WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical lasers

  1. Lasers in chemical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high cost of laser energy is the crucial issue in any potential laser-processing application. It is expensive relative to other forms of energy and to most bulk chemicals. We show those factors that have previously frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser-induced processes for the production of materials. Having identified the general criteria to be satisfied by an economically successful laser process and shown how these imply the laser-system requirements, we present a status report on the uranium laser isotope separation (LIS) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  2. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, Charter D.; Freedman, Andrew

    1990-02-01

    Studies of the thermal and photon-induced surface chemistry of dimethyl cadmium (DMCd) and dimethyl tellurium (DMTe) on GaAs(100) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed for substrate temperatures in the range of 123 K to 473 K. Results indicate that extremely efficient conversion of admixtures of DMTe and DMCd to CdTe can be obtained using low power (5 - 10 mJ cm-2) 193 nm laser pulses at substrate temperatures of 123 K. Subsequent annealing at 473 K produces an epitaxial film.

  3. Alpha high-power chemical laser program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordi, Anthony J.; Lurie, Henry; Callahan, David W.; Thomson, Matthew

    1993-06-01

    Alpha is a megawatt-class ground demonstration of a hydrogen fluoride, continuous wave, space-based chemical laser. The laser operates in the infrared at 2.8 microns. The basic device consists of a cylindrical combustion chamber that exhausts radially outward through circumferential nozzles into an annular lasing area. An annular ring resonator is used to extract the laser energy from this area. Technical firsts include: (1) use of aluminum combustion chamber/nozzle ring modules, (2) diamond turned, water-cooled optics made of molybdenum for low thermal distortion with good heat transfer, (3) use of uncooled silicon mirrors in a megawatt-class laser system, (4) an optical bench made of aluminum honeycomb, and (5) active controls to adjust alignment of selected mirrors and the optical bench.

  4. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  5. Laser-Beam-Absorption Chemical-Species Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersh, Michael; Goldstein, Neil; Lee, Jamine; Bien, Fritz; Richtsmeier, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus measures concentration of chemical species in fluid medium (e.g., gaseous industrial process stream). Directs laser beam through medium, and measures intensity of beam after passage through medium. Relative amount of beam power absorbed in medium indicative of concentration of chemical species; laser wavelength chosen to be one at which species of interest absorbs.

  6. Laser-Induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Silicon Carbonitride

    OpenAIRE

    Besling, W.; van der Put, P.; Schoonman, J.

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of silicon carbonitride coatings and powders has been investigated using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and ammonia as reactants. An industrial CW CO2-laser in parallel configuration has been used to heat up the reactant gases. HMDS dissociates in the laser beam and reactive radicals are formed which increase rapidly in molecular weight by an addition mechanism. Dense polymer-like silicon carbonitride thin films and nanosized powders are formed depending ...

  7. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions

  8. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, N. (ed.)

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  9. Project LOCOST: Laser or Chemical Hybrid Orbital Space Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Alan; Kost, Alicia; Lampshire, Gregory; Larsen, Rob; Monahan, Bob; Wright, Geoff

    1990-01-01

    A potential mission in the late 1990s is the servicing of spacecraft assets located in GEO. The Geosynchronous Operations Support Center (GeoShack) will be supported by a space transfer vehicle based at the Space Station (SS). The vehicle will transport cargo between the SS and the GeoShack. A proposed unmanned, laser or chemical hybrid orbital space transfer vehicle (LOCOST) can be used to efficiently transfer cargo between the two orbits. A preliminary design shows that an unmanned, laser/chemical hybrid vehicle results in the fuel savings needed while still providing fast trip times. The LOCOST vehicle receives a 12 MW laser beam from one Earth orbiting, solar pumped, iodide Laser Power Station (LPS). Two Energy Relay Units (ERU) provide laser beam support during periods of line-of-sight blockage by the Earth. The baseline mission specifies a 13 day round trip transfer time. The ship's configuration consist of an optical train, one hydrogen laser engine, two chemical engines, a 18 m by 29 m box truss, a mission-flexible payload module, and propellant tanks. Overall vehicle dry mass is 8,000 kg. Outbound cargo mass is 20,000 kg, and inbound cargo mass is 6,000 kg. The baseline mission needs 93,000 kg of propellants to complete the scenario. Fully fueled, outbound mission mass is 121,000 kg. A regeneratively cooled, single plasma, laser engine design producing a maximum of 768 N of thrust is utilized along with two traditional chemical engines. The payload module is designed to hold 40,000 kg of cargo, though the baseline mission specifies less. A proposed design of a laser/chemical hybrid vehicle provides a trip time and propellant efficient means to transport cargo from the SS to a GeoShack. Its unique, hybrid propulsion system provides safety through redundancy, allows baseline missions to be efficiently executed, while still allowing for the possibility of larger cargo transfers.

  10. Comparison of Laser Chemical Processing and LaserMicroJet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (LaserMicroJet®, LMJ, and Laser Chemical Processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used.

  11. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  12. Standoff photoacoustic sensing of trace chemicals by laser Doppler vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Hu, Q.; Liu, H.

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful technique that suitable for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. Normally a high-sensitive microphone or a quartz tuning fork is used to detect the signal in photoacoustic cell. In recent years, laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is proposed to remote-sense photoacoustic signal on various substrates. It is a high-sensitivity sensor with a displacement resolution of effect of various chemicals is excited by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) with a scanning wavelength range of 6.89μm to 8.5 μm. A home-developed LDV at 1550nm wavelength is applied to detect the vibration signal. After normalize the vibration amplitude with QCL power, the photoacoustic spectrum of various chemicals can be obtained. Different factors that affect the detection accuracy and sensitivity have also been discussed. The results show the potential of the proposed technique for standoff detection of trace chemicals and explosives.

  13. Laser isotope separation - a new class of chemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers may soon find several applications in chemical processing. The applications that have attracted the most research funding to date involve isotope separation for the nuclear industry. These isotopes have an unusually high value (≥$1000/kg) compared to bulk chemicals (∼$1/kg) and are generally required in very large quantities. In a laser isotope separation process, light is used to convert a separation that is very difficult or even impossible by conventional chemical engineering techniques to one that is readily handled by conventional separation technology. For some isotopes this can result in substantial capital and energy savings. A uranium enrichment process developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the closest to commercialization of the large scale laser isotope separation processes. Of particular interest to the Canadian nuclear industry are the laser separation of deuterium, tritium, zirconium-90 and carbon-14. In this paper, the basic principles behind laser isotope separation are reviewed and brief dscriptions of the more developed processes are given

  14. Applications of laser in the field of chemical solubility determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingming Chen(陈明鸣); Peisheng Ma(马沛生); Xinxing Liu(柳新星)

    2003-01-01

    A novel experiment method for chemical solubility determination was brought forward, in which opticsand chemistry principles are united and the change of laser intensity indicates the process of chemicaldissolving. The more undissolved solid exists in the mixture of solute and solvent, the less transmittedlaser intensity is detected. Only when the transmitted laser intensity in stirring state and that in staticstate comes into equalization, the dissolving process stops. Under the help of laser intensity judgement,measurements turn to be more feasible and objective, especially at high pressure. The average relativeerrors for the solubility data determined in this paper are 2.3% for those in the minor value scope and 1.7%for those in the high value scope respectively. Comparison of the experimental solubility data with theliterature ones demonstrates that the laser-aid solubility determination apparatus is stable and reliable.

  15. Feasibility of constructing a laser thermonuclear fusion driver based on an oxygen-iodine chemical laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the feasibility of constructing a driver for laser thermonuclear fusion in which the second harmonic of an oxygen-iodine chemical laser is used to pump solid-state lasers (for example, Cr3+-activated crystals). In contrast to the existing systems, a separate master oscillator is proposed for each channel of the driver. The proposal has the advantages of relative technological simplicity, high degree of uniformity of target irradiation, and providing optimal profile of a heating pulse at 0.8, 0.4, and 0.27 μm. 35 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  16. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  17. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the Chemical and Laser Sciences Division concludes its first year, the Division personnel can be proud of their many scientific and technical accomplishments. Among the important milestones which the Division achieved were significant demonstrations of the process performance in the Special Isotope Separation program, of beam sensing techniques for the NPB program, and of optical angular multiplexing and energy extraction from the ICF KrF laser. In addition, the Los Alamos FTS was brought to operational status and the Bright Source attained intensities on the order of 1017 W/cm2. A few highlights of these and other research and development activities are presented in the following sections of this report

  18. Clarification of sodium-water chemical reaction using laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes in a steam generator. Therefore the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for safety reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using laser diagnostics. The sodium-water, sodium-oxygen and sodium-hydrogen counter-flow reactions were measured using laser diagnostics such as Raman, absorption and photo-fragmentation spectroscopies. The measurement results show that the main product of the sodium-water reaction is NaOH. The sodium-water reaction rate is slower than that of the sodium-oxygen reaction and hydrogen does not react noticeably with sodium. (author)

  19. Laser assisted chemically shaped unstable resonator, for high power coherent laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser assisted chemical etching (LACE) is used to etch a continuous graded channel, set inside a wide stripe graded-index and separate confinement heterostructure (GRIN-SCH) for laser diodes, grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). After a procedure of growing-etching-regrowing, a two-part waveguide is formed inside such modified structure, that is characterized by a negative change in the lateral effective refractive index (ERI). This effects the cavity to work as an unstable resonator. Procedures on the photo etching process are described, including the GaAs photochemistry and the optical system, with special emphasis on the fabrication of the approximately parabolic channels, as this represents a novel step. We call the cavity fabricated by this method, the shaped unstable resonator (SHUR). (Author)

  20. Laser diagnostics of chemical vapour deposition of diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Wills, J B

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to make diagnostic measurements of chemically activated CH sub 4 / H sub 2 gas mixtures during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of thin diamond films. Absolute absorbances, concentrations and temperatures are presented for CH sub 3 , NH and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a hot filament (HF) activated gas mixture and CH, C sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a DC arc plasma jet activated mixture. Measurements of the radical species were made using a pulsed dye laser system to generate tuneable visible and UV wavelengths. These species have greatest concentration in the hottest, activated regions of the reactors. Spatial profiling of the number densities of CH sub 3 and NH radicals have been used as stringent tests of predictions of radical absorbance and number densities made by 3-D numerical simulations, with near quantitative agreement. O sub 2 has been shown to reside in the activated region of the Bristol DC arc jet at concentrations (approx 10 sup 1 sup 3 molecules / cm...

  1. Toxicological characterization of chemicals produced from laser irradiation of graphite composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major potential hazards associated with laser machining of graphite composite materials is the toxic fumes and gases that are generated. When exposed to the intense energy of the laser beam, the organic polymer matrix of the composite material may decompose into various toxic by-products. To advance the understanding of the laser machining process from a health and safety viewpoint, this particular study consisted of the following steps: collect and analyze gaseous by-products generated during laser machining; collect particulates generated during laser machining and chemically extract them to determine the chemical species that may have absorbed or recondensed onto these particles; and review and evaluate the toxicity of the identified chemical species

  2. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  3. Integrated chemical-thermal and laser treatment of structural and tool steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the techniques of autoradiography, radiography, metallography and micro hardness measurement, the distribution of boron and the surface hardening of structural and tool steels under complex chemical, thermal and laser treatment have been investigated

  4. [Effects of helium-neon laser on physico-chemical properties of the bile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Kh Kh; Dzhuraev, Kh Sh; Barakaev, S B; Kharina, T P; Pulatov, L I

    1990-08-01

    The influence of helium-neon laser radiation on bile physico-chemical characteristics in healthy subjects and in patients with the physico-chemical stage of gallstone disease was studied in vitro. This type of laser was found to induce positive therapeutic effects, such as: correction of hydrogen ion concentrations, surface tension and viscosity decrease and prolonged bile nucleation in patients with gallstone disease.

  5. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Tonneau, D.; Auvert, G.; Pauleau, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  6. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  7. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp3/sp2 after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp3/sp2 after laser treatment

  8. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  9. Laser-machined components for microanalytical and chemical separation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1998-10-01

    Excimer lasers have proven to be powerful tools for machining polymeric components used in microanalytical and microchemical separation devices. We report the use of laser machining methods to produce microfluidic channels and liquid/liquid contact membranes for a number of devices fabricated at our laboratory. Microchannels 50- to 100- micrometers -wide have been produced directly in bulk polycarbonate chips using a direct-write laser micromachining system. Wider microchannels have been produced by laser machining paths through sheets of polyimide film, then sandwiching the patterned piece between solid chips of polycarbonate stock. A comparison of direct-write and mask machining processes used to produce some of the microfluidic features is made. Examples of microanalytical devices produced using these methods are presented. Included are microdialysis units used to remove electrolytes from liquid samples and electrophoretic separation devices, both used for extremely low volume samples intended for mass spectrometric analysis. A multilayered microfluidic device designed to analyze low volume groundwater samples for hazardous metals and a fluidics motherboard are also described. Laser machining processes have also been explored for producing polymeric membranes suitable for use in liquid/liquid contactors used for removal of soluble hazardous components from waste streams. A step-and-repeat mask machining process was used to produce 0.5 X 8 cm membranes in 25- and 50-micrometers -thick polyimide. Pore diameters produced using this method were five and ten micrometers. The laser machined membranes were sputter coated with PTFE prior to use to improve fluid breakthrough characteristics.

  10. Chemical-ionization visible and ultraviolet gas lasers: A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudenslager, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions or Penning ionization reactions are used to produce population inversions between electronic states of molecular ions which should result in stimulated emission in ultraviolet and visible regions. Such lasers could be used in study of short-lived reaction intermediates, crystal structure and scattering, and photolysis.

  11. Laser induced chemical vapour deposition of TiN coatings at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Croonen, Y.; Verspui, G.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of a wide variety of materials has been studied extensively at reduced pressures. However, for this technique to be economically and industrially applicable, processes at atmospheric pressure are preferred. A model study was made on the substrate-coating system molybdenum-titaniumnitride focussing on the feasibility to deposit TiN films locally at atmospheric pressure. The results of this study turned out to be very promising. A Nd-YAG laser beam ([MAT...

  12. Fabrication of micro carbon pillar by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 罗迎社; 李立君; 钟琦文; 李新华; 殷水平

    2008-01-01

    Argon ion laser was used as the induced light source and ethane(C2H4) was selected as the precursor gas,in the variety ranges of laser power from 0.5 W to 4.5 W and the pressure of the precursor gas from 225×133.3 Pa to 680×133.3 Pa,the experiments of laser induced chemical vapor deposition were proceeded for fabrication of micro carbon pillar.In the experiments,the influences of power of laser and pressure of work gas on the diameter and length of micro carbon pillar were investigated,the variety on averaged growth rate of carbon pillar with the laser irradiation time and moving speed of focus was discussed.Based on experiment data,the micro carbon pillar with an aspect ratio of over 500 was built through the method of moving the focus.

  13. Physico-Chemical Dynamics of Nanoparticle Formation during Laser Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, M.D.

    2005-06-01

    Laser-ablation based decontamination is a new and effective approach for simultaneous removal and characterization of contaminants from surfaces (e.g., building interior and exterior walls, ground floors, etc.). The scientific objectives of this research are to: (1) characterize particulate matter generated during the laser-ablation based decontamination, (2) develop a technique for simultaneous cleaning and spectroscopic verification, and (3) develop an empirical model for predicting particle generation for the size range from 10 nm to tens of micrometers. This research project provides fundamental data obtained through a systematic study on the particle generation mechanism, and also provides a working model for prediction of particle generation such that an effective operational strategy can be devised to facilitate worker protection.

  14. Ultrasensitive standoff chemical sensing based on nonlinear multi-photon laser wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregerson, Marc; Hetu, Marcel; Iwabuchi, Manna; Jimenez, Jorge; Warren, Ashley; Tong, William G.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear multi-photon laser wave mixing is presented as an ultrasensitive optical detection method for chem/bio agents in thin films and gas- and liquid-phase samples. Laser wave mixing is an unusually sensitive optical absorption-based detection method that offers significant inherent advantages including excellent sensitivity, small sample requirements, short optical path lengths, high spatial resolution, high spectral resolution and standoff remote detection capability. Wave mixing can detect trace amounts of chemicals even when using micrometer-thin samples, and hence, it can be conveniently interfaced to fibers, microarrays, microfluidic systems, lab-on-a-chip, capillary electrophoresis and other capillary- or fiber-based chemical separation systems. The wave-mixing signal is generated instantaneously as the two input laser beams intersect inside the analyte of interest. Laser excitation wavelengths can be tuned to detect multiple chemicals in their native form since wave mixing can detect both fluorescing and non-fluorescing samples at parts-pertrillion or better detection sensitivity levels. The wave-mixing signal is a laser-like coherent beam, and hence, it allows reliable and effective remote sensing of chemicals. Sensitive wave-mixing detectors offer many potential applications including sensitive detection of biomarkers, early detection of diseases, sensitive monitoring of environmental samples, and reliable detection of hazardous chem/bio agents with a standoff detection capability.

  15. Quantum cascade laser: Applications in chemical detection and environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the structural parameter optimization of the active region of a GaAs-based quantum cascade laser in order to maximize the optical gain of the laser at the characteristic wavelengths, which are best suited for detection of pollutant gasses, such as SO2, HNO3, CH4, and NH3, in the ambient air by means of direct absorption. The procedure relies on applying elaborate tools for global optimization, such as the genetic algorithm. One of the important goals is to extend the applicability of a single active region design to the detection of several compounds absorbing at close wave-lengths, and this is achieved by introducing a strong external magnetic field perpendicularly to the epitaxial layers. The field causes two-dimensional continuous energy subbands to split into the series of discrete Landau levels. Since the arrangement of Landau levels depends strongly on the magnitude of the magnetic field, this enables one to control the population inversion in the active region, and hence the optical gain. Furthermore, strong effects of band non-parabolicity result in subtle changes of the lasing wavelength at magnetic fields which maximize the gain, thus providing a path for fine-tuning of the output radiation properties and changing the target compound for detection. The numerical results are presented for quantum cascade laser structures designed to emit at specified wavelengths in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum.

  16. Initiation of the emission of chemical gas lasers by neutron fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, N. G.; Molchanov, A. G.; Oraevskii, A. N.

    The possibility of initiating chemical lasers through a nuclear reaction is examined, and the required threshold density of a neutron flux is determined. In particular, attention is given to the conditions of lasing using UF6-H2, UF6-H2-F2, and UF6-D2-F2-CO2 mixtures in the case of a branched chain reaction. The possibility of chemical laser initiation using UF-containing mixtures, without any external neutron source, is demonstrated for the case where the total mass of the UF6 gas containing enriched uranium exceeds the critical mass.

  17. Effects of chemical reactions on the performance of gas dynamic lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rom, J.; Stricker, J.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that chemical reactions in the stagnation region of a gasdynamic laser in the shock tube may not be completed during the available test time. Therefore, analysis of data obtained in the shock tube must account for the instantaneous composition which may be effected by chemical reactions. A CO/sub 2/--N/sub 2/ gasdynamic laser experimental program in the shock tube including addition of H/sub 2/ into the system is described. This experiment involves reasonably complicated chemical reactions. These chemical reactions result in H/sub 2/O production under certain conditions. The comparison of the experimental results with the calculated results shows that such measurements can also be used to evaluate the energy transfer rates. The small-signal gain measurements indicate that the hydrogen is much more effective in depopulating the ..nu.. sub 3 level to ..nu.. sub 2 than previously assumed.

  18. Selective wet chemical etching of metallic thin films designed by laser interference metallurgy (LIMET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrin, Rodolphe; Gachot, Carsten; Marchand, Günter; Schmid, Ulrich; Mücklich, Frank

    2009-05-01

    The physical and chemical behaviour of materials is strongly correlated with their microstructure. Therefore, much effort is invested in the advanced microstructural design of metallic thin films. Laser Interference Metallurgy (LIMET) is used to locally tune the grain architecture of metallic thin films from the nanoto the microscale. This means a defined size and orientation of the grains with lateral periodicity, by interfering on the sample surface two or more laser beams of a high power nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. This technique enables the local nucleation and crystallization of amorphous or nanocrystalline metallic thin films, thus combining nano- and microcrystalline regions ordered in periodic line- or lattice-like arrangements in a composite architecture. After having locally modified the microstructure of e-beam evaporated Pt and Au thin films by laser irradiation a wet chemical etching procedure was induced in hot aqua regia. Doing so, a selective etching is achieved without using conventional lithography. Due to the laser-induced recrystallization in periodic structures, these microcrystalline zones of specific oriented grains show a higher resistance against the wet chemical etchant than the as-deposited, nanocrystalline areas, which are completely removed down to the substrate. Therefore, this procedure may have the potential to be an alternative, low cost approach to conventional lithographic techniques and provides a novel method for a straight-forward patterning of metallic thin films.

  19. Motivation and development of ultrafast laser-based accelerator techniques for chemical physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowell, Robert A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: rob_crowell@anl.gov; Shkrob, Ilya A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Oulianov, Dmitri A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Korovyanko, Oleg [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gosztola, David J. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Li, Yuelin [Accelerator Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rey-de-Castro, Roberto [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The products of radiation induced chemical reactions are determined by rapid primary processes such as energy transfer, thermalization and solvation. Ultrafast photoionization experiments on liquid water demonstrate that these initial events occur on time scales <5 ps and involve a complicated interplay between electronic relaxation and vibrational energy redistribution. These experiments also show that the chemical processes originating from ionizing radiation are unique and cannot be reproduced by laser photons alone. Due to the lack of a suitable femtosecond source of ionizing radiation, knowledge of the primary processes in radiation chemistry remains poor. To address this issue a 20 TW laser system has been constructed to obtain subpicosecond electron pulses with energies in the 1-10 MeV range. In addition to the production of femtosecond electron pulses, future efforts will be directed towards using this laser for accelerating heavier particles such as protons and generating hard X-rays.

  20. Motivation and development of ultrafast laser-based accelerator techniques for chemical physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The products of radiation induced chemical reactions are determined by rapid primary processes such as energy transfer, thermalization and solvation. Ultrafast photoionization experiments on liquid water demonstrate that these initial events occur on time scales <5 ps and involve a complicated interplay between electronic relaxation and vibrational energy redistribution. These experiments also show that the chemical processes originating from ionizing radiation are unique and cannot be reproduced by laser photons alone. Due to the lack of a suitable femtosecond source of ionizing radiation, knowledge of the primary processes in radiation chemistry remains poor. To address this issue a 20 TW laser system has been constructed to obtain subpicosecond electron pulses with energies in the 1-10 MeV range. In addition to the production of femtosecond electron pulses, future efforts will be directed towards using this laser for accelerating heavier particles such as protons and generating hard X-rays

  1. Generation of cavitation luminescence by laser-induced exothermic chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung Park, Han; Diebold, Gerald J. [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by aqueous carbon suspensions is known to result in the formation of highly compressed bubbles of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the endothermic carbon-steam reaction. The bubbles expand rapidly, overreaching their equilibrium diameter, and then collapse tens to hundreds of microseconds after formation to give a flash of radiation. Here we report on the effects of laser-initiated exothermic chemical reaction on cavitation luminescence. Experiments with hydrogen peroxide added to colloidal carbon suspensions show that both the time of the light flash following the laser pulse and the intensity of luminescence increase with hydrogen peroxide concentration, indicating that large, highly energetic gas bubbles are produced. Additional experiments with colloidal carbon suspensions show the effects of high pressure on the luminescent intensity and its time of appearance following firing of the laser.

  2. Fibre Laser Cutting and Chemical Etching of AZ31 for Manufacturing Biodegradable Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gökhan Demir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium-alloy stents shows promise as a less intrusive solution for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies as a result of the high biocompatibility of the material and its intrinsic dissolution in body fluids. However, in addition to requiring innovative solutions in material choice and design, these stents also require a greater understanding of the manufacturing process to achieve the desired quality with improved productivity. The present study demonstrates the manufacturing steps for the realisation of biodegradable stents in AZ31 magnesium alloy. These steps include laser microcutting with a Q-switched fibre laser for the generation of the stent mesh and subsequent chemical etching for the cleaning of kerf and surface finish. Specifically, for the laser microcutting step, inert and reactive gas cutting conditions were compared. The effect of chemical etching on the reduction in material thickness, as well as on spatter removal, was also evaluated. Prototype stents were produced, and the material composition and surface quality were characterised. The potentialities of combining nanosecond laser microcutting and chemical etching are shown and discussed.

  3. Chemical characterization of aerosol particles by laser Raman spectroscopy. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of aerosol particles in many branches of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, combustion, interfacial science, and material processing, has been steadily growing during the past decades. One of the unique properties of these particles is the very high surface-to-volume ratios, thus making them readily serve as centers for gas-phase condensation and heterogeneous reactions. These particles must be characterized by size, shape, physical state, and chemical composition. Traditionally, optical elastic scattering has been applied to obtain the physical properties of these particle (e.g., particle size, size distribution, and particle density). These physical properties are particularly important in atmospheric science as they govern the distribution and transport of atmospheric aerosols.

  4. Laser-chemical modification of nucleation barriers for area-selective thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, J. Y.; Ehrlich, D. J.

    1984-09-01

    The use of laser radiation to locally modify nucleation barriers to thin film growth is discussed. Examples are described in which UV laser photodeposition is used to directly pattern surface-altering monolayer or submonolayer films. The surface-altering films can then be used to promote or both physical condensation as well as surface chmistry. A qualitative is made of two kinds of processes: those relying on physical, and those relying on chemical, barriers. A figure of merit is defined and discussed, which measures the selectivity of a given process for patterned growth.

  5. Portable IR dye laser optofluidic microresonator as a temperature and chemical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, F; Martín, I R; Gil-Rostra, J; Oliva-Ramirez, M; Yubero, F; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R

    2016-06-27

    A compact and portable optofluidic microresonator has been fabricated and characterized. It is based on a Fabry-Perot microcavity consisting essentially of two tailored dichroic Bragg mirrors prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering deposition. The microresonator has been filled with an ethanol solution of Nile-Blue dye. Infrared laser emission has been measured with a pump threshold as low as 0.12 MW/cm2 and an external energy conversion efficiency of 41%. The application of the device as a temperature and a chemical sensor is demonstrated. Small temperature variations as well as small amount of water concentrations in the liquid laser medium are detected as a shift of the resonant laser modes. PMID:27410592

  6. ZnO-coated SMS structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser for chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, X. Y.; Huang, J.; Xiao, H.; Yang, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    A zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated single mode-multimode-single mode fiber (SMS) structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser has been developed as a chemical sensor. Response to relative humidity (RH) and ethanol volatilization was evaluated by tracking the wavelength shifts of the output laser line in different moisture environments and ethanol solutions, respectively. For humidity sensing a linear response with a measurement range of 4-96% RH, and a sensitivity of 0.06 nm per %RH were obtained. As for ethanol volatilization sensing obvious wavelength blue shift was observed for the sensor immersed in 50% and 62% ethanol solution, while no variation could be detected in pure ethanol solution (purity larger than 97%). With the advantages of low cost, ease of fabrication and sensitive response, ZnO-coated SMS interrogated with a fiber ring laser was demonstrated to be an effective sensor for humidity and ethanol volatilization sensing.

  7. ZnO-coated SMS structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser for chemical sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated single mode–multimode–single mode fiber (SMS) structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser has been developed as a chemical sensor. Response to relative humidity (RH) and ethanol volatilization was evaluated by tracking the wavelength shifts of the output laser line in different moisture environments and ethanol solutions, respectively. For humidity sensing a linear response with a measurement range of 4–96% RH, and a sensitivity of 0.06 nm per %RH were obtained. As for ethanol volatilization sensing obvious wavelength blue shift was observed for the sensor immersed in 50% and 62% ethanol solution, while no variation could be detected in pure ethanol solution (purity larger than 97%). With the advantages of low cost, ease of fabrication and sensitive response, ZnO-coated SMS interrogated with a fiber ring laser was demonstrated to be an effective sensor for humidity and ethanol volatilization sensing. (paper)

  8. Effects of He-Ne laser beam on mechanical, heat, chemical and superficial wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study summarizes the effects of low-doses of He-Ne laser radiation (λ = 6328 A), on healing of four types of wounds, including mechanical, heat, chemical and superficial wounds. The results revealed that variations between complete wound-closure in irradiated samples and that of control groups were statistically significant. Moreover, the results suggest that the stimulative action of laser is an accumulative phenomenon, that affects factors involved in the course of wound healing. The results also indicate that the skin epithelium is a highly responsive tissue towards this sort of radiation, which suggests that the stimulative action of He-Ne laser could be assayed easily by using such tissues as a test target. (author). 11 refs, 2 tabs

  9. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  10. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 deg. C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs

  11. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials

  12. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Garcia Guillen, G.; Aguilar Martinez, J.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties.

  13. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties

  14. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Haniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4 fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures.

  15. Laser-assisted chemical liquid-phase deposition of metals for micro- and optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Kordás, K. (Krisztián)

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The demands toward the development of simple and cost-effective fabrication methods of metallic structures with high lateral resolution on different substrates - applied in many fields of technology, such as in microelectronics, optoelectronics, micromechanics as well as in sensor and actuator applications - gave the idea to perform this research. Due to its simplicity, laser-assisted chemical liquid-phase deposition (LCLD) has been investigated and applied for the metallization o...

  16. Laser-based standoff detection of surface-bound explosive chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, David L.; Smith, Gregory P.; Oser, Harald

    2010-04-01

    Avoiding or minimizing potential damage from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as suicide, roadside, or vehicle bombs requires that the explosive device be detected and neutralized outside its effective blast radius. Only a few seconds may be available to both identify the device as hazardous and implement a response. As discussed in a study by the National Research Council, current technology is still far from capable of meeting these objectives. Conventional nitrocarbon explosive chemicals have very low vapor pressures, and any vapors are easily dispersed in air. Many pointdetection approaches rely on collecting trace solid residues from dust particles or surfaces. Practical approaches for standoff detection are yet to be developed. For the past 5 years, SRI International has been working toward development of a novel scheme for standoff detection of explosive chemicals that uses infrared (IR) laser evaporation of surfacebound explosive followed by ultraviolet (UV) laser photofragmentation of the explosive chemical vapor, and then UV laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of nitric oxide. This method offers the potential of long standoff range (up to 100 m or more), high sensitivity (vaporized solid), simplicity (no spectrometer or library of reference spectra), and selectivity (only nitrocompounds).

  17. Ambient diode laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry of nonvolatile chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Schilling, Michael; Ahlmann, Norman; Michels, Antje; Hayen, Heiko; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F; Franzke, Joachim

    2013-03-19

    In this work, the combined use of desorption by a continuous wave near-infrared diode laser and ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge-based probe (laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry (LD-DBDI-MS)) is presented as an ambient ionization method for the mass spectrometric detection of nonvolatile chemicals on surfaces. A separation of desorption and ionization processes could be verified. The use of the diode laser is motivated by its low cost, ease of use, and small size. To achieve an efficient desorption, the glass substrates are coated at the back side with a black point (target point, where the sample is deposited) in order to absorb the energy offered by the diode laser radiation. Subsequent ionization is accomplished by a helium plasmajet generated in the dielectric barrier discharge source. Examples on the application of this approach are shown in both positive and negative ionization modes. A wide variety of multiclass species with low vapor pressure were tested including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and explosives (reserpine, roxithromycin, propazine, prochloraz, spinosad, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, enrofloxacin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, spinosad, cyclo-1,3,5,7-tetramethylene tetranitrate (HMX), and cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene trinitramine (RDX)). A comparative evaluation revealed that the use of the laser is advantageous, compared to just heating the substrate surface. PMID:23419061

  18. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  19. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy of solid and liquid chemicals using laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Lim, Jacob Song Kiat; Liu, Huan; Fu, Yu

    2016-08-22

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity microphone or a piezo sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a laboratory environment. Due to the aforementioned requirements, traditionally this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms (membrane, powder and liquid) were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for applications in photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy, with potential to enable the detection of chemicals in open environment at safe standoff distance. PMID:27557194

  20. Effect of surface topography in the generation of chemical maps by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Quintas, I.; Piñon, V.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2012-09-01

    The development of technologically advanced materials is propelling the improvement of surface analytical techniques. In particular, the composition and hence the properties of most of these new materials are spatial dependent. Between the techniques able to provide chemical spatial information, laser-induced plasma spectroscopy known also as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very promising analytical technique. During the last decade, LIBS was successfully applied to the analysis of surfaces and the generation of chemical maps of heterogeneous materials. In the LIBS analysis, several experimental factors including surface topography must be taken into account. In this work, the influence of surface roughness in LIBS signal during the point analysis and acquisition of chemical maps was studied. For this purpose, samples of stainless steel with different surface finishes were prepared and analyzed by LIBS. In order to characterize the different surfaces, confocal microscopy images were obtained. Afterwards, both topographic and spectroscopic information were combined to show the relationship between them. Additionally, in order to reveal the effect of surface topography in the acquisition of chemical maps, a three dimensional analysis of a sample exhibiting two different finishes was carried out.

  1. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DLIL technique and etching were used for functionalization of Ti grade 2 surface. • Modification was performed on semi-finished flat and curved Ti surfaces. • Modification results in periodic multimodal (micro and nano-size) Ti topography. - Abstract: The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone–implants interactions

  2. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwaśniak, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Pura, J., E-mail: jaroslawpura@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Zwolińska, M.; Wieciński, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Skarżyński, H.; Olszewski, L. [Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw (Poland); World Hearing Center, Kajetany (Poland); Marczak, J. [Military University of Technology, Institute of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland); Garbacz, H.; Kurzydłowski, K.J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • DLIL technique and etching were used for functionalization of Ti grade 2 surface. • Modification was performed on semi-finished flat and curved Ti surfaces. • Modification results in periodic multimodal (micro and nano-size) Ti topography. - Abstract: The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone–implants interactions.

  3. Estimation of risks by chemicals produced during laser pyrolysis of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Lothar W.; Spleiss, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Use of laser systems in minimal invasive surgery results in formation of laser aerosol with volatile organic compounds of possible health risk. By use of currently identified chemical substances an overview on possibly associated risks to human health is given. The class of the different identified alkylnitriles seem to be a laser specific toxicological problem. Other groups of chemicals belong to the Maillard reaction type, the fatty acid pyrolysis type, or even the thermally activated chemolysis. In relation to the available different threshold limit values the possible exposure ranges of identified substances are discussed. A rough estimation results in an exposure range of less than 1/100 for almost all substances with given human threshold limit values without regard of possible interactions. For most identified alkylnitriles, alkenes, and heterocycles no threshold limit values are given for lack of, until now, practical purposes. Pyrolysis of anaesthetized organs with isoflurane gave no hints for additional pyrolysis products by fragment interactions with resulting VOCs. Measurements of pyrolysis gases resulted in detection of small amounts of NO additionally with NO2 formation at plasma status.

  4. Chemical reactions at metallic and metal/semiconductor interfaces stimulated by pulsed laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, E. J.; Caudano, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer Al/Sb thin films have been evaporated on GaSb single crystals in ultra-high vacuum and pulsed-laser irradiated in-situ above the energy density threshold for surface melting. Superficial and interfacial chemical reactions have been characterized in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy; and later, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical reaction between the Al and Sb films is considered as a model reaction for laser-assisted synthesis of high-purity intermetallic compounds. The observation of a strong interfacial reaction between the melted film and the substrate is also a subject of great concern for optical data recording and laser alloying of ohmic contacts on semiconductors. We show that a suitable choice of the substrate and adding a low surface tension element into the metallic film can improve its stability during melting, and prevent inhomogeneous reaction and formation of holes, cracks and particles. Finally, other solutions are suggested to improve the control of these reactions.

