energetic materials. Furthermore the history of HE materials is long, their condensed-phase chemical properties are poorly understood.

  4. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  5. Effects of chemical speciation in growth media on the toxicity of mercury(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, R E; Germida, J J; Huang, P M

    1993-05-01

    The toxicity of metals, including mercury, is expressed differently in different media, and the addition of soluble organics to the growth medium can have a significant impact on bioassay results. Although the effect of medium composition on metal toxicity is generally attributed to its effect on metal speciation (i.e., the chemical form in which the metal occurs), the importance of individual metal-ligand species remains largely unclear. Here, we report the results of a study that investigated, both experimentally and from a modeling perspective, the effects of complex soluble organic supplements on the acute toxicity (i.e., 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) of mercury to a Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate in chemically well-defined synthetic growth media (M-IIX). The media consisted of a basal inorganic salts medium supplemented with glycerol (0.1%, vol/vol) and a variety of common protein hydrolysates (0.1%, vol/vol), i.e., Difco beef extract (X = B), Casamino Acids (X = C), peptone (X = P), soytone (X = S), tryptone (X = T), and yeast extract (X = Y). These were analyzed to obtain cation, anion, and amino acid profiles and the results were used to compute the aqueous speciation of Hg(II) in the media. Respirometric bioassays were performed and IC50s were calculated. Medium components varied significantly in their effects on the acute toxicity of Hg(II) to the P. fluorescens isolate. IC50s ranged from 1.48 to 14.54 micrograms of Hg ml-1, and the acute toxicity of Hg(II) in the different media decreased in the order M-IIC > M-IIP > M-IIB > M-IIT > M-IIS > M-IIY.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Study of the adsorption and electroadsorption process of Cu (II) ions within thermally and chemically modified activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-García, A; Gómez Corzo, M; Alfaro Domínguez, M; Alexandre Franco, M; Martínez Naharro, J

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this work is to modify the porous texture and superficial groups of a commercial activated carbon through chemical and thermal treatment and subsequently study the kinetics of adsorption and electroadsorption of Cu (II) ion for these carbons. Samples of three activated carbons were used. These were a commercial activated carbon, commercial activated carbon modified thermically (C-N2-900) and finally commercial activated carbon modified chemically C-SO2-H2S-200. The activated carbons were characterized chemically and texturally and the electrical conductivity of them determined. Different kinetic models were applied. The kinetics of the adsorption and electroadsorption process of the Cu (II) ion fits a pseudo second order model and the most likely mechanism takes place in two stages. A first step through transfer of the metal mass through the boundary layer of the adsorbent and distribution of the Cu (II) on the external surface of the activated carbon and a second step that represents intraparticle diffusion and joining of the Cu (II) with the active centres of the activated carbon. Finally, the kinetics of the adsorption process are faster than the kinetics of the electroadsorption but the percentage of the Cu (II) ion retained is much higher in the electroadsorption process.

  7. Error estimation and adaptive chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Braack

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical method to use several chemical transport models of increasing accuracy and complexity in an adaptive way. In largest parts of the domain, a simplified chemical model may be used, whereas in certain regions a more complex model is needed for accuracy reasons. A mathematically derived error estimator measures the modeling error and provides information where to use more accurate models. The error is measured in terms of output functionals. Therefore, one has to consider adjoint problems which carry sensitivity information. This concept is demonstrated by means of ozone formation and pollution emission.

  8. New Source Model for Chemical Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    With sophisticated inversion scheme, we recover characteristics of SPE explosions such as corner frequency fc and moment M0, which are used to develop a new source model for chemical explosions.

  9. Reduced Chemical Kinetic Model for Titan Entries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Savajano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A reduced chemical kinetic model for Titan's atmosphere has been developed. This new model with 18 species and 28 reactions includes the mainfeatures of a more complete scheme, respecting the radiative fluxes. It has been verified against three key elements: a sensitivity analysis, the equilibrium chemical composition using shock tube simulations in CHEMKIN, and the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFDs simulations.

  10. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Segler, Marwin H. S.; Waller, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows Organic Chemists to solve synthetic problems and to invent novel transformations. Here, we propose a model which mimics chemical reasoning and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outpe...

  11. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  12. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration during transport from clean areas. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  13. Copper (II) diamino acid complexes: Quantum chemical computations regarding diastereomeric effects on the energy of complexation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilhof, H.; Morokuma, K.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were used to rationalize the observed enantiodifferentiation in the complexation of alpha-amino acids to chiral Cu(II) complexes. Apart from Cu(II)-pi interactions and steric repulsions between the anchoring cholesteryl-Glu moiety and an aromatic amino acid R group, hyd

  14. Modeling chlorine dioxide bleaching of chemical pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Tarvo, Ville

    2010-01-01

    This doctoral thesis deals with the phenomenon-based modeling of pulp bleaching. Previous bleaching models typically utilize one or two empirical correlations to predict the kinetics in kappa number development. Empirical correlations are simple to develop, but their parameters are often tied to the validation system. A major benefit of physico-chemical phenomenon models is that they are valid regardless of the reaction environment. Furthermore, modeling the bleaching processes at molecular l...

  15. Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The objectives for this project are as follows: Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for compression ignition (CI), homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engines; and Combine component models into surrogate fuel models to represent real transportation fuels. Use them to model low-temperature combustion strategies in HCCI, RCCI, and CI engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency.

  16. Mathematical modeling a chemical engineer's perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Aris

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is the art and craft of building a system of equations that is both sufficiently complex to do justice to physical reality and sufficiently simple to give real insight into the situation. Mathematical Modeling: A Chemical Engineer's Perspective provides an elementary introduction to the craft by one of the century's most distinguished practitioners.Though the book is written from a chemical engineering viewpoint, the principles and pitfalls are common to all mathematical modeling of physical systems. Seventeen of the author's frequently cited papers are reprinted to illus

  17. Chemical Posttranslational Modification with Designed Rhodium(II) Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S C; Minus, M B; Ball, Z T

    2016-01-01

    Natural enzymes use molecular recognition to perform exquisitely selective transformations on nucleic acids, proteins, and natural products. Rhodium(II) catalysts mimic this selectivity, using molecular recognition to allow selective modification of proteins with a variety of functionalized diazo reagents. The rhodium catalysts and the diazo reactivity have been successfully applied to a variety of protein folds, the chemistry succeeds in complex environments such as cell lysate, and a simple protein blot method accurately assesses modification efficiency. The studies with rhodium catalysts provide a new tool to study and probe protein-binding events, as well as a new synthetic approach to protein conjugates for medical, biochemical, or materials applications.

  18. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  19. Chemical-reaction model for Mexican wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    We present a chemical-reaction model to describe the Mexican wave ( La Ola) in football stadia. The spectator's action is described in terms of chemical reactions. The model is governed by three reaction rates k 1, k 2, and k3. We study the nonlinear waves on one- and two-dimensional lattices. The Mexican wave is formulated as a clockwise forwardly propagating wave. Waves are growing or disappear, depending on the values of reaction rates. In the specific case of k1= k2= k3=1, the nonlinear-wave equation produces a propagating pulse like soliton.

  20. PNe as observational constraints in chemical evolution models for NGC 6822

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Martinez, Liliana; Peña, Miriam; Peimbert, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Chemical evolution models are useful for understanding the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. Model predictions will be more robust as more observational constraints are used. We present chemical evolution models for the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 using chemical abundances of old and young Planetary Nebulae (PNe) and \\ion{H}{ii} regions as observational constraints. Two sets of chemical abundances, one derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs) and one, from recombination lines (RLs), are used. We try to use our models as a tool to discriminate between both procedures for abundance determinations. In our chemical evolution code, the chemical contribution of low and intermediate mass stars is time delayed, while for the massive stars the chemical contribution follows the instantaneous recycling approximation. Our models have two main free parameters: the mass-loss rate of a well-mixed outflow and the upper mass limit, $M_{up}$, of the initial mass function (IMF). To reproduce the gaseous ...

  1. Combinatorial QSAR modeling of chemical toxicants tested against Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Tropsha, Alexander; Fourches, Denis; Varnek, Alexandre; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola; Oberg, Tomas; Dao, Phuong; Cherkasov, Artem; Tetko, Igor V

    2008-04-01

    Selecting most rigorous quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approaches is of great importance in the development of robust and predictive models of chemical toxicity. To address this issue in a systematic way, we have formed an international virtual collaboratory consisting of six independent groups with shared interests in computational chemical toxicology. We have compiled an aqueous toxicity data set containing 983 unique compounds tested in the same laboratory over a decade against Tetrahymena pyriformis. A modeling set including 644 compounds was selected randomly from the original set and distributed to all groups that used their own QSAR tools for model development. The remaining 339 compounds in the original set (external set I) as well as 110 additional compounds (external set II) published recently by the same laboratory (after this computational study was already in progress) were used as two independent validation sets to assess the external predictive power of individual models. In total, our virtual collaboratory has developed 15 different types of QSAR models of aquatic toxicity for the training set. The internal prediction accuracy for the modeling set ranged from 0.76 to 0.93 as measured by the leave-one-out cross-validation correlation coefficient ( Q abs2). The prediction accuracy for the external validation sets I and II ranged from 0.71 to 0.85 (linear regression coefficient R absI2) and from 0.38 to 0.83 (linear regression coefficient R absII2), respectively. The use of an applicability domain threshold implemented in most models generally improved the external prediction accuracy but at the same time led to a decrease in chemical space coverage. Finally, several consensus models were developed by averaging the predicted aquatic toxicity for every compound using all 15 models, with or without taking into account their respective applicability domains. We find that consensus models afford higher prediction accuracy for the

  2. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah Y.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important for investigating the combustion behavior of diesel, gasoline, and aviation fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values and rate rules. These update provides a better agreement with rapid compression machine measurements of ignition delay time, while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  3. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks : II. Gas-rich environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro-Molano, German; Kamp, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present a method for including gas extinction of cosmic-ray-generated UV photons in chemical models of the midplane of protoplanetary disks, focusing on its implications on ice formation and chemical evolution. Aims. Our goal is to improve on chemical models by treating cosmic rays, the

  4. Chemical Evolution Model of M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Valdez, F.; Carigi, L.

    2011-10-01

    We present a chemical evolution model (CEM) of M33 and we find that M33, which is smaller than both M31 and MW, shows a lower gas infall rate, SFR efficiency, and IMF M_{up}. Therefore the CEMs for large spiral galaxies (Carigi et al. 2005; Meneses-Goytia et al. 2011) can be scaled to a smaller galaxy.

  5. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Segler, Marwin H S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows Organic Chemists to solve synthetic problems and to invent novel transformations. Here, we propose a model which mimics chemical reasoning and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180,000 randomly selected binary reactions. We show that our data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-) discovering novel transformations (even including transition-metal catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph, and because each single reaction prediction is typically ac...

  6. Modeling heterogeneous chemical processes on aerosol surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junjun Deng; Tijian Wang; Li Liu; Fei Jiang

    2010-01-01

    To explore the possible impact of heterogeneous chemical processes on atmospheric trace components,a coupled box model including gas-phase chemical processes,aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium processes,and heterogeneous chemical processes on the surface of dust,black carbon(BC)and sea salt is set up to simulate the effects of heterogeneous chemistry on the aerosol surface,and analyze the primary factors affecting the heterogeneous processes.Results indicate that heterogeneous chemical processes on the aerosol surface in the atmosphere will affect the concentrations of trace gases such as H2O2,HO2,O3,NO2,NO3,HNO3 and SO2,and aerosols such as SO42-,NO3-and NH4+.Sensitivity tests suggest that the magnitude of the impact of heterogeneous processes strongly depends on aerosol concentration and the surface uptake coefficients used in the box model.However,the impact of temperature on heterogeneous chemical processes is considerably less.The"renoxification"of HNO3 will affect the components of the troposphere such as nitrogen oxide and ozone.

  7. H II Regions and Protosolar Abundances in Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Carigi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos modelos de evolución química del disco galáctico con diferentes rendimientos dependientes de Z. Encontramos que una tasa moderada de pérdida de masa en estrellas masivas de metalicidad solar produce un excelente ajuste con los gradientes de C/H y C/O del disco de la Galaxia. El mejor modelo reproduce: las abundancias de H, He, C y O derivadas de líneas de recombinación en M17, las abundancias protosolares y las relaciones C/O-O/H, C/Fe-Fe/H y O/Fe-Fe/H derivadas de estrellas de la vecindad solar. La concordancia del modelo con las abundancias protosolares implica que el Sol se originó a una distancia galactocéntrica similar a la actual. El modelo para r = 3 kpc implica que una fracción de las estrellas en la dirección del bulbo se formó en el disco interno. Nuestro modelo reproduce la relación C/O-O/H derivada de regiones H II extragalácticas en galaxias espirales.

  8. Line emission from H II blister models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical techniques to calculate the thermal and geometric properties of line emission from H II 'blister' regions are presented. It is assumed that the density distributions of the H II regions are a function of two dimensions, with rotational symmetry specifying the shape in three-dimensions. The thermal and ionization equilibrium equations of the problem are solved by spherical modeling, and a spherical sector approximation is used to simplify the three-dimensional treatment of diffuse ionizing radiation. The global properties of H II 'blister' regions near the edges of a molecular cloud are simulated by means of the geometry/density distribution, and the results are compared with observational data. It is shown that there is a monotonic increase of peak surface brightness from the i = 0 deg (pole-on) observational position to the i = 90 deg (edge-on) position. The enhancement of the line peak intensity from the edge-on to the pole-on positions is found to depend on the density, stratification, ionization, and electron temperature weighting. It is found that as i increases, the position of peak line brightness of the lower excitation species is displaced to the high-density side of the high excitation species.

  9. Relative abundance of chemical forms of Cu(II) and Cd(II) on soybean roots as influenced by pH, cations and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Liu, Zhao-Dong; Liu, Yuan; Jiang, Jun; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2016-11-01

    Little information is available on chemical forms of heavy metals on integrate plant roots. KNO3 (1 M), 0.05M EDTA at pH6 and 0.01 M HCl were used sequentially to extract the exchangeable, complexed and precipitated forms of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from soybean roots and then to investigate chemical form distribution of Cu(II) and Cd(II) on soybean roots. Cu(II) and Cd(II) adsorbed on soybean roots were mainly exchangeable form, followed by complexed form, while their precipitated forms were very low under acidic conditions. Soybean roots had a higher adsorption affinity to Cu(II) than Cd(II), leading to higher toxic of Cu(II) than Cd(II). An increase in solution pH increased negative charge on soybean and thus increased exchangeable Cu(II) and Cd(II) on the roots. Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+ reduced exchangeable Cu(II) and Cd(II) levels on soybean roots and these cations showed greater effects on Cd(II) than Cu(II) due to greater adsorption affinity of the roots to Cu(II) than Cd(II). L-malic and citric acids decreased exchangeable and complexed Cu(II) on soybean roots. In conclusion, Cu(II) and Cd(II) mainly existed as exchangeable and complexed forms on soybean roots. Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations and citric and L-malic acids can potentially alleviate Cu(II) and Cd(II) toxicity to plants.

  10. Models and Modelling Tools for Chemical Product and Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    The design, development and reliability of a chemical product and the process to manufacture it, need to be consistent with the end-use characteristics of the desired product. One of the common ways to match the desired product-process characteristics is through trial and error based experiments......-based framework is that in the design, development and/or manufacturing of a chemical product-process, the knowledge of the applied phenomena together with the product-process design details can be provided with diverse degrees of abstractions and details. This would allow the experimental resources......, are the needed models for such a framework available? Or, are modelling tools that can help to develop the needed models available? Can such a model-based framework provide the needed model-based work-flows matching the requirements of the specific chemical product-process design problems? What types of models...

  11. Chemical element transport in stellar evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassisi, Santi

    2017-01-01

    Stellar evolution computations provide the foundation of several methods applied to study the evolutionary properties of stars and stellar populations, both Galactic and extragalactic. The accuracy of the results obtained with these techniques is linked to the accuracy of the stellar models, and in this context the correct treatment of the transport of chemical elements is crucial. Unfortunately, in many respects calculations of the evolution of the chemical abundance profiles in stars are still affected by sometimes sizable uncertainties. Here, we review the various mechanisms of element transport included in the current generation of stellar evolution calculations, how they are implemented, the free parameters and uncertainties involved, the impact on the models and the observational constraints.

  12. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  13. Quantum Chemical Studies on the Prediction of Structures, Charge Distributions and Vibrational Spectra of Some Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) Iodide Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakci, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal complexes play an important role in coordination chemistry as well as in the formation of metal-based drugs. In order to obtain accurate results for studying these type of complexes quantum chemical studies are performed and especially density functional theory (DFT) has become a promising choice. This talk represents molecular structures, charge distributions and vibrational analysis of Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) iodide complexes of p-toluidine and m-toluidine by means of DFT. Stable structures of the ligands and the related complexes have been obtained in the gas phase at B3LYP/def2-TZVP level and calculations predict Ni(II) complexes as distorted polymeric octahedral whereas Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes as distorted tetrahedral geometries. Charge distribution analysis have been performed by means of Mulliken, NBO and APT methods and physically most meaningful method for our compounds is explained. Vibrational spectra of the title compounds are computed from the optimized geometries and theoretical frequencies are compared with the previously obtained experimental data. Since coordination occurs via nitrogen atoms of the free ligands, N-H stretching bands of the ligands are shifted towards lower wavenumbers in the complexes whereas NH_2 wagging and twisting vibrations are shifted towards higher wavenumbers.

  14. Biotechnology for producing fuels and chemicals from biomass. Volume II. Fermentation chemicals from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villet, R. (ed.)

    1981-02-01

    The technological and economic feasibility of producing some selected chemicals by fermentation is discussed: acetone, butanol, acetic acid, citric acid, 2,3-butanediol, and propionic acid. The demand for acetone and butanol has grown considerably. They have not been produced fermentatively for three decades, but instead by the oxo and aldol processes. Improved cost of fermentative production will hinge on improving yields and using cellulosic feedstocks. The market for acetic acid is likely to grow 5% to 7%/yr. A potential process for production is the fermentation of hydrolyzed cellulosic material to ethanol followed by chemical conversion to acetic acid. For about 50 years fermentation has been the chief process for citric acid production. The feedstock cost is 15% to 20% of the overall cost of production. The anticipated 5%/yr growth in demand for citric acid could be enhanced by using it to displace phosphates in detergent manufacture. A number of useful chemicals can be derived from 2,3-butanediol, which has not been produced commercially on a large scale. R and D are needed to establish a viable commercial process. The commercial fermentative production of propionic acid has not yet been developed. Recovery and purification of the product require considerable improvement. Other chemicals such as lactic acid, isopropanol, maleic anhydride, fumarate, and glycerol merit evaluation for commercial fermentative production in the near future.

  15. Operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, J.; Balk, T.; Schultz, D.M.; Baklanov, A.; Klein, T.; Miranda, A.I.; Monteiro, A.; Hirtl, M.; Tarvainen, V.; Boy, M.; Peuch, V.H.; Poupkou, A.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Finardi, S.; Sofiev, M.; Sokhi, R.; Lehtinen, K.; Karatzas, K.; San José, R.; Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Schaap, M.; Reimer, E.; Jakobs, H.; Eben, K.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical models that combine weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry are here referred to as chemical weather forecasting models. Eighteen operational chemical weather forecasting models on regional and continental scales in Europe are described and compared in this article. Topics discussed

  16. A grand model for chemical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fung, Ka Y.; Ng, Ka M.; Zhang, Lei;

    2016-01-01

    Chemical engineering has been expanding its focus from primarily business-to-business products (B2B) to business-to-consumer (B2C) products. The production of B2B products generally emphasizes on process design and optimization, whereas the production of B2C products focuses on product quality......, ingredients and structure. Market and competitive analysis, government policies and regulations have to be explicitly considered in product design. All these considerations are accounted for in the Grand Product Design Model, which consists of a process model, a property model, a quality model, a cost model...... product composition changes with market conditions. Another is a hand lotion that illustrates how product quality affects the profit.(C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. PENGEMBANGAN ASESMEN ALTERNATIF PRAKTIKUM KIMIA DASAR II MELALUI CHEMISTRY FAIR PROJECT (CFP BERBASIS KONSERVASI DENGAN MEMANFAATKAN DAILY CHEMICAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Urwatin Wusqo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk (1 Mengembangkan asesmen alternatif pada praktikum kimia dasar II melalui chemistry fair project berbasis konservasi dengan memanfaatkan daily chemical(2 Mengetahui tingkat kevalidan, kepraktisan dan keefektifannya. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian pengembangan (Development Research Model pengembangan yang diterapkan Dick dan Carey (1985. Subjek uji coba terbatas maupun subjek uji coba lapangan adalah dosen dan mahasiswa Prodi Pendidikan IPA UNNES. Sampel ditentukan secara purposive, yaitu dosen pengampu dan mahasiswa yang menempuh mata kuliah Praktikum Kimia Dasar II. Data yang diperoleh dari uji coba ini adalah: (1 masukan dari pakar, untuk menentukan validitas isi dan konstruk dari fitur asesmen; (2 masukan dari sampel uji coba terbatas, untuk menentukan kepraktisan petunjuk chemistry fair project (CFP berbasis konservasi dengan memanfaatkan daily chemical ; Instrumen pengumpul data berupa angket keterbacaan petunjuk pembuatan chemistry fair project (CFP berbasis konservasi dengan memanfaatkan daily chemical, pedoman penskoran. (3 data hasil belajar siswa untuk mengetahui efektivitas asesmen. Masukan dari pakar angket mahasiswa, dan nilai chemistry fair project (CFP sampel ujicoba terbatas dianalisis secara kualitatif, dan kuantitatif. Asesmen alternative Praktikum Kimia Dasar II yang dikembangkan dikatakan berhasil baik apabila asesmen yang dikembangkan valid, praktis, dan efektif.

  18. Thermal, chemical, and mechanical cookoff modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    A Thermally Reactive, Elastic-plastic eXplosive code, TREX, has been developed to analyze coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical effects associated with cookoff simulation of confined or unconfined energetic materials. In confined systems, pressure buildup precedes thermal runaway, and unconfined energetic material expands to relieve high stress. The model was developed based on nucleation, decomposition chemistry, and elastic/plastic mechanical behavior of a material with a distribution of internal defects represented as clusters of spherical inclusions. A local force balance, with mass continuity constraints, forms the basis of the model requiring input of temperature and reacted gas fraction. This constitutive material model has been incorporated into a quasistatic mechanics code SANTOS as a material module which predicts stress history associated with a given strain history. The thermal-chemical solver XCHEM has been coupled to SANTOS to provide temperature and reacted gas fraction. Predicted spatial history variables include temperature, chemical species, solid/gas pressure, solid/gas density, local yield stress, and gas volume fraction. One-Dimensional Time to explosion (ODTX) experiments for TATB and PBX 9404 (HMX and NC) are simulated using global multistep kinetic mechanisms and the reactive elastic-plastic constitutive model. Pressure explosions, rather than thermal runaway, result in modeling slow cookoff experiments of confined conventional energetic materials such as TATB. For PBX 9404, pressure explosions also occur at fast cookoff conditions because of low temperature reactions of nitrocellulose resulting in substantial pressurization. A demonstrative calculation is also presented for reactive heat flow in a hollow, propellant-filled, stainless steel cylinder, representing a rocket motor. This example simulation show

  19. Ni(II immobilization by bio-apatite materials: Appraisal of chemical, thermal and combined treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šljivić-Ivanović Marija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal bones are natural and rich source of calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, which was found to be a good sorbent material for heavy metals and radionuclides. Various treatments can reduce the content of bone organic phase and improve sorption properties. In this study, sorption capacities of raw bovine bones (B and samples obtained by chemical treatment with NaOH (BNaOH, by heating at 400 oC (B400 and by combined chemical and thermal treatment (BNaOH+400, were compared, using Ni(II ions as sorbates. Maximum sorption capacities increased in the order BII sorption was found to be complex, with participation of both HAP and organic phase (when present. Sequential extraction analysis was applied for testing the stability of Ni(II ions sorbed by BNaOH+400. Majority of Ni(II was found in residual phase (65% at lower level of sorbent loading, while with the increase of sorbent saturation carbonate fraction became dominant (39 %. According to the results, BNaOH+400 can be utilized in water purification systems. As an apatite based material with low organic content and high efficiency for Ni(II sorption, it is also a good candidate for in-situ soil remediation, particularly at lower contamination levels. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 43009

  20. Property Modelling for Applications in Chemical Product and Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    Physical-chemical properties of pure chemicals and their mixtures play an important role in the design of chemicals based products and the processes that manufacture them. Although, the use of experimental data in design and analysis of chemicals based products and their processes is desirable...... such as database, property model library, model parameter regression, and, property-model based product-process design will be presented. The database contains pure component and mixture data for a wide range of organic chemicals. The property models are based on the combined group contribution and atom...... modeling tools in design and analysis of chemical product-process design, including biochemical processes will be highlighted....

  1. Chemically amplified resist modeling in OPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xin; Huang, Jason; Kuo, Fred; Kazarian, Aram; Chin, Fook; Fan, Yongfa

    2009-03-01

    The mechanism of chemically amplified resist plays a critical role in the modeling of the latent image. To achieve a practical model which can fit into the time frame of OPC, some simplifications and assumptions have to be made. We introduced regression kernels that take into account best exposure focus difference between isotropic pitch, dense, and line end features for the evaluation of image intensity. It compares the image intensity (signal) over small changes above and/or below the regressed "nominal" image position, which in principle corresponds to evaluating the intensity signal at various depths of a fixed resist profile thus can also be regressed for optimization during model development. Our calibration has shown that the model brought a great improvement in prediction for difficult structures such as dense features at or near the optical resolution limit and 2-dimensional features, which are the limiter of the overall model fitting accuracy for 45nm node and below. By replacing other existing techniques, total number of output kernels used for OPC operation is actually reduced with improvement of model accuracy. This model is proven to be a very effective yet accurate addition to the current OPC technology.

  2. Photoionization models of the CALIFA H II regions. I. Hybrid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Sánchez, S. F.; Galbany, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Roth, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Photoionization models of H ii regions require as input a description of the ionizing spectral energy distribution (SED) and of the gas distribution, in terms of ionization parameter U and chemical abundances (e.g., O/H and N/O).A strong degeneracy exists between the hardness of the SED and U, which in turn leads to high uncertainties in the determination of the other parameters, including abundances. One way to resolve the degeneracy is to fix one of the parameters using additional information. For each of the ~20 000 sources of the CALIFA H ii regions catalog, a grid of photoionization models is computed assuming the ionizing SED to be described by the underlying stellar population obtained from spectral synthesis modeling. The ionizing SED is then defined as the sum of various stellar bursts of different ages and metallicities. This solves the degeneracy between the shape of the ionizing SED and U. The nebular metallicity (associated with O/H) is defined using the classical strong line method O3N2 (which gives our models the status of "hybrids"). The remaining free parameters are the abundance ratio N/O and the ionization parameter U, which are determined by looking for the model fitting [N ii]/Hα and [O iii]/Hβ. The models are also selected to fit [O ii]/Hβ. This process leads to a set of ~3200 models that reproduce the three observations simultaneously. We find that the regions associated with young stellar bursts (i.e., ionized by OB stars) are affected by leaking of ionizing photons,the proportion of escaping photons having a median of 80%. The set of photoionization models satisfactorily reproduces the electron temperature derived from the [O iii]λ4363/5007 line ratio. We determine new relations between the nebular parameters, like the ionization parameter U and the [O ii]/[O iii] or [S ii]/[S iii] line ratios. A new relation between N/O and O/H is obtained, mostly compatible with previous empirical determinations (and not with previous results obtained

  3. ACE-Asia Chemical Transport Modeling Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    UNO, I.; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Ginoux, P.; Rasch, P.; Carmichael, G. R.; Yienger, J. J.

    2001-12-01

    ACE-Asia (Asia Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment) was designed to increase our understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth?s climate system. The intensive observation period was carried out during March to May, 2001, and more than 100 researchers from several countries (United States, Japan, Korea, China, and many other Asian countries) participated using aircraft, a research vessel, surface stations and numerical models. Aerosol transport forecast activities played an important role during the ACE-Asia intensive observation period. Three independent modeling groups operated chemical transport models in forecast mode and participated in flight planning activities at the operations center. These models were: MATCH (Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry; Rasch and Collins); GOCART (Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model; Chin and Ginour) and CFORS (Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University + University of Iowa - Chemical weather FORecast System; Uno, Carmichael and Yienger). The MATCH model used in ACE-Asia was a transport model applied for the Asia region, driven by NCEP forecast meteorology. A unique feature of this model was that it assimilated satellite derived optical depths into its forecast algorithm. The GOCART model provided global aerosol forecast using forecast meteorological fields provided by the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The CFORS model provided regional forecasts using a limited area transport model coupled with Regional Meteorological Modeling System (RAMS), initialized by NCEP and JMA forecasts. All models produced 3-d aerosol forecast products consisting of aerosol mass distributions and optical depths for sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt, and dust. In the field these model products were made available to all participating scientists via the Web, and were also presented during the

  4. Chemical-garden formation, morphology, and composition. II. Chemical gardens in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Escribano, Bruno; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Stodieck, Louis S

    2011-04-05

    We studied the growth of metal-ion silicate chemical gardens under Earth gravity (1 g) and microgravity (μg) conditions. Identical sets of reaction chambers from an automated system (the Silicate Garden Habitat or SGHab) were used in both cases. The μg experiment was performed on board the International Space Station (ISS) within a temperature-controlled setup that provided still and video images of the experiment downlinked to the ground. Calcium chloride, manganese chloride, cobalt chloride, and nickel sulfate were used as seed salts in sodium silicate solutions of several concentrations. The formation and growth of osmotic envelopes and microtubes was much slower under μg conditions. In 1 g, buoyancy forces caused tubes to grow upward, whereas a random orientation for tube growth was found under μg conditions.

  5. Modeling interactions of Hg(II) and bauxitic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J; Bandara, Atula

    2007-11-01

    The adsorptive interactions of Hg(II) with gibbsite-rich soils (hereafter SOIL-g) were modeled by 1-pK surface complexation theory using charge distribution multi-site ion competition model (CD MUSIC) incorporating basic Stern layer model (BSM) to account for electrostatic effects. The model calibrations were performed for the experimental data of synthetic gibbsite-Hg(II) adsorption. When [NaNO(3)] > or = 0.01M, the Hg(II) adsorption density values, of gibbsite, Gamma(Hg(II)), showed a negligible variation with ionic strength. However, Gamma(Hg(II)) values show a marked variation with the [Cl(-)]. When [Cl(-)] > or = 0.01M, the Gamma(Hg(II)) values showed a significant reduction with the pH. The Hg(II) adsorption behavior in NaNO(3) was modeled assuming homogeneous solid surface. The introduction of high affinity sites, i.e., >Al(s)OH at a low concentration (typically about 0.045 sites nm(-2)) is required to model Hg(II) adsorption in NaCl. According to IR spectroscopic data, the bauxitic soil (SOIL-g) is characterized by gibbsite and bayerite. These mineral phases were not treated discretely in modeling of Hg(II) and soil interactions. The CD MUSIC/BSM model combination can be used to model Hg(II) adsorption on bauxitic soil. The role of organic matter seems to play a role on Hg(II) binding when pH>8. The Hg(II) adsorption in the presence of excess Cl(-) ions required the selection of high affinity sites in modeling.

  6. ADSORPTION CHARACTERIZATION OF CO(II IONS ONTO CHEMICALLY TREATED QUERCUS COCCIFERA SHELL: EQUILIBRIUM, KINETIC AND THERMODYNAMIC STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamdi Karaoglu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Quercus coccifera shell (QCS, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent to remove cobalt(II from water. Before the adsorption experiments, QCS was subjected to chemical treatment to provide maximum surface area. Then, the kinetics and adsorption mechanism of Co(II ions on QCS were studied using different parameters such as adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, temperature, contact time, and solution pH. The loaded metals could be desorbed effectively with dilute hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and 0.1 M EDTA. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the uptake of cobalt on QCS. The equilibrium adsorption data were better fitted to Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (qm of QCS for Co(II was 33 mg g-1. Various kinetic models were used to describe the adsorption process. The adsorption followed pseudo second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion was found to be the rate-limiting step in the adsorption process. The diffusion coefficients were calculated and found to be in the range of 3.11×10−6 to 168.78×10−6 cm2s-1. The negative DH* value indicated exothermic nature of the adsorption.

  7. Numerical study of hypersonic flows over reentry configurations with different chemical nonequilibrium models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiaao; Wang, Jingying; Lee, Chunhian

    2016-09-01

    Effects of two different 11-species chemical reaction models on hypersonic reentry flow simulations are numerically investigated. These two models were proposed by Gupta (1990) and Park (1990) [12,15], respectively. In this study, two typical configurations, the RAM-C II vehicle and FIRE II capsule, are selected as test cases, whose thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flowfields are computed by a multi-block finite volume code using a two-temperature model (a translational-rotational temperature and a vibrational-electron-electronic temperature). In the RAM-C II case, it is indicated that although electron number density distributions of the two reaction models appear in a similar trend, their values are distinctively different. Results of the Gupta's model show a better agreement with the electrostatic probe data, while those of the Park's model are more consistent with the reflectometers data. Both models give similar temperature distributions. In the FIRE II case, the two models yield significantly different distribution profiles of ions and electrons, whose differences could reach an order of magnitude. In addition, an abnormal nonequilibrium relaxation process in the shock layer is found in the FIRE II flowfield simulated by the Gupta's model, which proves to be a consequence of electron impact ionization reactions.

  8. Photoionization models for giant h ii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gra´zyna Stasi´nska

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Revisamos las fuentes de incertidumbre en los modelos de fotoionizaci on de regiones H II gigantes. Tambi en discutimos el problema de la temperatura electr onica a la luz de los ajustes de modelos en tres regiones H II gigantes.

  9. Chemically induced mouse models of intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Weigmann, Benno; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Animal models of intestinal inflammation are indispensable for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease in humans. Here, we provide protocols for establishing murine 2,4,6-trinitro benzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-, oxazolone- and both acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis, the most widely used chemically induced models of intestinal inflammation. In the former two models, colitis is induced by intrarectal administration of the covalently reactive reagents TNBS/oxazolone, which are believed to induce a T-cell-mediated response against hapten-modified autologous proteins/luminal antigens. In the DSS model, mice are subjected several days to drinking water supplemented with DSS, which seems to be directly toxic to colonic epithelial cells of the basal crypts. The procedures for the hapten models of colitis and acute DSS colitis can be accomplished in about 2 weeks but the protocol for chronic DSS colitis takes about 2 months.

  10. Towards an improved modeling of chemical weathering in the SoilGen soil evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolot, Emmanuel; Finke, Peter

    2014-05-01

    As the need for soil information particularly in the fields of agriculture, land evaluation, hydrology, biogeochemistry and climate change keeps increasing, models for soil evolution are increasingly becoming valuable tools to provide such soil information. Although still limited, such models are progressively being developed. The SoilGen model is one of such models with capabilities to provide soil information such as soil texture, pH, base saturation, organic carbon, CEC, etc over multi-millennia time scale. SoilGen is a mechanistic water flow driven pedogenetic model describing soil forming processes such as carbon cycling, clay migration, decalcification, bioturbation, physical weathering and chemical weathering. The model has been calibrated and confronted with field measurements in a number of case studies, giving plausible results. Discrepancies between measured and simulated soil properties as concluded from case studies have been mainly attributed to (i) the simple chemical weathering system (ii) poor estimates of initial data inputs such as bulk density and element fluxes, and (iii) incorrect values of variables that describe boundary conditions such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. This study focuses on extending the chemical weathering system, such that it can deal with a more heterogeneous composition of primary minerals and includes more elements such as Fe and Si. We propose and discuss here an extended description of chemical weathering in the model that is based on more primary minerals, taking into account the role of the specific area of these minerals, and the effect of physical weathering on these specific areas over time. In the initial stage, the proposed chemical weathering mechanism is also implemented in PHREEQC (a widely applied geochemical code with capabilities to simulate equilibrium reactions involving water and minerals, surface complexes and ion exchangers, etc.) to facilitate comparison with the model results

  11. HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Bersten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present progress in light curve models of type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P obtained using a newly devel- oped, one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Using simple initial models (polytropes, we reproduced the global behavior of the observed light curves and we analyzed the sensitivity of the light curves to the variation of free parameters.

  12. The Impact of Modeling Assumptions in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    CERN Document Server

    Côté, Benoit; Ritter, Christian; Herwig, Falk; Venn, Kim A

    2016-01-01

    We use the OMEGA galactic chemical evolution code to investigate how the assumptions used for the treatment of galactic inflows and outflows impact numerical predictions. The goal is to determine how our capacity to reproduce the chemical evolution trends of a galaxy is affected by the choice of implementation used to include those physical processes. In pursuit of this goal, we experiment with three different prescriptions for galactic inflows and outflows and use OMEGA within a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code to recover the set of input parameters that best reproduces the chemical evolution of nine elements in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor. Despite their different degrees of intended physical realism, we found that all three prescriptions can reproduce in an almost identical way the stellar abundance trends observed in Sculptor. While the three models have the same capacity to fit the data, the best values recovered for the parameters controlling the number of Type Ia supernovae and the strength of gal...

  13. A kinetic model for chemical neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Fernandez de Miguel, Francisco

    Recent experimental observations in presynaptic terminals at the neuromuscular junction indicate that there are stereotyped patterns of cooperativeness in the fusion of adjacent vesicles. That is, a vesicle in hemifusion process appears on the side of a fused vesicle and which is followed by another vesicle in a priming state while the next one is in a docking state. In this talk we present a kinetic model for this morphological pattern in which each vesicle state previous to the exocytosis is represented by a kinetic state. This chain states kinetic model can be analyzed by means of a Master equation whose solution is simulated with the stochastic Gillespie algorithm. With this approach we have reproduced the responses to the basal release in the absence of stimulation evoked by the electrical activity and the phenomena of facilitation and depression of neuromuscular synapses. This model offers new perspectives to understand the underlying phenomena in chemical neurotransmission based on molecular interactions that result in the cooperativity between vesicles during neurotransmitter release. DGAPA Grants IN118410 and IN200914 and Conacyt Grant 130031.

  14. Chemical Mechanism Solvers in Air Quality Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Linford

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The solution of chemical kinetics is one of the most computationally intensivetasks in atmospheric chemical transport simulations. Due to the stiff nature of the system,implicit time stepping algorithms which repeatedly solve linear systems of equations arenecessary. This paper reviews the issues and challenges associated with the construction ofefficient chemical solvers, discusses several families of algorithms, presents strategies forincreasing computational efficiency, and gives insight into implementing chemical solverson accelerated computer architectures.

  15. A mesoscale chemical transport model (MEDIUM) nested in a global chemical transport model (MEDIANTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claveau, J.; Ramaroson, R. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    1997-12-31

    The lower stratosphere and upper troposphere (UT-LS) are frequently subject to mesoscale or local scale exchange of air masses occurring along discontinuities. This exchange (e.g. downward) can constitute one of the most important source of ozone from the stratosphere down to the middle troposphere where strong mixing dilutes the air mass and competing the non-linear chemistry. The distribution of the chemical species in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere depends upon various source emissions, e.g. from polluted boundary layer or from aircraft emissions. Global models, as well as chemical transport models describe the climatological state of the atmosphere and are not able to describe correctly the stratosphere and troposphere exchange. Mesoscale models go further in the description of smaller scales and can reasonably include a rather detailed chemistry. They can be used to assess the budget of NO{sub x} from aircraft emissions in a mesoscale domain. (author) 4 refs.

  16. Chemical leasing business models: a contribution to the effective risk management of chemical substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Cornelia; Moser, Frank

    2007-08-01

    Chemicals indisputably contribute greatly to the well-being of modern societies. Apart from such benefits, however, chemicals often pose serious threats to human health and the environment when improperly handled. Therefore, the European Commission has proposed a regulatory framework for the Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) that requires companies using chemicals to gather pertinent information on the properties of these substances. In this article, we argue that the crucial aspect of this information management may be the honesty and accuracy of the transfer of relevant knowledge from the producer of a chemical to its user. This may be particularly true if the application of potentially hazardous chemicals is not part of the user's core competency. Against this background, we maintain that the traditional sales concept provides no incentives for transferring this knowledge. The reason is that increased user knowledge of a chemical's properties may raise the efficiency of its application. That is, excessive and unnecessary usage will be eliminated. This, in turn, would lower the amount of chemicals sold and in competitive markets directly decrease profits of the producer. Through the introduction of chemical leasing business models, we attempt to present a strategy to overcome the incentive structure of classical sales models, which is counterproductive for the transfer of knowledge. By introducing two models (a Model A that differs least and a Model B that differs most from traditional sales concepts), we demonstrate that chemical leasing business models are capable of accomplishing the goal of Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals: to effectively manage the risk of chemicals by reducing the total quantity of chemicals used, either by a transfer of applicable knowledge from the lessor to the lessee (Model A) or by efficient application of the chemical by the lessor him/herself (Model B).

