WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical lasers

  1. Hydroxyl Radical Chemical Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-01

    Stone (I) 1 Atlantic Research Corporation, Alexandria, VA (Robert Naismith ) I Battelle Columbus laboratories, Columbus, OH (Fred Tietzel) 1...Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (Dr. Claude R. Culp) 1 Thiokol Chemical Corporation, Wasatch Division, Brigham City, UT ( James E. Hansen) 4 United

  2. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  3. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  4. Photonic crystal laser sources for chemical detection

    OpenAIRE

    Lončar, Marko; Scherer, Axel; Qiu, Yueming

    2003-01-01

    We have realized photonic crystal lasers that permit the introduction of analyte within the peak of the optical field of the lasing mode. We have explored the design compromises for developing such sensitive low-threshold spectroscopy sources, and demonstrate the operation of photonic crystal lasers in different ambient organic solutions. We show that nanocavity lasers can be used to perform spectroscopic tests on femtoliter volumes of analyte, and propose to use these lasers for high-resolut...

  5. Chemical-free cleaning using excimer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; O'Keeffe, Terence R.

    1996-04-01

    A critical requirement in many industrial processes is the cleaning of oils and grease, oxides, solvent residues, particles, thin films and other contaminants from surfaces. There is a particularly acute need in the electronics industry for cleaning semiconductor wafers and computer chips and in the metals industry for removing oxides and other contaminants. Cleaning traditionally is done by various wet chemical processes, almost all consuming large amounts of water and producing large amounts of hazardous wastes. To further complicate this, some of these cleaning agents and vast water consumption are undergoing stringent restrictions. The Radiance ProcessSM is a novel, patented Excimer Laser approach to dry surface cleaning. The process has removed particles from 80 microns to submicron sizes, paints, inks, oxides, fingerprints, hazes, parts of molecules and metallic ions in fingerprints. The process does not ablate, melt or damage the underlying surface. Micro-roughening on some Silicon and Gallium Arsenide is on the order of 1A or less. This paper will discuss the various applications with this process and the latest results from a beta wafer cleaning prototype test bed system that is being built under an EPA grant and joint partnership between Radiance Services Company, Neuman Micro Technologies, Inc. and the Microelectronics Research Laboratory.

  6. Laser micromachining of chemically altered polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippert, T.

    1998-08-01

    During the last decade laser processing of polymers has become an important field of applied and fundamental research. One of the most promising proposals, to use laser ablation as dry etching technique in photolithography, has not yet become an industrial application. Many disadvantages of laser ablation, compared to conventional photolithography, are the result of the use of standard polymers. These polymers are designed for totally different applications, but are compared to the highly specialized photoresist. A new approach to laser polymer ablation will be described; the development of polymers, specially designed for high resolution laser ablation. These polymers have photolabile groups in the polymer backbone, which decompose upon laser irradiation or standard polymers are modified for ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength. The absorption maximum can be tailored for specific laser emissino lines, e.g. 351, 308 and 248 nm lines of excimer lasers. The authors show that with this approach many problems associated with the application of laser ablation for photolithography can be solved. The mechanism of ablation for these photopolymers is photochemical, whereas for most of the standard polymers this mechanism is photothermal. The photochemical decomposition mechanism results in high resolution ablation with no thermal damage at the edges of the etched structures. In addition there are no redeposited ablation products or surface modifications of the polymer after ablation.

  7. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, N. (ed.)

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  8. Comparison of Laser Chemical Processing and LaserMicroJet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (LaserMicroJet®, LMJ, and Laser Chemical Processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used.

  9. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  10. Bibliography of Short Wavelength Chemical Laser Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Churassy, M.L. Gaillard, J.P. Pique and F. Hartmann HYPERFINE PREDISSOCIATION IN DIATOMIC BROMINE Laser Chem., 1, 185 (1983) 157. Koffend, J.B., C.E...FLUORESCENCE DECAY DYNAMICS OF MATRIX ISOLATED IBr J. Phys. Chem., 96, 4301 (1992) 172. Macler, M., J.P. Nicolai , and M.C. Heaven ELECTRONIC SPECTROSCOPY AND... Nicolai , J.P. and M.C. Heaven PHOTOSELECTION STUDY OF THE BROMINE MOLECULE A -4 X EMISSION SYSTEM IN AN ARGON MATRIX J. Chem. Phys., 83, 6538 (1985

  11. Applications of laser in the field of chemical solubility determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingming Chen(陈明鸣); Peisheng Ma(马沛生); Xinxing Liu(柳新星)

    2003-01-01

    A novel experiment method for chemical solubility determination was brought forward, in which opticsand chemistry principles are united and the change of laser intensity indicates the process of chemicaldissolving. The more undissolved solid exists in the mixture of solute and solvent, the less transmittedlaser intensity is detected. Only when the transmitted laser intensity in stirring state and that in staticstate comes into equalization, the dissolving process stops. Under the help of laser intensity judgement,measurements turn to be more feasible and objective, especially at high pressure. The average relativeerrors for the solubility data determined in this paper are 2.3% for those in the minor value scope and 1.7%for those in the high value scope respectively. Comparison of the experimental solubility data with theliterature ones demonstrates that the laser-aid solubility determination apparatus is stable and reliable.

  12. New Electronic-Transition Laser Systems. Part 1. Electron Pumped Systems. Part 2. Chemically Pumped Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    laser development . There has not yet been a demonstration of gain in a visible chemical laser systems, and it appears unlikely that practical lasers of this type will be developed in the near future. Substantial progress has been made

  13. 20-Kw nitrogen diluent chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tientsai T.; Bhowmik, Anup; Burde, David H.; Clark, Roy; Carroll, S.; Dickerson, Robert A.; Eblen, J.; Gylys, Vytas T.; Hsia, Y. C.; Humphreys, Richard H., Jr.; Moon, L. F.; Hurlock, Steve C.; Tomassian, A.

    2002-09-01

    A new Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL) has been developed and demonstrated at chlorine flow rates up to 1 gmol/s. The laser employs a cross flow jet oxygen generator operating with no diluent. The generator product flow enters the laser cavity at Mach 1 and is accelerated by mixing with 5 gmol/s, Mach 5 nitrogen diluent in an ejector nozzle array. The nitrogen also serves as the carrier for iodine. Vortex mixing is achieved through the use of mixing tabs at the nitrogen nozzle exit. Mixing approach design and analysis, including CFD analysis, led to the preferred nozzle configuration. The selected mixing enhancement design was tested in cold flow and the results are in good agreement with the CFD predictions. Good mixing was achieved within the desired cavity flow length of 20 cm and pressure recovery about 90 Torr was measured at the cavity exit. Finally, the design was incorporated into the laser and power extraction as high as 20 kw was measured at the best operating condition of 0.9 gmol/s. Stable resonator mode footprints showed desieable intensity profiles, which none of the sugar scoop profiles characteristic of the conventional COIL designs.

  14. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in Strategic Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    using <fJ*™’™ „, „,,„,,; rrÄr^ÄSXnceuea. MlRACL Chemical laser at White planned for 1995. ssssSS Sands New Mexico ^f Tit:*n s«ron»1 «>ta<J*’f...AsswnHY P«o Su<«y CS2 Secwios CaoaMitv LPE 10,412 OPE 12.323 S/C with Test Objects 12,382 Subtotal 35,117 Titan IVA Margin !32.7°.o

  15. Laser diagnostics of chemical vapour deposition of diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Wills, J B

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to make diagnostic measurements of chemically activated CH sub 4 / H sub 2 gas mixtures during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of thin diamond films. Absolute absorbances, concentrations and temperatures are presented for CH sub 3 , NH and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a hot filament (HF) activated gas mixture and CH, C sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a DC arc plasma jet activated mixture. Measurements of the radical species were made using a pulsed dye laser system to generate tuneable visible and UV wavelengths. These species have greatest concentration in the hottest, activated regions of the reactors. Spatial profiling of the number densities of CH sub 3 and NH radicals have been used as stringent tests of predictions of radical absorbance and number densities made by 3-D numerical simulations, with near quantitative agreement. O sub 2 has been shown to reside in the activated region of the Bristol DC arc jet at concentrations (approx 10 sup 1 sup 3 molecules / cm...

  16. Advanced Laser Chemical Processing For Microelectronics and Integrated Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-15

    Barbara, CA (June 25-27, 1990). 15. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Integrated Electronics and Optics," OITDA Conference, Tokyo, Japan, (July 5...Society Meeting, Boston, MA, November 26 - December 3, 1990. 20. R.M. Osgood, Jr., "Advances in Laser Fabrication for Solid-State Electronics and...Thin, Excimer Laser-Deposited Cd Interlayers," J. Elec. Mat. 12, 1239 (July, 1990). 14. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Solid State

  17. [Effects of helium-neon laser on physico-chemical properties of the bile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Kh Kh; Dzhuraev, Kh Sh; Barakaev, S B; Kharina, T P; Pulatov, L I

    1990-08-01

    The influence of helium-neon laser radiation on bile physico-chemical characteristics in healthy subjects and in patients with the physico-chemical stage of gallstone disease was studied in vitro. This type of laser was found to induce positive therapeutic effects, such as: correction of hydrogen ion concentrations, surface tension and viscosity decrease and prolonged bile nucleation in patients with gallstone disease.

  18. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  19. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  20. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  1. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  2. The effects of motive gas physical properties on the performance of ejector for chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jungkun; Kim, Sehoon; Kwon, Hyuckmo; Kwon, Sejin

    2005-03-01

    Axi-symmetric annular type ejector has been developed as a pressure recovery system for HF/DF chemical laser. Ejector was tested using air as operating gases and low-pressure entrained flow was obtained. In this paper, we changed motive gas since operating gases for chemical laser system are products of chemical reaction. By selection of motive gas, physical properties of operating gas changes, therefore the performance of ejector is different for each motive gas, i.e., specific heat at constant pressure (CP) and average molecular weight (MW) on the effectiveness of ejection. The research was carried out by both numerical analysis using commercial CFD code, FLUENT and experiments.

  3. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-01-12

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  4. Chemical Structure by Laser-Produced X-Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-02

    replicating sub-micrometer line- width patterns. (2) Besides replicating test patterns, the tech- nique has been used to fabricare surface acoustic wave...infrared prepulse of 30ns width, which has been chipped off the main laser pulse is focused with a cylindrical lens onto a rectangular region comprising

  5. Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Probe of Chemical Dynamics of Aerospace Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    valuable for modeling aerospace environments using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and Particles in Cell methods. Environments of interest to the...School of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology”, Shenzhen , China, Nov. 21, 2010. 29. C. Y. Ng, “The Role of Basic (Chemical) Research in Modern

  6. Gain generator optimization for hydrogen fluoride overtone and fundamental chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1993-06-01

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) chemical laser is the baseline concept for SDIO space based laser (SBL) weapons systems. Ground based tests at power levels appropriate for this application have been demonstrated. Because the brightness of a laser beam projected to the far field is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength, shorter wavelengths are desirable to enhance brightness on target. Development of the HF overtone chemical laser ((lambda) equals 1.3 - 1.4 micrometers ) as a growth technology for SBL applications has proceeded rapidly during the past several years. This paper reviews the parametric characterization and optimization of the Hypersonic, Low-Temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for HF overtone and HF fundamental performance. The experiments utilize advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. The experimental results reported include laser power, small signal gain, mode footprint, and spectral content. The design of a multiple nozzle HYLTE module as a building block to an advanced high power HF chemical laser device is presented. Design philosophy emphasizes traceability from an intermediate size linear module to a full scale cylindrical gain generator for SBL applications. The key issues addressed are power scalability, fabricability, regenerative cooling capability, and thermal/structural performance.

  7. Physico-Chemical Dynamics of Nanoparticle Formation during Laser Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, M.D.

    2005-06-01

    Laser-ablation based decontamination is a new and effective approach for simultaneous removal and characterization of contaminants from surfaces (e.g., building interior and exterior walls, ground floors, etc.). The scientific objectives of this research are to: (1) characterize particulate matter generated during the laser-ablation based decontamination, (2) develop a technique for simultaneous cleaning and spectroscopic verification, and (3) develop an empirical model for predicting particle generation for the size range from 10 nm to tens of micrometers. This research project provides fundamental data obtained through a systematic study on the particle generation mechanism, and also provides a working model for prediction of particle generation such that an effective operational strategy can be devised to facilitate worker protection.