  5. Application of laser diagnostics to sodium-water chemical reaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes in a steam generator. Therefore the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for safety reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using laser diagnostics. The sodium-water counter-flow reactions were measured using laser diagnostics such as laser induced fluorescence, CARS, Raman scattering and photo-fragmentation. The measurement results show that the sodium-water reaction proceeds mainly by the reaction Na + H2O → NaOH + H and the main product is NaOH in this reaction. Its forward and backward reaction rates tend to balance with each other and the whole reaction rate reduces as temperature increases. (author)

  6. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO2 laser thermal modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Influences of CO2 laser on lime wood surface were studied. • With growth of the irradiation dose brightness decrease and increase of the total colour difference were observed. • Cellulose degradation and loss of hemicelluloses were observed. • Higher values at the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. • CO2 laser irradiation can be used as a new colouring method. - Abstract: We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO2 laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO2 laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm−2) lightness (ΔL*) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE*) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses

  7. Chemical reactions of excited nitrogen atoms for short wavelength chemical lasers. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-15

    Accomplishments of this program include the following: (1) Scalable, chemical generation of oxygen atoms by reaction of fluorine atoms and water vapor. (2) Production of nitrogen atom densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 1}5 cm{sup {minus}3} with 5% electrical efficiency by injecting trace amounts of fluorine into microwave discharged nitrogen. (3) Production of cyanide radicals by reaction of high densities of N atoms with cyanogen. (4) Production of carbon atoms by reaction of nitrogen atoms with cyanogen or with fluorine atoms and hydrogen cyanide. (5) Confirmation that the reaction of carbon atoms and carbonyl sulfide produces CS(a{sup 3} {Pi}{sub r}), as predicted by conservation of electron spin and orbital angular momenta and as proposed by others under another SWCL program. (6) Production of cyanide radicals by injection of cyanogen halides into active nitrogen and use as spectroscopic calibration source. (7) Demonstration that sodium atoms react with cyanogen chloride, bromide and iodide and with cyanuric trifluoride to produce cyanide radicals. (8) Demonstration of the potential utility of the fluorine atom plus ammonia reaction system in the production of NF(b{sup l}{Sigma}{sup +}) via N({sup 2}D) + F{sub 2}.

  8. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  9. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y2O3 coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y2O3 coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y2O3 reaction with Cl2, U and UCl3. • Y2O3 coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt

  10. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  11. Fabrication of highly ultramicroporous carbon nanofoams by SF6-catalyzed laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shuhara, Ai; Kondo, Atsushi; Utsumi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Vallejos-Burgos, Fernando; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) method for preparing nanocarbons with the aid of SF6. This method would offer advantages for the production of aggregates of nanoscale foams (nanofoams) at high rates. Pyrolysis of the as-grown nanofoams induced the high surface area (1120 m2 g-1) and significantly enhanced the adsorption of supercritical H2 (16.6 mg g-1 at 77 K and 0.1 MPa). We also showed that the pyrolized nanofoams have highly ultramicroporous structures. The pyrolized nanofoams would be superior to highly microporous nanocarbons for the adsorption of supercritical gases.

  12. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water chemical reaction field using laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes. Therefore, the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of importance for security reasons. This study aims to clarify the gas phase sodium-water reaction path and reaction products. Na, Na2, H2O, and reaction products in the counter-flow sodium-water reaction field were measured using laser diagnostics such as Raman scattering and photo-fragmentation. The main product in the sodium-water reaction was determined to be NaOH and its reaction path was discussed using Na-H2O elementally reaction analysis. (author)

  13. Fabrication of microchannels in single-crystal GaN by wet-chemical-assisted femtosecond-laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated micro- and nano-fabrication of wide band-gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Nanoscale craters were successfully formed by wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation, in which the laser beam is focused onto a single-crystal GaN substrate in a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. This allows efficient removal of ablation debris produced by chemical reactions during ablation, resulting in high-quality ablation. However, a two-step processing method involving irradiation by a fs-laser beam in air followed by wet etching, distorts the shape of the crater because of residual debris. The threshold fluence for wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation is lower than that for fs-laser ablation in air, which is advantageous for improving fabrication resolution since it reduces thermal effects. We have fabricated craters as small as 510 nm by using a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens with an NA of 0.73. Furthermore, we have formed three-dimensional hollow microchannels in GaN by fs-laser direct-writing in HCl solution.

  14. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser for decommissioning and dismantlement of nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Kazuyoku; Sugimoto, Daichi; Endo, Masamori; Takeda, Shuzaburo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual designs of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) facility for decommissioning and dismantlement (DD) of nuclear facility is proposed. The requisite output power and beam quality was determined base don our preliminary experiments of nonmetal material processing. Assuming the laser power of 30kW, it is derived that the beam quality of M2 equals 36 required to cut a biological shield wall of a nuclear power plant at a cutting speed of 10mm/min. Then the requisite specification of an optical fiber to deliver the laser is calculated. It turned to be quite extreme, core diameter of 1.7mm and NA equals 0.018. The mass flow and heat balance of proposed facility is calculated based on our recent COIL studies. With the high-pressure subsonic mode, the vacuum pump size is minimized compared to the supersonic operation. Finally, the size of the facility is estimated assuming tow-hour continuous operation. It is revealed that such a system can be packed in five railway containers.

  15. Laser-based mass spectrometry for in situ chemical composition analysis of planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Samira; Neuland, Maike B.; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in space research. The chemical composition of planetary surface material is a key scientific question on every space mission to a planet, moon or asteroid. Chemical composition measurements of rocky material on the surface are of great importance to understand the origin and evolution of the planetary body.[1] A miniature laser ablation/ionisation reflectron- type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) was designed and built at the University of Bern for planetary research.[2] Despite its small size and light weight, the LMS instrument still maintains the same capabilities as large laboratory systems, which makes it suitable for its application on planetary space missions.[3-5] The high dynamic range of about eight orders of magnitude, high lateral (μm-level) and vertical (sub-nm level) resolution and high detection sensitivity for almost all elements (10 ppb, atomic fraction) make LMS a versatile instrument for various applications. LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotope composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of Pb- isotope abundances can be used for dating of planetary material. Measurements of bio-relevant elements allow searching for past or present life on a planetary surface. The high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction, is of considerable interest, e.g. for analysis of inhomogeneous, extraterrestrial samples as well as weathering processes of planetary material. References [1] P. Wurz, D. Abplanalp, M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, V.A. Fernandes, A. Chumikov, and G. Managadze, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis in Planetary Science: Investigation of the Surface and the Atmosphere", Sol. Sys. Res., 2012, 46, 408. [2] U. Rohner, J.A. Whitby, P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration" Meas. Sci. Tch., 2003, 14, 2159. [3] M. Tulej, A. Riedo, M.B. Neuland, S

  16. Kinetics analysis of chemiluminescence in discharge-driven HF chemical lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Luo; Shengfu Yuan; Baozhu Yan; Qisheng Lu; Qianjin Zou

    2011-01-01

    The chcinilummescence spectrum in the optical cavity of discharge-driven hydrogen fluoride (HF) chemical laser is measured. The result reveals that the spectra of the helium and fluorine (F) atoms are the major components. Moreover, the green chemiluminescence in the downstream of the optical axis is mostly composed of the 60P20 spectral line of the HF molecule. The analysis shows that, except for the cold pumping reaction, the recombination of the F atoms and the hot pumping reaction also occur in the optical cavity. Due to the hot. Pumping reaction and the optical cavity temperature in a specific range, the 60P20 line becomes the strongest HF molecule in the downstream region of the optical axis. After the hot pumping reaction, the green chcmilum inference always appears in the downstream region of the optical axis when the optical cavity temperature varies in a greater range.%@@ The chemiluminescence spectrum in the optical cavity of discharge-driven hydrogen fluoride(HF) chemical laser is measured.The result reveals that the spectra of the helium and fluorine(F) atoms are the major components.Moreover,the green chemiluminescence in the downstream of the optical axis is mostly composed of the 60P20 spectral line of the HF molecule.

  17. Chemical and explosive detection with long-wave infrared laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, Ei E.; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) mostly uses silicon-based detectors and measures the atomic emission in the UV-Vis-NIR (UVN) region of the spectrum. It can be used to detect the elements in the sample under test, such as the presence of lead in the solder for electronics during RoHS compliance verification. This wavelength region, however, does not provide sufficient information on the bonding between the elements, because the molecular vibration modes emit at longer wavelength region. Measuring long-wave infrared spectrum (LWIR) in a LIBS setup can instead reveal molecular composition of the sample, which is the information sought in applications including chemical and explosive detection and identification. This paper will present the work and results from the collaboration of several institutions to develop the methods of LWIR LIBS for chemical/explosive/pharmaceutical material detection/identification, such as DMMP and RDX, as fast as using a single excitation laser pulse. In our latest LIBS setup, both UVN and LWIR spectra can be collected at the same time, allowing more accurate detection and identification of materials.

  18. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  19. Noninvasive Facial Rejuvenation. Part 3: Physician-Directed-Lasers, Chemical Peels, and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaike, Jesse D; Agrawal, Nikhil; Chang, Daniel; Lee, Edward I; Nigro, Marjory G

    2016-08-01

    A proper knowledge of noninvasive facial rejuvenation is integral to the practice of a cosmetic surgeon. Noninvasive facial rejuvenation can be divided into patient- versus physician-directed modalities. Patient-directed facial rejuvenation combines the use of facial products such as sunscreen, moisturizers, retinoids, α-hydroxy acids, and various antioxidants to both maintain youthful skin and rejuvenate damaged skin. Physicians may recommend and often prescribe certain products, but patients are in control with this type of facial rejuvenation. On the other hand, physician-directed facial rejuvenation entails modalities that require direct physician involvement, such as neuromodulators, filler injections, laser resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. With the successful integration of each of these modalities, a complete facial regimen can be established and patient satisfaction can be maximized. This article is the last in a three-part series describing noninvasive facial rejuvenation. Here the authors review the mechanism, indications, and possible complications of lasers, chemical peels, and other commonly used noninvasive modalities. PMID:27478423

  20. Semi-gas kinetics model for performance modeling of flowing chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COIL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi; HU Limin; SHEN Yiqing

    2004-01-01

    A semi-gas kinetics (SGK) model for performance analyses of flowing chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is presented. In this model, the oxygen-iodine reaction gas flow is treated as a continuous medium, and the effect of thermal motions of particles of different laser energy levels on the performances of the COIL is included and the velocity distribution function equations are solved by using the double-parameter perturbational method. For a premixed flow, effects of different chemical reaction systems, different gain saturation models and temperature, pressure, yield of excited oxygen, iodine concentration and frequency-shift on the performances of the COIL are computed, and the calculated output power agrees well with the experimental data. The results indicate that the power extraction of the SGK model considering 21 reactions is close to those when only the reversible pumping reaction is considered, while different gain saturation models and adjustable parameters greatly affect the output power, the optimal threshold gain range, and the length of power extraction.

  1. Chemical-Assisted Femtosecond Laser Writing of Lab-in-Fiber Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Moez

    fringe contrast and peak resolution beyond that available with FPIs and offer a significant theoretical improvement in refractometer sensitivity. The advanced laser processes optimized here may provide a new base for photonics, microfluidics, and optofluidics fabrication in a LIF platform with multiplexed functionality and rapid prototyping capabilities of fully integrable 3D optofluidic systems. The proposed LIF devices define new micro-systems for temperature, strain, pressure, refractive index, and bend strain sensing that may find application in the acoustic, aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, civil, or medical fields.

  2. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants.

  3. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  4. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  5. Rapidly developed squamous cell carcinoma after laser therapy used to treat chemical burn wound: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyung-Rok; Kwon, Soon-Sung; Chung, Seum; Kie, Jeong-Hae

    2015-01-01

    Background In chronic wounds, especially burn scars, malignant tumors can arise. However, it is rare for a subacute burn injury to change to a malignant lesion within one month. Moreover, a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn has never been reported. Case report In this report, we examine a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn. Because pathologic investigations were made from the first oper...

  6. Chemically modified carbon nanotubes as material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI) material in protein profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomarkers play a potential role in the early detection and diagnosis of a disease. Our aim is to derivatize carbon nanotubes for exploration of the differences in human body fluids e.g. serum, through matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) that can be related to disease and subsequently to be employed in the biomarker discovery process. This application we termed as the material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI). The versatility of this technology is meant to increase the amount of information from biological samples on the protein level, which will have a major impact to serve the cause of diagnostic markers. Serum peptides and proteins are immobilized on derivatized carbon nanotubes, which function as binding material. Protein-loaded suspension is placed on a stainless steel target or buckypaper on aluminum target for direct analysis with MALDI-MS. The elution method to wash the bound proteins from carbon nanotubes was employed to compare with the direct analysis procedure. Elution is carried out by MALDI matrix solution to get them out of the entangled nanotubes, which are difficult to desorb by laser due to the complex nanotube structures. The advantage of these optimized methods compared to the conventional screening methods is the improved sensitivity, selectivity and the short analysis time without prior albumin and immunoglobulin depletion. The comparison of similarly modified diamond and carbon nanotubes exhibit differences in their nature to bind the proteins out of serum due to the differences in their physical characteristics. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy provided hint for the presence of tertiary amine peak at the crucial chemical step of iminodiacetic acid addition to acid chloride functionality on carbon nanotubes. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was utilized to quantitatively measure the copper capacity of these derivatized carbon nanotubes which is a direct measure of capacity of

  7. Chemically modified carbon nanotubes as material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI) material in protein profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najam-ul-Haq, M. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rainer, M. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schwarzenauer, T. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huck, C.W. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]. E-mail: christian.w.huck@uibk.ac.at; Bonn, G.K. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-03-02

    Biomarkers play a potential role in the early detection and diagnosis of a disease. Our aim is to derivatize carbon nanotubes for exploration of the differences in human body fluids e.g. serum, through matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) that can be related to disease and subsequently to be employed in the biomarker discovery process. This application we termed as the material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI). The versatility of this technology is meant to increase the amount of information from biological samples on the protein level, which will have a major impact to serve the cause of diagnostic markers. Serum peptides and proteins are immobilized on derivatized carbon nanotubes, which function as binding material. Protein-loaded suspension is placed on a stainless steel target or buckypaper on aluminum target for direct analysis with MALDI-MS. The elution method to wash the bound proteins from carbon nanotubes was employed to compare with the direct analysis procedure. Elution is carried out by MALDI matrix solution to get them out of the entangled nanotubes, which are difficult to desorb by laser due to the complex nanotube structures. The advantage of these optimized methods compared to the conventional screening methods is the improved sensitivity, selectivity and the short analysis time without prior albumin and immunoglobulin depletion. The comparison of similarly modified diamond and carbon nanotubes exhibit differences in their nature to bind the proteins out of serum due to the differences in their physical characteristics. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy provided hint for the presence of tertiary amine peak at the crucial chemical step of iminodiacetic acid addition to acid chloride functionality on carbon nanotubes. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was utilized to quantitatively measure the copper capacity of these derivatized carbon nanotubes which is a direct measure of capacity of

  8. Phase retarder in chemical oxygen-iodine laser at 45° incidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Wang; Jianbing Huang; Yingjian Wang; Zhengxiu Fan

    2006-01-01

    @@ A phase retarder used in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) system has been fabricated by ion beam sputtering (IBS). When the incident angle is 45° the reflectivity is about 99.9% from 1290 to 1340 nm and about 83.8% at 632.8 nm, and the phase retardance between the parallel and perpendicular polarization components is -92.8° at 1315 nm. In order to get the influence of temperature on the phase retarder, six samples have been annealed from 523 to 648 K at interval of 25 K in air respectively, and the results show good temperature performance. With increasing temperature, phase retardance becomes smaller, and the variation is within 4° at 1315 nm. At the same time, the variation maintains within ±10° for the incidence from 44° to 49°.

  9. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO2 laser thermal modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubovský, Ivan; Kačík, František

    2014-12-01

    We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO2 laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO2 laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm-2) lightness (ΔL*) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE*) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses.

  10. Chemical, morphological and chromatic behavior of mural paintings under Er:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striova, J.; Camaiti, M.; Castellucci, E. M.; Sansonetti, A.

    2011-08-01

    Several pigments (malachite CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, azurite 2CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, yellow ochre (goethite α-FeOOH, gypsum CaSO4ṡ2H2O), St. John's white CaCO3 formed from slaked lime) and respective mural paintings specimens were subjected to the free-running Er:YAG laser radiation in order to study their damage thresholds, in a broad range of laser fluences, both in dry and wet conditions. The specimens' damage thresholds were evaluated by spectroscopic methods, colorimetric measurements and microscopic observation. The pigments containing -OH groups were found to be more sensitive than St. John's white; hence the most sensitive paint layers in dry conditions are those containing malachite, azurite (both 1.3 J/cm2) and yellow ochre (2.5 J/cm2) as compared to the ones containing St. John's white (15.2 J/cm2). The presence of wetting agents (w.a.) attenuated the pigments chemical alteration. The damage thresholds of all the paint layers, in presence of w.a., were found to be around 2.5 J/cm2. The alteration was caused by thermo-mechanical damage and by binding medium ablation of a fresco and a secco prepared specimens, respectively.

  11. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  12. Topographical and chemical microanalysis of surfaces with a scanning probe microscope and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakovski; Beauchamp

    2000-10-01

    Spatially resolved chemical imaging is achieved by combining a fiber-optic scanning probe microscope with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in a single instrument, TOPOLIBS. Elemental composition of surfaces can be mapped and correlated with topographical data. The experiment is conducted in air with minimal sample preparation. In a typical experiment, surface topography is analyzed by scanning a sharp fiber-optic probe across the sample using shear force feedback. The probe is then positioned over a feature of interest and pulsed radiation is delivered to the surface using a nitrogen laser. The pulse vaporizes material from the surface and generates a localized plasma plume. Optical emission from the plume is analyzed with a compact UV/visible spectrometer. Ablation crater size is controlled by the amount of laser power coupled into the probe. Sampling areas with submicrometer dimensions are achieved by using reduced laser power. PMID:11028639

  13. Physico-chemical properties of Pd nanoparticles produced by Pulsed Laser Ablation in different organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladium nanoparticles are arousing an increasing interest because of their strong activity in heterogeneous catalysis in a wide range of reactions. Driven by the interest of producing Pd nanoparticles to be deposited for catalysis over hydrophobic supports, we investigated their synthesis via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid in several organic solvents, as acetone, ethanol, 2-propanol, toluene, n-hexane. The colloids were produced by using a Nd:YAG ns laser and without the addition of surfactant agents. The morphology, composition, stability and oxidation state of the obtained nanoparticles were investigated by TEM-EDS analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results evidence that the nature of the solvent influences both the yield and the physico-chemical properties of the produced nanoparticles. While in acetone and alcohols spheroidal, non aggregated and stable particles are obtained, in case of toluene and n-hexane few unstable particles surrounded by a gel-like material are produced. Raman/XPS measurements suggest the presence of amorphous or graphitic carbon onto crystalline Pd nanoparticles, which could have hindered their growth and determined the observed smaller sizes if compared to nanoparticles produced in water. The stability of Pd colloids obtained in acetone and alcohols was attributed to adsorbed anions like enolates or alcoholates; non polar solvents like toluene and n-hexane, unable to give rise to adsorbed anionic species, cannot provide any stabilization to the palladium nanoparticles. XPS analyses also evidenced a partial oxidation of particles surface, with a ratio Pd2+:Pd0 of 1:2.5 and 1:4 in acetone and ethanol, respectively.

  14. Physico-chemical properties of Pd nanoparticles produced by Pulsed Laser Ablation in different organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristoforetti, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.cristoforetti@cnr.it [National Institute of Optics, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Pitzalis, Emanuela; Spiniello, Roberto [Institute of Chemistry of OrganoMetallic Compounds, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ishak, Randa [Department of Chem. Eng. And Material Science, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Giammanco, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Palladium nanoparticles are arousing an increasing interest because of their strong activity in heterogeneous catalysis in a wide range of reactions. Driven by the interest of producing Pd nanoparticles to be deposited for catalysis over hydrophobic supports, we investigated their synthesis via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid in several organic solvents, as acetone, ethanol, 2-propanol, toluene, n-hexane. The colloids were produced by using a Nd:YAG ns laser and without the addition of surfactant agents. The morphology, composition, stability and oxidation state of the obtained nanoparticles were investigated by TEM-EDS analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results evidence that the nature of the solvent influences both the yield and the physico-chemical properties of the produced nanoparticles. While in acetone and alcohols spheroidal, non aggregated and stable particles are obtained, in case of toluene and n-hexane few unstable particles surrounded by a gel-like material are produced. Raman/XPS measurements suggest the presence of amorphous or graphitic carbon onto crystalline Pd nanoparticles, which could have hindered their growth and determined the observed smaller sizes if compared to nanoparticles produced in water. The stability of Pd colloids obtained in acetone and alcohols was attributed to adsorbed anions like enolates or alcoholates; non polar solvents like toluene and n-hexane, unable to give rise to adsorbed anionic species, cannot provide any stabilization to the palladium nanoparticles. XPS analyses also evidenced a partial oxidation of particles surface, with a ratio Pd{sup 2+}:Pd{sup 0} of 1:2.5 and 1:4 in acetone and ethanol, respectively.

  15. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  16. Laser speckle technique to study the effect of chemical pre-treatment on the quality of minimally processed apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minz, Preeti D.; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the laser speckle technique has been used for the quality evaluation of chemically treated cut apples. Chemical pre-treatment includes 1% (w/v) solution of citric acid (CA), sodium chloride (SC), and a combination of CA and sodium chloride (CS). The variation in weight loss, respiration rate, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity (TA), and absorbance of chemically treated cut apples stored at 5 °C was monitored for 11 d. The speckle grain size was calculated by an autocovariance method from the speckled images of freshly cut chemically treated apples. The effect of chemicals on TSS and the TA content variation of the cut apples were well correlated to the linear speckle grain size. Circular degree of polarization confirms the presence of a small scatterer and hence Rayleigh diffusion region. For all the treated cut apples, a decrease in the concentration of small particles nearly after the mid-period of storage results in the fast decay of circular degree of polarization. For non-invasive and fast analysis of the chemical constituent of fruits during minimal processing, the laser speckle can be practically used in the food industry.

  17. Quantum yield measurement in the chemical reactions of laser-excited Zn and Rb atoms with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A new method of determining the rate constants of chemical reactions proceeding with participant of Zn(4p 3P1) and Rb(11P3/2) atoms has been introduced. The method is based on the investigation of the spatial and temporary behavior of the atoms and their interaction with reagent-gas molecules in a carrier gas flow. For the excitation of the atom pulsed monochromatic resonance laser radiation was used. The interaction of electronically excited atoms with reagent-gas molecules causes a decrease in the concentration of atoms owing to chemical and physical quenching processes. Registering the change in the atom concentration at the end of the flow, one can evaluate the rate a constants of the reaction in which of stable chemical compounds forms. These investigations are necessary for the laser isotope separation. - Abstract: In the present paper, we introduce a method for measuring the apparent quantum yield θap and the rate-constant values of the physical kp and chemical kc quenching of electronically excited Zn and Rb atoms by gas molecules. The method is based on measuring the concentration of the atoms at the end of their flow in a mixture with a reagent-gas and a carrier gas, in the region where all quenching and secondary processes are already over. The concentration of the atoms was determined from measured absorbed energy of resonance laser radiation. The rate constants and the cross-sections of the chemical and physical quenching of Zn(3P10) and Rb(11P3/2) atoms with several molecules have been determined. For some collisions the quantum yield was found to be close to unity. The method may find applications in laser photochemical isotope separation and in measuring the rate constants of reactions proceeding with participation of ground state atoms.

  18. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  19. Particle Generation by Laser Ablation in Support of Chemical Analysis of High Level Mixed Waste from Plutonium Production Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigate particles produced by laser irradiation and their analysis by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA/ICP-MS), with a view towards optimizing particle production for analysis of high level waste materials and waste glass. LA/ICP-MS has considerable potential to increase the safety and speed of analysis required for the remediation of high level wastes from cold war plutonium production operations. In some sample types, notably the sodium nitrate-based wastes at Hanford and elsewhere, chemical analysis using typical laser conditions depends strongly on the details of sample history composition in a complex fashion, rendering the results of analysis uncertain. Conversely, waste glass materials appear to be better behaved and require different strategies to optimize analysis

  20. High-pressure gravity-independent singlet oxygen generator, laser nozzle, and iodine injection system for the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, George

    2004-09-01

    A novel approach is outlined for a singlet oxygen generator (SOG), a laser minimum length nozzle (MLN), and an iodine injector system for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). A unified approach, referred to as a SOG/MLN/I2 system, is partly based on past experimental work. For instance, the SOG concept stems from sparger technology and a KSY fesibility experiment. A MLN with a curved sonic line is used for the laser nozzle, and slender struts are used for the injection, in the downstream direction, of iodine/helium vapor. The heated struts are located downstream of the nozzle's throat. The engineering logic behind the approach is discussed; it has a diversity of potential system benefits relative to current technology. These include a compact, scalable laser that can operate in space. The SOG operates at a significantly higher pressure with a high O2(1Δ) yield. In addition, basic hydrogen peroxide reconditioning is not required, a water vapor removal system is not required, and diluent may be unnecessary, although useful for pressure recovery. The impact on a COIL system in terms of power, efficiency, and pressure recovery is briefly assessed.

  1. High sensitivity stand-off detection and quantification of chemical mixtures using an active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-05-01

    High sensitivity detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in a stand-off configuration is a highly sought after capability across the security and defense sector. Specific applications include assessing the presence of explosive related materials, poisonous or toxic chemical agents, and narcotics. Real world field deployment of an operational stand-off system is challenging due to stringent requirements: high detection sensitivity, stand-off ranges from centimeters to hundreds of meters, eye-safe invisible light, near real-time response and a wide chemical versatility encompassing both vapor and condensed phase chemicals. Additionally, field deployment requires a compact, rugged, power efficient, and cost-effective design. To address these demanding requirements, we have developed the concept of Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS), which can be also described as a middle infrared hyperspectral coherent lidar. Combined with robust spectral unmixing algorithms, inherited from retrievals of information from high-resolution spectral data generated by satellitebased spectrometers, ACLaS has been demonstrated to fulfil the above-mentioned needs. ACLaS prototypes have been so far developed using quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and interband cascade lasers (ICL) to exploit the fast frequency tuning capability of these solid state sources. Using distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, demonstration and performance analysis were carried out on narrow-band absorbing chemicals (N2O, H2O, H2O2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H6) at stand-off distances up to 50 m using realistic non cooperative targets such as wood, painted metal, and bricks. Using more widely tunable external cavity QCL, ACLaS has also been demonstrated on broadband absorbing chemicals (dichloroethane, HFC134a, ethylene glycol dinitrate and 4-nitroacetanilide solid) and on complex samples mixing narrow-band and broadband absorbers together in a realistic atmospheric background.

  2. Heat and Mass Transfer during Chemical Vapor Deposition on the Particle Surface Subjected to Nanosecond Laser Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Quan; He, Yaling; Mao, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    A thermal model of chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) on the spherical particle surface under irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse is presented in this paper. Heat and mass transfer on a single spherical metal powder particle surface subjected to temporal Gaussian heat flux is investigated analytically. The chemical reaction on the particle surface and the mass transfer in the gas phase are also considered. The surface temperature, thermal penetration depth, and deposited film thickness under different laser fluence, pulse width, initial particle temperature, and particle radius are investigated. The effect of total pressure in the reaction chamber on deposition rate is studied as well. The particle-level model presented in this paper is an important step toward development of multiscale model of LCVI.

  3. Low-intensity laser coupled with photosensitizer to reduce bacteria in root canals compared to chemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photodynamic therapy is a process in which a dye is associate with an appropriate wavelength of light and this dye goes to an excited state. The excited reacts with oxygen to form the highly reactive compound singlet oxygen, and this compound can kill bacteria and tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal reduction in root canal contaminated with E. Faecalis. Thirty teeth with their root canals prepared were contaminated with E. faecalis. The teeth have received the chemical substance sodium hypochlorite for 30 minutes; ten teeth have received the azulene dye paste for 5 minutes and have been irradiated with a diode laser, output power 10 mW and λ= 685 nm for 3 minutes. Ten teeth have not received treatment (control group). The bacterial reduction was significantly higher for laser group when compared to chemical and control groups. These results indicate photodynamic therapy as an effective method to kill bacteria. (author)

  4. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmm@ukw.edu.pl [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Rytlewski, Piotr [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Malinowski, Rafał [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes, ul. M. Skłodowskiej–Curie 55, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Żenkiewicz, Marian [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We modified polylactide surface layer with chemical, plasma or laser methods. • We tested selected properties and surface structure of modified samples. • We stated that the plasma treatment appears to be the most beneficial. - Abstract: The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm{sup 2} was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  5. Laser assisted modification and chemical metallization of electron-beam deposited ceria thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excimer laser processing is applied for tailoring the surface morphology and phase composition of CeO2 ceramic thin films. E-beam evaporation technique is used to deposit samples on stainless steel and silicate glass substrates. The films are then irradiated with ArF* excimer laser pulses under different exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, optical spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometry and EDS microanalysis are used to characterize the non-irradiated and laser-processed films. Upon UV laser exposure there is large increase of the surface roughness that is accompanied by photo-darkening and ceria reduction. It is shown that the laser induced changes in the CeO2 films facilitate the deposition of metal nano-aggregates in a commercial copper electroless plating bath. The significance of laser modification as a novel approach for the production of CeO2 based thin film catalysts is discussed.

  6. High power lasers & systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert; Birch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Some laser history; Airborne Laser Testbed & Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL); Laser modes and beam propagation; Fibre lasers and applications; US Navy Laser system – NRL 33kW fibre laser; Lockheed Martin 30kW fibre laser; Conclusions

  7. Two-coordinate control of the radiation pattern of a chemical non-chain electric-discharge DF laser by using space-time light modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of studies of radiation parameters of a chemical non-chain DF laser (emitting in the range from 3.5 to 4.1 μm) with an intracavity control of the radiation pattern with the help of spatiotemporal modulators based on PLZT electrooptic ceramics are presented. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  8. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  9. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-13

    A rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system for fast open-path quantification of multiple chemicals and mixtures is presented. The ECQCL system is swept over its entire tuning range (>100 cm-1) at frequencies up to 200 Hz. At 200 Hz the wavelength tuning rate and spectral resolution are 2x104 cm-1/sec and < 0.2 cm-1, respectively. The capability of the current system to quantify changes in chemical concentrations on millesecond timescales is demonstrated at atmospheric pressure using an open-path multi-pass cell. The detection limits for chemicals ranged from ppb to ppm levels depending on the absorption cross-section.

  10. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by near-field laser ablation and metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Alhmoud, H. Z.; Elnathan, R.; Delalat, B.; Voelcker, N. H.; Kraus, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present an elegant route for the fabrication of ordered arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires with tunable geometry at controlled locations on a silicon wafer. A monolayer of transparent microspheres convectively assembled onto a gold-coated silicon wafer acts as a microlens array. Irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse removes the gold beneath each focusing microsphere, leaving behind a hexagonal pattern of holes in the gold layer. Owing to the near-field effects, the diameter of the holes can be at least five times smaller than the laser wavelength. The patterned gold layer is used as catalyst in a metal-assisted chemical etching to produce an array of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires. This approach combines the advantages of direct laser writing with the benefits of parallel laser processing, yielding nanowire arrays with controlled geometry at predefined locations on the silicon surface. The fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can effectively transfect human cells with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein.

  11. Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser irradiation on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Enrique Vigueras; López, Susana Hernández; Camacho López, Marco A.; Contreras, Delfino Reyes; Farías-Mancilla, Rurik; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G.; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A.; Zaragoza-Contreras, E. Armando

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the nanosecond (Nd: YAG-1064 nm) laser pulse effect on the optical and morphological properties of chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Two suspensions of MWCNT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were prepared, one was submitted to laser pulses for 10 min while the other (blank) was only mechanically homogenized during the same time. Following the laser irradiation, the suspension acquired a yellow-amber color, in contrast to the black translucent appearance of the blank. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed this observation, showing the blank a higher absorption. Additionally, photoluminescence measurements exhibited a broad blue-green emission band both in the blank and irradiated suspension when excited at 369 nm, showing the blank a lower intensity. However, a modification in the excitation wavelength produced a violet to green tuning in the irradiated suspension, which did not occur in the blank. Lastly, the electron microscopy analysis of the treated nanotubes showed the abundant formation of amorphous carbon, nanocages, and nanotube unzipping, exhibiting the intense surface modification produced by the laser pulse. Nanotube surface modification and the coexistence with the new carbon nanostructures were considered as the conductive conditions for optical properties modification.

  12. Direct writing of carbon nanotube patterns by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on a transparent substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dot array and line patterns of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully grown by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) on a transparent substrate at room temperature. In the proposed technique, a Nd:YVO4 laser with a wavelength of 532 nm irradiates the backside of multiple catalyst layers (Ni/Al/Cr) through a transparent substrate to induce a local temperature rise, thereby allowing the direct writing of dense dot and line patterns of MWCNTs below 10 μm in size to be produced with uniform density on the controlled positions. In this LCVD method, a multiple-catalyst-layer with a Cr thermal layer is the central component for enabling the growth of dense MWCNTs with good spatial resolution.

  13. Experimental study and chemical application of GaAs semiconductor laser treating trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ke-Qum; Cao, Shu-Chen; Wang, Hu-Zhong; Wang, Ke-Ning; Xiao, Ton-Ha; Shen, Ke-Wei

    1993-03-01

    GaAs semiconductor laser was used to treat trigeminal neuralgia with an effective rate of 91.1%, and no side effects were found in 67 cases. Changes in and the recovery of the trigeminal nerve cell were studied with light and electromicroscope. Discussed in this article are the time length and quantity of laser treatment with low power. Experimental study and clinical application of the GaAs semiconductor laser have been carried out in our department since 1987. One-hundred-fifteen patients with various diseases in the maxillofacial region (including 67 cases of trigeminal neuralgia) have been treated with satisfactory effects and without any side-effects. The wavelength of the laser is 904 mu, the largest pulse length is 200 mu, and the average power is 2000 HZ.

  14. High-power supersonic chemical lasers: gas-dynamic problems of operation of mobile systems with PRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreysho, A. S.; Malkov, V. M.; Savin, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier. This is why they should be resolved anew with consideration of the specific aspects of the SCL processes. This is true for the gas-dynamic problems: new parameter areas, non-traditional channel geometry, consideration of new phenomena, etc.Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier

  15. Identification and quantification of selected chemicals in laser pyrolysis products of mammalian tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spleiss, Martin; Weber, Lothar W.; Meier, Thomas H.; Treffler, Bernd

    1995-01-01

    Liver and muscle tissue have been irradiated with a surgical CO2-laser. The prefiltered fumes were adsorbed on different sorbents (activated charcoal type NIOSH and Carbotrap) and desorbed with different solvents (carbondisulphide and acetone). Analysis was done by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. An updated list of identified substances is shown. Typical Maillard reaction products as found in warmed over flavour as aldehydes, aromatics, heterocyclic and sulphur compounds were detected. Quantification of some toxicological relevant substances is presented. The amounts of these substances are given in relation to the laser parameters and different tissues for further toxicological assessment.

  16. Excimer laser recrystallization of nanocrystalline-Si films deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition at 150 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFTs) fabricated at low temperature (under 200 deg. C) have been widely investigated for flexible substrate applications such as a transparent plastic substrate. Unlike the conventional TFT process using glass substrate, the maximum process temperature should be kept less than 200 deg. C in order to avoid thermal damage on flexible substrates. We report the characteristics of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) irradiated by an excimer laser. Nc-Si precursors were deposited on various buffer layers by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) at 150 deg. C. We employed various buffer layers, such as silicon nitride (SiNX) and silicon dioxide (SiO2), in order to report recrystallization characteristics in connection with a buffer layer of a different thermal conductivity. The dehydrogenation and recrystallization was performed by step-by-step excimer laser annealing (ELA) (XeCl,λ=308 nm) in order to prevent the explosive release of hydrogen atoms. The grain size of the poly-Si film, which was recrystallized on the various buffer layers, was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at each laser energy density. The process margin of step-by-step ELA employing the SiNX buffer layer is wider than SiO2 and the maximum grain size slightly increased

  17. Excimer laser recrystallization of nanocrystalline-Si films deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition at 150 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joong-Hyun [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Myeon [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Geun [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min-Koo [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Moon-Young [LTPS Team, AMLCD Business, Samsung Electronics Co., Giheung, Yongin City (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-01

    Polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFTs) fabricated at low temperature (under 200 deg. C) have been widely investigated for flexible substrate applications such as a transparent plastic substrate. Unlike the conventional TFT process using glass substrate, the maximum process temperature should be kept less than 200 deg. C in order to avoid thermal damage on flexible substrates. We report the characteristics of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) irradiated by an excimer laser. Nc-Si precursors were deposited on various buffer layers by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) at 150 deg. C. We employed various buffer layers, such as silicon nitride (SiN{sub X}) and silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), in order to report recrystallization characteristics in connection with a buffer layer of a different thermal conductivity. The dehydrogenation and recrystallization was performed by step-by-step excimer laser annealing (ELA) (XeCl,{lambda}=308 nm) in order to prevent the explosive release of hydrogen atoms. The grain size of the poly-Si film, which was recrystallized on the various buffer layers, was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at each laser energy density. The process margin of step-by-step ELA employing the SiN{sub X} buffer layer is wider than SiO{sub 2} and the maximum grain size slightly increased.