  17. Synthesis, Physico-Chemical and Antimicrobial Properties of Co(II, Ni(II, and Cu(II Mixed-Ligand Complexes of Dimethylglyoxime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Osunlaja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of non-electrolyte mixed-ligand complexes of the general formula [M(HdmgB], where M = Co(II, Ni(II or Cu(II Hdmg = dimethylglyoximato monoanion, B = 2- aminophenol(2-aph, diethylamine (dea or malonic acid (MOH are described. Metal analysis, melting points, solubility, conductivity, IR and UV/Visible electronic spectra were used in determining their physico-chemical properties. The antimicrobial activities of the complexes were tested against Esherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. The complexes melted/decomposed at 120-306ºC and, most of them dissolved only in polar solvents. The colours of the complexes are mostly dark - brown or red. The spectral results suggest the binding of Hdmg, 2-amino phenol or malonic acid through the N atom and O atoms respectively to the metal ion In the electronic spectra of the complexes, the absorption bands observed in the UV/Visible region are presumed to be either due to charge transfer or intra-ligand transitions from the ligands or d-d transitions from the metal ions. The complexes showed marked antimicrobial activity against the tested microbes at 10 mg/mL. The possible use of the complexes as chemotherapeutic agents is hereby suggested.

  18. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  19. In situ models, physico-chemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M

    1994-07-01

    In situ (intra-oral) caries models are used for two purposes. First, they provide information about oral physiological processes. Such information helps to detail our knowledge of the oral ecosystem and to verify conclusions from in vitro experiments. Second, in situ models are utilized to test preventive agents in the phase between laboratory testing and clinical trials. Most investigations involving enamel inserts have been aimed at testing new dentifrices. The experimental designs of such studies usually do not allow one to draw conclusions on physico-chemical processes, e.g., because of single point measurements. Studies of model parameters (lesion type, lesion severity, and de/remineralization in time) constitute only a minority of the research reports. The most striking observation obtained with in situ models has been the significant differences in de/remineralization observed among individuals and, more importantly, within one individual during different time periods and between different sites in the same mouth (for review, see ten Cate et al., 1992). Regardless of this, some general findings can be inferred: During in situ demineralization, up to 62 vol% microns/day may be removed from enamel. For dentin specimens, this value may be as high as 89 vol% microns/day. For remineralization, during fluoride dentifrice treatment, a median deposition rate of 0.7%/day (for lesions with integrated mineral loss values between 2000 and 4000 vol% microns) is found. The rate of deposition seems to be correlated with the extent of the pre-formed lesion. This suggests that the number of sites (crystallite surface) available for calcium phosphate precipitation is an important parameter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. The Impact of Modeling Assumptions in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Benoit; O'Shea, Brian W.; Ritter, Christian; Herwig, Falk; Venn, Kim A.

    2017-02-01

    We use the OMEGA galactic chemical evolution code to investigate how the assumptions used for the treatment of galactic inflows and outflows impact numerical predictions. The goal is to determine how our capacity to reproduce the chemical evolution trends of a galaxy is affected by the choice of implementation used to include those physical processes. In pursuit of this goal, we experiment with three different prescriptions for galactic inflows and outflows and use OMEGA within a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code to recover the set of input parameters that best reproduces the chemical evolution of nine elements in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor. This provides a consistent framework for comparing the best-fit solutions generated by our different models. Despite their different degrees of intended physical realism, we found that all three prescriptions can reproduce in an almost identical way the stellar abundance trends observed in Sculptor. This result supports the similar conclusions originally claimed by Romano & Starkenburg for Sculptor. While the three models have the same capacity to fit the data, the best values recovered for the parameters controlling the number of SNe Ia and the strength of galactic outflows, are substantially different and in fact mutually exclusive from one model to another. For the purpose of understanding how a galaxy evolves, we conclude that only reproducing the evolution of a limited number of elements is insufficient and can lead to misleading conclusions. More elements or additional constraints such as the Galaxy’s star-formation efficiency and the gas fraction are needed in order to break the degeneracy between the different modeling assumptions. Our results show that the successes and failures of chemical evolution models are predominantly driven by the input stellar yields, rather than by the complexity of the Galaxy model itself. Simple models such as OMEGA are therefore sufficient to test and validate stellar yields. OMEGA

  1. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Biofuel Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Subram Maniam

    Bioalcohols, such as bioethanol and biobutanol, are suitable replacements for gasoline, while biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This study's contribution is experimentally validated chemical kinetic combustion mechanisms for biobutanol and biodiesel. Fundamental combustion data and chemical kinetic mechanisms are presented and discussed to improve our understanding of biofuel combustion. The net environmental impact of biobutanol (i.e., n-butanol) has not been studied extensively, so this study first assesses the sustainability of n-butanol derived from corn. The results indicate that technical advances in fuel production are required before commercializing biobutanol. The primary contribution of this research is new experimental data and a novel chemical kinetic mechanism for n-butanol combustion. The results indicate that under the given experimental conditions, n-butanol is consumed primarily via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radical molecules, which subsequently decompose to smaller hydrocarbon and oxygenated species. The hydroxyl moiety in n-butanol results in the direct production of the oxygenated species such as butanal, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde. The formation of these compounds sequesters carbon from forming soot precursors, but they may introduce other adverse environmental and health effects. Biodiesel is a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters derived from fats and oils. This research study presents high quality experimental data for one large fatty acid methyl ester, methyl decanoate, and models its combustion using an improved skeletal mechanism. The results indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which ultimately lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular

  2. Modeling Complex Chemical Systems: Problems and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas in complex gas mixtures are at the heart of numerous contemporary technologies. They typically contain dozens to hundreds of species, involved in hundreds to thousands of reactions. Chemists and physicists have always been interested in what are now called chemical reduction techniques (CRT's). The idea of such CRT's is that they reduce the number of species that need to be considered explicitly without compromising the validity of the model. This is usually achieved on the basis of an analysis of the reaction time scales of the system under study, which identifies species that are in partial equilibrium after a given time span. The first such CRT that has been widely used in plasma physics was developed in the 1960's and resulted in the concept of effective ionization and recombination rates. It was later generalized to systems in which multiple levels are effected by transport. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in tools for chemical reduction and reaction pathway analysis. An example of the latter is the PumpKin tool. Another trend is that techniques that have previously been developed in other fields of science are adapted as to be able to handle the plasma state of matter. Examples are the Intrinsic Low Dimension Manifold (ILDM) method and its derivatives, which originate from combustion engineering, and the general-purpose Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique. In this contribution we will provide an overview of the most common reduction techniques, then critically assess the pros and cons of the methods that have gained most popularity in recent years. Examples will be provided for plasmas in argon and carbon dioxide.

  3. Dust as interstellar catalyst - II. How chemical desorption impacts the gas

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S; Dulieu, F; Hocuk, S

    2015-01-01

    Context. Interstellar dust particles, which represent 1% of the total mass, are recognized to be very powerful interstellar catalysts in star-forming regions. The presence of dust can have a strong impact on the chemical composition of molecular clouds. While observations show that many species that formed onto dust grains populate the gas phase, the process that transforms solid state into gas phase remains unclear. Aims. The aim of this paper is to consider the chemical desorption process, i.e. the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, in astrochemical models. These models allow determining the chemical composition of star-forming environments with an accurate treatment of the solid-phase chemistry. Methods. In paper I we derived a formula based on experimental studies with which we quantified the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process. Here we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results. The simulations of astrophysical environments show that the abundances of gas-p...

  4. Dissecting the chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures governing RNA polymerase II trigger loop closure by synthetic nucleic acid analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Liang; Butler, Kyle Vincent; Chong, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a conserved structural motif that is crucial for Pol II catalytic activity and transcriptional fidelity. The TL remains in an inactive open conformation when the mismatched substrate is bound. In contrast, TL switches from an inactive open...... II. This study reveals novel insights into understanding the molecular basis of TL conformational transition upon substrate binding during Pol II transcription. This synthetic chemical biology approach may be extended to understand the mechanisms of other RNA polymerases as well as other nucleic acid...... state to a closed active state to facilitate nucleotide addition upon the binding of the cognate substrate to the Pol II active site. However, a comprehensive understanding of the specific chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures that are essential to this TL conformational change...

  5. GREENSCOPE: A Method for Modeling Chemical Process ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current work within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory is focused on the development of a method for modeling chemical process sustainability. The GREENSCOPE methodology, defined for the four bases of Environment, Economics, Efficiency, and Energy, can evaluate processes with over a hundred different indicators. These indicators provide a means for realizing the principles of green chemistry and green engineering in the context of sustainability. Development of the methodology has centered around three focal points. One is a taxonomy of impacts that describe the indicators and provide absolute scales for their evaluation. The setting of best and worst limits for the indicators allows the user to know the status of the process under study in relation to understood values. Thus, existing or imagined processes can be evaluated according to their relative indicator scores, and process modifications can strive towards realizable targets. A second area of focus is in advancing definitions of data needs for the many indicators of the taxonomy. Each of the indicators has specific data that is necessary for their calculation. Values needed and data sources have been identified. These needs can be mapped according to the information source (e.g., input stream, output stream, external data, etc.) for each of the bases. The user can visualize data-indicator relationships on the way to choosing selected ones for evalua

  6. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  7. The chemical transport model Oslo CTM3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Søvde

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present here the global chemical transport model Oslo CTM3, an update of the Oslo CTM2. The update comprises a faster transport scheme, an improved wet scavenging scheme for large scale rain, updated photolysis rates and a new lightning parameterization. Oslo CTM3 is better parallelized and allows for stable, large time steps for advection, enabling more complex or high resolution simulations. Thorough comparisons between the Oslo CTM3, Oslo CTM2 and measurements are performed, and in general the Oslo CTM3 is found to reproduce measurements well. Inclusion of tropospheric sulfur chemistry and nitrate aerosols in CTM3 is shown to be important to reproduce tropospheric O3, OH and the CH4 lifetime well. Using the same meteorology to drive the two models, shows that some features related to transport are better resolved by the CTM3, such as polar cap transport, while features like transport close to the vortex edge are resolved better in the Oslo CTM2 due to its required shorter transport time step. The longer transport time steps in CTM3 result in larger errors e.g. near the jets, and when necessary, this can be remedied by using a shorter time step. An additional, more accurate and time consuming, treatment of polar cap transport is presented, however, both perform acceptably. A new treatment of the horizontal distribution of lightning is presented and found to compare well with measurements. Vertical distributions of lighting are updated, and tested against the old vertical distribution. The new profiles are found to produce more NOx in the tropical middle troposphere, and less at the surface and at high altitudes.

  8. Modeling release of chemicals from multilayer materials into food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The migration of chemicals from materials into food is predictable by various mathematical models. In this article, a general mathematical model is developed to quantify the release of chemicals through multilayer packaging films based on Fick's diffusion. The model is solved numerically to elucidate the effects of different diffusivity values of different layers, distribution of chemical between two adjacent layers and between material and food, mass transfer at the interface of material and food on the migration process.

  9. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  10. Testing of a one dimensional model for Field II calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    to the calibrated Field II program for 1, 4, and 10 cycle excitations. Two parameter sets were applied for modeling, one real valued Pz27 parameter set, manufacturer supplied, and one complex valued parameter set found in literature, Alguer´o et al. [11]. The latter implicitly accounts for attenuation. Results show......Field II is a program for simulating ultrasound transducer fields. It is capable of calculating the emitted and pulse-echoed fields for both pulsed and continuous wave transducers. To make it fully calibrated a model of the transducer’s electro-mechanical impulse response must be included. We...... examine an adapted one dimensional transducer model originally proposed by Willatzen [9] to calibrate Field II. This model is modified to calculate the required impulse responses needed by Field II for a calibrated field pressure and external circuit current calculation. The testing has been performed...

  11. Chemical Leasing business models and corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Frank; Jakl, Thomas; Joas, Reihard; Dondi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Chemical Leasing is a service-oriented business model that shifts the focus from increasing sales volume of chemicals towards a value-added approach. Recent pilot projects have shown the economic benefits of introducing Chemical Leasing business models in a broad range of sectors. A decade after its introduction, the promotion of Chemical Leasing is still predominantly done by the public sector and international organizations. We show in this paper that awareness-raising activities to disseminate information on this innovative business model mainly focus on the economic benefits. We argue that selling Chemical Leasing business models solely on the grounds of economic and ecological considerations falls short of branding it as a corporate social responsibility initiative, which, for this paper, is defined as a stakeholder-oriented concept that extends beyond the organization's boundaries and is driven by an ethical understanding of the organization's responsibility for the impact of its business activities. For the analysis of Chemical Leasing business models, we introduce two case studies from the water purification and metal degreasing fields, focusing on employees and local communities as two specific stakeholder groups of the company introducing Chemical Leasing. The paper seeks to demonstrate that Chemical Leasing business models can be branded as a corporate social responsibility initiative by outlining the vast potential of Chemical Leasing to improve occupational health and safety and to strengthen the ability of companies to protect the environment from the adverse effects of the chemicals they apply.

  12. Integrating Seasonal Oscillations into Basel II Behavioural Scoring Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Klepac

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a new methodology of temporal influence measurement (seasonal oscillations, temporal patterns for behavioural scoring development purposes. The paper shows how significant temporal variables can be recognised and then integrated into the behavioural scoring models in order to improve model performance. Behavioural scoring models are integral parts of the Basel II standard on Internal Ratings-Based Approaches (IRB. The IRB approach much more precisely reflects individual risk bank profile.A solution of the problem of how to analyze and integrate macroeconomic and microeconomic factors represented in time series into behavioural scorecard models will be shown in the paper by using the REF II model.

  13. Biosorption of copper(II) by Marrubium globosum subsp. globosum leaves powder: effect of chemical pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hüseyin; Kiliç, Mehmet; Solak, Murat

    2008-03-01

    The study was aimed at determining the effect of chemical pretreatment on copper(II) biosorption by Marrubium globosum subsp. globosum leaves. The uptake capacity of the biomass was increased by chemical pretreatment when compared with the raw biomass. The results of biosorption experiments, carried out at the conditions of 50 mg l(-1) initial metal concentration and pH 5.5, showed that pretreating the biomass with alkali solutions (laundry detergent, sodium hydroxide and sodium bicarbonate, 0.5 M) improved the biosorption capacity of biomass (45.90, 45.78 and 43.91%, respectively) compared with raw biomass. Pretreatment with sulfuric and nitric acid solutions, 0.5 M, increased the biosorption capacity of biomass by 11.82 and 10.18%, respectively, while there was no considerable change in the biosorption capacity of biomass (0.35%) after pretreatment with formic acid solution, 0.5 M. Furthermore, sodium chloride and calcium chloride, 0.5 M, pretreatments resulted in the improvement in biosorption capacity of biomass (31.38 and 26.69%, respectively). FT-IR analysis revealed that hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups were mainly responsible for copper(II) biosorption.

  14. Asymmetric Gepner Models II. Heterotic Weight Lifting

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, B

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study of "lifted" Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the $E_8$ factor by a modular isomorphic $N=0$ model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  15. Asymmetric Gepner models II. Heterotic weight lifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-05-21

    A systematic study of 'lifted' Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the E{sub 8} factor by a modular isomorphic N=0 model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  16. SATL MODEL LESSON IN CHEMICAL KINETICS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Department of Chemistry, The Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and ... are several strategies, through which teaching and learning of scientific subjects in ... the linear relationships among various factors involved in chemical kinetics.

  17. A chemical model of meteoric ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vondrak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the extraterrestrial dust entering the Earth's atmosphere ablates to produce metal vapours, which have significant effects on the aeronomy of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. A new Chemical Ablation Model (CAMOD is described which treats the physics and chemistry of ablation, by including the following processes: sputtering by inelastic collisions with air molecules before the meteoroid melts; evaporation of atoms and oxides from the molten particle; diffusion-controlled migration of the volatile constituents (Na and K through the molten particle; and impact ionization of the ablated fragments by hyperthermal collisions with air molecules. Evaporation is based on thermodynamic equilibrium in the molten meteoroid (treated as a melt of metal oxides, and between the particle and surrounding vapour phase. The loss rate of each element is then determined assuming Langmuir evaporation. CAMOD successfully predicts the meteor head echo appearance heights, observed from incoherent scatter radars, over a wide range of meteoroid velocities. The model also confirms that differential ablation explains common-volume lidar observations of K, Ca and Ca+ in fresh meteor trails. CAMOD is then used to calculate the injection rates into the atmosphere of a variety of elements as a function of altitude, integrated over the meteoroid mass and velocity distributions. The most abundant elements (Fe, Mg and Si have peak injection rates around 85 km, with Na and K about 8 km higher. The more refractory element Ca ablates around 82 km with a Na:Ca ratio of 4:1, which does therefore not explain the depletion of atomic Ca to Na, by more than 2 orders of magnitude, in the upper mesosphere. Diffusion of the most volatile elements (Na and K does not appear to be rate-limiting except in the fastest meteoroids. Non-thermal sputtering causes ~35% mass loss from the fastest (~60–70 km s−1 and smallest (10−17–10

  18. A chemical model of meteoric ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vondrak

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the extraterrestrial dust entering the Earth's atmosphere ablates to produce metal vapours, which have significant effects on the aeronomy of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. A new Chemical Ablation Model (CAMOD is described which treats the physics and chemistry of ablation, by including the following processes: sputtering by inelastic collisions with air molecules before the meteoroid melts; evaporation of atoms and oxides from the molten particle; diffusion-controlled migration of the volatile constituents (Na and K through the molten particle; and impact ionization of the ablated fragments by hyperthermal collisions with air molecules. Evaporation is based on thermodynamic equilibrium in the molten meteoroid (treated as a melt of metal oxides, and between the particle and surrounding vapour phase. The loss rate of each element is then determined assuming Langmuir evaporation. CAMOD successfully predicts the meteor head echo appearance heights, observed from incoherent scatter radars, over a wide range of meteoroid velocities. The model also confirms that differential ablation explains common-volume lidar observations of K, Ca and Ca+ in fresh meteor trails. CAMOD is then used to calculate the injection rates into the atmosphere of a variety of elements as a function of altitude, integrated over the meteoroid mass and velocity distributions. The most abundant elements (Fe, Mg and Si have peak injection rates around 85 km, with Na and K about 8 km higher. The more refractory element Ca ablates around 82 km with a Na:Ca ratio of 4:1, which does therefore not explain the depletion of atomic Ca to Na, by more than 2 orders of magnitude, in the upper mesosphere. Diffusion of the most volatile elements (Na and K does not appear to be rate-limiting except in the fastest meteoroids. Non-thermal sputtering causes ~35% mass loss from the fastest (~60–70 km s−1 and smallest (10−17–10

  19. On The Stability Of Model Flows For Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The flow in a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reactor is assessed. The reactor is modelled as a flow over an infinite-radius rotating disk, where the mean flow and convective instability of the disk boundary layer are measured. Temperature-dependent viscosity and enforced axial flow are used to model the steep temperature gradients present in CVD reactors and the pumping of the gas towards the disk, respectively. Increasing the temperature-dependence parameter of the fluid viscosity (ɛ) results in an overall narrowing of the fluid boundary layer. Increasing the axial flow strength parameter (Ts) accelerates the fluid both radially and axially, while also narrowing the thermal boundary layer. It is seen that when both effects are imposed, the effects of axial flow generally dominate those of the viscosity temperature dependence. A local stability analysis is performed and the linearized stability equations are solved using a Galerkin projection in terms of Chebyshev polynomials. The neutral stability curves are then plotted for a range of ɛ and Ts values. Preliminary results suggest that increasing Ts has a stabilising effect on both type I and type II stationary instabilities, while small increases in ɛ results in a significant reduction to the critical Reynolds number.

  20. Property Modelling for Applications in Chemical Product and Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    Physical-chemical properties of pure chemicals and their mixtures play an important role in the design of chemicals based products and the processes that manufacture them. Although, the use of experimental data in design and analysis of chemicals based products and their processes is desirable...... such as database, property model library, model parameter regression, and, property-model based product-process design will be presented. The database contains pure component and mixture data for a wide range of organic chemicals. The property models are based on the combined group contribution and atom......, polymers, mixtures as well as separation processes. The presentation will highlight the framework (ICAS software) for property modeling, the property models and issues such as prediction accuracy, flexibility, maintenance and updating of the database. Also, application issues related to the use of property...

  1. Formal modeling of a system of chemical reactions under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Krishnendu; Schlipf, John

    2014-10-01

    We describe a novel formalism representing a system of chemical reactions, with imprecise rates of reactions and concentrations of chemicals, and describe a model reduction method, pruning, based on the chemical properties. We present two algorithms, midpoint approximation and interval approximation, for construction of efficient model abstractions with uncertainty in data. We evaluate computational feasibility by posing queries in computation tree logic (CTL) on a prototype of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway.

  2. Development of regionalized multimedia chemical fate models for China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ying; Jones, Kevin; Sweetman, Andrew; Price, Oliver; Tao, Shu

    2016-01-01

    To balance the economic development with environmental safety and human health, China has released chemicals management legislation for which chemical prioritization and risk assessment are key issues. To support these ambitions two versions of an environmental fate and behaviour model SESAMe (Sino Evaluative Simplebox-MAMI models), have been developed with different resolutions and structures in this thesis. SESAMe is applied to hypothetical chemicals to investigate the influence of environm...

  3. Adsorption of Ni(II) onto Chemically Modified Spent Grated Coconut (Cocos Nucifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, F. I.; Khalid, K.; Hanafiah, M. A. K. M.

    2017-06-01

    A new adsorbent of plant waste origin from coconut processing food factory was explored for removing Ni(II) from aqueous solutions. Several parameters such as pH, dosage, concentration and contact time were studied to obtain optimum conditions for treatment of Ni(II) contaminated wastewater. Spent grated coconut (Cocos nucifera) treated with sulfuric acid (SSGC) showed good adsorption capacity for Ni(II) ion. The amount adsorbed was affected by solution pH with the highest value achieved at pH 5. Other optimum conditions found were; dosage of 0.02 g, and 60 min of equilibrium time. Ni(II) adsorption obeyed the pseudo-second order kinetic model which suggested that chemisorption mechanism occurred in the adsorption process. The equilibrium data presented a better fitting to the Langmuir isotherm model, an indication that monolayer adsorption occurred onto a homogeneous surface. The maximum adsorption capacity, qmax was 97.09 mg g-1, thus SSGC can be classified as good and comparable with other plant waste adsorbents.

  4. Integrated modelling of physical, chemical and biological weather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurganskiy, Alexander

    Integrated modelling of physical, chemical and biological weather has been widely considered during the recent decades. Such modelling includes interactions of atmospheric physics and chemical/biological aerosol concentrations. Emitted aerosols are subject to atmospheric transport, dispersion...... and deposition, but in turn they impact the radiation as well as cloud and precipitation formation. The present study focuses on birch pollen modelling as well as on physical and chemical weather with emphasis on black carbon (BC) aerosol modelling. The Enviro-HIRLAM model has been used for the study...

  5. Standard solar model. II - g-modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, D. B.; Demarque, P.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Kim, Y.-C.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the g-mode oscillation for a set of modern solar models. Each solar model is based on a single modification or improvement to the physics of a reference solar model. Improvements were made to the nuclear reaction rates, the equation of state, the opacities, and the treatment of the atmosphere. The error in the predicted g-mode periods associated with the uncertainties in the model physics is predicted and the specific sensitivities of the g-mode periods and their period spacings to the different model structures are described. In addition, these models are compared to a sample of published observations. A remarkably good agreement is found between the 'best' solar model and the observations of Hill and Gu (1990).

  6. Voltammetry as a Model for Teaching Chemical Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasingham, H.; Ang, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Voltammetry is used as a model for teaching chemical instrumentation to chemistry undergraduates at the National University of Singapore. Lists six criteria used to select a successful teaching model and shows how voltammetry satisfies each criterion. (JN)

  7. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  8. Efficient catalytic phosphate diester cleavage by the synergetic action of two Cu(II) centers in a dinuclear cis-diaqua Cu(II) calix[4]arene enzyme model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenveld, Peter; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Kooijman, Huub; Spek, Anthony L.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1998-01-01

    A calix[4]arene derivative 2-[Cu(II)]2 functionalized with two cis-diaqua Cu(II) centers at the distal positions of the upper rim was synthesized and investigated as a model for dinuclear metalloenzymes that catalyze chemical transformations of phosphate esters. The flexible dinuclear calix[4]arene

  9. Modeling Chemical Reactors I: Quiescent Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Michoski, C E; Schmitz, P G

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a fully generalized quiescent chemical reactor system in arbitrary space $\\vdim =1,2$ or 3, with $n\\in\\mathbb{N}$ chemical constituents $\\alpha_{i}$, where the character of the numerical solution is strongly determined by the relative scaling between the local reactivity of species $\\alpha_{i}$ and the local functional diffusivity $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(\\alpha)$ of the reaction mixture. We develop an operator time-splitting predictor multi-corrector RK--LDG scheme, and utilize $hp$-adaptivity relying only on the entropy $\\mathscr{S}_{\\mathfrak{R}}$ of the reactive system $\\mathfrak{R}$. This condition preserves these bounded nonlinear entropy functionals as a necessarily enforced stability condition on the coupled system. We apply this scheme to a number of application problems in chemical kinetics; including a difficult classical problem arising in nonequilibrium thermodynamics known as the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction where we utilize a concentration-dependent diffusivity tensor $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(...

  10. Modelling Human Exposure to Chemicals in Food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob W

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to foodborne chemicals is often estimated using the average consumption pattern in the human population. To protect the human population instead of the average individual, however, interindividual variability in consumption behaviour must be taken into account. This report shows how food

  11. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  12. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  13. Multilayer piezoelectric transducer models combined with Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    with a polymer ring, and submerged into water. The transducer models are developed to account for any external electrical loading impedance in the driving circuit. The models are adapted to calculate the surface acceleration needed by the Field II software in predicting pressure pulses at any location in front...

  14. Meteorological and Back Trajectory Modeling for the Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A. Gebhart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS II study with field operations during November 2008 through November 2009 was designed to evaluate the composition and sources of reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. As part of RoMANS II, a mesoscale meteorological model was utilized to provide input for back trajectory and chemical transport models. Evaluation of the model's ability to capture important transport patterns in this region of complex terrain is discussed. Previous source-receptor studies of nitrogen in this region are also reviewed. Finally, results of several back trajectory analyses for RoMANS II are presented. The trajectory mass balance (TrMB model, a receptor-based linear regression technique, was used to estimate mean source attributions of airborne ammonia concentrations during RoMANS II. Though ammonia concentrations are usually higher when there is transport from the east, the TrMB model estimates that, on average, areas to the west contribute a larger mean fraction of the ammonia. Possible reasons for this are discussed and include the greater frequency of westerly versus easterly winds, the possibility that ammonia is transported long distances as ammonium nitrate, and the difficulty of correctly modeling the transport winds in this area.

  15. Modeling of The hERG K+ Channel Blockage Using Online Chemical Database and Modeling Environment (OCHEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Huanhuan; Zhao, Yong

    2017-08-30

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) K+ channel plays an important role in cardiac action potential. Blockage of hERG channel may result in long QT syndrome (LQTS), even cause sudden cardiac death. Many drugs have been withdrawn from the market because of the serious hERG-related cardiotoxicity. Therefore, it is quite essential to estimate the chemical blockage of hERG in the early stage of drug discovery. In this study, a diverse set of 3721 compounds with hERG inhibition data was assembled from literature. Then, we make full use of the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM), which supplies rich machine learning methods and descriptor sets, to build a series of classification models for hERG blockage. We also generated two consensus models based on the top-performing individual models. The consensus models performed much better than the individual models both on 5-fold cross validation and external validation. Especially, consensus model II yielded the prediction accuracy of 89.5 % and MCC of 0.670 on external validation. This result indicated that the predictive power of consensus model II should be stronger than most of the previously reported models. The 17 top-performing individual models and the consensus models and the data sets used for model development are available at https://ochem.eu/article/103592. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Chemical and biological effects of heavy distillate recycle in the SRC-II process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Anderson, R.P.; Freel, J.

    1983-12-01

    Recent work from the Merriam Laboratory continuous coal liquefaction units shows that heavy distillate from the SRC-II process can be recycled to extinction, and hence a distillate product boiling entirely below 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) (or other selected boiling points) is feasible. In these runs distillate yield was not reduced; gas make was unaffected; and hydrogen consumption was increased only slightly, in keeping with the generally higher hydrogen content of lighter end products. Total distillate yield (C/sub 5/-590/sup 0/F) was 56 wt %, MAF coal in runs with subbituminous coal from the Amax Belle Ayr mine. Product endpoint is well below 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F), the temperature above which coal distillates appear to become genotoxic; and the product was shown to be free of mutagenic activity in the Ames test. Chemical analyses showed both the < 270/sup 0/C (< 518/sup 0/F) and the < 310/sup 0/C (< 590/sup 0/F) distillates to be essentially devoid of several reference polycyclic compounds known to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Tests for tumorigenic or carcinogenic activity were not carried out on these materials. However, a comparison of chemical data from the Merriam heavy distillate samples with data on the other SRC-II distillates where carcinogenesis or tumorigenesis data is available leads to the expectation that < 371/sup 0/C (< 700/sup 0/F) materials from the Merriam Laboratory will have greatly reduced tumorigenic and carcinogenic activity in skin painting tests. Other studies suggest the product should be more readily upgraded than full-range (C/sub 5/-900/sup 0/F) distillate.

  17. Studies of Trace Gas Chemical Cycles Using Observations, Inverse Methods and Global Chemical Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    For interpreting observational data, and in particular for use in inverse methods, accurate and realistic chemical transport models are essential. Toward this end we have, in recent years, helped develop and utilize a number of three-dimensional models including the Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH).

  18. The application of chemical leasing business models in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, Petra; Moser, Frank

    2006-03-01

    To better address the requirements of the changing multilateral order, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Cleaner Production Programme, in 2004, developed the new Sustainable Industrial Resource Management (SIRM) approach. This approach is in accordance with the principles decided at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 1992. Unlike the traditional approaches to environmental management, the SIRM concept captures the idea of achieving sustainable industrial development through the implementation of circular material and energy flows in the entire production chain and reduction of the amount of material and energy used with greater efficiency solutions. The SIRM approach seeks to develop new models to encourage a shift from selling products to supplying services, modifying, in this manner, the supplier/user relationship and resulting in a win-win situation for the economy and the environment. Chemical Leasing represents such a new service-oriented business model and is currently being promoted by UNIDO's Cleaner Production Programme. MAIN FEATURES. One of the potential approaches to address the problems related to ineffective use and over-consumption of chemicals is the development and implementation of Chemical Leasing business models. These provide concrete solutions to the effective management of chemicals and on the ways negative releases to the environment can be reduced. The Chemical Leasing approach is a strategy that addresses the obligations of the changing international chemicals policy by focusing on a more service-oriented strategy. Mexico is one of the countries that were selected for the implementation of UNIDO's demonstration project to promote Chemical Leasing models in the country. The target sector of this project is the chemical industry, which is expected to shift their traditional business concept towards a more service and value-added approach. This is

  19. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  20. Mineral vein dynamics modelling (FRACS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' started out as a team of 7 research groups in its first phase and continued with a team of 5 research groups at the Universities of Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Mainz and Glasgow during its second phase ''FRACS 11''. The aim of the group was to develop an advanced understanding of the interplay between fracturing, fluid flow and fracture healing with a special emphasis on the comparison of field data and numerical models. Field areas comprised the Oman mountains in Oman (which where already studied in detail in the first phase), a siliciclastic sequence in the Internal Ligurian Units in Italy (closed to Sestri Levante) and cores of Zechstein carbonates from a Lean Gas reservoir in Northern Germany. Numerical models of fracturing, sealing and interaction with fluid that were developed in phase I where expanded in phase 11. They were used to model small scale fracture healing by crystal growth and the resulting influence on flow, medium scale fracture healing and its influence on successive fracturing and healing, as well as large scale dynamic fluid flow through opening and closing fractures and channels as a function of fluid overpressure. The numerical models were compared with structures in the field and we were able to identify first proxies for mechanical vein-hostrock properties and fluid overpressures versus tectonic stresses. Finally we propose a new classification of stylolites based on numerical models and observations in the Zechstein cores and continued to develop a new stress inversion tool to use stylolites to estimate depth of their formation.

  1. Horns Rev II, 2-D Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), on behalf of Energy E2 A/S part of DONG Energy A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was: to investigate the combined influence of the pile...

  2. Chemical Diversity in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Tucana II

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Alexander P; Ezzeddine, Rana; Casey, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance study of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Tucana II based on high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectra of four red giant stars. The metallicity of these stars ranges from [Fe/H] = -3.2 to -2.6, and all stars are low in neutron-capture abundances ([Sr/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] < -1). However, a number of anomalous chemical signatures are present. Three stars are carbon-enhanced, including the most metal-rich star. This star ([Fe/H]=-2.6) shows [Na,$\\alpha$,Sc/Fe] < 0, suggesting an extended star formation history with contributions from AGB stars and Type Ia supernovae. The other carbon-enhanced stars have [Fe/H] < -3 and may be consistent with enrichment by faint supernovae, if such supernovae can produce neutron-capture elements. A fourth star with [Fe/H] = -3 is carbon-normal, and exhibits distinct light element abundance ratios from the carbon-enhanced stars. The carbon-normal star implies that at least two distinct nucleosynthesis sources, both possibly associated w...

  3. [Irritant contact dermatitis. Part II. Evaluation evaluation of skin irritation potential of chemicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiczewska, Dorota; Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of skin irritation potential of chemicals is essential to secure the safety of individuals exposed to several substances designed for industrial, pharmaceutical or cosmetic use. Until recently, preclinical safety assessment of chemicals was largely based on animal experiments. Ethical concerns and the limited value of animal models in evaluating human skin irritation potential resulted in the development of alternative in vitro methods, such as EpiDerm, EPISKIN or SkinEthic, to assess irritation, i.e. cell cultures and human epidermis models. International organizations like the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) promotes and monitors the development of nonanimal tests. Human patch tests and use tests also provide an opportunity to identify substances with significant skin irritation potential without recourse to the use of animals. These tests are useful to assess skin irritation potential of cosmetics and detergents.

  4. Chemically induced intestinal damage models in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlers, Stefan H; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Christopher J; Okuda, Kazuhide S; Sison, John Oliver; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Several intestinal damage models have been developed using zebrafish, with the aim of recapitulating aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These experimentally induced inflammation models have utilized immersion exposure to an array of colitogenic agents (including live bacteria, bacterial products, and chemicals) to induce varying severity of inflammation. This technical report describes methods used to generate two chemically induced intestinal damage models using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods to monitor intestinal damage and inflammatory processes, and chemical-genetic methods to manipulate the host response to injury are also described.

  5. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  6. THEORETICAL CHEMICAL ENGINEERING - Modeling and Simulation by Christo Boyadjiev

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Oka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Book Title: THEORETICAL CHEMICAL ENGINEERING - Modeling and Simulation Author(s: Christo Boyadjiev Institute of Chemical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Science, Sofia Publisher: Springer, 2010 ISBN: 978-3-642-10777-1 Review by: Prof. Simeon Oka, Ph. D., Scientific advisor - retired

  7. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding…

  8. A coupled model for intragranular deformation and chemical diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Vrijmoed, Johannes; Moulas, Evangelos; Tajčmanová, Lucie

    2017-09-01

    A coupled model for chemical diffusion and mechanical deformation is developed in analogy to the studies of poroelasticity and thermoelasticity. Nondimensionalization of the governing equations yields a controlling dimensionless parameter, the Deborah number, given by the ratio of the characteristic time for pressure relaxation and concentration homogenization. Using the Deborah number two types of plausible chemical zonation are distinguished, i.e. diffusion controlled, and mechanically controlled. The transition between these two types of chemical zonation is determined at the conditions where the Deborah number equals one. We apply our model to a chemically zoned plagioclase rim in a spherical coordinate frame assuming homogeneous initial pressure. Using thermodynamic data, an experimentally derived diffusion coefficient and a viscous flow law for plagioclase, our numerical simulations show that up to ∼0.6 GPa grain-scale pressure variation is generated during the diffusion-deformation process. Due to the mechanical-chemical coupling, the pressure variations maintain the chemical zonation longer than predicted by the classical diffusion model. The fully coupled mechanical-chemical model provides an alternative explanation for the preservation of chemically zoned minerals, and may contribute to a better understanding of metamorphic processes in the deep Earth interior.

  9. Turbulent Chemical Interaction Models in NCC: Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a scalar PDF hydrogen-air combustion model in predicting a complex reacting flow is evaluated. In addition the results are compared to those obtained by running the same case with the so-called laminar chemistry model and also a new model based on the concept of mapping partially stirred reactor data onto perfectly stirred reactor data. The results show that the scalar PDF model produces significantly different results from the other two models, and at a significantly higher computational cost.

  10. Strictly isospectral Bianchi type II cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C; Obregón, O

    1996-01-01

    We show that, in the Q=0 factor ordering, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the Bianchi type ll model with the Ansatz \\rm \\Psi=A\\, e^{\\pm \\Phi(q^{\\mu})}, due to its one-dimensional character, may be approached by the strictly isospectral Darboux-Witten technique in standard supersymmetric quantum mechanics. One-parameter families of cosmological potentials and normalizable `wavefunctions of the universe' are exhibited. The isospectral method can be used to introduce normalizable wavefunctions in quantum cosmology.

  11. The Mg II index for upper atmosphere modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thuillier

    Full Text Available The solar radio flux at 10.7 cm has been used in upper atmosphere density modelling because of its correlation with EUV radiation and its long and complete observational record. A proxy, the Mg II index, for the solar chromospheric activity has been derived by Heath and Schlesinger (1986 from Nimbus-7 data. This index allows one to describe the changes occurring in solar-activity in the UV Sun spectral irradiance. The use of this new proxy in upper atmosphere density modelling will be considered. First, this is supported by the 99.9% correlation between the solar radio flux (F10.7 and the Mg II index over a period of 19 years with, however, large differences on time scales of days to months. Secondly, correlation between EUV emissions and the Mg II index has been shown recently, suggesting that this last index may also be used to describe the EUV variations. Using the same density dataset, a model was first run with the F10.7 index as a solar forcing function and second, with the Mg II index. Comparison of their respective predictions to partial density data showed a 3–8% higher precision when the modelling uses the Mg II index rather than F10.7. An external validation, by means of orbit computation, resulted in a 20–40% smaller RMS of the tracking residuals. A density dataset spanning an entire solar cycle, together with Mg II data, is required to construct an accurate, unbiased as possible density model.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; thermosphere – composition and chemistry – History of geophysics (atmospheric sciences

  12. Part 6: Modelling of simultaneous chemical-biological P removal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    This paper reviews three published models for simultaneous chemical phosphorus precipitation in ... could not form dynamically during the ensuing kinetic simulation. ... choice of certain key equilibrium (or solubility product) constants.

  13. Importance of predictor variables for models of chemical function

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Importance of random forest predictors for all classification models of chemical function. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Isaacs , K., M....

  14. Mathematical modeling of copper(II) ion inhibition on COD removal in an activated sludge unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamukoglu, M Yunus; Kargi, Fikret

    2007-07-19

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the Cu(II) ion inhibition on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from synthetic wastewater containing 15 mg l(-1) Cu(II) in an activated sludge unit. Experimental data obtained at different sludge ages (5-30 days) and hydraulic residence times (HRT) (5-25 h) were used to determine the kinetic, stoichiometric and inhibition constants for the COD removal rate in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions. The inhibition pattern was identified as non-competitive, since Cu(II) ion inhibitions were observed both on maximum specific substrate removal rate (k) and on the saturation constant (Ks) with the inhibition constants of 97 and 18 mg l(-1), respectively, indicating more pronounced inhibition on Ks. The growth yield coefficient (Y) decreased and the death rate constant (b) increased in the presence of Cu(II) ions due to copper ion toxicity on microbial growth with inhibition constants of 29 and 200 mg l(-1), respectively indicating more effective inhibition on the growth yield coefficient or higher maintenance requirements. The mathematical model with the predetermined kinetic constants was able to predict the system performance reasonably well especially at high HRT operations.

  15. Modelling of asymmetric nebulae. II. Line profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Morisset, C

    2006-01-01

    We present a tool, VELNEB_3D, which can be applied to the results of 3D photoionization codes to generate emission line profiles, position-velocity maps and 3D maps in any emission line by assuming an arbitrary velocity field. We give a few examples, based on our pseudo-3D photoionization code NEBU_3D (Morisset, Stasinska and Pena, 2005) which show the potentiality and usefulness of our tool. One example shows how complex line profiles can be obtained even with a simple expansion law if the nebula is bipolar and the slit slightly off-center. Another example shows different ways to produce line profiles that could be attributed to a turbulent velocity field while there is no turbulence in the model. A third example shows how, in certain circumstances, it is possible to discriminate between two very different geometrical structures -- here a face-on blister and its ``spherical impostor'' -- when using appropriate high resolution spectra. Finally, we show how our tool is able to generate 3D maps, similar to the ...