  8. Quantum cascade laser: Applications in chemical detection and environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the structural parameter optimization of the active region of a GaAs-based quantum cascade laser in order to maximize the optical gain of the laser at the characteristic wavelengths, which are best suited for detection of pollutant gasses, such as SO2, HNO3, CH4, and NH3, in the ambient air by means of direct absorption. The procedure relies on applying elaborate tools for global optimization, such as the genetic algorithm. One of the important goals is to extend the applicability of a single active region design to the detection of several compounds absorbing at close wave-lengths, and this is achieved by introducing a strong external magnetic field perpendicularly to the epitaxial layers. The field causes two-dimensional continuous energy subbands to split into the series of discrete Landau levels. Since the arrangement of Landau levels depends strongly on the magnitude of the magnetic field, this enables one to control the population inversion in the active region, and hence the optical gain. Furthermore, strong effects of band non-parabolicity result in subtle changes of the lasing wavelength at magnetic fields which maximize the gain, thus providing a path for fine-tuning of the output radiation properties and changing the target compound for detection. The numerical results are presented for quantum cascade laser structures designed to emit at specified wavelengths in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum.

  9. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaji, S.; Garcia, L. V.; Loredo, S. L.; Krishnan, B.; Aguilar Martinez, J. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Avellaneda, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb2S3 thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb2S3 thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  10. Advanced nozzle characterization for hydrogen fluoride overtone chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1992-07-01

    The parametric characterization and optimization of the hypersonic, low-temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for the hydrogen fluoride (HF) overtone and HF fundamental performance are reviewed. The HF fundamental space-based laser for weapons systems is considered to be more mature, nearer term potential application than the overtone. Emphasis is placed on the Task 3 advanced gain generator technology configurations (AGGTC) aimed at a thorough characterization in the fundamental regime. The experiments were based on advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. It is concluded that the Task 3 AGGTC hardware functioned quite well in optimizing the performance of the HYLTE nozzle concept.

  11. Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0550 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum...ARL-RP-0550 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum Cascade...Lasers by Ellen L Holthoff, Logan S Marcus, and Paul M Pellegrino Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL A reprint from Proc

  12. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Manuela Díaz-Monroy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n=12. Group I (control; Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2, 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2, and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2, respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence: quantitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in human aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Erbin; Wishart, David; Khoury, Samir; Kay, Cyril M.; Jugdutt, Bodh I.; Tulip, John; Lucas, Alexandra

    1996-05-01

    We have been studying laser-induced fluorescence as a technique for identification of selected changes in the chemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Formulae for quantification of chemical changes have been developed based upon analysis of fluorescence emission spectra using multiple regression analysis and the principal of least squares. The intima of human aortic necropsy specimens was injected with chemical compounds present in atherosclerotic plaque. Spectra recorded after injection of selected chemical components found in plaque (collagen I, III, IV, elastin and cholesterol) at varying concentrations (0.01 - 1.0 mg) were compared with saline injection. A single fiber system was used for both fluorescence excitation (XeCl excimer laser, 308 nm, 1.5 - 2.0 mJ/ pulse, 5 Hz) and fluorescence emission detection. Average spectra for each chemical have been developed and the wavelengths of peak emission intensity identified. Curve fitting analysis as well as multiple regression analysis were used to develop formulae for assessment of chemical content. Distinctive identifying average curves were established for each chemical. Excellent correlations were identified for collagen I, III, and IV, elastin, and cholesterol (R2 equals 0.92 6- 0.997). Conclusions: (1) Fluorescence spectra of human aortas were significantly altered by collagen I, collagen III, elastin and cholesterol. (2) Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis may allow quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in situ.

  14. Partial feedback unstable resonator on small scale supersonic large aperture chemical laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Rui; Li, Lei

    2015-05-01

    There is always a challenge on large aperture medium power laser's resonator design, stable resonator would supports significant higher order transverse modes, folded and telescope stable resonator are too complex and not preferred by engineers, unstable resonator need rather large round trip gain to compensate its high geometric out-coupling, which is difficult for this kind of laser since its gain length is limited due to the power level and large aperture. Partial feedback unstable resonator had been proposed to tackle this difficulty since the early days of laser development, however, the debates of its effect never stopped even with those distinguished optical resonator scientists such as Siegman, Anan'ev, and Weber. Recently integrated partial feedback unstable resonator design had been successfully demonstrated on a medium size chemical oxygen iodine laser. In this paper, we carry this resonator configuration on a small scale discharge driven supersonic nozzle array Hydrogen Fluoride chemical laser, a typical large aperture short gain length device. With magnification equals 4/3, we successfully get ten Watts level ring beam output.

  15. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  16. Fibre Laser Cutting and Chemical Etching of AZ31 for Manufacturing Biodegradable Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gökhan Demir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium-alloy stents shows promise as a less intrusive solution for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies as a result of the high biocompatibility of the material and its intrinsic dissolution in body fluids. However, in addition to requiring innovative solutions in material choice and design, these stents also require a greater understanding of the manufacturing process to achieve the desired quality with improved productivity. The present study demonstrates the manufacturing steps for the realisation of biodegradable stents in AZ31 magnesium alloy. These steps include laser microcutting with a Q-switched fibre laser for the generation of the stent mesh and subsequent chemical etching for the cleaning of kerf and surface finish. Specifically, for the laser microcutting step, inert and reactive gas cutting conditions were compared. The effect of chemical etching on the reduction in material thickness, as well as on spatter removal, was also evaluated. Prototype stents were produced, and the material composition and surface quality were characterised. The potentialities of combining nanosecond laser microcutting and chemical etching are shown and discussed.

  17. Chemical and microstructural transformations in lithium iron phosphate battery electrodes following pulsed laser exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutey, Adrian H.A., E-mail: adrian.lutey2@unibo.it [DIN, Università di Bologna, viale Risorgimento, 2, Bologna (Italy); Fiorini, Maurizio [DICAM, Università di Bologna, via Terracini, 28, Bologna (Italy); Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro [DIN, Università di Bologna, viale Risorgimento, 2, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Lithium iron phosphate battery electrodes are exposed to pulsed laser radiation. • Raman spectroscopy is performed on regions approaching the incisions and cuts. • Chemical and microstructural changes in the active electrode layers are limited to the visible HAZ. • Some oxidation and degradation of the olive LiFePO{sub 4} cathode active material takes place in the HAZ. • The anode polycrystalline graphite structure becomes less ordered (higher D/G ratio) in the HAZ. - Abstract: Multi-layer lithium iron phosphate (LFP) battery electrodes are exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser radiation of wavelength 1064 nm. Test parameters are chosen to achieve characteristic interaction types ranging from partial incision of the active coating layers only to complete penetration of the electrodes with high visual cut quality. Raman spectroscopy is performed on unexposed regions and at points approaching each incision, highlighting changes in chemical composition and microstructure in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Thermogravimetric analysis is performed on the unexposed electrode active materials to distinguish the development of compositional changes under conditions of slow heating below the melting and sublimation temperatures. A brief theoretical description of the physical phenomena taking place during laser exposure is provided in terms of direct ablation during each laser pulse and vaporization or thermal degradation due to conductive heat transfer on a much longer time-scale, with characteristics of the HAZ reported in terms of these changes. For all laser exposures carried out in the study, chemical and microstructural changes are limited to the visible HAZ. Some degree of oxidation and LFP olivine phase degradation is observed in the cathode, while the polycrystalline graphite structure becomes less ordered in the anode. Where complete penetration is achieved, melting of the cathode active layer and combustion of the anode active layer take place

  18. Physics of a ballistic missile defense - The chemical laser boost-phase defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1988-01-01

    The basic physics involved in proposals to use a chemical laser based on satellites for a boost-phase defense are investigated. After a brief consideration of simple physical conditions for the defense, a calculation of an equation for the number of satellites needed for the defense is made along with some typical values of this for possible future conditions for the defense. Basic energy and power requirements for the defense are determined. A sumary is made of probable minimum conditions that must be achieved for laser power, targeting accuracy, number of satellites, and total sources for power needed.

  19. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition.

  20. A pressure recovery system for chemical oxygen-iodine laser based on an active diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, V. M.; Kiselev, I. A.; Orlov, A. E.; Shatalov, I. V.

    2011-09-01

    An open-type pressure recovery system (PRS) for chemical oxygen-iodine laser was designed and fabricated. As a first stage, an active diffuser was used in which the ejecting gas supply was organized through nozzles disposed around the channel periphery. The second stage was a supersonic ejector. Numerical simulation data for the viscous turbulent flow with heat release through the diffuser gas-dynamic channel, and also data obtained by testing the active diffuser in operation on a model facility equipped with a vacuum chamber, are reported. The obtained data were used to develop a full-scale setup with exhaust of laser gas into the atmosphere; this has allowed us to optimize the performance characteristics of the setup and substantially improve its mass-dimensional characteristics. Special attention was paid to parameter matching and synchronization of laser start with the operation of PRS components.

  1. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time.

  2. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Garcia Guillen, G.; Aguilar Martinez, J.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties.

  3. Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Duong V.; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates superhydrophobic behavior on nanosecond laser patterned copper and brass surfaces. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such texturing, infrared nanosecond fiber lasers offer a lower cost and more robust system combined with potentially much higher processing rates. The wettability of the textured surfaces develops from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity over time when exposed to ambient conditions. The change in the wetting property is attributed to the partial deoxidation of oxides on the surface induced during laser texturing. Textures exhibiting steady state contact angles of up to ∼152° with contact angle hysteresis of around 3-4° have been achieved. Interestingly, the superhydrobobic surfaces have the self-cleaning ability and have potential for chemical sensing applications. The principle of these novel chemical sensors is based on the change in contact angle with the concentration of methanol in a solution. To demonstrate the principle of operation of such a sensor, it is found that the contact angle of methanol solution on the superhydrophobic surfaces exponentially decays with increasing concentration. A significant reduction, of 128°, in contact angle on superhydrophobic brass is observed, which is one order of magnitude greater than that for the untreated surface (12°), when percent composition of methanol reaches to 28%.

  4. Laser-based standoff detection of surface-bound explosive chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, David L.; Smith, Gregory P.; Oser, Harald

    2010-04-01

    Avoiding or minimizing potential damage from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as suicide, roadside, or vehicle bombs requires that the explosive device be detected and neutralized outside its effective blast radius. Only a few seconds may be available to both identify the device as hazardous and implement a response. As discussed in a study by the National Research Council, current technology is still far from capable of meeting these objectives. Conventional nitrocarbon explosive chemicals have very low vapor pressures, and any vapors are easily dispersed in air. Many pointdetection approaches rely on collecting trace solid residues from dust particles or surfaces. Practical approaches for standoff detection are yet to be developed. For the past 5 years, SRI International has been working toward development of a novel scheme for standoff detection of explosive chemicals that uses infrared (IR) laser evaporation of surfacebound explosive followed by ultraviolet (UV) laser photofragmentation of the explosive chemical vapor, and then UV laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of nitric oxide. This method offers the potential of long standoff range (up to 100 m or more), high sensitivity (vaporized solid), simplicity (no spectrometer or library of reference spectra), and selectivity (only nitrocompounds).

  5. Photothermal laser fabrication of micro- and nanostructured chemical templates for directed protein immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Anja; Franzka, Steffen; Hartmann, Nils

    2014-12-16

    Photothermal patterning of poly(ethylene glycol) terminated organic monolayers on surface-oxidized silicon substrates is carried out using a microfocused beam of a CW laser operated at a wavelength of 532 nm. Trichlorosilane and trimethoxysilane precursors are used for coating. Monolayers from trimethoxysilane precursors show negligible unspecific protein adsorption in the background, i.e., provide platforms of superior protein repellency. Laser patterning results in decomposition of the monolayers and yields chemical templates for directed immobilization of proteins at predefined positions. Characterization is carried out via complementary analytical methods including fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Appropriate labeling techniques (fluorescent markers and gold clusters) and substrates (native and thermally oxidized silicon substrates) are chosen in order to facilitate identification of protein adsorption and ensure high sensitivity and selectivity. Variation of the laser parameters at a 1/e(2) spot diameter of 2.8 μm allows for fabrication of protein binding domains with diameters on the micrometer and nanometer length scale. Minimum domain sizes are about 300 nm. In addition to unspecific protein adsorption on as-patterned monolayers, biotin-streptavidin coupling chemistry is exploited for specific protein binding. This approach represents a novel facile laser-based means for fabrication of protein micro- and nanopatterns. The routine is readily applicable to femtosecond laser processing of glass substrates for the fabrication of transparent templates.