  18. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof; Rytlewski, Piotr; Malinowski, Rafał; Żenkiewicz, Marian

    2015-08-01

    The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm2 was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  19. Improved AMOLED with aligned poly-Si thin-film transistors by laser annealing and chemical solution treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistors (TFT) were prepared for the active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED). The excimer laser annealing (ELA) recrystallization technique was employed with a chemical solution treatment process to improve the TFT characteristic uniformity and the AMOLED display image quality. The characteristics of the poly-Si array thin films were influenced by XeCl ELA optic module design, TFT device channel direction, and laser irradiation overlap ratio. The ELA system module provided aligned poly-Si grain size of 0.3 μm by the homogenization lens design. The chemical solution treatment process included a dilute HF solution (DHF), ozone (O3) water, and buffer oxide etching solution (BOE). The PMOS TFT showed better field effect mobility of 87.6 cm2/V s, and the threshold voltage was -1.35 V. The off current (Ioff) was 1.25x10-11 A, and the on/off current ratio was 6.27x106. In addition, the image quality of the AMOLED display was highly improved using the 2T1C structure design without any compensation circuit.

  20. Improved AMOLED with aligned poly-Si thin-film transistors by laser annealing and chemical solution treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G. M.; Chen, C. N.; Feng, W. S.; Lu, H. C.

    2009-12-01

    Low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistors (TFT) were prepared for the active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED). The excimer laser annealing (ELA) recrystallization technique was employed with a chemical solution treatment process to improve the TFT characteristic uniformity and the AMOLED display image quality. The characteristics of the poly-Si array thin films were influenced by XeCl ELA optic module design, TFT device channel direction, and laser irradiation overlap ratio. The ELA system module provided aligned poly-Si grain size of 0.3 μm by the homogenization lens design. The chemical solution treatment process included a dilute HF solution (DHF), ozone (O 3) water, and buffer oxide etching solution (BOE). The PMOS TFT showed better field effect mobility of 87.6 cm 2/V s, and the threshold voltage was -1.35 V. The off current ( Ioff) was 1.25×10 -11 A, and the on/off current ratio was 6.27×10 6. In addition, the image quality of the AMOLED display was highly improved using the 2T1C structure design without any compensation circuit.

  1. Improved AMOLED with aligned poly-Si thin-film transistors by laser annealing and chemical solution treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.M., E-mail: wu@mail.cgu.edu.t [Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Department of Electronic Engineering, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.N.; Feng, W.S.; Lu, H.C. [Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Department of Electronic Engineering, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-15

    Low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistors (TFT) were prepared for the active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED). The excimer laser annealing (ELA) recrystallization technique was employed with a chemical solution treatment process to improve the TFT characteristic uniformity and the AMOLED display image quality. The characteristics of the poly-Si array thin films were influenced by XeCl ELA optic module design, TFT device channel direction, and laser irradiation overlap ratio. The ELA system module provided aligned poly-Si grain size of 0.3 mum by the homogenization lens design. The chemical solution treatment process included a dilute HF solution (DHF), ozone (O{sub 3}) water, and buffer oxide etching solution (BOE). The PMOS TFT showed better field effect mobility of 87.6 cm{sup 2}/V s, and the threshold voltage was -1.35 V. The off current (I{sub off}) was 1.25x10{sup -11} A, and the on/off current ratio was 6.27x10{sup 6}. In addition, the image quality of the AMOLED display was highly improved using the 2T1C structure design without any compensation circuit.

  2. Chemical Composition of Micrometer-Sized Filaments in an Aragonite Host by a Miniature Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, Marek; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Detection of extraterrestrial life is an ongoing goal in space exploration, and there is a need for advanced instruments and methods for the detection of signatures of life based on chemical and isotopic composition. Here, we present the first investigation of chemical composition of putative microfossils in natural samples using a miniature laser ablation/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS). The studies were conducted with high lateral (∼15 μm) and vertical (∼20-200 nm) resolution. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the instrument performance on micrometer-sized samples both in terms of isotope abundance and element composition. The following objectives had to be achieved: (1) Consider the detection and calculation of single stable isotope ratios in natural rock samples with techniques compatible with their employment of space instrumentation for biomarker detection in future planetary missions. (2) Achieve a highly accurate chemical compositional map of rock samples with embedded structures at the micrometer scale in which the rock matrix is easily distinguished from the micrometer structures. Our results indicate that chemical mapping of strongly heterogeneous rock samples can be obtained with a high accuracy, whereas the requirements for isotope ratios need to be improved to reach sufficiently large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:26247475

  3. Contribution to the study of physico-chemical properties of surfaces modified by laser treatment. Application to the enhancement of localized corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic materials are more and more used in severe conditions with particularly strong request for improving their behavior in aggressive environment and especially over long periods. The objective of this PhD work is to estimate the potentiality of a laser surface melting treatment on the improvement of the stainless steel 304L corrosion resistance, surface treatments by laser can be revisited on the basis of a recent change in the laser technology. In the frame of this work, a nano-pulsed laser fiber was chosen: it allows the treated surface to be melted for few microns in depth, followed by an ultra-fast solidification occurring with cooling rates up to 1011 K/s. The combination of these processes leads to the elimination of the surface defects, the formation (trapping) of metastable phases, the segregation of chemical elements and the growth of a new oxide layer which properties are governed by the laser parameters. To correlate these latter to the electrochemical reactivity of the surface, the influence of two laser parameters on the physico-chemical properties of the surface was studied: the laser power and the overlap of the laser impacts. To support this approach, the pitting corrosion resistance of the samples was determined by standard electrochemical tests. For specific laser parameters, the pitting potential of a 304L stainless steel was increased by more than 500 mV corresponding to an important enhancement in localized corrosion resistance in chloride environment. The interdependence of the different phenomena resulting from the laser treatment lead to a quite complex prioritization of their role on the sensibility of the 304L. However, it was demonstrated that the nature of the thermal oxide formed during the laser surface melting and the induced defects are first-order parameters for the initiation of pits. (author)

  4. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO{sub 2} laser thermal modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubovský, Ivan, E-mail: kubovsky@tuzvo.sk; Kačík, František

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Influences of CO{sub 2} laser on lime wood surface were studied. • With growth of the irradiation dose brightness decrease and increase of the total colour difference were observed. • Cellulose degradation and loss of hemicelluloses were observed. • Higher values at the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. • CO{sub 2} laser irradiation can be used as a new colouring method. - Abstract: We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO{sub 2} laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO{sub 2} laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm{sup −2}) lightness (ΔL{sup *}) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE{sup *}) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses.

  5. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  6. Surface hardening of steels by alloying under laser heating with subsequent chemical thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of laser alloying of carbon and low-chromium steels (20, 40, 45, 20Kh and 40Kh) with nitride-forming elements (V, Cr, Mo, Al) and subsequent nitriding is under consideration as a promising technology of enhancing wear resistance of steels. It is shown that the technology proposed permits increasing microhardness, wear resistance and favourable distribution of residual stresses in surface layers

  7. Laser-Shot-Induced Chemical Reactions inside Nanotubes: a TDDFT investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Rubio, Angel

    2011-03-01

    We present the application of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) on ultrafast laser pulse which induces dynamics in molecules encapsulated by a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond-stretch of an HCl molecule inside both C and BN nanotubes. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different. We also observed a radial motion of the nanotube and vacancies appear on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to tube axis. Furthermore, the disintegration of HCl molecules took place when their molecular axis tilted to tube axis. These simulations are important to analyze light-induced nanochemistry and manipulation of nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes. The computational scheme used in present work was a combination of the molecular dynamics and real-time propagation of electron wave functions under presence of strong optical field [2,3]. The energy conservation rule was checked to monitor the numerical stability.

  8. Fast synthesis of ZnO nanostructures by laser-induced chemical liquid deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZnO nanostructures were obtained by directly irradiating a small volume of a solution of precursor on a fused-quartz substrate using an unfocused continuous wave CO2 laser for 2-30 s at laser powers ranging from 20 to 40 W. The laser-based thermochemistry approach allows rapid non-isothermal heating and convection enhanced mass transport which opens new growth mechanisms for the rapid deposition of nanomaterials at predetermined locations on a substrate. The deposits consist of a variety of ZnO nanostructure morphologies, including aggregated nanoparticles, nanorods, faceted nanocrystals and nanowires. The samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy. They were found to exhibit an intense room-temperature photoluminescence, which is characterized by the presence of a strong UV peak around 390 nm and no visible emission. The relationship between the PL signal characteristics and specific ZnO nanostructures was investigated in order to point up optimal nanostructures for possible luminescent devices

  9. Exogenous bleaching evaluation on dentin using chemical activated technique compared with diode laser technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This in vitro study compared the results of different exogenous bleaching proceedings on dentin after treatment of enamel surface. Thirty human canine were hewn preserving the vestibular half of the crown and 3 mm of root, showing a vestibular-lingual thickness average of 3,5 mm, measuring in the third middle of the crown. Ali teeth were maintained in wet chamber during the experiment. Digital photographs were taken of the dentin surface at 3 experimental times (LI: initial record, L0: immediate pos-bleaching record and L 15: 15 days after bleaching). The teeth were divided into 3 experimental groups of 10 teeth in each. The Control Group did not receive any kind of treatment. The Laser Group received 2 session of laser bleaching, with 3 applications each, using 35% hydrogen peroxide, activated by diode laser during 30 seconds, by scanning the enamel surface from incisal edge to the top of the crown, from mesial to distal portion of the crown and circularly, each movement during 10 seconds. The following parameters being adopted: wavelength of 808 nm, power of 1,5 W and optic fiber with 600 μm (core). The Peroxide Group received 28 daily applications, during 4 hours each application, using 16% carbamide peroxide. The bleaching records were analysed using a computer, through RGBK (red, green , blue and black). The K averages (K=100% for black and K=0% for white) of the records for Control Group were: LI=50,1 %, L0=50,3% and L 15=50,6%. For Laser Group the K averages were LI=48,5%, L0=50,0% and L 15=47,7%. And for the Peroxide Group were LI=50,5%, L0=35,9% and L 15=37,3%. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference of the K between the Control Group and the Laser Group, as to LI, L0 and L 15. Only Peroxide Group showed significant statistical difference between LI with L0 and L 15 (0,1%), and L0 in comparison with L 15 did not show any difference. (author)

  10. Depth-resolved chemical mapping of rock coatings using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Implications for geochemical investigations on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, C.; Catalá-Espí, A.; Sobron, P.; Koujelev, A.; Léveillé, R.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is capable of identifying the presence of natural rock coatings, and we define LIBS signatures of complex multi-layered coatings. This is illustrated by detailed LIBS analysis, in Mars-simulated conditions, of a rock collected in the Svalbard Islands, and which is analogous to some altered Martian rocks. The sample is a basaltic rock with sub-mm Ca-Mg-Fe-Si rich mineral coatings. LIBS elemental analysis of several distinct regions on the surface of the rock demonstrates the variability of chemical compositions of the various coatings, which is confirmed by complementary scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Furthermore, the LIBS analysis as a function of the depth at different locations shows chemical variability, indicative of penetration through thin coatings of varying composition. Fine-scale, three-dimensional LIBS analysis is of interest for identifying and characterizing coatings on martian rocks, likely originating from aqueous processes, providing a rapid chemical composition as a function of the layers and further understanding of the formation of the deposits and on planetary evolution.

  11. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an innovative technique that has been used as a method for fast elemental analysis in real time. Conventional ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) LIBS has been applied to detect the elemental composition of different materials, including explosives, pharmaceutical drugs, and biological samples. The extension of conventional LIBS to the infrared region (˜1-12 mum) promises to provide additional information on molecular emission signatures due to rotational-vibrational transitions. In this research, a pulsed Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was focused onto several sodium compounds (NaCl, NaClO3, Na2CO3 and NaClO4) and potassium compounds (KCl, KClO3, K2CO3 and KClO4) to produce an intense plasma at the target surface. Several distinct infrared (IR) atomic emission signatures were observed from all sodium and potassium containing compounds. The atomic emission lines observed from the investigated samples matched assigned transitions of neutral sodium and potassium atoms published in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) atomic database. In addition to the intense atomic lines, the rst evidence of molecular LIBS emission structures were observed at ˜10.0 m in KClO3 and NaClO3 for the chlorate anion (ClO3 --1), at ˜6.7 to 8.0 mum in KNO3 and NaNO 3 for the nitrate anion (NO3--1 ), ˜8.0 to 10.0 mum in KClO4 and NaClO4 for perchlorate anion (ClO4--1 ), and ˜6.88 mum and 11.53 mum in Na2CO3 for the carbonate anion (CO3--1 ). The observed molecular emission showed strong correlation with the conventional Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) absorption spectra of the investigated samples. IR LIBS was also applied to determine the limit of detection (LOD) for the perchlorate anion in KClO4 using the 8.0 -11.0 mum IR-LIBS emission band. The calibration curve of ClO4 in KClO4 was constructed using peak and integrated emission intensities for known concentrations of mixed KClO4/NH4NO3 samples. The

  12. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of planetary rocks using a laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The context chemical analysis is of considerable importance in space research. High resolution in situ studies of planetary materials can yield important information on surface heterogeneity, basic grain mineralogy and chemical composition of surface and subsurface. In turn, these data are the basis for our understanding of the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation and alteration of planetary material [1] [2]. A highly heterogeneous sample of Allende meteorite, representative for extraterrestrial material, is investigated by LMS, a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for space research [3]. In the current setup a fs-laser ablation ion source is applied, allowing chemical analysis with lateral resolution of about 10-15 μm and sub-micrometre depth resolution [4]. The reflectron TOF mass analyser is used to measure elemental and isotopic composition of the sampled surface. The LMS instrument supports mass resolution 400 and dynamic range of 108 [5]. In the current studies with the fs-ablation ion source significant improvements in the detection efficiency of several metals e.g., Ni, Co, and non-metals e.g., Si, P, S and O, was achieved comparing to our previous setup [6]. Also the values of sensitivity coefficients for these elements are determined to be close to one, which resulted in the substantial improvements of the quantitative element analysis of the sample. Since the ablation crater depth is expected to be about 1 nm/laser shot also the possible changes of the main element or isotope distribution in depth can be analysed to assess their influence on the mineralogical analysis [7]. Several areas on an Allende sample were investigated and the chemical composition across the surface was determined from the mass spectrometric analysis. Also accurate isotope analysis could be conducted for most of main elements with sufficiently high signal to noise ratio. Correlation of elements was conducted and yielded mineralogical maps

  13. Laboratory feasibility study of fusion vessel inner wall chemical analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy was used for the determination of the atomic composition of multilayered samples simulating the tiles of plasma facing components in the next generation fusion machines. Highlights: ► Description and characterization of an LIBS set-up for diagnostics in fusion machines. ► Identification of atomic composition of multilayered tiles simulating plasma facing components. ► Qualitative applicability of the Calibration Free method for quantitative analysis. ► Feasibility of large scale application in the processes of control during the tiles fabrication. ► Feasibility of erosion monitoring during operation of fusion machines. - Abstract: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is nowadays a well established tool for qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses of surfaces, with micro-destructive characteristics and capabilities for stratigraphy. LIBS is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis thanks to the set up versatility facilitating non-invasive and remote analyses, as well as suitability to diagnostics in harsh environments. In this work, LIBS capabilities were used for the determination of the atomic composition of multilayered samples simulating the tiles of plasma facing components in the next generation fusion machines such as ITER. A new experimental setup was designed and realized in order to optimize the characteristics of an LIBS system working at low pressure and remotely, as it should be for an in situ system to be applied in monitoring the erosion and redeposition phenomena occurring on the inner walls of a fusion device. The effects of time delay and laser fluence on LIBS sensitivity at reduced pressure were examined, looking for operational conditions suitable to analytical applications. The quantitative analysis of some atomic species in the superficial layer has been carried out using a Calibration Free (CF) approach in the time

  14. Flavin mononucleotide biomolecular laser: longitudinal mode structure, polarization, and temporal characteristics as probes of local chemical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, José A; Eden, J Gary

    2016-05-16

    A detailed characterization of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) biomolecular laser, optically pumped in a stable resonator, is reported here. Photoexcitation of the molecule at 355 nm results in lasing over the ~566.5-573.5 nm spectral region, and the threshold pump energy density is measured to be 110 ± 10 µJ/mm2 for a 10 mM FMN/water solution. Over twenty longitudinal modes are observed when the cavity length L and the energy pump fluence Ep are 375 µm and 300 µJ/mm2, respectively. Partial substitution of glycerol for water as the solvent results in a factor of four reduction in the threshold pump energy fluence (to 2) and a quadrupling of the slope efficiency. This effect is attributed to the O2 - mediated photoconversion of FMN molecules in the triplet state to the singlet species. For pump intensities a factor of 2.5 above threshold, the laser pulse width is ~2 ns FWHM, and the output intensity decays exponentially with a photon lifetime of 1.7 ns. The addition of glycerol to a FMN/water solution also suppresses s-polarized emission (yielding P = 0.78 ± 0.08), presumably as a result of the inhibition of FMN rotational diffusion. The sensitivity of the spectral and optical properties of this and other biomolecular lasers to the chemical environment underscores the value of coherent emission as a biochemical or biomedical diagnostic tool, particularly insofar as molecule-molecule interactions are concerned. PMID:27409906

  15. Pulse Operation of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser by Pulsed Gas Discharge with the Assistance of Spark Pre-ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-Fu; YU Hai-Jun; DUO Li-Ping; JIN Yu-Qi; WANG Jian; SANG Feng-Ting; FANG Ben-Jie; WANG De-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    The continuous wavelength chemical oxygen-iodine laser can be turned into pulse operation mode in order to obtain high energy and high pulse power. We propose an approach to produce iodine atoms instantaneously by pulsed gas discharge with the assistance of spark pre-ionization to achieve the pulsed goal. The influence of spark pre-ionization on discharge homogeneity is discussed. Voltage-current characteristics are shown and discussed in existence of the pre-ionization capacitor and peaking capacitor. The spark pre-ionization and peaking capacitor are very helpful in obtaining a stable and homogeneous discharge. The lasing is achieved at the total pressure of 2.2-2.9 kPa and single pulse energy is up to 180m J, the corresponding specific output energy is 1.0 J/L.

  16. Data acquisition and control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi; Wang, Jian; Sang, Fengting; Kang, Yuanfu; Li, Liucheng; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    A user-friendly data acquisition and control system (DACS) for a pulsed chemical oxygen -iodine laser (PCOIL) has been developed. It is implemented by an industrial control computer,a PLC, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the valve and transmitter. The system is capable of handling 200 analogue/digital channels for performing various operations such as on-line acquisition, display, safety measures and control of various valves. These operations are controlled either by control switches configured on a PC while not running or by a pre-determined sequence or timings during the run. The system is capable of real-time acquisition and on-line estimation of important diagnostic parameters for optimization of a PCOIL. The DACS system has been programmed using software programmable logic controller (PLC). Using this DACS, more than 200 runs were given performed successfully.

  17. Physico-chemical studies of laser-induced plasmas for quantitative analysis of materials in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a multi-elemental analysis technique very well suited for analysis in hostile environments particularly in the nuclear industry. Quantitative measurements are frequently performed on liquid or solid samples but in some cases, atypical signal behaviors were observed in the LIBS experiment. To avoid or minimize any impact on measurement accuracy, it is necessary to improve the understanding of these phenomena. In the framework of a three-year PhD thesis, the objective was to study the chemical reactions occurring within laser-generated plasma in a LIBS analysis. Experiments on a model material (pure aluminum sample) highlighted the dynamics of molecular recombination according to different ambient gas. The temporal evolution of Al I atomic emission lines and molecular bands of AlO and AlN were studied. A collisional excitation effect was identified for a peculiar electronic energy level of aluminum in the case of a nitrogen atmosphere. This effect disappeared in air. The aluminum plasma was also imaged during its expansion under the different atmospheres in order to localize the areas in which the molecular recombination process takes place. Spectacular particle projections have been highlighted. (author)

  18. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of laser diode facets on nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzky, L. Y.; Becerra, D. L.; Saud Abbas, A.; Nedy, J.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Cohen, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a vertical (beam etching (CAIBE) in Cl2 chemistry that is suitable for forming laser diode (LD) facets on nonpolar and semipolar oriented III-nitride devices. The etch profiles were achieved with photoresist masks and optimized CAIBE chamber conditions including the platen tilt angle and Cl2 flow rate. Co-loaded studies showed similar etch rates of ˜60 nm min-1 for (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}),(20\\bar{2}1), and m-plane orientations. The etched surfaces of LD facets on these orientations are chemically dissimilar (Ga-rich versus N-rich), but were visually indistinguishable, thus confirming the negligible orientation dependence of the etch. Continuous-wave blue LDs were fabricated on the semipolar (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) plane to compare CAIBE and reactive ion etch (RIE) facet processes. The CAIBE process resulted in LDs with lower threshold current densities due to reduced parasitic mirror loss compared with the RIE process. The LER, degree of verticality, and model of the 1D vertical laser mode were used to calculate a maximum uncoated facet reflection of 17% (94% of the nominal) for the CAIBE facet. The results demonstrate the suitability of CAIBE for forming high quality facets for high performance nonpolar and semipolar III-N LDs.

  19. Pulsed Chemical Oxygen Iodine Lasers Excited by Pulse Gas Discharge with the Assistance of Surface Sliding Discharge Pre-ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous-wave chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) can be operated in a pulsed operation mode to obtain a higher peak power. The key point is to obtain a uniform and stable glow discharge in the mixture of singlet delta oxygen and iodide. We propose using an electrode system with the assistance of surface sliding pre-ionization to solve the problem of the stable glow discharge with a large aperture. The pre-ionization unit is symmetrically fixed on the plane of the cathode surface. A uniform and stable glow discharge is obtained in a mixture of iodide (such as CH3I) and nitrogen at the specific deposition energy of 4.5 J/L, pressure of 1.99–3.32 kPa, aperture size of 11 cm × 10 cm. The electrode system is applied in a pulsed COIL. Laser energy up to 4.4 J is obtained and the specific energy output is 2 J/L. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  20. Morphology, thermoelectric properties and wet-chemical doping of laser-sintered germanium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous, highly doped semiconductors are potential candidates for thermoelectric energy conversion elements. We report on the fabrication of thin films of Ge via short-pulse laser-sintering of Ge nanoparticles (NPs) in vacuum and study the macroporous morphology of the samples by secondary electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient of undoped Ge is discussed in conjunction with the formation of a defect band near the valence band. We further introduce a versatile method of doping the resulting films with a variety of common dopant elements in group-IV semiconductors by using a liquid containing the dopant atoms. This method is fully compatible with laser-direct writing and suited to fabricate small scale thermoelectric generators. The incorporation of the dopants is verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and their electrical activation is studied by conductivity and thermopower measurements. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Similarity between the mechanisms of soft-laser radiation and chemical adaptogen action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leonid L.; Pavlova, Rimma N.; Murzin, Alexander G.; Boiko, Vladimir A.; Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Soms, Leonid N.

    1993-07-01

    The comparative studies of SLR effects vs chemical adaptogens effects on animals poisoned by industrial poisons and SLR as compared to traditional radio-protectors effects on gamma- irradiated animals were carried out. Obtained results show the stressed adaptogenous effect of SLR.

  2. Characterization of the onset asphaltenes by focused-beam laser reflectance : a tool for chemical additives screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marugan, J.; Calles, J.A.; Dufour, J.; Gimenez-Aguirre, R. [Univ. Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain). URJC-Repsol-YPF Flow Assurance Laboratory, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Technology; Pena, J.L. [Univ. Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain). URJC-Repsol-YPF Flow Assurance Laboratory, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Technology; Centro Tecnologico Repsol-YPF, Madrid (Spain); Merino-Garcia, D. [Centro Tecnologico Repsol-YPF, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    The deposition of asphaltenes in crude oil can cause flow assurance problems. In this study, a laser reflectance technique known as Focused-Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM) was used to study the kinetics of asphaltenes aggregation near onset. The FBRM tool provides a very sensitive way of determining the onset n-alkane/oil mass ratio. The influence of the n-alkane solvent and temperature on the solvent/oil threshold ratio of 2 South American crude oils with 21 and 27 API were investigated. The FBRM technique provided kinetic information about the evolution with time of the size distribution of asphaltenes flocs. Additional FBRM experiments of asphaltene redissolution and reprecipitation were also performed for a comparative evaluation, beginning with the solids recovered following the IP- 143 standard, which were fractionated into 4 different polarity groups using n-pentane - chloroform mixtures. The objective was to find correlations between polarity of the asphaltenes and its instability near the onset. Metal content was determined through atomic emission spectroscopy. The solids were characterized by 1H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopy, and vapour-pressure osmometry in order to determine the chemical and structural features of the most unstable asphaltenes. The FBRM probe was used to screen commercial chemical additives to prevent asphaltenes deposits. This technique was shown to be a very powerful tool for examining the influence of additives on the aggregation kinetics and the particle size distribution of the first asphaltene solids.

  3. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  4. Chemical kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    IR absorption using tunable diode laser spectroscopy provides a sensitive and quantitative detection method for laboratory kinetic studies of atmospheric trace gases. Improvements in multipass cell design, real time signal processing, and computer controlled data acquisition and analysis have extended the applicability of the technique. We have developed several optical systems using off-axis resonator mirror designs which maximize path length while minimizing both the sample volume and the interference fringes inherent in conventional 'White' cells. Computerized signal processing using rapid scan (300 kHz), sweep integration with 100 percent duty cycle allows substantial noise reduction while retaining the advantages of using direct absorption for absolute absorbance measurements and simultaneous detection of multiple species. Peak heights and areas are determined by curve fitting using nonlinear least square methods. We have applied these techniques to measurements of: (1) heterogeneous uptake chemistry of atmospheric trace gases (HCl, H2O2, and N2O5) on aqueous and sulfuric acid droplets; (2) vapor pressure measurements of nitric acid and water over prototypical stratospheric aerosol (nitric acid trihydrate) surfaces; and (3) discharge flow tube kinetic studies of the HO2 radical using isotopic labeling for product channel and mechanistic analysis. Results from each of these areas demonstrate the versatility of TDL absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric chemistry applications.

  5. Chemical Production by Pulse-Laser Irradiation on Ices: Simulation of Impact Shock-Induced Chemistry on Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nna-Mvondo, Delphine; Khare, B. N.; Ishihara, T.; McKay, C. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    2007-12-01

    Several icy satellites of the outer planets show a variety of impact cratering features. The effect of impact by extraterrestrial objects into the surface is commonly related to physical changes. Most of the research applied to impacts on ices has been developed to study and understand the cratering formation process and their physical, geophysical characteristics. Chemical changes and synthesis occurring on icy planetary surfaces are generally explained by the influence of UV photons and high-energy charged particles on ices. Nonetheless, impact process onto ices could be a source of local or global endogenic process and could be especially advantageous as an efficient energy source for driving interesting chemistry. Upon impact on icy surface, the kinetic energy of the impacting body is transferred to the ground liberating a great deal of stress energy which could initiate in situ aqueous melts of the ice, hydrolysis and other chemical reactions in the fracture zone beneath the crater. Here we present a novel experimental method to study the chemistry in planetary ices induced by impact shocks. Impact shocks were simulated in laboratory using a powerful pulsed laser (Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, 1064 nm). We have irradiated at 77K icy mixtures of H2O / CO2, H2O / Na2CO3, H2O / CH3OH and finally H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4. GC-MS and FTIR analyses show that hydrogen peroxide, carbon monoxide and methanol are formed in irradiated H2O / CO2 ices. Ice containing sodium carbonate generates under simulated impact CO and CO2 which are also produced in impacted H2O / CH3OH and H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 ices. But, in both latter icy mixtures, methane and more complex molecules are also formed. We have detected acetone, methyl formate and dimethyl formal. Adding ammonium sulfate to ice containing methanol induces the production of N2O, HCN and CH3CN.

  6. High Temperature Nanocomposites For Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and In-Space Fabrication by Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Webb, N. D.; Espinoza, M.; Cook, S.; Houts, M.; Kim, T.

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is an indispensable technology for the manned exploration of the solar system. By using Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (HP-LCVD), the authors propose to design and build a promising next-generation fuel element composed of uranium carbide UC embedded in a latticed matrix of highly refractory Ta4HfC5 for an NTP rocket capable of sustaining temperatures up to 4000 K, enabling an Isp of up to 1250 s. Furthermore, HP-LCVD technology can also be harnessed to enable 3D rapid prototyping of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics and composites, opening up the possibility of in-space fabrication of components, replacement parts, difficult-to-launch solar sails and panels and a variety of other space structures. Additionally, rapid prototyping with HP-LCVD makes a feasible "live off the land" strategy of interplanetary and interstellar exploration ­ the precursors commonly used in the technology are found, often in abundance, on other solar system bodies either as readily harvestable gas (e.g. methane) or as a raw material that could be converted into a suitable precursor (e.g. iron oxide into ferrocene on Mars).

  7. Total microcystins analysis in water using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Fayad, Paul B; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-04-11

    A new approach for the analysis of the cyanobacterial microcystins (MCs) in environmental water matrices has been developed. It offers a cost efficient alternative method for the fast quantification of total MCs using mass spectrometry. This approach permits the quantification of total MCs concentrations without requiring any derivatization or the use of a suite of MCs standards. The oxidation product 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) was formed through a Lemieux oxidation and represented the total concentration of free and bound MCs in water samples. MMPB was analyzed using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). LDTD is a robust and reliable sample introduction method with ultra-fast analysis time (0.999). Limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.9 μg L(-1), respectively. These values are comparable with the WHO (World Health Organization) guideline of 1 μg L(-1) for total microcystin-LR congener in drinking water. Accuracy and interday/intraday variation coefficients were below 15%. Matrix effect was determined with a recovery of 91%, showing no significant signal suppression. This work demonstrates the use of the LDTD-APCI-MS/MS interface for the screening, detection and quantification of total MCs in complex environmental matrices.

  8. First-Principles Simulations of Chemical Reactions in an HCl Molecule Embedded inside a C or BN Nanotube Induced by Ultrafast Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong; Rubio, Angel

    2010-12-01

    We show by first-principles simulations that ultrafast laser pulses induce different chemical reactions in a molecule trapped inside a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond stretch of an encapsulated HCl molecule in semiconducting carbon nanotube or in a BN nanotube. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different: either complete disintegration or rebonding of the HCl molecule. Radial motion of the nanotube is always observed and a vacancy appears on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to the tube axis. Those results are important to analyze confined nanochemistry and to manipulate molecules and nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes.

  9. Low-intensity laser coupled with photosensitizer to reduce bacteria in root canals compared to chemical control; Laser em baixa intensidade associado a fotosensibilizador para reducao bacteriana intracanal comparado ao controle quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcez Segundo, Aguinaldo Silva

    2002-07-01

    The photodynamic therapy is a process in which a dye is associate with an appropriate wavelength of light and this dye goes to an excited state. The excited reacts with oxygen to form the highly reactive compound singlet oxygen, and this compound can kill bacteria and tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal reduction in root canal contaminated with E. Faecalis. Thirty teeth with their root canals prepared were contaminated with E. faecalis. The teeth have received the chemical substance sodium hypochlorite for 30 minutes; ten teeth have received the azulene dye paste for 5 minutes and have been irradiated with a diode laser, output power 10 mW and {lambda}= 685 nm for 3 minutes. Ten teeth have not received treatment (control group). The bacterial reduction was significantly higher for laser group when compared to chemical and control groups. These results indicate photodynamic therapy as an effective method to kill bacteria. (author)

  10. Laser-induced chemical reactions. [H + H/sub 2/; F + H/sub 2/; H + HF; Cl + H/sub 2/; H + HCl; H + LiF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orel, A.E.

    1980-12-01

    A classical model for the interaction of laser radiation with a molecular system is derived. This model is used to study the enhancement of a chemical reaction via a collision induced absorption. It was found that an infrared laser will in general enhance the rate of a chemical reaction, even if the reactants are infrared inactive. Results for an illustrative analytically solvable model are presented, as well as results from classical trajectory studies on a number of systems. The collision induced absorption spectrum in these systems can be written as the Fourier transform of a particular dipole correlation function. This is used to obtain the collision induced absorption spectrum for a state-selected, mono-energetic reactive collision system. Examples treated are a one-dimensional barrier problem, reactive and nonreactive collisions of H + H/sub 2/, and a modified H + H/sub 2/ potential energy surface which leads to a collision intermediate. An extension of the classical model to treat laser-induced electronically nonadiabatic collision processes is constructed. The model treats all degrees of freedom, molecular, electronic and radiation, in a dynamically consistent framework within classical mechanics. Application is made to several systems. Several interesting phenomena are discovered including a Franck-Condon-like effect causing maxima in the reaction probability at energies much below the classical threshold, laser de-enhancement of chemical reactions and an isotope effect. In order to assess the validity of the classical model for electronically nonadiabatic process (without a laser field), a model problem involving energy transfer in a collinear atom-diatom system is studied, and the results compared to the available quantum mechanical calculation. The calculations are in qualitative agreement.

  11. Selective Laser Sintering And Melting Of Pristine Titanium And Titanium Ti6Al4V Alloy Powders And Selection Of Chemical Environment For Etching Of Such Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzański L.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigations described in this article is to present a selective laser sintering and melting technology to fabricate metallic scaffolds made of pristine titanium and titanium Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Titanium scaffolds with different properties and structure were manufactured with this technique using appropriate conditions, notably laser power and laser beam size. The purpose of such elements is to replace the missing pieces of bones, mainly cranial and facial bones in the implantation treatment process. All the samples for the investigations were designed in CAD/CAM (3D MARCARM ENGINEERING AutoFab (Software for Manufacturing Applications software suitably integrated with an SLS/SLM system. Cube-shaped test samples dimensioned 10×10×10 mm were designed for the investigations using a hexagon-shaped base cell. The so designed 3D models were transferred to the machine software and the actual rapid manufacturing process was commenced. The samples produced according to the laser sintering technology were subjected to chemical processing consisting of etching the scaffolds’ surface in different chemical mediums. Etching was carried out to remove the loosely bound powder from the surface of scaffolds, which might detach from their surface during implantation treatment and travel elsewhere in an organism. The scaffolds created were subjected to micro- and spectroscopic examinations

  12. Development of Laser Warning and Detection Technology for Chemical/Biological Agents%生化战剂激光侦检技术的发展概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴慧云; 孙振海; 黄志松; 生甡; 王华; 徐卸古

    2013-01-01

    Application of chemical/biological agents in terrorism and unmilitary fields induce serious impact to the public safety. Principles of laser warning and detection technology for chemical/biological agents based on Mie scattering signals, Rayleigh scattering signals, Raman scattering signals, absorption signals and laser induced fluorescence signals are described. The key technologies in the laser warning and detection system are analyzed, the laser warning and detection technology development profiles in the United States, Russia, German and France are introduced.%生化战剂在恐怖主义活动和非军事领域的非法使用对社会公共安全造成了严重的威胁.分析了基于米氏散射、瑞利散射、拉曼散射、吸收光谱和诱导荧光光谱信号的生化战剂激光侦察报警和快速检测技术的基本原理,说明了生化战剂激光侦检系统的关键技术,回顾了美、俄、德、法等国生化战剂激光侦检技术的发展情况.