  16. Potts Flux Tube Model at Nonzero Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Condella, J; Condella, Jac; Tar, Carleton De

    2000-01-01

    We model the deconfinement phase transition in quantum chromodynamics at nonzero baryon number density and large quark mass by extending the flux tube model (three-state, three-dimensional Potts model) to nonzero chemical potential. In a direct numerical simulation we confirm mean-field-theory predictions that the deconfinement transition does not occur in a baryon-rich environment.

  17. NONLINEAR MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. SILVA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm for model predictive control is presented. The algorithm utilizes a simultaneous solution and optimization strategy to solve the model's differential equations. The equations are discretized by equidistant collocation, and along with the algebraic model equations are included as constraints in a nonlinear programming (NLP problem. This algorithm is compared with the algorithm that uses orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The equidistant collocation algorithm results in simpler equations, providing a decrease in computation time for the control moves. Simulation results are presented and show a satisfactory performance of this algorithm.

  18. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Chemical Release Modeling Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirrup, Timothy Scott [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This evaluation documents the methodology and results of chemical release modeling for operations at Building 518, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Core Facility. This evaluation is intended to supplement an update to the CINT [Standalone] Hazards Analysis (SHA). This evaluation also updates the original [Design] Hazards Analysis (DHA) completed in 2003 during the design and construction of the facility; since the original DHA, additional toxic materials have been evaluated and modeled to confirm the continued low hazard classification of the CINT facility and operations. This evaluation addresses the potential catastrophic release of the current inventory of toxic chemicals at Building 518 based on a standard query in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

  19. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  20. Thermodynamically consistent model calibration in chemical kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of biochemical reaction systems are constrained by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, which impose well-defined relationships among the reaction rate constants characterizing these systems. Constructing biochemical reaction systems from experimental observations often leads to parameter values that do not satisfy the necessary thermodynamic constraints. This can result in models that are not physically realizable and may lead to inaccurate, or even erroneous, descriptions of cellular function. Results We introduce a thermodynamically consistent model calibration (TCMC method that can be effectively used to provide thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of an open biochemical reaction system. The proposed method formulates the model calibration problem as a constrained optimization problem that takes thermodynamic constraints (and, if desired, additional non-thermodynamic constraints into account. By calculating thermodynamically feasible values for the kinetic parameters of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling cascade, we demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative significance of imposing thermodynamic constraints on these parameters and the effectiveness of our method for accomplishing this important task. MATLAB software, using the Systems Biology Toolbox 2.1, can be accessed from http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS lab/software.html. An SBML file containing the thermodynamically feasible EGF/ERK signaling cascade model can be found in the BioModels database. Conclusions TCMC is a simple and flexible method for obtaining physically plausible values for the kinetic parameters of open biochemical reaction systems. It can be effectively used to recalculate a thermodynamically consistent set of parameter values for existing thermodynamically infeasible biochemical reaction models of cellular function as well as to estimate thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of new

  1. Beyond standard model report of working group II

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, Anjan S; Roy, Probir

    1995-01-01

    Working group II at WHEPP3 concentrated on issues related to the supersymmetric standard model as well as SUSY GUTS and neutrino properties. The projects identified by various working groups as well as progress made in them since WHEPP3 are briefly reviewed.

  2. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Model for TNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for 2,4,6-tri-nitrotoluene (TNT) has been developed to explore problems of explosive performance and soot formation during the destruction of munitions. The TNT mechanism treats only gas-phase reactions. Reactions for the decomposition of TNT and for the consumption of intermediate products formed from TNT are assembled based on information from the literature and on current understanding of aromatic chemistry. Thermodynamic properties of intermediate and radical species are estimated by group additivity. Reaction paths are developed based on similar paths for aromatic hydrocarbons. Reaction-rate constant expressions are estimated from the literature and from analogous reactions where the rate constants are available. The detailed reaction mechanism for TNT is added to existing reaction mechanisms for RDX and for hydrocarbons. Computed results show the effect of oxygen concentration on the amount of soot precursors that are formed in the combustion of RDX and TNT mixtures in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures.

  3. Modeling food matrix effects on chemical reactivity: Challenges and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Edoardo; Oliviero, Teresa; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2017-06-29

    The same chemical reaction may be different in terms of its position of the equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamics) and its kinetics when studied in different foods. The diversity in the chemical composition of food and in its structural organization at macro-, meso-, and microscopic levels, that is, the food matrix, is responsible for this difference. In this viewpoint paper, the multiple, and interconnected ways the food matrix can affect chemical reactivity are summarized. Moreover, mechanistic and empirical approaches to explain and predict the effect of food matrix on chemical reactivity are described. Mechanistic models aim to quantify the effect of food matrix based on a detailed understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in food. Their applicability is limited at the moment to very simple food systems. Empirical modeling based on machine learning combined with data-mining techniques may represent an alternative, useful option to predict the effect of the food matrix on chemical reactivity and to identify chemical and physical properties to be further tested. In such a way the mechanistic understanding of the effect of the food matrix on chemical reactions can be improved.

  4. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  5. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  6. Multi-pathway exposure modelling of chemicals in cosmetics ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present a novel multi-pathway, mass balance based, fate and exposure model compatible with life cycle and high-throughput screening assessments of chemicals in cosmetic products. The exposures through product use as well as post-use emissions and environmental media were quantified based on the chemical mass originally applied via a product, multiplied by the product intake fractions (PiF, the fraction of a chemical in a product that is taken in by exposed persons) to yield intake rates. The average PiFs for the evaluated chemicals in shampoo ranged from 3 × 10− 4 up to 0.3 for rapidly absorbed ingredients. Average intake rates ranged between nano- and micrograms per kilogram bodyweight per day; the order of chemical prioritization was strongly affected by the ingredient concentration in shampoo. Dermal intake and inhalation (for 20% of the evaluated chemicals) during use dominated exposure, while the skin permeation coefficient dominated the estimated uncertainties. The fraction of chemical taken in by a shampoo user often exceeded, by orders of magnitude, the aggregated fraction taken in by the population through post-use environmental emissions. Chemicals with relatively high octanol-water partitioning and/or volatility, and low molecular weight tended to have higher use stage exposure. Chemicals with low intakes during use (< 1%) and subsequent high post-use emissions, however, may yield comparable intake for a member of the general population. The pre

  7. Implementation and evaluation of an array of chemical solvers in a global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lee

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the implementation and performance of an array of gas-phase chemistry solvers for the state-of-the-science GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. The implementation is based on the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP. Two perl parsers automatically generate the needed interfaces between GEOS-Chem and KPP, and allow access to the chemical simulation code without any additional programming effort. This work illustrates the potential of KPP to positively impact global chemical transport modeling by providing additional functionality as follows. (1 The user can select a highly efficient numerical integration method from an array of solvers available in the KPP library. (2 KPP offers extreme flexibility for studies that involve changing the chemical mechanism (e.g., a set of additional reactions is automatically translated into efficient code and incorporated into a modified global model. (3 This work provides immediate access to tangent linear, continuous adjoint, and discrete adjoint chemical models, with applications to sensitivity analysis and data assimilation.

  8. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  9. Chempy: A flexible chemical evolution model for abundance fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybizki, J.; Just, A.; Rix, H.-W.; Fouesneau, M.

    2017-02-01

    Chempy models Galactic chemical evolution (GCE); it is a parametrized open one-zone model within a Bayesian framework. A Chempy model is specified by a set of 5-10 parameters that describe the effective galaxy evolution along with the stellar and star-formation physics: e.g. the star-formation history (SFH), the feedback efficiency, the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and the incidence of supernova of type Ia (SN Ia). Chempy can sample the posterior probability distribution in the full model parameter space and test data-model matches for different nucleosynthetic yield sets, performing essentially as a chemical evolution fitting tool. Chempy can be used to confront predictions from stellar nucleosynthesis with complex abundance data sets and to refine the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of stellar systems.

  10. The hydrodynamical models of the cometary compact H II region

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jiang-Shui; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a full numerical method to study the gas dynamics of cometary ultra-compact (UC) H II regions, and associated photodissociation regions (PDRs). The bow-shock and champagne-flow models with a $40.9/21.9 M_\\odot$ star are simulated. In the bow-shock models, the massive star is assumed to move through dense ($n=8000~cm^{-3}$) molecular material with a stellar velocity of $15~km~s^{-1}$. In the champagne-flow models, an exponential distribution of density with a scale height of 0.2 pc is assumed. The profiles of the [Ne II] 12.81\\mum and $H_2~S(2)$ lines from the ionized regions and PDRs are compared for two sets of models. In champagne-flow models, emission lines from the ionized gas clearly show the effect of acceleration along the direction toward the tail due to the density gradient. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell is mainly due to the expansion of the H II region. However, in bow-shock models the ionized gas mainly moves in the same direction as the stellar motion...

  11. Composition of early planetary atmospheres - II. Coupled Dust and chemical evolution in protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cridland, A. J.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Birnstiel, Tilman; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2017-08-01

    We present the next step in a series of papers devoted to connecting the composition of the atmospheres of forming planets with the chemistry of their natal evolving protoplanetary discs. The model presented here computes the coupled chemical and dust evolution of the disc and the formation of three planets per disc model. Our three canonical planet traps produce a Jupiter near 1 AU, a Hot Jupiter and a Super-Earth. We study the dependence of the final orbital radius, mass, and atmospheric chemistry of planets forming in disc models with initial disc masses that vary by 0.02 M⊙ above and below our fiducial model (M_{disc,0} = 0.1 M_{⊙}). We compute C/O and C/N for the atmospheres formed in our three models and find that C/Oplanet ˜ C/O_{disc}, which does not vary strongly between different planets formed in our model. The nitrogen content of atmospheres can vary in planets that grow in different disc models. These differences are related to the formation history of the planet, the time and location that the planet accretes its atmosphere, and are encoded in the bulk abundance of NH3. These results suggest that future observations of atmospheric NH3 and an estimation of the planetary C/O and C/N can inform the formation history of particular planetary systems.

  12. Synthesis and physico-chemical characterization of zinc(II, nickel(II and cobalt(II complexes with 2-phenyl-2-imidazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podunavac-Kuzmanović Sanja O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorides and nitrates of zinc(II, nickel(II and cobalt(II react with 2-phenyl-2-imidazoline to give complexes of the type [ML2X2]·nH2O (M=Zn, Ni or Co; L=2-phenyl-2-imidazoline; X=Cl or NO3; n=0, 1 or 2. The complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis of the metal molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility measurements and IR spectra. The molar conductances of the zinc(II complexes in DMF solutions indicate that the complexes behave as non-electrolytes. The values of magnetic conductivity in the case of nickel(II complexes indicate that one of the coordinated anions (chloride or nitrate has been replaced by DMF molecule. The molar conductivity values of cobalt(II complexes indicate the partial substitution of coordinated anions with solvent molecules. The room temperature effective magnetic moments and IR data of the complexes suggest that all Zn(II, Ni(II and Co(II complexes have a tetrahedral configuration, which is realized by participation of the pyridine nitrogen of two organic ligand molecules, and two chloride or nitrate anions typical for these classes of organic ligands.

  13. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  14. Tests of the higher order turbulence model for atmospheric circulations (HOTMAC) at Deseret Chemical Depot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costigan, K.R.

    1998-11-01

    Deseret Chemical Depot is one of the US Army`s storage facilities for its stockpile of chemical weapon agents. Congress has directed the Department of Defense to eliminate the aging stockpiles, which have existed since the end of World War II, and the US Army is destroying these lethal chemical munitions. Although the danger is slight, accurate predictions of the wind field in the valley are necessary for dispersion calculations in the event of an accident involving toxic chemicals at the depot. There are several small communities in Rush and Tooele valleys, including the town of Tooele, and Salt Lake City is located 65 km to the Northeast of Deseret Chemical Depot South area, at 1,300 m MSL and beyond the Oquirrh Mountains. The purpose of this report is to carry out three-dimensional numerical simulations of the atmospheric circulations in the region around Deseret Chemical Depot with the Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric Circulations (HOTMAC) and to evaluate the performance of the model. The code had been modified to assimilate local meteorological observations through the use of Newtonian nudging. The nudging scheme takes advantage of the extensive network of local observations in the valley.

  15. Extension of association models to complex chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Ane Søgaard

    Summary of “Extension of association models to complex chemicals”. Ph.D. thesis by Ane Søgaard Avlund The subject of this thesis is application of SAFT type equations of state (EoS). Accurate and predictive thermodynamic models are important in many industries including the petroleum industry....... The SAFT EoS was developed 20 years ago, and a large number of papers on the subject has been published since, but many issues still remain unsolved. These issues are both theoretical and practical. The SAFT theory does not account for intramolecular association, it can only treat flexible chains, and does...... not account for steric self-hindrance for tree-like structures. An important practical problem is how to obtain optimal and consistent parameters. Moreover, multifunctional associating molecules represent a special challenge. In this work two equations of state using the SAFT theory for association are used...

  16. The chemically controlled synthesis of dust in type II-P supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejecta of solar metallicity, Type II-P supernovae using a chemical kinetic approach. We follow the evolution of molecules and small dust cluster masses from day 100 to day 1500 after explosion. We consider stellar progenitors with initial mass of 12, 15, 19 and 25 Msun that explode as supernovae with stratified ejecta. The molecular precursors to dust grains comprise molecular chains, rings and small clusters of silica, silicates, metal oxides, sulphides and carbides, pure metals, and carbon, where the nucleation of silicate clusters is described by a two-step process of metal and oxygen addition. We study the impact of the 56Ni mass on the type and amount of synthesised dust. We predict that large masses of molecules including CO, SiO, SiS, O2, and SO form in the ejecta. We show that the discrepancy between the small dust masses detected at infrared wavelengths some 500 days post-explosion and the larger amounts of dust recently detected with Hersc...

  17. Bayesian molecular design with a chemical language model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikebata, Hisaki; Hongo, Kenta; Isomura, Tetsu; Maezono, Ryo; Yoshida, Ryo

    2017-03-09

    The aim of computational molecular design is the identification of promising hypothetical molecules with a predefined set of desired properties. We address the issue of accelerating the material discovery with state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. The method involves two different types of prediction; the forward and backward predictions. The objective of the forward prediction is to create a set of machine learning models on various properties of a given molecule. Inverting the trained forward models through Bayes' law, we derive a posterior distribution for the backward prediction, which is conditioned by a desired property requirement. Exploring high-probability regions of the posterior with a sequential Monte Carlo technique, molecules that exhibit the desired properties can computationally be created. One major difficulty in the computational creation of molecules is the exclusion of the occurrence of chemically unfavorable structures. To circumvent this issue, we derive a chemical language model that acquires commonly occurring patterns of chemical fragments through natural language processing of ASCII strings of existing compounds, which follow the SMILES chemical language notation. In the backward prediction, the trained language model is used to refine chemical strings such that the properties of the resulting structures fall within the desired property region while chemically unfavorable structures are successfully removed. The present method is demonstrated through the design of small organic molecules with the property requirements on HOMO-LUMO gap and internal energy. The R package iqspr is available at the CRAN repository.

  18. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and Antimicrobial Studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II Complexes of ONO Schiff Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Mendu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II complexes have been synthesized from the schiff base ligand L. The schiff base ligand [(4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl methylene] benzohydrazide (L has been synthesized by the reaction between chromone-3-carbaldehyde and benzoyl hydrazine. The nature of bonding and geometry of the transition metal complexes as well as schiff base ligand L have been deduced from elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1HNMR, ESR spectral studies, mass, thermal (TGA and DTA analysis, magnetic susceptibility, and molar conductance measurements. Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Mn(II metal ions are forming 1:2 (M:L complexes, Zn(II is forming 1:1 (M:L complex. Based on elemental, conductance and spectral studies, six-coordinated geometry was assigned for Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II complexes. The complexes are 1:2 electrolytes in DMSO except zinc complex, which is neutral in DMSO. The ligand L acts as tridentate and coordinates through nitrogen atom of azomethine group, oxygen atom of keto group of γ-pyrone ring and oxygen atom of hydrazoic group of benzoyl hydrazine. The 3D molecular modeling and energies of all the compounds are furnished. The biological activity of the ligand and its complexes have been studied on the four bacteria E. coli, Edwardella, Pseudomonas, and B. subtilis and two fungi pencillium and tricoderma by well disc and fusion method and found that the metal chelates are more active than the free schiff base ligand.

  19. Visual Basic and Excel in Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, Michael; Easter, Jesse; Cohn, Kim

    1998-05-01

    A series of modules were prepared to model some topics in molecular mechanics and computational chemistry. In order to make modules that would be useful in personal, academic or professional situations and to make them easy to use on both IBM and Macintosh compatible computers as well as require little or no computational, advanced mathematical or programming skills we settled on Microsoft Excel as the program of choice. The release of Excel 5.0 incorporates Visual Basic. This allows the use of custom commands, menus, dialog boxes, buttons and custom on-line help.

  20. Cleaner combustion developing detailed chemical kinetic models

    CERN Document Server

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This overview compiles the on-going research in Europe to enlarge and deepen the understanding of the reaction mechanisms and pathways associated with the combustion of an increased range of fuels. Focus is given to the formation of a large number of hazardous minor pollutants and the inability of current combustion models to predict the  formation of minor products such as alkenes, dienes, aromatics, aldehydes and soot nano-particles which have a deleterious impact on both the environment and on human health. Cleaner Combustion describes, at a fundamental level, the reactive chemistry of min

  1. Structural, spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of acetyl hydrazone oxime and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yunus; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T.; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2015-09-01

    Acetyl hydrazone oxime, [(1E,2E)-2-(hydroxyimino)-1-phenylethylidene]acetohydrazone (hipeahH2) and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes, [M(hipeahH)2] (M = PdII and PtII), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis IR, NMR and LC-MS techniques. X-ray diffraction analysis of [Pd(hipeahH)2] shows that the two hipeahH2 ligands are not equal; one of the ligands loses the hydrazone proton, while the other one loses the oxime proton, resulting in a different coordination behavior to form five- and six-membered chelate rings. The molecular geometries from X-ray experiments in the ground state were compared using the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method combined with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the ligand and the LanL2DZ basis set for the complexes. Comprehensive theoretical and experimental structural studies on the molecule have been carried out by FT-IR, NMR and UV-vis spectrometry. In addition, the isomer studies of ligand and its complexes were made by DFT.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and chemical properties of 1-((E)-2-pyridinylmethylidene)semicarbazone manganese(II) and iron(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbelini, Ellery Regina; Martin, Maria da Graça M. B.; Back, Davi Fernando; Evans, David John; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Ronny Rocha; Lang, Ernesto Schulz; Nunes, Fábio Souza

    2012-01-01

    Manganese(II) perchlorate and iron(II) chloride react with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone (HCSpy) in boiling ethanol to produce [Mn II(HSCpy) 2](ClO 4) 2·C 2H 5OH and [Fe IICl(HSCpy)]Cl. The distorted octahedral manganese complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group P(-1). The ligand HSCpy is tridentate and is coordinated through two nitrogen and one oxygen atoms. Comparison of the bond distances with analogous transition metal complexes that have the same geometry revealed longer bonds for the manganese derivative, an outcome that correlates well with the radius of the metal ions. The iron(II) ion is tetracoordinated to one semicarbazone and one chloride. Mass spectrometry, conductivity measurements, Mössbauer, UV-VIS, FTIR and elemental analysis were all in accordance with the proposed composition and the plausible geometry of [FeCl(HSCpy)]Cl. Mass spectrometry unequivocally detected the presence of the [FeCl(HSCpy)] + ion with a m/ z of 254.97 and intensity of 2 × 10 5.

  3. ZEBRAFISH AS AN IN VIVO MODEL FOR SUSTAINABLE CHEMICAL DESIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Pamela D; Garcia, Gloria R; Tanguay, Robert L

    2016-12-21

    Heightened public awareness about the many thousands of chemicals in use and present as persistent contaminants in the environment has increased the demand for safer chemicals and more rigorous toxicity testing. There is a growing recognition that the use of traditional test models and empirical approaches is impractical for screening for toxicity the many thousands of chemicals in the environment and the hundreds of new chemistries introduced each year. These realities coupled with the green chemistry movement have prompted efforts to implement more predictive-based approaches to evaluate chemical toxicity early in product development. While used for many years in environmental toxicology and biomedicine, zebrafish use has accelerated more recently in genetic toxicology, high throughput screening (HTS), and behavioral testing. This review describes major advances in these testing methods that have positioned the zebrafish as a highly applicable model in chemical safety evaluations and sustainable chemistry efforts. Many toxic responses have been shown to be shared among fish and mammals owing to their generally well-conserved development, cellular networks, and organ systems. These shared responses have been observed for chemicals that impair endocrine functioning, development, and reproduction, as well as those that elicit cardiotoxicity and carcinogenicity, among other diseases. HTS technologies with zebrafish enable screening large chemical libraries for bioactivity that provide opportunities for testing early in product development. A compelling attribute of the zebrafish centers on being able to characterize toxicity mechanisms across multiple levels of biological organization from the genome to receptor interactions and cellular processes leading to phenotypic changes such as developmental malformations. Finally, there is a growing recognition of the links between human and wildlife health and the need for approaches that allow for assessment of real world

  4. Synthesis, physico-chemical investigations of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes and their in vitro microbial, cytotoxic, DNA cleavage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagihalli, Gangadhar B; Patil, Sangamesh A

    2010-06-01

    A series of metal complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), and copper(II) have been synthesized with newly derived biologically active ligands. These ligands were synthesized by the condensation of 2-amino-4-phenyl-1,3-thiazole with 8-formyl-7-hydroxy- 4-methylcoumarin. The probable structure of the complexes has been proposed on the basis of analytical and spectroscopic data (IR, UV-Vis, ESR, FAB-mass, and thermoanalytical). Electrochemical study of the complexes is also reported. Elemental analysis of the complexes confined them to stoichiometry of the type ML(2).2H(2)O [M = Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)]. The Schiff base and its metal(II) complexes have been screened for their antibacterial (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus pyogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal activities (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, and Cladosporium) by the MIC method. The brine shrimp bioassay was carried out to study their in vitro cytotoxic properties, and also the Schiff base and its metal(II) complexes have been studied for DNA cleavage.

  5. A model for chemically-induced mechanical loading on MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiot, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    , and displacements). As these phenomena usually arise from species adsorption, adsorbate modification or surface reconstruction, they are surface-related by nature and thus require some dedicated mechanical modeling. The accompanying mechanical modeling proposed herein is intended to represent the chemical part......The development of full displacement field measurements as an alternative to the optical lever technique to measure the mechanical response for microelectro-mechanical systems components in their environment calls for a modeling of chemically-induced mechanical fields (stress, strain...

  6. A Coupled Chemical and Mass Transport Model for Concrete Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    curves which is established from a set of mathematical criteria. The chemical degradation is modelled with the geochemical code iphreeqc, which provides a general tool for evaluating different paste compositions. The governing system of equations is solved by the finite element method with a Newton......-Raphson iteration scheme arising from the non-linearity. The overall model is a transient problem, solved using a single parameter formulation. The sorption hysteresis and chemical equilibrium is included as source or sink terms. The advantages with this formulation is that each node in the discrete system has......In this paper a general continuum theory is used to evaluate the service life of cement based materials, in terms of mass transport processes and chemical degradation of the solid matrix. The model established is a reactive mass transport model, based on an extended version of the Poisson...

  7. Atomic data for S II - Toward Better Diagnostics of Chemical Evolution in High-redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kisielius, Romas; Ferland, Gary J; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Lykins, Matt L

    2013-01-01

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in the nearby as well as distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is, naturally, limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform the new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state-of-the-art quantal calculations. Here we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-ralativistic and ...

  8. Consequence and Resilience Modeling for Chemical Supply Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamber, Kevin L.; Vugrin, Eric D.; Ehlen, Mark A.; Sun, Amy C.; Warren, Drake E.; Welk, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. chemical sector produces more than 70,000 chemicals that are essential material inputs to critical infrastructure systems, such as the energy, public health, and food and agriculture sectors. Disruptions to the chemical sector can potentially cascade to other dependent sectors, resulting in serious national consequences. To address this concern, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) tasked Sandia National Laboratories to develop a predictive consequence modeling and simulation capability for global chemical supply chains. This paper describes that capability , which includes a dynamic supply chain simulation platform called N_ABLE(tm). The paper also presents results from a case study that simulates the consequences of a Gulf Coast hurricane on selected segments of the U.S. chemical sector. The case study identified consequences that include impacted chemical facilities, cascading impacts to other parts of the chemical sector. and estimates of the lengths of chemical shortages and recovery . Overall. these simulation results can DHS prepare for and respond to actual disruptions.

  9. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  10. Model Based Monitoring and Control of Chemical and Biochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    This presentation will give an overview of the work performed at the department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering related to process control. A research vision is formulated and related to a number of active projects at the department. In more detail a project describing model estimation...... and controller tuning in Model Predictive Control application is discussed....

  11. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  12. Identification of Chemical Reactor Plant’s Mathematical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyakillya Boris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a solution of the identification problem of chemical reactor plant’s mathematical model. The main goal is to obtain a mathematical description of a chemical reactor plant from experimental data, which based on plant’s time response measurements. This data consists sequence of measurements for water jacket temperature and information about control input signal, which is used to govern plant’s behavior.

  13. Hydrogeochemical modeling of groundwater chemical environmental evolution in Hebei Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永海; 沈照理; 钟佐燊

    1997-01-01

    Using the hydrogeochemical modeling method, the groundwater chemical environmental problems of the Hebei Plain which involve increasing of hardness and total dissolved solids in piedmont area and mixing of saline water with fresh water in middle-eastern area are studied. The water-rock interactions and mass transfer along a ground-water flow path and in mixing processes are calculated. Thus the evolution mechanisms of the groundwater chemical environment are brought to light.

  14. Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    under two different conditions corresponding to marginally stable and unstable operation in order to evaluate the performance of the chemical kinetics...instability is a complex interaction between acoustics and the heat release due to combustion.In rocket engines, which are acoustically compact, there is...and amplitudes remains a challenge. The present article is an attempt towards addressing such discrepancies by enhancing the chemical kinetics model

  15. Towards chemical analysis of nanostructures in biofilms II: tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas; Messmer, Andreas; Yeo, Boon-Siang; Zhang, Weihua; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-07-01

    This study examines the feasibility of using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) for label-free chemical characterization of nanostructures in biological systems. For this purpose, a well-defined model system consisting of calcium alginate fibers is studied. In a companion paper, calcium alginate fibers and their network structures were shown to be a good model for the extracellular polysaccharides of biofilms at the nanoscale. TERS analysis of biological macromolecules, such as alginates, is complicated by heterogeneity in their sequence, molecular weight, and conformations, their small Raman cross-section, and the large number of functional groups, which can chemically interact with the silver surface of the tip and cause significant band shifts. Due to these effects, Raman frequencies in TERS spectra of biopolymers do not necessarily resemble band positions in the normal Raman spectrum of the bulk material, as is the case for less complex samples (e.g., dye molecules) studied so far. Additionally, analyte decomposition due to laser heating can have a significant influence, and carbon contamination signals can sometimes even overwhelm the weak analyte signals. Based on the investigation of alginates, strategies for spectra correction, choice of appropriate reference samples, and data interpretation are presented. With this approach, characteristic frequency ranges and specific marker bands can be found for biological macromolecules that can be employed for their identification in complex environments.

  16. Modeling and Analysis of NGC System using Ptolemy II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Sreekumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Model based system design has been used in real time embedded systems for validating and testing during the development lifecycle. Computation models - synchronous dataflow model (SDF and Discrete Event (DE have been used and finite state machine has been integrated with SDF and Discrete Event (DE modeling domains for simulating the functionalities in the system. Here a case study of resource augmented Navigation, Guidance and Control unit of onboard computers in satellite launch vehicle has been selected as a frame work and fault tolerant algorithm has been modeled and simulated with Ptolemy II. Feasibility of the scheduling of the fault tolerant algorithm has been analyzed and dependencies existing between different components and processes in the system have been investigated. The future work consists of modeling original functionality of NGC units inside each state of FSM and can be validated for the correct performance. Non-deterministic communication and clock drifts can be accounted into the model.

  17. Synthesis, physico-chemical studies of manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with some p-substituted acetophenone benzoylhydrazones and their antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinod P; Singh, Shweta; Katiyar, Anshu

    2009-04-01

    Complexes of the type [M(pabh)(H2O)Cl], [M(pcbh)(H2O)Cl] and [M(Hpabh)(H2O)2 (SO4)] where, M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); Hpabh = p-amino acetophenone benzoyl hydrazone and Hpcbh = p-chloro acetophenone benzoyl hydrazone have been synthesized and characterized with the help of elemental analyses, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, ESR and IR spectra, thermal (TGA & DTA) and X-ray diffraction studies. Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) chloride complexes are square planar, whereas their sulfate complexes have spin-free octahedral geometry. ESR spectra of Cu(II) complexes with Hpabh are axial and suggest d(x(2)-y(2) as the ground state. The ligand is bidentate bonding through > C = N--and deprotonated enolate group in all the chloro complexes, whereas, >C = N and >C = O groups in all the sulfato complexes. Thermal studies (TGA & DTA) on [Cu(Hpabh)(H2O)2(SO4)] indicate a multistep decomposition pattern, which are both exothermic and endothermic in nature. X-ray powder diffraction parameters for [Co(pabh)(H2O)Cl] and [Ni(Hpabh)(H2O)2(SO4)] correspond to tetragonal and orthorhombic crystal lattices, respectively. The ligands as well as their complexes show a significant antifungal and antibacterial activity. The metal complexes are more active than the ligand.

  18. Models of chemical biosignatures - a vibrational spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, B.; Böttger, U.; Hübers, H.-W.; deVera, J.-P.; Fox, S.; Strasdeit, H.

    2013-09-01

    Investigating possible biosignatures is of central interest in the search for the oldest traces of terrestrial life. Possible biosignatures are: (i) physical structures, such as fossilized single-celled or colonyforming microorganisms; (ii) biomolecules and their altered residues (chemical biosignatures); (iii) altered element, isotope and mineral compositions in former microbial habitats and related effects caused by metabolic activity [1]. New insights in this field of research are also important in the search for life on other planets and moons, especially Mars. However, abiotically formed organic compounds are widely distributed in the universe. Therefore, in future Mars missions, it will be essential to know whether organic molecules are actually of biological origin. Here, we describe the syntheses and spectroscopic (Raman and infrared) properties of artificial chemical biosignatures that might help answering this question.

  19. Sensitivity of chemical tracers to meteorological parameters in the MOZART-3 chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, D. E.; Brasseur, G. P.; Walters, S.; Garcia, R. R.; Marsh, D. R.; Sassi, F.; Harvey, V. L.; Randall, C. E.; Emmons, L.; Lamarque, J. F.; Hess, P.; Orlando, J. J.; Tie, X. X.; Randel, W.; Pan, L. L.; Gettelman, A.; Granier, C.; Diehl, T.; Niemeier, U.; Simmons, A. J.

    2007-10-01

    The Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 3 (MOZART-3), which represents the chemical and physical processes from the troposphere through the lower mesosphere, was used to evaluate the representation of long-lived tracers and ozone using three different meteorological fields. The meteorological fields are based on (1) the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, version 1b (WACCM1b), (2) the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis, and (3) a new reanalysis for year 2000 from ECMWF called EXP471. Model-derived tracers (methane, water vapor, and total inorganic nitrogen) and ozone are compared to data climatologies from satellites. Model mean age of air was also derived and compared to in situ CO2 and SF6 data. A detailed analysis of the chemical fields simulated by MOZART-3 shows that even though the general features characterizing the three dynamical sets are rather similar, slight differences in winds and temperature can produce substantial differences in the calculated distributions of chemical tracers. The MOZART-3 simulations that use meteorological fields from WACCM1b and ECMWF EXP471 represented best the distribution of long-lived tracers and mean age of air in the stratosphere. There was a significant improvement using the ECMWF EXP471 reanalysis data product over the ECMWF operational data product. The effect of the quasi-biennial oscillation circulation on long-lived tracers and ozone is examined.

  20. Chemical modification of silica gel with synthesized new Schiff base derivatives and sorption studies of cobalt (II) and nickel (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kursunlu, Ahmed Nuri, E-mail: ankursunlu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Selcuk University, Campus, 42075, Konya (Turkey); Guler, Ersin; Dumrul, Hakan; Kocyigit, Ozcan; Gubbuk, Ilkay Hilal [Department of Chemistry, Selcuk University, Campus, 42075, Konya (Turkey)

    2009-08-15

    In this study, three Schiff base ligands and their complexes were synthesized and characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis and magnetic susceptibility apparatuses. Silica gel was respectively modified with Schiff base derivatives, (E)-2-[(2-chloroethylimino)methyl]phenol, (E)-4-[(2-chloroethylimino)methyl]phenol and N,N'-[1,4-phenilendi(E)methylidene]bis(2-chloroethanamine), after silanization of silica gel by (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTS) by using a suitable method. Characterization of the surface modification was also performed with IR, TGA and elemental analysis. The immobilized surfaces were used for Co(II) and Ni(II) sorption from aqueous solutions and values of sorption were detected by atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS).

  1. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Modelling of variability of the chemically peculiar star phi Draconis

    CERN Document Server

    Prvák, Milan; Krtička, Jiří; Mikulášek, Zdeněk; Lüftinger, T

    2015-01-01

    Context: The presence of heavier chemical elements in stellar atmospheres influences the spectral energy distribution (SED) of stars. An uneven surface distribution of these elements, together with flux redistribution and stellar rotation, are commonly believed to be the primary causes of the variability of chemically peculiar (CP) stars. Aims: We aim to model the photometric variability of the CP star PHI Dra based on the assumption of inhomogeneous surface distribution of heavier elements and compare it to the observed variability of the star. We also intend to identify the processes that contribute most significantly to its photometric variability. Methods: We use a grid of TLUSTY model atmospheres and the SYNSPEC code to model the radiative flux emerging from the individual surface elements of PHI Dra with different chemical compositions. We integrate the emerging flux over the visible surface of the star at different phases throughout the entire rotational period to synthesise theoretical light curves of...

  3. CHEMICAL REACTIONS SIMULATED BY GROUND-WATER-QUALITY MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, David B.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent literature concerning the modeling of chemical reactions during transport in ground water is examined with emphasis on sorption reactions. The theory of transport and reactions in porous media has been well documented. Numerous equations have been developed from this theory, to provide both continuous and sequential or multistep models, with the water phase considered for both mobile and immobile phases. Chemical reactions can be either equilibrium or non-equilibrium, and can be quantified in linear or non-linear mathematical forms. Non-equilibrium reactions can be separated into kinetic and diffusional rate-limiting mechanisms. Solutions to the equations are available by either analytical expressions or numerical techniques. Saturated and unsaturated batch, column, and field studies are discussed with one-dimensional, laboratory-column experiments predominating. A summary table is presented that references the various kinds of models studied and their applications in predicting chemical concentrations in ground waters.

  4. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  5. Nahoon: Time-dependent gas-phase chemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelam, V.

    2014-09-01

    Nahoon is a gas-phase chemical model that computes the chemical evolution in a 1D temperature and density structure. It uses chemical networks downloaded from the KInetic Database for Astrochemistry (KIDA) but the model can be adapted to any network. The program is written in Fortran 90 and uses the DLSODES (double precision) solver from the ODEPACK package to solve the coupled stiff differential equations. The solver computes the chemical evolution of gas-phase species at a fixed temperature and density and can be used in one dimension (1D) if a grid of temperature, density, and visual extinction is provided. Grains, both neutral and negatively charged, and electrons are considered as chemical species and their concentrations are computed at the same time as those of the other species. Nahoon contains a test to check the temperature range of the validity of the rate coefficients and avoid extrapolations outside this range. A test is also included to check for duplication of chemical reactions, defined over complementary ranges of temperature.

  6. Synthesis, Biological, and Quantum Chemical Studies of Zn(II and Ni(II Mixed-Ligand Complexes Derived from N,N-Disubstituted Dithiocarbamate and Benzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C. Ekennia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some mixed-ligand complexes of Zn(II and Ni(II derived from the sodium salt of N-alkyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate and benzoic acid have been prepared. The complexes are represented as ZnMDBz, ZnEDBz, NiMDBz, and NiEDBz (MD: N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, ED: N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, and Bz: benzoate; and their coordination behavior was characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements, and quantum chemical calculations. The magnetic moment measurement and electronic spectra were in agreement with the four proposed coordinate geometries for nickel and zinc complexes and were corroborated by the theoretical quantum chemical calculations. The quantum chemically derived thermodynamics parameters revealed that the formation of N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate complexes is more thermodynamically favourable than that of the N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate complexes. The bioefficacy of the mixed-ligand complexes examined against different microbes showed moderate to high activity against the test microbes. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant studies of the metal complexes showed that the ethyl substituted dithiocarbamate complexes exhibited better anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties than the methyl substituted dithiocarbamate complexes.

  7. A model for chemically-induced mechanical loading on MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiot, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    The development of full displacement field measurements as an alternative to the optical lever technique to measure the mechanical response for microelectro-mechanical systems components in their environment calls for a modeling of chemically-induced mechanical fields (stress, strain, and displac......The development of full displacement field measurements as an alternative to the optical lever technique to measure the mechanical response for microelectro-mechanical systems components in their environment calls for a modeling of chemically-induced mechanical fields (stress, strain...

  8. Chemical Processes in Protoplanetary Disks II. On the importance of photochemistry and X-ray ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T J; Aikawa, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization, here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO+, N2H+, H2O, CO2 and CH3OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N2H+ indicating it is safe to adopt existi...

  9. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model for solution conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Malcolm S; Leij, Feike J

    2014-02-01

    Solute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to relatively complex and inaccessible solution conduits where transport is often rapid, turbulent, and at times constrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests in solution conduits are typically positively-skewed with long tails evident. Physical nonequilibrium models to fit breakthrough curves for tracer tests in solution conduits are now routinely employed. Chemical nonequilibrium processes are likely important interactions, however. In addition to partitioning between different flow domains, there may also be equilibrium and nonequilibrium partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. A combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was developed for an instantaneous release similar to that developed by Leij and Bradford (2009) for a pulse release. The PCNE model allows for partitioning open space in solution conduits into mobile and immobile flow regions with first-order mass transfer between the two regions to represent physical nonequilibrium in the conduit. Partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases proceeds either as an equilibrium process or as a first-order process and represents chemical nonequilibrium for both the mobile and immobile regions. Application of the model to three example breakthrough curves demonstrates the applicability of the combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium model to tracer tests conducted in karst aquifers, with exceptionally good model fits to the data. The three models, each from a different state in the United States, exhibit very different velocities, dispersions, and other transport properties with most of the transport occurring via the fraction of mobile water. Fitting the model suggests the potentially important interaction of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes.

  10. Fitting the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhardt, Otto

    2014-01-01

    We present the current status of the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II. Taking into account all available relevant information, we exclude at $95$% CL sizeable deviations of the so-called alignment limit, in which all couplings of the light CP-even Higgs boson $h$ are Standard-Model-like. While we can set a lower limit of $240$ GeV on the mass of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson at $95$% CL, the mass of the heavy CP-even Higgs boson $H$ can be even lighter than $200$ GeV. The strong constraints on the model parameters also set limits on the triple Higgs couplings: the $hhh$ coupling in the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II cannot be larger than in the Standard Model, while the $hhH$ coupling can maximally be $2.5$ times the size of the Standard Model $hhh$ coupling, assuming an $H$ mass below $1$ TeV. The selection of benchmark scenarios which maximize specific effects within the allowed regions for further collider studies is illustrated for the $H$ branching fraction to fermions and gauge bosons. As an exampl...

  11. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding science. However, many studies have determined that the use of models in science education can contribute to students' difficulties understanding the topic, and that students generally find chemical bonding a challenging topic. The aim of this study is to investigate teachers' knowledge of teaching chemical bonding. The study focuses on three essential components of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK): (1) the students' understanding, (2) representations, and (3) instructional strategies. We analyzed lesson plans about chemical bonding generated by 10 chemistry teachers with whom we also conducted semi-structured interviews about their teaching. Our results revealed that the teachers were generally unaware of how the representations of models they used affected student comprehension. The teachers had trouble specifying students' difficulties in understanding. Moreover, most of the instructional strategies described were generic and insufficient for promoting student understanding. Additionally, the teachers' rationale for choosing a specific representation or activity was seldom directed at addressing students' understanding. Our results indicate that both PCK components require improvement, and suggest that the two components should be connected. Implications for the professional development of pre-service and in-service teachers are discussed.