  6. Chemical decomposition of urinary stones during holmium-laser lithotripsy: II. Evidence for photothermal breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Vassar, George J.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Chan, Kin Foong; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Because of the greater than or equal to 250 microsecond pulsewidth emitted by the Ho:YAG laser used in clinical lithotripsy, it is unlikely that stress confinement occurs within the irradiated stones. Experimental data supports a thermal mechanism for Ho:YAG laser stone ablation. Stone fragmentation occurs soon after the onset of the laser pulse, is uncorrelated to cavitation bubble formation or collapse, and is associated with low pressures (cf. part I). The mass- loss of desiccated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones exposed to 150 J from the Ho:YAG laser in air was 40 plus or minus 12 mg (mean plus or minus 1 s.d.); for hydrated stones in air was 25 plus or minus 9 mg; and for hydrated stones in water was 17 plus or minus 3 mg, p less than .001. These differences indicate that direct absorption of the laser radiation by the stone is required for the most efficient ablation. Lowering the initial temperature of COM or cystine stones also reduced the stone mass-loss following 20 J of delivered laser energy: 2.2 plus or minus 1.1 mg vs 5.2 plus or minus 1.6 mg for COM stones (-80 vs 23 degrees Celsius), and 0.8 plus or minus 0.4 mg vs 2.2 plus or minus 1.1 mg for cystine stones (-80 vs 23 degrees Celsius), p less than or equal to .05. Finally, chemical analysis of the laser-induced stone fragments revealed the presence of thermal breakdown products: CaCO3 from COM; free sulfur and cysteine from cystine; Ca2O7P2 from calcium hydorgen phosphate dihydrate, and cyanide from uric acid.

  7. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  8. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy of solid and liquid chemicals using laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Lim, Jacob Song Kiat; Liu, Huan; Fu, Yu

    2016-08-22

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity microphone or a piezo sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a laboratory environment. Due to the aforementioned requirements, traditionally this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms (membrane, powder and liquid) were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for applications in photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy, with potential to enable the detection of chemicals in open environment at safe standoff distance.

  9. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwaśniak, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Pura, J., E-mail: jaroslawpura@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Zwolińska, M.; Wieciński, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Skarżyński, H.; Olszewski, L. [Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw (Poland); World Hearing Center, Kajetany (Poland); Marczak, J. [Military University of Technology, Institute of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland); Garbacz, H.; Kurzydłowski, K.J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • DLIL technique and etching were used for functionalization of Ti grade 2 surface. • Modification was performed on semi-finished flat and curved Ti surfaces. • Modification results in periodic multimodal (micro and nano-size) Ti topography. - Abstract: The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone–implants interactions.

  10. Chemical reactions at metallic and metal/semiconductor interfaces stimulated by pulsed laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, E. J.; Caudano, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer Al/Sb thin films have been evaporated on GaSb single crystals in ultra-high vacuum and pulsed-laser irradiated in-situ above the energy density threshold for surface melting. Superficial and interfacial chemical reactions have been characterized in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy; and later, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical reaction between the Al and Sb films is considered as a model reaction for laser-assisted synthesis of high-purity intermetallic compounds. The observation of a strong interfacial reaction between the melted film and the substrate is also a subject of great concern for optical data recording and laser alloying of ohmic contacts on semiconductors. We show that a suitable choice of the substrate and adding a low surface tension element into the metallic film can improve its stability during melting, and prevent inhomogeneous reaction and formation of holes, cracks and particles. Finally, other solutions are suggested to improve the control of these reactions.

  11. Chemical-Free Cotton Defoliation by; Mechanical, Flame and Laser Girdling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew G. Pelletier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel new way to achieve chemical-free defoliation of cotton is discussed. The research found that by severing the phloem tissue on the main stalk, via a girdling operation, the operation stimulated the cotton plant to alter its growth into an early senescence pathway that resulted in the plant shedding its leaves and opening up all its bolls, leaving the plant in the perfect state for machine harvesting. Even with follow-up rains, zero regrowth occurred in the treated plants, unlike the untreated control plots where significant regrowth did occur. This report compares the results of greenhouse and field trials where the girdling operation was performed by hand, flame, mechanical and via a CO2 laser to achieve phloem tissue severance. Design parameters for a prototype laser girdling system are also provided. Results suggest that for deficit irrigated cotton, girdling can provide an alternative means to defoliate cotton.

  12. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  13. Diesel combustion: an integrated view combining laser diagnostics, chemical kinetics, and empirical validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinyami, O C; Dec, J E; Durrett, R P; Flynn, P F; Hunter, G L; Loye, A O; Westbrook, C

    1999-02-01

    This paper proposes a structure for the diesel combustion process based on a combination of previously published and new results. Processes are analyzed with proven chemical kinetic models and validated with data from production-like direct injection diesel engines. The analysis provides new insight into the ignition and particulate formation processes, which combined with laser diagnostics, delineates the two-stage nature of combustion in diesel engines. Data are presented to quantify events occurring during the ignition and initial combustion processes that form soot precursors. A framework is also proposed for understanding the heat release and emission formation processes.

  14. Composition analysis of oxide films formed on titanium surface under pulsed laser action by method of chemical thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, E. I.; Andreeva, Ya M.; Karlagina, Yu Yu; Kolobov, Yu R.; Manokhin, S. S.; Odintsova, G. V.; Slobodov, A. A.; Veiko, V. P.

    2017-04-01

    A pulsed fiber laser with a wavelength of 1.06 µm was used to treat a commercial pure titanium surface in the air at intensities below the ablation threshold to provide oxide formation. Laser oxidation results are predicted by the chemical thermodynamic method and confirmed by experimental techniques (x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy). For the first time, the chemical thermodynamic method was used for determining the qualitative and quantitative phase-chemical composition of the compounds formed by a pulsed laser heating of commercial titanium in the air, and its applicability is proven. The simulation shows that multilayered composite film appears on a surface, the lower layers of which consist of Ti2O3 and TiO oxides with the addition of titanium nitride; and the thin upper layer consists of transparent titanium dioxide. Also, the chemical composition of films remains unchanged within a temperature range of 881–2000 K.

  15. Fabrication of microchannels in single-crystal GaN by wet-chemical-assisted femtosecond-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Seisuke, E-mail: seisuke@riken.jp [RIKEN-Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi [RIKEN-Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2009-09-30

    We investigated micro- and nano-fabrication of wide band-gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Nanoscale craters were successfully formed by wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation, in which the laser beam is focused onto a single-crystal GaN substrate in a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. This allows efficient removal of ablation debris produced by chemical reactions during ablation, resulting in high-quality ablation. However, a two-step processing method involving irradiation by a fs-laser beam in air followed by wet etching, distorts the shape of the crater because of residual debris. The threshold fluence for wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation is lower than that for fs-laser ablation in air, which is advantageous for improving fabrication resolution since it reduces thermal effects. We have fabricated craters as small as 510 nm by using a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens with an NA of 0.73. Furthermore, we have formed three-dimensional hollow microchannels in GaN by fs-laser direct-writing in HCl solution.

  16. Fabrication of microchannels in single-crystal GaN by wet-chemical-assisted femtosecond-laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Seisuke; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2009-09-01

    We investigated micro- and nano-fabrication of wide band-gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Nanoscale craters were successfully formed by wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation, in which the laser beam is focused onto a single-crystal GaN substrate in a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. This allows efficient removal of ablation debris produced by chemical reactions during ablation, resulting in high-quality ablation. However, a two-step processing method involving irradiation by a fs-laser beam in air followed by wet etching, distorts the shape of the crater because of residual debris. The threshold fluence for wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation is lower than that for fs-laser ablation in air, which is advantageous for improving fabrication resolution since it reduces thermal effects. We have fabricated craters as small as 510 nm by using a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens with an NA of 0.73. Furthermore, we have formed three-dimensional hollow microchannels in GaN by fs-laser direct-writing in HCl solution.

  17. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy applications to meteorites: Chemical analysis and composition profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aglio, M.; De Giacomo, A.; Gaudiuso, R.; Pascale, O. De; Senesi, G. S.; Longo, S.

    2010-12-01

    A fast procedure for chemical analysis of different meteorites is presented, based on LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy). The technique is applied to several test cases (Dhofar 019, Dhofar 461, Sahara 98222, Toluca, Sikhote Alin and Campo del Cielo) and can be useful for rapid meteorite identification providing geologists with specific chemical information for meteorite classification. Concentration profiles of Fe, Ni and Co are simultaneously detected across the Widmanstätten structure of the iron meteorite Toluca with a view to determining cooling rates. The LIBS analysis of meteorites is also used as a laboratory test for analogous studies on the respective parent bodies (Mars, asteroids) in space exploration missions where one clear advantage of the proposed technique is that no direct contact with the sample is required.

  18. Laser-based mass spectrometry for in situ chemical composition analysis of planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Samira; Neuland, Maike B.; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in space research. The chemical composition of planetary surface material is a key scientific question on every space mission to a planet, moon or asteroid. Chemical composition measurements of rocky material on the surface are of great importance to understand the origin and evolution of the planetary body.[1] A miniature laser ablation/ionisation reflectron- type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) was designed and built at the University of Bern for planetary research.[2] Despite its small size and light weight, the LMS instrument still maintains the same capabilities as large laboratory systems, which makes it suitable for its application on planetary space missions.[3-5] The high dynamic range of about eight orders of magnitude, high lateral (μm-level) and vertical (sub-nm level) resolution and high detection sensitivity for almost all elements (10 ppb, atomic fraction) make LMS a versatile instrument for various applications. LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotope composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of Pb- isotope abundances can be used for dating of planetary material. Measurements of bio-relevant elements allow searching for past or present life on a planetary surface. The high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction, is of considerable interest, e.g. for analysis of inhomogeneous, extraterrestrial samples as well as weathering processes of planetary material. References [1] P. Wurz, D. Abplanalp, M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, V.A. Fernandes, A. Chumikov, and G. Managadze, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis in Planetary Science: Investigation of the Surface and the Atmosphere", Sol. Sys. Res., 2012, 46, 408. [2] U. Rohner, J.A. Whitby, P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration" Meas. Sci. Tch., 2003, 14, 2159. [3] M. Tulej, A. Riedo, M.B. Neuland, S

  19. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  20. Semi-gas kinetics model for performance modeling of flowing chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COIL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi; HU Limin; SHEN Yiqing

    2004-01-01

    A semi-gas kinetics (SGK) model for performance analyses of flowing chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is presented. In this model, the oxygen-iodine reaction gas flow is treated as a continuous medium, and the effect of thermal motions of particles of different laser energy levels on the performances of the COIL is included and the velocity distribution function equations are solved by using the double-parameter perturbational method. For a premixed flow, effects of different chemical reaction systems, different gain saturation models and temperature, pressure, yield of excited oxygen, iodine concentration and frequency-shift on the performances of the COIL are computed, and the calculated output power agrees well with the experimental data. The results indicate that the power extraction of the SGK model considering 21 reactions is close to those when only the reversible pumping reaction is considered, while different gain saturation models and adjustable parameters greatly affect the output power, the optimal threshold gain range, and the length of power extraction.