  13. A Passively Mode-Locked Diode-End-Pumped Nd:YAG Laser with a Semiconductor Saturable Absorber Mirror Grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇刚; 马骁宇; 李春勇; 张治国; 张丙元; 张志刚

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental results of a mode-locked diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror(SESAM)from which we achieved a 10ps pulse duration at 150MHz repetition rate.The SESAM was grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition at low temperature.The recovery time was measured to be 0.5 ps,indicating the potential pulse compression to sub-picoseconds.

  14. Lasers '92; Proceedings of the International Conference on Lasers and Applications, 15th, Houston, TX, Dec. 7-10, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charles P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: x-ray lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, high power lasers, blue-green lasers, dye lasers, solid state lasers, semiconductor lasers, gas and discharge lasers, carbon dioxide lasers, ultrafast phenomena, nonlinear optics, quantum optics, dynamic gratings and wave mixing, laser radar, lasers in medicine, optical filters and laser communication, optical techniques and instruments, laser material interaction, and industrial and manufacturing applications.

  15. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS, in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 105 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for OH and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  16. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  17. Laser thermal effect on silicon nitride ceramic based on thermo-chemical reaction with temperature-dependent thermo-physical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. F.; Wang, W. J.; Mei, X. S.; Wang, K. D.; Zhao, W. Q.; Li, T. Q.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a two-dimensional thermo-chemical reaction model with temperature-dependent thermo-physical parameters on Si3N4 with 10 ns laser was developed to investigate the ablated size, volume and surface morphology after single pulse. For model parameters, thermal conductivity and heat capacity of β-Si3N4 were obtained from first-principles calculations. Thermal-chemical reaction rate was fitted by collision theory, and then, reaction element length was deduced using the relationship between reaction rate and temperature distribution. Furthermore, plasma absorption related to energy loss was approximated as a function of electron concentration in Si3N4. It turned out that theoretical ablated volume and radius increased and then remained constant with increasing laser energy, and the maximum ablated depth was not in the center of the ablated zone. Moreover, the surface maximum temperature of Si3N4 was verified to be above 3000 K within pulse duration, and it was much higher than its thermal decomposition temperature of 1800 K, which indicated that Si3N4 was not ablated directly above the thermal decomposition temperature. Meanwhile, the single pulse ablation of Si3N4 was performed at different powers using a TEM00 10 ns pulse Nd:YAG laser to validate the model. The model showed a satisfactory consistence between the experimental data and numerical predictions, presenting a new modeling technology that may significantly increase the accuracy of the predicated results for laser ablation of materials undergoing thermo-chemical reactions.

  18. RILIS laser room

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  19. RILIS laser room HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  20. Performance Improvement of Microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si Thin Film Solar Cells by Using Laser-Assisted Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si thin film solar cells treated with hydrogen plasma were fabricated at low temperature using a CO2 laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (LAPECVD system. According to the micro-Raman results, the i-Si films shifted from 482 cm−1 to 512 cm−1 as the assisting laser power increased from 0 W to 80 W, which indicated a gradual transformation from amorphous to crystalline Si. From X-ray diffraction (XRD results, the microcrystalline i-Si films with (111, (220, and (311 diffraction were obtained. Compared with the Si-based thin film solar cells deposited without laser assistance, the short-circuit current density and the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells with assisting laser power of 80 W were improved from 14.38 mA/cm2 to 18.16 mA/cm2 and from 6.89% to 8.58%, respectively.

  1. AN H2 (D2)/F2 CHEMICAL LASER INITIATED WITH A NOVEL TEFLON SURFACE SPARK UV FLASH

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, K.; Sato, Y; Lee, C; Obara, M.; Fujioka, T.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics and the optimization parameters of a newly developed HF (DF) laser initiated by a novel surface spark UV flash using Teflon are presented. We have obtained an output energy of 0.65 J/pulse (11 J/1, 1.6 µsec FWHM) for HF laser, 0.25 J/pulse (4.2 J/1, 2.0 µsec FWHM) for DF laser with the improved maintenance of the light source. An intense short-pulse surface spark UV source driven by a coaxial Marx generator is realized experimentally in order to improve the pow...

  2. The role of physical and chemical properties of Pd nanostructured materials immobilized on inorganic carriers on ion formation in atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-06-01

    Fundamental parameters influencing the ion-producing efficiency of palladium nanostructures (nanoparticles [Pd-NP], nanoflowers, nanofilms) during laser irradiation were studied in this paper. The nanostructures were immobilized on the surface of different solid inorganic carrier materials (porous and mono-crystalline silicon, anodic porous aluminum oxide, glass and polished steel) by using classical galvanic deposition, electroless local deposition and sputtering. It was the goal of this study to investigate the influence of both the nanoparticular layer as well as the carrier material on ion production for selected analyte molecules. Our experiments demonstrated that the dimensions of the synthesized nanostructures, the thickness of the active layers, surface disorders, thermal conductivity and physically or chemically adsorbed water influenced signal intensities of analyte ions during surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) while no effects such as plasmon resonance, photoelectric effect or catalytic activity were expected to occur. Excellent LDI abilities were seen for Pd-NPs immobilized on steel, while Pd nanoflowers on porous silicon exhibited several disadvantages; viz, strong memory effects, dependency of the analytical signal on amount of physically and chemically adsorbed water inside porous carrier, reduced SALDI activity from unstable connections between Pd and semiconductor material, decrease of the melting point of pure silicon after Pd immobilization and resulting strong laser ablation of metal/semiconductor complex, as well as significantly changed surface morphology after laser irradiation. The analytical performance of Pd-NP/steel was further improved by applying a hydrophobic coating to the steel surface before galvanic deposition. This procedure increased the distance between Pd-NPs, thus reducing thermal stress upon LDI; it simultaneously decreased spot sizes of deposited sample solutions. PMID:24913399

  3. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface. (paper)

  4. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuland, M. B.; Grimaudo, V.; Mezger, K.; Moreno-García, P.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2016-03-01

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface.

  5. Chemical and physical analysis on hard tissues after irradiation with short pulse Nd:YAG laser; Alteracoes quimicas e fisicas de tecidos duros irradiados por laser de neodimio chaveado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Andrea Antunes

    2003-07-01

    This work reports on a study that was designed to investigate chemical, physical and morphological alterations in the dental enamel surface. The influence of application of laser in enamel surface by microscopic technical, X-ray fluorescence for chemical analysis, physical property as well as hardness and thermal analysis with Nd:YAG laser is also pointed out. A prototype of Nd:YAG (Q-switched) laser developed at the Center of Lasers and Applications - Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, aiming applications in the Medical Sciences that typical wavelength of 1.064 nm was used. The modifications in human dental enamel chemical composition for major and trace elements are here outlined. The accuracy of procedures was performed by analysis of natural hydroxyapatite as standard reference material. The identification and quantification of the chemical elements presented in the dental tissue samples were performed trough EDS, XRF and INAA. We determined the rate Calcium/Phosphorus (Ca/P) for different techniques. We performed an analysis in different regions of the surface and for different areas allowing a description of the chemical change in the total area of the specimen and the assessment of the compositional homogeneity of the each specimen. A comparison between XRF and INAA is presented. Based on morphological analysis of the irradiated surfaces with short pulse Nd:YAG laser we determined the area surrounded by the irradiation for the parameters for this thesis, and this technique allowed us to visualize the regions of fusion and re-solidification. The energy densities ranged from 10 J/cm{sup 2} to 40 J/cm{sup 2}, with pulse width of 6, 10 e 200 ns, and repetition rates of 5 and 7 Hz. In this thesis, FTIR-spectroscopy is used to analyze powder of mineralized tissue as well as enamel, dentine, root and cementum for human and bovine teeth after irradiation with short-pulse Nd:YAG laser. Characteristic spectra were obtained for the proteins components and

  6. Direct Chemical Analysis of Solids by Laser Ablation in an Ion-Storage Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G L; Grant, P M; Andresen, B D; Russo, R E

    2003-09-29

    A laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer system is described for the direct analysis of solids, particles, and fibers. The system uses a quadrupole ion trap operated in an ion-storage (IS) mode, coupled with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The sample is inserted radially into the ring electrode and an imaging system allows direct viewing and selected analysis of the sample. Measurements identified trace contaminants of Ag, Sn, and Sb in a Pb target with single laser-shot experiments. Resolution (m/{micro}m) of 1500 and detection limits of approximately 10 pg have been achieved with a single laser pulse. The system configuration and related operating principles for accurately measuring low concentrations of isotopes are described.

  7. The development of laser chemical vapor deposition and focused ion beam methods for prototype integrated circuit modification

    OpenAIRE

    Remes, J. (Jukka)

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this work the LCVD of copper and nickel from the precursor gases Cu(hfac)tmvs and Ni(CO)4 has been investigated. The in-house constructed LCVD system and processes and the practical utilisation of these in prototype integrated circuit edit work are described. The investigated process parameters include laser power, laser scan speed, precursor partial pressure and the effect of H2 and He carrier gases. The deposited metal conductor lines have been examined by LIMA, AFM, FIB seco...

  8. In vitro study of morphological and chemical modification threshold of bovine dental enamel irradiated by the holmium laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Ho:YLF laser effects on the dental enamel surface with regards to its morphology, thermal variations during its irradiation in the pulp chamber and its increased resistance to demineralization through quantitative analysis of calcium and phosphorous atoms reactive concentrations in samples. Twenty samples of bovine enamel were used and divided in four groups: control - acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) application followed by demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (100 J/cm2) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (350 J/cm2) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid: and irradiation with Ho:YLF laser ( 450 J/cm2) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid. Ali samples were quantified according to their calcium and phosphorous atoms relative concentrations before and after the treatments above. X-Ray fluorescence spectrochemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. It was observed an increase on the calcium and phosphorous atoms concentration ratio and therefore the enamel demineralization reduction as a result of the lactic acid treatment in the samples irradiated with the holmium laser followed by the APF application. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this study for clinical purposes, morphological changes caused by the holmium laser irradiation were analyzed. Such modifications were characterized by melted and re-solidified regions of the enamel with consequent changes on its permeability and solubility. Temperature changes of ten human pre-molars teeth irradiated with 350 J/cm2 and 450 J/cm2 were also monitored in the pulp chamber in real time. Temperature increases over 4,20 C did not occur. The results obtained from this study along with the results from previous researches developed at 'Center for

  9. Chemical effects of 100 keV primary electrons in an e-beam sustained carbon dioxide laser discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissociation of carbon dioxide and the reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen caused by a high-energy (approx 100 kev) electron beam in a typical carbon dioxide laser gas mixture has been observed. The variation of reaction rates with electron energy and current, interelectrode spacing, and gas composition has been studied. The rates of both processes suggest that the reactions are caused by unthermalized secondary electrons. The conditions were investigated under which the carbon monoxide oxidation reaction could be used to offset dissociation in a laser and thus prolong its sealed life. For a secondary to primary current ratio of one hundred this condition should be satisfied for any practical device. A sealed run was carried out which demonstrated that dissociation by secondary electrons could be offset by the oxidation of carbon monoxide by the primary electrons. (author)

  10. Development of a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for in situ multi-element chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Blair; Takahashi, Tomoko; Sato, Takumi; Sakka, Tetsuo; Tamura, Ayaka; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ohki, Toshihiko; Ohki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy is emerging as a technique that can expand the envelope of modern oceanographic sensors. The selectivity of spectroscopic techniques enables a single instrument to measure multiple components of the marine environment and can form the basis for versatile tools to perform in situ geochemical analysis. We have developed a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (ChemiCam) and successfully deployed the instrument from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to perform in situ multi-element analysis of both seawater and mineral deposits at depths of over 1000 m. The instrument consists of a long-nanosecond duration pulse-laser, a spectrometer and a high-speed camera. Power supply, instrument control and signal telemetry are provided through a ROV tether. The instrument has two modes of operation. In the first mode, the laser is focused directly into seawater and spectroscopic measurements of seawater composition are performed. In the second mode, a fiber-optic cable assembly is used to make spectroscopic measurements of mineral deposits. In this mode the laser is fired through a 4 m long fiber-optic cable and is focused onto the target's surface using an optical head and a linear stage that can be held by a ROV manipulator. In this paper, we describe the instrument and the methods developed to process its measurements. Exemplary measurements of both seawater and mineral deposits made during deployments of the device at an active hydrothermal vent field in the Okinawa trough are presented. Through integration with platforms such as underwater vehicles, drilling systems and subsea observatories, it is hoped that this technology can contribute to more efficient scientific surveys of the deep-sea environment.

  11. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagoev, K., E-mail: kblagoev@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grozeva, M., E-mail: margo@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Malcheva, G., E-mail: bobcheva@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Neykova, S., E-mail: sevdalinaneikova@abv.bg [National Institute of Archaeology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2 Saborna, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893–972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts. - Highlights: ► LIBS, XRF and XRD analyses of medieval white-clay ceramic tiles fragments are done. ► Different elements and phases, presented in the ceramics fragments were determined. ► Differences in the tiles' raw material mineral composition are found. ► Information of the tiles' production process and the raw clay deposits is obtained.

  12. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements.

  13. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements. PMID:27150429

  14. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  15. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  16. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting–optical trapping–laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC–OT–LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium. - Highlights: • Detection of single nanoparticles by OC–OT–LIBS has been described for the first time. • An absolute mass quantity of 17 fg (single particle 100-nm sized Al2O3) was detected. • Results confirm the extreme sensitivity of LIBS for single nanoparticle analysis. • The LOD for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium. • A photon budget was performed in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach

  17. Evaluation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for determination of the chemical composition of copper concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łazarek, Łukasz, E-mail: lukasz.lazarek@pwr.wroc.pl [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Drzymała, Jan [Faculty of Geoengineering, Mining and Geology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Abramski, Krzysztof M. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), like many other spectroscopic techniques, is a comparative method. Typically, in qualitative analysis, synthetic certified standard with a well-known elemental composition is used to calibrate the system. Nevertheless, in all laser-induced techniques, such calibration can affect the accuracy through differences in the overall composition of the chosen standard. There are also some intermediate factors, which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure and thermal conductivity. In this work the calibration performed for the LIBS technique utilizes pellets made directly from the tested materials (old well-characterized samples). This choice produces a considerable improvement in the accuracy of the method. This technique was adopted for the determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates, standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for three elements: silver, cobalt and vanadium. We also proposed a method of post-processing the measurement data to minimize matrix effects and permit reliable analysis. It has been shown that the described technique can be used in qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates. It was noted that the final validation of such methodology is limited mainly by the accuracy of the characterization of the standards. - Highlights: • A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique is introduced for composition monitoring in industrial copper concentrates. • Calibration samples consisted of pellets produced from the tested materials. • The proposed method of post-processing significantly minimizes matrix effects. • The possible uses of this technique are limited mainly by accurate characterization of the standard samples.

  18. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  19. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  20. Comparison of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with a chemical vapour deposition bur and conventional techniques for cavity preparation: a microleakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Yıldırım, Zeren; Antonson, Sibel A; Kilinc, Evren; Koch, Daniele; Antonson, Donald E; Dayangaç, Berrin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) bur cavity preparation with conventional preparation methods including a diamond bur and a carbide bur on the microleakage with two different adhesive systems. A total of 40 extracted human premolars were randomly assigned to four experimental groups according to the cavity preparation technique: group I diamond bur (Diatech); group II carbide bur (Diatech); group III Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase Millennium II); and group IV CVD bur (CVDentUS). Using the different preparation techniques, Class V standardized preparations were performed on the buccal and lingual surfaces with gingival margins on the dentin and occlusal margins on the enamel. Each preparation group was randomly assigned to two subgroups (five teeth, ten preparations) according to the type of adhesive: an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), and a single-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE One). All preparations were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin in a single increment. Following thermocycling (×500; 5-55°C), the teeth were immersed in basic fuchsin and sectioned in the orovestibular direction. Dye penetration was evaluated under a light microscope by two blinded examiners. Data were statistically analysed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (p0.05). Comparing the enamel and dentin leakage scores within each group, no statistically significant differences were found (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser cavity preparation did not differ from preparation with CVD, diamond or carbide bur in terms of microleakage with the different adhesive systems.

  1. Sub-micron period grating structures in Ta2O5 thin oxide films patterned using UV laser post-exposure chemically assisted selective etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-resolution and low-damage method for patterning relief structures in thin Ta2O5 films by chemically assisted UV laser selective etching is presented. The method is based on the initial exposure of the Ta2O5 films to pulsed UV radiation (quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm) at fluences below the ablation threshold, for the creation of volume damage in the exposed areas. Subsequent immersion of the exposed sample in a KOH solution results in selective etching of the UV-exposed areas, developing relief structures of high quality. Interferometric exposure was used for the patterning of such gratings with periods of the order of 500 nm in films with a thickness of 100 and 500 nm. The behaviour of the patterning process is studied using diffraction efficiency measurements and AFM scans. Diffraction efficiency increases by a factor of ∼63, compared to the undeveloped structure, were obtained for gratings exposed with 1000 pulses of 30 mJ/cm2 energy density, which were developed in a KOH solution. The etching method presented is being applied to the fabrication of gratings in optical waveguides

  2. The influence of multivariate analysis methods and target grain size on the accuracy of remote quantitative chemical analysis of rocks using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Morris, Richard V.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Bell, James F.; Wiens, Roger C.; Humphries, Seth D.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Graff, Trevor G.; McInroy, Rhonda

    2011-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to quantitatively analyze 195 rock slab samples with known bulk chemical compositions, 90 pressed-powder samples derived from a subset of those rocks, and 31 pressed-powder geostandards under conditions that simulate the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Rover (MSL), Curiosity. The low-volatile (training, validation, and test sets. The LIBS spectra and chemical compositions of the training set were used with three multivariate methods to predict the chemical compositions of the test set. The methods were partial least squares (PLS), multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks (MLP ANNs) and cascade correlation (CC) ANNs. Both the full LIBS spectrum and the intensity at five pre-selected spectral channels per major element (feature selection) were used as input data for the multivariate calculations. The training spectra were supplied to the algorithms without averaging ( i.e. five spectra per target) and with averaging ( i.e. all spectra from the same target averaged and treated as one spectrum). In most cases neural networks did not perform better than PLS for our samples. PLS2 without spectral averaging outperformed all other procedures on the basis of lowest quadrature root mean squared error (RMSE) for both the full test set and the igneous rocks test set. The RMSE for PLS2 using the igneous rock slab test set is: 3.07 wt.% SiO 2, 0.87 wt.% TiO 2, 2.36 wt.% Al 2O 3, 2.20 wt.% Fe 2O 3, 0.08 wt.% MnO, 1.74 wt.% MgO, 1.14 wt.% CaO, 0.85 wt.% Na 2O, 0.81 wt.% K 2O. PLS1 with feature selection and averaging had a higher quadrature RMSE than PLS2, but merits further investigation as a method of reducing data volume and computation time and potentially improving prediction accuracy, particularly for samples that differ significantly from the training set. Precision and accuracy were influenced by the ratio of laser beam diameter (˜490 μm) to grain size, with coarse-grained rocks often

  3. Chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and explosives in fingermarks using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Chemical analysis of latent fingermarks, "touch chemistry," has the potential of providing intelligence or forensically relevant information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used as an analytical platform for obtaining mass spectra and chemical images of target drugs and explosives in fingermark residues following conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix processing. There were two main purposes of this research: (1) develop effective laboratory methods for detecting drugs and explosives in fingermark residues and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting drugs and explosives after casual contact with pills, powders, and residues. Further, synthetic latent print reference pads were evaluated as mimics of natural fingermark residue to determine if the pads could be used for method development and quality control. The results suggest that artificial amino acid and sebaceous oil residue pads are not suitable to adequately simulate natural fingermark chemistry for MALDI/TOF MS analysis. However, the pads were useful for designing experiments and setting instrumental parameters. Based on the natural fingermark residue experiments, handling whole or broken pills did not transfer sufficient quantities of drugs to allow for definitive detection. Transferring drugs or explosives in the form of powders and residues was successful for preparing analytes for detection after contact with fingers and deposition of fingermark residue. One downfall to handling powders was that the analyte particles were easily spread beyond the original fingermark during development. Analyte particles were confined in the original fingermark when using transfer residues. The MALDI/TOF MS was able to detect procaine, pseudoephedrine, TNT, and RDX from contact residue under laboratory conditions with the integration of conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix. MALDI/TOF MS is a nondestructive

  4. Calcium phosphate thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition: Physico-chemical characterization and in vitro cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)]. E-mail: mihailes@ifin.nipne.ro; Torricelli, P. [Servizio di Chirurgia Sperimentale-Istituto di Ricerca Codivilla PuttiIOR, Bologna (Italy); Bigi, A. [Department of Chemistry ' G. Ciamician' , University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Mayer, I. [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Iliescu, M. [Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Werckmann, J. [Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Socol, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Miroiu, F. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Cuisinier, F. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, 67085 Strasbourg (France); Elkaim, R. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, 67085 Strasbourg (France); Hildebrand, G. [IBA e.V., Department of Biomaterials, Rosenhof, D-37308 Heilbad Heiligenstadt (Germany)

    2005-07-30

    We review the progress made by us using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of two bioactive calcium phosphates: octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and Mn doped carbonated hydroxyapatite (Mn-CHA). Coatings of these materials well suited for biomimetic medical prostheses and pivots were synthesized on titanium substrates with a pulsed KrF* UV laser source. The best deposition conditions for Mn-CHA thin films were 13 Pa O{sub 2}, 400 deg. C with post heat treatment of 6 h in air enriched with water vapours. The coatings are stoichiometric and crystalline. For OCP, deposition at 150 deg. C in 50 Pa water vapor atmosphere, post treated by 6 h annealing in hot flux of water vapours, resulted in stoichiometric, but poorly-crystallized films. Degradation tests show different behavior for the OCP and Mn-CHA coatings. In vitro cell growth shows excellent adherence and biocompatibility of osteoblasts and fibroblasts in both OCP and Mn-CHA coatings. Human osteoblasts display normal proliferation and viability, and good differentiation behaviour.

  5. Coupled simulation of chemical lasers based on intracavity partially coherent light model and 3D CFD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kenan; Huai, Ying; Jia, Shuqin; Jin, Yuqi

    2011-12-19

    Coupled simulation based on intracavity partially coherent light model and 3D CFD model is firstly achieved in this paper. The dynamic equation of partially coherent intracavity field is derived based on partially coherent light theory. A numerical scheme for the coupled simulation as well as a method for computing the intracavity partially coherent field is given. The presented model explains the formation of the sugar scooping phenomenon, and enables studies on the dependence of the spatial mode spectrum on physical parameters of laser cavity and gain medium. Computational results show that as the flow rate of iodine increases, higher order mode components dominate in the partially coherent field. Results obtained by the proposed model are in good agreement with experimental results. PMID:22274214

  6. Multivariate approach to the chemical mapping of uranium in sandstone-hosted uranium ores analyzed using double pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klus, Jakub; Mikysek, Petr; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Prochazková, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Trojek, Tomáš; Novotný, Karel; Slobodník, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to provide high resolution mapping of uranium in sandstone-hosted uranium ores using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. In order to obtain chemical image with highest possible spatial resolution, LIBS system in orthogonal double pulse (DP LIBS) arrangement was employed. Owing to this experimental arrangement the spot size of 50 μm in diameter resulting in lateral resolution of 100 μm was reached. Despite the increase in signal intensity in DP LIBS modification, the detection of uranium is challenging. The main cause is the high density of uranium spectral lines, which together with broadening of LIBS spectral lines overreaches the resolution of commonly used spectrometers. It results in increased overall background radiation with only few distinguishable uranium lines. Three different approaches in the LIBS data treatment for the uranium detection were utilized: i) spectral line intensity, ii) region of apparent background and iii) multivariate data analysis. By utilizing multivariate statistical methods, a specific specimen features (in our case uranium content) were revealed by processing complete spectral information obtained from broadband echelle spectrograph. Our results are in a good agreement with conventional approaches such as line fitting and show new possibilities of processing spectral data in mapping. As a reference technique to LIBS was employed X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). The XRF chemical images used in this paper have lower resolution (approximately 1-2 mm per image point), nevertheless the elemental distribution is apparent and corresponds to presented LIBS experiments.

  7. Laser Processing and Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bäuerle, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the fundamentals and applications of laser-matter interactions, in particular with regard to laser material processing. Special attention is given to laser-induced physical and chemical processes at gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid interfaces. Starting with the background physics, the book proceeds to examine applications of lasers in “standard” laser machining and laser chemical processing (LCP), including the patterning, coating, and modification of material surfaces. This fourth edition has been enlarged to cover the rapid advances in the understanding of the dynamics of materials under the action of ultrashort laser pulses, and to include a number of new topics, in particular the increasing importance of lasers in various different fields of surface functionalizations and nanotechnology. In two additional chapters, recent developments in biotechnology, medicine, art conservation and restoration are summarized. Graduate students, physicists, chemists, engineers, a...

  8. $\\beta$-decay study of very neutron-rich Cd isotopes with a chemically selective laser ion source

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Following our test measurements of N=82-84 Cd isotopes with a specifically developed laser ion source (CERN/ISC 97-16, ISC/I 22), we now propose detailed spectroscopic studies of the decay of $^{130}$Cd to $\\,^{132}\\!$Cd, and at least the determination of some gross properties of the new N=85-86 nuclides $^{133}\\!$Cd and $\\,^{134}\\!$Cd. The main nuclear-structure objective of this experiment is the identification of the energies of the single-hole (SH) proton states in $^{131}$In. Nearly all of the other single-nucleon shell-model basis energies around doubly magic $^{132}$Sn are known by now, except those $\\pi$SH in Z=49 $\\,^{131}$In. Theoretical agreement on these values has not been achieved so far. Of particular interest is the depth of the $\\pi$f$_{5/3}$ hole and the p$_{3/2}$ - p$_{1/2}$ spin-orbit splitting. A second important goal is the determination of the position of the lowest-energy 1$^+\\,$ level in $^{130}$In predominantly populated in the Gamow-Teller (GT) decay of N=82 $^{130}\\!$Cd. Apart from...

  9. Confocal laser scanning microscopy elucidation of the micromorphology of the leaf cuticle and analysis of its chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiminti, Pavani P; Rookes, James E; Boyd, Ben J; Cahill, David M

    2015-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been invaluable tools for the study of the micromorphology of plant cuticles. However, for electron microscopy, the preparation techniques required may invariably introduce artefacts in cuticle preservation. Further, there are a limited number of methods available for quantifying the image data obtained through electron microscopy. Therefore, in this study, optical microscopy techniques were coupled with staining procedures and, along with SEM were used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the ultrastructure of plant leaf cuticles. Leaf cryosections of Triticum aestivum (wheat), Zea mays (maize), and Lupinus angustifolius (lupin) were stained with either fat-soluble azo stain Sudan IV or fluorescent, diarylmethane Auramine O and were observed under confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). For all the plant species tested, the cuticle on the leaf surfaces could be clearly resolved in many cases into cuticular proper (CP), external cuticular layer (ECL), and internal cuticular layer (ICL). Novel image data analysis procedures for quantifying the epicuticular wax micromorphology were developed, and epicuticular waxes of L. angustifolius were described here for the first time. Together, application of a multifaceted approach involving the use of a range of techniques to study the plant cuticle has led to a better understanding of cuticular structure and provides new insights into leaf surface architecture.

  10. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D2O ice beneath a H2O ice layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D2O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D2O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H2O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H2O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D2O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D2O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H2O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be

  11. Effect of working pressure and annealing temperature on microstructure and surface chemical composition of barium strontium titanate films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahra Saroukhani; Nemat Tahmasebi; Seyed Mohammad Mahdavi; Ali Nemati

    2015-10-01

    Barium strontium titanate (BST, Ba1−SrTiO3) thin films have been extensively used in many dielectric devices such as dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). To optimize its characteristics, a microstructural control is essential. In this paper, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 thin film has been deposited on the SiO2/Si substrate by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique at three different oxygen working pressures of 100, 220 and 350 mTorr. Then the deposited thin films at 100 mTorr oxygen pressure were annealed for 50 min in oxygen ambient at three different temperatures: 650, 720 and 800°C. The effect of oxygen working pressure during laser ablation and thermal treatment on the films was investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis methods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was used to determine the surface chemical composition of the samples. The results indicate that the deposited BST film at low working pressure (100 mTorr) in PLD chamber shows a lower surface roughness than other working pressures (220 and 350 mTorr). The as-deposited films show an amorphous structure and would turn into polycrystalline structure at annealing temperature above 650°C. Increase of temperature would cause the formation of cubic and per-ovskite phases, improvement in crystalline peaks and also result in the decomposition of BST at high temperature (above 800°C). In addition, rising of temperature leads to the increase in size of grains and clusters. Therefore more roughness was found at higher temperatures as a result of a more heterogeneous growth and less tensions.

  12. Optical-chemical-microphysical relationships and closure studies for mixed carbonaceous aerosols observed at Jeju Island; 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer, particle sizing, and filter analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Flowers

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Transport of aerosols in pollution plumes from the mainland Asian continent was observed in situ at Jeju, South Korea during the Cheju Asian Brown Cloud Plume-Asian Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX field campaign throughout August and September 2008 using a 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer (PASS-3, chemical filter analysis, and size distributions. The PASS-3 directly measures the effects of morphology (e.g. coatings on light absorption that traditional filter-based instruments are unable to address. Transport of mixed sulfate, carbonaceous, and nitrate aerosols from various Asian pollution plumes to Jeju accounted for 74% of the deployment days, showing large variations in their measured chemical and optical properties. Analysis of eight distinct episodes, spanning wide ranges of chemical composition, optical properties, and source regions, reveals that episodes with higher organic carbon (OC/sulfate (SO42− and nitrate (NO3/SO42− composition ratios exhibit lower single scatter albedo at shorter wavelengths (ω405. We infer complex refractive indices (n–ik as a function of wavelength for the high, intermediate, and low OC/SO42− pollution episodes by using the observed particle size distributions and the measured optical properties. The smallest mean particle diameter corresponds to the high OC/SO42− aerosol episode. The imaginary part of the refractive index (k is greater for the high OC/SO42− episode at all wavelengths. A distinct, sharp increase in k at short wavelength implies enhanced light absorption by OC, which accounts for 50% of the light absorption at 405 nm, in the high OC/SO42− episode. Idealized analysis indicates increased absorption at 781 nm by factors greater than 3 relative to denuded black carbon in the laboratory. We hypothesize

  13. Influence of plasma density on the chemical composition and structural properties of pulsed laser deposited TiAlN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Camps, Enrique [Departamento de Física, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, México D.F. C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, México D.F. C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Flores, M. [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Apdo. Postal 307, C.P. 45101 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); Campos-González, E. [Departamento de Física, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, México D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    Incorporation of substitutional Al into the TiN lattice of the ternary alloy TiAlN results in a material with improved properties compared to TiN. In this work, TiAlN thin films were grown by the simultaneous ablation of Ti and Al targets in a nitrogen containing reactive atmosphere. The deposit was formed on silicon substrates at low deposition temperature (200 °C). The dependence of the Al content of the films was studied as a function of the ion density of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of the Al target. The plasma parameters were measured by means of a planar Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical composition of the films was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed a strong dependence of the amount of aluminum incorporated in the films with the plasma density. The structural characterization of the deposits was carried out by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, where the substitutional incorporation of the Al into the TiN was demonstrated.

  14. Metallurgical and chemical characterization of copper alloy reference materials within laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Method development for minimally-invasive analysis of ancient bronze objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaszek, Damian, E-mail: damian.walaszek@empa.ch [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Senn, Marianne [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Faller, Markus [Laboratory for Jointing Technology and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Philippe, Laetitia [Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Ulrich, Andrea [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of ancient metal objects provides important information for manufacturing studies and authenticity verification of ancient copper or bronze artifacts. Non- or minimal-destructive analytical methods are preferred to mitigate visible damage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) enables the determination of major elements as well as impurities down to lower ppm-levels, however, accuracy and precision of analysis strongly depend on the homogeneity of reference materials used for calibration. Moreover, appropriate analytical procedures are required e.g. in terms of ablation strategies (scan mode, spot size, etc.). This study reviews available copper alloy (certified) reference materials — (C)RMs from different sources and contributes new metallurgical data on homogeneity and spatial elemental distribution. Investigations of the standards were performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) for the following copper alloy and bronze (certified) reference materials: NIST 454, BAM 374, BAM 211, BAM 227, BAM 374, BAM 378, BAS 50.01-2, BAS 50.03-4, and BAS 50.04-4. Additionally, the influence of inhomogeneities on different ablation and calibration strategies is evaluated to define an optimum analytical strategy in terms of line scan versus single spot ablation, variation of spot size, selection of the most appropriate RMs or minimum number of calibration reference materials. - Highlights: ► New metallographic data for copper alloy reference materials are provided. ► Influence of RMs homogeneity on quality of LA-ICPMS analysis was evaluated. ► Ablation and calibration strategies were critically discussed. ► An LA-ICPMS method is proposed for analyzing most typical ancient copper alloys.

  15. Laser machining of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dahotre, Narendra B

    2011-01-01

    Advanced materialsIntroductionApplicationsStructural ceramicsBiomaterials CompositesIntermetallicsMachining of advanced materials IntroductionFabrication techniquesMechanical machiningChemical Machining (CM)Electrical machiningRadiation machining Hybrid machiningLaser machiningIntroductionAbsorption of laser energy and multiple reflectionsThermal effectsLaser machining of structural ceramicsIntrodu

  16. Laser Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Laser Resurfacing Uses for Laser Resurfacing Learn more about specific conditions where laser ... skin Scars Sun-damaged skin Wrinkles What is laser resurfacing? Laser resurfacing is a procedure that uses ...

  17. Análise química e morfológica do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio durante a colagem ortodôntica Chemical and morphological analysis of the human dental enamel treated with argon laser during orthodontic bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra Guimarães

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: as principais utilizações do laser argônio na Ortodontia são a redução do tempo de polimerização durante a colagem ortodôntica e o aumento da resistência à cárie do esmalte dentário. OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as alterações químicas e morfológicas do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio nos parâmetros da colagem ortodôntica. MÉTODOS: quinze primeiros pré-molares hígidos, extraídos por indicação ortodôntica, foram selecionados e seccionados no sentido do longo eixo em dois segmentos iguais. Uma metade de cada elemento dentário foi tratada e a outra permaneceu sem tratamento. Um total de 30 amostras foi analisado, criando o grupo laser (n = 15 e o grupo controle (n = 15. O tratamento foi feito com laser argônio com 250mW de potência por 5 segundos, com densidade de energia de 8J/cm². RESULTADOS: a análise de difração de raios X demonstrou duas fases em ambos os grupos, as fases apatita e monetita. A redução da fase monetita foi significativa após o tratamento com laser, sugerindo maior cristalinidade. A análise de Espectroscopia de Energia Dispersiva (EDS indicou aumento na razão cálcio-fósforo no grupo laser, compatível com a diminuição da fase monetita. A morfologia superficial do esmalte dentário apresentou-se mais lisa após o tratamento com laser argônio. CONCLUSÕES: o aumento de cristalinidade e a lisura superficial do esmalte no grupo laser são fatores sugestivos de aumento de resistência à cárie no esmalte dentário.INTRODUCTION: The main utilities of the argon laser in orthodontics are the high speed curing process in orthodontic bonding and the caries resistance promotion of the tooth enamel. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical and morphological changes in the tooth enamel treated with the argon laser in the orthodontic bonding parameters. METHODS: Fifteen sound human first premolars, removed for orthodontic

  18. Contribution to the study of physico-chemical properties of surfaces modified by laser treatment. Application to the enhancement of localized corrosion resistance of stainless steels; Contribution a l'etude des proprietes physico-chimiques des surfaces modifiees par traitement laser. Application a l'amelioration de la resistance a la corrosion localisee des aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacquentin, W.