  12. Photon Number Conserving Models of H II Bubbles during Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Paranjape, Aseem; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2015-01-01

    Traditional excursion set based models of H II bubble growth during the epoch of reionization are known to violate photon number conservation, in the sense that the mass fraction in ionized bubbles in these models does not equal the ratio of the number of ionizing photons produced by sources and the number of hydrogen atoms in the intergalactic medium. We demonstrate that this problem arises from a fundamental conceptual shortcoming of the excursion set approach (already recognised in the literature on this formalism) which only tracks average mass fractions instead of the exact, stochastic source counts. With this insight, we build an approximately photon number conserving Monte Carlo model of bubble growth based on partitioning regions of dark matter into halos. Our model, which is formally valid for white noise initial conditions (ICs), shows dramatic improvements in photon number conservation, as well as substantial differences in the bubble size distribution, as compared to traditional models. We explore...

  13. Model of wet chemical etching of swift heavy ions tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, S. A.; Malakhov, A. I.; Rymzhanov, R. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    A model of wet chemical etching of tracks of swift heavy ions (SHI) decelerated in solids in the electronic stopping regime is presented. This model takes into account both possible etching modes: etching controlled by diffusion of etchant molecules to the etching front, and etching controlled by the rate of a reaction of an etchant with a material. Olivine ((Mg0.88Fe0.12)2SiO4) crystals were chosen as a system for modeling. Two mechanisms of chemical activation of olivine around the SHI trajectory are considered. The first mechanism is activation stimulated by structural transformations in a nanometric track core, while the second one results from neutralization of metallic atoms by generated electrons spreading over micrometric distances. Monte-Carlo simulations (TREKIS code) form the basis for the description of excitations of the electronic subsystem and the lattice of olivine in an SHI track at times up to 100 fs after the projectile passage. Molecular dynamics supplies the initial conditions for modeling of lattice relaxation for longer times. These simulations enable us to estimate the effects of the chemical activation of olivine governed by both mechanisms. The developed model was applied to describe chemical activation and the etching kinetics of tracks of Au 2.1 GeV ions in olivine. The estimated lengthwise etching rate (38 µm · h‑1) is in reasonable agreement with that detected in the experiments (24 µm · h‑1).

  14. Fate modelling of chemical compounds with incomplete data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Heijungs, Reinout

    2011-01-01

    in an approximate way. The idea is that not all data needed in a multi-media fate and exposure model are completely independent and equally important, but that there are physical-chemical and biological relationships between sets of chemical properties. A statistical model is constructed to underpin this assumption......, and to provide simplified proxies for the more complicated “real”model relationships. In the presented study two approaches for the reduction of the data demand associated with characterization of chemical emissions in USEtoxTM are tested: The first approach yields a simplified set of mode of entry specific meta......-models with a data demand of app. 63 % (5/8) of the USEtoxTM characterization model. The second yields a simplified set of mode of entry specific meta-models with a data demand of 75 % (6/8) of the original model. The results of the study indicate that it is possible to simplify characterization models and lower...

  15. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  16. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application

  17. Speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in Contaminated Aquifer Sediments Using Chemical Extraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, Gorm; Crouzet, Catherine.; Bourg, Alain C. M.;

    1994-01-01

    The iron mineralogy of aquifer sediments was described by chemical extraction techniques. Single-step extractions including 1 M CaC12, NaAc, oxalate, dithionite, Ti(II1)- EDTA, 0.5 M HC1,5 M HC1, hot 6 M HC1, and a sequential extraction by HI and CrIIHC1 were tested on standard iron minerals...

  18. On matrix model partition functions for QCD with chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Akemann, G; Vernizzi, G

    2004-01-01

    Partition functions of two different matrix models for QCD with chemical potential are computed for an arbitrary number of quark and complex conjugate anti-quark flavors. In the large-N limit of weak nonhermiticity complete agreement is found between the two models. This supports the universality of such fermionic partition functions, that is of products of characteristic polynomials in the complex plane. In the strong nonhermiticity limit agreement is found for an equal number of quark and conjugate flavours. For a general flavor content the equality of partition functions holds only for small chemical potential. The chiral phase transition is analyzed for an arbitrary number of quarks, where the free energy presents a discontinuity of first order at a critical chemical potential. In the case of nondegenerate flavors there is first order phase transition for each separate mass scale.

  19. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Galagali, Nikhil

    2015-02-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model structure. Most existing applications of Bayesian model selection methods to chemical kinetics have been limited to comparisons among a small set of models, however. The significant computational cost of evaluating posterior model probabilities renders traditional Bayesian methods infeasible when the model space becomes large. We present a new framework for tractable Bayesian model inference and uncertainty quantification using a large number of systematically generated model hypotheses. The approach involves imposing point-mass mixture priors over rate constants and exploring the resulting posterior distribution using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The posterior samples are used to identify plausible models, to quantify rate constant uncertainties, and to extract key diagnostic information about model structure-such as the reactions and operating pathways most strongly supported by the data. We provide numerical demonstrations of the proposed framework by inferring kinetic models for catalytic steam and dry reforming of methane using available experimental data.

  20. Automated Physico-Chemical Cell Model Development through Information Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Ortoleva

    2005-11-29

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive models of the chemical responses of microbial cells to variations in their surroundings. The application of these models is optimization of environmental remediation and energy-producing biotechnical processes.The principles on which our project is based are as follows: chemical thermodynamics and kinetics; automation of calibration through information theory; integration of multiplex data (e.g. cDNA microarrays, NMR, proteomics), cell modeling, and bifurcation theory to overcome cellular complexity; and the use of multiplex data and information theory to calibrate and run an incomplete model. In this report we review four papers summarizing key findings and a web-enabled, multiple module workflow we have implemented that consists of a set of interoperable systems biology computational modules.

  1. The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of MALDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The coupled physical and chemical dynamics model of ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has reproduced and explained a wide variety of MALDI phenomena. The rationale behind and elements of the model are reviewed, including the photophysics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of primary and secondary reaction steps. Experimental results are compared with model predictions to illustrate the foundations of the model, coupling of ablation and ionization, differences between and commonalities of matrices, secondary charge transfer reactions, ionization in both polarities, fluence and concentration dependencies, and suppression and enhancement effects.

  2. Computer-Aided Multiscale Modelling for Chemical Process Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Gani, Rafiqul

    2007-01-01

    T) for model translation, analysis and solution. The integration of ModDev, MoT and ICAS or any other external software or process simulator (using COM-Objects) permits the generation of different models and/or process configurations for purposes of simulation, design and analysis. Consequently, it is possible......Chemical processes are generally modeled through monoscale approaches, which, while not adequate, satisfy a useful role in product-process design. In this case, use of a multi-dimensional and multi-scale model-based approach has importance in product-process development. A computer-aided framework...... for model generation, analysis, solution and implementation is necessary for the development and application of the desired model-based approach for product-centric process design/analysis. This goal is achieved through the combination of a system for model development (ModDev), and a modelling tool (Mo...

  3. Evaluation of Artificial Intelligence Based Models for Chemical Biodegradability Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Sabljic

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a review of biodegradability modeling efforts including a detailed assessment of two models developed using an artificial intelligence based methodology. Validation results for these models using an independent, quality reviewed database, demonstrate that the models perform well when compared to another commonly used biodegradability model, against the same data. The ability of models induced by an artificial intelligence methodology to accommodate complex interactions in detailed systems, and the demonstrated reliability of the approach evaluated by this study, indicate that the methodology may have application in broadening the scope of biodegradability models. Given adequate data for biodegradability of chemicals under environmental conditions, this may allow for the development of future models that include such things as surface interface impacts on biodegradability for example.

  4. Modeling the chemical evolution of Omega Centauri using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Marcolini, A; D'Ercole, A; Gibson, B K; Ferraro, F R

    2007-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical and chemical model for the globular cluster Omega Cen, under the assumption that it is the remnant of an ancient dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph), the bulk of which was disrupted and accreted by our Galaxy ~10 Gyr ago. We highlight the very different roles played by Type II and Type Ia supernovae (SNe) in the chemical enrichment of the inner regions of the putative parent dSph. While the SNe II pollute the interstellar medium rather uniformly, the SNe Ia ejecta may remain confined inside dense pockets of gas as long as succesive SNe II explosions spread them out. Stars forming in such pockets have lower alpha-to-iron ratios than the stars forming elsewhere. Owing to the inhomogeneous pollution by SNe Ia, the metal distribution of the stars in the central region differs substantially from that of the main population of the dwarf galaxy, and resembles that observed in Omega Cen. This inhomogeneous mixing is also responsible for a radial segregation of iron-rich stars with depleted [alp...

  5. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different......Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...

  6. Towards consensus in chemical characterization modeling for LCA:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralf; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Bachmann, Till

    2006-01-01

    exposure, human toxicity and ecotoxicity. The invitation was accepted by the developers of CalTOX, IMPACT 2002, USES-LCA, EDIP, WATSON, and EcoSense. A consistent chemical test set comprising 66 organic (generic, amphiphilic and dissociating) and inorganic (metals, salts) compounds was selected...... representing a wide range of substance property combinations. All compared models showed correlation for human health endpoints for generic organics, with high variations on individual chemicals, typically with high Kow. For the other organics and inorganics, less agreement was observed. Influential processes...

  7. Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less-developed than for aquatic systems. This manuscript reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, inver...

  8. Modeling Warfare in Social Animals: A "Chemical" Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarlasci, Alisa; Martelloni, Gianluca; Frizzi, Filippo; Santini, Giacomo; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present here a general method for modelling the dynamics of battles among social animals. The proposed method exploits the procedures widely used to model chemical reactions, but still uncommon in behavioural studies. We applied this methodology to the interpretation of experimental observations of battles between two species of ants (Lasius neglectus and Lasius paralienus), but this scheme may have a wider applicability and can be extended to other species as well. We performed two types of experiment labelled as interaction and mortality. The interaction experiments are designed to obtain information on the combat dynamics and lasted one hour. The mortality ones provide information on the casualty rates of the two species and lasted five hours. We modelled the interactions among ants using a chemical model which considers the single ant individuals and fighting groups analogously to atoms and molecules. The mean-field behaviour of the model is described by a set of non-linear differential equations. We also performed stochastic simulations of the corresponding agent-based model by means of the Gillespie event-driven integration scheme. By fitting the stochastic trajectories with the deterministic model, we obtained the probability distribution of the reaction parameters. The main result that we obtained is a dominance phase diagram, that gives the average trajectory of a generic battle, for an arbitrary number of opponents. This phase diagram was validated with some extra experiments. With respect to other war models (e.g., Lanchester's ones), our chemical model considers all phases of the battle and not only casualties. This allows a more detailed description of the battle (with a larger number of parameters), allowing the development of more sophisticated models (e.g., spatial ones), with the goal of distinguishing collective effects from the strategic ones. PMID:25369269

  9. The effect of chemical information on the spatial distribution of fruit flies: II parameterization, calibration, and sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gee, de M.; Lof, M.E.; Hemerik, L.

    2008-01-01

    In a companion paper (Lof et al., in Bull. Math. Biol., 2008), we describe a spatio-temporal model for insect behavior. This model includes chemical information for finding resources and conspecifics. As a model species, we used Drosophila melanogaster, because its behavior is documented comparative

  10. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  11. Nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and chiral chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Frasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We derive the critical temperature in a nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with the presence of a chiral chemical potential. The model we consider uses a form factor derived from recent studies of the gluon propagator in Yang-Mills theory and has the property to fit in excellent way the form factor arising from the instanton liquid picture for the vacuum of the theory. Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model is derived form quantum chromodynamics providing all the constants of the theory without any need for fits. We show that the critical temperature in this case always exists and increases as the square of the chiral chemical potential. The expression we obtain for the critical temperature depends on the mass gap that naturally arises from Yang-Mills theory at low-energy as also confirmed by lattice computations.

  12. SDG-based Model Validation in Chemical Process Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贝克; 许欣; 马昕; 吴重光

    2013-01-01

    Signed direct graph (SDG) theory provides algorithms and methods that can be applied directly to chemical process modeling and analysis to validate simulation models, and is a basis for the development of a soft-ware environment that can automate the validation activity. This paper is concentrated on the pretreatment of the model validation. We use the validation scenarios and standard sequences generated by well-established SDG model to validate the trends fitted from the simulation model. The results are helpful to find potential problems, as-sess possible bugs in the simulation model and solve the problem effectively. A case study on a simulation model of boiler is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method.

  13. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oboh, I., E-mail: innocentoboh@uniuyo.edu.ng [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Uyo, Uyo (Nigeria); Aluyor, E.; Audu, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Uyo, BeninCity, BeninCity (Nigeria)

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  14. An efficient algorithm for corona simulation with complex chemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Andrea; Barbieri, Luca; Gondola, Marco; Leon-Garzon, Andres R.; Malgesini, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    The simulation of cold plasma discharges is a leading field of applied sciences with many applications ranging from pollutant control to surface treatment. Many of these applications call for the development of novel numerical techniques to implement fully three-dimensional corona solvers that can utilize complex and physically detailed chemical databases. This is a challenging task since it multiplies the difficulties inherent to a three-dimensional approach by the complexity of databases comprising tens of chemical species and hundreds of reactions. In this paper a novel approach, capable of reducing significantly the computational burden, is developed. The proposed method is based on a proper time stepping algorithm capable of decomposing the original problem into simpler ones: each of them has then been tackled with either finite element, finite volume or ordinary differential equations solvers. This last solver deals with the chemical model and its efficient implementation is one of the main contributions of this work.

  15. Aesthetics of Chemical Products: Materials, Molecules, and Molecular Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Schummer

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available By comparing chemistry to art, chemists have recently made claims to the aesthetic value, even beauty, of some of their products. This paper takes these claims seriously and turns them into a systematic investigation of the aesthetics of chemical products. I distinguish three types of chemical products - materials, molecules, and molecular models - and use a wide variety of aesthetic theories suitable for an investigation of the corresponding sorts of objects. These include aesthetics of materials, idealistic aesthetics from Plato to Kant and Schopenhauer, psychological approaches of Ernst Gombrich and Rudolf Arnheim, and semiotic aesthetics of Nelson Goodman and Umberto Eco. Although the investigation does not support recent claims, I point out where aesthetics does and can play an import role in chemistry. Particularly, Eco's approach helps us understand that and how aesthetic experience can be a driving force in chemical research.

  16. Rapid adsorption of toxic Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution using multiwall carbon nanotubes synthesized by microwave chemical vapor deposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Nabisab Mujawar; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Abdullah, Ezzat Chan; Jayakumar, Natesan Subramanian

    2016-07-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a tubular microwave chemical vapor deposition technique, using acetylene and hydrogen as the precursor gases and ferrocene as catalyst. The novel MWCNT samples were tested for their performance in terms of Pb(II) binding. The synthesized MWCNT samples were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis, and the adsorption of Pb(II) was studied as a function of pH, initial Pb(II) concentration, MWCNT dosage, agitation speed, and adsorption time, and process parameters were optimized. The adsorption data followed both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. On the basis of the Langmuir model, Qmax was calculated to be 104.2mg/g for the microwave-synthesized MWCNTs. In order to investigate the dynamic behavior of MWCNTs as an adsorbent, the kinetic data were modeled using pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order equations. Different thermodynamic parameters, viz., ∆H(0), ∆S(0) and ∆G(0) were evaluated and it was found that the adsorption was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The statistical analysis revealed that the optimum conditions for the highest removal (99.9%) of Pb(II) are at pH5, MWCNT dosage 0.1g, agitation speed 160r/min and time of 22.5min with the initial concentration of 10mg/L. Our results proved that microwave-synthesized MWCNTs can be used as an effective Pb(II) adsorbent due to their high adsorption capacity as well as the short adsorption time needed to achieve equilibrium.

  17. Counterparty risk analysis using Merton's structural model under Solvency II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Otero González

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The new solvency regulation in the European insurance sector, denominated Solvency II, will completely transform the system of capital requirements estimation. Recently it has introduced the latest quantitative impact study (QIS5, which provides the calculation method in the internal model for the determination of capital requirements. The aim of this paper is to analyze the adequacy of the calibration of the counterparty credit risk by the models proposed in recent quantitative impact reports (fourth and fifth. To do this we compare capital requirements obtained by the two alternatives, against which that results from applying a simulation model based on the structural approach. The results shows that the use of probabilities based on the methodology of Merton, which can be used in an internal model, compared to those based on ratings (standard model result in substantially higher capital requirements. In addition, the model proposed in QIS4 based on Vasicek distribution is not appropriate when the number of counterparties is reduced, a common situation in the European insurance sector. Moreover, the new proposal (QIS5 or Ter Berg model is more versatile and suitable than its predecessor but requires further research in order to improve the calibration hypothesis and, thus, to better approximate estimates to the risk actually assumed.

  18. Chemical domain of QSAR models from atom-centered fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Ralph; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2009-12-01

    A methodology to characterize the chemical domain of qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on the atom-centered fragment (ACF) approach is introduced. ACFs decompose the molecule into structural pieces, with each non-hydrogen atom of the molecule acting as an ACF center. ACFs vary with respect to their size in terms of the path length covered in each bonding direction starting from a given central atom and how comprehensively the neighbor atoms (including hydrogen) are described in terms of element type and bonding environment. In addition to these different levels of ACF definitions, the ACF match mode as degree of strictness of the ACF comparison between a test compound and a given ACF pool (such as from a training set) has to be specified. Analyses of the prediction statistics of three QSAR models with their training sets as well as with external test sets and associated subsets demonstrate a clear relationship between the prediction performance and the levels of ACF definition and match mode. The findings suggest that second-order ACFs combined with a borderline match mode may serve as a generic and at the same time a mechanistically sound tool to define and evaluate the chemical domain of QSAR models. Moreover, four standard categories of the ACF-based membership to a given chemical domain (outside, borderline outside, borderline inside, inside) are introduced that provide more specific information about the expected QSAR prediction performance. As such, the ACF-based characterization of the chemical domain appears to be particularly useful for QSAR applications in the context of REACH and other regulatory schemes addressing the safety evaluation of chemical compounds.

  19. 2-D Chemical-Dynamical Modeling of Venus's Sulfur Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierson, Carver J.; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a combination of ground based and Venus Express observations have been made of the concentration of sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere, both above [1, 2] and below the clouds [3, 4]. These observations put constraints on both the vertical and meridional variations of the major sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere.. It has also been observed that SO2 concentrations varies on both timescales of hours and years [1,4]. The spatial and temporal distribution of tracer species is owing to two possibilities: mutual chemical interaction and dynamical tracer transport.Previous Chemical modeling of Venus's middle atmosphere has only been explored in 1-D. We will present the first 2-D (altitude and latitude) chemical-dynamical model for Venus's middle atmosphere. The sulfur chemistry is based on of the 1D model of Zhang et al. 2012 [5]. We do model runs over multiple Venus decades testing two scenarios: first one with varying sulfur fluxes from below, and second with secular dynamical perturbations in the atmosphere [6]. By comparing to Venus Express and ground based observations, we put constraints on the dynamics of Venus's middle atmosphere.References: [1] Belyaev et al. Icarus 2012 [2] Marcq et al. Nature geoscience, 2013 [3] Marcq et al. JGR:Planets, 2008 [4] Arney et al. JGR:Planets, 2014 [5] Zhang et al. Icarus 2012 [6] Parish et al. Icarus 2012

  20. Modeling reservoir density underflow and interflow from a chemical spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, R.; McCutcheon, S.C.; Wang, P.-F.

    1996-01-01

    An integral simulation model has been developed for understanding and simulating the process of a density current and the transport of spilled chemicals in a stratified reservoir. The model is capable of describing flow behavior and mixing mechanisms in different flow regimes (plunging flow, underflow, and interflow). It computes flow rate, velocity, flow thickness, mixing parameterized by entrainment and dilution, depths of plunging, separation and intrusion, and time of travel. The model was applied to the Shasta Reservoir in northern California during the July 1991 Sacramento River chemical spill. The simulations were used to assist in the emergency response, confirm remediation measures, and guide data collection. Spill data that were available after the emergency response are used to conduct a postaudit of the model results. Predicted flow parameters are presented and compared with observed interflow intrusion depth, travel time, and measured concentrations of spilled chemicals. In the reservoir, temperature difference between incoming river flow and ambient lake water played a dominant role during the processes of flow plunging, separation, and intrusion. With the integral approach, the gross flow behavior can be adequately described and information useful in the analysis of contaminated flow in a reservoir after a spill is provided.

  1. On Chemical Modeling an Alchemical Process: The Use of Combined Chemical Methods in a Historical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodygin, Mikhail Yu.; Rodygin, Irene V.

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory work is an important component of a course in the History of Chemistry and Alchemy, though it can only be illustrative and not comprehensive. The course should exercise both the cognitive and research abilities of an university student. Therefore methods of modeling are of prime importance at this stage of instruction. Modeling can be both a priori and experimental. The experiment can use the alchemist's materials, or it can reproduce the procedure with modern reagents. A good example for the use of this method is a recipe for the preparation of the Philosopher's Stone attributed to Lullius and cited by J. Ripley in Liber Duodecium Portarum. Thus, the Ripley's recipe is not only considered to be the first indication of the existence of acetone, but it may also indicate the formation of acetyl acetone and its derivatives. Thus, as far as the history of alchemy is concerned, the use of an experimental model not only allows us to solve a number of specific problems such as recipe interpretation and product identification, but it allows also to probe the essence of alchemical work. The combination of empirical and speculative modelings leads to the interaction of the exact methods of chemistry with the broad historico-chemical generalizations, thus introducing some additional dimensions to the definition of historico-chemical practice.

  2. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology.

  3. Quantum chemical topology study of the water-platinum(II) interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergès, Jacqueline; Fourré, Isabelle; Pilmé, Julien; Kozelka, Jiri

    2013-02-04

    The "inverse hydration" of neutral complexes of Pt(II) by an axial water molecule, whose one OH-bond is oriented toward Pt, has been the subject of recent works, theoretical as well as experimental. To study the influence of the ligands on this non-conventional H-bond, we extend here our previous energy calculations, using the second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) method together with the Dolg-Pélissier pseudopotential for platinum, to various neutral complexes including the well-known chemotherapeutic agent "cisplatin". The stabilization energy, depending on the nature and the configuration of platinum ligands, is dominated by the same important dispersive component, for all the investigated complexes. For a further characterization of this particular H-bond, we used the atoms in molecules theory (AIM) and the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF). The charge transfer occurring from the complex to the water molecule and the Laplacian of the density at the bond critical point between water and Pt are identified as interesting AIM descriptors of this non-conventional H-bond. Beyond this AIM analysis, we show that the polarization of the ELF bonding O-H basin involved in the non-conventional H-bond is enhanced during the approach of the water molecule to the Pt complexes. When the water medium, treated in an implicit solvation model, is taken into account, the interaction energies become independent on the nature and configuration of platinum ligands. However, the topological descriptors remain qualitatively unchanged.

  4. Atomic Data and Spectral Models for FeII

    CERN Document Server

    Bautista, Manuel A; Ballance, Connor; Quinet, Pascal; Ferland, Gary; Mendoza, Claudio; Kallman, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    We present extensive calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact collision strengths for Fe II. The data sets involve 52 levels from the $3d\\,^7$, $3d\\,^64s$, and $3d\\,^54s^2$ configurations. Computations of $A$-values are carried out with a combination of state-of-the-art multiconfiguration approaches, namely the relativistic Hartree--Fock, Thomas--Fermi--Dirac potential, and Dirac--Fock methods; while the $R$-matrix plus intermediate coupling frame transformation, Breit--Pauli $R$-matrix and Dirac $R$-matrix packages are used to obtain collision strengths. We examine the advantages and shortcomings of each of these methods, and estimate rate uncertainties from the resulting data dispersion. We proceed to construct excitation balance spectral models, and compare the predictions from each data set with observed spectra from various astronomical objects. We are thus able to establish benchmarks in the spectral modeling of [Fe II] emission in the IR and optical regions as well as in the UV Fe...

  5. Hydrodynamical models of Type II-Plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bersten, Melina C; Hamuy, Mario

    2011-01-01

    We present bolometric light curves of Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) obtained using a newly developed, one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code with flux-limited radiation diffusion. Using our code we calculate the bolometric light curve and photospheric velocities of SN1999em obtaining a remarkably good agreement with observations despite the simplifications used in our calculation. The physical parameters used in our calculation are E=1.25 foe, M= 19 M_\\odot, R= 800 R_\\odot and M_{Ni}=0.056 M_\\odot. We find that an extensive mixing of 56Ni is needed in order to reproduce a plateau as flat as that shown by the observations. We also study the possibility to fit the observations with lower values of the initial mass consistently with upper limits that have been inferred from pre-supernova imaging of SN1999em in connection with stellar evolution models. We cannot find a set of physical parameters that reproduce well the observations for models with pre-supernova mass of \\leq 12 M_\\odot, although mode...

  6. Eagle II: A prototype for multi-resolution combat modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, D.R.; Hutchinson, J.L.

    1993-02-01

    Eagle 11 is a prototype analytic model derived from the integration of the low resolution Eagle model with the high resolution SIMNET model. This integration promises a new capability to allow for a more effective examination of proposed or existing combat systems that could not be easily evaluated using either Eagle or SIMNET alone. In essence, Eagle II becomes a multi-resolution combat model in which simulated combat units can exhibit both high and low fidelity behavior at different times during model execution. This capability allows a unit to behave in a highly manner only when required, thereby reducing the overall computational and manpower requirements for a given study. In this framework, the SIMNET portion enables a highly credible assessment of the performance of individual combat systems under consideration, encompassing both engineering performance and crew capabilities. However, when the assessment being conducted goes beyond system performance and extends to questions of force structure balance and sustainment, then SISMNET results can be used to ``calibrate`` the Eagle attrition process appropriate to the study at hand. Advancing technologies, changes in the world-wide threat, requirements for flexible response, declining defense budgets, and down-sizing of military forces motivate the development of manpower-efficient, low-cost, responsive tools for combat development studies. Eagle and SIMNET both serve as credible and useful tools. The integration of these two models promises enhanced capabilities to examine the broader, deeper, more complex battlefield of the future with higher fidelity, greater responsiveness and low overall cost.

  7. A photometric study of chemically peculiar stars with the STEREO satellites. II. Non-magnetic chemically peculiar stars

    CERN Document Server

    Paunzen, E; Fossati, L; Netopil, M; White, G J; Bewsher, D

    2012-01-01

    We have analysed the photometric data obtained with the STEREO spacecraft for 558 non-magnetic chemically peculiar (CP) stars to search for rotational and pulsational variability. Applying the Lomb-Scargle and the phase dispersion minimisation methods, we have detected photometric variability for 44 objects from which 35 were previously unknown. The new objects are all bright stars on the Ecliptic Plane (magnitude range 4.7 < V < 11.7) and will therefore be of great interest to studies of stellar structure and evolution. In particular, several show multiple signals consistent with hybrid delta Scuti and gamma Doradus pulsation, with different periodicities allowing very different regions of the stellar interior to be studied. There are two subgroups of stars in our sample: the cool metallic line Am (CP1) and the hot HgMn (CP3) stars. These objects fall well inside the classical instability strip where delta Scuti, gamma Doradus and slowly pulsating B-type stars are located. We also expect to find period...

  8. Economic model predictive control theory, formulations and chemical process applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Matthew; Christofides, Panagiotis D

    2017-01-01

    This book presents general methods for the design of economic model predictive control (EMPC) systems for broad classes of nonlinear systems that address key theoretical and practical considerations including recursive feasibility, closed-loop stability, closed-loop performance, and computational efficiency. Specifically, the book proposes: Lyapunov-based EMPC methods for nonlinear systems; two-tier EMPC architectures that are highly computationally efficient; and EMPC schemes handling explicitly uncertainty, time-varying cost functions, time-delays and multiple-time-scale dynamics. The proposed methods employ a variety of tools ranging from nonlinear systems analysis, through Lyapunov-based control techniques to nonlinear dynamic optimization. The applicability and performance of the proposed methods are demonstrated through a number of chemical process examples. The book presents state-of-the-art methods for the design of economic model predictive control systems for chemical processes. In addition to being...

  9. Computer-Aided Construction of Chemical Kinetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, William H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    The combustion chemistry of even simple fuels can be extremely complex, involving hundreds or thousands of kinetically significant species. The most reasonable way to deal with this complexity is to use a computer not only to numerically solve the kinetic model, but also to construct the kinetic model in the first place. Because these large models contain so many numerical parameters (e.g. rate coefficients, thermochemistry) one never has sufficient data to uniquely determine them all experimentally. Instead one must work in “predictive” mode, using theoretical rather than experimental values for many of the numbers in the model, and as appropriate refining the most sensitive numbers through experiments. Predictive chemical kinetics is exactly what is needed for computer-aided design of combustion systems based on proposed alternative fuels, particularly for early assessment of the value and viability of proposed new fuels before those fuels are commercially available. This project was aimed at making accurate predictive chemical kinetics practical; this is a challenging goal which requires a range of science advances. The project spanned a wide range from quantum chemical calculations on individual molecules and elementary-step reactions, through the development of improved rate/thermo calculation procedures, the creation of algorithms and software for constructing and solving kinetic simulations, the invention of methods for model-reduction while maintaining error control, and finally comparisons with experiment. Many of the parameters in the models were derived from quantum chemistry calculations, and the models were compared with experimental data measured in our lab or in collaboration with others.

  10. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.(KEYSPAN R AND D INITIATIVE)

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  11. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gioannini, Lorenzo; Vladilo, Giovanni; Calura, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by AGB stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to Damped Lyman-Alpha systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are: i) we can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of du...

  12. Studies on modelling of bubble driven flows in chemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevskott, Sverre

    1997-12-31

    Multiphase reactors are widely used in the process industry, especially in the petrochemical industry. They very often are characterized by very good thermal control and high heat transfer coefficients against heating and cooling surfaces. This thesis first reviews recent advances in bubble column modelling, focusing on the fundamental flow equations, drag forces, transversal forces and added mass forces. The mathematical equations for the bubble column reactor are developed, using an Eulerian description for the continuous and dispersed phase in tensor notation. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy and chemical species are given, and the k-{epsilon} and Rice-Geary models for turbulence are described. The different algebraic solvers used in the model are described, as are relaxation procedures. Simulation results are presented and compared with experimental values. Attention is focused on the modelling of void fractions and gas velocities in the column. The energy conservation equation has been included in the bubble column model in order to model temperature distributions in a heated reactor. The conservation equation of chemical species has been included to simulate absorption of CO{sub 2}. Simulated axial and radial mass fraction profiles for CO{sub 2} in the gas phase are compared with measured values. Simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the column are also presented. 189 refs., 124 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Probabilistic consequence model of accidenal or intentional chemical releases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-S.; Samsa, M. E.; Folga, S. M.; Hartmann, H. M.

    2008-06-02

    In this work, general methodologies for evaluating the impacts of large-scale toxic chemical releases are proposed. The potential numbers of injuries and fatalities, the numbers of hospital beds, and the geographical areas rendered unusable during and some time after the occurrence and passage of a toxic plume are estimated on a probabilistic basis. To arrive at these estimates, historical accidental release data, maximum stored volumes, and meteorological data were used as inputs into the SLAB accidental chemical release model. Toxic gas footprints from the model were overlaid onto detailed population and hospital distribution data for a given region to estimate potential impacts. Output results are in the form of a generic statistical distribution of injuries and fatalities associated with specific toxic chemicals and regions of the United States. In addition, indoor hazards were estimated, so the model can provide contingency plans for either shelter-in-place or evacuation when an accident occurs. The stochastic distributions of injuries and fatalities are being used in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security-sponsored decision support system as source terms for a Monte Carlo simulation that evaluates potential measures for mitigating terrorist threats. This information can also be used to support the formulation of evacuation plans and to estimate damage and cleanup costs.

  14. Chemical modeling of water deuteration in IRAS16293-2422

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Aikawa, Y; Coutens, A; Bottinelli, S; Caux, E

    2014-01-01

    IRAS 16293-2422 is a well studied low-mass protostar characterized by a strong level of deuterium fractionation. In the line of sight of the protostellar envelope, an additional absorption layer, rich in singly and doubly deuterated water has been discovered by a detailed multiline analysis of HDO. To model the chemistry in this source, the gas-grain chemical code Nautilus has been used with an extended deuterium network. For the protostellar envelope, we solve the chemical reaction network in infalling fluid parcels in a protostellar core model. For the foreground cloud, we explored several physical conditions (density, cosmic ionization rate, C/O ratio). The main results of the paper are that gas-phase abundances of H2O, HDO and D2O observed in the inner regions of IRAS16293-2422 are lower than those predicted by a 1D dynamical/chemical (hot corino) model in which the ices are fully evaporated. The abundance in the outer part of the envelope present chaotic profiles due to adsorption/evaporation competition...

  15. A review of operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, J.; Olsson, T.; Schultz, D.M.; Baklanov, A.; Klein, T.; Miranda, A.I.; Monteiro, A.; Hirtl, M.; Tarvainen, V.; Boy, M.; Peuch, V.-H.; Poupkou, A.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Finardi, S.; Sofiev, M.; Sokhi, R.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Karatzas, K.; San José, R.; Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Schaap, M.; Reimer, E.; Jakobs, H.; Eben, K.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical models that combine weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry are here referred to as chemical weather forecasting models. Eighteen operational chemical weather forecasting models on regional and continental scales in Europe are described and compared in this article. Topics discussed

  16. Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward; Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Sirjean, Baptiste; Warth, V

    2011-09-01

    In the context of limiting the environmental impact of transportation, this critical review discusses new directions which are being followed in the development of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels. In the first part, the performance of current models, especially in terms of the prediction of pollutant formation, is evaluated. In the next parts, recent methods and ways to improve these models are described. An emphasis is given on the development of detailed models based on elementary reactions, on the production of the related thermochemical and kinetic parameters, and on the experimental techniques available to produce the data necessary to evaluate model predictions under well defined conditions (212 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  17. Regimes of chemical reaction waves initiated by nonuniform initial conditions for detailed chemical reaction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, M A; Kiverin, A D; Ivanov, M F

    2012-05-01

    Regimes of chemical reaction wave propagation initiated by initial temperature nonuniformity in gaseous mixtures, whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics, are studied using a multispecies transport model and a detailed chemical model. Possible regimes of reaction wave propagation are identified for stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-air mixtures in a wide range of initial pressures and temperature levels, depending on the initial non-uniformity steepness. The limits of the regimes of reaction wave propagation depend upon the values of the spontaneous wave speed and the characteristic velocities of the problem. It is shown that one-step kinetics cannot reproduce either quantitative neither qualitative features of the ignition process in real gaseous mixtures because the difference between the induction time and the time when the exothermic reaction begins significantly affects the ignition, evolution, and coupling of the spontaneous reaction wave and the pressure wave, especially at lower temperatures. We show that all the regimes initiated by the temperature gradient occur for much shallower temperature gradients than predicted by a one-step model. The difference is very large for lower initial pressures and for slowly reacting mixtures. In this way the paper provides an answer to questions, important in practice, about the ignition energy, its distribution, and the scale of the initial nonuniformity required for ignition in one or another regime of combustion wave propagation.

  18. Signal and binding. II. Converting physico-chemical responses to macromolecule-ligand interactions into thermodynamic binding isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J; Bujalowski, Paul J

    2017-03-01

    Physico-chemical titration techniques are the most commonly used methods in characterizing molecular interactions. These methods are mainly based on spectroscopic, calorimetric, hydrodynamic, etc., measurements. However, truly quantitative physico-chemical methods are absolutely based on the determination of the relationship between the measured signal and the total average degree of binding in order to obtain meaningful interaction parameters. The relationship between the observed physico-chemical signal of whatever nature and the degree of binding must be determined and not assumed, based on some ad hoc intuitive relationship/model, leading to determination of the true binding isotherm. The quantitative methods reviewed and discussed here allow an experimenter to rigorously determine the degree of binding and the free ligand concentration, i.e., they lead to the construction of the thermodynamic binding isotherm in a model-independent fashion from physico-chemical titration curves. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Synthesis, Spectroscopic, Structural and Quantum Chemical Studies of a New Imine Oxime and Its Palladium(II) Complex: Hydrolysis Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yunus; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we report synthesis, crystallographic, spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of a new imine oxime, namely (4-nitro-phenyl)-(1-phenyl-ethylimino)-acetaldehyde oxime (nppeieoH). Spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction studies showed that nppeieoH is hydrolyzed in aqueous solution, forming nitroisonitrosoacetophenone (ninap) and the hydrolysis product binds to Pd(II) to yield [Pd(nppeieo)(ninap)]. The mechanism of the hydrolysis reaction has been theoretically investigated in detail, using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method. The vibrational and the electronic spectra of nppeieoH and its Pd(II) complex, the HOMO and LUMO analysis, Mulliken atomic charges and molecular electrostatic potential were also performed. The predicted nonlinear optical properties of both compounds are higher than those of urea.

  20. The Instanton-Dyon Liquid Model III: Finite Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    We discuss an extension of the instanton-dyon liquid model that includes light quarks at finite chemical potential in the center symmetric phase. We develop the model in details for the case of SU_c(2)\\times SU_f(2) by mapping the theory on a 3-dimensional quantum effective theory. We analyze the different phases in the mean-field approximation. We extend this analysis to the general case of SU_c(N_c)\\times SU_f(N_f) and note that the chiral and diquark pairings are always comparable.

  1. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R.; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes......, chemical industry, economy, and ecosystem. In addition, we propose a multi-scale approach for integrating the existing models into a cohesive framework. The major benefit of this proposed framework is that the design and decision-making at each scale can be informed, guided, and constrained by simulations...

  2. Predictive Modeling of Chemical Hazard by Integrating Numerical Descriptors of Chemical Structures and Short-term Toxicity Assay Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Sedykh, Alexander; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are widely used for in silico prediction of in vivo toxicity of drug candidates or environmental chemicals, adding value to candidate selection in drug development or in a search for less hazardous and more sustainable alternatives for chemicals in commerce. The development of traditional QSAR models is enabled by numerical descriptors representing the inherent chemical properties that can be easily defined for any number of molecules; however, traditional QSAR models often have limited predictive power due to the lack of data and complexity of in vivo endpoints. Although it has been indeed difficult to obtain experimentally derived toxicity data on a large number of chemicals in the past, the results of quantitative in vitro screening of thousands of environmental chemicals in hundreds of experimental systems are now available and continue to accumulate. In addition, publicly accessible toxicogenomics data collected on hundreds of chemicals provide another dimension of molecular information that is potentially useful for predictive toxicity modeling. These new characteristics of molecular bioactivity arising from short-term biological assays, i.e., in vitro screening and/or in vivo toxicogenomics data can now be exploited in combination with chemical structural information to generate hybrid QSAR–like quantitative models to predict human toxicity and carcinogenicity. Using several case studies, we illustrate the benefits of a hybrid modeling approach, namely improvements in the accuracy of models, enhanced interpretation of the most predictive features, and expanded applicability domain for wider chemical space coverage. PMID:22387746

  3. Fate modelling of chemical compounds with incomplete data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Heijungs, Reinout

    2011-01-01

    , and to provide simplified proxies for the more complicated “real”model relationships. In the presented study two approaches for the reduction of the data demand associated with characterization of chemical emissions in USEtoxTM are tested: The first approach yields a simplified set of mode of entry specific meta......-models with a data demand of app. 63 % (5/8) of the USEtoxTM characterization model. The second yields a simplified set of mode of entry specific meta-models with a data demand of 75 % (6/8) of the original model. The results of the study indicate that it is possible to simplify characterization models and lower...... the data demand of these models applying the presented approach. The results further indicate that the second approach relying on 75 % of the original data set provides the meta-model sets which best mimics the original model. An overall trend observed from the 75 % data demand meta-model sets...

  4. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict and Invent Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segler, Marwin H S; Waller, Mark P

    2016-11-11

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows organic chemists to solve synthetic problems and invent novel transformations. Herein, we propose a model that mimics chemical reasoning, and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180 000 randomly selected binary reactions. The data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-)discovering novel transformations (even including transition metal-catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph and because each single reaction prediction is typically achieved in a sub-second time frame, the model can be used as a high-throughput generator of reaction hypotheses for reaction discovery.

  5. Modeling thermal/chemical/mechanical response of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J. [and others

    1995-07-01

    An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve reactive heat transfer and structural mechanics in complex geometries. Nonlinear conduction heat transfer, with multiple step finite-rate chemistry, is resolved using a thermal finite element code. Rate equations are solved element-by-element using a modified matrix-free stiff solver This finite element software was developed for the simulation of systems requiring large numbers of finite elements. An iterative implicit scheme, based on the conjugate gradient method, is used and a hemi-cube algorithm is employed for the determination of view factors in surface-to-surface radiation transfer The critical link between the reactive heat transfer and mechanics is the introduction of an appropriate constitutive material model providing a stress-strain relationship for quasi-static mechanics analysis. This model is formally derived from bubble nucleation theory, and parameter variations of critical model parameters indicate that a small degree of decomposition leads to significant mechanical response. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical analysis is presented which simulates experiments designed to probe cookoff thermal-mechanical response of energetic materials.