  1. Laser-micromachined and laminated microfluidic components for miniaturized thermal, chemical, and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Stewart, Donald C.; Lin, Yuehe

    1999-03-01

    Microchannel microfluidic components are being developed for heat transfer, chemical reactor, chemical analysis, and biological analytical applications. Specific applications include chemical sensing, DNA replication, blood analysis, capillary electrophoresis, fuel cell reactors, high temperature chemical reactors, heat pumps, combustors, and fuel processors. Two general types of component architectures have been developed and the fabrication processes defined. All involve a lamination scheme using plastic, ceramic, or metal laminates, as opposed to planar components. The first type is a stacked architecture that utilizes functionality built in each layer, with fluid flow interconnects between layers. Each layer of the laminate has specific microchannel geometry, and performs a specific function. Polymeric materials are used primarily. Fabrication processes used are laser micromachining, wet and dry etching, and coating deposition. the laminates can also be micromolded plastics. The second architecture employs laminates to form internal microchannels and interconnects. Materials include ceramic tapes and high temperature metals. Catalysts can be placed in the microchannels. Fabrication processes used are diffusion bonding, ceramic bonding and firing, photochemical etching, and electrochemical micromachining. Bonding, thus sealing, the laminates is an important issue. Process conditions have been develop to reduce distortion of the laminates and to hermetically seal the components.

  2. ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL AND PHASE TRANSITIONS OF MULTICOMPONENT ALLOYS UNDER PULSED LASER EXPOSURE IN THE AIR BY METHODS OF CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Veiko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with computational thermodynamic method for determination of phase chemical composition of metal alloys surface formed under laser action in the atmosphere, depending on its volume components, conditions of laser exposure and atmosphere composition. By giving an example of laser heating of complex alloy (alloyed steel in the air it is demonstrated that from a set of various possible reactions of interaction between iron, nickel or chrome with air components (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, their compounds, atmospheric moisture, etc., only strictly defined reactions are realized. Primarily, these are metal oxidation processes with the formation of an oxide film, whose phase and chemical composition is determined by temperature and heating time. Calculation data are confirmed by the experimental data provided by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  3. Chemical-Assisted Femtosecond Laser Writing of Lab-in-Fiber Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Moez

    fringe contrast and peak resolution beyond that available with FPIs and offer a significant theoretical improvement in refractometer sensitivity. The advanced laser processes optimized here may provide a new base for photonics, microfluidics, and optofluidics fabrication in a LIF platform with multiplexed functionality and rapid prototyping capabilities of fully integrable 3D optofluidic systems. The proposed LIF devices define new micro-systems for temperature, strain, pressure, refractive index, and bend strain sensing that may find application in the acoustic, aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, civil, or medical fields.

  4. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants.

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Enhancement of the efficiency and control of emission parameters of an unstable-resonator chemical oxygen—iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Lobachev, V. V.; Savin, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu; Trilis, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    The outlook is considered for the development of a high-power supersonic flowing chemical oxygen—iodine laser operating as an amplifier and controlled by radiation from a master oscillator by using an unstable resonator with a hole-coupled mirror. The influence of the seed radiation intensity, the coupling-hole diameter, the active-medium length, and the magnification factor on the parameters of laser radiation is analysed. It is shown that the use of such resonators is most advisable in medium-power oxygen—iodine lasers for which classical unstable resonators are inefficient because of their low magnification factors. The use of unstable resonators with a hole-coupled mirror and injection provides the control of radiation parameters and a considerable increase in the output power and brightness of laser radiation.

  6. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  7. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  8. Ultrasonic photoacoustic spectroscopy of trace hazardous chemicals using quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Ghai, Devinder Pal; Soni, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    We report an ultrasonic sensor based on open-cell photoacoustic spectroscopy method for the detection of explosive agents in traces. Experimentally, we recorded photoacoustic spectra of traces of hazardous explosives and molecules. Tunable mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers in the wavelength range 7.0-8.8 μm lying in the molecular fingerprint region are used as optical source. Samples of Pentaerylthirol Tetranitrate (PETN), Tetranitro-triazacyclohexane (RDX), Dinitrotoluene, p-Nitrobenzoic acid and other chemicals like Ibuprofen having quantity 1.0 mg were detected using a custom made photoacoustic cells in both open and closed configurations. The explosive traces were swiped using paper from contaminated surface and detected. Finite element mesh based simulation of photoacoustic cell is carried out for optimization of geometry at ultrasonic frequency (40 kHz). A point sensor based on above approach will be very effective for forensic applications and suspicious material screening.

  9. Chemical, morphological and chromatic behavior of mural paintings under Er:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striova, J.; Camaiti, M.; Castellucci, E. M.; Sansonetti, A.

    2011-08-01

    Several pigments (malachite CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, azurite 2CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, yellow ochre (goethite α-FeOOH, gypsum CaSO4ṡ2H2O), St. John's white CaCO3 formed from slaked lime) and respective mural paintings specimens were subjected to the free-running Er:YAG laser radiation in order to study their damage thresholds, in a broad range of laser fluences, both in dry and wet conditions. The specimens' damage thresholds were evaluated by spectroscopic methods, colorimetric measurements and microscopic observation. The pigments containing -OH groups were found to be more sensitive than St. John's white; hence the most sensitive paint layers in dry conditions are those containing malachite, azurite (both 1.3 J/cm2) and yellow ochre (2.5 J/cm2) as compared to the ones containing St. John's white (15.2 J/cm2). The presence of wetting agents (w.a.) attenuated the pigments chemical alteration. The damage thresholds of all the paint layers, in presence of w.a., were found to be around 2.5 J/cm2. The alteration was caused by thermo-mechanical damage and by binding medium ablation of a fresco and a secco prepared specimens, respectively.

  10. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO2 laser thermal modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubovský, Ivan; Kačík, František

    2014-12-01

    We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO2 laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO2 laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm-2) lightness (ΔL*) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE*) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses.

  11. Tattoo pigments are cleaved by laser light-the chemical analysis in vitro provide evidence for hazardous compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasold, Rudolf; Naarmann, Natascha; Ulrich, Heidi; Fischer, Daniela; König, Burkhard; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    In the western world, more than 80 million people decorate their skin with tattoos. Tattoo colorants are injected into the skin, like medical drugs. Most tattoo colorants are industrial pigments, and chemical industries have never produced them for human use but only to stain consumer goods. Up to 10% of tattooed people request removal of their tattoos because of an improved self-image or social stigmatization. In contrast to tattooing, physicians usually perform the tattoo removal. For that purpose laser light at very high intensities irradiates the skin to destroy the tattoo pigments. Based on a recent analysis of tattoo pigments, two widely used azo compounds were irradiated in suspension with laser and subsequently analyzed by using quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The high laser intensities cleaved the azo compounds, leading to an increase of decomposition products such as 2-methyl-5-nitroaniline, 2-5-dichloraniline and 4-nitro-toluene, which are toxic or even carcinogenic compounds. Moreover, the results of the chemical analysis show that the tattoo colorants already contain such compounds before laser irradiation. Because of a high number of patients undergoing laser treatment of tattoos and based on the results of our findings in vitro, it is an important goal to perform a risk assessment in humans regarding laser-induced decomposition products.

  12. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  13. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-02-08

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 µm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate.

  14. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  15. Influence of the Local Chemical Composition on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Al-Li Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Josephin; Riekehr, Stefan; Ventzke, Volker; Kashaev, Nikolai

    The increasing interest of the aircraft industry in reduction of structural weight of aircrafts has resulted in the development of lightweight and high-strength Al-Li alloys as well as in the introduction of laser beam welding to the manufacturing process. The objective of this study is the investigation of the influence of variations in the chemical composition on local mechanical properties, like micro-hardness and micro-tensile strength, of CO 2 laser beam welded skin-stringer joints made from AA2196 and AA2198. Additionally the influence of the welding process on weld chemistry is studied in view of the improvement of the weld quality.

  16. Modeling of Flowing Plasmas and Pulse Power Schemes for O2(1Delta) Production for Chemical Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-19

    Redistribution subject to AlP license or copyright, see http:l/jap.aip.org/jap/copyright.jsp 113306-11 Babaeva, Arakoni, and Kushner J. Appi . Phys. 99...Babaeva, and M. J. Kushner, J. Appl. ’W. E. McDermott, N R. Pchelkin, D. J. Benard. and R. R. Bousek, AppI . Phys. 98. 073304 (2t005). Phys. Lett. 32. 469...8217A. Elior, B. D. Barm,tsheniko, E. Lebiush, and S. Rosenwaks. AppI . Phys. Gas Flost and Chemical Las,ers and lligh Power Laser Conference tyro- B

  17. Laser speckle technique to study the effect of chemical pre-treatment on the quality of minimally processed apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minz, Preeti D.; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the laser speckle technique has been used for the quality evaluation of chemically treated cut apples. Chemical pre-treatment includes 1% (w/v) solution of citric acid (CA), sodium chloride (SC), and a combination of CA and sodium chloride (CS). The variation in weight loss, respiration rate, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity (TA), and absorbance of chemically treated cut apples stored at 5 °C was monitored for 11 d. The speckle grain size was calculated by an autocovariance method from the speckled images of freshly cut chemically treated apples. The effect of chemicals on TSS and the TA content variation of the cut apples were well correlated to the linear speckle grain size. Circular degree of polarization confirms the presence of a small scatterer and hence Rayleigh diffusion region. For all the treated cut apples, a decrease in the concentration of small particles nearly after the mid-period of storage results in the fast decay of circular degree of polarization. For non-invasive and fast analysis of the chemical constituent of fruits during minimal processing, the laser speckle can be practically used in the food industry.

  18. Start features of supersonic chemical laser (SCL) channel operating with pressure recovery system (PRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreysho, A. S.; Malkov, V. M.

    2007-05-01

    The particularity of start process of rectangular laser channel in comparison with star of wind tunnel - the state of understart - is discovered. The higher pressure level is realized in laser cavity as result of this phenomena and it brings to laser power decrease.

  19. Aluminum-coated hollow glass fibers for ArF-excimer laser light fabricated by metallorganic chemical-vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Y; Miyagi, M

    1999-04-20

    A hollow fiber composed of a glass capillary tube and a metal thin film upon the inside of the tube is proposed for the delivery of ArF-excimer laser light. From theoretical analysis, aluminum is chosen as the metal layer. A thin aluminum film is deposited by metallorganic chemical-vapor deposition, with dimethylethylamine alane employed as the source material. Measured loss spectra in vacuum-ultraviolet and ultraviolet regions and losses for ArF-excimer laser light show the low-loss property of the aluminum-coated fiber at the 193-nm wavelength of ArF-excimer laser light. The straight loss of the 1-m long, 1-mm-bore fiber is 1.0 dB.

  20. Particle Generation by Laser Ablation in Support of Chemical Analysis of High Level Mixed Waste from Plutonium Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Thomas Dickinson; Michael L. Alexander

    2001-11-30

    Investigate particles produced by laser irradiation and their analysis by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA/ICP-MS), with a view towards optimizing particle production for analysis of high level waste materials and waste glass. LA/ICP-MS has considerable potential to increase the safety and speed of analysis required for the remediation of high level wastes from cold war plutonium production operations. In some sample types, notably the sodium nitrate-based wastes at Hanford and elsewhere, chemical analysis using typical laser conditions depends strongly on the details of sample history composition in a complex fashion, rendering the results of analysis uncertain. Conversely, waste glass materials appear to be better behaved and require different strategies to optimize analysis.

  1. High-pressure gravity-independent singlet oxygen generator, laser nozzle, and iodine injection system for the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, George

    2004-09-01

    A novel approach is outlined for a singlet oxygen generator (SOG), a laser minimum length nozzle (MLN), and an iodine injector system for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). A unified approach, referred to as a SOG/MLN/I2 system, is partly based on past experimental work. For instance, the SOG concept stems from sparger technology and a KSY fesibility experiment. A MLN with a curved sonic line is used for the laser nozzle, and slender struts are used for the injection, in the downstream direction, of iodine/helium vapor. The heated struts are located downstream of the nozzle's throat. The engineering logic behind the approach is discussed; it has a diversity of potential system benefits relative to current technology. These include a compact, scalable laser that can operate in space. The SOG operates at a significantly higher pressure with a high O2(1Δ) yield. In addition, basic hydrogen peroxide reconditioning is not required, a water vapor removal system is not required, and diluent may be unnecessary, although useful for pressure recovery. The impact on a COIL system in terms of power, efficiency, and pressure recovery is briefly assessed.