    2011-11-25

    Metallic materials are more and more used in severe conditions with particularly strong request for improving their behavior in aggressive environment and especially over long periods. The objective of this PhD work is to estimate the potentiality of a laser surface melting treatment on the improvement of the stainless steel 304L corrosion resistance, surface treatments by laser can be revisited on the basis of a recent change in the laser technology. In the frame of this work, a nano-pulsed laser fiber was chosen: it allows the treated surface to be melted for few microns in depth, followed by an ultra-fast solidification occurring with cooling rates up to 1011 K/s. The combination of these processes leads to the elimination of the surface defects, the formation (trapping) of metastable phases, the segregation of chemical elements and the growth of a new oxide layer which properties are governed by the laser parameters. To correlate these latter to the electrochemical reactivity of the surface, the influence of two laser parameters on the physico-chemical properties of the surface was studied: the laser power and the overlap of the laser impacts. To support this approach, the pitting corrosion resistance of the samples was determined by standard electrochemical tests. For specific laser parameters, the pitting potential of a 304L stainless steel was increased by more than 500 mV corresponding to an important enhancement in localized corrosion resistance in chloride environment. The interdependence of the different phenomena resulting from the laser treatment lead to a quite complex prioritization of their role on the sensibility of the 304L. However, it was demonstrated that the nature of the thermal oxide formed during the laser surface melting and the induced defects are first-order parameters for the initiation of pits. (author) [French] Les materiaux metalliques sont utilises dans des conditions de plus en plus severes et doivent presenter une parfaite

  19. The optimisation of the Multi-Atmospheric Ar:Xe Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Gielkens, Serge William Agnew

    1998-01-01

    In 1960 the first successful demonstration of laser operation was achieved by Maiman in ruby [1], which is an example of a solid-state laser. Since then numerous other types of lasers have been constructed, like gas lasers, semiconductor lasers, dye lasers, chemical lasers and free-electron lasers (FELs). Each type possesses some unique characteristics, which make it particularly suitable for certain applications that cannot be realised by other lasers. The same holds for gas lasers and in th...

  20. Development of applied optical techniques using lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researches on laser isotope separation of deuterium using Infrared Multi-photon Absorption/Dissociation (IR MPA/D) and UV predissociation were reviewed and several kinds of lasers were built for this purpose. A tunable TEA COsub(2) laser with power of about 10 MW was assembled and a HF chemical laser with output energy of 300 mJ was built. These lasers are not ready to be used as sources for IR MPA/D experiment yet. The TEA CO2 laser needs modification for more stable output and higher repetition rate and the HF chemical laser needs improvement for more output energy and tunability. Also, a KrF excimer laser was built for UV predissociation experiment, but requires modification for stable output. Furthermore, laser welding of Zr was surveyed and a few samples were welded using Nd:YAG laser. Finally, a remote inspection instrument was designed using a He-Ne laser and a CCD array. (Author)

  1. Atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program

  2. In vitro study of morphological and chemical modification threshold of bovine dental enamel irradiated by the holmium laser; Estudo in vitro das alteracoes morfologicas e quimicas do esmalte dental bovino irradiado pelo laser de holmio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduardo, Patricia Lerro de Paula

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Ho:YLF laser effects on the dental enamel surface with regards to its morphology, thermal variations during its irradiation in the pulp chamber and its increased resistance to demineralization through quantitative analysis of calcium and phosphorous atoms reactive concentrations in samples. Twenty samples of bovine enamel were used and divided in four groups: control - acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) application followed by demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (100 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (350 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid: and irradiation with Ho:YLF laser ( 450 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid. Ali samples were quantified according to their calcium and phosphorous atoms relative concentrations before and after the treatments above. X-Ray fluorescence spectrochemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. It was observed an increase on the calcium and phosphorous atoms concentration ratio and therefore the enamel demineralization reduction as a result of the lactic acid treatment in the samples irradiated with the holmium laser followed by the APF application. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this study for clinical purposes, morphological changes caused by the holmium laser irradiation were analyzed. Such modifications were characterized by melted and re-solidified regions of the enamel with consequent changes on its permeability and solubility. Temperature changes of ten human pre-molars teeth irradiated with 350 J/cm{sup 2} and 450 J/cm{sup 2} were also monitored in the pulp chamber in real time. Temperature increases over 4,20 C did not occur. The results obtained from this study along with the results from previous

  3. Measurement and analysis of internal loss and injection efficiency for continuous-wave blue semipolar ( 20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) III-nitride laser diodes with chemically assisted ion beam etched facets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Daniel L.; Kuritzky, Leah Y.; Nedy, Joseph; Saud Abbas, Arwa; Pourhashemi, Arash; Farrell, Robert M.; Cohen, Daniel A.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2016-02-01

    Continuous-wave blue semipolar ( 20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) III-nitride laser diodes were fabricated with highly vertical, smooth, and uniform mirror facets produced by chemically assisted ion beam etching. Uniform mirror facets are a requirement for accurate experimental determination of internal laser parameters, including internal loss and injection efficiency, which were determined to be 9 cm-1 and 73%, respectively, using the cavity length dependent method. The cavity length of the uncoated devices was varied from 900 μm to 1800 μm, with threshold current densities ranging from 3 kA/cm2 to 9 kA/cm2 and threshold voltages ranging from 5.5 V to 7 V. The experimentally determined internal loss was found to be in good agreement with a calculated value of 9.5 cm-1 using a 1D mode solver. The loss in each layer was calculated and in light of the analysis several modifications to the laser design are proposed.

  4. Large-energy, wavelength-tunable, all-fiber passively Q-switched Er:Yb-codoped double-clad fiber laser with mono-layer chemical vapor deposition graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duanduan; Xiong, Fengfu; Zhang, Cankun; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Cai, Weiwei; Che, Kaijun; Luo, Zhengqian

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a large-energy, wavelength-tunable, all-fiber passively Q-switched Er:Yb-codoped laser using a mono-layer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene saturable absorber (SA). By exploiting the large laser gain of Er:Yb double-clad fiber and optimizing the coupling ratio of the output coupler, not only can the mono-layer CVD graphene SA be protected from oversaturation and thermal damage, but also a large pulse energy up to 1.05 μJ (corresponding to the average output power of 25.6 mW) is thus achieved. Using a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter, stable Q-switched pulses can operate with a tunable range from 1530.97 to 1546.92 nm, covering a wavelength range of ∼16  nm. The Q-switching states at the different lasing wavelengths have been observed and recorded. The Q-switched repetition rate and the pulse duration (with the minimum one of 2.6 μs) have been characterized as well. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the largest pulse energy from an all-fiber graphene Q-switched laser. PMID:25089965

  5. Laser Remote Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    LIDAR is the first generation of laser remote sensing deve loped for detection of gas molecule in atmosphere. LIDAR is the abbreviated word for laser radar (laser light detection and ranging). It combines advantages of lasers ability to detect atoms and molecules and radars ability for remote sensing. The advance of technologies: tunable solid state laser (Ti-sapphire, O PO etc), optical fiber, photonics imaging technique and last but not least compu tational techniques, have promoted the development of new types of laser remote sensors capable of detecting toxic and radioactive chemicals and metals not in g as form and not exposed in air but under ground water and subsurface soil. The h igh power laser is used to vaporize the target material and generate plasma. Opt ical fiber is often used to delivery the laser beam and to collect the emission for imaging. The combination of spectroscopy with advanced photonics imaging te chniques can study both the chemical components of sample in-situ under ambient conditions and spatial distribution of different chemicals in remote operation without requiring sample preparation or extensive sample handing. These new deve lopments have greatly enlarged the horizon of traditional capability of remote s ensing.

  6. Exogenous bleaching evaluation on dentin using chemical activated technique compared with diode laser technique; Avaliacao do clareamento exogeno sobre a dentina realizado pela tecnica por ativacao quimica comparada com a tecnica por ativacao pelo laser de diodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Breno Carnevalli Franco de

    2003-07-01

    This in vitro study compared the results of different exogenous bleaching proceedings on dentin after treatment of enamel surface. Thirty human canine were hewn preserving the vestibular half of the crown and 3 mm of root, showing a vestibular-lingual thickness average of 3,5 mm, measuring in the third middle of the crown. Ali teeth were maintained in wet chamber during the experiment. Digital photographs were taken of the dentin surface at 3 experimental times (LI: initial record, L0: immediate pos-bleaching record and L 15: 15 days after bleaching). The teeth were divided into 3 experimental groups of 10 teeth in each. The Control Group did not receive any kind of treatment. The Laser Group received 2 session of laser bleaching, with 3 applications each, using 35% hydrogen peroxide, activated by diode laser during 30 seconds, by scanning the enamel surface from incisal edge to the top of the crown, from mesial to distal portion of the crown and circularly, each movement during 10 seconds. The following parameters being adopted: wavelength of 808 nm, power of 1,5 W and optic fiber with 600 {mu}m (core). The Peroxide Group received 28 daily applications, during 4 hours each application, using 16% carbamide peroxide. The bleaching records were analysed using a computer, through RGBK (red, green , blue and black). The K averages (K=100% for black and K=0% for white) of the records for Control Group were: LI=50,1 %, L0=50,3% and L 15=50,6%. For Laser Group the K averages were LI=48,5%, L0=50,0% and L 15=47,7%. And for the Peroxide Group were LI=50,5%, L0=35,9% and L 15=37,3%. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference of the K between the Control Group and the Laser Group, as to LI, L0 and L 15. Only Peroxide Group showed significant statistical difference between LI with L0 and L 15 (0,1%), and L0 in comparison with L 15 did not show any difference. (author)

  7. Chemical analysis of archeological materials in submarine environments using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. On-site trials in the Mediterranean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirado, S.; Fortes, F.J. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Lazic, V. [ENEA - Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Laserna, J.J., E-mail: laserna@uma.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    The main aim of this work is to demonstrate the capability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the recognition and identification of archeological materials submerged in sea water at depths up to 30 m. For this purpose, a remote LIBS instrument based on a fiber optic cable to deliver the laser beam energy has been evaluated. An air flux was applied to create a sample-air interface prior to laser ablation. This flux prevents the contact of sea water with the sample surface during the analysis. In this way, good quality LIBS spectra were obtained. Parametric studies in the laboratory such as gas flow pressure, beam focal conditions and angle of incidence, among others, were performed to optimize the best conditions for field analysis. Finally, real samples such as different bronzes containing a high oxidation degree were analyzed underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. The dependence of LIBS signal with the analysis depth was also studied. Results obtained in these field trials confirmed the capability of remote LIBS for in-situ analysis of underwater archeological samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used a remote LIBS instrument based on a 45 m long optical fiber. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Archeological material was analyzed underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the influence of the immersion depth on the LIBS signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novelty of this application opens a new horizon to the LIBS technique.

  8. USE OF MULTI-PHOTON LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO DESCRIBE THE DISTRIBUTION OF XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better understand the mechanisms by which persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) produce toxicity during fish early life stages (ELS), dose response relationships need to be determined in relation to the dynamic distribution of chemicals in sensitive tissues. In this stud...

  9. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lasers Technology Program of IPEN is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of optical materials and new technologies, as well to laser applications in several areas: Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. The Program is basically divided into two main areas: Material and Laser Development and Laser Applications

  10. Qualitative and quantitative spectro-chemical analysis of dates using UV-pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehder, A O; Habibullah, Y B; Gondal, M A; Baig, Umair

    2016-08-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is demonstrated for the spectral analysis of nutritional and toxic elements present in several varieties of date fruit samples available in the Saudi Arabia market. The method analyzes the optical emission of a test sample when subjected to pulsed laser ablation. In this demonstration, our primary focus is on calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), as nutritional elements, and on chromium (Cr), as a toxic element. The local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was confirmed prior to the elemental characterization of date samples to ensure accuracy of the LIBS analysis. This was achieved by measuring parameters associated with the plasma, such as the electron temperature and the electron number density. These plasma parameters aid interpretation of processes such as ionization, dissociation, and excitation occurring in the plasma plume formed by ablating the date palm sample. The minimum detection limit was established from calibration curves that involved plotting the LIBS signal intensity as a function of standard date samples with known concentrations. The concentration of Ca and Mg detected in different varieties of date samples was between 187 and 515 and 35-196mgL(-1) respectively, while Cr concentration measured between 1.72 and 7.76mgL(-1). In order to optimize our LIBS system, we have studied how the LIBS signal intensity depends on the incident laser energy and the delay time. In order to validate our LIBS analysis results, standard techniques such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were also applied on an identical (duplicate) date samples as those used for the LIBS analysis. The LIBS results exhibit remarkable agreement with those obtained from the ICP-MS analysis. In addition, the finger print wavelengths of other elements present in date samples were also identified and are reported here, which has not been previously reported, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:27216665

  11. Laser development for laser fusion applications. Research progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research conducted during this period is reported on the following: (1) rare-gas-halogen lasers, (2) XeCl laser at excitation rates of 1.7 to 4.7 MW/cm3, (3) rare gas halogen laser modeling, (4) three-body ion recombination coefficients, (5) electron beam accelerators, (6) power conditioning studies for accelerators, (7) chemically pumped iodine lasers, (8) hydrogen fluoride lasers, and (9) supporting research

  12. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  13. Influence of physical properties and chemical composition of sample on formation of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond laser ablation at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa, E-mail: mhola@sci.muni.c [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Konecna, Veronika [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikuska, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, Jozef [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of sample properties and composition on the size and concentration of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser ablation at 213 nm was investigated for three sets of different materials, each containing five specimens with a similar matrix (Co-cemented carbides with a variable content of W and Co, steel samples with minor differences in elemental content and silica glasses with various colors). The concentration of ablated particles (particle number concentration, PNC) was measured in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 mum) using an optical aerosol spectrometer. The shapes and volumes of the ablation craters were obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by an optical profilometer, respectively. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using SEM. The results of particle concentration measurements showed a significant dominance of particles smaller than 250 nm in comparison with larger particles, irrespective of the kind of material. Even if the number of particles larger than 0.25 mum is negligible (up to 0.1%), the volume of large particles that left the ablation cell can reach 50% of the whole particle volume depending on the material. Study of the ablation craters and the laser-generated particles showed a various number of particles produced by different ablation mechanisms (particle splashing or condensation), but the similar character of released particles for all materials was observed by SEM after particle collection on the membrane filter. The created aerosol always consisted of two main structures - spherical particles with diameters from tenths to units of micrometers originally ejected from the molten surface layer and mum-sized 'fibres' composed of primary agglomerates with diameters in the range between tens and hundreds of nanometers. The shape and structure of ablation craters were in good agreement with particle concentration

  14. Simulation of temperature field of graphene substrate fabricated by laser chemical vapor deposition%激光化学气相沉积石墨烯的基底温度场仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永庆; 张陈涛; 张建寰

    2015-01-01

    In order to analyze the relationship between static and dynamic temperature field distribution of catalyst substrate and various experimental parameters in graphene fabrication with laser-induced chemical vapor deposition , the finite element model was established by using ANSYS software and 532nm laser model was loaded as the heat source .The data of temperature field distribution and the needing time for achieving reaction temperature under different parameters were obtained .The results show that under the influence of the property of substrate , laser power , the size of substrate area , the focus spot diameter and the reaction gas flow , the substrate temperature field distribution and the needing time for achieving reaction temperature are different.It can be used as the reference in high quality graphene fabrication experiment .The dynamic temperature field distribution under the conditions of continuous wave laser (wavelength of 532nm, power of 3W, focused spot diameter of 50μm, movement speed of 1mm/s), nickel foil substrate, 10mL/min methane and 5mL/min hydrogen conforms to the pattern graphene growth mechanism fabricated by laser chemical vapor deposition .%为了分析激光化学气相沉积制备石墨烯过程中催化剂基底的静态和动态温度场分布与各个实验参量之间的关系,采用基于ANSYS软件建立有限元分析模型和加载532nm激光热源模型的方法,取得了不同实验参量影响下基底温度场分布和达到反应温度所需时间的数据。结果表明,在基底材料属性、激光功率大小、基底面积尺寸、聚焦光斑直径、反应气体流量的影响下,基底静态温度场的分布与达到反应温度所需时间均不同,可作为制备高质量石墨烯实验的参考依据。采用波长为532nm、功率为3W、聚焦光斑直径为50μm、移动速率为1mm/s的连续型激光器,以镍箔为基底材料,在标准状态下甲烷和氢气流量分别为10mL/min和5

  15. Development of a flow injection analysis (FIA) system for the measurement of heavy metals using a fiber optic chemical sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Prestel, Harald; Gahr, Achim; Niessner, Reinhard

    2000-05-01

    The development of a fiber optic sensor system is described, for the on-line detection of heavy metal ions in water. This is based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of suitable metal-ligand complexes. The sensor system is designed to measure heavy metal ions in the field. Flow injection analysis (FIA) is coupled with the sensor system, to overcome problems of a slow diffusion rate of heavy metals through the membrane of an in situ sensor head. Preliminary experiments show the new FIA system has good reproducibility, a high sample analysis rate and it can measure heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II)) at the ppb level, when using the appropriate ligands.

  16. [Characteristics of laser light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S

    1999-01-01

    Laser is one of the greatest technical discoveries of the 20th century. It is important in basic sciences, but particularly in diagnosis and therapy of various pathologic conditions of human organism. It is electromagnetic radiation, not X-irradiation and, as such, it is not expected to produce new generation of iatrogenic malignancies. Laser falls between infrared and ultraviolet on the spectrum mainly in the visible light spectrum. Properties of laser light are: monochromacity (the same color), coherence (all of the light waves are in phase both spatially and temporally), collimation (all rays are parallel to each other and do not diverge significantly even over long distances). Lasers were first conceived by Einstein in 1917 when he wrote his "Zur Quantum Theorie der Strahlung" (the quantum theory of radiation) which enumerated concepts of stimulated and spontaneous emission and absorption. Drs. Arthur Schawlow and Charles Townes, in 1956, extended lasers into the optical frequency range and Maiman, in 1960, operated the first laser using ruby as the active medium (ruby laser). Laser is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. To understand the acronym, it is necessary to understand the basic physics of the atom. However, if the atom that is in the excited state is struck by another photon of energy before it returns to the ground state, two photons of equal frequency and energy, travelling in the same direction and in perfect spatial and temporal harmony, are produced. This phenomenon is termed stimulated emission of radiation. An external power source hyperexcites the atoms in the laser medium so that the number of atoms possessing upper energy levels exceeds the number of atoms in a power energy level, a condition termed a population inversion. This "pumping system" which imparts additional energy to the atoms may be optical, mechanical, or chemical. These atoms in a hyperexcited state spontaneously emit photons of light. The

  17. Laser therapy of muscle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Munqith S; Al-Salihi, Anam Rasheed; Qasim, Amenah Wala'a

    2013-05-01

    Low-level lasers are used in general therapy and healing process due to their good photo-bio-stimulation effects. In this paper, the effects of diode laser and Nd:YAG laser on the healing process of practically managed skeletal muscle trauma has been successfully studied. Standard impact trauma was induced by using a specially designed mechanical device. The impacted muscle was left for 3 days for complete development of blunt trauma. After that it was irradiated by five laser sessions for 5 days. Two types of lasers were used; 785-nm diode laser and 1.064-nm Nd:YAG laser, both in continuous and pulsed modes. A special electronic circuit was designed and implemented to modulate the diode laser for this purpose. Tissue samples of crushed skeletal muscle have been dissected from the injured irradiated muscle then bio-chemically analyzed for the regeneration of contractile and collagenous proteins using Lowry assay for protein determination and Reddy and Enwemeka assay for hydroxyproline determination. The results showed that both lasers stimulate the regeneration capability of traumatized skeletal muscle. The diode laser in CW and pulsed modes showed better results than the Nd:YAG in accelerating the preservation of the normal tissue content of collagenous and contractile proteins beside controlling the regeneration of non-functional fibrous tissue. This study proved that the healing achieved by the laser treatment was faster than the control group by 15-20 days.

  18. Effect of the manufacturing parameters on the structure of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes produced by catalytic laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morjan, Iuliana P., E-mail: iulianasoare@yahoo.com; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Morjan, Ion; Luculescu, Catalin [Plasma and Radiation Physics, National Institute for Lasers (Romania); Vasile, Eugeniu [METAV-R and D (Romania); Osiceanu, Petre [“Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy (Romania); Scarisoreanu, Monica [Plasma and Radiation Physics, National Institute for Lasers (Romania); Demian, Gabriela [University of Craiova, Faculty of Mechanics (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    Nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (CNx-NTs), with a relatively high level of nitrogen doping were prepared by the catalytic laser-induced CVD method. The nanotubes were catalytically grown directly on a silicon substrate from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} gaseous precursors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) give firm evidence for the nitrogen doping. As determined by XPS, the N concentration for the prepared CNx-NTs increases from 3.6 to 30.6 at.% with increasing ammonia concentration and pressure. TEM images indicate that the nanotubes are bamboo like. As the nitrogen content increases, there is a transition from the bamboo shape with few defects and little distortion to a corrugated structure with a much larger number of defects. Raman spectroscopy revealed that with increasing nitrogen concentration, there is more disorder and defects, together with an increase in I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio. By energy-filtering TEM, a higher N concentration was found on the outer amorphous nanolayer than in the compartment core of the nanotubes.

  19. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  20. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  1. Laser processing and analysis of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, W W

    1983-01-01

    It has often been said that the laser is a solution searching for a problem. The rapid development of laser technology over the past dozen years has led to the availability of reliable, industrially rated laser sources with a wide variety of output characteristics. This, in turn, has resulted in new laser applications as the laser becomes a familiar processing and analytical tool. The field of materials science, in particular, has become a fertile one for new laser applications. Laser annealing, alloying, cladding, and heat treating were all but unknown 10 years ago. Today, each is a separate, dynamic field of research activity with many of the early laboratory experiments resulting in the development of new industrial processing techniques using laser technology. Ten years ago, chemical processing was in its infancy awaiting, primarily, the development of reliable tunable laser sources. Now, with tunability over the entire spectrum from the vacuum ultraviolet to the far infrared, photo­ chemistry is undergo...

  2. The effect of deposition atmosphere on the chemical composition of TiN and ZrN thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very thin TiN and ZrN films (4 or N2. Auger electron spectroscopy investigations found that films contained a relatively low oxygen concentration, usually below 3.0 at%. Films deposited under residual vacuum or very low N2 pressures (−3 Pa) contained 3–6 at% C atoms in the bulk. This fraction grew to 8–10 at% when the deposition was performed under an atmosphere of 2 × 10−3 Pa CH4. To avoid C atoms incorporation into the bulk a deposition pressure of 10 Pa N2 was required. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations found that oxygen was mostly bonded in an oxynitride type of compound, while carbon was bonded into a metallic carbide. The presence of C atoms in the chemical composition of the TiN or ZrN improved the measured hardness of the films.

  3. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  4. Polymer photonic crystal dye lasers as optofluidic cell sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen;

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers are chemically activated to covalently bind bio-molecules or for HeLa cell attachment using an anthraquinone (AQ) UV activated photolinker. The lasers change emission wavelength linearly with inhomogeneous cell coverage.......Hybrid polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers are chemically activated to covalently bind bio-molecules or for HeLa cell attachment using an anthraquinone (AQ) UV activated photolinker. The lasers change emission wavelength linearly with inhomogeneous cell coverage....

  5. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners

  6. Lasers technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners.

  7. Lasers (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1969-01-01

    A laser is an instrument that produces an enormously intense pencil-thin beam of light. In this booklet we shall learn what there is about the laser that gives it so much promise. We shall investigate what it is, how it works, and the different kinds of lasers there are.

  8. Fs-laser processing of polydimethylsiloxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, Petar A., E-mail: paatanas@ie.bas.bg; Nedyalkov, Nikolay N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Shose, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Valova, Eugenia I.; Georgieva, Zhenya S.; Armyanov, Stefan A.; Kolev, Konstantin N. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Amoruso, Salvatore; Wang, Xuan; Bruzzese, Ricardo [CNR-SPIN, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sawczak, Miroslaw; Śliwiński, Gerard [Photophysics Department, The Szewalski Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, 14 Fiszera St, 80-231 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2014-07-14

    We present an experimental analysis on surface structuring of polydimethylsiloxane films with UV (263 nm) femtosecond laser pulses, in air. Laser processed areas are analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, and μ-Raman spectroscopy. The laser-treated sample shows the formation of a randomly nanostructured surface morphology. μ-Raman spectra, carried out at both 514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, prior and after laser treatment allow evidencing the changes in the sample structure. The influence of the laser fluence on the surface morphology is studied. Finally, successful electro-less metallization of the laser-processed sample is achieved, even after several months from the laser-treatment contrary to previous observation with nanosecond pulses. Our findings address the effectiveness of fs-laser treatment and chemical metallization of polydimethylsiloxane films with perspective technological interest in micro-fabrication devices for MEMS and nano-electromechanical systems.

  9. Laser polishing of niobium for SRF applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael [W& M

    2013-09-01

    Smooth interior surfaces are desired for niobium SRF cavities, now obtained by buffered chemical polish (BCP) and/or electropolish (EP). Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from chemistry and in-process inspection. Here we show that laser polishing can produce smooth topography with Power Spectral Density (PSD) measurements similar to that obtained by EP. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damaging it. Computational modeling was used to simulate the surface temperature and explain the mechanism of laser polishing.

  10. Laser device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  11. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  12. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  13. Metal atom oxidation laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  14. Industrial applications of laser diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Deguchi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Tighter regulations of harmful substances such as NOx, CO, heavy metals, particles, emissions from commercial plants and automobiles reflect a growing demand for lowering the anthropogenic burdens on the environment. It is equally important to monitor controlling factors to improve the operation of industrial machinery and plants. Among the many methods for doing this, laser diagnostics stands out. Taking a practical approach, Industrial Applications of Laser Diagnostics discusses how to apply laser diagnostics to engines, gas turbines, thermal and chemical plant systems, and disposal faciliti

  15. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  16. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision. PMID:23140957

  17. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51).

  18. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51). PMID:26805597

  19. A laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, N.; Syundzo, Yo.

    1984-06-19

    It is reported that an improved gas laser design using pumping of the active medium has been developed. A diagram of the laser system is given in graph form and its principle of operation is briefly described. A special sealing element is used in such lasers to seal the reservoir containing the oil in the pump which pumps the gas active medium. When the sealing element fails, there is the danger of oil penetration into the active laser medium. It is proposed that an additional pump which continually evacuates the oil reservoir during laser system operation be used. Thus, a low pressure is maintained in the reservoir. If the sealing element fails, the secondary pump generates a gas flow from the pumping system to the reservoir and eliminates gas penetration into the laser medium.

  20. Optical monitoring of laser-generated plasma during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John O.; Beirne, Gareth J.; O'Connor, Gerard M.; Glynn, Thomas J.; Conneely, Alan J.

    2000-03-01

    Process monitoring is a vital part of industrial laser applications that enables intelligent control of processes by observing acoustic, optical, thermal and other emissions. By monitoring these emission during laser processing, it is possible to ascertain characteristics that help diagnose features of the laser processed material and hence to optimize the technique. An experimental set up of observing plasmas during laser spot welding is described here. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to spot-weld a variety of materials of different thickness, the plasmas generated during welding were monitored by a number of techniques, and the data obtained was used to characterize the welds. In the study photodiodes were set at different angles and observed the intensity and generation of the plasmas during the laser spot-welding process thereby giving a weld 'signature.' A portable spectrometer was used off-axis to obtain spectra of the emissions from the plasmas. Post process analysis was performed on the materials by mechanical polishing and chemical etching and observations of weld penetration depth and weld quality were correlated with the data collected on the plasmas. Different cover gases were also used during laser welding and the results of the effects of the various gases on the plasma are shown. The results indicate the relationship between laser weld generated plasma characteristics and weld features such as penetration depth. A direct correlation between the intensities of the photodiode and portable spectrometer signals was observed with weld penetration depth.

  1. Laser Optomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Weijian Yang; Stephen Adair Gerke; Kar Wei Ng; Yi Rao; Christopher Chase; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, great...

  2. Laser accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  3. Laser interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Joo, K.N.; Ellis, J.D.; Spronck, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Laser interferometer comprising a laser light source providing at least one light beam at two distinct frequencies, a beam splitter for splitting the at least one light beam into reference and measurement beams, a first reflector and a second reflector for reflection of the reference and measurement beams, and at least one detector for detection of the interference signal pertaining to the reflected reference and measurement beams. The laser light source provides first and second light beams ...

  4. Newer trends in laser tattoo removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil D Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Q switched lasers are the current gold standard for laser tattoo removal. Though these systems are generally quite effective in clearing tattoos & have an established safety record, certain limitations exist while following the standard protocol. To overcome these limitation newer techniques such as multipass method, combination treatments with chemical agent and other laser have been introduced. These methods help in faster, less painful and complication free tattoo removal.

  5. Status of laser enrichment technology updated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, Y.

    1986-08-01

    The principles of uranium enrichment by a laser method, the technology's current status and future prospects, centered on research and development activity at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research are described.

  6. Biocavity Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  7. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  8. Laser cleaning on Roman coins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Karydas, A. G.; Klinkenberg, B.; Kokkoris, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Stavrou, E.; Vlastou, R.; Zarkadas, C.

    Ancient metal objects react with moisture and environmental chemicals to form various corrosion products. Because of the unique character and high value of such objects, any cleaning procedure should guarantee minimum destructiveness. The most common treatment used is mechanical stripping, in which it is difficult to avoid surface damage when employed. Lasers are currently being tested for a wide range of conservation applications. Since they are highly controllable and can be selectively applied, lasers can be used to achieve more effective and safer cleaning of archaeological artifacts and protect their surface details. The basic criterion that motivated us to use lasers to clean Roman coins was the requirement of pulsed emission, in order to minimize heat-induced damages. In fact, the laser interaction with the coins has to be short enough, to produce a fast removal of the encrustation, avoiding heat conduction into the substrate. The cleaning effects of three lasers operating at different wavelengths, namely a TEA CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 μm, an Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm, and a 2ω-Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm have been compared on corroded Romans coins and various atomic and nuclear techniques have also been applied to evaluate the efficiency of the applied procedure.

  9. Modification of Hydroxyapatite Crystal Using IR Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Saburoh; Goto, M; Guan, W; Hayashi, N; Ihara, S; Yamabe, C; Yamaguchi, Y

    2004-01-01

    The first application of laser technology to dentistry was for the removal of caries. However, reports of laser application on improvement of dental surface were emerged, much attention has been focused on the laser’s potential to enhance enamel’s hardness and resistance to acid. Most of the previous reports concentrated on the photo issue interaction. Few research has pursued the photochemical phenomenon occurred during laser irradiation on biological tissues. In order to find a creative method to remineralize the dissociating enamel and exposed coronal of dentine, the authors developed a novel procedure during laser irradiation. Slice of sound molar and artificial HAp pellet were irradiated separately, with CO2 laser under different laser parameters. Tow series of samples covered with saturation calcium ion solution were irradiated separately. To investigate the crystal morphology, XRD pattern were surveyed. The comparison of each cases show that the chemical coating affected the ablation process evidentl...

  10. Direct frequency comb laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Jayich, A M; Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) lasers are the enabling technology for producing ultracold atoms and molecules through laser cooling and trapping. The resulting pristine samples of slow moving particles are the de facto starting point for both fundamental and applied science when a highly-controlled quantum system is required. Laser cooled atoms have recently led to major advances in quantum information, the search to understand dark energy, quantum chemistry, and quantum sensors. However, CW laser technology currently limits laser cooling and trapping to special types of elements that do not include highly abundant and chemically relevant atoms such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Here, we demonstrate that Doppler cooling and trapping by optical frequency combs may provide a route to trapped, ultracold atoms whose spectra are not amenable to CW lasers. We laser cool a gas of atoms by driving a two-photon transition with an optical frequency comb, an efficient process to which every comb tooth coherently cont...

  11. A novel approach to laser inertial fusion driver construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a new scheme of the construction of a laser driver for ICF research. This scheme is based on the use of the pulse chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) radiation as a pump source for solid state lasers. The principle of operation of the COIL and the driver scheme are presented. (TEC). 25 refs., 7 figs

  12. A new approach to laser inertial fusion driver construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new scheme is proposed of the construction of laser driver for inertial thermo-nuclear fusion researches. The scheme is based on the use of chemical oxigen-iodine laser of visible range as a pump source for solid-state lasers

  13. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe2/ sup *(1)/, Kr:O(21S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  14. Probing Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KLEYN, A.W.; KLEYN, A.W

    2001-01-01

    An account is given of recent progress concerning chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The goal is to elucidate the reaction dynamics at the molecular level, both as time and distance is concerned. The methods of study include molecular beam scattering, scanning tunnelling microscopy, and (femtosecond) laser spectroscopy. Systems studied include elementary interactions of NO, CO, and O2 at single crystal metal surfaces.

  15. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  16. Laser interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joo, K.N.; Ellis, J.D.; Spronck, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Laser interferometer comprising a laser light source providing at least one light beam at two distinct frequencies, a beam splitter for splitting the at least one light beam into reference and measurement beams, a first reflector and a second reflector for reflection of the reference and measurement

  17. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lasers Technology Program of IPEN is strongly committed to the study of Laser Applications on several areas: Nuclear, Medicine and Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced research, aiming not only research but diffusion and innovation in association with Brazilian universities and commercial partners

  18. Laser flash synthesis of graphene and its inorganic analogues: An innovative breakthrough with immense promise

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Prashant

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based green synthetic approaches for 2D atomic sheets of graphene, graphene nanoribbons and inorganic analogues of graphene are relatively new techniques. There are several significant laser-based approaches for graphene synthesis such as (a) laser exfoliation, (b) intercalation and exfoliation in liquid nitrogen, (c) pulsed laser deposition, (d) laser induced ultrafast chemical vapour deposition, (e) laser induced catalyst-free growth of graphene from solid carbon sources, (f) epitaxia...

  19. Laser yellowing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B Sai Prasad; Salvatore Siano

    2010-12-01

    Over the past few years there has been an increasing interest in researches related to the application of lasers in conservation, analysis and diagnostics of artwork surfaces. Among the many interesting problems to be tackled, one issue was drawing more interest because of the limitations it can impose on the use of lasers. Laser yellowing is a phenomenon wherein artwork surfaces assume a yellow hue when cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) lasers in particular. Here the effect of yellowing has been studied and quantified for artwork surfaces (marble) using SFR Nd:YAG and LQS Nd:YAG lasers. Colorimetric measurements by employing a spectroradiometer helps to quantify the effect of yellowing by analysing three variables (chromaticity coordinates) of interest.

  20. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  1. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  2. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  3. Autokeratomileusis Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Seymour P.

    1987-03-01

    Refractive defects such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism may be corrected by laser milling of the cornea. An apparatus combining automatic refraction/keratometry and an excimer type laser for precision reshaping of corneal surfaces has been developed for testing. When electronically linked to a refractometer or keratometer or holographic imaging device, the laser is capable of rapidly milling or ablating corneal surfaces to preselected dioptric power shapes without the surgical errors characteristic of radial keratotomy, cryokeratomileusis or epikeratophakia. The excimer laser simultaneously generates a synthetic Bowman's like layer or corneal condensate which appears to support re-epithelialization of the corneal surface. An electronic feedback arrangement between the measuring instrument and the laser enables real time control of the ablative milling process for precise refractive changes in the low to very high dioptric ranges. One of numerous options is the use of a rotating aperture wheel with reflective portions providing rapid alternate ablation/measurement interfaced to both laser and measurement instrumentation. The need for the eye to be fixated is eliminated or minimized. In addition to reshaping corneal surfaces, the laser milling apparatus may also be used in the process of milling both synthetic and natural corneal inlays for lamellar transplants.

  4. GAS LASERS FOR STRONG-FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2004-09-15

    Atomic-, molecular- and excimer-gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers can produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer- and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for generating pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are underway and prospects are opening up to bring ultrafast gas laser technology to the front lines of advanced accelerator applications.