  6. Modeling the chemical evolution of nitrogen oxides near roadways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Jason; DenBleyker, Allison; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Allen, David; Zhang, K. Max

    2011-01-01

    The chemical evolution of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) in the vicinity of roadways is numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT and a Gaussian-based model, CALINE4. CFD-VIT-RIT couples a standard k- ɛ turbulence model for turbulent mixing and the Finite-Rate model for chemical reactions. CALINE4 employs a discrete parcel method, assuming that chemical reactions are independent of the dilution process. The modeling results are compared to the field measurement data collected near two roadways in Austin, Texas, State Highway 71 (SH-71) and Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), under parallel and perpendicular wind conditions during the summer of 2007. In addition to ozone (O 3), other oxidants and reactive species including hydroperoxyl radical (HO 2), organic peroxyl radical (RO 2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and acetaldehyde (CH 3CHO) are considered in the transformation from NO to NO 2. CFD-VIT-RIT is shown to be capable of predicting both NO x and NO 2 profiles downwind. CALINE4 is able to capture the NO x profiles, but underpredicts NO 2 concentrations under high wind velocity. Our study suggests that the initial NO 2/NO x ratios have to be carefully selected based on traffic conditions in order to assess NO 2 concentrations near roadways. The commonly assumed NO 2/NO x ratio by volume of 5% may not be suitable for most roadways, especially those with a high fraction of heavy-duty truck traffic. In addition, high O 3 concentrations and high traffic volumes would lead to the peak NO 2 concentration occurring near roadways with elevated concentrations persistent over a long distance downwind.

  7. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  8. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  9. Unified Ion-chemical Model for the Middle Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamsali, Nagaraja; Kamsali, Nagaraja; Datta, Jayati; Prasad, Bsn

    The importance of ion-chemical model studies in our understanding of middle atmospheric regions needs no special emphasis. Present day knowledge of middle atmosphere (0-100 km) has come from two distinct experimental developments: first, in situ measurements of ion composition by balloons and sounding rockets and second, laboratory investigations on ionchemical reactions of importance at these heights, determination of reaction rate coefficients and their temperature dependence. Model studies act as an interface between these, to generate theoretical estimates of ion composition and their derivatives (e.g. electrical conductivity) by using as input the laboratory data on reaction rate coefficients and the data on neutral species density, ionization flux, temperature etc. Free electrons exist only in the mesosphere. Positive molecular ions dominate the upper mesospheric heights and heavy positive and negative cluster ions appearing at the lower mesospheric heights continue to dominate in strato and troposphere. The equilibrium density of electrons and ionic species is governed by: a) ionization of the atmospheric constituents producing electron-positive ion pair b)gas-phase ion-chemical reactions that convert the electrons and primary positive ions into heavy cluster ions of both polarity c)heterogeneous ion-chemical reactions for producing aerosol ions and d) loss mechanisms for small ions and aerosol ions through recombination of oppositely charged species. Physical entities that control the ion production and loss processes are not the same and vary vastly both in nature and magnitude in the middle atmosphere X-rays, Lymann-alpha and precipitating electrons are the dominant ionizing agents at the mesospheric heights. Cosmic ray ionization that is not so significant in the mesosphere is the sole ionizing agent at stratosphere and troposphere. At the ground level and up to a few tens of meters above the earth's surface, natural radioactivity induced ionization is

  10. Quantum chemical modeling of uranyl adsorption on mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremleva, A.; Krueger, S.; Roesch, N. [Dept. Chemie and Catalysis Research Center, Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We overview quantum mechanical simulations that model the adsorption of actinide ions at solvated mineral surfaces. Pertinent examples illustrate the status of this emerging field of computational chemistry. In particular, we describe our own studies on uranyl adsorption on kaolinite. Already the few available results, from applications of density functional methods to cluster models or periodic slab models, show that such calculations are a useful complement to experimental investigations. Detailed information at the atomic level from accurate electronic structure calculations on well defined model systems helps to refine current interpretations of the chemical nature of uranyl adsorption species and to discover new features of these interface systems. Results from quantum mechanical simulations also provide a valuable reference for future experimental investigations. (orig.)

  11. Strongly Interacting Matter at Finite Chemical Potential: Hybrid Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Search for a proper and realistic equation of state (EOS) for strongly interacting matter used in the study of the QCD phase diagram still appears as a challenging problem. Recently, we constructed a hybrid model description for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) as well as hadron gas (HG) phases where we used an excluded volume model for HG and a thermodynamically consistent quasiparticle model for the QGP phase. The hybrid model suitably describes the recent lattice results of various thermodynamical as well as transport properties of the QCD matter at zero baryon chemical potential (μB). In this paper, we extend our investigations further in obtaining the properties of QCD matter at finite value of μB and compare our results with the most recent results of lattice QCD calculation.

  12. Comparison with CLPX II airborne data using DMRT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Andreadis, K.M.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we considered a physical-based model which use numerical solution of Maxwell Equations in three-dimensional simulations and apply into Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT). The model is validated in two specific dataset from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) at Alaska and Colorado. The data were all obtain by the Ku-band (13.95GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). Snow is a densely packed media. To take into account the collective scattering and incoherent scattering, analytical Quasi-Crystalline Approximation (QCA) and Numerical Maxwell Equation Method of 3-D simulation (NMM3D) are used to calculate the extinction coefficient and phase matrix. DMRT equations were solved by iterative solution up to 2nd order for the case of small optical thickness and full multiple scattering solution by decomposing the diffuse intensities into Fourier series was used when optical thickness exceed unity. It was shown that the model predictions agree with the field experiment not only co-polarization but also cross-polarization. For Alaska region, the input snow structure data was obtain by the in situ ground observations, while for Colorado region, we combined the VIC model to get the snow profile. ??2009 IEEE.

  13. The black hole challenge in Randall-Sundrum II model

    CERN Document Server

    Pappas, Nikolaos D

    2014-01-01

    Models postulating the existence of additional spacelike dimensions of macroscopic or even infinite size, while viewing our observable universe as merely a 3-brane living in a higher-dimensional bulk were a major breakthrough when proposed some 15 years ago. The most interesting among them both in terms of elegance of the setup and of the richness of the emerging phenomenology is the Randall-Sundrum II model where one infinite extra spacelike dimension is considered with an AdS topology, characterized by the warping effect caused by the presence of a negative cosmological constant in the bulk. A major drawback of this model is that despite numerous efforts no line element has ever been found that could describe a stable, regular, realistic black hole. Finding a smoothly behaved such solution supported by the presence of some more or less conventional fields either in the bulk and/or on the brane is the core of the black hole challenge. After a comprehensive presentation of the details of the model and the ana...

  14. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  15. Chemical Remediation of Nickel(II) Waste: A Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, K. Blake; Rood, Brian E.; Trogden, Bridget G.

    2011-01-01

    This project involved developing a method to remediate large quantities of aqueous waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment. Aqueous Ni(II) waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment was converted into solid nickel hydroxide hydrate with a substantial decrease in waste volume. The remediation method was developed for a…

  16. Chemical Remediation of Nickel(II) Waste: A Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, K. Blake; Rood, Brian E.; Trogden, Bridget G.

    2011-01-01

    This project involved developing a method to remediate large quantities of aqueous waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment. Aqueous Ni(II) waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment was converted into solid nickel hydroxide hydrate with a substantial decrease in waste volume. The remediation method was developed for a…

  17. Modeling Nonlinear Adsorption with a Single Chemical Parameter: Predicting Chemical Median Langmuir Binding Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Craig Warren; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2015-07-07

    Procedures for accurately predicting linear partition coefficients onto various sorbents (e.g., organic carbon, soils, clay) are reliable and well established. However, similar procedures for the prediction of sorption parameters of nonlinear isotherm models are not. The purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for predicting nonlinear isotherm parameters, specifically the median Langmuir binding constants, K̃L, obtained utilizing the single-chemical parameter log-normal Langmuir isotherm developed in the accompanying work. A reduced poly parameter linear free energy relationship (pp-LFER) is able to predict median Langmuir binding constants for graphite, charcoal, and Darco granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption data. For the larger F400 GAC data set, a single pp-LFER model was insufficient, as a plateau is observed for the median Langmuir binding constants of larger molecular volume sorbates. This volumetric cutoff occurs in proximity to the median pore diameter for F400 GAC. A log-linear relationship exists between the aqueous solubility of these large compounds and their median Langmuir binding constants. Using this relationship for the chemicals above the volumetric cutoff and the pp-LFER below the cutoff, the median Langmuir binding constants can be predicted with a root-mean square error for graphite (n = 13), charcoal (n = 11), Darco GAC (n = 14), and F400 GAC (n = 44) of 0.129, 0.307, 0.407, and 0.424, respectively.

  18. Efficient three-dimensional global models for climate studies - Models I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, G.; Rind, D.; Lacis, A.; Travis, L.; Stone, P.; Lebedeff, S.; Ruedy, R.; Hansen, J.

    1983-01-01

    Climate modeling based on numerical solution of the fundamental equations for atmospheric structure and motion permits the explicit modeling of physical processes in the climate system and the natural treatment of interactions and feedbacks among parts of the system. The main difficulty concerning this approach is related to the computational requirements. The present investigation is concerned with the development of a grid-point model which is programmed so that both horizontal and vertical resolutions can easily be changed. Attention is given to a description of Model I, the performance of sensitivity experiments by varying parameters, the definition of an improved Model II, and a study of the dependence of climate simulation on resolution with Model II. It is shown that the major features of global climate can be simulated reasonably well with a horizontal resolution as coarse as 1000 km. Such a resolution allows the possibility of long-range climate studies with moderate computer resources.

  19. The effect of intermediate mass close binaries on the chemical evolution of Globular Clusters II

    CERN Document Server

    Mennekens, N; De Greve, J P

    2013-01-01

    The chemical processes during the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) evolution of intermediate mass single stars predict most of the observations of the different populations in Globular Clusters although some important issues still need to be further clarified. In particular, to reproduce the observed anticorrelations of Na-O and Al-Mg, chemically enriched gas lost during the AGB phase of intermediate mass single stars must be mixed with matter with a pristine chemical composition. The source of this matter is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, observations reveal that a significant fraction of the intermediate mass and massive stars are born as components of close binaries. We will investigate the effects of binaries on the chemical evolution of Globular Clusters and on the origin of matter with a pristine chemical composition that is needed for the single star AGB scenario to work. We use a population synthesis code that accounts for binary physics in order to estimate the amount and the composition of the ...

  20. 'Chemical abundances in H II regions and their implications -- Retrospective on: M. Peimbert & R. Costero, Boletin de los Observatorios de Tonantzintla y Tacubaya, Vol. 5, 3, 1969'

    CERN Document Server

    Peimbert, M

    2009-01-01

    We present a review about the relevance of the paper by Peimbert and Costero (1969), on the chemical abundance determinations of H II regions. We analize the observational evidence in favor of the presence of temperature variations inside gaseous nebulae. We make a brief mention of the methods used to estimate the contribution of the unobserved ions to the total chemical abundances.

  1. Equilibrium modeling of mono and binary sorption of Cu(II and Zn(II onto chitosan gel beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaj Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work are in-depth experimental studies of Cu(II and Zn(II ion removal on chitosan gel beads from both one- and two-component water solutions at the temperature of 303 K. The optimal process conditions such as: pH value, dose of sorbent and contact time were determined. Based on the optimal process conditions, equilibrium and kinetic studies were carried out. The maximum sorption capacities equaled: 191.25 mg/g and 142.88 mg/g for Cu(II and Zn(II ions respectively, when the sorbent dose was 10 g/L and the pH of a solution was 5.0 for both heavy metal ions. One-component sorption equilibrium data were successfully presented for six of the most useful three-parameter equilibrium models: Langmuir-Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Koble-Corrigan, Hill and Toth. Extended forms of Langmuir-Freundlich, Koble-Corrigan and Sips models were also well fitted to the two-component equilibrium data obtained for different ratios of concentrations of Cu(II and Zn(II ions (1:1, 1:2, 2:1. Experimental sorption data were described by two kinetic models of the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order. Furthermore, an attempt to explain the mechanisms of the divalent metal ion sorption process on chitosan gel beads was undertaken.

  2. Gompertz kinetics model of fast chemical neurotransmission currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    At a chemical synapse, transmitter molecules ejected from presynaptic terminal(s) bind reversibly with postsynaptic receptors and trigger an increase in channel conductance to specific ions. This paper describes a simple but accurate predictive model for the time course of the synaptic conductance transient, based on Gompertz kinetics. In the model, two simple exponential decay terms set the rates of development and decline of transmitter action. The first, r, triggering conductance activation, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of growth of conductance, G. The second, r', responsible for Y, deactivation of the conductance, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of decline of transmitter action. Therefore, the differential equation for the net conductance change, g, triggered by the transmitter is dg/dt=g(r-r'). The solution of that equation yields the product of G(t), representing activation, and Y(t), which defines the proportional decline (deactivation) of the current. The model fits, over their full-time course, published records of macroscopic ionic current associated with fast chemical transmission. The Gompertz model is a convenient and accurate method for routine analysis and comparison of records of synaptic current and putative transmitter time course. A Gompertz fit requiring only three independent rate constants plus initial current appears indistinguishable from a Markov fit using seven rate constants.

  3. A constitutive model for bonded geomaterials subject to mechanical and/or chemical degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova, R.; Castellanza, R.; Tamagnini, C.

    2003-08-01

    The mechanical behaviour of bonded geomaterials is described by means of an elastoplastic strain-hardening model. The internal variables, taking into account the history of the material, depend on the plastic strains experienced and on a conveniently defined scalar measure of damage induced by weathering and/or chemical degradation.For the sake of simplicity, it is assumed that only internal variables are affected by mechanical and chemical history of the material. Despite this simplifying assumption, it can be shown that many interesting phenomena exhibited by weathered bonded geomaterials can be successfully described. For instance, (i) the transition from brittle to ductile behaviour with increasing pressure of a calcarenite with collapsing internal structure, (ii) the complex behaviour of chalk and other calcareous materials in oedometric tests, (iii) the chemically induced variation of the stress and strain state of such kind of materials, are all phenomena that can be qualitatively reproduced. Several comparisons with experimental data show that the model can capture the observed behaviour also quantitatively.

  4. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Cloutman, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Work being carried out at LLNL has concentrated on studies of the role of chemical kinetics in a variety of problems related to hydrogen combustion in practical combustion systems, with an emphasis on vehicle propulsion. Use of hydrogen offers significant advantages over fossil fuels, and computer modeling provides advantages when used in concert with experimental studies. Many numerical {open_quotes}experiments{close_quotes} can be carried out quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of system development, and many new and speculative concepts can be screened to identify those with sufficient promise to pursue experimentally. This project uses chemical kinetic and fluid dynamic computational modeling to examine the combustion characteristics of systems burning hydrogen, either as the only fuel or mixed with natural gas. Oxidation kinetics are combined with pollutant formation kinetics, including formation of oxides of nitrogen but also including air toxics in natural gas combustion. We have refined many of the elementary kinetic reaction steps in the detailed reaction mechanism for hydrogen oxidation. To extend the model to pressures characteristic of internal combustion engines, it was necessary to apply theoretical pressure falloff formalisms for several key steps in the reaction mechanism. We have continued development of simplified reaction mechanisms for hydrogen oxidation, we have implemented those mechanisms into multidimensional computational fluid dynamics models, and we have used models of chemistry and fluid dynamics to address selected application problems. At the present time, we are using computed high pressure flame, and auto-ignition data to further refine the simplified kinetics models that are then to be used in multidimensional fluid mechanics models. Detailed kinetics studies have investigated hydrogen flames and ignition of hydrogen behind shock waves, intended to refine the detailed reactions mechanisms.

  5. The TOMCAT global chemical transport model v1.6: description of chemical mechanism and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Sarah A.; Arnold, Stephen R.; Hollaway, Michael J.; Pope, Richard J.; Wilson, Chris; Feng, Wuhu; Emmerson, Kathryn M.; Kerridge, Brian J.; Latter, Barry L.; Miles, Georgina M.; Siddans, Richard; Chipperfield, Martyn P.

    2017-08-01

    This paper documents the tropospheric chemical mechanism scheme used in the TOMCAT 3-D chemical transport model. The current scheme includes a more detailed representation of hydrocarbon chemistry than previously included in the model, with the inclusion of the emission and oxidation of ethene, propene, butane, toluene and monoterpenes. The model is evaluated against a range of surface, balloon, aircraft and satellite measurements. The model is generally able to capture the main spatial and seasonal features of high and low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and reactive nitrogen. However, model biases are found in some species, some of which are common to chemistry models and some that are specific to TOMCAT and warrant further investigation. The most notable of these biases are (1) a negative bias in Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter and spring CO and a positive bias in Southern Hemisphere (SH) CO throughout the year, (2) a positive bias in NH O3 in summer and a negative bias at high latitudes during SH winter and (3) a negative bias in NH winter C2 and C3 alkanes and alkenes. TOMCAT global mean tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations are higher than estimates inferred from observations of methyl chloroform but similar to, or lower than, multi-model mean concentrations reported in recent model intercomparison studies. TOMCAT shows peak OH concentrations in the tropical lower troposphere, unlike other models which show peak concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere. This is likely to affect the lifetime and transport of important trace gases and warrants further investigation.

  6. A review of class I and class II pet food recalls involving chemical contaminants from 1996 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbeiha, Wilson; Morrison, Jamie

    2011-03-01

    Commercial pet food in USA is generally safe, but adulteration does occur. Adulterated food has to be recalled to protect pets and public health. All stakeholders, including food firms, distributors, and government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) participate in food recall. The objective of this review is to describe the pet food recall procedure from start to finish, and to review class I and II pet food recalls from 1996 to 2008, with a specific focus on those due to chemical contaminants/adulterants. Information was requested from the FDA by Freedom of Information Act. Only those recalls backed by the FDA scientific review were considered. The legal framework for food recalls in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Chapter 1, Part 7 and in the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007, Title X was reviewed. From 1996 to 2008, there were a total of 22 class I and II pet food recalls. Of these, only six (27%) were due to chemical adulterants. The adulterants were aflatoxins, cholecalciferol, methionine, and melamine, and cyanuric acid. The causes of adulteration included inadequate testing of raw materials for toxins, use of wrong or faulty mixing equipment, and misformulation of raw materials. Overall, pet food manufactured in the USA is safe. Even with shortcomings in the recall process, the incidence of illness associated with pet food adulteration is low. Added changes can only make the system better in the future to safeguard pet and public safety. © American College of Medical Toxicology 2010

  7. A new extension of the polarizable continuum model: Toward a quantum chemical description of chemical reactions at extreme high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammi, Roberto

    2015-11-15

    A quantum chemical method for studying potential energy surfaces of reactive molecular systems at extreme high pressures is presented. The method is an extension of the standard Polarizable Continuum Model that is usually used for Quantum Chemical study of chemical reactions at a standard condition of pressure. The physical basis of the method and the corresponding computational protocol are described in necessary detail, and an application of the method to the dimerization of cyclopentadiene (up to 20 GPa) is reported.

  8. Physical and chemical bases of synthesis of cobalt(II sulfide in the reverse microemulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslyuk D.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research results of stability of reverse microemulsion which consists of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS / n-butanol – water – heptane in the presence of an aqueous phase dissolved cobalt(II sulfate and sodium sulfide. The results of the spectrophotometric and conductometric studies of microemulsion have been presented. The dependence of reverse microemulsion electrical conductivity and optical density on the phase relation has been indicated. Based on these results some assumptions of the ongoing structural changes in the microemulsions have been made. Thermodynamic calculation describing boundary formation of cobalt(II sulfide precipitate in aqueous solution depending on pH has been carried out, the competing hydrolysis reactions have been estimated

  9. Acomprehensive study of high metallicity giant extragalactic h ii regions: chemical abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Castellanos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemos realizado observaciones espectrofotom etricas en el optico e infrarrojo cercano de 15 regiones H II en las galaxias espirales NGC 628, NGC 925, NGC 1232 y NGC 1637. Dichas observaciones han sido realizadas con una amplia cobertura espectral y con una resoluci on su ciente para detectar y medir tanto las d ebiles l neas aurorales como las caracter sticas de estrellas Wolf-Rayet (WR. Hemos derivado la temperatura electr onica en las regiones observadas con el n de investigar la estructura de ionizaci on de las mismas y la composici on qu mica del gas. De esta manera, hemos seleccionado de la muestra de Van Zee et al. (1998, aquellas regiones H II gigantes cuya metalicidad, obtenida a partir de calibraciones emp ricas basadas en las l neas prohibidas del ox geno, es solar o sobresolar.

  10. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  11. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Comp A-3 Type II Prills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    by other authorized documents . Citation of manufacturer’s or trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use thereof...distribution unlimited. ii REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is...was used to evaluate RDX crystals (R021 and R210) made under controlled conditions at Los Alamos National Laboratory ( LANL ). 3. Results and

  12. Acomprehensive study of high metallicity giant extragalactic h ii regions: chemical abundances

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Castellanos; Díaz, Angeles I.; Elena Terlevich

    2002-01-01

    Hemos realizado observaciones espectrofotom etricas en el optico e infrarrojo cercano de 15 regiones H II en las galaxias espirales NGC 628, NGC 925, NGC 1232 y NGC 1637. Dichas observaciones han sido realizadas con una amplia cobertura espectral y con una resoluci on su ciente para detectar y medir tanto las d ebiles l neas aurorales como las caracter sticas de estrellas Wolf-Rayet (WR). Hemos derivado la temperatura electr onica en las regiones observadas con el n de investi...

  13. Iso-chemical potential trajectories in the P-T plane for He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, B.; Nissen, J. A.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Trajectories of constant chemical potential in the P-T plane serve as an integral formulation of London's equation. The trajectories are useful for analysis and synthesis of fountain effect pump performance. A family of trajectories is generated from available numerical codes.

  14. Iso-chemical potential trajectories in the P-T plane for He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, B.; Nissen, J. A.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Trajectories of constant chemical potential in the P-T plane serve as an integral formulation of London's equation. The trajectories are useful for analysis and synthesis of fountain effect pump performance. A family of trajectories is generated from available numerical codes.

  15. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  16. Innovations in bonding to zirconia-based materials. Part II: focusing on chemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Aboushelib; H. Mirmohamadi; J.P. Matinlinna; E. Kukk; H.F. Ounsi; Z. Salameh

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The zirconia-resin bond strength was enhanced using novel engineered zirconia primers in combination with selective infiltration etching as a surface pre-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial aging on the chemical stability of the established bond and

  17. Direct Conversion of Chemically De-Ashed Coal in Fuel Cells (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J F

    2005-07-25

    We review the technical challenges associated with the production and use of various coal chars in a direct carbon conversion fuel cell. Existing chemical and physical deashing processes remove material below levels impacting performance at minimal cost. At equilibrium, sulfur entrained is rejected from the melt as COS in the offgas.

  18. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  19. Brownian motion in a field of force and the diffusion theory of chemical reactions. II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, H.C.

    1956-01-01

    H. A. Kramers has studied the rate of chemical reactions in view of the Brownian forces caused by a surrounding medium in temperature equilibrium. In a previous paper 3) the author gave a solution of Kramers' diffusion equation in phase space by systematic development. In this paper the general prob

  20. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  1. To Model Chemical Reactivity in Heterogeneous Emulsions, Think Homogeneous Microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence Stuart; Liu, Changyao; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Pastoriza-Gallego, Maria José; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Qing; Krishnan, Gunaseelan; Sánchez-Paz, Verónica; Zhang, Yongliang; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-08-25

    Two important and unsolved problems in the food industry and also fundamental questions in colloid chemistry are how to measure molecular distributions, especially antioxidants (AOs), and how to model chemical reactivity, including AO efficiency in opaque emulsions. The key to understanding reactivity in organized surfactant media is that reaction mechanisms are consistent with a discrete structures-separate continuous regions duality. Aggregate structures in emulsions are determined by highly cooperative but weak organizing forces that allow reactants to diffuse at rates approaching their diffusion-controlled limit. Reactant distributions for slow thermal bimolecular reactions are in dynamic equilibrium, and their distributions are proportional to their relative solubilities in the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions. Our chemical kinetic method is grounded in thermodynamics and combines a pseudophase model with methods for monitoring the reactions of AOs with a hydrophobic arenediazonium ion probe in opaque emulsions. We introduce (a) the logic and basic assumptions of the pseudophase model used to define the distributions of AOs among the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions in microemulsions and emulsions and (b) the dye derivatization and linear sweep voltammetry methods for monitoring the rates of reaction in opaque emulsions. Our results show that this approach provides a unique, versatile, and robust method for obtaining quantitative estimates of AO partition coefficients or partition constants and distributions and interfacial rate constants in emulsions. The examples provided illustrate the effects of various emulsion properties on AO distributions such as oil hydrophobicity, emulsifier structure and HLB, temperature, droplet size, surfactant charge, and acidity on reactant distributions. Finally, we show that the chemical kinetic method provides a natural explanation for the cut-off effect, a maximum followed by a sharp reduction in AO efficiency with

  2. Meteorological and Chemical Urban Scale Modelling for Shanghai Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Gonzalez-Aparicio, Iratxe; Amstrup, Bjarne; Yang, Xiaohua; Baklanov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Urban air pollution is a serious problem in megacities and major industrial agglomerations of China. Therefore, air quality information is important for public. In particular, the Shanghai metropolitan area is well known as megacity having severe air pollution episodes. The Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model) is applied for on-line integrated meteorology and atmospheric composition forecasting for the Shanghai region of China. The model setup includes the urban Building Effects Parameterization module, describing different types of urban districts with its own morphological and aerodynamical characteristics. The model is running in downscaling chain from regional-to-urban scales for selected periods in summer and winter having both elevated pollution levels as well as unfavorable meteorological conditions. For these periods, the effects of urbanization are analyzed for spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric and chemical/aerosols patterns. The formation and development of meteorological (air and surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, boundary layer height) and chemical/aerosol patterns (concentration and deposition) due to influence of the metropolitan area is evaluated. The impact of Shanghai region on regional-to-urban scales as well as relationship between air pollution and meteorology are estimated.

  3. Assimilation of stratospheric ozone in the chemical transport model STRATAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grassi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a sequential assimilation approach useful for assimilating tracer measurements into a three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM of the stratosphere. The numerical code, developed largely according to Kha00, uses parameterizations and simplifications allowing assimilation of sparse observations and the simultaneous evaluation of analysis errors, with reasonable computational requirements. Assimilation parameters are set by using χ2 and OmF (Observation minus Forecast statistics. The CTM used here is a high resolution three-dimensional model. It includes a detailed chemical package and is driven by UKMO (United Kingdom Meteorological Office analyses. We illustrate the method using assimilation of Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS/MLS ozone observations for three weeks during the 1996 antarctic spring. The comparison of results from the simulations with TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer measurements shows improved total ozone fields due to assimilation of MLS observations. Moreover, the assimilation gives indications on a possible model weakness in reproducing polar ozone values during springtime.

  4. Mathematical models of thermal and chemical transport in geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, C.-H.

    1985-12-01

    Semi-analytical and numerical methods are used to investigate thermal and chemical transport processes in geologic media. The work is divided into two parts: (1) development of semi-analytical models for the analysis of uncoupled isothermal and nonisothermal fluid flow in naturally fractured media, and (2) development of a high resolution numerical code to address coupled nonisothermal chemical transport in geologic media. A semi-analytical model is developed for well test data analysis in naturally fractured reservoirs. A simple approximate analytical solution for pressure buildup and drawdown tests is developed. Methods based on the approximate solution are developed for the evaluation of important reservoir properties. Type curves for nonisothermal fluid flow in naturally fractured media are developed to design injection systems for maximum energy in hydrothermal systems. An accurate finite difference method for the solution of a convection-diffusion type equation is developed. The method is incorporated in a two-dimensional code to investigate free convection in a porous slab and kinetic silica-water reactions in geothermal systems. A multicomponent model considering the variations of pressure, temperature and silica concentration is developed to interpret the evolution of geothermal systems during exploitation.

  5. Chemical production in electrocautery smoke by a novel predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y-C; Tang, C-S; Huang, H-Y; Liu, C-H; Chen, Y-L; Chen, D-R; Lin, Y-W

    2011-01-01

    The hazards of electrocautery smoke have been known for decades. However, few clinical studies have been conducted to analyze the responsible variables of the smoke production. This study collected clinical smoke samples and systematically analyzed all possible factors. Thirty diathermy smoke samples were collected during mastectomy and abdominal cavity operations. Samples were analyzed using a gas chromatographer with a flame ionization detector. Data were applied to construct prediction models for chemical production from electrosurgeries to identify all possible factors that impact chemical production during electrosurgery. Toluene was detected in 27 smoke samples (90%) with concentrations of 0.003-0.463 mg/m(3) and production of 176.0-2,780.0 ng. Ethyl benzene and styrene were identified in very few cases. General linear regression analysis demonstrates that surgery type, patient age, electrocautery duration and imparted coagulation energy explained 67.63% of the variation in toluene production. Surgery type and patient age are known prior to surgery. In terms of risk precaution, the operating team should pay close attention to exposure when certain positive factors of increasing the chemical production are known in advance. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Tribo-chemical mechanisms of copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) - Fundamental investigations and integrated modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shantanu

    In this work, copper Chemical Mechanical Planarization is identified primarily as a wear enhanced corrosion process (as opposed to the corrosion enhanced wear process assumed in existing modeling work), where intermittent abrasive action enhances the local oxidation rate, and is followed by time-dependant passivation of copper. Based on this mechanism, an integrated tribo-chemical model of material removal at the abrasive scale was developed based on oxidation of copper. This considers abrasive and pad properties, process parameters, and slurry chemistry. Three important components of this model -- the passivation kinetics of copper in CMP slurry chemicals; the mechanical properties of passive films on copper; and the interaction frequency of copper and abrasives -- are introduced. The first two components, in particular the passivation kinetics of copper, are extensively studied experimentally, while the third component is addressed theoretically. The passivation kinetics of copper (i.e. decrease in oxidation currents as passive films form on bare copper) were investigated by potential step chronoamperometry. Low cost microelectrodes were developed (first of its kind for studying copper CMP) to reduce many of the problems of traditional macroelectrodes, such as interference from capacitive charging, IR drops and low diffusion limited current. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used on copper microelectrodes in CMP slurry constituents to obtain equivalent circuit elements associated with different electrochemical phenomena (capacitive, kinetics, diffusion etc.) at different polarization potentials. The circuit elements were used to simulate chronoamperometry in a system where copper actively corrodes at anodic potentials; from the simulation and the experimental results, the current decay in this system was attributed entirely to capacitive charging. The circuit elements were also used to explain the chronoamperometry results in passivating and

  7. CHEMICALS

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  8. Analytical model of plasma-chemical etching in planar reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselov, D. S.; Bakun, A. D.; Voronov, Yu A.; Kireev, V. Yu; Vasileva, O. V.

    2016-09-01

    The paper discusses an analytical model of plasma-chemical etching in planar diode- type reactor. Analytical expressions of etch rate and etch anisotropy were obtained. It is shown that etch anisotropy increases with increasing the ion current and ion energy. At the same time, etch selectivity of processed material decreases as compared with the mask. Etch rate decreases with the distance from the centre axis of the reactor. To decrease the loading effect, it is necessary to reduce the wafer temperature and pressure in the reactor, as well as increase the gas flow rate through the reactor.

  9. Chemical kinetics and combustion modelling with CFX 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopford, P. [AEA Technology, Computational Fluid Dynamics Services Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation describes some recent developments in combustion and kinetics models used in the CFX software of AEA Technology. Three topics are highlighted: the development of coupled solvers in a traditional `SIMPLE`-based CFD code, the use of detailed chemical kinetics mechanism via `look-up` tables and the application of CFD to large-scale multi-burner combustion plant. The aim is identify those physical approximations and numerical methods that are likely to be most useful in the future and those areas where further developments are required. (author) 6 refs.

  10. Blooms' separation of the final exam of Engineering Mathematics II: Item reliability using Rasch measurement model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuaad, Norain Farhana Ahmad; Nopiah, Zulkifli Mohd; Tawil, Norgainy Mohd; Othman, Haliza; Asshaari, Izamarlina; Osman, Mohd Hanif; Ismail, Nur Arzilah

    2014-06-01

    In engineering studies and researches, Mathematics is one of the main elements which express physical, chemical and engineering laws. Therefore, it is essential for engineering students to have a strong knowledge in the fundamental of mathematics in order to apply the knowledge to real life issues. However, based on the previous results of Mathematics Pre-Test, it shows that the engineering students lack the fundamental knowledge in certain topics in mathematics. Due to this, apart from making improvements in the methods of teaching and learning, studies on the construction of questions (items) should also be emphasized. The purpose of this study is to assist lecturers in the process of item development and to monitor the separation of items based on Blooms' Taxonomy and to measure the reliability of the items itself usingRasch Measurement Model as a tool. By using Rasch Measurement Model, the final exam questions of Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) for semester 2 sessions 2012/2013 were analysed and the results will provide the details onthe extent to which the content of the item providesuseful information about students' ability. This study reveals that the items used in Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) final exam are well constructed but the separation of the items raises concern as it is argued that it needs further attention, as there is abig gap between items at several levels of Blooms' cognitive skill.

  11. Improved Chemical Structure-Activity Modeling Through Data Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Bender, Andreas

    2015-12-28

    Extending the original training data with simulated unobserved data points has proven powerful to increase both the generalization ability of predictive models and their robustness against changes in the structure of data (e.g., systematic drifts in the response variable) in diverse areas such as the analysis of spectroscopic data or the detection of conserved domains in protein sequences. In this contribution, we explore the effect of data augmentation in the predictive power of QSAR models, quantified by the RMSE values on the test set. We collected 8 diverse data sets from the literature and ChEMBL version 19 reporting compound activity as pIC50 values. The original training data were replicated (i.e., augmented) N times (N ∈ 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10), and these replications were perturbed with Gaussian noise (μ = 0, σ = σnoise) on either (i) the pIC50 values, (ii) the compound descriptors, (iii) both the compound descriptors and the pIC50 values, or (iv) none of them. The effect of data augmentation was evaluated across three different algorithms (RF, GBM, and SVM radial) and two descriptor types (Morgan fingerprints and physicochemical-property-based descriptors). The influence of all factor levels was analyzed with a balanced fixed-effect full-factorial experiment. Overall, data augmentation constantly led to increased predictive power on the test set by 10-15%. Injecting noise on (i) compound descriptors or on (ii) both compound descriptors and pIC50 values led to the highest drop of RMSEtest values (from 0.67-0.72 to 0.60-0.63 pIC50 units). The maximum increase in predictive power provided by data augmentation is reached when the training data is replicated one time. Therefore, extending the original training data with one perturbed repetition thereof represents a reasonable trade-off between the increased performance of the models and the computational cost of data augmentation, namely increase of (i) model complexity due to the need for optimizing

  12. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  13. Two-dimensional numerical and eco-toxicological modeling of chemical spills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suiliang HUANG; Yafei JIA; Sam S. Y. WANG

    2009-01-01

    The effects of chemical spills on aquatic nontarget organisms were evaluated in this study. Based on a review of three types of current eco-toxicological models of chemicals, i.e., ACQUATOX model of the US-EPA, Hudson River Model of PCBs, and critical body residual (CBR) model and dynamic energy budget (DEBtox)model, this paper presents an uncoupled numerical ecotoxicological model. The transport and transformation of spilled chemicals were simulated by a chemical transport model (including flow and sediment transport), and the mortalities of an organism caused by the chemicals were simulated by the extended threshold damage model,separately. Due to extreme scarcity of data, this model was applied to two hypothetical cases of chemical spills happening upstream of a lake. Theoretical analysis and simulated results indicated that this model is capable of reasonably predicting the acute effects of chemical spills on aquatic ecosystems or organism killings.

  14. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous type II plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pumo, M L; Spiro, S; Pastorello, A; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Manicò, G; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe we infer explosion energies of $0.16$-$0.18$ foe, radii at explosion of $1.8$-$3.5 \\times 10^{13}$ cm, and ejected masses of $10$-$11.3$\\Msun. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range $\\sim 13.2$-$15.1$\\Msun\\, for SN 2003Z and $\\sim 11.4$-$12.9$\\Msun\\, for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way, enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that: a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP, b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explo...

  15. Integration Strategies for Efficient Multizone Chemical Kinetics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNenly, M J; Havstad, M A; Aceves, S M; Pitz, W J

    2009-10-15

    Three integration strategies are developed and tested for the stiff, ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrators used to solve the fully coupled multizone chemical kinetics model. Two of the strategies tested are found to provide more than an order of magnitude of improvement over the original, basic level of usage for the stiff ODE solver. One of the faster strategies uses a decoupled, or segregated, multizone model to generate an approximate Jacobian. This approach yields a 35-fold reduction in the computational cost for a 20 zone model. Using the same approximate Jacobian as a preconditioner for an iterative Krylov-type linear system solver, the second improved strategy achieves a 75-fold reduction in the computational cost for a 20 zone model. The faster strategies achieve their cost savings with no significant loss of accuracy. The pressure, temperature and major species mass fractions agree with the solution from the original integration approach to within six significant digits; and the radical mass fractions agree with the original solution to within four significant digits. The faster strategies effectively change the cost scaling of the multizone model from cubic to quadratic, with respect to the number of zones. As a consequence of the improved scaling, the 40 zone model offers more than a 250-fold cost savings over the basic calculation.

  16. ALTERNATIVE BINDERS TO BENTONITE FOR IRON ORE PELLETIZING : PART II : EFFECTS ON METALLURGICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sivrikaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was started to find alternative binders to bentonite and to recover the low preheated and fired pellet mechanical strengths of organic binders-bonded pellets. Bentonite is considered as a chemical impurity for pellet chemistry due to acid constituents (SiO2 and Al2O3. Especially addition of silica-alumina bearing binders is detrimental for iron ore concentrate with high acidic content. Organic binders are the most studied binders since they are free in silica. Although they yield pellets with good wet strength; they have found limited application in industry since they fail to give sufficient physical and mechanical strength to preheated and fired pellets. It is investigated that how insufficient preheated and fired pellet strengths can be improved when organic binders are used as binder. The addition of a slag bonding/strength increasing constituent (free in acidic contents into pellet feed to provide pellet strength with the use of organic binders was proposed. Addition of boron compounds such as colemanite, tincal, borax pentahydrate, boric acid together with organic binders such as CMC, starch, dextrin and some organic based binders, into magnetite and hematite pellet mixture was tested. After determining the addition of boron compounds is beneficial to recover the low pellet physical and mechanical qualities in the first part of this study, in this second part, metallurgical and chemical properties (reducibility - swelling index – microstructure – mineralogy - chemical content of pellets produced with combined binders (an organic binder plus a boron compound were presented. The metallurgical and chemical tests results showed that good quality product pellets can be produced with combined binders when compared with the bentonite-bonded pellets. Hence, the suggested combined binders can be used as binder in place of bentonite in iron ore pelletizing without compromising the pellet chemistry.

  17. Comparison of chemical and thermal protein denaturation by combination of computational and experimental approaches. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Christiansen, Alexander; Samiotakis, Antonios; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-11-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation methods have been widely used to investigate folding processes of proteins in vitro. However, a molecular understanding of the relationship between these two perturbation methods is lacking. Here, we combined computational and experimental approaches to investigate denaturing effects on three structurally different proteins. We derived a linear relationship between thermal denaturation at temperature Tb and chemical denaturation at another temperature Tu using the stability change of a protein (ΔG). For this, we related the dependence of ΔG on temperature, in the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, to that of ΔG on urea concentration in the linear extrapolation method, assuming that there is a temperature pair from the urea (Tu) and the aqueous (Tb) ensembles that produces the same protein structures. We tested this relationship on apoazurin, cytochrome c, and apoflavodoxin using coarse-grained molecular simulations. We found a linear correlation between the temperature for a particular structural ensemble in the absence of urea, Tb, and the temperature of the same structural ensemble at a specific urea concentration, Tu. The in silico results agreed with in vitro far-UV circular dichroism data on apoazurin and cytochrome c. We conclude that chemical and thermal unfolding processes correlate in terms of thermodynamics and structural ensembles at most conditions; however, deviations were found at high concentrations of denaturant.