  2. High sensitivity stand-off detection and quantification of chemical mixtures using an active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-05-01

    High sensitivity detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in a stand-off configuration is a highly sought after capability across the security and defense sector. Specific applications include assessing the presence of explosive related materials, poisonous or toxic chemical agents, and narcotics. Real world field deployment of an operational stand-off system is challenging due to stringent requirements: high detection sensitivity, stand-off ranges from centimeters to hundreds of meters, eye-safe invisible light, near real-time response and a wide chemical versatility encompassing both vapor and condensed phase chemicals. Additionally, field deployment requires a compact, rugged, power efficient, and cost-effective design. To address these demanding requirements, we have developed the concept of Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS), which can be also described as a middle infrared hyperspectral coherent lidar. Combined with robust spectral unmixing algorithms, inherited from retrievals of information from high-resolution spectral data generated by satellitebased spectrometers, ACLaS has been demonstrated to fulfil the above-mentioned needs. ACLaS prototypes have been so far developed using quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and interband cascade lasers (ICL) to exploit the fast frequency tuning capability of these solid state sources. Using distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, demonstration and performance analysis were carried out on narrow-band absorbing chemicals (N2O, H2O, H2O2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H6) at stand-off distances up to 50 m using realistic non cooperative targets such as wood, painted metal, and bricks. Using more widely tunable external cavity QCL, ACLaS has also been demonstrated on broadband absorbing chemicals (dichloroethane, HFC134a, ethylene glycol dinitrate and 4-nitroacetanilide solid) and on complex samples mixing narrow-band and broadband absorbers together in a realistic atmospheric background.

  3. Heat and Mass Transfer during Chemical Vapor Deposition on the Particle Surface Subjected to Nanosecond Laser Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Quan; He, Yaling; Mao, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    A thermal model of chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) on the spherical particle surface under irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse is presented in this paper. Heat and mass transfer on a single spherical metal powder particle surface subjected to temporal Gaussian heat flux is investigated analytically. The chemical reaction on the particle surface and the mass transfer in the gas phase are also considered. The surface temperature, thermal penetration depth, and deposited film thickness under different laser fluence, pulse width, initial particle temperature, and particle radius are investigated. The effect of total pressure in the reaction chamber on deposition rate is studied as well. The particle-level model presented in this paper is an important step toward development of multiscale model of LCVI.

  4. A study on fractional erbium glass laser therapy versus chemical peeling for the treatment of melasma in female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Melasma is a commonly acquired hypermelanosis and a common dermatologic skin disease that occurs on sun-exposed areas of face. Aims: To assess the efficacy and safety of non-ablative 1,550 nm Erbium glass fractional laser therapy and compare results with those obtained with chemical peeling. Materials and Methods: We selected 30 patients of melasma aged between 20 years and 50 years for the study. The patients were divided into two groups of 15 patients each. Group I patients were subjected to four sessions of 1,550 nm Erbium glass non-ablative fractional laser at 3 weeks interval. In group II patients, four sessions of chemical peeling with 70% glycolic acid was performed. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment, percentage reduction in Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI score was seen in 62.9% in the laser group and 58.7% in the peels group. Conclusion: It was observed that 1,550 nm fractional laser is as effective as 70% glycolic acid peel in reducing MASI score in patients with melasma.

  5. A Study on Fractional Erbium Glass Laser Therapy Versus Chemical Peeling for the Treatment of Melasma in Female Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Neerja

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Melasma is a commonly acquired hypermelanosis and a common dermatologic skin disease that occurs on sun-exposed areas of face. Aims: To assess the efficacy and safety of non-ablative 1,550 nm Erbium glass fractional laser therapy and compare results with those obtained with chemical peeling. Materials and Methods: We selected 30 patients of melasma aged between 20 years and 50 years for the study. The patients were divided into two groups of 15 patients each. Group I patients were subjected to four sessions of 1,550 nm Erbium glass non-ablative fractional laser at 3 weeks interval. In group II patients, four sessions of chemical peeling with 70% glycolic acid was performed. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment, percentage reduction in Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) score was seen in 62.9% in the laser group and 58.7% in the peels group. Conclusion: It was observed that 1,550 nm fractional laser is as effective as 70% glycolic acid peel in reducing MASI score in patients with melasma. PMID:24163531

  6. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F; Garrison, Barbara J

    2007-08-28

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  7. Chemical Oxidation of La2CuO4 Epitaxial Thin Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-Chang; YAN Yun-Jie; ZHU Jing

    2007-01-01

    Chemical oxidation is used to induce superconductivity in La2CuO4 expitaxial thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition technique. Details about the influence of oxidation time on structural, surface morphology, Raman spectra, and electrical properties have been investigated. The results convince that successful uptake of oxygen occurs in the oxidized films, and the content of the inserted oxygen increases with increasing oxidation interval. The possible mechanism for the excess oxygen insertion into the film is also discussed.

  8. Chemical-assisted femtosecond laser writing of lab-in-fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Moez; Lee, Kenneth K C; Ho, Stephen; Fernandes, Luís A; Herman, Peter R

    2014-10-07

    The lab-on-chip (LOC) platform has presented a powerful opportunity to improve functionalization, parallelization, and miniaturization on planar or multilevel geometries that has not been possible with fiber optic technology. A migration of such LOC devices into the optical fiber platform would therefore open the revolutionary prospect of creating novel lab-in-fiber (LIF) systems on the basis of an efficient optical transport highway for multifunctional sensing. For the LIF, the core optical waveguide inherently offers a facile means to interconnect numerous types of sensing elements along the optical fiber, presenting a radical opportunity for optimizing the packaging and densification of diverse components in convenient geometries beyond that available with conventional LOCs. In this paper, three-dimensional patterning inside the optical fiber by femtosecond laser writing, together with selective chemical etching, is presented as a powerful tool to form refractive index structures such as optical waveguides and gratings as well as to open buried microfluidic channels and optical resonators inside the flexible and robust glass fiber. In this approach, optically smooth surfaces (~12 nm rms) are introduced for the first time inside the fiber cladding that precisely conform to planar nanograting structures when formed by aberration-free focusing with an oil-immersion lens across the cylindrical fiber wall. This process has enabled optofluidic components to be precisely embedded within the fiber to be probed by either the single-mode fiber core waveguide or the laser-formed optical circuits. We establish cladding waveguides, X-couplers, fiber Bragg gratings, microholes, mirrors, optofluidic resonators, and microfluidic reservoirs that define the building blocks for facile interconnection of inline core-waveguide devices with cladding optofluidics. With these components, more advanced, integrated, and multiplexed fiber microsystems are presented demonstrating

  9. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmm@ukw.edu.pl [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Rytlewski, Piotr [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Malinowski, Rafał [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes, ul. M. Skłodowskiej–Curie 55, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Żenkiewicz, Marian [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We modified polylactide surface layer with chemical, plasma or laser methods. • We tested selected properties and surface structure of modified samples. • We stated that the plasma treatment appears to be the most beneficial. - Abstract: The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm{sup 2} was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  10. High power lasers & systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert; Birch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Some laser history;\\ud Airborne Laser Testbed & Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL);\\ud Laser modes and beam propagation;\\ud Fibre lasers and applications;\\ud US Navy Laser system – NRL 33kW fibre laser;\\ud Lockheed Martin 30kW fibre laser;\\ud Conclusions

  11. Laser assisted modification and chemical metallization of electron-beam deposited ceria thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumov, E., E-mail: emodk@clf.bas.bg [Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses ' Acad. Jordan Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgy Bonchev Str., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Starbov, N.; Starbova, K. [Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses ' Acad. Jordan Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgy Bonchev Str., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Perea, A.; Solis, J. [Instituto de Optica ' Daza de Valdes' , CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Excimer laser processing is applied for tailoring the surface morphology and phase composition of CeO{sub 2} ceramic thin films. E-beam evaporation technique is used to deposit samples on stainless steel and silicate glass substrates. The films are then irradiated with ArF* excimer laser pulses under different exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, optical spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometry and EDS microanalysis are used to characterize the non-irradiated and laser-processed films. Upon UV laser exposure there is large increase of the surface roughness that is accompanied by photo-darkening and ceria reduction. It is shown that the laser induced changes in the CeO{sub 2} films facilitate the deposition of metal nano-aggregates in a commercial copper electroless plating bath. The significance of laser modification as a novel approach for the production of CeO{sub 2} based thin film catalysts is discussed.

  12. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  13. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-13

    A rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system for fast open-path quantification of multiple chemicals and mixtures is presented. The ECQCL system is swept over its entire tuning range (>100 cm-1) at frequencies up to 200 Hz. At 200 Hz the wavelength tuning rate and spectral resolution are 2x104 cm-1/sec and < 0.2 cm-1, respectively. The capability of the current system to quantify changes in chemical concentrations on millesecond timescales is demonstrated at atmospheric pressure using an open-path multi-pass cell. The detection limits for chemicals ranged from ppb to ppm levels depending on the absorption cross-section.

  14. Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser irradiation on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Enrique Vigueras; López, Susana Hernández; Camacho López, Marco A.; Contreras, Delfino Reyes; Farías-Mancilla, Rurik; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G.; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A.; Zaragoza-Contreras, E. Armando

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the nanosecond (Nd: YAG-1064 nm) laser pulse effect on the optical and morphological properties of chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Two suspensions of MWCNT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were prepared, one was submitted to laser pulses for 10 min while the other (blank) was only mechanically homogenized during the same time. Following the laser irradiation, the suspension acquired a yellow-amber color, in contrast to the black translucent appearance of the blank. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed this observation, showing the blank a higher absorption. Additionally, photoluminescence measurements exhibited a broad blue-green emission band both in the blank and irradiated suspension when excited at 369 nm, showing the blank a lower intensity. However, a modification in the excitation wavelength produced a violet to green tuning in the irradiated suspension, which did not occur in the blank. Lastly, the electron microscopy analysis of the treated nanotubes showed the abundant formation of amorphous carbon, nanocages, and nanotube unzipping, exhibiting the intense surface modification produced by the laser pulse. Nanotube surface modification and the coexistence with the new carbon nanostructures were considered as the conductive conditions for optical properties modification.

  15. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by near-field laser ablation and metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Alhmoud, H. Z.; Elnathan, R.; Delalat, B.; Voelcker, N. H.; Kraus, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present an elegant route for the fabrication of ordered arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires with tunable geometry at controlled locations on a silicon wafer. A monolayer of transparent microspheres convectively assembled onto a gold-coated silicon wafer acts as a microlens array. Irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse removes the gold beneath each focusing microsphere, leaving behind a hexagonal pattern of holes in the gold layer. Owing to the near-field effects, the diameter of the holes can be at least five times smaller than the laser wavelength. The patterned gold layer is used as catalyst in a metal-assisted chemical etching to produce an array of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires. This approach combines the advantages of direct laser writing with the benefits of parallel laser processing, yielding nanowire arrays with controlled geometry at predefined locations on the silicon surface. The fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can effectively transfect human cells with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein.

  16. Direct writing of carbon nanotube patterns by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on a transparent substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.B. [Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, M.S. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, S.H., E-mail: shjeong@gist.ac.kr [Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    Dot array and line patterns of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully grown by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) on a transparent substrate at room temperature. In the proposed technique, a Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser with a wavelength of 532 nm irradiates the backside of multiple catalyst layers (Ni/Al/Cr) through a transparent substrate to induce a local temperature rise, thereby allowing the direct writing of dense dot and line patterns of MWCNTs below 10 {mu}m in size to be produced with uniform density on the controlled positions. In this LCVD method, a multiple-catalyst-layer with a Cr thermal layer is the central component for enabling the growth of dense MWCNTs with good spatial resolution.

  17. Experimental study and chemical application of GaAs semiconductor laser treating trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ke-Qum; Cao, Shu-Chen; Wang, Hu-Zhong; Wang, Ke-Ning; Xiao, Ton-Ha; Shen, Ke-Wei

    1993-03-01

    GaAs semiconductor laser was used to treat trigeminal neuralgia with an effective rate of 91.1%, and no side effects were found in 67 cases. Changes in and the recovery of the trigeminal nerve cell were studied with light and electromicroscope. Discussed in this article are the time length and quantity of laser treatment with low power. Experimental study and clinical application of the GaAs semiconductor laser have been carried out in our department since 1987. One-hundred-fifteen patients with various diseases in the maxillofacial region (including 67 cases of trigeminal neuralgia) have been treated with satisfactory effects and without any side-effects. The wavelength of the laser is 904 mu, the largest pulse length is 200 mu, and the average power is 2000 HZ.