  5. Miniature laser direct-detection radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharekar, Madhu; Lebeau, Robert

    1992-06-01

    A miniature laser with a total volume less than 15 cu cm and weight less than 100 g has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. The laser uses a composite rod consisting of Nd:Cr:GSGG material rod cladded with an Er:Cr:YSGG tube. The laser provides output at 1 and 3 micron wavelengths. The size and weight reduction is obtained by chemical pumping which eliminates the prime power and the power supply. The laser is used as an illuminator in a direct detection radar.

  6. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  7. Micromachining soda-lime glass by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Yu, Jian; Chai, Lu; Wang, Ching-Yue

    2015-08-01

    The physical process of forming a modified region in soda-lime glass was investigated using 1 kHz intense femtosecond laser pulses from a Ti: sapphire laser at 775 nm. Through the modifications induced by the femtosecond laser radiation using selective chemical etching techniques, we fabricated reproducible and defined microstructures and further studied their morphologies and etching properties. Moreover, a possible physical mechanism for the femtosecond laser modification in soda-lime glass was proposed.

  8. Laser-evoked coloration in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H. Y.; Rosseinsky, David; Lim, G. C.

    2005-05-01

    Laser-evoked coloration in polymers has long been a major aim of polymer technology for potential applications in product surface decoration, marking personalised images and logos. However, the coloration results reported so far were mostly attributed to laser-induced thermal-chemical reactions. The laser-irradiated areas are characterized with grooves due to material removal. Furthermore, only single color was laser-induced in any given polymer matrix. To induce multiple colors in a given polymer matrix with no apparent surface material removal is most desirable and challenging and may be achieved through laser-induced photo-chemical reactions. However, little public information is available at present. We report that two colors of red and green have been produced on an initially transparent CPV/PVA samples through UV laser-induced photo-chemical reactions. This is believed the first observation of laser-induced multiple-colors in the given polymer matrix. It is believed that the colorants underwent photo-effected electron transfer with suitable electron donors from the polymers to change from colorless bipyridilium Bipm 2+ to the colored Bipm + species. The discovery may lead to new approaches to the development of laser-evoked multiple coloration in polymers.

  9. Explosive laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO2 and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO2 lasing

  10. Semiconductor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K.; Shyuue, M.

    1982-09-25

    A distributed feedback semiconductor laser is proposed which generates several beams with equal wavelengths in different directions. For this purpose, 1 millimeter grooves are cut into the surface of an n-type conductance GaAs plate in three different directions; these grooves form a diffraction grating. The center of this plate has no grooves and is bombarded by an He/Ne laser beam. The diffraction gratings provide resonance properties and generate laser beams with wavelengths of 8850, 9000 and 9200 angstroms.

  11. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  12. Growth of ferroelectric Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} epitaxial films by ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of chemical solution derived precursor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queraltó, A.; Pérez del Pino, A., E-mail: aperez@icmab.es; Mata, M. de la; Tristany, M.; Gómez, A.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Arbiol, J. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-06-29

    Highly crystalline epitaxial Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (BST) thin-films are grown on (001)-oriented LaNiO{sub 3}-buffered LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser irradiation of solution derived barium-zirconium-titanium precursor layers using a UV Nd:YAG laser source at atmospheric conditions. The structural analyses of the obtained films, studied by X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy, demonstrate that laser processing allows the growth of tens of nm-thick BST epitaxial films with crystalline structure similar to that of films obtained through conventional thermal annealing methods. However, the fast pulsed nature of the laser employed leads to crystallization kinetic evolution orders of magnitude faster than in thermal treatments. The combination of specific photothermal and photochemical mechanisms is the main responsible for the ultrafast epitaxial laser-induced crystallization. Piezoresponse microscopy measurements demonstrate equivalent ferroelectric behavior in laser and thermally annealed films, being the piezoelectric constant ∼25 pm V{sup −1}.

  13. Impulsive rotational Raman scattering of N2 by a remote "air laser" in femtosecond laser filament

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Jielei; Chu, Wei; Zhang, Haisu; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Xie, Hongqiang; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of impulsive rotational Raman scattering from neutral nitrogen molecules in a femtosecond laser filament using an intense self-induced white-light seeding "air laser" generated during the filamentation of an 800 nm Ti: Sapphire laser in nitrogen gas. The impulsive rotational Raman fingerprint signals are observed with a maximum conversion efficiency of ~0.8%. Our observation provides a promising way of remote identification and location of chemical specie...

  14. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  15. Laser patterning of vertically grown carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Won Seok [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The selective patterning of a carbon nanotube (CNT) forest on a Si substrate has been performed using a femtosecond laser. The high shock wave generated by the femtosecond laser effectively removed the CNTs without damage to the Si substrate. This process has many advantages because it is performed without chemicals and can be easily applied to large area patterning. The CNTs grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have a catalyst cap at the end of the nanotube owing to the tip growth mode mechanism. For the application of an electron emission and biosensor probe, the catalyst cap is usually removed chemically, which damages the surface of the CNT wall. Precise control of the femtosecond laser power and focal position could solve this problem. Furthermore, selective CNT cutting using a femtosecond laser is also possible without any phase change in the CNTs, which is usually observed in the focused ion beam irradiation of CNTs.

  16. Theoretical analysis of one dimensional gas dynamics of total pressure losses for combustion-driven continuous wave DF/HF chemical lasers%燃烧驱动CWDF/HF化学激光器总压损失的一维气体动力学理论分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐力铁; 李艳娜; 赵乐至

    2016-01-01

    The pressure recovery system is one of the key techniques for the high energy chemical lasers. Total pressure losses affect the key specification of lasers, such as the output ability, the size and weight of laser systems. The total pressure losses for combustion-driven continuous wave DF/HF chemical lasers were proposed according to the theory analysis of one dimensional gas exhausting. The analysis of the main factors of total pressure losses in the gain generator of the laser is the foundation of the research of recovering the gain generator with high pressure. Two major factors of total pressure losses caused by viscous friction and the temperature rise caused by chemical reaction in optical cavity were discussed in this paper. The result shows that temperature rise caused by burning has obvious influence on system's performance of pressure recovery.%压力恢复系统是目前高能化学激光器的关键部件,它的总压损失会影响到整个激光器系统的出光能力和全系统的体积重量等关键技术指标。为了研究燃烧驱动CW DF/HF化学激光器总压损失,从一维气体动力学进行了理论分析。分析在激光器增益发生器内引起总压损失的主要因素,是研究高压力恢复激光器增益发生器的基础。主要讨论了引起总压损失的两个主要原因:第一,由于粘性摩擦引起的总压损失;第二,由于光学谐振腔中化学反应放热升温引起的总压损失。计算结果表明,燃烧升温对系统的压力恢复能力有较大的影响。

  17. Laser Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Weijian; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, greatly enhancing the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we used an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror in a VCSEL, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity with > 550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micro-mechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical. This new scheme not only offers an efficient approach for high-...

  18. Imagerie laser

    OpenAIRE

    Bellet, Jean-Baptiste; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    International audience We derive an original direct imaging method of an object. It is based on topological derivatives, and aims at inverting the amplitude of waves that are retropropagated after laser illuminations.

  19. A laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, N.

    1984-06-19

    It is reported that an improved laser design employing pumping of the active gas medium has been developed. A diagram of the laser system is given and its principle of operation is described in detail. Gas pumping is achieved using a pump whose oil reservoir is sealed by a sealing element. When the sealing element fails, the oil from the reservoir pollutes the laser substance. It is proposed that an additional oil reservoir pumping loop be used to maintain a lower pressure. The reservoir pressure is recorded by a sensor. When the sealing element fails, the pressure in the reservoir increases. The sensor records the change in pressure and generates a signal which shuts down the laser system. Thus, the possibility for oil penetration into the gas system is totally eliminated.

  20. Green lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2010-01-01

    Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range......Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range...

  1. Laser Resurfacing

    OpenAIRE

    Janik, Joseph P.; Markus, Jodi L.; Al-Dujaili, Zeena; Markus, Ramsey F.

    2007-01-01

    In a society desiring images of beauty and youthfulness, the world of cutaneous surgery offers the gifts of facial rejuvenation for those determined to combat the signs of aging. With the development of novel laser and plasma technology, pigmentary changes, scarring, and wrinkles can be conquered providing smoother, healthier, younger-looking skin. This review highlights five of the most popular resurfacing technologies in practice today including the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser, the erbium:yt...

  2. The Difference between the Two Methods of Animal Models for Depigmentation Separately Induced by Q-Switched YAG Laser and Chemical Decolorization%Q开关YAG激光及化学脱色法构建色素脱失动物模型的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪静; 刘莉萍; 马红; 许辉; 顾文涛; 李遇梅

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨Q开关YAG激光及化学脱色法对豚鼠皮肤黑素细胞的影响,从而构建色素脱失动物模型.方法 分别应用Q开关YAG激光照射及5%H2O2化学脱色处理豚鼠黑色皮肤,肉眼观察皮肤颜色变化,HE染色和HMM5免疫组化染色观察皮肤黑素细胞的变化.结果 Q开关YAG激光照射3次后,豚鼠黑色皮肤变为白色,同时长出白色毛发,HE及HMB45染色后基底层未见黑素细胞.2个月后,照射区域皮肤及毛发仍呈白色,镜下基底层亦未见黑素细胞.而化学脱色法可使皮肤略变白,毛发仍呈黑色,HE及HMB45染色镜下基底层仍可见大量黑素细胞.结论 Q开关YAG激光可以构建短期稳定色素脱失动物模型,为色素减少性皮肤病的研究提供了可依据的动物模型.%Objective To explore the changes on melanocytes from guinea pig skin which was derived by Q-Switched YAG laser or chemical decolorization and to establish animal models for depigmentation. Methods Q-Switched YAG laser or 5% H2O2 chemical decolorization was separately applied to guinea pig's dark skin, and then the change of skin color was observed under macroscopy while melanocytes were detected after stained by HE and immunohistochemistry with HMB45. Results After radiated by Q-Switched YAG laser for three times, the dark skins became white and grew white hair, meanwhile melanocytes were not seen in the stratum basale through HE and HMB 45 stain. Two months later, the skins and hair still maintained white and melanocytes couldn't be seen in the stratum basale. However, chemical decolorization could slightly make darken skins decolored while the hair still appeared black, and melanocytes could be seen obviously after stained with HE and HMB45. Conclusion Compared with chemical decolorization, Q-Switched YAG laser could establish stable animal models for depigmentation temporarily.

  3. Laser optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-09-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors.

  4. Trends In Materials Processing With Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herziger, G.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1989-04-01

    The objectives of reactive chemical and nonreactive thermal processing with laser radiation are outlined giving indication that processing with laser radiation is governed by a hierarchy of time constants originating from photon-matter interaction, phase transition dynamics, laser source excitation fluctuations,, and optical feedback in combination with the influence of beam delivery systems, processing/shielding gas flow configurations, robotics, production lines and environment. The minimization of losses by heat flow, reflection and transmission and the stringent need for quality assurance require as first approach the control of processing, which is mainly due to the capability of laser radiation source. The current status of laser radiation sources is reported giving information on the state of the art of processing with laser radiation in combination with subsequent demonstration of future trends and developments with respect to radiation sources, beam delivery, beam shaping, materials, processing and quality assurance.

  5. Trends in materials processsing with laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herziger, Gerd; Kreutz, Ernst W.

    1989-03-01

    The objectives of reactive chemical and nonreactive thermal processing with laser radiation are outlined giving indication that processing with laser radiation is governed by a hierarchy of time constants originating from photon-matter interaction, phase transition dynamics, laser source excitation fluctuations, and optical feedback in combination with the influence of beam delivery systems, processing/shielding gas flow configurations, robotics, production lines and environment. The minimization of losses by heat flow, reflection and transmission and the stringent need for quality assurance require as first approach the control of processing, which is mainly due to the capability of laser radiation source. The current status of laser radiation sources is reported giving information on the state of the art of processing with laser radiation in combination with subsequent demonstration of future trends and developments with respect to radiation sources, beam delivery, beam shaping, materials, processing and quality assurance.

  6. Computer control of pulsed tunable dye lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed tunable dye lasers are being used extensively for spectroscopic and photo-chemical experiments, and a system for acquisition and spectral analysis of a volume of data generated will be quite useful. The development of a system for wavelength tuning and control of tunable dye lasers and an acquisition system for spectral data generated in experiments with these lasers are described. With this system, it is possible to control the tuning of three lasers, and acquire data in four channels, simultaneously. It is possible to arrive at the desired dye laser wavelength with a reproducibility of ± 0.012 cm-1, which is within the absorption width (atomic interaction) caused by pulsed dye lasers of linewidth 0.08 cm-1. The spectroscopic data generated can be analyzed for spectral identification within absolute accuracy ± 0.012 cm-1. (author). 6 refs., 11 figs

  7. Chemical networks*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One o...

  8. Gas and metal vapor lasers and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 22, 23, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    Various papers on gas and metal vapor lasers and applications are presented. Individual topics addressed include: high-power copper vapor laser development, modified off-axis unstable resonator for copper vapor laser, industrial applications of metal vapor lasers, newly developed excitation circuit for kHz pulsed lasers, copper vapor laser precision processing, development of solid state pulse power supply for copper vapor laser, multiple spectral structure of the 578.2-nm line for copper vapor laser, adsorption of bromine in CuBr laser, processing of polytetrafluoroethylene with high-power VUV laser radiation, characterization of a subpicosecond XeF(C - A) excimer laser, X-ray preionization for high-repetition-rate discharge excimer lasers. Also discussed are: investigation of microwave-pumped excimer and rare-gas laser transitions, influence of gas composition of XeCl laser performance, output power stabilization of a XeCl excimer laser by HCl gas injection, excimer laser machining of optical fiber taps, diagnostics of a compact UV-preionized XeCl laser with BCl3 halogen donor, blackbody-pumped CO32 lasers using Gaussian and waveguide cavities, chemical problems of high-power sealed-off CO lasers, laser action of Xe and Ne pumped by electron beam, process monitoring during CO2 laser cutting, double-pulsed TEA CO2 laser, superhigh-gain gas laser, high-power ns-pulse iodine laser provided with SBS mirror. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  9. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  10. Theory of the magnetronic laser

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, M

    2003-01-01

    We determine the total power of radiation of electron moving in the planar magnetron fields and the power spectrum generated by a single electron and by a system of N electrons moving coherently in the planar magnetron. We argue that for large N and high intensity of electric and magnetic fields, the power of radiation of such magnetronic laser, MAL, can be sufficient for application in the physical, chemical, biological and medicine sciences. In medicine, the magnetronic laser, can be used for the therapy of the localized cancer tumors. The application of MAL in CERN as an ion source for LHC is not excluded.

  11. Header For Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1990-01-01

    Header designed to contain laser diode. Output combined incoherently with outputs of other laser diodes in grating laser-beam combiner in optical communication system. Provides electrical connections to laser diode, cooling to thermally stabilize laser operation, and optomechanical adjustments that steer and focus laser beam. Range of adjustments provides for correction of worst-case decentering and defocusing of laser beam encountered with laser diodes. Mechanical configuration made simple to promote stability and keep cost low.

  12. Laser Physics and Laser-Tissue Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, A.J.; Torres, Jorge H; Cheong, Wai-Fung

    1989-01-01

    Within the last few years, lasers have gained increasing use in the management of cardiovascular disease, and laser angioplasty has become a widely performed procedure. For this reason, a basic knowledge of lasers and their applications is essential to vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. To elucidate some fundamental concepts regarding laser physics, we describe how laser light is generated and review the properties that make lasers useful in medicine. We also d...

  13. Chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  14. Chemical Radioprotectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Upadhyay

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Protection of biological systems against radiation damage is of paramount importance during accidental and unavoidable exposure to radiation. Several physico-chemical and biological factors collectively contribute to the damage caused by radiation and are, therefore, targets for developing radioprotectors. Work on the development of chemicals capable of protecting biological systemsfrom radiation damage was initiated nearly six decades ago with cysteine being the first molecule to be reported. Chemicals capable of scavenging free radicals, inducing oxygen depletion,antioxidants and modulators of immune response have been some of the radioprotectors extensively investigated with limited success. Mechanism of action of some chemical radioprotectors and their combinations have been elucidated, while further understanding is required in many instances. The present review elaborates on structure-activity relationship of some of the chemical radioprotectors, their evaluation, and assessment, limitation, and future prospects.

  15. A laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, N.

    1984-06-19

    The development of an improved gas laser system employing pumping of the active gaseous medium is reported. The layout of the design is given and its principle of operation is described in detail. The oil reservoir in the vacuum pump which pumps the gas through the laser system is separated by a sealing element; when this element fails, the oil may pollute the active medium. It is proposed that an additional oil reservoir pumping loop be used with the pump that operates continuously and maintains a lower pressure in the reservoir. The pressure in the reservoir is monitored by a special sensor. When the sealing element fails, the pressure sensor records the pressure drop in the oil reservoir. A signal is then generated and the laser system ceases operation, and eliminates the possibility for the oil penetrating into the pumping system.

  16. Laser Heterodyning

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopov, Vladimir V

    2009-01-01

    Laser heterodyning is now a widespread optical technique, based on interference of two waves with slightly different frequencies within the sensitive area of a photo-detector. Its unique feature – preserving phase information about optical wave in the electrical signal of the photo-detector – finds numerous applications in various domains of applied optics and optoelectronics: in spectroscopy, polarimetry, radiometry, laser radars and Lidars, microscopy and other areas. The reader may be surprised by a variety of disciplines that this book covers and satisfied by detailed explanation of the phenomena. Very well illustrated, this book will be helpful for researches, postgraduates and students, working in applied optics.

  17. Graviton laser

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, A

    2016-01-01

    We consider the possibility of creating a graviton laser. The lasing medium would be a system of contained, ultra cold neutrons. Ultra cold neutrons are a quantum mechanical system that interacts with gravitational fields and with the phonons of the container walls. It is possible to create a population inversion by pumping the system using the phonons. We compute the rate of spontaneous emission of gravitons and the rate of the subsequent stimulated emission of gravitons. The gain obtainable is directly proportional to the density of the lasing medium and the fraction of the population inversion. The applications of a graviton laser would be interesting.

  18. Thermodynamically predicted oscillations in closed chemical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zilbergleyt, B

    2010-01-01

    All known up to now models of chemical oscillations are based exclusively on kinetic considerations. The chemical gross-process equation is split usually by elementary steps, each step is supplied by an arrow and a differential equation, joint solution to such a construction under certain, often ad hoc chosen conditions and with ad hoc numerical coefficients leads to chemical oscillations. Kinetic perception of chemical oscillations reigns without exclusions. However, as it was recently shown by the author for the laser and for the electrochemical systems, chemical oscillations follow also from solutions to the basic expressions of discrete thermodynamics of chemical equilibria. Graphically those solutions are various fork bifurcation diagrams, and, in certain types of chemical systems, oscillations are well pronounced in the bistable bifurcation areas. In this work we describe a general thermodynamic approach to chemical oscillations as opposite to kinetic models, and depict some of their new features like s...

  19. Cleaning laser spark spectroscopy for online cleaning quality control method development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutin, T. Y.; Smirnov, V. N.; Veiko, V. P.; Volkov, S. A.

    2011-02-01

    This work is dedicated to spectroscopic investigations of laser spark during the laser cleaning process. The goal is to proof its analytical possibilities for chemical composition determination for online cleaning quality control. Photographic recordings of laser spark were performed to estimate its parameters. Fiber spectrometer was used to analyze the emission of cleaning process established with fiber laser. Conclusions have been made about fiber laser radiation usability for spectroscopic purpose.

  20. Monolithic optofluidic ring resonator lasers created by femtosecond laser nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrahalim, Hengky; Chen, Qiushu; Said, Ali A; Dugan, Mark; Fan, Xudong

    2015-05-21

    We designed, fabricated, and characterized a monolithically integrated optofluidic ring resonator laser that is mechanically, thermally, and chemically robust. The entire device, including the ring resonator channel and sample delivery microfluidics, was created in a block of fused-silica glass using a 3-dimensional femtosecond laser writing process. The gain medium, composed of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dissolved in quinoline, was flowed through the ring resonator. Lasing was achieved at a pump threshold of approximately 15 μJ mm(-2). Detailed analysis shows that the Q-factor of the optofluidic ring resonator is 3.3 × 10(4), which is limited by both solvent absorption and scattering loss. In particular, a Q-factor resulting from the scattering loss can be as high as 4.2 × 10(4), suggesting the feasibility of using a femtosecond laser to create high quality optical cavities.

  1. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  2. Dye laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telle, H.; Schieder, R.; Raue, R.; Eckstein, U.

    1980-05-22

    For a laser radiating in the range of wavelengths from 420 to 480 nm dye solutions are proposed. The dyes are produced by transformation of 4,4'-biphenylene-bis-(methylenoxy-2-benzaldehydes) or their bisaniles in bipolar aprotic solvents adding strongly basic alkali compounds to the benzofurans and subsequent sulfonation.

  3. Laser capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  4. Laser device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source for light circuits on a silicon platform. A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region arranged between a first mirror structure and a second mirror structure, both acting as mirrors, by forming a grating region including an active material...

  5. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pills, who subsequently become pregnant or have a history of brownish facial discoloration. Scarring Reactivation of cold sores What can I expect after having a chemical peel? All peels require some follow-up care: ...

  6. Unnecessary Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  7. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  8. Excimer Laser Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Basting, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive survey on Excimer Lasers investigates the current range of the technology, applications and devices of this commonly used laser source, as well as the future of new technologies, such as F2 laser technology. Additional chapters on optics, devices and laser systems complete this compact handbook. A must read for laser technology students, process application researchers, engineers or anyone interested in excimer laser technology. An effective and understandable introduction to the current and future status of excimer laser technology.

  9. Visible Solid State Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Hikmet, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Diode lasers can be found in various applications most notably in optical communication and optical storage. Visible lasers were until recently were all based on IR diode lasers. Using GaN, directly blue and violet emitting lasers have also been introduced to the market mainly in the area of optical recording. However blue diode lasers can find many new applications especially in the area of lighting. This short report describes laser basics and applications of visible lasers.

  10. Longitudinal Laser Shaping in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Chen, Pisin

    2000-01-01

    We study the energetics of wake excitation during the laser-plasma interaction in application to laser wakefield accelerators. We find that both the wake amplitude and the accelerating efficiency (transformer ratio) can be maximized by properly shaping the longitudinal profile of the driving laser pulse. The corresponding family of laser pulse shapes is derived in the nonlinear regime of laser-plasma interaction. Such shapes provide theoretical upper limit on the magnitude of the wakefield an...

  11. Dissipative Structures At Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanai, Laszlo

    1989-05-01

    The questions which are discussed in this lecture refer to one of sections of laser-solid interactions, namely: to formation of different dissipative structures on the surface of metals and semiconductors when they are irradiated by intensive laser light in chemically active media (f.e.air). Some particular examples of the development at different spatial and time instabilities, periodic and stochastic structures, auto-wave processes are present-ed using testing materials vanadium metal and semiconducting V205 single crystals and light sources: cw and pulsed CO2 and YAG lasers.

  12. Intense laser beams; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23, 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Richard C. (Editor); Ulrich, Peter B. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Various papers on intense laser beams are presented. Individual topics addressed include: novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation, UCLA IR FEL, lasing characteristics of a large-bore copper vapor laser (CVL), copper density measurement of a large-bore CVL, high-power XeCl excimer laser, solid state direct-drive circuit for pumping gas lasers, united energy model for FELs, intensity and frequency instabilities in double-mode CO2 lasers, comparison of output power stabilities of CO and CO2 lasers, increasing efficiency of sealed-off CO lasers, thermal effects in singlet delta oxygen generation, optical extraction from the chemical oxygen-iodine laser medium, generation and laser diagnostic analysis of bismuth fluoride. Also discussed are: high-Q resonator design for an HF overtone chemical lasers, improved coatings for HF overtone lasers, scaled atmospheric blooming experiment, simulation on producing conjugate field using deformable mirrors, paraxial theory of amplitude correction, potential capabilities of adaptive optical systems in the atmosphere, power beaming research at NASA, system evaluations of laser power beaming options, performance projections for laser beam power to space, independent assessment of laser power beaming options, removal of atmospheric CFCs by lasers, efficiency of vaporization cutting by CVL.

  13. Dermatological laser treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reviews the different lasers used in dermatology. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of naevus flammeus (''portwine stain'') where lasers are the treatment of choice. Argon laser and pulsed dye laser are the main lasers used in vascular skin diseases, and the article focuses on these two types. Copper-vapour laser, neodymium-YAG laser and CO2 laser are also presented. Information is provided about the availability of laser technology in the different health regions in Norway. 5 refs., 2 figs

  14. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hema Ramachandran

    2002-02-01

    Experimental realization of mirrorless lasers in the last decade have resulted in hectic activity in this field, due to their novelty, simplicity and ruggedness and their great potential for application. In this article, I will review the various developments in this field in roughly chronological order, and discuss some possible applications of this exciting phenomenon, also termed as ‘random lasing’.

  15. Laser Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Pisin

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in our understanding of the cosmos, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. Concurrently the laser technology has undergone dramatic revolutions, providing exciting opportunity for science applications. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. We believe that this remains true in cosmology. Current frontier phenomena re...

  16. Graviton laser

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the possibility of creating a graviton laser. The lasing medium would be a system of contained, ultra cold neutrons. Ultra cold neutrons are a quantum mechanical system that interacts with gravitational fields and with the phonons of the container walls. It is possible to create a population inversion by pumping the system using the phonons. We compute the rate of spontaneous emission of gravitons and the rate of the subsequent stimulated emission of gravitons. The gain obtainable...

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm-2) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm-2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm-2. The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  18. Lasers and medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deren, Przemyslaw J. [Institute of Low Temperatures and Structure Researches, Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents physical bases of laser light interaction with biological tissue. Invasive and non-invasive laser applications like laser knife (scalpel), biostymulation - Low Level Laser Therapy, laser diagnosis and therapy especially Photodynamic Diagnosis and Therapy are reviewed. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Investigation of the Periodic Microstructure Induced by a 355 nm UV Polarized Laser on a Polyimide Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅; 路庆华; 印杰; 罗售余; 王宗光

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a periodic microstructure induced by a 355 nm ultraviolet polarized laser on a polyimide surface and the dependence of the structures on laser parameters. Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) of sub-micrometre size were generated on three kinds of polyimide films by a polarized Nd:YAG laser of 355nm within a wide range of laser fluence. The chemical structure of the polyimide, the film-making process, the number of laser pulses and the laser fluence greatly influenced the formation of LIPSS. The periodicity of LIPSS was decided by the wavelength, the incidence angle of the laser beam and the apparent refractive index of the material.

  20. Chemical Mahjong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  1. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... Chemical peels public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  2. Chemical pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Andreas; Amstutz, Nahid; Delahaye, Sandra; Sadki, Asmaâ; Schenker, Sabine; Sieber, Regula; Zerara, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    The physical and photophysical properties of three classic transition metal complexes, namely [Fe(bpy)3]2+, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, and [Co(bpy)3]2+, can be tuned by doping them into a variety of inert crystalline host lattices. The underlying guest-host interactions are discussed in terms of a chemical pressure.

  3. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  4. Mars Observer Laser Altimeter: laser transmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, R S

    1994-05-20

    The Mars Observer Laser Altimeter utilizes a space-qualified diode-laser-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser transmitter. A simple numerical model of the laser energetics is presented, which predicts the pulse energy and pulse width. Comparisons with the measured data available are made. The temperature dependence of the laser transmitter is also predicted. This dependence prediction is particularly important in determining the operational temperature range of the transmitter. Knowing the operational temperature range is especially important for a passive, thermally controlled laser operating in space. PMID:20885685

  5. Gas dynamic lasers. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-07-01

    The citations cover research on kinetic and energy transfer processes, design, optics, nozzles, and performance of gas and chemical lasers relying on gas dynamic effects for lasing enhancement. Diffusion and flow studies specifically applicable to such lasers are also included. This updated bibliography contains 253 citations, 6 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  6. Laser-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, Y. van de

    2014-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LACVD) is an attractive maskless process for growing locally carbon nanotubes at selected places on substrates that may contain temperature-sensitive components. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the reported research with respect to laser assist

  7. Investigation on orientation, epitaxial growth and microstructure of a-axis-, c-axis-, (103)/(110)- and (113)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ films prepared on (001), (110) and (111) SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by spray atomizing and coprecipitating laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Wang, Ying; Huang, Zhi liang; Mao, Yangwu; Xu, Yuan Lai

    2015-04-01

    a-axis-, c-axis-, (103)/(110)- and (113)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films were pareared by spray atomizing and coprecipitating laser chemical vapor deposition. The surface of the a-axis-oriented YBCO film consisted of rectangular needle-like grains whose in-plane epitaxial growth relationship was YBCO [100] // STO [001] (YBCO [001] // STO [100]), and that of the c-axis-oriented YBCO film consisted of dense flat surface with epitaxial growth relationship of YBCO [001] // STO [001] (YBCO [100] //STO [100]). For the (103)/(110)-oriented and (113)-oriented YBCO film, they showed wedge-shaped and triangle-shaped grains, with corresponding in-plane epitaxial growth relationship of YBCO [110] // STO [110] (YBCO [010] // STO [010]) and YBCO [100] // STO [100] (YBCO [113] // STO [111], respectively.

  8. Laser Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hair Removal, Laser A A A AFTER: Two laser hair removal treatments were performed. This picture is ... Procedure Overview With just the right type of laser or Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) technology, suitable hairs ...

  9. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are used in cancer treatment? What are the advantages of laser therapy? What are the disadvantages of ... the drugs used in PDT. What are the advantages of laser therapy? Lasers are more precise than ...

  10. Laser therapy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  11. Posibilities Of Appliance Of Therapeutic Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnikowski, I.; Spiechowicz, E.

    1987-10-01

    The appliance of a therapeutic laser also known as soft laser has gained wider scope in the latest years. The main characteristics of the laser radiation, namely its monochromatic and coherent nature render the photochemic activity selecive especially on the intracelluar level, stimulating the dynamics of the oxido-reductive changes in a cell. The action of the laser beam upon living tissue depends on the power of the used laser as well as upon the physical properties of the object itself i.e. its optical, mechanical, chemical properties. The use of a high powered laser causes a big rise in the temperature and prescure inside tissue which leads to denaturation of protein and than to evaporation and destruction of the cell. It is possible to gain quite diffrent effects using a soft /or therapeutic/ laser which in the course of stimulating the biological changes in a cell causes its regeneration and not its degradation. There exist three main phenomena on the level of the radiation emition. These are absorption, reflection and penetration. The most important from the medical point of view are penetration and absorption, for the direct biological changes depend upon these very parameters. The action of the laser beam upon tissue in fig. 1.

  12. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  13. Development of Fiber Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yang; HUANG, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, fiber lasers have been focused as research topic in the field of laser. It is widely applicable in the field of modern optical communication, optical sensing, materials technology, life sciences and precision mechanics, national defence science ,etc. Fiber laser is typical representative of the third generation lasers. Fiber lasers have great ad-vantages compare to any other lasers, such as long lifetime, small size, high efficiency, compact structure, etc. This repor...

  14. The Laser Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, C. B.

    1986-11-01

    The total value of all lasers sold during 1986 in the non-Communist world will exceed US $600 million. This paper examines these sales and categorizes them according to application and according to type of laser. The results are presented both in terms of numbers of lasers sold, and in terms of the value of those lasers. The data are based on extensive interviews with laser manufacturers and laser users.

  15. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  16. Chemical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress over the past year is reported in: (1) Multiphoton Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules; (2) Collisional Ionization; (3) Studies of Molecular Clustering Phenomena; (4) Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Studies; (5) Studies of Helium Negative Ions; (6) Photophysics Theory; (7) Ultrasensitive Detection of Molecules by Laser Fluorescence and Molecular RIS; (8) Collisional Redistribution Between He(21P) and He(21S); (9) RIS Studies of Lithium; (10) Generalization of RIS Schemes of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy with Amplification; (11) Solar Neutrino Proportional Counter Using RIS; (12) New Approaches to One Atom Detection: Maxwell's Sorting Demon; and (13) Precision Measurements of Diffusion Coefficients Using RIS Techniques. The descriptive material is limited to include only research highlights under each of these headings

  17. Laser biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This issue of Quantum Electronics presents the papers that reflect the state-of-the-art of laser technologies used in biomedical studies and medical practice. Among the new technologies, one can note the methods of correlation and Doppler spectroscopy, as well as THz spectroscopy, in which biologically significant molecules are characterised by specific resonances. The latter topic is considered in the paper by Nazarov et al., where the dielectric function of aqueous solutions of glucose and albumin is studied using pulsed THz spectroscopy.

  18. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  19. Femtosecond laser in laser in situ keratomileusis

    OpenAIRE

    Salomão, Marcella Q.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Flap creation is a critical step in laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Efforts to improve the safety and predictability of the lamellar incision have fostered the development of femtosecond lasers. Several advantages of the femtosecond laser over mechanical microkeratomes have been reported in LASIK surgery. In this article, we review common considerations in management and complications of this step in femtosecond laser–LASIK and concentrate primarily on the IntraLase laser because most p...

  20. Análise química e morfológica do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio durante a colagem ortodôntica Chemical and morphological analysis of the human dental enamel treated with argon laser during orthodontic bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Glaucio Serra Guimarães; Liliane Siqueira de Morais; Carlos Nelson Elias; Carlos André de Castro Pérez; Ana Maria Bolognese

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: as principais utilizações do laser argônio na Ortodontia são a redução do tempo de polimerização durante a colagem ortodôntica e o aumento da resistência à cárie do esmalte dentário. OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as alterações químicas e morfológicas do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio nos parâmetros da colagem ortodôntica. MÉTODOS: quinze primeiros pré-molares hígidos, extraídos por indicação ortodôntica, foram selecionados e seccionados no sent...

  1. Impulsive rotational Raman scattering of N2 by a remote "air laser" in femtosecond laser filament

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Xie, Hongqiang; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of impulsive rotational Raman scattering from neutral nitrogen molecules in a femtosecond laser filament using an intense self-induced white-light seeding "air laser" generated during the filamentation of an 800 nm Ti: Sapphire laser in nitrogen gas. The impulsive rotational Raman fingerprint signals are observed with a maximum conversion efficiency of ~0.8%. Our observation provides a promising way of remote identification and location of chemical species in atmosphere by rotational Raman scattering of molecules.

  2. Laser radiation - application for surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of uses laser radiation for decontamination of metal surfaces was considered. The principle of the method is to evaporate a very thin layer of material from the surface via ablation using intensive and focused laser beam. The material removed should then be transferred to a filter by a carrier gas. Some of the obtained data, regarding use of pulsed Nd:YAG laser and energy transfer through an optical fiber, were presented here too. Fundamentals of light interaction with a metal surface were also considered in order to be able to predict conditions and possible ways of successful ablation. It was pointed out that the development of the method would bring several benefits: improved safety - decontamination can be performed remotely, reduced waste volume and less secondary waste, no hazardous chemicals and thus no concerns over chemical handling. (author)

  3. Chemical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair - i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.A sociedade obtém numerosos benefícios da utilização de compostos químicos. A aplicação dos pesticidas, por exemplo, permitiu obter alimento em quantidade suficiente para satisfazer as necessidades alimentares de milhões de pessoas, condição relacionada com o aumento da esperança de vida. Os benefícios estão, por

  4. Laser-induced volatilization and ionization of microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the laser vaporization and ionization of individual micron-size particles is presented whereby a particle is ionized by a laser pulse while in flight in the beam. Ionization in the beam offers a real-time analytical capability and eliminates any possible substrate-sample interferences during an analysis. An experimental arrangement using a high-energy Nd-YAG laser is described, and results are presented for ions generated from potassium biphthalate particles (1.96 micron in diameter). The method proposed here is useful for the chemical analysis of aerosol particles by mass spectrometry and for other spectroscopic and chemical kinetic studies.

  5. Diamond device architectures for UV laser monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, S.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Conte, G.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper reviews the status of diamond detectors for UV laser monitoring and imaging. Single pixel detectors, position sensitive architectures, optically activated switches and sensor arrays for beam positioning and imaging are analyzed. The performances of natural diamond and synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition are compared to evaluate the suitability of such an outstanding material for the described applications.