  18. Uncertainty quantification for quantum chemical models of complex reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, Jonny; Husch, Tamara; Simm, Gregor N; Reiher, Markus

    2016-12-22

    For the quantitative understanding of complex chemical reaction mechanisms, it is, in general, necessary to accurately determine the corresponding free energy surface and to solve the resulting continuous-time reaction rate equations for a continuous state space. For a general (complex) reaction network, it is computationally hard to fulfill these two requirements. However, it is possible to approximately address these challenges in a physically consistent way. On the one hand, it may be sufficient to consider approximate free energies if a reliable uncertainty measure can be provided. On the other hand, a highly resolved time evolution may not be necessary to still determine quantitative fluxes in a reaction network if one is interested in specific time scales. In this paper, we present discrete-time kinetic simulations in discrete state space taking free energy uncertainties into account. The method builds upon thermo-chemical data obtained from electronic structure calculations in a condensed-phase model. Our kinetic approach supports the analysis of general reaction networks spanning multiple time scales, which is here demonstrated for the example of the formose reaction. An important application of our approach is the detection of regions in a reaction network which require further investigation, given the uncertainties introduced by both approximate electronic structure methods and kinetic models. Such cases can then be studied in greater detail with more sophisticated first-principles calculations and kinetic simulations.

  19. Modelling the chemical evolution in galaxies with KROME

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, Stefano; Capelo, Pedro R; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Banerjee, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present and test chemical models for three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution. The microphysics is modelled by employing the public chemistry package KROME and the chemical networks have been tested to work in a wide range of densities and temperatures. We describe a simple H/He network following the formation of H2, and a more sophisticated network which includes metals. Photochemistry, thermal processes, and different prescriptions for the H2 catalysis on dust are presented and tested within a simple one-zone framework. We explore the effect of changing some of the key parameters such as metallicity, radiation and non-equilibrium versus equilibrium metal cooling approximations on the transition between the different gas phases. We find that employing an accurate treatment of the dust-related processes induces a faster HI-H2 transition. In addition, we show when the equilibrium assumption for metal cooling holds, and how a non-equilibrium approach affects the thermal ...

  20. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  1. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  2. Reaction Networks For Interstellar Chemical Modelling: Improvements and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Herbst, E; Troe, J; Geppert, W; Linnartz, H; Oberg, K; Roueff, E; Agundez, M; Pernot, P; Cuppen, H M; Loison, J C; Talbi, D

    2010-01-01

    We survey the current situation regarding chemical modelling of the synthesis of molecules in the interstellar medium. The present state of knowledge concerning the rate coefficients and their uncertainties for the major gas-phase processes -- ion-neutral reactions, neutral-neutral reactions, radiative association, and dissociative recombination -- is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on those reactions that have been identified, by sensitivity analyses, as 'crucial' in determining the predicted abundances of the species observed in the interstellar medium. These sensitivity analyses have been carried out for gas-phase models of three representative, molecule-rich, astronomical sources: the cold dense molecular clouds TMC-1 and L134N, and the expanding circumstellar envelope IRC +10216. Our review has led to the proposal of new values and uncertainties for the rate coefficients of many of the key reactions. The impact of these new data on the predicted abundances in TMC-1 and L134N is reported. Interstellar dust p...

  3. Chempy: A flexible chemical evolution model for abundance fitting. Do the Sun's abundances alone constrain chemical evolution models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybizki, Jan; Just, Andreas; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-09-01

    Elemental abundances of stars are the result of the complex enrichment history of their galaxy. Interpretation of observed abundances requires flexible modeling tools to explore and quantify the information about Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) stored in such data. Here we present Chempy, a newly developed code for GCE modeling, representing a parametrized open one-zone model within a Bayesian framework. A Chempy model is specified by a set of five to ten parameters that describe the effective galaxy evolution along with the stellar and star-formation physics: for example, the star-formation history (SFH), the feedback efficiency, the stellar initial mass function (IMF), and the incidence of supernova of type Ia (SN Ia). Unlike established approaches, Chempy can sample the posterior probability distribution in the full model parameter space and test data-model matches for different nucleosynthetic yield sets. It is essentially a chemical evolution fitting tool. We straightforwardly extend Chempy to a multi-zone scheme. As an illustrative application, we show that interesting parameter constraints result from only the ages and elemental abundances of the Sun, Arcturus, and the present-day interstellar medium (ISM). For the first time, we use such information to infer the IMF parameter via GCE modeling, where we properly marginalize over nuisance parameters and account for different yield sets. We find that 11.6+ 2.1-1.6% of the IMF explodes as core-collapse supernova (CC-SN), compatible with Salpeter (1955, ApJ, 121, 161). We also constrain the incidence of SN Ia per 103M⊙ to 0.5-1.4. At the same time, this Chempy application shows persistent discrepancies between predicted and observed abundances for some elements, irrespective of the chosen yield set. These cannot be remedied by any variations of Chempy's parameters and could be an indication of missing nucleosynthetic channels. Chempy could be a powerful tool to confront predictions from stellar

  4. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Vladilo, G.; Calura, F.

    2016-09-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by AGB stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to Damped Lyman-α systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are: i) we can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. iii) Concerning Damped Lyman-α systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nano-particles.

  5. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Vladilo, G.; Calura, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova (SN) explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to damped Lyman α (DLA) systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are the following. (i) We can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. (ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. (iii) Concerning DLA systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. (iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nanoparticles.

  6. Atomic data for Zn II - Improving Spectral Diagnostics of Chemical Evolution in High-redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kisielius, Romas; Ferland, Gary J; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Som, Debopam; Lykins, Matt L

    2015-01-01

    Damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorbers in quasar spectra provide the most sensitive tools for measuring element abundances of distant galaxies. Estimation of abundances from absorption lines depends sensitively on the accuracy of the atomic data used. We have started a project to produce new atomic spectroscopic parameters for optical/UV spectral lines using state-of-the-art computer codes employing very broad configuration interaction basis. Here we report our results for Zn II, an ion used widely in studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) as well as DLA/sub-DLAs. We report new calculations of many energy levels of Zn II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations use the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework. We use both non-relativistic and quasi-relativistic one-electron radial orbitals. We have incorporated the results of these atomic calculations into the plasma simulation code Cloudy, and applied them to a lab plasma a...

  7. Overview of chemical modeling of nuclear waste glass dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-02-01

    Glass dissolution takes place through metal leaching and hydration of the glass surface accompanied by development of alternation layers of varying crystallinity. The reaction which controls the long-term glass dissolution rate appears to be surface layer dissolution. This reaction is reversible because the buildup of dissolved species in solution slows the dissolution rate due to a decreased dissolution affinity. Glass dissolution rates are therefore highly dependent on silica concentrations in solution because silica is the major component of the alteration layer. Chemical modeling of glass dissolution using reaction path computer codes has successfully been applied to short term experimental tests and used to predict long-term repository performance. Current problems and limitations of the models include a poorly defined long-term glass dissolution mechanism, the use of model parameters determined from the same experiments that the model is used to predict, and the lack of sufficient validation of key assumptions in the modeling approach. Work is in progress that addresses these issues. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Models of cortical malformation--Chemical and physical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-02-15

    Pharmaco-resistant epilepsies, and also some neuropsychiatric disorders, are often associated with malformations in hippocampal and neocortical structures. The mechanisms leading to these cortical malformations causing an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory system are largely unknown. Animal models using chemical or physical manipulations reproduce different human pathologies by interfering with cell generation and neuronal migration. The model of in utero injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate mimics periventricular nodular heterotopia. The freeze lesion model reproduces (poly)microgyria, focal heterotopia and schizencephaly. The in utero irradiation model causes microgyria and heterotopia. Intraperitoneal injections of carmustine 1-3-bis-chloroethyl-nitrosurea (BCNU) to pregnant rats produces laminar disorganization, heterotopias and cytomegalic neurons. The ibotenic acid model induces focal cortical malformations, which resemble human microgyria and ulegyria. Cortical dysplasia can be also observed following prenatal exposure to ethanol, cocaine or antiepileptic drugs. All these models of cortical malformations are characterized by a pronounced hyperexcitability, few of them also produce spontaneous epileptic seizures. This dysfunction results from an impairment in GABAergic inhibition and/or an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. The cortical region initiating or contributing to this hyperexcitability may not necessarily correspond to the site of the focal malformation. In some models wide-spread molecular and functional changes can be observed in remote regions of the brain, where they cause pathophysiological activities. This paper gives an overview on different animal models of cortical malformations, which are mostly used in rodents and which mimic the pathology and to some extent the pathophysiology of neuronal migration disorders associated with epilepsy in humans.

  9. A minimalist chemical model of matrix metalloproteinases--can small peptides mimic the more rigid metal binding sites of proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árus, Dávid; Nagy, Nóra Veronika; Dancs, Ágnes; Jancsó, Attila; Berkecz, Róbert; Gajda, Tamás

    2013-09-01

    In order to mimic the active center of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), we synthesized a pentadecapeptide (Ac-KAHEFGHSLGLDHSK-NH2) corresponding to the catalytic zinc(II) binding site of human MMP-13. The multi-domain structural organization of MMPs fundamentally determines their metal binding affinity, catalytic activity and selectivity. Our potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR, NMR, mass spectrometric and kinetic studies are aimed to explore the usefulness of such flexible peptides to mimic the more rigid metal binding sites of proteins, to examine the intrinsic metal binding properties of this naked sequence, as well as to contribute to the development of a minimalist, peptide-based chemical model of MMPs, including the catalytic properties. Since the multiimidazole environment is also characteristic for copper(II), and recently copper(II) containing variants of MMPs have been identified, we also studied the copper(II) complexes of the above peptide. Around pH 6-7 the peptide, similarly to MMPs, offers a {3Nim} coordination binding site for both zinc(II) and copper(II). In the case of copper(II), the formation of amide coordinated species at higher pH abolished the analogy with the copper(II) containing MMP variant. On the other hand, the zinc(II)-peptide system mimics some basic features of the MMP active sites: the main species around pH7 (ZnH2L) possesses a {3Nim,H2O} coordination environment, the deprotonation of the zinc-bound water takes place near the physiological pH, it forms relatively stable ternary complexes with hydroxamic acids, and the species ZnH2L(OH) and ZnH2L(OH)2 have notable hydrolytic activity between pH7 and 9.

  10. Coupled thermo-hydro-chemical models of swelling bentonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, Javier; Mon, Alba; Zheng, Liange; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Pisani, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories is based on the multibarrier concept of retention of the waste by a combination of engineered and geological barriers. The engineered barrier system (EBS) includes the solid conditioned waste-form, the waste container, the buffer made of materials such as clay, grout or crushed rock that separate the waste package from the host rock and the tunnel linings and supports. The geological barrier supports the engineered system and provides stability over the long term during which time radioactive decay reduces the levels of radioactivity. The strong interplays among thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration, thermal and solute transport stages of the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository call for coupled THMC models for the metallic overpack, the unsaturated compacted bentonite and the concrete liner. Conceptual and numerical coupled THMC models of the EBS have been developed, which have been implemented in INVERSE-FADES-CORE. Chemical reactions are coupled to the hydrodynamic processes through chemical osmosis (C-H coupling) while bentonite swelling affects solute transport via changes in bentonite porosity changes (M-H coupling). Here we present THMC models of heating and hydration laboratory experiments performed by CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain) on compacted FEBEX bentonite and numerical models for the long-term evolution of the EBS for 1 Ma. The changes in porosity caused by swelling are more important than those produced by the chemical reactions during the early evolution of the EBS (t < 100 years). For longer times, however, the changes in porosity induced by the dissolution/precipitation reactions are more relevant due to: 1) The effect of iron mineral phases (corrosion products) released by the corrosion of the carbon steel canister; and 2) The hyper alkaline plume produced by the concrete liner. Numerical results show that

  11. Chemical consequences of pyrazole orientation in Ru(II) complexes of unsymmetric quinoline-pyrazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg Wallenstein, Joachim; Fredin, Lisa A; Jarenmark, Martin; Abrahamsson, Maria; Persson, Petter

    2016-08-07

    A series of homoleptic Ru(II) complexes including the tris-bidentate complexes of a new bidentate ligand 8-(1-pyrazol)-quinoline (Q1Pz) and bidentate 8-(3-pyrazol)-quinoline (Q3PzH), as well as the bis-tridentate complex of bis(quinolinyl)-1,3-pyrazole (DQPz) was studied. Together these complexes explore the orientation of the pyrazole relative to the quinoline. By examining the complexes structurally, photophysically, photochemically, electrochemically, and computationally by DFT and TD-DFT, it is shown that the pyrazole orientation has a significant influence on key properties. In particular, its orientation has noticeable effects on oxidation and reduction potentials, photostability and proton sensitivity, indicating that [Ru(Q3PzH)3](2+) is a particularly good local environment acidity-probe candidate.

  12. A multi-time-scale analysis of chemical reaction networks: II. Stochastic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Xingye; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Othmer, Hans G

    2016-11-01

    We consider stochastic descriptions of chemical reaction networks in which there are both fast and slow reactions, and for which the time scales are widely separated. We develop a computational algorithm that produces the generator of the full chemical master equation for arbitrary systems, and show how to obtain a reduced equation that governs the evolution on the slow time scale. This is done by applying a state space decomposition to the full equation that leads to the reduced dynamics in terms of certain projections and the invariant distributions of the fast system. The rates or propensities of the reduced system are shown to be the rates of the slow reactions conditioned on the expectations of fast steps. We also show that the generator of the reduced system is a Markov generator, and we present an efficient stochastic simulation algorithm for the slow time scale dynamics. We illustrate the numerical accuracy of the approximation by simulating several examples. Graph-theoretic techniques are used throughout to describe the structure of the reaction network and the state-space transitions accessible under the dynamics.

  13. Photo-chemical transport modelling of tropospheric ozone: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Sharma, Prateek; Khare, Mukesh

    2017-06-01

    Ground level ozone (GLO), a secondary pollutant having adverse impact on human health, ecology, and agricultural productivity, apart from being a major contributor to global warming, has been a subject matter of several studies. In order to identify appropriate strategies to control GLO levels, accurate assessment and prediction is essential, for which elaborate simulation and modelling is required. Several studies have been undertaken in the past to simulate GLO levels at different scales and for various applications. It is important to evaluate these studies, widely spread over in literature. This paper aims to critically review various studies that have been undertaken, especially in the past 15 years (2000-15) to model GLO. The review has been done of the studies that range over different spatial scales - urban to regional and continental to global. It also includes a review of performance evaluation and sensitivity analysis of photo-chemical transport models in order to assess the extent of application of these models and their predictive capability. The review indicates following major findings: (a) models tend to over-estimate the night-time GLO concentrations due to limited titration of GLO with NO within the model; (b) dominance of contribution from far-off regional sources to average ozone concentration in the urban region and higher contribution of local sources during days of high ozone episodes; requiring strategies for controlling precursor emissions at both regional and local scales; (c) greater influence of NOx over VOC in export of ozone from urban regions due to shifting of urban plumes from VOC-sensitive regime to NOx-sensitive as they move out from city centres to neighbouring rural regions; (d) models with finer resolution inputs perform better to a certain extent, however, further improvement in resolutions (beyond 10 km) did not show improvement always; (e) future projections show an increase in GLO concentrations mainly due to rise in

  14. Integration of process design and controller design for chemical processes using model-based methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abd.Hamid, Mohd-Kamaruddin; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel systematic model-based methodology for performing integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) for chemical processes is presented. The methodology uses a decomposition method to solve the IPDC typically formulated as a mathematical programming (optimization...... with constraints) problem. Accordingly the optimization problem is decomposed into four sub-problems: (i) pre-analysis, (ii) design analysis, (iii) controller design analysis, and (iv) final selection and verification, which are relatively easier to solve. The methodology makes use of thermodynamic-process...... insights and the reverse design approach to arrive at the final process design–controller design decisions. The developed methodology is illustrated through the design of: (a) a single reactor, (b) a single separator, and (c) a reactor–separator-recycle system and shown to provide effective solutions...

  15. A microscopic model for chemically-powered Janus motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-07-07

    Very small synthetic motors that make use of chemical reactions to propel themselves in solution hold promise for new applications in the development of new materials, science and medicine. The prospect of such potential applications, along with the fact that systems with many motors or active elements display interesting cooperative phenomena of fundamental interest, has made the study of synthetic motors an active research area. Janus motors, comprising catalytic and noncatalytic hemispheres, figure prominently in experimental and theoretical studies of these systems. While continuum models of Janus motor systems are often used to describe motor dynamics, microscopic models that are able to account for intermolecular interactions, many-body concentration gradients, fluid flows and thermal fluctuations provide a way to explore the dynamical behavior of these complex out-of-equilibrium systems that does not rely on approximations that are often made in continuum theories. The analysis of microscopic models from first principles provides a foundation from which the range of validity and limitations of approximate theories of the dynamics may be assessed. In this paper, a microscopic model for the diffusiophoretic propulsion of Janus motors, where motor interactions with the environment occur only through hard collisions, is constructed, analyzed and compared to theoretical predictions. Microscopic simulations of both single-motor and many-motor systems are carried out to illustrate the results.

  16. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  17. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  18. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  19. Overview of the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Pace, Thompson G.

    On 14-17 March 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II) at the Quail Roost Conference Center, Rougemont, NC. Thirty-five scientists were invited to participate. The objective of the workshop was to document and compare results of source apportionment analyses of simulated and real aerosol data sets. The simulated data set was developed by scientists from the National Bureau of Standards. It consisted of elemental mass data generated using a dispersion model that simulated transport of aerosols from a variety of sources to a receptor site. The real data set contained the mass, elemental, and ionic species concentrations of samples obtained in 18 consecutive 12-h sampling periods in Houston, TX. Some participants performed additional analyses of the Houston filters by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, or light microscopy. Ten groups analyzed these data sets using a variety of modeling procedures. The results of the modeling exercises were evaluated and structured in a manner that permitted model intercomparisons. The major conclusions and recommendations derived from the intercomparisons were: (1) using aerosol elemental composition data, receptor models can resolve major emission sources, but additional analyses (including light microscopy and X-ray diffraction) significantly increase the number of sources that can be resolved; (2) simulated data sets that contain up to 6 dissimilar emission sources need to be generated, so that different receptor models can be adequately compared; (3) source apportionment methods need to be modified to incorporate a means of apportioning such aerosol species as sulfate and nitrate formed from SO 2 and NO, respectively, because current models tend to resolve particles into chemical species rather than to deduce their sources and (4) a source signature library may be required to be compiled for each airshed in order to

  20. [Historical review on chemical and medical studies of globefish toxin before World War II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, M

    1994-01-01

    "Fugu," a species of globefish has eaten by Japanese people for a long time, so globefish poisoning in Japan has been prevalent. Figures are shown in the Annual Food Poisoning Report collected and issued by health service authorities of Japanese Government since 1879. These reports prompted Dr. Yoshizumi Tahara, National Institute of Hygienic Sciences to conduct a chemical investigation of the toxic substance of globefish in 1884. However, the analysis was very difficult and his report of investigation was delayed. Before publication of the report of Dr. Tahara, pharmacological and toxicological studies of globefish poisoning were reported by three research groups from the Facultly of Medicine, University of Tokyo in 1889. These reports concluded that globefish poison has curare-like activity and its distribution was limited to specific organs such as the ovaries and the liver. Dr. Tahara successfully isolated the poison from aqueaous extract of ovaries of globefish by precipitation with lead acetate in the presence of ammonia. He presented the results at the monthly meeting of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan in July 1894. He continued the studies and established an improved method for extraction and purification suitable for large-scale production. Finally, he confirmed that globefish contains only one toxic substance and named it Tetrodotoxin (TTX) in 1909. He elucidated the chemical nature of TTX as follows: 1) TTX is an amorphous hygroscopic powder and its character is neither alkaloid nor protein. 2) The possibility of TTX being a protamine was excluded by chemical analysis. Before the discovery ot TTX, according to folklore, globefish was regarded as medicine for leprosy because flesh of globefish contaminated with a sublethal dose of toxic substance alleviated the neuralgia of patients affected with leprosy. The clinical effect of TTX prepared by Tahara's method to suppress severe neuralgia due to leprosy and to reduce muscle spasms due to tetanus were

  1. Upper D region chemical kinetic modeling of LORE relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Luque, A.; Haldoupis, C.

    2016-04-01

    The recovery times of upper D region electron density elevations, caused by lightning-induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP), are modeled. The work was motivated from the need to understand a recently identified narrowband VLF perturbation named LOREs, an acronym for LOng Recovery Early VLF events. LOREs associate with long-living electron density perturbations in the upper D region ionosphere; they are generated by strong EMP radiated from large peak current intensities of ±CG (cloud to ground) lightning discharges, known also to be capable of producing elves. Relaxation model scenarios are considered first for a weak enhancement in electron density and then for a much stronger one caused by an intense lightning EMP acting as an impulsive ionization source. The full nonequilibrium kinetic modeling of the perturbed mesosphere in the 76 to 92 km range during LORE-occurring conditions predicts that the electron density relaxation time is controlled by electron attachment at lower altitudes, whereas above 79 km attachment is balanced totally by associative electron detachment so that electron loss at these higher altitudes is controlled mainly by electron recombination with hydrated positive clusters H+(H2O)n and secondarily by dissociative recombination with NO+ ions, a process which gradually dominates at altitudes >88 km. The calculated recovery times agree fairly well with LORE observations. In addition, a simplified (quasi-analytic) model build for the key charged species and chemical reactions is applied, which arrives at similar results with those of the full kinetic model. Finally, the modeled recovery estimates for lower altitudes, that is <79 km, are in good agreement with the observed short recovery times of typical early VLF events, which are known to be associated with sprites.

  2. Reduced Models in Chemical Kinetics via Nonlinear Data-Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliodoro Chiavazzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of detailed mechanisms for chemical kinetics often poses two types of severe challenges: First, the number of degrees of freedom is large; and second, the dynamics is characterized by widely disparate time scales. As a result, reactive flow solvers with detailed chemistry often become intractable even for large clusters of CPUs, especially when dealing with direct numerical simulation (DNS of turbulent combustion problems. This has motivated the development of several techniques for reducing the complexity of such kinetics models, where, eventually, only a few variables are considered in the development of the simplified model. Unfortunately, no generally applicable a priori recipe for selecting suitable parameterizations of the reduced model is available, and the choice of slow variables often relies upon intuition and experience. We present an automated approach to this task, consisting of three main steps. First, the low dimensional manifold of slow motions is (approximately sampled by brief simulations of the detailed model, starting from a rich enough ensemble of admissible initial conditions. Second, a global parametrization of the manifold is obtained through the Diffusion Map (DMAP approach, which has recently emerged as a powerful tool in data analysis/machine learning. Finally, a simplified model is constructed and solved on the fly in terms of the above reduced (slow variables. Clearly, closing this latter model requires nontrivial interpolation calculations, enabling restriction (mapping from the full ambient space to the reduced one and lifting (mapping from the reduced space to the ambient one. This is a key step in our approach, and a variety of interpolation schemes are reported and compared. The scope of the proposed procedure is presented and discussed by means of an illustrative combustion example.

  3. Physical and chemical cross analyses of II-VI semiconductor nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, S.; Laurenti, J.P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Arl, D.; Fregnaux, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et de Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Gaumet, J.J. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et de Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine, Metz (France); Zhang, Y. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux, Univ. Paul Verlaine, Metz (France)

    2010-06-15

    CdS quantum dots (QDs) are synthesized by the single source precursor thermal method. Compared with previous reports, a temperature ramp allows faster elaboration of smaller nanocrystals (NCs) with efficient room temperature (RT) visible emission. A cross-disciplinary study between chemical analyses and physical techniques provides consistent data for these small NCs. Joint mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and optical spectrometry techniques give a consistent picture about purity and stability of precursors, average size and size dispersion of the NCs, as well as their optical spectral response in correlation with their size via quantum confinement effects. RT photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals the great potential of such QDs and their tunable response wavelength in the visible spectrum. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. [His Majesty's distillers: distillation and chemical medicine in the court of Phillip II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Bueno, M; Alegre Pérez, M E

    2001-01-01

    The present work studies the appearance and development of Paracelsian Practices in the Spanish Court through a linked series of events that took place between 1564 and 1602. These were: the creation of Philippine distillation laboratories, the ordenance of the protophysician Francisco de Valles regarding distilled waters; the concession of a patent to Diego de Santiago for the invention of a steam distillery; the publication of the last treatise by Francisco de Valles, dedicated to weights, measures, and distilled waters; the appearance of a distiller on the founding staff of the Royal Apothecary, in charge of preparing all the distilled waters and chemical medicines; and the creation of a new post within the Court health organigram, that of Distiller Major.

  5. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim

    CERN Document Server

    Woitke, Peter; Thi, Wing-Fai

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a new disk code, called ProDiMo, to calculate the thermo-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and to interpret gas emission lines from UV to sub-mm. We combine frequency-dependent 2D dust continuum radiative transfer, kinetic gas-phase and UV photo-chemistry, ice formation, and detailed non-LTE heating & cooling balance with the consistent calculation of the hydrostatic disk structure. We include FeII and CO ro-vibrational line heating/cooling relevant for the high-density gas close to the star, and apply a modified escape probability treatment. The models are characterized by a high degree of consistency between the various physical, chemical and radiative processes, where the mutual feedbacks are solved iteratively. In application to a T Tauri disk extending from 0.5AU to 500AU, the models are featured by a puffed-up inner rim and show that the dense, shielded and cold midplane (z/r<0.1, Tg~Td) is surrounded by a layer of hot (5000K) and thin (10^7 to 10^8 cm^-3) atomic ga...

  6. Combined analysis of chemical bonding in a Cu(II) dimer using QTAIM, Voronoi tessellation and Hirshfeld surface approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologzhanina, Anna V; Kats, Svitlana V; Penkova, Larisa V; Pavlenko, Vadim A; Efimov, Nikolay N; Minin, Vadim V; Eremenko, Igor L

    2015-10-01

    Interaction of 1-(1H-pyrazol-5-yl)ethanone oxime (H2PzOx) with copper(II) chloride in the presence of pyridine afforded a binuclear discrete [Cu2(HPzOx)2Cl2py2] complex, which was characterized by Fourier transform-IR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, magnetochemistry and high-resolution X-ray diffraction experiments. Multipole refinement of X-ray diffraction data and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations of an isolated molecule allowed charge and spin distributions to be obtained for this compound. Magnetochemistry data, EPR spectra and DFT calculations of an isolated molecule show antiferromagnetic coupling between copper(II) ions. The spin distribution suggests an exchange pathway via the bridging pyrazole ring in the equatorial plane of the CuN4Cl coordination polyhedron, thus providing support for the classical superexchange mechanism; the calculated value of the magnetic coupling constant -2J is equal to 220 cm(-1), which compares well with the experimental value of 203 ± 2 cm(-1). Chemical connectivity was derived by Bader's 'quantum theory of atoms in molecules' and compared with Voronoi tessellation and Hirshfeld surface representations of crystal space. All methodologies gave a similar qualitative and semi-quantitative description of intra- and intermolecular connectivity.

  7. Modeling Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Couple Stress Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张朝辉; 雒建斌; 温诗铸

    2004-01-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a manufacturing process used to achieve high levels of global and local planarity.Currently, the slurries used in CMP usually contain nanoscale particles to accelerate the removal ratio and to optimize the planarity, whose rheological properties can no longer be accurately modeled with Newtonian fluids.The Reynolds equation, including the couple stress effects, was derived in this paper.The equation describes the mechanism to solve the CMP lubrication equation with the couple stress effects.The effects on load and moments resulting from the various parameters, such as pivot height, roll angle, and pitch angle, were subsequently simulated.The results show that the couple stress can provide higher load and angular moments.This study sheds some lights into the mechanism of the CMP process.

  8. Nonlinear model predictive control for chemical looping process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao; Lou, Xinsheng

    2017-08-22

    A control system for optimizing a chemical looping ("CL") plant includes a reduced order mathematical model ("ROM") that is designed by eliminating mathematical terms that have minimal effect on the outcome. A non-linear optimizer provides various inputs to the ROM and monitors the outputs to determine the optimum inputs that are then provided to the CL plant. An estimator estimates the values of various internal state variables of the CL plant. The system has one structure adapted to control a CL plant that only provides pressure measurements in the CL loops A and B, a second structure adapted to a CL plant that provides pressure measurements and solid levels in both loops A, and B, and a third structure adapted to control a CL plant that provides full information on internal state variables. A final structure provides a neural network NMPC controller to control operation of loops A and B.

  9. Longitudinal Stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II: A Latent Trait-State-Occasion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In a six-wave longitudinal study with two cohorts (660 adolescents and 630 young adults), this study investigated the longitudinal stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) using the Trait-State-Occasion (TSO) model. The results revealed that the full TSO model was the best fitting representation of the depression measured by the…

  10. Femtochemistry of orange II in solution and in chemical and biological nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Sanz, Mikel; Tormo, Laura

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we report on studies of the nature of the dynamics and hydrophobic binding in cyclodextrins and human serum albumin protein complexes with orange II. With femtosecond time resolution, we examined the proton-transfer and trans-cis isomerization reactions of the ligand in these nanocavities and in pure solvents. Because of confinement at the ground state, the orientational motion in the formed phototautomer is restricted, leading to a rich dynamics. Therefore, the emission lifetimes span a large window of tens to hundreds of picoseconds in the cavities. Possible H-bond interactions between the guest and cyclodextrin do not affect the caged dynamics. For the protein–ligand complexes, slow diffusional motion (≈630 ps) observed in the anisotropy decay indicates that the binding structure is not completely rigid, and the embedded guest is not frozen with the hydrophobic pocket. The ultrafast isomerization and decays are explained in terms of coupling motions between N–N and C–N stretching modes of the formed tautomer. We discuss the role of confinement on the trans-cis isomerization with the cavities and its relationships to frequency and time domains of nanostructure emission. PMID:16365300

  11. Material removal model for non-contact chemical mechanical polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JianQun; ZHANG ChaoHui

    2008-01-01

    Material removal mechanism under non-contact condition between the pad and the wafer in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is investigated. Based on the assumption that almost all effective material removals take place due to the active abrasives which cut material through the plowing effects. A novel model is developed to predict the material removal rate (MRR) under non-contact condition between the pad and the wafer in CMP. Validated by the experimental data, the model is proved to be able to predict the change of MRR under non-contact condition. Numerical simulation of the model shows: the relative velocity u between the pad and the wafer and fluid viscosity η are the most important factors which impact MRR under non-contact condition; load changes of wafer also affects the MRR, but the effect is not as obvious as the relative velocity and fluid viscosity;when the radius of abrasive is not less than 50nm, the impact of MRR alone with the changes in the size of the abrasive can be ignored.

  12. Chemical Reaction and Flow Modeling in Fullerene and Nanotube Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Greendyke, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of processes to produce fullerenes and carbon nanotubes has largely been empirical. Fullerenes were first discovered in the soot produced by laser ablation of graphite [1]and then in the soot of electric arc evaporated carbon. Techniques and conditions for producing larger and larger quantities of fullerenes depended mainly on trial and error empirical variations of these processes, with attempts to scale them up by using larger electrodes and targets and higher power. Various concepts of how fullerenes and carbon nanotubes were formed were put forth, but very little was done based on chemical kinetics of the reactions. This was mainly due to the complex mixture of species and complex nature of conditions in the reactors. Temperatures in the reactors varied from several thousand degrees Kelvin down to near room temperature. There are hundreds of species possible, ranging from atomic carbon to large clusters of carbonaceous soot, and metallic catalyst atoms to metal clusters, to complexes of metals and carbon. Most of the chemical kinetics of the reactions and the thermodynamic properties of clusters and complexes have only been approximated. In addition, flow conditions in the reactors are transient or unsteady, and three dimensional, with steep spatial gradients of temperature and species concentrations. All these factors make computational simulations of reactors very complex and challenging. This article addresses the development of the chemical reaction involved in fullerene production and extends this to production of carbon nanotubes by the laser ablation/oven process and by the electric arc evaporation process. In addition, the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process is discussed. The article is in several parts. The first one addresses the thermochemical aspects of modeling; and considers the development of chemical rate equations, estimates of reaction rates, and thermodynamic properties where they are available. The second part

  13. Multiscale modeling, simulations, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers. Part II. Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldum, A.; Clemons, C. B.; Dill, L. H.; Kreider, K. L.; Young, G. W.; Zheng, X.; Evans, E. A.; Zhang, G.; Hariharan, S. I.

    2005-08-01

    This work is Part II of an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin-film materials using plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with aluminum materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. This procedure begins with the sputtering of the coating material from a target. Part I [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 044303 (2005)] focused on the sputtering aspect and transport of the sputtered material through the reactor. That reactor level model determines the concentration field of the coating material. This field serves as input into the present species transport and deposition model for the region surrounding an individual nanofiber. The interrelationships among processing factors for the transport and deposition are investigated here from a detailed modeling approach that includes the salient physical and chemical phenomena. Solution strategies that couple continuum and atomistic models are used. At the continuum scale, transport dynamics near the nanofiber are described. At the atomic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the deposition and sputtering mechanisms at the coating surface. Ion kinetic energies and fluxes are passed from the continuum sheath model to the MD simulations. These simulations calculate sputtering and sticking probabilities that in turn are used to calculate parameters for the continuum transport model. The continuum transport model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating-free surface. This equation is solved using boundary perturbation and level set methods to determine the coating morphology as a function of operating conditions.

  14. Iceland as a Model for Chemical Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Murad, E.; Southard, R.

    2001-03-01

    Subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland has led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxide-rich alteration products that may ressemble chemical alteration on Mars. The spectral and chemical properties of Icelandic samples are presented.

  15. Modeling and optimization of a sequence of chemical cleaning cycles in dead-end ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Edwin; Betlem, Ben H.L.; Blankert, Bastiaan; Roffel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a chemical cleaning sequence model is proposed that can be used to predict the fouling status of a membrane during multiple chemical cleaning cycles. The proposed model is used to minimize the overall operating costs – based on chemicals consumption, energy consumption and investment c

  16. Radial metallicity gradients in spiral galaxies from H II regions and planetary nebulae: probing galactic chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Radial metallicity gradients, typically observed in spiral galaxies, are excellent constraints for chemical evolution models. The contemporary studies of the two stellar populations, whose progenitors have formed at different times, yield to the chemical and time constraining of the models. In this context, planetary nebula and HII region analysis proved to be ideal two-epochs test populations. We present an assortment of galaxies whose oxygen abundances have been determined both with weak- and strong-line methods, and whose radial metallicity gradients and their evolution in time have disclosed very interesting correlations with the galaxy characteristics. New results from our Gemini/GMOS observations, and a review of the best literature data, set the stage for a better understanding of spiral galaxy evolution.

  17. A simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir model of chemical evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple closed-box (CB models of chemical evolution are extended on two respects, namely (i simple closed-(box+reservoir (CBR models allowing gas outflow from the box into the reservoir (Hartwick 1976 or gas inflow into the box from the reservoir (Caimmi 2007 with rate proportional to the star formation rate, and (ii simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir (MCBR models allowing different stages of evolution characterized by different inflow or outflow rates. The theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD predicted by the model maintains close to a continuous broken straight line. An application is made where a fictitious sample is built up from two distinct samples of halo stars and taken as representative of the inner Galactic halo. The related empirical differential oxygen abundance distribution (EDOD is represented, to an acceptable extent, as a continuous broken line for two viable [O/H]-[Fe/H] empirical relations. The slopes and the intercepts of the regression lines are determined, and then used as input parameters to MCBR models. Within the errors (-+σ, regression line slopes correspond to a large inflow during the earlier stage of evolution and to low or moderate outflow during the subsequent stages. A possible inner halo - outer (metal-poor bulge connection is also briefly discussed. Quantitative results cannot be considered for applications to the inner Galactic halo, unless selection effects and disk contamination are removed from halo samples, and discrepancies between different oxygen abundance determination methods are explained.

  18. Modelling stratospheric chemistry in a global three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummukainen, M. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1995-12-31

    Numerical modelling of atmospheric chemistry aims to increase the understanding of the characteristics, the behavior and the evolution of atmospheric composition. These topics are of utmost importance in the study of climate change. The multitude of gases and particulates making up the atmosphere and the complicated interactions between them affect radiation transfer, atmospheric dynamics, and the impacts of anthropogenic and natural emissions. Chemical processes are fundamental factors in global warming, ozone depletion and atmospheric pollution problems in general. Much of the prevailing work on modelling stratospheric chemistry has so far been done with 1- and 2-dimensional models. Carrying an extensive chemistry parameterisation in a model with high spatial and temporal resolution is computationally heavy. Today, computers are becoming powerful enough to allow going over to 3-dimensional models. In order to concentrate on the chemistry, many Chemical Transport Models (CTM) are still run off-line, i.e. with precalculated and archived meteorology and radiation. In chemistry simulations, the archived values drive the model forward in time, without interacting with the chemical evolution. This is an approach that has been adopted in stratospheric chemistry modelling studies at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. In collaboration with the University of Oslo, a development project was initiated in 1993 to prepare a stratospheric chemistry parameterisation, fit for global 3-dimensional modelling. This article presents the parameterisation approach. Selected results are shown from basic photochemical simulations

  19. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  20. Analytic Models for Radiation Induced Loss in Optical Fibers II. A Physical Model,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    and identify by Mock number) PIEL GRUP UB.GR. Optical fibers Analytical models Radiation effects 19. ABSTRACT (ConinueII. anl mwr,f fneciua,, and...conditions specified in the derivation of the equations existed during the irradiations. This is because the functional form of the equations is not...tion is not necessarily incorrect. If one assumes a relatively simple form of re- covery as a function of time, such as an exponential recovery, it can

  1. Chemical evolution in the early phases of massive star formation II: Deuteration

    CERN Document Server

    Gerner, Th; Beuther, H; Semenov, D; Linz, H; Abertsson, T; Henning, Th

    2015-01-01

    The chemical evolution in high-mass star-forming regions is still poorly constrained. Studying the evolution of deuterated molecules allows to differentiate between subsequent stages of high-mass star formation regions due to the strong temperature dependence of deuterium isotopic fractionation. We observed a sample of 59 sources including 19 infrared dark clouds, 20 high-mass protostellar objects, 11 hot molecular cores and 9 ultra-compact HII regions in the (3-2) transitions of the four deuterated molecules, DCN, DNC, DCO+ and N2D+ as well as their non-deuterated counterpart. The overall detection fraction of DCN, DNC and DCO+ is high and exceeds 50% for most of the stages. N2D+ was only detected in a few infrared dark clouds and high-mass protostellar objects. It can be related to problems in the bandpass at the frequency of the transition and to low abundances in the more evolved, warmer stages. We find median D/H ratios of ~0.02 for DCN, ~0.005 for DNC, ~0.0025 for DCO+ and ~0.02 for N2D+. While the D/H ...

  2. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. II. Magnesium isotopes and pollution scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Thygesen, A O; Ludwig, H -G; Ventura, P; Yong, D; Collet, R; Christlieb, N; Melendez, J; Zaggia, S

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of multiple populations in globular clusters is still far from understood, with several proposed mechanisms to explain the observed behaviour. The study of elemental and isotopic abundance patterns are crucial for investigating the differences among candidate pollution mechanisms. We derive magnesium isotopic ratios for 13 stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to provide new, detailed information about the nucleosynthesis that has occurred within the cluster. For the first time, the impact of 3D model stellar atmospheres on the derived Mg isotopic ratios is investigated. Using both tailored 1D atmospheric models and 3D hydrodynamical models, we derive magnesium isotopic ratios from four features of MgH near 5135{\\AA} in 13 giants near the tip of the RGB, using high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectra. We derive the magnesium isotopic ratios for all stars and find no significant offset of the isotopic distribution between the pristine and the polluted populations. Furthermore, ...

  3. Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobas, Frank A P C; Burkhard, Lawrence P; Doucette, William J; Sappington, Keith G; Verbruggen, Eric M J; Hope, Bruce K; Bonnell, Mark A; Arnot, Jon A; Tarazona, Jose V

    2016-01-01

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less-developed than for aquatic systems. This article reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, invertebrate, mammal, and avian species and for entire terrestrial food webs, including some that consider spatial factors. Limitations and gaps in terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling include the lack of QSARs for biotransformation and dietary assimilation efficiencies for terrestrial species; the lack of models and QSARs for important terrestrial species such as insects, amphibians and reptiles; the lack of standardized testing protocols for plants with limited development of plant models; and the limited chemical domain of existing bioaccumulation models and QSARs (e.g., primarily applicable to nonionic organic chemicals). There is an urgent need for high-quality field data sets for validating models and assessing their performance. There is a need to improve coordination among laboratory, field, and modeling efforts on bioaccumulative substances in order to improve the state of the science for challenging substances.