  18. Effects of the Spectral Line Broadened Model on the Performance of a Flowing Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高智; 胡利民

    2002-01-01

    A new gain saturation model of chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) is deduced from the conservation equations of the population number of upper and lower lasing levels. The present model is compared with both the Voigt profile function model and its low-pressure limit model. The differences between the Voigt profile function model or its low-pressure limit model and the model presented here are pointed out, such as the length of power extraction, the optimal range of the threshold gain. These differences are useful for the optimization of COIL adjustable parameters.

  19. Accumulation boundaries: codimension-two accumulation of accumulations in phase diagrams of semiconductor lasers, electric circuits, atmospheric and chemical oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatto, Cristian; Gallas, Jason Alfredo Carlson

    2008-02-28

    We report high-resolution phase diagrams for several familiar dynamical systems described by sets of ordinary differential equations: semiconductor lasers; electric circuits; Lorenz-84 low-order atmospheric circulation model; and Rössler and chemical oscillators. All these systems contain chaotic phases with highly complicated and interesting accumulation boundaries, curves where networks of stable islands of regular oscillations with ever-increasing periodicities accumulate systematically. The experimental exploration of such codimension-two boundaries characterized by the presence of infinite accumulation of accumulations is feasible with existing technology for some of these systems.

  20. High-power supersonic chemical lasers: gas-dynamic problems of operation of mobile systems with PRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreysho, A. S.; Malkov, V. M.; Savin, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier. This is why they should be resolved anew with consideration of the specific aspects of the SCL processes. This is true for the gas-dynamic problems: new parameter areas, non-traditional channel geometry, consideration of new phenomena, etc.Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier

  1. Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  2. [Lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  3. Simulations of Erosion/Corrosion Surface Chemical Reactions with a Laser Beam,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    wt% in alpha iron at 875°C,s and it may be SIMS and Metallographic Observations substantially lower.9 Consequently, the high sur- face concentration of...surfaces as a result of air contamina- is of the order of 0.004 wt% in alpha iron at tion than by laser-pulsing in nitrogen and ammo- 873°C, 0.025 wt% in...that may have occurred during laser-pulsing pre- and alpha iron .1 4 sented an interesting predicament. Evidence of 44 The extensive oxidation and

  4. Theoretical Study of Laser-Stimulated Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes of Importance in Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    fundamental microscopic theory for the laser-induced periodic surface structure ( LIPSS ), which includes electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the...deposition rate. The dynamics of subsequent multilayer LIPSS formation is treated using a metal-metal interaction potential obtained by combining MO theory

  5. Multi-Disciplinary Research for High Energy Chemical Lasers, Closed-Cycle ElectricOIL Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-31

    ARLINGTO 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5o. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT 10. SPONSORyMONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) USAF, AFRL...supersonic section and absorption in the subsonic section. Frequency (MHz) Laser power measurements were made with a Scientech Astral ™ model AC2500/AC25H

  6. Adhesion of fibroblasts on micro- and nanostructured surfaces prepared by chemical vapor deposition and pulsed laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veith, M; Aktas, O C; Ullah Wazir, H; Grobelsek, I [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Metzger, W; Sossong, D; Pohlemann, T; Oberringer, M [Department of Trauma-, Hand- and Reconstructive Surgery, Saarland University, Kirrberger Strasse, Building 57, 66421 Homburg (Germany); Puetz, N; Wennemuth, G, E-mail: Michael.Veith@inm-gmbh.d [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Saarland University, Kirrberger Strasse, Building 61, 66421 Homburg (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    The development of micro- and nanostructured surfaces which improve the cell-substrate interaction is of great interest in today's implant applications. In this regard, Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bi-phasic nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of the molecular precursor ({sup t}BuOAlH{sub 2}){sub 2}. Heat treatment of such bi-phasic nanowires with short laser pulses leads to micro- and nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces. Such surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Following the detailed material characterization, the prepared surfaces were tested for their cell compatibility using normal human dermal fibroblasts. While the cells cultivated on Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bi-phasic nanowires showed an unusual morphology, cells cultivated on nanowires treated with one and two laser pulses exhibited morphologies similar to those observed on the control substrate. The highest cell density was observed on surfaces treated with one laser pulse. The interaction of the cells with the nano- and microstructures was investigated by SEM analysis in detail. Laser treatment of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bi-phasic nanowires is a fast and easy method to fabricate nano- and microstructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-surfaces for studying cell-surface interactions. It is our goal to develop a biocompatible Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-surface which could be used as a coating material for medical implants exhibiting a cell selective response because of its specific physical landscape and especially because it promotes the adhesion of osteoblasts while minimizing the adhesion of fibroblasts.

  7. 3D mapping of chemical distribution from melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Gaal, R.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is a unique tool for subjecting materials to pressures over few hundreds of GPa and temperatures of thousands of Kelvins which enables us to experimentally simulate the inaccessible interiors of planets. However, small sample size, laser profile and thermally conductive diamonds cause temperature gradients of 1000s K over a few microns which also affects chemical and structural distribution of phases in the sample. We have examined samples of San Carlos olivine (Mg,Fe)2SiO3 powder melted in the diamond anvil cell by double-sided and single-sided laser heating for 3-6 minutes to ~3000 K at 35-37 GPa. Moreover, MgO is used as an insulating media in one of the sample. Recovered samples were analyzed by a combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector. Images and chemical maps were acquired for ~300 slices with ~70 nm depth from each sample, comprising about half of the heated zone. Detailed chemical and structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of lamellas prepared from the remaining section of the samples will also be presented. In all samples the heated zone included (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (PV) phase and two (Mg, Fe)O phases, one of which, magnesiowüstite (MW), is richer in iron than the other one, ferropericlase (FP). In double-side heated samples we observe a Fe-rich quenched melt core surrounded by MW phase. Our results show that with increasing heating time, Fe migrates to the molten center of the sample. In the single-side heated sample, the Fe-rich MW phase is concentrated in the center of heated zone. In all samples a FP crust was observed around the heated zone. This crust, however, is broken in the upper part (colder part) of the single-side heated sample due the high asymmetrical temperature gradient within the sample. The results confirm the importance of double-side heating and insulating media

  8. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  9. Fabrication of honeycomb texture on poly-Si by laser interference and chemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bogeum; Lee, Myeongkyu, E-mail: myeong@yonsei.ac.kr

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we present a laser-interference method to fabricate honeycomb textures on poly-Si wafer for reflection reduction. When exposed to three interfering pulsed laser beams at 532 nm, the Si surface was periodically melted in accordance with the interference pattern. As a result, concave holes were generated on the surface because the melted material overflowed and condensed at the periphery. Subsequent acid etching revealed uniform and clean honeycomb textures. The texture depth could be controlled by varying the irradiation condition and a minimum reflectance of 10% was obtained. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that no irradiation-induced damage remained after etching. This approach can be a cost-effective alternative to lithographic processes for fabricating high-efficiency poly-Si solar cells.

  10. Laser-Shot-Induced Chemical Reactions inside Nanotubes: a TDDFT investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Rubio, Angel

    2011-03-01

    We present the application of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) on ultrafast laser pulse which induces dynamics in molecules encapsulated by a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond-stretch of an HCl molecule inside both C and BN nanotubes. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different. We also observed a radial motion of the nanotube and vacancies appear on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to tube axis. Furthermore, the disintegration of HCl molecules took place when their molecular axis tilted to tube axis. These simulations are important to analyze light-induced nanochemistry and manipulation of nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes. The computational scheme used in present work was a combination of the molecular dynamics and real-time propagation of electron wave functions under presence of strong optical field [2,3]. The energy conservation rule was checked to monitor the numerical stability.

  11. Analyzing the Chemical and Spectral Effects of Pulsed Laser Irradiation to Simulate Space Weathering of a Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. S.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Rahman, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Space weathering processes alter the chemical composition, microstructure, and spectral characteristics of material on the surfaces of airless bodies. The mechanisms driving space weathering include solar wind irradiation and the melting, vaporization and recondensation effects associated with micrometeorite impacts e.g., [1]. While much work has been done to understand space weathering of lunar and ordinary chondritic materials, the effects of these processes on hydrated carbonaceous chondrites is poorly understood. Analysis of space weathering of carbonaceous materials will be critical for understanding the nature of samples returned by upcoming missions targeting primitive, organic-rich bodies (e.g., OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa 2). Recent experiments have shown the spectral properties of carbonaceous materials and associated minerals are altered by simulated weathering events e.g., [2-5]. However, the resulting type of alteration i.e., reddening vs. bluing of the reflectance spectrum, is not consistent across all experiments [2-5]. In addition, the microstructural and crystal chemical effects of many of these experiments have not been well characterized, making it difficult to attribute spectral changes to specific mineralogical or chemical changes in the samples. Here we report results of a pulsed laser irradiation experiment on a chip of the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite to simulate micrometeorite impact processing.

  12. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of planetary rocks using a laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The context chemical analysis is of considerable importance in space research. High resolution in situ studies of planetary materials can yield important information on surface heterogeneity, basic grain mineralogy and chemical composition of surface and subsurface. In turn, these data are the basis for our understanding of the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation and alteration of planetary material [1] [2]. A highly heterogeneous sample of Allende meteorite, representative for extraterrestrial material, is investigated by LMS, a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for space research [3]. In the current setup a fs-laser ablation ion source is applied, allowing chemical analysis with lateral resolution of about 10-15 μm and sub-micrometre depth resolution [4]. The reflectron TOF mass analyser is used to measure elemental and isotopic composition of the sampled surface. The LMS instrument supports mass resolution 400 and dynamic range of 108 [5]. In the current studies with the fs-ablation ion source significant improvements in the detection efficiency of several metals e.g., Ni, Co, and non-metals e.g., Si, P, S and O, was achieved comparing to our previous setup [6]. Also the values of sensitivity coefficients for these elements are determined to be close to one, which resulted in the substantial improvements of the quantitative element analysis of the sample. Since the ablation crater depth is expected to be about 1 nm/laser shot also the possible changes of the main element or isotope distribution in depth can be analysed to assess their influence on the mineralogical analysis [7]. Several areas on an Allende sample were investigated and the chemical composition across the surface was determined from the mass spectrometric analysis. Also accurate isotope analysis could be conducted for most of main elements with sufficiently high signal to noise ratio. Correlation of elements was conducted and yielded mineralogical maps

  13. Optical properties and chemical behavior of Laser-dye Coumarin-500 and the influence of atmospheric corona discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, S Sinan; Aslan, Necdet; Bayrakçeken, Fuat

    2009-03-01

    Structure elucidation of Coumarin-500 Laser-dye in cyclohexane at room temperature has been studied by UV-Vis, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Optical properties and chemical behavior under the influence of atmospheric positive electric pulsed corona discharges were also examined. The effects of UV-Vis irradiation changed some optical parameters, such as decrease in optical density on the absorption spectrum and formation of photoproducts, due to the chromaticity removal. No significant optical changes were observed in the light absorption upon UV-irradiation but large changes in absorption spectrum were observed after positive electric corona discharge treatments, FTIR and Raman spectra in non-polar solvent are recorded and interpreted.

  14. Pulse Operation of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser by Pulsed Gas Discharge with the Assistance of Spark Pre-ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-Fu; YU Hai-Jun; DUO Li-Ping; JIN Yu-Qi; WANG Jian; SANG Feng-Ting; FANG Ben-Jie; WANG De-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    The continuous wavelength chemical oxygen-iodine laser can be turned into pulse operation mode in order to obtain high energy and high pulse power. We propose an approach to produce iodine atoms instantaneously by pulsed gas discharge with the assistance of spark pre-ionization to achieve the pulsed goal. The influence of spark pre-ionization on discharge homogeneity is discussed. Voltage-current characteristics are shown and discussed in existence of the pre-ionization capacitor and peaking capacitor. The spark pre-ionization and peaking capacitor are very helpful in obtaining a stable and homogeneous discharge. The lasing is achieved at the total pressure of 2.2-2.9 kPa and single pulse energy is up to 180m J, the corresponding specific output energy is 1.0 J/L.