  6. TWINNING MECHANISMS IN LASER PROCESSED CERAMIC COATINGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Twinning behaviour and martensitic transformations are observed in laser treated (Fe, Cr) spinel with chemical formula FexCr3-xO4 (0

  7. Laser fusion project second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumbaugh, W.H.; Morgan, D.W.; Flannery, J.E.

    1978-11-10

    This research program is devoted to the preparation and characterization of fluoride glasses for laser fusion. The overall objective is to explore and characterize fluoride glass systems to find a glass with the lowest possible nonlinear refractive index, satisfactory chemical durability, and physical properties which enable coating large optical quality pieces. (MOW)

  8. Efficient solutions for low-temperature singlet-oxygen generators. [For iodine lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igoshin, V.I.; Karyshev, V.D.; Katulin, V.A.; Kirilin, A.V.; Kisletsov, A.V. (Fizicheskii Institut, Kuibyshev (USSR))

    1989-02-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics of working solutions for chemical generators of an oxygen-iodine laser are studied. A strong temperature dependence of the solution viscosity is found. The effect of this factor on the performance of singlet-oxygen generator and laser is discussed. The cyclical operation of the laser with efficient neutralization of reagents and the addition of alkali is simulated. 12 refs.

  9. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  10. Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

    2010-03-25

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

  11. Lasers in cosmetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Lasers have become a necessary instrument in the esthetic restorative armamentarium. This article presents smile design guidelines for soft tissue lasers, as well as an overview of hard tissue procedures that may be performed using all-tissue lasers. The goal is to help dentists determine the appropriate laser for a given clinical situations.

  12. Laser safety and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers are finding increasing routine applications in many areas of science, medicine and industry. Though laser radiation is non-ionizing in nature, the usage of high power lasers requires specific safety procedures. This paper briefly outlines the properties of laser beams and various safety procedures necessary in their handling and usage. (author)

  13. Applications of Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Te; SUN Yan-fang; NING Yong-qiang; WANG Li-jun

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the applications of semiconductor lasers is presented. Diode lasers are widely used today,and the most prevalent use of the laser is probably in CD and DVD drives for computers and audio/video media systems. Semiconductor lasers are also used in many other fields ranging from optical fiber communications to display,medicine and pumping sources.

  14. NEW LASER SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Silvfast, W.; Wood, O.

    1980-01-01

    Two new types of lasers, using electron-ion recombination as a pumping mechanism, are described. The first, a segmented-plasma-excitation-recombination (SPER) laser, is simple to construct and provides ultraviolet, visible and infrared laser output from many metal vapors. The second, an annular recombination laser, promises efficiencies of 5% in the near infrared in several species.

  15. Obstacles to Laser Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K

    2005-04-25

    The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

  16. Laser Wire Stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  17. Visible Solid State Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikmet, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Diode lasers can be found in various applications most notably in optical communication and optical storage. Visible lasers were until recently were all based on IR diode lasers. Using GaN, directly blue and violet emitting lasers have also been introduced to the market mainly in the area of optical

  18. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  19. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  20. Multibeam fiber laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Hansen, Klaus Schütt; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2009-01-01

    The appearance of the high power high brilliance fiber laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating Cutting laser, the CO2 laser. However, quality problems in fiber-laser...... cutting have until now limited its application to metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle Studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness and short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multibeam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from two single mode fiber lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W...

  1. Multibeam Fibre Laser Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    The appearance of the high power high brilliance fibre laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating cutting laser, the CO2-laser. However, quality problems in fibre-laser...... cutting have until now limited its application in metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multi beam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from 2 single mode fibre lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W of single...

  2. Prospects for lasers for fusion energy assessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, N. G.; Rozanov, V.

    1985-06-01

    The authors assess the status of laser thermonuclear fusion research in the USSR and abroad, reviewing some of its major advances as well as current objectives of scientists working in this field. The possible development of an experimental laser thermonuclear reactor is discussed. Such a laser must operate with a pulse repetition frequency of 1 to 10 pulses per second, and it must have a service life of about 100 million pulses. It will be made up of individual modules (10 to 20 modules) with an overall energy of 2 to 3 megajoules, and it will ensure stable focusing of radiation on a target about 1 centimeter in size from a distance of about 50 meters. Its efficiency will be adequate and its cost low enough. Lasers of several types (including carbon-dioxide lasers and chemical and excimer lasers based on a mixture of noble gases with halogen) can meet these requirements, but incorporating them in a single unit is quite difficult from the engineering standpoint. The development of modules of such lasers is also an important task.

  3. Free-electron lasers shine on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global race is on to build a laser that can produce coherent, high-power X-rays, as John Galayda describes. Most people think of lasers as small devices that emit red light and are found in laser pointers or barcode scanners. Experimental physicists tend to be familiar with more powerful devices - some of which are big enough to fill a room - that produce light at shorter wavelengths. But one type of laser is in a league of its own when it comes to size and performance: the free-electron laser. The world's first free-electron laser (FEL) switched on at Stanford University in 1977, producing infrared light with a wavelength of 3400 nm. Today there are over 30 free-electron lasers in operation worldwide, with a further dozen at various stages of planning and construction. These new facilities, which were discussed at the 'FEL 2005' conference at Stanford in August, will produce extremely short pulses of very high-intensity radiation in the X-ray region of the spectrum. They will therefore act like a microscopic stroboscope, enabling researchers to investigate chemical and physical processes at the atomic level in real time. (U.K.)

  4. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S

    2002-05-24

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas. PMID:18968642

  5. Atom laser divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Le Coq, Yann; Thywissen, Joseph H.; Rangwala, Sadiq A.; Gerbier, Fabrice; Richard, Simon; Delannoy, Guillaume; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

    2001-01-01

    We measure the angular divergence of a quasi-continuous, rf-outcoupled, free-falling atom laser as a function of the outcoupling frequency. The data is compared to a Gaussian-beam model of laser propagation that generalizes the standard formalism of photonic lasers. Our treatment includes diffraction, magnetic lensing, and interaction between the atom laser and the condensate. We find that the dominant source of divergence is the condensate-laser interaction.

  6. Laser Hardening of Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Institute for Laser Physics; V.A.Serebryakov; K.V.Gratzianov; A.S.Eremenko; A.A.Timopheev; SPBSUITMO; M.V.Volkov

    2006-01-01

    Results of experiments on laser hardening of various materials with intensity 109~1010W/cm2 are represented. Nd:glass laser with energy up to 45J with a pulse duration ~30ns was used as a source of ra diation. Comparative researches of the laser peening for the various target areas are fulfilled. Results of laser hardening were determined by the microstructure analysis. The new approach to creation of the industrial laser for peening is discussed.

  7. High power fiber lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Qi-hong; ZHOU Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this review article, the development of the double cladding optical fiber for high power fiber lasers is reviewed. The main technology for high power fiber lasers, including laser diode beam shaping, fiber laser pumping techniques, and amplification systems, are discussed in de-tail. 1050 W CW output and 133 W pulsed output are ob-tained in Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, China. Finally, the applications of fiber lasers in industry are also reviewed.

  8. The laser in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Alfons G.

    2002-10-01

    Laser is an acronym for a physical principle and means: Light Amplification by stimulated Emission of Radiation. This principle offers a lot of tissue/light effects caused by the parameters: power density/time and the special qualities of the laser light. Nowadays for diagnosis and therapy following lasers are used in urology: Krypton- and Dye-lasers as well as the Neodymium-YAG- (nd:YAG-), Holmium-YAG (Ho:YAG-), Diode-, Argon- and the CO2-lasers.

  9. Zeolite-dye micro lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Vietze, U; Laeri, F; Ihlein, G; Schüth, F; Limburg, B; Abraham, M

    1998-01-01

    We present a new class of micro lasers based on nanoporous molecular sieve host-guest systems. Organic dye guest molecules of 1-Ethyl-4-(4-(p-Dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl)-pyridinium Perchlorat were inserted into the 0.73-nm-wide channel pores of a zeolite AlPO$_4$-5 host. The zeolitic micro crystal compounds where hydrothermally synthesized according to a particular host-guest chemical process. The dye molecules are found not only to be aligned along the host channel axis, but to be oriented as well. Single mode laser emission at 687 nm was obtained from a whispering gallery mode oscillating in a 8-$\\mu$m-diameter monolithic micro resonator, in which the field is confined by total internal reflection at the natural hexagonal boundaries inside the zeolitic microcrystals.

  10. Investigation of passive and active silica-tin oxide nanostructured optical fibers fabricated by " inverse dip-coating " and " powder in tube " method based on the chemical sol-gel process and laser emission

    OpenAIRE

    Granger, Geoffroy; Restoin, Christine; Roy, Philippe; Jamier, Raphaël; Rougier, Sébastien; Duclere, J.-R; Lecomte, A; Dauliat, Romain; Blondy, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    International audience This paper presents a study of original nanostructured optical fibers based on the SiO 2-SnO 2-(Yb 3+) system. Two different processes have been developed and compared: the sol-gel chemical method associated to the " inverse dip-coating " (IDC) and the " powder in tube " (PIT) process. The microstructural and optical properties of the fibers are studied according to the concentration of SnO 2. X-Ray Diffraction as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy studies show...

  11. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  12. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  13. Magnetoelectric charge states of matter-energy. A second approximation. Part VII. Diffuse relativistic superconductive plasma. Measurable and non-measurable physical manifestations. Kirlian photography. Laser phenomena. Cosmic effects on chemical and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, F W

    1980-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that all objects, and especially living objects, contain and are surrounded by diffuse clouds of matter-energy probably best considered as a superconductive plasma state and best analyzed by application of an extended form of the Einstein special theory of relativity. Such a plasma state would have physical properties that for relativistic reasons the experimentalists could not expect to measure, and also those he could expect to measure. Not possible to measure should be (a) absorption or reflection of light, (b) electric charge mobilities of Hall effects, and (c) any particulate structure within the plasma. Possible to measure should be (a) channel formation ("arcing") in high applied electric fields (e.g., as in Kirlian photography), (b) effects of the plasma on temperatures and potentials of electrons in solid objects moving through that plasma, (c) facilitation of coupling between electromagnetic oscillations in sets of adjacent molecules, resulting in facilitation of laser and maser emissions of electromagnetic waves and in facilitation of geometrical alignment of adjacent molecules, and (d) magnetic and electric flux trapping with resultant magnetic and/or electric dipole moments. Experimental evidence suggests that diffuse superconductive plasma may reach the earth from the sun, resulting in diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in rates of antigen-antibody reactions as well as in rates of precipitation and crystallization of solids from solutions. PMID:7454856

  14. Chemical intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven;

    2015-01-01

    are available, the presence of the condition can only be established in accordance to criteria definitions. Numerous modes of action have been suggested to explain CI, with the most commonly discussed theories involving the immune system, central nervous system, olfactory and respiratory systems as well...... chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI...... or offered health care solutions with limited or no effect, and they experience being met with mistrust and doubt by health care professionals, the social care system and by friends and relatives. Evidence-based treatment options are currently unavailable, however, a person-centered care model based...

  15. Selective laser extraction of the Pt group metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadeeva, S.; Krynetsky, B.; Prokhorov, A.; Zhidkov, A. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-15

    The interest to the platinum-group metals extraction from solutions, especially industry waste, is stimulated by their extraordinary chemical inert. The traditional chemical methods of the extraction are uneffective. Have been investigated process of the extraction of metal Pt-group from acid solutions. Discussed processes reduction of noble metals by resonance laser action.

  16. Application of a laser to decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities at JAERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Takakuni; Kameo, Yutaka; Myodo, Masato

    2000-01-01

    In the research and development of various advanced technologies needed for decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, laser was applied to decontamination of metal and concrete surfaces and to cutting of large metal of low level radioactive waste. (a) Laser decontamination for metal waste: Metal waste was irradiated by laser in the atmosphere of chloride gas, and contaminant was changed from oxide to chloride which is sublimable or soluble in water and could be easily removed; and also metal waste coated with gel-decontamination reagent was irradiated by laser, and contaminant could be removed through the laser-induced chemical reaction. (b) Laser decontamination for concrete surface: Concrete surface was bursted or vitrified by laser irradiation and easily removed. (c) Laser cutting: Laser cutter was applied to cutting of large metal wastes such as tanks arising from dismantling of nuclear facilities.

  17. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  18. Laser action in runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Panchenko, Nikolai A.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Suslov, Alexei I.

    2015-12-01

    Formation features of run-away electron preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) and REP DD properties in different experimental conditions are studied. It was shown that sufficient uniformity of REP DD allows its application as an excitation source of lasers on different gas mixtures at elevated pressure. Promising results of REP DD application for development of gas lasers are shown. Stimulated radiation in the IR, visible and UV spectral ranges was obtained in the diffuse discharge. Ultimate efficiency of non-chain HF(DF) chemical and nitrogen lasers on mixtures of SF6 with H2(D2) and N2 was achieved. New operation mode of nitrogen laser is demonstrated under REP DD excitation. Kinetic model of the REP DD in mixtures of nitrogen with SF6 is developed allowing to predict the radiation parameters of nitrogen laser at λ = 337,1 nm. Long-pulse operation of rare gas halide lasers was achieved.

  19. Fs-laser processing of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, P. A.; Stankova, N. E.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Fukata, N.; Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B.; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    Medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer is a biomaterial widely used in medicine and high-tech devices, e.g. MEMS and NEMS. In this work, we report an experimental investigation on femtosecond laser processing of PDMS-elastomer with near infrared (NIR), visible (VIS) and ultraviolet (UV) pulses. High definition trenches are produced by varying processing parameters as laser wavelength, pulse duration, fluence, scanning speed and overlap of the subsequent pulses. The sample surface morphology and chemical composition are investigated by Laser Microscopy, SEM and Raman spectroscopy, addressing the effects of the various processing parameters through comparison with the native materials characteristics. For all the laser pulse wavelengths used, the produced tracks are successfully metalized with Ni via electro-less plating method. We observe a negligible influence of the time interval elapsed between laser treatment and metallization process. Our experimental findings suggest promising perspectives of femtosecond laser pulses in micro- and nano-fabrication of hi-tech PDMS devices.

  20. Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Federico

    2004-03-01

    QC lasers have emerged in recent years as the dominant laser technology for the mid-to far infrared spectrum in light of their room temperature operation, their tunability, ultrahigh speed operation and broad range of applications to chemical sensing, spectroscopy etc. (Ref. 1-3). After briefly reviewing the latter, I will describe a new class of mid-infrared QC lasers, Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal Surface Emitting Lasers (QCPCSELS), that combine electronic and photonic band structure engineering to achieve vertical emission from the surface (Ref. 4). Devices operating on bandedge mode and on defect modes will be discussed. Exciting potential uses of these new devices exist in nonlinear optics, microfluidics as well as novel sensors. Finally a bird's eye view of other exciting areas of QC laser research will be given including broadband QCLs and new nonlinear optical sources based on multiwavelength QCLs. 1. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, D. L. Sivco, and A. Y. Cho, Physics Today 55, 34 (May 2002) 2. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, R. Paiella, A. Tredicucci, A. L. Hutchinson, D. L. Sivco, J. N. Baillargeon, A. Y. Cho and H. C. Liu, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 6, 931 (2000). 3. F. Capasso, R. Paiella, R. Martini, R. Colombelli, C. Gmachl, T. L. Myers, M. S. Taubman, R. M. Williams, C. G. Bethea, K. Unterrainer, H. Y. Hwang, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho, A. M. Sergent, H. C. Liu, E. A. Whittaker, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 38, 511 (2002) 4. R. Colombelli, K. Srivasan, M. Troccoli, O. Painter, C. Gmachl, D. M. Tennant, A. M. Sergent, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho and F. Capasso, Science 302, 1374 (2003)

  1. Infrared laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture

  2. Laser research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Laser Development (ALD) program has four principal objectives: to support the activation of the Nova laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experimentation; to develop a low-cost, 5- to 10-MJ laser for ICF research; to develop efficient, high-repetition-rate (1 Hz to 1 kHz), high-quality lasers for ICF reactor applications, for the medium-power solid state laser program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and for the free-electron laser program of the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO); and to conduct basic laser research for energy (Office of Basic Energy Science) and for special tasks such as the development of uv laser coatings for the Air Force Weapons Laboratory. This section describes the efforts in these areas as well as investigation of: damage in laser glasses, crystals and optical coatings; growth and understanding of nonlinear crystals; optical feedback, and flashlamp properties

  3. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  4. Laser inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the energy of the radiation pulses generated by the world's largest laser facilities approach the MJ limit, it is still lower than that calculated on means of the Lawson criterion for thermonuclear fusion. The severe energy requirements can be weakened by efficient pre-compression of laser targets and by non-linear conversion of laser radiation to shorter wavelengths. The homogeneity of the laser target irradiation can be improved by using multi-beam or indirect-drive laser schemes. The neodymium laser facilities such as Nova Upgrade in Livermore or Gekko XII in Osaca are still the most promising fusion drivers, but the chances of powerful iodine lasers such as ISKRA 5 in Arzamas and Asterix in Munich are also high. The prospects of these and other laser fusion drivers are critically assessed and the role of smaller devices as the Prague iodine laser Perun is discussed. (J.U.) 6 figs., 7 refs

  5. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  6. Direct Laser Acceleration in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, the direct laser acceleration (DLA) of ionization-injected electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) operating in the quasi-blowout regime has been investigated through experiment and simulation. In the blowout regime of LWFA, the radiation pressure of an intense laser pulse can push a majority of the plasma electrons out and around the main body of the pulse. The expelled plasma electrons feel the electrostatic field of the relatively-stationary ions and are t...

  7. Nitrogen laser-pumped dye lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design considerations and performance of nitrogen laser-pumped dye lasers are presented. Two methods for obtaining narrow linewidth operation are discussed. These methods employed telescope and prism beam expander with a diffraction grating used in littrow mount configuration. These lasers have given a nearly diffraction limited linewidth of ∼ 0.1 Ao and pulse width of ∼ 3ns. In one of our cell design the amplified spontaneous emission background was found to be <3%

  8. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  9. Controlling Chaotic Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gills, Zelda; Roy, Rajarshi

    1995-01-01

    Irregular fluctuations in intensity have long plagued the operation of a wide variety of solid-state lasers. We are exploring the possibility of exploiting rather than avoiding a laser's chaotic output. As an important step in that direction, we have applied a novel control technique to stabilize a solid state laser. By making small periodic changes in only one input parameter of the laser, we are able to stabilize complex periodic waveforms and steady state behavior in the laser output. We demonstrate the application of this approach in a diode pumped Nd:/YAG laser system.

  10. 1982 laser program annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications

  11. Chemical information science coverage in Chemical Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, G

    1987-02-01

    For many years Chemical Abstracts has included in its coverage publications on chemical documentation or chemical information science. Although the bulk of those publications can be found in section 20 of Chemical Abstracts, many relevant articles were found scattered among 39 other sections of CA in 1984-1985. In addition to the scattering of references in CA, the comprehensiveness of Chemical Abstracts as a secondary source for chemical information science is called into question. Data are provided on the journals that contributed the most references on chemical information science and on the languages of publication of relevant articles.

  12. 372-mJ long pulse pyrotechnically pumped laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Xiao; Zongfu Jiang; Weihong Hua; Shengfu Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A pyrotechnically pumped Nd glass laser is demonstrated by the use of pyrotechnic flashlamps composed of several chemical materials arranged in a stable plane concave resonator cavity. The flashlamp was made of chemical mixture with oxidant, fuel, and binder. The emission spectrum of pyrotechnic flame covered most of the absorption bands of Nd3+ in phosphate glass. Under 4.56-g chemical mixture pumping, long pulse output power of about 5.5 W was achieved.

  13. Narrow-linewidth and tunable fiber lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Morkel, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Introduction 2. Line-narrowed fiber laser devices Integral fiber reflective Bragg grating lasers Intra-cavity etalon laser 3. Tunable, line narrowed fiber laser devices Ring lasers using wavelength selective couplers Tunable lasers using bulk-optic components a) Mechanical tuning b) Electronic tuning 4. Single frequency fiber lasers Integral fiber reflective Bragg grating laser Interferometric cavity laser Injection locked laser Travellin...

  14. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  15. Direct-write waveplates using femtosecond lasers

    CERN Document Server

    McMillen, Ben; Bellouard, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The use of femtosecond lasers to introduce controlled stress states has recently been demonstrated in silica glass. We use this principle in combination with chemical etching to demonstrate direct-write wave plates with precisely tailored retardance levels. In this work, we achieve sufficient retardance to act as a quarter-wave plate, producing a broadband device with a clear aperture free of any laser modifications. We analyze and model the stress distribution within the clear aperture, providing a generic template that can be applied to form multiple retardance levels within the same substrate.

  16. 2009 Laser Diagnostics in Combustion GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volker Sick

    2009-08-16

    Non-intrusive laser diagnostics for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of temperature, chemical composition, and flow parameters have emerged over the last few decades as major tools for the study of both fundamental and applied combustion science. Many of the important advances in the field can be attributed to the discussions and ideas emanating from this meeting. This conference, originating in 1981 and held biennially, focuses on laser-based methods for measurement of both macroscopic parameters and the underlying microscale physical and chemical processes. Applications are discussed primarily to elucidate new chemical and physical issues and/or interferences that need to be addressed to improve the accuracy and precision of the various diagnostic approaches or to challenge the community of diagnosticians to invent new measurement techniques. Combustion environments present special challenges to the optical diagnostics community as they address measurements relevant to turbulence, spray and mixture formation, or turbulence/chemistry interactions important in practical combustion systems as well as fundamental chemical reactions in stationary laminar flames. The diagnostics considered may be generally classed as being incoherent, where the signals are radiated isotropically, or coherent, where the signals are generated in a directed, beam-like fashion. Both of the foregoing may employ either electronic or Raman resonance enhancement or a combination of both. Prominent incoherent approaches include laser induced fluorescence (LIF), spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, laser induced incandescence, molecular flow tagging, and Mie scattering and their two- and three-dimensional imaging variants. Coherent approaches include coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM), polarization spectroscopy (PS), laser induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) and laser-based absorption spectroscopy. Spectroscopic

  17. Analytical Applications Of Laser Powered Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, R. L.; Kajkowski, K. A.

    1984-05-01

    The ability to rapidly heat samples using infrared laser radiation without the complicating effects of hot surfaces offers new opportunities for pyrolysis techniques in materials characterization and process control. By using pulsed radiation, timescales on the order of microseconds are achieved, restricting the chemistry primarily to initial reactions. The homogeneous nature of laser powered heating minimizes wall reactions and improves reproducibility by eliminating effects of surface contamination in the pyrolysis reactor. In Laser Powered Homogeneous Pyrolysis (LPHP), a pulsed CO2 laser (10μm) is used to rapidly heat a gas mixture to be pyrolyzed. If the mixture does not absorb 10um radiation, a chemically inert sensitizer such as SF6 or SiF4 must be added to couple energy into the mixture. Temperatures up to 1200K can be reached, with reaction times ranging from lOpsec to lOmsec. Product analysis is by gas chromatography after a sufficient number of laser pulses to generate detectable amounts of products. Applications of LPHP to hydrocarbon mixture analysis will be presented, as well as potential applications to process control. The short reaction times in LPHP will be illustrated by methane and ethane pyrolysis, which also provide information on the details of the temperature profile during laser powered pyrolysis.

  18. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.;

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  19. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  20. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vascular Access for Hemodialysis Ventricular Assist Devices Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization | Share Like every other organ or tissue ... bypass surgery, there is a procedure called transmyocardial laser revascularization, also called TMLR or TMR. TMLR cannot ...

  1. Laser Skin Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Skin Renewal, Laser A A A BEFORE: This patient wanted the appearance of his acne scars minimized by laser treatment. Procedure Overview Photorejuvenation, simply put, is the ...

  2. Exciton laser rate equations

    OpenAIRE

    Garkavenko A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The rate equations of the exciton laser in the system of interacting excitons have been obtained and the inverted population conditions and generation have been derived. The possibility of creating radically new gamma-ray laser has been shown.

  3. Laser in operative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yasini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Today laser has a lot of usage in medicine and dentistry. In the field of dentistry, laser is used in soft tissue surgery, sterilization of canals (in root canal therapy and in restorative dentistry laser is used for cavity preparation, caries removal, sealing the grooves (in preventive dentistry, etching enamel and dentin, composite polymerization and removal of tooth sensitivity. The use of Co2 lasers and Nd: YAG for cavity preparation, due to creating high heat causes darkness and cracks around the region of laser radiation. Also due to high temperature of these lasers, pulp damage is inevitable. So today, by using the Excimer laser especially the argon floride type with a wavelength of 193 nm, the problem of heat stress have been solved, but the use of lasers in dentistry, especially for cavity preparation needs more researches and evaluations.

  4. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  5. Wavelength sweepable laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength sweepable laser source is disclosed, wherein the laser source is a semiconductor laser source adapted for generating laser light at a lasing wavelength. The laser source comprises a substrate, a first reflector, and a second reflector. The first and second reflector together defines...... and having a rest position, the second reflector and suspension together defining a microelectromechanical MEMS oscillator. The MEMS oscillator has a resonance frequency and is adapted for oscillating the second reflector on either side of the rest position.; The laser source further comprises electrical...... connections adapted for applying an electric field to the MEMS oscillator. Furthermore, a laser source system and a method of use of the laser source are disclosed....

  6. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastroint...

  7. Tunable laser optics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2015-01-01

    This Second Edition of a bestselling book describes the optics and optical principles needed to build lasers. It also highlights the optics instrumentation necessary to characterize laser emissions and focuses on laser-based optical instrumentation. The book emphasizes practical and utilitarian aspects of relevant optics including the essential theory. This revised, expanded, and improved edition contains new material on tunable lasers and discusses relevant topics in quantum optics.

  8. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the be...

  9. Lasers in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Sugumari Elavarasu; Devisree Naveen; Arthiie Thangavelu

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20 th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging imp...

  10. Ceramic Laser Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Villalobos; Jasbinder Sanghera; Ishwar Aggarwal; Bryan Sadowski; Jesse Frantz; Colin Baker; Brandon Shaw; Woohong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers,...

  11. Periocular Laser Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Gonzalo; Clavero, Antonio; Soparkar, Charles N.S.; Patrinely, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Laser periocular surgery has achieved an increased popularity, particularly since the widespread use of CO2 and erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser and more recently with the development of nonablative laser technology. The main target of these techniques is to treat photoaging changes to obtain a rejuvenated skin. Despite the relatively safety of these procedures on experienced hands, postoperative complications affecting the periocular region, and the eye itself, may follow laser surgery. ...

  12. Laser Micromachining of Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Sciti, Diletta; Bellosi, Alida

    2011-01-01

    Laser surface processing of ceramics is an area of considerable technological importance for several structural, tribological, optical and electronic applications. The laser beam behaves as a heat source that induces a temperature rise on the surface and within the bulk of the material. Depending on laser parameters and material characteristics, lasers can be used for fabricating microholes at designated locations, for cutting, scribing, for surface modifications In this work different types ...

  13. Laser technologies for laser accelerators. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary result of the work reported is the determination of laser system architectures that satsify the requirements of high luminosity, high energy (about 1 TeV), electron accelerators. It has been found that high laser efficiency is a very hard driver for these accelerators as the total average laser output optical power is likely to fall above 10 MW. The luminosity requires rep rates in the kHz range, and individual pulse lengths in the 1-10 psec range are required to satisfy acceleration gradient goals. CO2 and KrF lasers were chosen for study because of their potential to simultaneously satisfy the given requirements. Accelerator luminosity is reviewed, and requirements on laser system average power and rep rate are determined as a function of electron beam bunch parameters. Laser technologies are reviewed, including CO2, excimers, solid state, and free electron lasers. The proposed accelerator mechanisms are summarized briefly. Work on optical transport geometries for near and far field accelerators are presented. Possible exploitation of the CO2 and DrF laser technology to generate the required pulse lengths, rep rates, and projected efficiencies is illustrated and needed development work is suggested. Initial efforts at developing a 50 GeV benchmark conceptual design and a 100 MeV demonstration experiment conceptual design are presented

  14. Isotope separation by laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Isotope separation processes operate on very small differences, given either by the Quotient of masses with the same number of electrons or by their mass difference. When separating isotopes of light elements in mass quantities, thermodynamic processes accounting for the quotient, either in diffusion, chemical reactivity or distillation are used. For heavy elements those quotients are very small. Therefore they need a large number of separation steps. Large plants with high energy consumption result from that. As uranium isotope separation is the most important industrial field, alternatives, taking account for the mass difference, as e.g. gas centrifuges, have been developed. They use only a fraction of the energy input, but need a very large number of machines, as the individual throughput is small. Since it was discovered, that molecules of high symmetry like Uranium-Hexafluoride as a deep-cooled gas stream can be ionized by multiple photon excitation, this process was studied in detail and in competition to the selective ionization of metal vapors, as already demonstrated with uranium. The paper reports about the principles of the laser excitation for both processes, the different laboratory scale and prototypical plants built, the difficulties with materials, as far as the metal vapor laser separation is concerned, and the difficulties experienced in the similarity in molecular spectra. An overview of the relative economic merits of the different processes and the auspices in a saturated market for uranium isotope separation, together with other potential markets for molecular laser separation, is contained in the conclusions.

  15. Excimer laser irradiation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, Grant

    In this work a new method of enhancing CO2 laser processing by modifying the radiative properties of a metal surface is studied. In this procedure, an excimer laser (XeCl) or KrF) exposes the metal surface to overlapping pulses of high intensity, 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) W cm(exp -2), and short pulse duration, 30 nsec FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum), to promote structural and chemical change. The major processing effect at these intensities is the production of a surface plasma which can lead to the formation of a laser supported detonation wave (LSD wave). This shock wave can interact with the thin molten layer on the metal surface influencing to a varying degree surface oxidation and roughness features. The possibility of the expulsion, oxidation and redeposition of molten droplets, leading to the formation of micron thick oxide layers, is related to bulk metal properties and the incident laser intensity. A correlation is found between the expulsion of molten droplets and a Reynolds number, showing the interaction is turbulent. The permanent effects of these interactions on metal surfaces are observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transient calorimetric measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Observed surface textures are related to the scanning procedures used to irradiate the metal surface. Fundamental radiative properties of a metal surface, the total hemispherical emissivity, the near-normal spectral absorptivity, and others are examined in this study as they are affected by excimer laser radiation. It is determined that for heavily exposed Al surface, alpha' (10.6 microns) can be increased to values close to unity. Data relating to material removal rates and chemical surface modification for excimer laser radiation is also discussed. The resultant reduction in the near-normal reflectivity solves the fundamental problem of coupling laser radiation into highly reflective and conductive metals such as copper and aluminum. The

  16. Application of Various Lasers to Laser Trimming Resistance System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ji-feng

    2007-01-01

    Though the laser trimming resistance has been an old laser machining industry for over 30 years, the development of technology brings new alternative lasers which can be used for the traditional machining. The paper describes application of various lasers to laser trimming resistance system including early traditional krypton arc lamp pumped Nd:YAG to laser, modern popular diode pumped solid state laser and the present advanced harmonic diode pumped solid state laser. Using the new alternative lasers in the laser trimming resistance system can dramatically improve the yields and equipment performance.

  17. LaserFest Celebration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  18. Pulsed laser machining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus and method for directing a controlled number of laser pulses onto a work piece to be machined. More specifically, the laser machining apparatus includes an excitable laser and an excitation lamp for continuously exciting the laser to emit a sequence of laser pulses. The application of the laser pulses to the work piece is controlled by an inner-cavity shutter that is opened to permit a precise number of pulses to be directed onto the work piece. The frequency (REP RATE) and pulse width of the laser pulses are controlled by the excitation lamp and, in turn, are set to create a progressive weld of significant depth and structural integrity. In particular there is provided control means for counting the number of laser pulses applied to a machining site of the work piece, whereby a known controllable quantity of energy is imparted to each site. To this end, the counting of the laser pulses begins after the completion of a laser pulse, whereby the actuation of the inner-cavity shutter is not synchronized to the computer but rather to the laser emission so that only whole laser pulses will be applied to the site

  19. Laser welding in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the design and construction, as well as typical results from performing low gravity laser welding experiments on NASA's KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic maneuvers to simulate low gravity. Results of the experiments are reported and some new concepts regarding the implementation of laser technology suitable for laser welding in space are presented

  20. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  1. Fiber Lasers V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes;

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser ...

  2. Laser processing of plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Peter A.

    1995-03-01

    CO2-laser processing of plastics has been studied experimentally and theoretically. Welding of cylindrical parts made from polycarbonate and polypropylene, cutting of polymethyl-methacrylate plates, and drilling holes in polypropylene are presented as examples. A good coincidence between theoretical and experimental results in case of laser welding has been found. Some practical aspects of laser processing of plastics has been given.

  3. Laser in ophthalmology. Laser i oftalmologien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrdalen, P. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway))

    1991-09-01

    The article presents a brief history of the use of laser in ophthalmology in Norway, from the introduction of the first argon-photocoalulator in 1972 to the excimer laser in 1990. The argon-photocoagulator is in daily us in all Eye Departments in Norway and the main group of patients treated are those with diabetic retionopathy. Glaucoma has been treated with argon-laser with good results for the last ten years. YAG-laser, introduced in Norway in 1985, is used to treat secondary cataracts which occur after extracapsular cataract extractions and implantation of artificial lenses. In 1990, the excimer laser was introduced for refractive surgery (myopia, astigmatism). 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Tunable laser applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2008-01-01

    Introduction F. J. Duarte Spectroscopic Applications of Tunable Optical Parametric Oscillators B. J. Orr, R. T. White, and Y. He Solid-State Dye Lasers Costela, I. García-Moreno, and R. Sastre Tunable Lasers Based on Dye-Doped Polymer Gain Media Incorporating Homogeneous Distributions of Functional Nanoparticles F. J. Duarte and R. O. James Broadly Tunable External-Cavity Semiconductor Lasers F. J. Duarte Tunable Fiber Lasers T. M. Shay and F. J. Duarte Fiber Laser Overview and Medical Applications

  5. Lasers In Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth. S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The uses of Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three & a half decades of the 20th century. Initially it was used for ablating the hard tissues for acid etch treatment. Later Lasers were used for cutting, coagulation & cauterization of the soft tissues. It is also been used for the diagnosis of carious lesions& to test pulp vitality with Doppler. There are more than 40 uses for Laser. Initially Lasers were very expensive, but now they have become much cheaper. Portable models are available which have increased its versatility. Lasers will be the main weapon in the armamentarium of the dental surgeons.

  6. Quantum well lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zory, Jr, Peter S; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the information necessary for the reader to achieve a thorough understanding of all aspects of QW lasers - from the basic mechanism of optical gain, through the current technolgoical state of the art, to the future technologies of quantum wires and quantum dots. In view of the growing importance of QW lasers, this book should be read by all those with an active interest in laser science and technology, from the advanced student to the experienced laser scientist.* The first comprehensive book-length treatment of quantum well lasers* Provides a detailed treatment

  7. Coherent laser beam combining

    CERN Document Server

    Brignon, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the improvement of diode pumping in solid state lasers and the development of double clad fiber lasers have allowed to maintain excellent laser beam quality with single mode fibers. However, the fiber output power if often limited below a power damage threshold. Coherent laser beam combining (CLBC) brings a solution to these limitations by identifying the most efficient architectures and allowing for excellent spectral and spatial quality. This knowledge will become critical for the design of the next generation high-power lasers and is of major interest to many industrial, environme

  8. Laser Cutting, Development Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review of the development trends in laser cutting will be given.The technology, which is the fastest expanding industrial production technology will develop in both its core market segment: Flat bed cutting of sheet metal, as it will expand in heavy industry and in cutting...... of 3-dimensional shapes.The CO2-laser will also in the near future be the dominating laser source in the market, although the new developments in ND-YAG-lasers opens for new possibilities for this laser type....

  9. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  10. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  11. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  12. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  13. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Liang Xu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation.

  14. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Shuman, E S; DeMille, D

    2011-01-01

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a vast array of fields. Unfortunately laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for many applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments which lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures make ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulation of condensed matter systems and quantum computation. Also ultracold molecules may provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme re...