  4. Evaluation of the performance of four chemical transport models in predicting the aerosol chemical composition in Europe in 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prank, M.; Sofiev, M.; Tsyro, S.; Hendriks, C.; Semeena, V.; Francis, X.V.; Butler, T.; Gon, H.D. van der; Friedrich, R.; Hendricks, J.; Kong, X.; Lawrence, M.; Righi, M.; Samaras, Z.; Sausen, R.; Kukkonen, J.; Sokhi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Four regional chemistry transport models were applied to simulate the concentration and composition of particulate matter (PM) in Europe for 2005 with horizontal resolution 20 km. The modelled concentrations were compared with the measurements of PM chemical composition by the European Monitoring

  5. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  6. Chemical decomposition of urinary stones during holmium-laser lithotripsy: II. Evidence for photothermal breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Vassar, George J.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Chan, Kin Foong; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Because of the greater than or equal to 250 microsecond pulsewidth emitted by the Ho:YAG laser used in clinical lithotripsy, it is unlikely that stress confinement occurs within the irradiated stones. Experimental data supports a thermal mechanism for Ho:YAG laser stone ablation. Stone fragmentation occurs soon after the onset of the laser pulse, is uncorrelated to cavitation bubble formation or collapse, and is associated with low pressures (cf. part I). The mass- loss of desiccated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones exposed to 150 J from the Ho:YAG laser in air was 40 plus or minus 12 mg (mean plus or minus 1 s.d.); for hydrated stones in air was 25 plus or minus 9 mg; and for hydrated stones in water was 17 plus or minus 3 mg, p less than .001. These differences indicate that direct absorption of the laser radiation by the stone is required for the most efficient ablation. Lowering the initial temperature of COM or cystine stones also reduced the stone mass-loss following 20 J of delivered laser energy: 2.2 plus or minus 1.1 mg vs 5.2 plus or minus 1.6 mg for COM stones (-80 vs 23 degrees Celsius), and 0.8 plus or minus 0.4 mg vs 2.2 plus or minus 1.1 mg for cystine stones (-80 vs 23 degrees Celsius), p less than or equal to .05. Finally, chemical analysis of the laser-induced stone fragments revealed the presence of thermal breakdown products: CaCO3 from COM; free sulfur and cysteine from cystine; Ca2O7P2 from calcium hydorgen phosphate dihydrate, and cyanide from uric acid.

  7. CSO and CARMA Observations of L1157. II. Chemical Complexity in the Shocked Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew M.; Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Corby, Joanna F.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Loomis, Ryan A.; Booth, Shawn Thomas; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Herbst, Eric; Remijan, Anthony J.; McGuire, Brett A.

    2016-08-01

    L1157, a molecular dark cloud with an embedded Class 0 protostar possessing a bipolar outflow, is an excellent source for studying shock chemistry, including grain-surface chemistry prior to shocks, and post-shock, gas-phase processing. The L1157-B1 and B2 positions experienced shocks at an estimated ˜2000 and 4000 years ago, respectively. Prior to these shock events, temperatures were too low for most complex organic molecules to undergo thermal desorption. Thus, the shocks should have liberated these molecules from the ice grain-surfaces en masse, evidenced by prior observations of SiO and multiple grain mantle species commonly associated with shocks. Grain species, such as OCS, CH3OH, and HNCO, all peak at different positions relative to species that are preferably formed in higher-velocity shocks or repeatedly shocked material, such as SiO and HCN. Here, we present high spatial resolution (˜3″) maps of CH3OH, HNCO, HCN, and HCO+ in the southern portion of the outflow containing B1 and B2, as observed with Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy. The HNCO maps are the first interferometric observations of this species in L1157. The maps show distinct differences in the chemistry within the various shocked regions in L1157B. This is further supported through constraints of the molecular abundances using the non-LTE code radex. We find that the east/west chemical differentiation in C2 may be explained by the contrast of the shock’s interaction with either cold, pristine material or warm, previously shocked gas, as seen in enhanced HCN abundances. In addition, the enhancement of the HNCO abundance toward the the older shock, B2, suggests the importance of high-temperature O-chemistry in shocked regions.

  8. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  9. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Zhen; Jing, Y P

    2015-01-01

    Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH) has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH using a simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe) as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass M_x of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of M_x depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = t_sat . Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > t_sat , part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  10. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  11. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  12. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  13. Chemical or microbiological models of secondary caries development around different dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Maristela M; Gonçalves, Reginaldo B; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria B; Pimenta, Luiz André F

    2005-08-01

    This study evaluated artificial secondary caries around restorative materials, induced by means of chemical or microbiological models. The following materials were used randomly to restore 130 dental blocks: (1) zinc-oxide eugenol-free temporary filling: Coltosol (Coltène/Whaledent Inc.; n = 30), (2) silver amalgam: Permite C (SDI Limited, n = 20), (3) composite resin: Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE; n = 20), (4) glass-ionomer cement: Fuji II (GC America Inc.; n = 20), (5) resin-modified glass ionomer: Vitremer (3M ESPE; n = 20), and (6) polyacid modified resin: Dyract AP (Dentsply; n = 20). Ten specimens of Group 1 were kept in humidity, and had no carious formation (NC). Ten specimens of each group were submitted to pH cycling (CG, n = 60), and the others were immersed in a medium containing Streptococcus mutans and sucrose (BG, n = 60). Mineral content was determined by microhardness assessment, and lesion depth was measured in polarized light photomicrographs. In the chemical model (CG), mineral content values in the vicinities of restoration were high for Groups 5 (75.7 +/- 11.9), 4 (70.8 +/- 14.2), and NC (95.4 +/- 3.8); intermediate for Groups 1 (55.8 +/- 18.5), 6 (45.6 +/- 11.0), and 2 (44.3 +/- 11.2); and reduced for Group 3 (34.7 +/- 9.7). In the microbiological model (BG), results were similar to CG, although there was less demineralization. The highest lesion depths were found for Groups 3 (182.3 +/- 33.2) in CG and 6 (126.5 +/- 42.8) in BG, when compared to Group 5 (114.6 +/- 26.0 and 56.2 +/- 33.2, respectively). In both models of caries induction, ionomeric materials showed a superior cariostatic effect when compared to the other restorative materials.

  14. Impact of Lewis base on chemical reactivity and separation efficiency for hydrated fourth-row transition metal (II) complexes: an ONIOM DFT/MM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dingsheng; Ma, Ming

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, two-layer ONIOM combinations of high-level quantum mechanics (QM) and inexpensive molecular mechanics (MM) are successfully used to investigate the structural characters of metal (M, all the transition metals in the fourth period)-H2O-Lewis base (A(-)) complexes. Global and local descriptors of chemical reactivity and selectivity from conceptual density functional theory are employed to show the properties of the active complexes of M(H2O)2A2 and to study the effect of the Lewis base for the separation of transition metal ions. It is shown that chemical potential, hardness, electrophilicity, as well as the dual and multiphilic descriptors are adequate for characterizing the global and local reactivity trends of the M(H2O)2A2 complex. It is found that the reactivity is well localized at the metallic center in M(H2O)2A2 and the dual descriptor (ΔfM(r)) can also be used to characterize the directional attack of the electrophile and nucleophile except for the selectivity of the reaction. On the basis of the values of ωM and Δsk, and the sign of ΔfM(r), the selectivity of the nucleophilic reagent (R(-)) for M(II) in M(H2O)2A2 (from high to low) follows this order: Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Co(II) > Fe(II) ≫ Mn(II) > Zn(II) > Cr(II). The Lewis base (A(-)) improves chemical reactivity and selectivity because of changing the reaction path and forming an intermediate, which possesses the higher antibonding character and the larger HOMO/LUMO gap. NBO or AIMALL analysis and Frontier orbital theory results presented here provided more theoretical support for the above reactivity and selectivity studies.

  15. Chemical Control for Host-Parasitoid Model within the Parasitism Season and Its Complex Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we develop a host-parasitoid model with Holling type II functional response function and chemical control, which can be applied at any time of each parasitism season or pest generation, and focus on addressing the importance of the timing of application pesticide during the parasitism season or pest generation in successful pest control. Firstly, the existence and stability of both the host and parasitoid populations extinction equilibrium and parasitoid-free equilibrium have been investigated. Secondly, the effects of key parameters on the threshold conditions have been discussed in more detail, which shows the importance of pesticide application times on the pest control. Thirdly, the complex dynamics including multiple attractors coexistence, chaotic behavior, and initial sensitivity have been studied by using numerical bifurcation analyses. Finally, the uncertainty and sensitivity of all the parameters on the solutions of both the host and parasitoid populations are investigated, which can help us to determine the key parameters in designing the pest control strategy. The present research can help us to further understand the importance of timings of pesticide application in the pest control and to improve the classical chemical control and to make management decisions.

  16. Molecule survival in magnetized protostellar disk winds. I. Chemical model and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Panoglou, D; Forets, G Pineau des; Garcia, P J V; Ferreira, J; Casse, F

    2011-01-01

    Molecular counterparts to atomic jets have been detected within 1000 AU of young stars. Reproducing them is a challenge for proposed ejection models. We explore whether molecules may survive in an MHD disk wind invoked to reproduce the kinematics and tentative rotation signatures of atomic jets in T Tauri stars. The coupled ionization, chemical and thermal evolution along dusty flow streamlines is computed for a prescribed MHD disk wind solution, using a method developed for magnetized shocks in the interstellar medium. Irradiation by wind-attenuated coronal X-rays and FUV photons from accretion hot spots is included, with self-shielding of H2 and CO. Disk accretion rates of 5e-6, 1e-6 and 1e-7 solar masses per year are considered, representative of low-mass young protostars (Class 0), evolved protostars (Class I) and very active T Tauri stars (Class II). The disk wind has an onion-like thermo-chemical structure, with streamlines launched from larger radii having lower temperature and ionisation, and higher H...

  17. Modelling the chemical evolution of star forming filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, D.; Walch, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present simulations of star forming filaments incorporating - to our knowledge - the largest chemical network used to date on-the-fly in a 3D-MHD simulation. The network contains 37 chemical species and about 300 selected reaction rates. For this we use the newly developed package KROME (Grassi et al. [4]). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using such a complex chemical network in 3D-MHD simulations on modern supercomputers. We perform simulations with different strengths of the interstellar radiation field and the cosmic ray ionisation rate and find chemical and physical results in accordance with observations and other recent numerical work.

  18. Modelling the chemical evolution of star forming filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Seifried, D

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of star forming filaments incorporating - to our knowledge - the largest chemical network used to date on-the-fly in a 3D-MHD simulation. The network contains 37 chemical species and about 300 selected reaction rates. For this we use the newly developed package KROME (Grassi et al. 2014). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using such a complex chemical network in 3D-MHD simulations on modern supercomputers. We perform simulations with different strengths of the interstellar radiation field and the cosmic ray ionisation rate and find chemical and physical results in accordance with observations and other recent numerical work.

  19. In situ chemical sensing for hydrothermal plume mapping and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, T.; Kusunoki, T.; Maeda, Y.; Shitashima, K.; Kyo, M.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, T.; Sunamura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, monitoring, and mapping of biogeochemical anomalies in seawater such as temperature, salinity, turbidity, oxidation-reduction potential, and pH are essential missions to explore undiscovered hydrothermal sites and to understand distribution and behavior of hydrothermal plumes. Utilization of reliable and useful in situ sensors has been widely accepted as a promised approach to realize a spatiotemporally resolved mapping of anomalies without water sampling operations. Due to remarkable progresses of sensor technologies and its relatives, a number of highly miniaturized and robust chemical sensors have been proposed and developed. We have been developed, evaluated, and operated a compact ISFET (Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor)-based chemical sensors for ocean environmental sensing purposes. An ISFET has advantages against conventional glass-based electrodes on its faster response, robustness, and potential on miniaturization, and thus variety of chemical sensors has been already on the market. In this study, ISFET-based standalone pH sensors with a solid-state Cl-ISE as a reference electrode were mounted on various platforms and operated to monitor the pH anomalies in deep-sea environment at the Kairei, Edmond, and surrounding hydrothermal sites in the southern Central Indian Ridge area during KH10-06 scientific cruise (Nov. 2010), supported by project TAIGA (Trans-crustal Advection and In situ biogeochemical processes of Global sub-seafloor Aquifer). Up to three pH sensors were mounted on a wire-lined CTD/RMS (Rosette Multiple Sampler), dredge sampler, a series of MTD plankton nets, and VMPS (Vertical Multiple-operating Plankton Sampler). A standalone temperature sensor was bundled and operated with the pH sensor when they were mounted on the dredge sampler, MTD plankton nets, and VMPS. An AUV equipped with the pH sensor was also operated for hydrothermal activity survey operations. As a result of Tow-Yo intersect operations of the CTD

  20. Simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir) models of chemical evolution: an application to the inner Galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Caimmi, R

    2010-01-01

    Simple closed-box (CB) models of chemical evolution are extended on two respects: (i) simple closed-(box+reservoir) (CBR) models allowing gas outflow from the box into the reservoir or gas inflow into the box from the reservoir with same composition as the preexisting gas and rate proportional to the star formation rate, and (ii) simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir) (MCBR) models allowing different stages of evolution characterized by different inflow or outflow rates. The stellar initial mass function is assumed to be universal, and mass conservation holds for the whole system (box+reservoir) while it is violated for each subsystem (box and reservoir). The theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD) predicted by the model, under the assumption of instantaneous recycling, is a continuous broken line, where different slopes are related to different inflow rates. For an application of the model (a) a fictitious sample is built up from two distinct samples and taken as representative of the...

  1. Estimation of the potential leakage of the chemical munitions based on two hydrodynamical models implemented for the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakacki, Jaromir; Golenko, Mariya

    2014-05-01

    Two hydrodynamical models (Princeton Ocean Model (POM) and Parallel Ocean Program (POP)) have been implemented for the Baltic Sea area that consists of locations of the dumped chemical munitions during II War World. The models have been configured based on similar data source - bathymetry, initial conditions and external forces were implemented based on identical data. The horizontal resolutions of the models are also very similar. Several simulations with different initial conditions have been done. Comparison and analysis of the bottom currents from both models have been performed. Based on it estimating of the dangerous area and critical time have been done. Also lagrangian particle tracking and passive tracer were implemented and based on these results probability of the appearing dangerous doses and its time evolution have been presented. This work has been performed in the frame of the MODUM project financially supported by NATO.

  2. Modeling regional secondary organic aerosol using the Master Chemical Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi; Cleveland, Meredith; Ziemba, Luke D.; Griffin, Robert J.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Pankow, James F.; Ying, Qi

    2015-02-01

    A modified near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.2) with 5727 species and 16,930 reactions and an equilibrium partitioning module was incorporated into the Community Air Quality Model (CMAQ) to predict the regional concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the eastern United States (US). In addition to the semi-volatile SOA from equilibrium partitioning, reactive surface uptake processes were used to simulate SOA formation due to isoprene epoxydiol, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The CMAQ-MCM-SOA model was applied to simulate SOA formation during a two-week episode from August 28 to September 7, 2006. The southeastern US has the highest SOA, with a maximum episode-averaged concentration of ∼12 μg m-3. Primary organic aerosol (POA) and SOA concentrations predicted by CMAQ-MCM-SOA agree well with AMS-derived hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) urban concentrations at the Moody Tower at the University of Houston. Predicted molecular properties of SOA (O/C, H/C, N/C and OM/OC ratios) at the site are similar to those reported in other urban areas, and O/C values agree with measured O/C at the same site. Isoprene epoxydiol is predicted to be the largest contributor to total SOA concentration in the southeast US, followed by methylglyoxal and glyoxal. The semi-volatile SOA components are dominated by products from β-caryophyllene oxidation, but the major species and their concentrations are sensitive to errors in saturation vapor pressure estimation. A uniform decrease of saturation vapor pressure by a factor of 100 for all condensable compounds can lead to a 150% increase in total SOA. A sensitivity simulation with UNIFAC-calculated activity coefficients (ignoring phase separation and water molecule partitioning into the organic phase) led to a 10% change in the predicted semi-volatile SOA concentrations.

  3. Models for risk assessment of reactive chemicals in aquatic toxicology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freidig, Andreas Peter

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) for a,b-unsaturated carboxylates (mainly acrylates and methacrylates) was established in chapter 2. Chemical reaction rate constants were measured for 12 different chemicals with three different nucleophiles, namely H 2 O, OH - and glutathione (G

  4. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...

  5. Numerical investigation of a straw combustion boiler – Part I: Modelling of the thermo-chemical conversion of straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dernbecher Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a European project, a straw combustion boiler in conjunction with an organic Rankine cycle is developed. One objective of the project is the enhancement of the combustion chamber by numerical methods. A comprehensive simulation of the combustion chamber is prepared, which contains the necessary submodels for the thermo-chemical conversion of straw and for the homogeneous gas phase reactions. Part I introduces the modelling approach for the thermal decomposition of the biomass inside the fuel bed, whereas part II deals with the simulation of the gas phase reactions in the freeboard.

  6. Systematic reduction of complex tropospheric chemical mechanisms, Part II: Lumping using a time-scale based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Whitehouse

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a formal method of species lumping that can be applied automatically to intermediate compounds within detailed and complex tropospheric chemical reaction schemes. The method is based on grouping species with reference to their chemical lifetimes and reactivity structures. A method for determining the forward and reverse transformations between individual and lumped compounds is developed. Preliminary application to the Leeds Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv2.0 has led to the removal of 734 species and 1777 reactions from the scheme, with minimal degradation of accuracy across a wide range of test trajectories relevant to polluted tropospheric conditions. The lumped groups are seen to relate to groups of peroxy acyl nitrates, nitrates, carbonates, oxepins, substituted phenols, oxeacids and peracids with similar lifetimes and reaction rates with OH. In combination with other reduction techniques, such as sensitivity analysis and the application of the quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA, a reduced mechanism has been developed that contains 35% of the number of species and 40% of the number of reactions compared to the full mechanism. This has led to a speed up of a factor of 8 in terms of computer calculation time within box model simulations.

  7. QGSjet II and EPOS hadronic interaction models: comparison with the Yakutsk EAS array data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knurenko, S.P.; Sabourov, A.V. [Yu. G. Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    Various hadronic interaction models were used in extensive air showers simulations. This resulted in ambiguous estimation of primary energy, cosmic ray flux intensity, mass composition, etc. Several revisions of models have been made recently; for example, third major version of QGSjet II (QGSjet II-03) model was released, new models based on actual accelerator data appeared (EPOS). Employment of newer models always leads to new comprehension of experimental results. Nevertheless, in this case there still is some ambiguity. It is a matter of how correct does the model extrapolate characteristics of primary particle interaction with nuclei of the air from high energies to ultra-high.

  8. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  9. 3 Lectures: "Lagrangian Models", "Numerical Transport Schemes", and "Chemical and Transport Models"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A.

    2005-01-01

    The topics for the three lectures for the Canadian Summer School are Lagrangian Models, numerical transport schemes, and chemical and transport models. In the first lecture I will explain the basic components of the Lagrangian model (a trajectory code and a photochemical code), the difficulties in using such a model (initialization) and show some applications in interpretation of aircraft and satellite data. If time permits I will show some results concerning inverse modeling which is being used to evaluate sources of tropospheric pollutants. In the second lecture I will discuss one of the core components of any grid point model, the numerical transport scheme. I will explain the basics of shock capturing schemes, and performance criteria. I will include an example of the importance of horizontal resolution to polar processes. We have learned from NASA's global modeling initiative that horizontal resolution matters for predictions of the future evolution of the ozone hole. The numerical scheme will be evaluated using performance metrics based on satellite observations of long-lived tracers. The final lecture will discuss the evolution of chemical transport models over the last decade. Some of the problems with assimilated winds will be demonstrated, using satellite data to evaluate the simulations.

  10. Chemical chaperones improve transport and enhance stability of mutant alpha-glucosidases in glycogen storage disease type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Toshika; Kroos, Marian A; Vliet, Laura Van; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2007-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (AalphaGlu) deficiency and manifests predominantly as skeletal muscle weakness. Defects in post-translational modification and transport of mutant AalphaGlu species are frequently encountered and may potentially be corrected with chaperone-mediated therapy. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis by using deoxynojirimycin and derivatives as chemical chaperones to correct the AalphaGlu deficiency in cultured fibroblasts from patients with GSDII. Four mutant phenotypes were chosen: Y455F/Y455F, P545L/P545L, 525del/R600C and D645E/R854X. In case of Y455F/Y455F and P545L/P545L, N-(n-butyl)deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) restored the transport, maturation and activity of AalphaGlu in a dose dependent manner, while it had no effect on the reference enzyme beta-hexosaminidase. NB-DNJ promoted export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the lysosomes and stabilized the activity of mutant AalphaGlu species, Y455F and P545L, inside the lysosomes. In long-term culture, the AalphaGlu activity in the fibroblasts from the patients with mutant phenotypes, Y455F/Y455F and P545L/P545L, increased up to 14.0- and 7.9-fold, respectively, in the presence of 10mumol/L NB-DNJ. However, the effect of NB-DNJ on Y455F/Y455F subsided quickly after removal of the compound. We conclude that NB-DNJ acts in low concentration as chemical chaperone for certain mutant forms of AalphaGlu that are trapped in the ER, poorly transported or labile in the lysosomal environment. Chemical chaperone therapy could create new perspectives for therapeutic intervention in GSDII.

  11. Theoretical investigation of the magnetic exchange interactions in copper(II) oxides under chemical and physical pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocquefelte, Xavier; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Blaha, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It remains a challenge to understand the unconventional mechanisms that cause high-T(C) superconductivity in cuprate superconductors, high-T(C) multiferroicity in CuO, or low-dimensional magnetism in the spin-Peierls transition compounds such as CuGeO(3). A common feature of all these copper oxide compounds (containing Cu(2+) ions) is the presence of large magnetic superexchange interactions J. It is a general strategy to apply chemical and/or physical pressure in order to tune these exotic properties. Here we show theoretically, for the first time, the impact of physical pressure on J on CuO, for which we predict a strong enhancement of the low-dimensionality of the magnetic interactions and the spin-frustration at high-pressures. Such modifications are expected to strongly influence the multiferroic properties of CuO. We finally demonstrate that PBE0 hybrid DFT calculations provide reliable J values for a wide range of copper(II) oxides compounds, i.e. CuGeO(3), BaCu(2)Si(2)O(7), BaCu(2)Ge(2)O(7), and La(2)CuO(4).

  12. Computational evaluation of unsaturated carbonitriles as neutral receptor model for beryllium(II) recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Alias, Yatimah; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-12-01

    Design of neutral receptor molecules (ionophores) for beryllium(II) using unsaturated carbonitrile models has been carried out via density functional theory, G3, and G4 calculations. The first part of this work focuses on gas phase binding energies between beryllium(II) and 2-cyano butadiene (2-CN BD), 3-cyano propene (3-CN P), and simpler models with two separate fragments; acrylonitrile and ethylene. Interactions between beryllium(II) and cyano nitrogen and terminal olefin in the models have been examined in terms of geometrical changes, distribution of charge over the entire π-system, and rehybridization of vinyl carbon orbitals. NMR shieldings and vibrational frequencies probed charge centers and strength of interactions. The six-membered cyclic complexes have planar structures with the rehybridized carbon slightly out of plane (16° in 2-CN BD). G3 results show that in 2-CN BD complex participation of vinyl carbon further stabilizes the cyclic adduct by 16.3 kcal mol(-1), whereas, in simpler models, interaction between beryllium(II) and acetonitrile is favorable by 46.4 kcal mol(-1) compared with that of ethylene. The terminal vinyl carbon in 2-CN BD rehybridizes to sp (3) with an increase of 7 % of s character to allow interaction with beryllium(II). G4 calculations show that the Be(II) and 2-CN BD complex is more strongly bound than those with Mg(II) and Ca(II) by 98.5 and 139.2 kcal mol(-1) (-1), respectively. QST2 method shows that the cyclic and acyclic forms of Be(II)-2-CN BD complexes are separated by 12.3 kcal mol(-1) barrier height. Overlap population analysis reveals that Ca(II) can be discriminated based on its tendency to form ionic interaction with the receptor models.

  13. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-10-08

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al

  14. Thermochemical model for shock-induced chemical reactions in porous thermite: The heat detonation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    A thermochemical model has been developed that treats a shock-induced solid state chemical reaction as a special type of detonation, called a ''heat detonation'' to distinguish it from an ordinary explosive detonation and describe the final form that the chemical energy takes. According to shock temperature measurements, chemical energy can be released from porous reactive solids on a time scale shorter than shock-transit times in laboratory samples. By comparing the experimental shock temperature for porous thermite to that calculated by the model, the amount of thermite reacted when shocked to about 4 GPa was estimated to be between 60 and 70%. Calculated shock temperatures are extremely strong functions of the extent of reaction, but are relatively insensitive to the initial porosity and amount of volatile impurities. Thus, shock temperature measurements are the most useful for real-time studies of shock-induced exothermic chemical reactions in solids. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Alternative Models of Service, Centralized Machine Operations. Phase II Report. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Management Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was conducted to determine if the centralization of playback machine operations for the national free library program would be feasible, economical, and desirable. An alternative model of playback machine services was constructed and compared with existing network operations considering both cost and service. The alternative model was…

  16. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  17. Fate Model for Organic Chemicals in Sewage Treatment Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J.

    Miljøprojekt, 308; I tilknytning til hovedrapporten Environmental Exposure Assessment of Chemicals (Miljøprojekt, 306) er udgivet i alt 5 tekniske bilagsrapporter, alle i serien Miljøprojekt.......Miljøprojekt, 308; I tilknytning til hovedrapporten Environmental Exposure Assessment of Chemicals (Miljøprojekt, 306) er udgivet i alt 5 tekniske bilagsrapporter, alle i serien Miljøprojekt....

  18. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-07

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  19. A review of operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kukkonen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical models that combine weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry are here referred to as chemical weather forecasting models. Eighteen operational chemical weather forecasting models on regional and continental scales in Europe are described and compared in this article. Topics discussed in this article include how weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry models are integrated into chemical weather forecasting systems, how physical processes are incorporated into the models through parameterization schemes, how the model architecture affects the predicted variables, and how air chemistry and aerosol processes are formulated. In addition, we discuss sensitivity analysis and evaluation of the models, user operational requirements, such as model availability and documentation, and output availability and dissemination. In this manner, this article allows for the evaluation of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the various modelling systems and modelling approaches. Finally, this article highlights the most prominent gaps of knowledge for chemical weather forecasting models and suggests potential priorities for future research directions, for the following selected focus areas: emission inventories, the integration of numerical weather prediction and atmospheric chemical transport models, boundary conditions and nesting of models, data assimilation of the various chemical species, improved understanding and parameterization of physical processes, better evaluation of models against data and the construction of model ensembles.

  20. A simple model for the distribution and fate of organic chemicals in a landfill: MOCLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2001-01-01

    of degradation and transformation in the landfill. Local equilibrium is assumed for the distribution of the chemicals in the landfill as expressed by Henry’s Law for the leachate-gas interface, and by the linear partition coefficient based on the waste solid organic carbon content for the waste......A simple mathematical model (MOCLA: Model for Organic Chemicals in Landfills) is presented, describing the distribution of organic chemicals between leachate, gas and solid waste. The model also predicts the fate of the chemicals in terms of emissions with leachate and landfill gas and in terms......-leachate interface. Degradation of the chemicals is expressed as a first order reaction. Annual specific leachate and gas generation data in combination with data on landfill area and volume allow for prediction of main emission routes. Model simulations involving two landfill scenarios for a number of chemicals...

  1. Environmental capacity of chemical oxygen demand in the Bohai Sea: modeling and calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xixi; WANG Xiulin; SHI Xiaoyong; LI Keqiang; DING Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional advection-diffusion model coupled with the degradation process is established for describing the transport of chemical oxygen demand (COD). Comparison of the simulated distribution of COD at the surface in the Bohai Sea in August, 2001 with field observations, shows that the model simulates the dataset reasonably well. The Laizhou Bay, Bohai Bay, and Liaodong Bay were contaminated heavily near shore. Based on the optimal discharge flux method, the Environmental Capacity (EC) and allocated capacities of COD in the Bohai Sea are calculated. For seawater of Grades I to IV of the Chinese National Standard, the ECs of COD in the Bohai Sea were 77×104t/a, 116×l04t/a, 154×l04t/a and 193×104t/a, respectively. The Huanghe (Yellow) River pollutant discharge accounted for the largest percentage of COD at 14.3%, followed by that of from the Liugu River (11.5%), and other nine local rivers below 10%. The COD level in 2005 was worse than that of Grade II seawater and was beyond the environmental capacity. In average, 35% COD reduction is called to meet the standard of Grade I seawater.

  2. Partial Paschen-Back splitting of Si II and Si III lines in magnetic chemically peculiar stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalack, V.; Landstreet, J. D.

    2012-11-01

    Modelling of the spectra of magnetic A and B main-sequence stars is generally done assuming that all the lines are split by the magnetic field according to the Zeeman effect. However, a number of prominent spectral lines are produced by closely spaced doublets or triplets. Such lines should be treated using the theory of the partial Paschen-Back (PPB) effect. Depending on the strength and orientation of magnetic field, the PPB effect can result in the Stokes I and V profiles of a spectral line that differ significantly from those predicted by the Zeeman effect theory. It is important to understand the size and types of errors that are introduced into magnetic spectrum synthesis by treating such lines with the usual Zeeman splitting theory rather than using the correct theoretical treatment of line splitting. To estimate the error introduced by the use of the Zeeman approximation, numerical simulations have been performed for spectral lines of the element silicon, for which a number of important lines are actually in the PPB regime, assuming an oblique rotator model, for various silicon abundances and V sin i values. A comparative analysis of the Stokes I and V profiles calculated assuming the PPB and Zeeman splitting has been carried out for a number of both strong and weak Si II and Si III lines. The analysis indicates that for high precision studies of some spectral lines the PPB approach should be used if the field strength at the magnetic poles is Bp > 10 kG. In the case of the Si II line 5041 Å, the difference between the two simulated profiles is caused by a significant contribution from a so-called 'ghost' line. The Stokes I and V profiles of this particular line simulated taking into account PPB splitting provide a significantly better fit to the observed profiles in the spectrum of the magnetic Ap star HD 318107 than the profiles calculated with Zeeman splitting. Employing the PPB approach, the Si II 5041 Å line can become a useful tool for abundance

  3. Available for the Apple II: FIRM: Florida InteRactive Modeler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, C. Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The Apple II microcomputer program described allows instructors with minimal programing experience to construct computer models of psychological phenomena for students to investigate. Use of these models eliminates need to maintain/house/breed animals or purchase sophisticated laboratory equipment. Several content models are also described,…

  4. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model: Analytical solution, moments, and application to colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport of solutes and colloids in porous media is influenced by a variety of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. A combined physical–chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was therefore used to describe general mass transport. The model partitions the pore space into “mobile” and “i...

  5. The Kimball Free-Cloud Model: A Failed Innovation in Chemical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William B.

    2014-01-01

    This historical review traces the origins of the Kimball free-cloud model of the chemical bond, otherwise known as the charge-cloud or tangent-sphere model, and the central role it played in attempts to reform the introductory chemical curriculum at both the high school and college levels in the 1960s. It also critically evaluates the limitations…

  6. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics.

  7. CONSISTENT USE OF THE KALMAN FILTER IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS (CTMS) FOR DEDUCING EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has shown that emissions can be deduced using observed concentrations of a chemical, a Chemical Transport Model (CTM), and the Kalman filter in an inverse modeling application. An expression was derived for the relationship between the "observable" (i.e., the con...

  8. Organism and population-level ecological models for chemical risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological risk assessment typically focuses on animal populations as endpoints for regulatory ecotoxicology. Scientists at USEPA are developing models for animal populations exposed to a wide range of chemicals from pesticides to emerging contaminants. Modeled taxa include aquat...

  9. Organism and population-level ecological models for chemical risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological risk assessment typically focuses on animal populations as endpoints for regulatory ecotoxicology. Scientists at USEPA are developing models for animal populations exposed to a wide range of chemicals from pesticides to emerging contaminants. Modeled taxa include aquat...

  10. Three-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals (3DFATMIC) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This model simulates subsurface flow, fate and transport of contaminants that are undergoing chemical or biological transformations. The model is applicable to transient conditions in both saturated and unsaturated zones.

  11. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: I. Model development and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Rong; Yang Fuquan; Sloan, James J [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Scholtz, M Trevor, E-mail: sloanj@connect.uwaterloo.ca [ORTECH Environmental, 2395 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, ON L5K 1B3 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    We have combined the US EPA MM5/MCIP/SMOKE/CMAQ modeling system with a dynamic soil model, the pesticide emission model (PEM), to create a multimedia chemical transport model capable of describing the important physical and chemical processes involving pesticides in the soil, in the atmosphere, and on the surface of vegetation. These processes include: agricultural practices (e.g. soil tilling and pesticide application mode); advection and diffusion of pesticides, moisture, and heat in the soil; partitioning of pesticides between soil organic carbon and interstitial water and air; emissions from the soil to the atmosphere; gas-particle partitioning and transport in the atmosphere; and atmospheric chemistry and dry and wet deposition of pesticides to terrestrial and water surfaces. The modeling system was tested by simulating toxaphene in a domain that covers most of North America for the period from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2000. The results show obvious transport of the pesticide from the heavily contaminated soils in the southern United States and Mexico to water bodies including the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Great Lakes, leading to significant dry and wet deposition into these ecosystems. The spatial distributions of dry and wet depositions differ because of their different physical mechanisms; the former follows the distribution of air concentrations whereas the latter is more biased to the North East due to the effect of precipitation.

  12. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: I. Model development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Scholtz, M. Trevor; Yang, Fuquan; Sloan, James J.

    2011-07-01

    We have combined the US EPA MM5/MCIP/SMOKE/CMAQ modeling system with a dynamic soil model, the pesticide emission model (PEM), to create a multimedia chemical transport model capable of describing the important physical and chemical processes involving pesticides in the soil, in the atmosphere, and on the surface of vegetation. These processes include: agricultural practices (e.g. soil tilling and pesticide application mode); advection and diffusion of pesticides, moisture, and heat in the soil; partitioning of pesticides between soil organic carbon and interstitial water and air; emissions from the soil to the atmosphere; gas-particle partitioning and transport in the atmosphere; and atmospheric chemistry and dry and wet deposition of pesticides to terrestrial and water surfaces. The modeling system was tested by simulating toxaphene in a domain that covers most of North America for the period from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2000. The results show obvious transport of the pesticide from the heavily contaminated soils in the southern United States and Mexico to water bodies including the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Great Lakes, leading to significant dry and wet deposition into these ecosystems. The spatial distributions of dry and wet depositions differ because of their different physical mechanisms; the former follows the distribution of air concentrations whereas the latter is more biased to the North East due to the effect of precipitation.

  13. Some Sensitivity Studies of Chemical Transport Simulated in Models of the Soil-Plant-Litter System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C.L.

    2002-10-28

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO{sub 2}) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO{sub 2} and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  14. Some sensitivity studies of chemical transport simulated in models of the soil-plant-litter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.

    1979-09-01

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO/sub 2/) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO/sub 2/ and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  15. Modeling strength loss in wood by chemical composition. Part I, An individual component model for southern pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. E. Winandy; P. K. Lebow

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we develop models for predicting loss in bending strength of clear, straight-grained pine from changes in chemical composition. Although significant work needs to be done before truly universal predictive models are developed, a quantitative fundamental relationship between changes in chemical composition and strength loss for pine was demonstrated. In...

  16. A review of models for near-field exposure pathways of chemicals in consumer products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lei; Ernstoff, Alexi; Fantke, Peter;

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to chemicals in consumer products has been gaining increasing attention, with multiple studies showing that near-field exposures from products is high compared to far-field exposures. Regarding the numerous chemical-product combinations, there is a need for an overarching review of models...... able to quantify the multiple transfers of chemicals from products used near-field to humans. The present review therefore aims at an in-depth overview of modeling approaches for near-field chemical release and human exposure pathways associated with consumer products. It focuses on lower...... in a “human receptor compartment”. We first focus on models of physical mass transfers from the product to ‘near-field’ compartments. For transfers of chemicals from article interior, adequate modeling of in-article diffusion and of partitioning between article surface and air/skin/food is key. Modeling...

  17. Chemical abundance analysis of symbiotic giants - II. AE Ara, BX Mon, KX TrA, and CL Sco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałan, Cezary; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the elemental abundances of symbiotic giants is essential to address the role of chemical composition in the evolution of symbiotic binaries, to map their parent population, and to trace their mass transfer history. However, there are few symbiotic giants for which the photospheric abundances are fairly well determined. This is the second in a series of papers on chemical composition of symbiotic giants determined from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000) near-IR spectra. Results are presented for the late-type giant star in the AE Ara, BX Mon, KX TrA, and CL Sco systems. Spectrum synthesis employing standard local thermal equilibrium (LTE) analysis and stellar atmosphere models were used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Sc, Ti, Fe, and Ni). Our analysis resulted in sub-solar metallicities in BX Mon, KX TrA, and CL Sco by [Fe/H] ˜ -0.3 or -0.5 depending on the value of microturbulence. AE Ara shows metallicity closer to solar by ˜ 0.2 dex. The enrichment in 14N isotope found in all these objects indicates that the giants have experienced the first dredge-up. In the case of BX Mon first dredge-up is also confirmed by the low 12C/13C isotopic ratio of ˜ 8.

  18. Computer programming for nucleic acid studies. II. Total chemical shifts calculation of all protons of double-stranded helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessner-Prettre, C; Ribas Prado, F; Pullman, B; Kan, L; Kast, J R; Ts'o, P O

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called SHIFTS is described. Through SHIFTS, one can calculate the NMR chemical shifts of the proton resonances of single and double-stranded nucleic acids of known sequences and of predetermined conformations. The program can handle RNA and DNA for an arbitrary sequence of a set of 4 out of the 6 base types A,U,G,C,I and T. Data files for the geometrical parameters are available for A-, A'-, B-, D- and S-conformations. The positions of all the atoms are calculated using a modified version of the SEQ program [1]. Then, based on this defined geometry three chemical shift effects exerted by the atoms of the neighboring nucleotides on the protons of each monomeric unit are calculated separately: the ring current shielding effect: the local atomic magnetic susceptibility effect (including both diamagnetic and paramagnetic terms); and the polarization or electric field effect. Results of the program are compared with experimental results for a gamma (ApApGpCpUpU) 2 helical duplex and with calculated results on this same helix based on model building of A'-form and B-form and on graphical procedure for evaluating the ring current effects.

  19. Neurobiologia do parkinsonismo: II. modelos experimentais Neurobiology of parkinsonism: II. experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Ponzoni

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O emprego de modelos experimentais de parkinsonismo tem contribuído não só para explicar o conhecimento das funções dos gânglios basais como também tem permitido o surgimento de várias hipóteses para explicar os processos neurodegeneratives do sistema nervoso central. Nesta revisão são apresentados e discutidos os modelos de parkinsonismo que utilizam neurotoxins como a 6-hidroxidopamina, MPTP e o manganês.The study of experimental models of parkinsonism has contributed to the knowledge of basal ganglia functions, as well as to the establishment of several hypothesis for the explanation of the cause and expression of central neurodegenerative disorders. In this review we present and discuss several models such as 6-hydroxydopamine, MPTP and manganese, all of them widely used to characterize the behavioral, cellular and molecular mechanisms of parkinsonism.

  20. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  1. A structure-based model of energy transfer reveals the principles of light harvesting in photosystem II supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Doran I G; Amarnath, Kapil; Fleming, Graham R

    2013-06-19

    Photosystem II (PSII) initiates photosynthesis in plants through the absorption of light and subsequent conversion of excitation energy to chemical energy via charge separation. The pigment binding proteins associated with PSII assemble in the grana membrane into PSII supercomplexes and surrounding light harvesting complex II trimers. To understand the high efficiency of light harvesting in PSII requires quantitative insight into energy transfer and charge separation in PSII supercomplexes. We have constructed the first structure-based model of energy transfer in PSII supercomplexes. This model shows that the kinetics of light harvesting cannot be simplified to a single rate limiting step. Instead, substantial contributions arise from both excitation diffusion through the antenna pigments and transfer from the antenna to the reaction center (RC), where charge separation occurs. Because of the lack of a rate-limiting step, fitting kinetic models to fluorescence lifetime data cannot be used to derive mechanistic insight on light harvesting in PSII. This model will clarify the interpretation of chlorophyll fluorescence data from PSII supercomplexes, grana membranes, and leaves.