  15. Data acquisition and control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi; Wang, Jian; Sang, Fengting; Kang, Yuanfu; Li, Liucheng; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    A user-friendly data acquisition and control system (DACS) for a pulsed chemical oxygen -iodine laser (PCOIL) has been developed. It is implemented by an industrial control computer,a PLC, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the valve and transmitter. The system is capable of handling 200 analogue/digital channels for performing various operations such as on-line acquisition, display, safety measures and control of various valves. These operations are controlled either by control switches configured on a PC while not running or by a pre-determined sequence or timings during the run. The system is capable of real-time acquisition and on-line estimation of important diagnostic parameters for optimization of a PCOIL. The DACS system has been programmed using software programmable logic controller (PLC). Using this DACS, more than 200 runs were given performed successfully.

  16. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of laser diode facets on nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzky, L. Y.; Becerra, D. L.; Saud Abbas, A.; Nedy, J.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Cohen, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a vertical (beam etching (CAIBE) in Cl2 chemistry that is suitable for forming laser diode (LD) facets on nonpolar and semipolar oriented III-nitride devices. The etch profiles were achieved with photoresist masks and optimized CAIBE chamber conditions including the platen tilt angle and Cl2 flow rate. Co-loaded studies showed similar etch rates of ˜60 nm min-1 for (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}),(20\\bar{2}1), and m-plane orientations. The etched surfaces of LD facets on these orientations are chemically dissimilar (Ga-rich versus N-rich), but were visually indistinguishable, thus confirming the negligible orientation dependence of the etch. Continuous-wave blue LDs were fabricated on the semipolar (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) plane to compare CAIBE and reactive ion etch (RIE) facet processes. The CAIBE process resulted in LDs with lower threshold current densities due to reduced parasitic mirror loss compared with the RIE process. The LER, degree of verticality, and model of the 1D vertical laser mode were used to calculate a maximum uncoated facet reflection of 17% (94% of the nominal) for the CAIBE facet. The results demonstrate the suitability of CAIBE for forming high quality facets for high performance nonpolar and semipolar III-N LDs.

  17. Morphology, thermoelectric properties and wet-chemical doping of laser-sintered germanium nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoib, Benedikt; Langmann, Tim; Matich, Sonja; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Petermann, Nils; Wiggers, Hartmut [Institut fuer Verbrennung und Gasdynamik and Center for Nanointegration, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Porous, highly doped semiconductors are potential candidates for thermoelectric energy conversion elements. We report on the fabrication of thin films of Ge via short-pulse laser-sintering of Ge nanoparticles (NPs) in vacuum and study the macroporous morphology of the samples by secondary electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient of undoped Ge is discussed in conjunction with the formation of a defect band near the valence band. We further introduce a versatile method of doping the resulting films with a variety of common dopant elements in group-IV semiconductors by using a liquid containing the dopant atoms. This method is fully compatible with laser-direct writing and suited to fabricate small scale thermoelectric generators. The incorporation of the dopants is verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and their electrical activation is studied by conductivity and thermopower measurements. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Direct chemical analysis of frozen ice cores by UV-laser ablation ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Wolfgang; Shelley, J. Michael G.; Rasmussen, Sune Olander

    2011-01-01

    Cryo-cell UV-LA-ICPMS is a new technique for direct chemical analysis of frozen ice cores at high spatial resolution (ice and reveals sea ice/dust records and annual layer signatures at unprecedented spatial/time resolution. Uniquely......, the location of cation impurities relative to grain boundaries in recrystallized ice can be assessed....

  19. Similarity between the mechanisms of soft-laser radiation and chemical adaptogen action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leonid L.; Pavlova, Rimma N.; Murzin, Alexander G.; Boiko, Vladimir A.; Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Soms, Leonid N.

    1993-07-01

    The comparative studies of SLR effects vs chemical adaptogens effects on animals poisoned by industrial poisons and SLR as compared to traditional radio-protectors effects on gamma- irradiated animals were carried out. Obtained results show the stressed adaptogenous effect of SLR.

  20. Low threshold 1.55 {mu}m wavelength InAsP/InGaAsP strained multiquantum well laser diode grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlin, J.F.; Syrbu, A.V.; Berseth, C.A.; Behrend, J.; Rudra, A.; Kapon, E. [Institut de Micro- et Optoelectronique, Departement de Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1997-07-01

    By using chemical beam epitaxy at growth temperatures as low as 460{endash}480{degree}C, we have overcome strain relaxation problems that prevented so far the successful use of InAsP quantum wells in 1.55 {mu}m lasers. Five quantum well InAsP/InGaAsP horizontal cavity lasers showed 88{percent} internal efficiency, 1.6cm{sup {minus}1} losses per well, and 33A/cm{sup 2} transparency current density per well, which equal or even surpass the best published characteristics for 1.55 {mu}m wavelength lasers based on any material system. Moreover, up to 17 quantum wells were integrated in a strain-balanced laser, which showed equally good characteristics. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Multivariate analysis of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy chemical signatures for geomaterial classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L., E-mail: jennifer.gottfried@us.army.mi [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Harmon, Russell S. [ARL Army Research Office, PO Box 12211, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 (United States); De Lucia, Frank C.; Miziolek, Andrzej W. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    A large suite of natural carbonate, fluorite and silicate geological materials was studied using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Both single- and double-pulse LIBS spectra were acquired using close-contact benchtop and standoff (25 m) LIBS systems. Principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to identify the distinguishing characteristics of the geological samples and to classify the materials. Excellent discrimination was achieved with all sample types using PLS-DA and several techniques for improving sample classification were identified. The laboratory double-pulse LIBS system did not provide any advantage for sample classification over the single-pulse LIBS system, except in the case of the soil samples. The standoff LIBS system provided comparable results to the laboratory systems. This work also demonstrates how PCA can be used to identify spectral differences between similar sample types based on minor impurities.

  2. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Craig A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Miguel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Black, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maskaly, Karlene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boman, Mats [UPPSALA UNIV

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  3. Mitigation of organic laser damage precursors from chemical processing of fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxamusa, S; Miller, P E; Wong, L; Steele, R; Shen, N; Bude, J

    2014-12-01

    Increases in the laser damage threshold of fused silica have been driven by the successive elimination of near-surface damage precursors such as polishing residue, fractures, and inorganic salts. In this work, we show that trace impurities in ultrapure water used to process fused silica optics may be responsible for the formation of carbonaceous deposits. We use surrogate materials to show that organic compounds precipitated onto fused silica surfaces form discrete damage precursors. Following a standard etching process, solvent-free oxidative decomposition using oxygen plasma or high-temperature thermal treatments in air reduced the total density of damage precursors to as low as inorganic compounds are more likely to cause damage when they are tightly adhered to a surface, which may explain why high-temperature thermal treatments have been historically unsuccessful at removing extrinsic damage precursors from fused silica.

  4. Preparation, characterisation and optimisation of lithium battery anodes consisting of silicon synthesised using Laser assisted Chemical Vapour Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliscek, Ziga; Perse, Lidija Slemenik; Dominko, Robert; Kelder, Erik; Gaberscek, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Suitability of silicon prepared using Laser assisted Chemical Vapour Pyrolysis (LaCVP) as a potential anode material in lithium batteries is systematically investigated. Its compositional, morphological, physical-chemical and electrochemical properties are compared to a current benchmark commercial silicon. Important differences in particle size and particle composition are found which, as shown, affect critically the rheological properties of the corresponding electrode slurries. In order to overcome the rheological problems of prepared nanosilicon, we introduce and optimise a spraying method instead of using the usual casting technique for slurry application. Interestingly, the optimised electrodes show similar electrochemical performance, regardless of the particle size or composition of nanosilicon. This unexpected result is explained by the unusually high resistance of electrochemical wiring in silicon-based electrodes (about 60 Ohm per 1 mg cm-2 of active material loading). Despite that, the optimised material still shows a capacity up to 1200 mA h g-1 at a relatively high loading of 1.6 mg cm-2 and after 20 cycles. On the other hand, by decreasing the loading to below ca. 0.9 mg cm-2 the wiring problems are effectively overcome and capacities close to theoretical values can be obtained.

  5. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  6. Probing of Fast Chemical Dynamics at High Pressures and Temperatures using Pulsed Laser Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-17

    and dissociation of ammonia at high pressure and high temperature, The Journal of Chemical Physics, (08 2012): 0. doi: 10.1063/1.4742340 Ross Howie...Alexander Goncharov, Mohammad F. Mahmood, Synthesis of Energetic Nitrogen and Hydrogen Compounds Using High Pressure and Multiphoton Absorption, Poster...27, 2014. Alexander Goncharov, High-pressure synthesis of novel materials with new bonding patterns and unusual stoichiometries, Invited talk

  7. An Axisymmetric Numerical Model for Simulating Kinetically-Limited Growth of a Cylindrical Rod in 3D Laser-induced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) is an important process for freeform microfabrication of high aspect ratio prototypes. The system consists of a laser beam focused onto a movable substrate in a vacuum chamber.Heat from the laser at or near the focal spot of the beam causes gas in the chamber to react. As a result, solidphase reaction products are deposited on the substrate to form the microstructure. In this paper, we develop a numerical model for simulating growth of an axisymmetric cylindrical rod by pre-specifying the surface temperatures required for growing the rod and then by solving for the laser power that satisfies the pre-specified temperatures.The solution using least squares is obtained by minimizing the sum of square deviations between the pre-specified surface temperatures and the calculated temperatures from the heat equation with a given laser power as a heat source. Model predictions of the laser power over growth time helped in optimizing the growth process. Rods grown based on the predicted laser power from the numerical model were very close to being cylindrical in shape. Ways to further improve the model are being investigated.

  8. Optical-chemical relationships for carbonaceous aerosols observed at Jeju Island, Korea with a 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Flowers

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Transport of aerosols in pollution plumes from the mainland Asian continent was observed in situ at Jeju, South Korea during the Cheju Asian Brown Cloud Plume-Asian Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX field campaign throughout August and September 2008 using a 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer. Transport of mixed sulfate, carbonaceous, and nitrate aerosols from various Asian pollution plumes to Jeju accounted for 76% of the deployment days, showing large variations in their measured chemical and optical properties. Our analysis of eight distinct episodes, spanning a wide range of chemical composition, optical properties, and source regions, reveals that at episodes with higher OC/SO2−4 and NO3/SO2−4 composition ratios exhibit lower single scatter albedo at shorter wavelengths (ω405; significantly lower [ω405meas = 0.79±0.06, ω405calc = 0.86±0.01] than predicted by an optical model that assumes constant complex index of refraction with wavelength (an optical model of soot. We attribute this discrepancy to enhanced absorption by organic material. Organic carbon absorption accounts for up to 50% of the measured aerosol absorption at 405 nm for the high OC/SO2−4 episode. Coatings of elemental carbon aerosol cores are hypothesized to increase absorption by factors up to 6 at visible wavelengths. Carbonaceous aerosol absorption can alter global radiative forcing estimates substantially, underscoring the need to understand and predict chemical composition effects on optical properties.

  9. Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies. Technical report, January 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The relaxation of vibrationally excited pyrazine (E=40,640 cm{sup -1}) by collisions which populate the high J tail (J=58-82) of the vibrationless ground state (00{sup 0}0) of CO{sub 2} has been studied using tunable infrared diode lasers to probe the scattered CO{sub 2} molecules. The nascent rotational populations and translational recoil velocities for a series of rotational states in the high J tail of the 00{sup 0}0 level of CO{sub 2} were measured at five collision cell temperatures: 243, 263, 298, 339, and 364 K. Both the rate constants describing these V-R/T processes and the translational temperatures describing the recoiling CO{sub 2} molecules exhibit a very weak positive temperature dependence indicating that the high energy CO{sub 2} molecules must originate from near the center of the pre-collision energy distribution. Quantitative estimates of the actual amount of energy transferred in collisions between CO{sub 2} and vibrationally excited pyrazine, based on an angular momentum and translational energy exponential gap model of the cross section, indicate that {triangle}E{sub total} can be as large as 7090 cm{sup -1} ({approximately}20 kcal/mol). These experiments offer compelling evidence that these energy transfer events can indeed be classified as supercollisions since they involve unusually large, single collision energy transfer magnitudes; and despite their relative infrequency, they play a most important role in the collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited pyrazine by a CO{sub 2} bath.