  15. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  16. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrieva, O., E-mail: o.dmitrieva@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Choi, P., E-mail: p.choi@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Gerstl, S.S.A. [Imago Scientific Instruments, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Ponge, D.; Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected. -- Research highlights: {yields} Changing the laser pulse energy in pulsed-laser atom probe could induce some changes in the analysis results of complex steels. {yields} Decreases in the evaporation fields and the ++/+ charge state ratios were detected with raising laser energy. {yields} Chemical composition of the intermetallic precipitates and the interface sharpness were not influenced by changing the laser energy.

  17. Laser diode pumped solid state laser driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical and economical feasibility of a diode pumped solid state laser driver for the fusion reactor is presented. Nd-doped solid state laser materials of lasing wavelengths at 1 μm are selected. We discuss the total efficiency of the laser driver in detail and then show that a total efficiency of 12 % can be achieved in the diode pumped solid state laser driver. We design the diode pumped solid state laser drivers with five typical solid state materials using a conceptual design technique. Designing conditions are the output energy of 4MJ per pulse at the wavelength of 0.35 μm, total efficiency of 12 % and repetition rate of 12 Hz. From the results of design, it is concluded the some diode pumped solid state laser drivers have large potentiality from both technical and economical points of view. Based on the conclusion, the items to be investigated for the quicker realization of the diode pumped solid state laser driver are also presented. (author)

  18. ORION laser target diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K. [Plasma Physics Department, Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-10-15

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  19. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few years, several laser systems have been considered as possible laser fusion drivers. Recently, there has been an increasing effort to evaluate these systems in terms of a reactor driver application. The specifications for such a system have become firmer and generally more restrictive. Several of the promising candidates such as the group VI laser, the metal vapor excimers and some solid state lasers can be eliminated on the basis of inefficiency. New solid state systems may impact the long range development of a fusion driver. Of the short wavelength gas lasers, the KrF laser used in conjunction with Raman compression and pulse stacking techniques is the most promising approach. Efficiencies approaching 10% may be possible with this system. While technically feasible, these approaches are complex and costly and are unsatisfying in an aethetic sense. A search for new lasers with more compelling features is still needed

  20. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  1. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  2. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One objective of research on inertial confinement fusion is the development of a power generating system based on this concept. Realization of this goal will depend on the availability of a suitable laser or other system to drive the power plant. The primary laser systems used for laser fusion research, Nd3+: Glass and CO2, have characteristics which may preclude their use for this application. Glass lasers are presently perceived to be incapable of sufficiently high average power operation and the CO2 laser may be limited by and issues associated with target coupling. These general perceptions have encouraged a search for alternatives to the present systems. The search for new lasers has been directed generally towards shorter wavelengths; most of the new lasers discovered in the past few years have been in the visible and ultraviolet region of the spectrum. Virtually all of them have been advocated as the most promising candidate for a fusion driver at one time or another

  3. Mode selection laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a semiconductor mode selection laser, particularly to a VCSEL laser (200) having mode selection properties. The mode selection capability of the laser is achieved by configuring one of the reflectors (15,51) in the resonance cavity so that a reflectivity of the reflector...... (15) varies spatially in one dimension or two dimensions. Accordingly, the reflector (15) with spatially varying reflectivity is part both of the resonance cavity and the mode selection functionality of the laser. A plurality of the lasers configured with different mode selectors, i.e. different...... spatial reflector variations, may be combined to generate a laser beam containing a plurality of orthogonal modes. The laser beam may be injected into a few- mode optical fiber, e.g. for the purpose of optical communication. The VCSEL may have intra-cavity contacts (31,37) and a Tunnel junction (33...

  4. Flexible Laser Metal Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Sigurd; Jørgensen, Steffen Nordahl; Kristiansen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new flexible and fast approach to laser cutting called ROBOCUT. Combined with CAD/CAM technology, laser cutting of metal provides the flexibility to perform one-of-a-kind cutting and hereby realises mass production of customised products. Today’s laser cutting techniques...... possess, despite their wide use in industry, limitations regarding speed and geometry. Research trends point towards remote laser cutting techniques which can improve speed and geometrical freedom and hereby the competitiveness of laser cutting compared to fixed-tool-based cutting technology...... such as punching. This paper presents the concepts and preliminary test results of the ROBOCUT laser cutting technology, a technology which potentially can revolutionise laser cutting....

  5. ORION laser target diagnosticsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; Wright, M. J.; Hood, B. A.; Kemshall, P.

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  6. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics. PMID:23126904

  7. Parameter Optimization for Laser Polishing of Niobium for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Klopf, John Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Surface smoothness is critical to the performance of SRF cavities. As laser technology has been widely applied to metal machining and surface treatment, we are encouraged to use it on niobium as an alternative to the traditional wet polishing process where aggressive chemicals are involved. In this study, we describe progress toward smoothing by optimizing laser parameters on BCP treated niobium surfaces. Results shows that microsmoothing of the surface without ablation is achievable.

  8. Lasers in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Forbes, A.; Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Mathye, A.

    2008-05-01

    A variety of laser applications in space, past, present, future and far future are reviewed together with the contributions of some of the scientists and engineers involved, especially those that happen to have South African connections. Historically, two of the earliest laser applications in space, were atmospheric LIDAR and lunar ranging. These applications involved atmospheric physicists, several astronauts and many of the staff recruited into the Soviet and North American lunar exploration programmes. There is a strong interest in South Africa in both LIDAR and lunar ranging. Shortly after the birth of the laser (and even just prior) theoretical work on photonic propulsion and space propulsion by laser ablation was initiated by Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz and Eugen Saenger. Present or near future experimental programs are developing in the following fields: laser ablation propulsion, possibly coupled with rail gun or gas gun propulsion; interplanetary laser transmission; laser altimetry; gravity wave detection by space based Michelson interferometry; the de-orbiting of space debris by high power lasers; atom laser interferometry in space. Far future applications of laser-photonic space-propulsion were also pioneered by Carl Sagan and Robert Forward. They envisaged means of putting Saenger's ideas into practice. Forward also invented a laser based method for manufacturing solid antimatter or SANTIM, well before the ongoing experiments at CERN with anti-hydrogen production and laser-trapping. SANTIM would be an ideal propellant for interstellar missions if it could be manufactured in sufficient quantities. It would be equally useful as a power source for the transmission of information over light year distances. We briefly mention military lasers. Last but not least, we address naturally occurring lasers in space and pose the question: "did the Big Bang lase?"

  9. Tunable lasers for waste management photochemistry applications. [Dye lasers, excimer lasers, IR lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, F.T. (comp.)

    1978-09-01

    A review of lasers with potential photochemical applications in waste management indicates that dye lasers, as a class, can provide tunable laser output through the visible and near-uv regions of the spectrum of most interest to photochemistry. Many variables can affect the performance of a specific dye laser, and the interactions of these variables, at the current state of the art, are complex. The recent literature on dye-laser characteristics has been reviewed and summarized, with emphasis on those parameters that most likely will affect the scaling of dye lasers in photochemical applications. Current costs are reviewed and correlated with output power. A new class of efficient uv lasers that appear to be scalable in both energy output and pulse rate, based on rare-gas halide excimers and similar molecules, is certain to find major applications in photochemistry. Because the most important developments are too recent to be adequately described in the literature or are the likely outcome of current experiments, the basic physics underlying the class of excimer lasers is described. Specific cost data are unavailable, but these new gas lasers should reflect costs similar to those of existing gas lasers, in particular, the pulsed CO/sub 2/ lasers. To complete the survey of tunable-laser characteristics, the technical characteristics of the various classes of lasers in the ir are summarized. Important developments in ir laser technology are being accelerated by isotope-separation research, but, initially at least, this portion of the spectrum is least likely to receive emphasis in waste-management-oriented photochemistry.

  10. Optical coatings for fiber lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Dong-mei; ZHU Zhen; YUE Wei

    2005-01-01

    Fiber laser is the future development direction for the high energy lasers. This paper describs two kinds of optical coatings for fiber laser, including long and short wave pass filters. The one characteristic of fiber laser coatings lies in that coatings should separate two closely wavelength light including laser pump wavelength (980 nm) and laser irradiation wavelength(1 050~1 100 nm). At the same time, the coatings should have high laser damage threshold.

  11. Laser ablation plasmas for diagnostics of structured electronic and optical materials during or after laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; González, Jhanis J.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced plasma can be used for rapid optical diagnostics of electronic, optical, electro-optical, electromechanical and other structures. Plasma monitoring and diagnostics can be realized during laser processing in real time by means of measuring optical emission that originates from the pulsed laser-material interaction. In post-process applications, e.g., quality assurance and quality control, surface raster scanning and depth profiling can be realized with high spatial resolution (~10 nm in depth and ~3 μm lateral). Commercial instruments based on laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) are available for these purposes. Since only a laser beam comes in direct contact with the sample, such diagnostics are sterile and non-disruptive, and can be performed at a distance, e.g. through a window. The technique enables rapid micro-localized chemical analysis without a need for sample preparation, dissolution or evacuation of samples, thus it is particularly beneficial in fabrication of thin films and structures, such as electronic, photovoltaic and electro-optical devices or circuits of devices. Spectrum acquisition from a single laser shot provides detection limits for metal traces of ~10 μg/g, which can be further improved by accumulating signal from multiple laser pulses. LIBS detection limit for Br in polyethylene is 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation (halogen detection is a requirement for semiconductor package materials). Three to four orders of magnitude lower detection limits can be obtained with a femtosecond laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS), which is also provided on commercial basis. Laser repetition rate is currently up to 20 Hz in LIBS instruments and up to 100 kHz in LA-ICP-MS.

  12. Investigation of Laser Parameters in Silicon Pulsed Laser Conduction Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Khoshnoud, Afsaneh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser welding of silicon in conduction mode is investigated numerically. In this study, the effects of laser beam characteristics on the welding have been studied. In order to model the welding process, heat conduction equation is solved numerically and laser beam energy is considered as a boundary condition. Time depended heat conduction equation is used in our calculations to model pulsed laser welding. Thermo-physical and optical properties of the material are considered to be temperature dependent in our calculations. Effects of spatial and temporal laser beam parameters such as laser beam spot size, laser beam quality, laser beam polarization, laser incident angle, laser pulse energy, laser pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and welding speed on the welding characteristics are assessed. The results show that how the temperature dependent thermo-physical and optical parameters of the material are important in laser welding modeling. Also the results show how the parameters of the laser beam influence the welding characteristics.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  14. Laser additive manufacturing of high-performance materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    This book entitled “Laser Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance Materials” covers the specific aspects of laser additive manufacturing of high-performance new materials components based on an unconventional materials incremental manufacturing philosophy, in terms of materials design and preparation, process control and optimization, and theories of physical and chemical metallurgy. This book describes the capabilities and characteristics of the development of new metallic materials components by laser additive manufacturing process, including nanostructured materials, in situ composite materials, particle reinforced metal matrix composites, etc. The topics presented in this book, similar as laser additive manufacturing technology itself, show a significant interdisciplinary feature, integrating laser technology, materials science, metallurgical engineering, and mechanical engineering. This is a book for researchers, students, practicing engineers, and manufacturing industry professionals interested i...

  15. Chemical sensors for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of chemical sensors for detection of gases at trace levels for applications in nuclear industry will be highlighted. The sensors have to be highly sensitive, reliable and rugged with long term stability to operate in harsh industrial environment. Semiconductor and solid electrolyte based electrochemical sensors satisfy the requirements. Physico-chemical aspects underlying the development of H2 sensors in sodium and in cover gas circuit of the Fast breeder reactors for its smooth functioning, NH3 and H2S sensors for use in Heavy water production industries and NOx sensors for spent fuel reprocessing plants will be presented. Development of oxygen sensors to monitor the oxygen level in the reactor containments and sodium sensors for detection of sodium leakages will also be discussed. The talk will focus the general aspects of identification of the sensing material for the respective analyte species, development of suitable chemical route for preparing them as fine powders, the need for configuring them in thick film or thin film geometries and their performance. Pulsed laser deposition method, an elegant technique to prepare the high quality thin films of multicomponent oxides is demonstrated for preparation of nanostructured thin films of complex oxides and its use in tailoring the morphology of the complex sensing material in the desired form by optimizing the in-situ growth conditions. (author)

  16. A Dye Laser Pumped by an Air Laser

    OpenAIRE

    El-Raey, M.; Helmi, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    A modified dye laser system operating at UNARC is discussed. The dye laser (peak wavelength ≈ 440 nm) is pumped by an air/N2-laser. The dye is a new one, Tinopal, provided by CIBA Co. in Egypt. The dye laser/air laser characteristics are presented.

  17. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  18. Femtosecond-laser processing of nitrobiphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröter, Anja; Franzka, Steffen [Fakultät für Chemie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); CENIDE – Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Koch, Jürgen; Chichkov, Boris N. [LZH – Laser Zentrum Hannover e. V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Ostendorf, Andreas [Fakultät für Maschinenbau, Ruhruniversität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Hartmann, Nils, E-mail: nils.hartmann@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Chemie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); CENIDE – Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Single-pulse femtosecond laser patterning of nitrobiphenylthiol monolayers on Au-coated Si substrates at λ = 800 nm, τ < 30 fs and ambient conditions has been investigated. After laser processing wet etching experiments are performed. Laser irradiation reduces the chemical resistance of the coating. In particular, the monolayer acts as a positive-tone resist. Burr-free pattern transfer is feasible at laser pulse fluences between 1 and 2.7 J/cm{sup 2}. Minimum structure sizes at a 1/e laser spot diameter of about 1 μm are close to 300 nm, i.e. sub-wavelength processing is demonstrated. Noteworthy, however, no indications for negative-tone resist properties of processed monolayers are evident, that is, cross-linking of the biphenyl moieties, if at all, is marginal. Also, complementary labeling experiments provide no evidence for chemical transformation of the nitro end groups into amine functionalities. Perspectives of resonant fs-laser processing in exploiting the particular prospects of nitrobiphenylthiol monolayers as negative-tone resists and chemically patternable platforms are discussed.

  19. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  20. Study on pulsed excimer laser deposited films

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Jing Ru; Li Tie Jun; Yao Dong Sheng; Wang Li Ge; Yuan Xiao; Wang Sheng; Ye Xi Sheng

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed lasers of two different durations (30 ns, 500 fs) are used to deposit Hydrogen-free Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) films over large areas. Analysis of DLC films shows remarkable mechanical, optical, electrical, and chemical properties that are close to those of diamond. By optical emission spectroscopy and ion probe, the effects of plasma characteristic on DLC film are on experimentally studied. Amorphous silicon films deposited by PLD are also experimentally studied

  1. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS

  2. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanawade, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Kanawade@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Mehari, Fanuel [Master Programme in Advanced Optical Technologies (MAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Glueckstrasse 11, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Tangermann-Gerk, Katja [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Michael [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS.

  3. Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy on laser-doped silicon with different surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Joon; Franklin, Evan; Fell, Andreas; Ernst, Marco; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Macdonald, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μ-PLS) is applied to investigate shallow layers of laser-processed silicon for solar cell applications. Micron-scale measurement (with spatial resolution down to 1 μm) enables investigation of the fundamental impact of laser processing on the electronic properties of silicon as a function of position within the laser-processed region, and in particular at specific positions such as at the boundary/edge of processed and unprocessed regions. Low-temperature μ-PLS enables qualitative analysis of laser-processed regions by identifying PLS signals corresponding to both laser-induced doping and laser-induced damage. We show that the position of particular luminescence peaks can be attributed to band-gap narrowing corresponding to different levels of subsurface laser doping, which is achieved via multiple 248 nm nanosecond excimer laser pulses with fluences in the range 1.5-4 J/cm2 and using commercially available boron-rich spin-on-dopant precursor films. We demonstrate that characteristic defect PL spectra can be observed subsequent to laser doping, providing evidence of laser-induced crystal damage. The impact of laser parameters such as fluence and number of repeat pulses on laser-induced damage is also analyzed by observing the relative level of defect PL spectra and absolute luminescence intensity. Luminescence owing to laser-induced damage is observed to be considerably larger at the boundaries of laser-doped regions than at the centers, highlighting the significant role of the edges of laser-doped region on laser doping quality. Furthermore, by comparing the damage signal observed after laser processing of two different substrate surface conditions (chemically-mechanically polished and tetramethylammonium hydroxide etched), we show that wafer preparation can be an important factor impacting the quality of laser-processed silicon and solar cells.

  4. Lasers in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Qian [Department of Pathology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, University of Oslo, Montebello, 0310 Oslo (Norway); Juzeniene, Asta; Moan, Johan [Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, University of Oslo, Montebello, 0310 Oslo (Norway); Chen Jiyao [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China); Svaasand, Lars O [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, O.S. Bragstads Plass 2A, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Warloe, Trond; Giercksky, Karl-Erik [Department of Surgical Oncology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, University of Oslo, Montebello, 0310 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: Qian.Peng@rr-research.no

    2008-05-15

    It is hard to imagine that a narrow, one-way, coherent, moving, amplified beam of light fired by excited atoms is powerful enough to slice through steel. In 1917, Albert Einstein speculated that under certain conditions atoms could absorb light and be stimulated to shed their borrowed energy. Charles Townes coined the term laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) in 1951. Theodore Maiman investigated the glare of a flash lamp in a rod of synthetic ruby, creating the first human-made laser in 1960. The laser involves exciting atoms and passing them through a medium such as crystal, gas or liquid. As the cascade of photon energy sweeps through the medium, bouncing off mirrors, it is reflected back and forth, and gains energy to produce a high wattage beam of light. Although lasers are today used by a large variety of professions, one of the most meaningful applications of laser technology has been through its use in medicine. Being faster and less invasive with a high precision, lasers have penetrated into most medical disciplines during the last half century including dermatology, ophthalmology, dentistry, otolaryngology, gastroenterology, urology, gynaecology, cardiology, neurosurgery and orthopaedics. In many ways the laser has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of a disease. As a surgical tool the laser is capable of three basic functions. When focused on a point it can cauterize deeply as it cuts, reducing the surgical trauma caused by a knife. It can vaporize the surface of a tissue. Or, through optical fibres, it can permit a doctor to see inside the body. Lasers have also become an indispensable tool in biological applications from high-resolution microscopy to subcellular nanosurgery. Indeed, medical lasers are a prime example of how the movement of an idea can truly change the medical world. This review will survey various applications of lasers in medicine including four major categories: types of lasers, laser

  5. Laser program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Laser Fusion program are to understand and develop the science and technology of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and to utilize ICF in short- and long-term military applications, and, in the long-term, as a candidate for central-station civilian power generation. In 1984, using the Novette laser system, the authors completed experiments showing the very favorable scaling of laser-plama interactions with short-wavelength laser light. Their Novette experiments have unequivocally shown that short laser wavelength, i.e., less than 1 μm, is required to provide the drive necessary for efficient compression, ignition, and burn of DT fusion fuel. In other experiments with Novette, the authors made the first unambiguous observation of amplified spontaneous emission in the soft x-ray regime. The authors also conducted military applications and weapons physics experiments, which they discuss in detail in the classified volume of our Laser Program Annual Report. In the second thrust, advanced laser studies, they develop and test the concepts, components, and materials for present and future laser systems. Over the years, this has meant providing the technology base and scientific advances necessary to construct and operate a succession of six evermore-powerful laser systems. The latest of these, Nova, a 100-TW/100-kJ-class laser system, was completed in 1984. The Nd:glass laser continues to be the most effective and versatile tool for ICF and weapons physics because of its scalability in energy, the ability to efficiently convert its 1=μm output to shorter wavelengths, its ability to provide flexible, controlled pulse shaping, and its capability to adapt to a variety of irradiation and focusing geometries. For these reasons, many of our advanced laser studies are in areas appropriate to solid state laser technologies

  6. Laser microprocessing and nanoengineering of large-area functional micro/nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M.; Xie, X. Z.; Yang, J.; Chen, Z. C.; Xu, L.; Choo, Y. S.; Hong, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Laser microprocessing and nanoengineering are of great interest to both scientists and engineers, since the inspired properties of functional micro/nanostructures over large areas can lead to numerous unique applications. Currently laser processing systems combined with high speed automation ensure the focused laser beam to process various materials at a high throughput and a high accuracy over large working areas. UV lasers are widely used in both laser microprocessing and nanoengineering. However by improving the processing methods, green pulsed laser is capable of replacing UV lasers to make high aspect ratio micro-grooves on fragile and transparent sapphire substrates. Laser micro-texturing can also tune the wetting property of metal surfaces from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic at a contact angle of 161° without chemical coating. Laser microlens array (MLA) can split a laser beam into multiple laser beams and reduce the laser spot size down to sub-microns. It can be applied to fabricate split ring resonator (SRR) meta-materials for THz sensing, surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) structures for NIR and molding tools for soft lithography. Furthermore, laser interference lithography combined with thermal annealing can obtain a large area of sub-50nm nano-dot clusters used for SPR applications.

  7. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  8. Laser surgery: using the carbon dioxide laser.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    In 1917 Einstein theorized tha through an atomic process a unique kind of electromagnetic radiation could be produced by stimulated emission. When such radiation is in the optical or infrared spectrum it is termed laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) light. A laser, a high-intensity light source, emits a nearly parallel electromagnetic beam of energy at a given wavelength that can be captured by a lens and concentrated in the focal spot. The wavelength determines ho...

  9. Laser Heater and seeded Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Dattoli, G.; Petrillo, V.; E. Sabia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effect of laser heater on a seeded Free Electron Laser. We develop a model embedding the effect of the energy modulation induced by the heater with those due to the seeding. The present analysis is compatible with the experimental results obtained at FERMI displaying secondary maxima with increasing heater intensity. The treatment developed in the paper confirms and extends previous analyses and put in evidence further effects which can be tested in future experi...

  10. Laser polishing of additive laser manufacturing surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Benoit; MOGNOL, Pascal; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    International audience The additive laser manufacturing (ALM) technique is an additive manufacturing process which enables the rapid manufacturing of complex metallic parts and the creation of thin parts so as, for example, to decrease parts weight for biomechanical or aeronautic applications. Furthermore, compared with selective laser sintering technology, the ALM process allows creating more huge parts and material gradient. However, for aesthetic or tribological functions, the ALM surfa...

  11. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected.

  12. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  13. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [William and Mary College; Klopf, John M. [William and Mary College; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB

    2014-08-01

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  14. Possibility of developing a laser thermonuclear fusion driver on the base of an oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the feasibility of constructing a driver for laser thermonuclear fusion in which the second harmonic of an oxygen-iodine chemical laser is used to pump solid-state lasers (for example, Cr3+-activated crystals). In contrast to the existing systems, a separate master oscillator is proposed for each channel of the driver. The proposal has the advantages of relative technological simplicity, high degree of uniformity of target irradiation, and providing optimal profile of a heating pulse at 0.8, 0.4, and 0.27 μm. 35 refs.; 12 figs

  15. Lasers in Dermatology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Nouri, Keyvan

    2012-01-01

    Laser technology is constantly evolving and progressing. The use of laser therapy is vastly expanding and for this reason a medical book of this magnitude is necessary. Lasers and Light Therapy includes an up-to-date comprehensive look at lasers and light therapy not only in the field of Cutaneous Laser Surgery, but in other medical specialties as well.

  16. Physical and Chemical Sciences Center - research briefs. Volume 1-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattern, P.L.

    1994-12-31

    This report provides brief summaries of research performed in chemical and physical sciences at Sandia National Laboratories. Programs are described in the areas of advanced materials and technology, applied physics and chemistry, lasers, optics, and vision, and resources and capabilities.

  17. Influence of laser power on tensile properties and material characteristics of laser-sintered UHMWPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Yas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE has excellent properties, such as high mechanical performance, low friction, high wear and chemical resistance but so far there has been limited use in additive manufacturing (AM. Laser sintering of polymers is one of the most promising AM technologies due to its ability to produce complex geometries with accurate dimensions and good mechanical properties. Consequently, this study investigates the influence of laser power on physical and mechanical properties of UHMWPE parts produced by laser sintering. In particular mechanical properties, such as Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS, Young’s Modulus and elongation at break were evaluated alongside relative density, dilation and shrinkage. Finally, the fracture surface of the tensile test specimens was examined by electron microscopy. Results show that within a laser power range of 6–12 W there appears to be an optimum where tensile strength and relative density reach a maximum, dilation is minimised and where elongation increases with laser power. UTS up to 2.42 MPa, modulus up to 72.6 MPa and elongation at break up to 51.4% were observed. Relative density and part dimensions are also influenced by laser power.

  18. Setup for functional cell ablation with lasers: coupling of a laser to a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Sean T; Hidalgo, Alicia; de Belle, J Steven; Keshishian, Haig

    2012-06-01

    The selective removal of cells by ablation is a powerful tool in the study of eukaryotic developmental biology, providing much information about their origin, fate, or function in the developing organism. In Drosophila, three main methods have been used to ablate cells: chemical, genetic, and laser ablation. Each method has its own applicability with regard to developmental stage and the cells to be ablated, and its own limitations. The primary advantage of laser-based ablation is the flexibility provided by the method: The operations can be performed in any cell pattern and at any time in development. Laser-based techniques permit manipulation of structures within cells, even to the molecular level. They can also be used for gene activation. However, laser ablation can be expensive, labor-intensive, and time-consuming. Although live cells can be difficult to image in Drosophila embryos, the use of vital fluorescent imaging methods has made laser-mediated cell manipulation methods more appealing; the methods are relatively straightforward. This article provides the information necessary for setting up and using a laser microscope for lasesr ablation studies.

  19. Principles of Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Svelto, Orazio

    2010-01-01

    This new Fifth Edition of Principles of Lasers incorporates corrections to the previous edition. The text’s essential mission remains the same: to provide a wide-ranging yet unified description of laser behavior, physics, technology, and current applications. Dr. Svelto emphasizes the physical rather than the mathematical aspects of lasers, and presents the subject in the simplest terms compatible with a correct physical understanding. Praise for earlier editions: "Professor Svelto is himself a longtime laser pioneer and his text shows the breadth of his broad acquaintance with all aspects of the field … Anyone mastering the contents of this book will be well prepared to understand advanced treatises and research papers in laser science and technology." (Arthur L. Schawlow, 1981 Nobel Laureate in Physics) "Already well established as a self-contained introduction to the physics and technology of lasers … Professor Svelto’s book, in this lucid translation by David Hanna, can be strongly recommended for...

  20. Strong field laser physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Since the invention of the laser in the 1960s, people have strived to reach higher intensities and shorter pulse durations. High intensities and ultrashort pulse durations are intimately related. Recent developments have shown that high intensity lasers also open the way to realize pulses with the shortest durations to date, giving birth to the field of attosecond science (1 asec = 10-18s). This book is about high-intensity lasers and their applications. The goal is to give an up to date introduction to the technology behind these laser systems and to the broad range of intense laser applications. These applications include AMO (atomic molecular and optical) physics, x-ray science, attosecond science, plasma physics and particle acceleration, condensed matter science and laser micromachining, and finally even high-energy physics.

  1. Cutaneous laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J A; Gilbertson, J J

    1985-12-01

    The carbon dioxide laser is useful for vaporizing lesions and applying incisions, the argon laser coagulates superficial vascular lesions and the neodymium-YAG laser is used for large vascular and more deeply situated lesions. Many patients with port-wine stains have been treated with excellent to poor results, major problems consisting of incomplete color removal and hypertrophic scarring (occurring in 4% to 23% of cases). While results are imperfect, patients are satisfied with the improvement in 86% of cases. Lasers have been used with good results for treating patients with strawberry angioma of infancy, pyogenic granuloma, telangiectasia of the face, decorative tattoos, genital condylomata and warts. The results of laser treatment of essential telangiectasia of the lower extremities have generally been poor. The CO(2) laser has been effective in excising small lesions and elevating skin flaps. PMID:4090490

  2. Lasers Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thyagarajan, K

    2010-01-01

    Lasers: Fundamentals and Applications, serves as a vital textbook to accompany undergraduate and graduate courses on lasers and their applications. Ever since their invention in 1960, lasers have assumed tremendous importance in the fields of science, engineering and technology because of their diverse uses in basic research and countless technological applications. This book provides a coherent presentation of the basic physics behind the way lasers work, and presents some of their most important applications in vivid detail. After reading this book, students will understand how to apply the concepts found within to practical, tangible situations. This textbook includes worked-out examples and exercises to enhance understanding, and the preface shows lecturers how to most beneficially match the textbook with their course curricula. The book includes several recent Nobel Lectures, which will further expose students to the emerging applications and excitement of working with lasers. Students who study lasers, ...

  3. Nuclear-pumped lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Prelas, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on Nuclear-Pumped Laser (NPL) technology and provides the reader with a fundamental understanding of NPLs, a review of research in the field, and exploration of large scale NPL system design and applications. Early chapters look at the fundamental properties of lasers, nuclear-pumping and nuclear reactions that may be used as drivers for nuclear-pumped lasers. The book goes on to explore the efficient transport of energy from the ionizing radiation to the laser medium and then the operational characteristics of existing nuclear-pumped lasers. Models based on Mathematica, explanations and a tutorial all assist the reader’s understanding of this technology. Later chapters consider the integration of the various systems involved in NPLs and the ways in which they can be used, including beyond the military agenda. As readers will discover, there are significant humanitarian applications for high energy/power lasers, such as deflecting asteroids, space propulsion, power transmission and mining....

  4. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  5. A gas laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sydzo, Y.; Norio, T.

    1984-04-02

    It is reported that an improved gas laser system with active medium circulation has been developed. The design of the gas laser is given in block diagram form, and its principle of operation is described in detail. The gaseous active medium flows through the inlet hole to the laser system, and is uniformly dispersed as it flows through the cylindrical diffuser. Thus, a near uniform distribution in the flow velocity of the gas flow in the laser discharge tube is achieved. The gas flow velocity along the edges of the discharge tube exceeds somewhat the flow velocity in the central section, which aids in generating and maintaining a stable and uniform pumping discharge. It is established experimentally that when using the proposed design, the parameters of the output emission from the gas laser are improved significantly. A relationship is given which demonstrates the near linear relationship between the pumping voltage and the output emission power from a gas laser.

  6. Laser absorption spectroscopy using lead salt and quantum cascade tunable lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjou-Khales, Khosrow

    A new class of analytic instruments based on the detection of chemical species through their spectroscopic absorption 'fingerprint' is emerging based on the use of tunable semiconductor lasers as the excitation source. Advantages of this approach include compact device size, in-line measurement capability, and large signal-bandwidth product. To realize these advantages will require the marriage of laser devices with broad tunability in the infrared spectral range with sophisticated signal processing techniques. Currently, commercial devices based on short wavelength telecommunications type lasers exist but there is potential for much more versatile instruments based on longer wavelength operation. This thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part I present a theoretical analysis and experimental characterization of frequency and wavelength modulation spectroscopy using long wavelength infrared tunable lasers. The experimental measurements were carried out using commercially available lead salt lasers and excellent agreement is found between theoretically predicted performance and experimental verification. The lead salt laser has several important drawbacks as a source in practical instrumentation. In the second part of the thesis I report on the use of the quantum cascade (QC) laser for use in sensitive absorption spectroscopy. The QC laser is a new type of tunable device developed at Bell Laboratories. It features broad infrared tunability, single mode distributed feedback operation, and near room temperature lasing. Using the modulation techniques developed originally for the lead salt lasers, the QC laser was used to detect Nsb2O and other small molecules with absorption features near 8 mum wavelength. The noise equivalent absorption for our measurements was 5× 10sp{-5}/sqrt{Hz} which corresponds to a detection limit of ˜0.25 ppm-m/sqrt{Hz} for Nsb2O. The QC laser sensitivity was found to be limited by excess amplitude modulation in the detection

  7. Laser cutting plastic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  8. Space laser components reliability

    OpenAIRE

    Riede, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Space environment presents unique challenges for operation of optics and optical coatings as part of laser systems. Besides testing components and sub-systems on the component qualification level, the extended testing of complete laser systems like flight modules under acceptance level conditions is an effective way to determine the reliability and long term stability, mitigating the mission risk. Hence, optics as part of high power space laser systems have to be extensively tested in view...

  9. Lasers in orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Nalcaci, Ruhi; Cokakoglu, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Many types of dental lasers are currently available that can be efficiently used for soft and hard tissue applications in the field of orthodontics. For achieving the desired effects in the target tissue, knowledge of laser characteristics such as power, wavelength and timing, is necessary. Laser therapy is advantageous because it often avoids bleeding, can be pain free, is non-invasive and is relatively quick. The high cost is its primary disadvantage. It is very important to take the necess...

  10. The Laser Accessory Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ashvin

    1988-09-01

    Wandering through the exhibit hall yesterday, I noticed that if you look at the laser companies and if you look at the accessory companies, there are pretty much the same number of accessory booths as well as the laser companies. There was one difference. Laser company booths are all sexy looking, very flashy, big booths. Whereas if you look at the accessories booths, they were small, not so prominent.

  11. Welding by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laser which does not require a vacuum and the beam from which can be projected over a distance without loss of power is sited outside a welding zone and the beam projected through a replaceable laser transparent window. The window is designed and shaped to facilitate access of the beam of workpiece items to be welded in containment. Either the workpiece or the laser beam may be moved during welding. (author)

  12. Laser precision microfabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Sugioka, Koji; Pique, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Miniaturization and high precision are rapidly becoming a requirement for many industrial processes and products. As a result, there is greater interest in the use of laser microfabrication technology to achieve these goals. This book composed of 16 chapters covers all the topics of laser precision processing from fundamental aspects to industrial applications to both inorganic and biological materials. It reviews the sate of the art of research and technological development in the area of laser processing.

  13. Modern retinal laser therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal dise...

  14. Cutaneous Laser Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    John A. Dixon; Gilbertson, Jeffrey J.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon dioxide laser is useful for vaporizing lesions and applying incisions, the argon laser coagulates superficial vascular lesions and the neodymium-YAG laser is used for large vascular and more deeply situated lesions. Many patients with port-wine stains have been treated with excellent to poor results, major problems consisting of incomplete color removal and hypertrophic scarring (occurring in 4% to 23% of cases). While results are imperfect, patients are satisfied with the improvem...

  15. Semiconductor laser. Halbleiterlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuenstel, K.; Gohla, B.; Tegude, F.; Luz, G.; Hildebrand, O.

    1987-08-27

    A highly modulable semiconductor laser and a process for its manufacture are described. The semiconductor laser has a substrate, a stack of semiconductor layers and electrical contacts. To reduce the capacity, the width of the stack of semiconductor layers is reduced at the sides by anisotropic etching. The electrical contacts are situated on the same side of the substrate and are applied in the same stage of the process. The semiconductor laser is suitable for monolithic integration in other components.

  16. Laser Interference Lithography

    OpenAIRE

    Wolferen, van, Henk A.G.M.; Abelmann, Leon; Hennessy, Theodore C.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter we explain how submicron gratings can be prepared by Laser Interference Lithography (LIL). In this maskless lithography technique, the standing wave pattern that exists at the intersection of two coherent laser beams is used to expose a photosensitive layer. We show how to build the basic setup, with special attention for the optical aspects. The pros and cons of different types of resist as well as the limitations and errors of the setup are discussed. The bottleneck in Laser...

  17. Semiconductor laser beam bending

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIRIM, REMZİ; ÇELEBİ, FATİH VEHBİ

    2015-01-01

    This study is about a single-component cylindrical structured lens with a gradient curve that was used for bending laser beams. It operates under atmospheric conditions and bends the laser beam independently of temperature, pressure, polarity, polarization, magnetic field, electric field, radioactivity, and gravity. A single-piece cylindrical lens that can bend laser beams was developed. Lenses are made of transparent, tinted, or colored glass and are used to undermine or absorb the energy of...

  18. The rotating cavity laser

    OpenAIRE

    Eckold, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes a new technique for mitigating the detrimental thermal phenomena that often limit the power scaling potential of solid state lasers. The unavoidable heating effect that arisesfrom the quantum defect leads to a degradation in beam quality, reduced efficiency and, eventually catastrophic failure. However, lasing processes occur on a faster time scale than those associated with heat flow through a typical laser gain medium. This is made use of whenever a laser is operated i...

  19. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  20. Precision laser aiming system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, Brandon R. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2009-04-28

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.