  2. Thermodynamic Modeling of the Chemical Composition of Calcine at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Frazee; J. D. Christian

    2004-02-01

    To send calcine produced at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Yucca Mountain Project for disposal, characterization information will be required. To sample calcine from its existing storage location would require extensive personnel exposure. Sufficient analyses of the chemical composition of the calcine would be extremely difficult and very expensive. In support of characterization development, the chemical composition of calcine from Bin 3 of Calcine Solid Storage Facility II was thermodynamic modeled. This calcine was produced in the Waste Calcination Facility during its second processing campaign, operating with indirect heating at 400 C and 0.744 bar (0.734 atm) during processing of aluminum high-level liquid waste (first cycle extraction raffinate from reprocessing aluminum-clad fuels) from tanks WM-180 and -182 from December 27, 1966 through August 26, 1967. The current modeling effort documents the input compositional data (liquid feed and calciner off-gas) for Batches 300 - 620 and a methodology for estimating the calcine chemical composition. The results, along with assumptions and limitations of the thermodynamic calculations, will serve as a basis for benchmarking subsequent calculations. This will be done by comparing the predictions against extensive analytical results that are currently being obtained on representative samples of the modeled calcine. A commercial free-energy minimization program and database, HSC 5.1, was used to perform the thermodynamic calculations. Currently available experimental data and process information on the calcine were used to make judgments about specific phases and compounds to include and eliminate in the thermodynamic calculations. Some off-gas species were eliminated based on kinetics restrictions evidenced by experimental data and other estimates, and some calcine components and off-gas compounds were eliminated as improbable species (unreliable thermodynamic data). The current Yucca

  3. A generalized physiologically-based toxicokinetic modeling system for chemical mixtures containing metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isukapalli Sastry S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Humans are routinely and concurrently exposed to multiple toxic chemicals, including various metals and organics, often at levels that can cause adverse and potentially synergistic effects. However, toxicokinetic modeling studies of exposures to these chemicals are typically performed on a single chemical basis. Furthermore, the attributes of available models for individual chemicals are commonly estimated specifically for the compound studied. As a result, the available models usually have parameters and even structures that are not consistent or compatible across the range of chemicals of concern. This fact precludes the systematic consideration of synergistic effects, and may also lead to inconsistencies in calculations of co-occurring exposures and corresponding risks. There is a need, therefore, for a consistent modeling framework that would allow the systematic study of cumulative risks from complex mixtures of contaminants. Methods A Generalized Toxicokinetic Modeling system for Mixtures (GTMM was developed and evaluated with case studies. The GTMM is physiologically-based and uses a consistent, chemical-independent physiological description for integrating widely varying toxicokinetic models. It is modular and can be directly "mapped" to individual toxicokinetic models, while maintaining physiological consistency across different chemicals. Interaction effects of complex mixtures can be directly incorporated into the GTMM. Conclusions The application of GTMM to different individual metals and metal compounds showed that it explains available observational data as well as replicates the results from models that have been optimized for individual chemicals. The GTMM also made it feasible to model toxicokinetics of complex, interacting mixtures of multiple metals and nonmetals in humans, based on available literature information. The GTMM provides a central component in the development of a "source

  4. Models of cuspy triaxial stellar systems. II. Regular orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Muzzio, J C; Zorzi, A F

    2012-01-01

    In the first paper of this series we used the N--body method to build a dozen cuspy (gamma ~ 1) triaxial models of stellar systems, and we showed that they were highly stable over time intervals of the order of a Hubble time, even though they had very large fractions of chaotic orbits (more than 85 per cent in some cases). The models were grouped in four sets, each one comprising models morphologically resembling E2, E3, E4 and E5 galaxies, respectively. The three models within each set, although different, had the same global properties and were statistically equivalent. In the present paper we use frequency analysis to classify the regular orbits of those models. The bulk of those orbits are short axis tubes (SATs), with a significant fraction of long axis tubes (LATs) in the E2 models that decreases in the E3 and E4 models to become negligibly small in the E5 models. Most of the LATs in the E2 and E3 models are outer LATs, but the situation reverses in the E4 and E5 models where the few LATs are mainly inn...

  5. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Diesel Combustion with Oxygenated Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, H J; Fisher, E M; Glaude, P-A; Marinov, N M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Flynn, P F; Durrett, R P; zur Loye, A O; Akinyemi, O C; Dryer, F L

    2000-01-11

    Emission standards for diesel engines in vehicles have been steadily reduced in recent years, and a great deal of research and development effort has been focused on reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. One promising approach to reducing emissions involves the addition of oxygen to the fuel, generally by adding an oxygenated compound to the normal diesel fuel. Miyamoto et al. [1] showed experimentally that particulate levels can be significantly reduced by adding oxygenated species to the fuel. They found the Bosch smoke number (a measure of the particulate or soot levels in diesel exhaust) falls from about 55% for conventional diesel fuel to less than 1% when the oxygen content of the fuel is above about 25% by mass, as shown in Figure 1. It has been well established that addition of oxygenates to automotive fuel, including both diesel fuel as well as gasoline, reduces NOx and CO emissions by reducing flame temperatures. This is the basis for addition of oxygenates to produce reformulated gasoline in selected portions of the country. Of course, this is also accompanied by a slight reduction in fuel economy. A new overall picture of diesel combustion has been developed by Dec [2], in which laser diagnostic studies identified stages in diesel combustion that had not previously been recognized. These stages are summarized in Figure 2. The evolution of the diesel spray is shown, starting as a liquid jet that vaporizes and entrains hot air from the combustion chamber. This relatively steady process continues as long as fuel is being injected. In particular, Dec showed that the fuel spray vaporizes and mixes with air and products of earlier combustion to provide a region in which a gas phase, premixed fuel-rich ignition and burn occurs. The products of this ignition are then observed experimentally to lead rapidly to formation of soot particles, which subsequently are consumed in a diffusion flame. Recently, Flynn et al. [3] used a chemical kinetic and

  6. Two-Higgs-doublet model of type II confronted with the LHC run I and run II data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Han, Xiao-Fang

    2017-06-01

    We examine the parameter space of the two-Higgs-doublet model of type II after imposing the relevant theoretical and experimental constraints from the precision electroweak data, B -meson decays, and the LHC run I and run II data. We find that the searches for Higgs bosons via the τ+τ- , W W , Z Z , γ γ , h h , h Z , H Z , and A Z channels can give strong constraints on the C P -odd Higgs A and heavy C P -even Higgs H , and the parameter space excluded by each channel is respectively carved out in detail assuming that either mA or mH are fixed to 600 or 700 GeV in the scans. The surviving samples are discussed in two different regions. (i) In the standard model-like coupling region of the 125 GeV Higgs, mA is allowed to be as low as 350 GeV, and a strong upper limit is imposed on tan β . mH is allowed to be as low as 200 GeV for the appropriate values of tan β , sin (β -α ), and mA, but is required to be larger than 300 GeV for mA=700 GeV . (ii) In the wrong-sign Yukawa coupling region of the 125 GeV Higgs, the b b ¯→A /H →τ+τ- channel can impose the upper limits on tan β and sin (β -α ), and the A →h Z channel can give the lower limits on tan β and sin (β -α ). mA and mH are allowed to be as low as 60 and 200 GeV, respectively, but 320 GeV

  7. Quantum origins of the Iczkowski-Margrave model of chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Charge flow in materials is controlled at the atomistic level through some model of the chemical potential, such as the Iczkowski-Margrave (IM) model. This model is built largely on heuristic arguments. Here a model Hamiltonian is constructed at the atomistic level commensurate with the IM model. Essential properties of the model Hamiltonian are presented, including a possible revision of the charge dependence in the IM model. Transitional properties of the model are shown to be central to regulating charge flow.

  8. Causality in 1+1-dimensional Yukawa model-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asrarul Haque; Satish D Joglekar

    2013-10-01

    The limits → large, $M →$ large with ($g^{3}/M$) = const. of the 1+1-dimensional Yukawa model are discussed. The conclusion of the results on bound states of the Yukawa model in this limit (obtained in arXiv:0908.4510v3 [hep-th]) is taken into account. It is found that model reduces to an effective non-local 3 theory in this limit. Causality violation also is observed in this limit.

  9. Optimization Model for Refinery Hydrogen Networks Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique E. Tarifa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this work, a model of optimization was presented that minimizes the consumption of the hydrogen of a refinery. In this second part, the model will be augmented to take into account the length of the pipelines, the addition of purification units and the installation of new compressors, all features of industrial real networks. The model developed was implemented in the LINGO software environment. For data input and results output, an Excel spreadsheet was developed that interfaces with LINGO. The model is currently being used in YPFLuján de Cuyo refinery (Mendoza, Argentina

  10. Simple inflationary quintessential model. II. Power law potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-09-01

    The present work is a sequel of our previous work [Phys. Rev. D 93, 084018 (2016)] which depicted a simple version of an inflationary quintessential model whose inflationary stage was described by a Higgs-type potential and the quintessential phase was responsible due to an exponential potential. Additionally, the model predicted a nonsingular universe in past which was geodesically past incomplete. Further, it was also found that the model is in agreement with the Planck 2013 data when running is allowed. But, this model provides a theoretical value of the running which is far smaller than the central value of the best fit in ns , r , αs≡d ns/d l n k parameter space where ns, r , αs respectively denote the spectral index, tensor-to-scalar ratio and the running of the spectral index associated with any inflationary model, and consequently to analyze the viability of the model one has to focus in the two-dimensional marginalized confidence level in the allowed domain of the plane (ns,r ) without taking into account the running. Unfortunately, such analysis shows that this model does not pass this test. However, in this sequel we propose a family of models runs by a single parameter α ∈[0 ,1 ] which proposes another "inflationary quintessential model" where the inflation and the quintessence regimes are respectively described by a power law potential and a cosmological constant. The model is also nonsingular although geodesically past incomplete as in the cited model. Moreover, the present one is found to be more simple compared to the previous model and it is in excellent agreement with the observational data. In fact, we note that, unlike the previous model, a large number of the models of this family with α ∈[0 ,1/2 ) match with both Planck 2013 and Planck 2015 data without allowing the running. Thus, the properties in the current family of models compared to its past companion justify its need for a better cosmological model with the successive

  11. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  12. A detailed chemical kinetic model for pyrolysis of the lignin model compound chroman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Bland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis of woody biomass, including the lignin component, is emerging as a potential technology for the production of renewable fuels and commodity chemicals. Here we describe the construction and implementation of an elementary chemical kinetic model for pyrolysis of the lignin model compound chroman and its reaction intermediate ortho-quinone methide (o-QM. The model is developed using both experimental and theoretical data, and represents a hybrid approach to kinetic modeling that has the potential to provide molecular level insight into reaction pathways and intermediates while accurately describing reaction rates and product formation. The kinetic model developed here can replicate all known aspects of chroman pyrolysis, and provides new information on elementary reaction steps. Chroman pyrolysis is found to proceed via an initial retro-Diels–Alder reaction to form o-QM + ethene (C2H4, followed by dissociation of o-QM to the C6H6 isomers benzene and fulvene (+ CO. At temperatures of around 1000–1200 K and above fulvene rapidly isomerizes to benzene, where an activation energy of around 270 kJ mol-1 is required to reproduce experimental observations. A new G3SX level energy surface for the isomerization of fulvene to benzene supports this result. Our modeling also suggests that thermal decomposition of fulvene may be important at around 950 K and above. This study demonstrates that theoretical protocols can provide a significant contribution to the development of kinetic models for biomass pyrolysis by elucidating reaction mechanisms, intermediates, and products, and also by supplying realistic rate coefficients and thermochemical properties.

  13. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  14. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-15

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics, and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR, and cryo-electron microscopy, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger's functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, whereas our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions.

  15. A Primary Prevention Program: Teaching Models I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlan, Nancy T; Tschiderer, Patricia A.

    Two teaching models of a service delivery program designed to prevent speech-language problems in lower socioeconomic children were compared. Specific goals included increasing mothers' awareness of the sensory input to which infants are responsive and increasing mothers' abilities to read infant nonverbal signals. In Model 1, two speech-language…

  16. [Application of multilevel models in the evaluation of bioequivalence (II).].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiao-lan; Shen, Zhuo-zhi; Li, Xiao-song; Chen, Feng; Yang, Min

    2010-03-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to explore the applicability of multivariate multilevel models for bioequivalence evaluation. Using an example of a 4 x 4 cross-over test design in evaluating bioequivalence of homemade and imported rosiglitazone maleate tablets, this paper illustrated the multivariate-model-based method for partitioning total variances of ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) in the framework of multilevel models. It examined the feasibility of multivariate multilevel models in directly evaluating average bioequivalence (ABE), population bioequivalence (PBE) and individual bioequivalence (IBE). Taking into account the correlation between ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) of rosiglitazone maleate tablets, the proposed models suggested no statistical difference between the two effect measures in their ABE bioequivalence via joint tests, whilst a contradictive conclusion was derived based on univariate multilevel models. Furthermore, the PBE and IBE for both ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) of the two types of tablets were assessed with no statistical difference based on estimates of variance components from the proposed models. Multivariate multilevel models could be used to analyze bioequivalence of multiple effect measures simultaneously and they provided a new way of statistical analysis to evaluate bioequivalence.

  17. Shunted-Josephson-junction model. II. The nonautonomous case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V. N.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1977-01-01

    The shunted-Josephson-junction model with a monochromatic ac current drive is discussed employing the qualitative methods of the theory of nonlinear oscillations. As in the preceding paper dealing with the autonomous junction, the model includes a phase-dependent conductance and a shunt capacitance...

  18. Filament winding cylinders. II - Validation of the process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calius, Emilio P.; Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to validate the model developed by Lee and Springer for simulating the manufacturing process of filament wound composite cylinders. First, results calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to results of the Calius-Springer thin cylinder model. Second, temperatures and strains calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to data. The data used in these comparisons were generated during the course of this investigation with cylinders made of Hercules IM-6G/HBRF-55 and Fiberite T-300/976 graphite-epoxy tows. Good agreement was found between the calculated and measured stresses and strains, indicating that the model is a useful representation of the winding and curing processes.

  19. Developing a Semi-Quantitative Occupational Risk Prediction Model for Chemical Exposures and Its Application to a National Chemical Exposure Databank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Ying Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a semi-quantitative occupational chemical exposure risk prediction model, based on the calculation of exposure hazard indexes, was proposed, corrected, and applied to a national chemical exposure databank. The model comprises one factor used to describe toxicity (i.e., the toxicity index, and two factors used to reflect the exposure potential (i.e., the exposure index and protection deficiency index of workers exposed to chemicals. An expert system was used to correct the above proposed model. By applying the corrected model to data obtained from a national occupational chemical hazard survey program, chemical exposure risks of various manufacturing industries were determined and a national control strategy for the abatement of occupational chemical exposures was proposed. The results of the present study would provide useful information for governmental agencies to allocate their limited resources effectively for reducing chemical exposures of workers.

  20. Cholesterol photo-oxidation: A chemical reaction network for kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, Carlo; Rodríguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; García, Hugo Sergio; Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) methyl esters on cholesterol photo-induced oxidation. The oxidative routes were modeled with a chemical reaction network (CRN), which represents the first application of CRN to the oxidative degradation of a food-related lipid matrix. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, T-I), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, T-II) and a mixture of both (T-III) were added to cholesterol using hematoporphyrin as sensitizer, and were exposed to a fluorescent lamp for 48h. High amounts of Type I cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were recovered (epimers 7α- and 7β-OH, 7-keto and 25-OH), as well as 5β,6β-epoxy. Fitting the experimental data with the CRN allowed characterizing the associated kinetics. DHA and EPA exerted different effects on the oxidative process. DHA showed a protective effect to 7-hydroxy derivatives, whereas EPA enhanced side-chain oxidation and 7β-OH kinetic rates. The mixture of PUFAs increased the kinetic rates several fold, particularly for 25-OH. With respect to the control, the formation of β-epoxy was reduced, suggesting potential inhibition in the presence of PUFAs.

  1. Thermodynamic Modeling of the Solubility and Chemical Speciation of Mercury and Methylmercury Driven by Organic Thiols and Micromolar Sulfide Concentrations in Boreal Wetland Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem-Nguyen, Van; Skyllberg, Ulf; Björn, Erik

    2017-03-15

    Boreal wetlands have been identified as environments in which inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) is transformed to methylmercury (MeHg) by anaerobic microbes. In order to understand this transformation and the mobility and transport of Hg(II) and MeHg, factors and conditions in control of the solubility and chemical speciation of Hg(II) and MeHg need to be clarified. Here we explore the ability of thermodynamic models to simulate measured solubility of Hg(II) and MeHg in different types of boreal wetland soils. With the input of measured concentrations of MeHg, sulfide, eight low molecular mass thiols and thiol groups associated with natural organic matter (NOM), as determined by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Hg LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), the model could accurately predict porewater concentrations of MeHg in the wetlands. A similar model for Hg(II) successfully predicted the average level of its concentration in the porewaters, but the variability among samples, driven mainly by the concentration of aqueous inorganic sulfide, was predicted to be larger than measurements. The smaller than predicted variability in Hg(II) solubility is discussed in light of possible formation of colloidal HgS(s) passing the 0.22 μm filters used to define the aqueous phase. The chemical speciation of the solid/adsorbed and aqueous phases were dominated by NOM associated thiol complexes for MeHg and by an equal contribution from NOM associated thiols and HgS(s) for Hg(II).

  2. Conceptual Modeling in the Time of the Revolution: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylopoulos, John

    Conceptual Modeling was a marginal research topic at the very fringes of Computer Science in the 60s and 70s, when the discipline was dominated by topics focusing on programs, systems and hardware architectures. Over the years, however, the field has moved to centre stage and has come to claim a central role both in Computer Science research and practice in diverse areas, such as Software Engineering, Databases, Information Systems, the Semantic Web, Business Process Management, Service-Oriented Computing, Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Management, and more. The transformation was greatly aided by the adoption of standards in modeling languages (e.g., UML), and model-based methodologies (e.g., Model-Driven Architectures) by the Object Management Group (OMG) and other standards organizations. We briefly review the history of the field over the past 40 years, focusing on the evolution of key ideas. We then note some open challenges and report on-going research, covering topics such as the representation of variability in conceptual models, capturing model intentions, and models of laws.

  3. Synthetic Model of the Oxygen-Evolving Center: Photosystem II under the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Hu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Jiangyun

    2015-09-21

    The oxygen-evolving center (OEC) in photosystem II catalyzes a water splitting reaction. Great efforts have already been made to artificially synthesize the OEC, in order to elucidate the structure-function relationship and the mechanism of the reaction. Now, a new synthetic model makes the best mimic yet of the OEC. This recent study opens up the possibility to study the mechanism of photosystem II and photosynthesis in general for applications in renewable energy and synthetic biology.

  4. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks. I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, P.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.

    2009-07-01

    Context: Emission lines from protoplanetary disks originate mainly in the irradiated surface layers, where the gas is generally warmer than the dust. Therefore, interpreting emission lines requires detailed thermo-chemical models, which are essential to converting line observations into understanding disk physics. Aims: We aim at hydrostatic disk models that are valid from 0.1 AU to 1000 AU to interpret gas emission lines from UV to sub-mm. In particular, our interest lies in interpreting far IR gas emission lines, such as will be observed by the Herschel observatory, related to the Gasps open time key program. This paper introduces a new disk code called ProDiMo. Methods: We combine frequency-dependent 2D dust continuum radiative transfer, kinetic gas-phase and UV photo-chemistry, ice formation, and detailed non-LTE heating & cooling with the consistent calculation of the hydrostatic disk structure. We include Fe ii and CO ro-vibrational line heating/cooling relevant to the high-density gas close to the star, and apply a modified escape-probability treatment. The models are characterised by a high degree of consistency between the various physical, chemical, and radiative processes, where the mutual feedbacks are solved iteratively. Results: In application to a T Tauri disk extending from 0.5 AU to 500 AU, the models show that the dense, shielded and cold midplane (z/r ⪉ 0.1, T g≈ T d) is surrounded by a layer of hot (T g≈ 5000 K) and thin (n ≈10 7 to 10 8 cm-3) atomic gas that extends radially to about 10 AU and vertically up to z/r≈0.5. This layer is predominantly heated by the stellar UV (e.g. PAH-heating) and cools via Fe ii semi-forbidden and Oi 630 nm optical line emission. The dust grains in this “halo” scatter the starlight back onto the disk, which affects the photochemistry. The more distant regions are characterised by a cooler flaring structure. Beyond r ⪆ 100 AU, T g decouples from T d even in the midplane and reaches values of about T

  5. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  6. Nutritional models for space travel from chemically defined diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Human nutritional requirements are summarized, including recommended daily intake and maximum safe chronic intake of nutrients. The biomedical literature on various types of chemically defined diets (CDD's), which are liquid, formulated diets for enteral and total parenteral nutrition, is reviewed. The chemical forms of the nutrients in CDD's are detailed, and the compositions and sources of representative commercial CDD's are tabulated. Reported effects of CDD's in medical patients, healthy volunteers, and laboratory animals are discussed. The effects include gastrointestinal side effects, metabolic imbalances, nutrient deficiencies and excesses, and psychological problems. Dietary factors contributing to the side effects are examined. Certain human nutrient requirements have been specified more precisely as a result of long-term use of CDD's, and related studies are included. CDD's are the most restricted yet nutritionally complete diets available.

  7. Realizability algebras II : new models of ZF + DC

    CERN Document Server

    Krivine, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Using the proof-program (Curry-Howard) correspondence, we give a new method to obtain models of ZF and relative consistency results. We show the relative consistency of ZF + DC + some unusual properties for the power set of R.

  8. Supersymmetric standard model from the heterotic string (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamaguchi, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Lebedev, O.; Ratz, M. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    2006-06-15

    We describe in detail a Z{sub 6} orbifold compactification of the heterotic E{sub 8} x E{sub 8} string which leads to the (supersymmetric) standard model gauge group and matter content. The quarks and leptons appear as three 16-plets of SO(10), two of which are localized at fixed points with local SO(10) symmetry. The model has supersymmetric vacua without exotics at low energies and is consistent with gauge coupling unification. Supersymmetry can be broken via gaugino condensation in the hidden sector. The model has large vacuum degeneracy. Certain vacua with approximate B-L symmetry have attractive phenomenological features. The top quark Yukawa coupling arises from gauge interactions and is of the order of the gauge couplings. The other Yukawa couplings are suppressed by powers of standard model singlet fields, similarly to the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. (Orig.)

  9. Structural analysis and physico-chemical characterization of mononuclear manganese(II) and polynuclear copper(II) complexes with pyridine-based alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienkiewicz-Machnik, Małgorzata; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Two novel manganese(II) and copper(II) complexes, mononuclear [Mn(H2O)2(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2](NO3)2 (1) and polynuclear [Cu(SO4)(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2]n (2), based on 2-(hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-(CH2)2OHpy) were synthesised and fully characterised using X-ray structure analysis as well as spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal methods. Both central metal ions Mn(1) and Cu(1) are coordinated by two N,O-donor 2-(CH2)2OHpy ligands and possess an almost perfect octahedral geometry (a chromophore of {MN2O4} type). The coordination sphere of Mn(II) is completed by two molecules of water, whereas, in polynuclear complex 2, Cu(II) atoms are linked along the a crystallographic direction by bridging sulfate ligands in a μ2-κ2 binding mode to form chains. The intermolecular interactions in 1 and 2 have been interpreted in view of the 3D Hirshfeld surface analysis and associated 2D fingerprint plots. Furthermore, the complexes have been tested with ABTSrad + assay in order to assess their antioxidant activity. In addition, the IC50 values calculated for 1 and 2 revealed that the complexes show a higher antioxidant activity than corresponding ligand.

  10. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Brorsen, Michael

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. The starting point for the present report is the previously carried out run-up tests described in Lykke Andersen & Frigaard, 2006......-shaped access platforms on piles. The Model tests include mainly regular waves and a few irregular wave tests. These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. November, 2006 to 17. November, 2006....

  11. The role of mathematical modelling in chemical and food engineering studies

    OpenAIRE

    Brandão, Teresa R. S.; Silva, Cristina L. M.

    2003-01-01

    The role of mathematical modelling in chemical and food engineering studies is briefly and consistently presented. The main goal was to give a short global overview of the relevant aspects involved in modelling processes. Food engineering problems are generally highlighted. It must be emphasised that the following matter should not be analysed in a narrow perspective. The mathematical modelling field, in chemical and food engineering subjects, is very wide and this paper just presents the ...

  12. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  13. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  14. Modelling the exposure to chemicals for risk assessment: a comprehensive library of multimedia and PBPK models for integration, prediction, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis - the MERLIN-Expo tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciffroy, P; Alfonso, B; Altenpohl, A; Banjac, Z; Bierkens, J; Brochot, C; Critto, A; De Wilde, T; Fait, G; Fierens, T; Garratt, J; Giubilato, E; Grange, E; Johansson, E; Radomyski, A; Reschwann, K; Suciu, N; Tanaka, T; Tediosi, A; Van Holderbeke, M; Verdonck, F

    2016-10-15

    MERLIN-Expo is a library of models that was developed in the frame of the FP7 EU project 4FUN in order to provide an integrated assessment tool for state-of-the-art exposure assessment for environment, biota and humans, allowing the detection of scientific uncertainties at each step of the exposure process. This paper describes the main features of the MERLIN-Expo tool. The main challenges in exposure modelling that MERLIN-Expo has tackled are: (i) the integration of multimedia (MM) models simulating the fate of chemicals in environmental media, and of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models simulating the fate of chemicals in human body. MERLIN-Expo thus allows the determination of internal effective chemical concentrations; (ii) the incorporation of a set of functionalities for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis, from screening to variance-based approaches. The availability of such tools for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis aimed to facilitate the incorporation of such issues in future decision making; (iii) the integration of human and wildlife biota targets with common fate modelling in the environment. MERLIN-Expo is composed of a library of fate models dedicated to non biological receptor media (surface waters, soils, outdoor air), biological media of concern for humans (several cultivated crops, mammals, milk, fish), as well as wildlife biota (primary producers in rivers, invertebrates, fish) and humans. These models can be linked together to create flexible scenarios relevant for both human and wildlife biota exposure. Standardized documentation for each model and training material were prepared to support an accurate use of the tool by end-users. One of the objectives of the 4FUN project was also to increase the confidence in the applicability of the MERLIN-Expo tool through targeted realistic case studies. In particular, we aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of building complex realistic exposure scenarios and the accuracy of the

  15. Modeling of pheromone communication system of forest Lepidopterous insects. II. Model of female searching by male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kovalev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an agent­based simulation model search. This model allows us to evaluate the effectiveness of different males­females pheromone search strategies for Lepidoptera. In the model, we consider the simplest case of the search, when the pheromone has only one chemical component. It is assumed that the insects are able to detect the pheromone molecules and the sensory cells generate action potentials in contact with the pheromone for some time. Thereafter pheromone molecule is inactivated. This behavior can be regarded as a memory of individual. Proportion of individuals who have reached the source is selected as an integral indicator of the search efficiency. To evaluate the effectiveness, numeric experiments were performed in different conditions: random walk, search algorithm without memory, and algorithm with memory and return mechanism. The resulting effectiveness of source localization by insects for flight in turbulent flows is ~ 70 %, which corresponds to experiments with live specimens in literature. In this case, proposed pheromone search algorithm is quite simple, which makes it biologically correct. Conducted modeling calculations can be the starting point for planning of field observations and pest monitoring systems using pheromone traps.

  16. Scale invariant cosmology II: model equations and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We want to establish the basic properties of a scale invariant cosmology, that also accounts for the hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scales. We write the basic analytical properties of the scale invariant cosmological models. The hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scale brings interesting simplifications in the scale invariant equations for cosmology. There is one new term, depending on the scale factor of the scale invariant cosmology, that opposes to gravity and favours an accelerated expansion. We first consider a zero-density model and find an accelerated expansion, going like t square. In models with matter present, the displacements due to the new term make a significant contribution Omega_l to the energy-density of the Universe, satisfying an equation of the form Omega_m + Omega_k + Omega_l = 1. Unlike the Friedman's models, there is a whole family of flat models (k=0) with different density parameters Omega_m smaller than 1. We examine the basic relat...

  17. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as a potential in vitro model for predictive identification of chemical sensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépin, Elsa; Goutet, Michèle; Ban, Masarin

    2007-12-10

    The identification of potential sensitizing chemicals is a key step in the safety assessment process. To this end, predictive tests that require no or few animals and that are reliable, inexpensive and easy to perform are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) in an in vitro skin sensitization model. BMDCs were exposed to six well-known allergens (dinitrochlorobenzene, DNCB; dinitrofluorobenzene, DNFB; Bandrowski's base, BB; paraphenylenediamine, PPD; nickel sulfate, NiSO(4); cinnamaldehyde, Cinn). Surface expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD54, and CD86 was measured by flow cytometry after 48h exposure to these chemicals. All the allergens tested induced a significant increase in marker expression, with an augmentation in the percentage of mature cells ranging from 2.3- to 10.5-fold change over control. The level of up-regulation was dependent on the concentration and the strength of the allergens. In contrast, the irritants (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS and 4-aminobenzoic acid, pABA) and the negative control (zinc sulfate, ZnSO(4)) tested induced either no modification or a down-regulation of membrane marker expression. Taken together, our data suggest that murine BMDCs may represent a new and valuable in vitro model to predict the sensitizing properties of chemicals.

  18. Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Hans; Pruss, Jan; Webb, Glenn F.

    2006-12-01

    A new mathematical model for the dynamics of prion proliferation involving an ordinary differential equation coupled with a partial integro-differential equation is analyzed, continuing the work in [J. Pruss, L. Pujo-Menjouet, G.F. Webb, R. Zacher, Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 6 (2006) 225-235]. We show the well-posedness of this problem in its natural phase space , i.e., there is a unique global semiflow on Z+ associated to the problem. A theorem of threshold type is derived for this model which is typical for mathematical epidemics. If a certain combination of kinetic parameters is below or at the threshold, there is a unique steady state, the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable in Z+; above the threshold it is unstable, and there is another unique steady state, the disease equilibrium, which inherits that property.

  19. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. The Increased Model Precision

    CERN Document Server

    Prsa, Andrej; Horvat, Martin; Pablo, Herbert; Kochoska, Angela; Bloemen, Steven; Nemravova, Jana; Giammarco, Joseph; Hambleton, Kelly M; Degroote, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. ...

  20. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke [Center for Energy Studies, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  1. Turbulent convection model in the overshooting region: II. Theoretical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Q

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent convection models are thought to be good tools to deal with the convective overshooting in the stellar interior. However, they are too complex to be applied in calculations of stellar structure and evolution. In order to understand the physical processes of the convective overshooting and to simplify the application of turbulent convection models, a semi-analytic solution is necessary. We obtain the approximate solution and asymptotic solution of the turbulent convection model in the overshooting region, and find some important properties of the convective overshooting: I. The overshooting region can be partitioned into three parts: a thin region just outside the convective boundary with high efficiency of turbulent heat transfer, a power law dissipation region of turbulent kinetic energy in the middle, and a thermal dissipation area with rapidly decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. The decaying indices of the turbulent correlations $k$, $\\bar{u_{r}'T'}$, and $\\bar{T'T'}$ are only determined by the ...

  2. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU). The objective of the tests was: To investigate the combined influence of the pile diameter to water depth ratio and the wave height to water...... on the front side of the pile (0 to 90 degrees). These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. October, 2006 to 8. November, 2006. Unless otherwise mentioned, all values given in this report are in model scale....

  3. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  4. Autocorrelation and regularization in digital images. II - Simple image models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    1989-01-01

    The variogram function used in geostatistical analysis is a useful statistic in the analysis of remotely sensed images. Using the results derived by Jupp et al. (1988), the basic second-order, or covariance, properties of scenes modeled by simple disks of varying size and spacing after imaging into disk-shaped pixels are analyzed to explore the relationship betwee image variograms and discrete object scene structure. The models provide insight into the nature of real images of the earth's surface and the tools for a complete analysis of the more complex case of three-dimensional illuminated discrete-object images.

  5. Hierarchical dose-response modeling for high-throughput toxicity screening of environmental chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ander; Reif, David M; Reich, Brian J

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of environmental chemicals is used to identify chemicals with high potential for adverse human health and environmental effects from among the thousands of untested chemicals. Predicting physiologically relevant activity with HTS data requires estimating the response of a large number of chemicals across a battery of screening assays based on sparse dose-response data for each chemical-assay combination. Many standard dose-response methods are inadequate because they treat each curve separately and under-perform when there are as few as 6-10 observations per curve. We propose a semiparametric Bayesian model that borrows strength across chemicals and assays. Our method directly parametrizes the efficacy and potency of the chemicals as well as the probability of response. We use the ToxCast data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as motivation. We demonstrate that our hierarchical method provides more accurate estimates of the probability of response, efficacy, and potency than separate curve estimation in a simulation study. We use our semiparametric method to compare the efficacy of chemicals in the ToxCast data to well-characterized reference chemicals on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) assays, then estimate the probability that other chemicals are active at lower concentrations than the reference chemicals.

  6. Quantitative Regression Models for the Prediction of Chemical Properties by an Efficient Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongmin; Xu, Congying; Gu, Shikai; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Rapid safety assessment is more and more needed for the increasing chemicals both in chemical industries and regulators around the world. The traditional experimental methods couldn't meet the current demand any more. With the development of the information technology and the growth of experimental data, in silico modeling has become a practical and rapid alternative for the assessment of chemical properties, especially for the toxicity prediction of organic chemicals. In this study, a quantitative regression workflow was built by KNIME to predict chemical properties. With this regression workflow, quantitative values of chemical properties can be obtained, which is different from the binary-classification model or multi-classification models that can only give qualitative results. To illustrate the usage of the workflow, two predictive models were constructed based on datasets of Tetrahymena pyriformis toxicity and Aqueous solubility. The qcv (2) and qtest (2) of 5-fold cross validation and external validation for both types of models were greater than 0.7, which implies that our models are robust and reliable, and the workflow is very convenient and efficient in prediction of various chemical properties. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Lanchester-Type Models of Warfare. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    verification of combat models are as follows: 594 (1) principle of uniformitarianism does not hold, (2) systems are only partially observable, (3...the principle of uniformitarianism , which holds that physical and biological process- es, conditions, and operations do not change over time (i.e. uni

  8. SPARTAN II: An Instructional High Resolution Land Combat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico (14: C1,J4). TRAC uses these two models for doctrinal and force-structure evaluation and for training and education...8217 COMMON SHARED soldato, evento , ptgto, tgtreco, bluecount, & redcount, activeblue, activered, timetostop ’obs observer ID ’time = current simulation time

  9. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sembolini, F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M(supcrit)(sub200) = 1.1×10(sup15)h(sup-1)M) in a CDM universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modeling hydrodynamics with full radiative...

  10. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. Toward the Increased Model Fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prša, A.; Conroy, K. E.; Horvat, M.; Pablo, H.; Kochoska, A.; Bloemen, S.; Giammarco, J.; Hambleton, K. M.; Degroote, P.

    2016-12-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures, and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. In particular, we discuss triangulation as a superior surface discretization algorithm, meshing of rotating single stars, light travel time effects, advanced phase computation, volume conservation in eccentric orbits, and improved computation of local intensity across the stellar surfaces that includes the photon-weighted mode, the enhanced limb darkening treatment, the better reflection treatment, and Doppler boosting. Here we present the concepts on which PHOEBE is built and proofs of concept that demonstrate the increased model fidelity.

  11. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Brorsen, Michael

    This report is an extension of the study presented in Lykke Andersen and Brorsen, 2006 and includes results from the irregular wave tests, where Lykke Andersen & Brorsen, 2006 focused on regular waves. The 2D physical model tests were carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil...

  12. Storm Water Management Model Reference Manual Volume II – Hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWMM is a dynamic rainfall-runoff simulation model used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. The runoff component of SWMM operates on a collection of subcatchment areas that receive precipitation and gene...

  13. Preliminary Results of the first European Source Apportionment intercomparison for Receptor and Chemical Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belis, Claudio A.; Pernigotti, Denise; Pirovano, Guido

    2017-04-01

    Source Apportionment (SA) is the identification of ambient air pollution sources and the quantification of their contribution to pollution levels. This task can be accomplished using different approaches: chemical transport models and receptor models. Receptor models are derived from measurements and therefore are considered as a reference for primary sources urban background levels. Chemical transport model have better estimation of the secondary pollutants (inorganic) and are capable to provide gridded results with high time resolution. Assessing the performance of SA model results is essential to guarantee reliable information on source contributions to be used for the reporting to the Commission and in the development of pollution abatement strategies. This is the first intercomparison ever designed to test both receptor oriented models (or receptor models) and chemical transport models (or source oriented models) using a comprehensive method based on model quality indicators and pre-established criteria. The target pollutant of this exercise, organised in the frame of FAIRMODE WG 3, is PM10. Both receptor models and chemical transport models present good performances when evaluated against their respective references. Both types of models demonstrate quite satisfactory capabilities to estimate the yearly source contributions while the estimation of the source contributions at the daily level (time series) is more critical. Chemical transport models showed a tendency to underestimate the contribution of some single sources when compared to receptor models. For receptor models the most critical source category is industry. This is probably due to the variety of single sources with different characteristics that belong to this category. Dust is the most problematic source for Chemical Transport Models, likely due to the poor information about this kind of source in the emission inventories, particularly concerning road dust re-suspension, and consequently the

  14. The global distribution of tropospheric NO{sub x} estimated by a 3-D chemical tracer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, A.B.; Rohrer, F.; Ehhalt, D.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Chemie

    1997-12-31

    The global distribution of NO{sub x} in the troposphere is calculated using a three-dimensional chemical tracer model with a simplified chemistry scheme for the tracers NO{sub x} {identical_to} NO + NO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3}. At northern mid- and high latitudes, the calculated tropospheric NO{sub x} content is dominated by the surface source fossil fuel combustion. In the tropical free troposphere lightning discharges provide about 80% of the total NO{sub x} throughout the year. The zonally averaged fractional contribution of aircraft emissions strongly depends on season. The NO mixing ratios determined by the model show good overall agreement with corresponding zonal mean values observed during the STRATOZ III aircraft campaign in June. Over Canada, mixing ratios as high as 0.5-1.0 ppbv NO were measured during TROPOZ II, the origin of which is not yet understood. (author) 8 refs.

  15. A Conceptual Framework for Predicting the Toxicity of Reactive Chemicals: Modeling Soft Electrophilicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the literature is replete with QSAR models developed for many toxic effects caused by reversible chemical interactions, the development of QSARs for the toxic effects of reactive chemicals lacks a consistent approach. While limitations exit, an appropriate starting-point...

  16. A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechelke, Martin; Habeck, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Protein chemical shifts encode detailed structural information that is difficult and computationally costly to describe at a fundamental level. Statistical and machine learning approaches have been used to infer correlations between chemical shifts and secondary structure from experimental chemical shifts. These methods range from simple statistics such as the chemical shift index to complex methods using neural networks. Notwithstanding their higher accuracy, more complex approaches tend to obscure the relationship between secondary structure and chemical shift and often involve many parameters that need to be trained. We present hidden Markov models (HMMs) with Gaussian emission probabilities to model the dependence between protein chemical shifts and secondary structure. The continuous emission probabilities are modeled as conditional probabilities for a given amino acid and secondary structure type. Using these distributions as outputs of first- and second-order HMMs, we achieve a prediction accuracy of 82.3%, which is competitive with existing methods for predicting secondary structure from protein chemical shifts. Incorporation of sequence-based secondary structure prediction into our HMM improves the prediction accuracy to 84.0%. Our findings suggest that an HMM with correlated Gaussian distributions conditioned on the secondary structure provides an adequate generative model of chemical shifts.

  17. High-throughput exposure modeling to support prioritization of chemicals in personal care products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csiszar, Susan A.; Ernstoff, Alexi; Fantke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of a high-throughput modeling framework to estimate exposure to chemicals used in personal care products (PCPs). As a basis for estimating exposure, we use the product intake fraction (PiF), defined as the mass of chemical taken by an individual or population per mass...

  18. A Conceptual Framework for Predicting the Toxicity of Reactive Chemicals: Modeling Soft Electrophilicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the literature is replete with QSAR models developed for many toxic effects caused by reversible chemical interactions, the development of QSARs for the toxic effects of reactive chemicals lacks a consistent approach. While limitations exit, an appropriate starting-point...

  19. Numerical modeling of chemical spills and assessment of their environmental impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical spills in surface water bodies often occur in modern societies, which cause significant impacts on water quality, eco-environment and drinking water safety. In this paper, chemical spill contamination in water resources was studied using a depth-integrated computational model, CCHE2D, for p...

  20. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using Background Galaxies & Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bordoloi, R; Kacprzak, G G; Churchill, C W

    2012-01-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of MgII absorption around galaxies, by combining the MgII absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of host galaxies of strong MgII systems from the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that predict, the dependence of MgII absorption on a galaxy's apparent inclination, impact parameter(b) and azimuthal angle. The variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the MgII absorption than the dependence on the galaxy's inclination. Strong MgII absorbers (W_r(2796)>0.3) are asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies:72% of the absorbers studied and 100% of the close-in absorbers within b<38 kpc, are located within 50deg of the host galaxy's projected minor axis. Composite models consisting either of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can...