  10. High Temperature Nanocomposites For Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and In-Space Fabrication by Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Webb, N. D.; Espinoza, M.; Cook, S.; Houts, M.; Kim, T.

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is an indispensable technology for the manned exploration of the solar system. By using Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (HP-LCVD), the authors propose to design and build a promising next-generation fuel element composed of uranium carbide UC embedded in a latticed matrix of highly refractory Ta4HfC5 for an NTP rocket capable of sustaining temperatures up to 4000 K, enabling an Isp of up to 1250 s. Furthermore, HP-LCVD technology can also be harnessed to enable 3D rapid prototyping of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics and composites, opening up the possibility of in-space fabrication of components, replacement parts, difficult-to-launch solar sails and panels and a variety of other space structures. Additionally, rapid prototyping with HP-LCVD makes a feasible "live off the land" strategy of interplanetary and interstellar exploration ­ the precursors commonly used in the technology are found, often in abundance, on other solar system bodies either as readily harvestable gas (e.g. methane) or as a raw material that could be converted into a suitable precursor (e.g. iron oxide into ferrocene on Mars).

  11. Growth of normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), binary alloys, and metallic fibers by hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Black, M. R.; Chavez, C. A.; Maskaly, K. R.; Espinoza, M.; Boman, M.; Landstrom, L.

    2008-06-01

    This work demonstrates that two or more elements of negligible solubility (and no known phase diagram) can be co-deposited in fiber form by hyperbaric-pressure laser chemical vapor deposition (HP-LCVD). For the first time, Hg-W alloys were grown as fibers from mixtures of tungsten hexafluoride, mercury vapor, and hydrogen. This new class of materials is termed normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), and includes not only immiscible materials, but also those elemental combinations that have liquid states at exclusive temperatures. This work also demonstrates that a wide variety of other binary and ternary alloys, intermetallics, and mixtures can be grown as fibers, e.g. silicon-tungsten, aluminum-silicon, boron-carbon-silicon, and titanium-carbon-nitride. In addition, pure metallic fibers of aluminum, titanium, and tungsten were deposited, demonstrating that materials of high thermal conductivity can indeed be grown in three-dimensions, provided sufficient vapor pressures are employed. A wide variety of fiber properties and microstructures resulted depending on process conditions; for example, single crystals, fine-grained alloys, and glassy metals could be deposited.

  12. Growth of normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), binary alloys, and metallic fibers by hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, J.L.; Black, M.R.; Chavez, C.A.; Maskaly, K.R.; Espinoza, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NEMISIS Team, IAT-2, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boman, M.; Landstrom, L. [Uppsala University, Inorganic Chemistry, Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-06-15

    This work demonstrates that two or more elements of negligible solubility (and no known phase diagram) can be co-deposited in fiber form by hyperbaric-pressure laser chemical vapor deposition (HP-LCVD). For the first time, Hg-W alloys were grown as fibers from mixtures of tungsten hexafluoride, mercury vapor, and hydrogen. This new class of materials is termed normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), and includes not only immiscible materials, but also those elemental combinations that have liquid states at exclusive temperatures. This work also demonstrates that a wide variety of other binary and ternary alloys, intermetallics, and mixtures can be grown as fibers, e.g. silicon-tungsten, aluminum-silicon, boron-carbon-silicon, and titanium-carbon-nitride. In addition, pure metallic fibers of aluminum, titanium, and tungsten were deposited, demonstrating that materials of high thermal conductivity can indeed be grown in three-dimensions, provided sufficient vapor pressures are employed. A wide variety of fiber properties and microstructures resulted depending on process conditions; for example, single crystals, fine-grained alloys, and glassy metals could be deposited. (orig.)

  13. Total microcystins analysis in water using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Fayad, Paul B; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-04-11

    A new approach for the analysis of the cyanobacterial microcystins (MCs) in environmental water matrices has been developed. It offers a cost efficient alternative method for the fast quantification of total MCs using mass spectrometry. This approach permits the quantification of total MCs concentrations without requiring any derivatization or the use of a suite of MCs standards. The oxidation product 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) was formed through a Lemieux oxidation and represented the total concentration of free and bound MCs in water samples. MMPB was analyzed using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). LDTD is a robust and reliable sample introduction method with ultra-fast analysis time (0.999). Limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.9 μg L(-1), respectively. These values are comparable with the WHO (World Health Organization) guideline of 1 μg L(-1) for total microcystin-LR congener in drinking water. Accuracy and interday/intraday variation coefficients were below 15%. Matrix effect was determined with a recovery of 91%, showing no significant signal suppression. This work demonstrates the use of the LDTD-APCI-MS/MS interface for the screening, detection and quantification of total MCs in complex environmental matrices.

  14. Low-intensity laser coupled with photosensitizer to reduce bacteria in root canals compared to chemical control; Laser em baixa intensidade associado a fotosensibilizador para reducao bacteriana intracanal comparado ao controle quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcez Segundo, Aguinaldo Silva

    2002-07-01

    The photodynamic therapy is a process in which a dye is associate with an appropriate wavelength of light and this dye goes to an excited state. The excited reacts with oxygen to form the highly reactive compound singlet oxygen, and this compound can kill bacteria and tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal reduction in root canal contaminated with E. Faecalis. Thirty teeth with their root canals prepared were contaminated with E. faecalis. The teeth have received the chemical substance sodium hypochlorite for 30 minutes; ten teeth have received the azulene dye paste for 5 minutes and have been irradiated with a diode laser, output power 10 mW and {lambda}= 685 nm for 3 minutes. Ten teeth have not received treatment (control group). The bacterial reduction was significantly higher for laser group when compared to chemical and control groups. These results indicate photodynamic therapy as an effective method to kill bacteria. (author)

  15. First-Principles Simulations of Chemical Reactions in an HCl Molecule Embedded inside a C or BN Nanotube Induced by Ultrafast Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong; Rubio, Angel

    2010-12-01

    We show by first-principles simulations that ultrafast laser pulses induce different chemical reactions in a molecule trapped inside a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond stretch of an encapsulated HCl molecule in semiconducting carbon nanotube or in a BN nanotube. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different: either complete disintegration or rebonding of the HCl molecule. Radial motion of the nanotube is always observed and a vacancy appears on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to the tube axis. Those results are important to analyze confined nanochemistry and to manipulate molecules and nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes.

  16. Laser-induced chemical reactions. [H + H/sub 2/; F + H/sub 2/; H + HF; Cl + H/sub 2/; H + HCl; H + LiF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orel, A.E.

    1980-12-01

    A classical model for the interaction of laser radiation with a molecular system is derived. This model is used to study the enhancement of a chemical reaction via a collision induced absorption. It was found that an infrared laser will in general enhance the rate of a chemical reaction, even if the reactants are infrared inactive. Results for an illustrative analytically solvable model are presented, as well as results from classical trajectory studies on a number of systems. The collision induced absorption spectrum in these systems can be written as the Fourier transform of a particular dipole correlation function. This is used to obtain the collision induced absorption spectrum for a state-selected, mono-energetic reactive collision system. Examples treated are a one-dimensional barrier problem, reactive and nonreactive collisions of H + H/sub 2/, and a modified H + H/sub 2/ potential energy surface which leads to a collision intermediate. An extension of the classical model to treat laser-induced electronically nonadiabatic collision processes is constructed. The model treats all degrees of freedom, molecular, electronic and radiation, in a dynamically consistent framework within classical mechanics. Application is made to several systems. Several interesting phenomena are discovered including a Franck-Condon-like effect causing maxima in the reaction probability at energies much below the classical threshold, laser de-enhancement of chemical reactions and an isotope effect. In order to assess the validity of the classical model for electronically nonadiabatic process (without a laser field), a model problem involving energy transfer in a collinear atom-diatom system is studied, and the results compared to the available quantum mechanical calculation. The calculations are in qualitative agreement.

  17. Selective Laser Sintering And Melting Of Pristine Titanium And Titanium Ti6Al4V Alloy Powders And Selection Of Chemical Environment For Etching Of Such Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzański L.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigations described in this article is to present a selective laser sintering and melting technology to fabricate metallic scaffolds made of pristine titanium and titanium Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Titanium scaffolds with different properties and structure were manufactured with this technique using appropriate conditions, notably laser power and laser beam size. The purpose of such elements is to replace the missing pieces of bones, mainly cranial and facial bones in the implantation treatment process. All the samples for the investigations were designed in CAD/CAM (3D MARCARM ENGINEERING AutoFab (Software for Manufacturing Applications software suitably integrated with an SLS/SLM system. Cube-shaped test samples dimensioned 10×10×10 mm were designed for the investigations using a hexagon-shaped base cell. The so designed 3D models were transferred to the machine software and the actual rapid manufacturing process was commenced. The samples produced according to the laser sintering technology were subjected to chemical processing consisting of etching the scaffolds’ surface in different chemical mediums. Etching was carried out to remove the loosely bound powder from the surface of scaffolds, which might detach from their surface during implantation treatment and travel elsewhere in an organism. The scaffolds created were subjected to micro- and spectroscopic examinations

  18. A Passively Mode-Locked Diode-End-Pumped Nd:YAG Laser with a Semiconductor Saturable Absorber Mirror Grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇刚; 马骁宇; 李春勇; 张治国; 张丙元; 张志刚

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental results of a mode-locked diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror(SESAM)from which we achieved a 10ps pulse duration at 150MHz repetition rate.The SESAM was grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition at low temperature.The recovery time was measured to be 0.5 ps,indicating the potential pulse compression to sub-picoseconds.

  19. Lasers '92; Proceedings of the International Conference on Lasers and Applications, 15th, Houston, TX, Dec. 7-10, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charles P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: x-ray lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, high power lasers, blue-green lasers, dye lasers, solid state lasers, semiconductor lasers, gas and discharge lasers, carbon dioxide lasers, ultrafast phenomena, nonlinear optics, quantum optics, dynamic gratings and wave mixing, laser radar, lasers in medicine, optical filters and laser communication, optical techniques and instruments, laser material interaction, and industrial and manufacturing applications.

  20. RILIS laser room HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  1. RILIS laser room

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  2. Laser thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    Laser propulsion can reduce fuel by 57 t to 105 t over chemical propulsion for a 144 t Lunar base, with no significant increase in trip time. Laser propulsion reduces trip time by a factor of 40 to 120 over nuclear electric propulsion and time in radiation belts by a factor of 100 to 1700. Either solar or nuclear driven laser diode arrays could produce multimegawatt beams, typically 3,700 t for a 235 MW laser system. Laser diode arrays have high payoff due to short wavelength (850 nm) and high diode efficiency (70 percent). A dry laser OTV of 8790 kg and 60 percent efficiency can transport a 144 t lunar base. Laser propulsion could carry both personnel and cargo safely to the lunar base.

  3. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893-972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts.

  4. Performance Improvement of Microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si Thin Film Solar Cells by Using Laser-Assisted Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si thin film solar cells treated with hydrogen plasma were fabricated at low temperature using a CO2 laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (LAPECVD system. According to the micro-Raman results, the i-Si films shifted from 482 cm−1 to 512 cm−1 as the assisting laser power increased from 0 W to 80 W, which indicated a gradual transformation from amorphous to crystalline Si. From X-ray diffraction (XRD results, the microcrystalline i-Si films with (111, (220, and (311 diffraction were obtained. Compared with the Si-based thin film solar cells deposited without laser assistance, the short-circuit current density and the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells with assisting laser power of 80 W were improved from 14.38 mA/cm2 to 18.16 mA/cm2 and from 6.89% to 8.58%, respectively.

  5. Carbon nanotubes grown by catalytic CO 2 laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on core-shell Fe/C composite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morjan, I.; Soare, I.; Alexandrescu, R.; Gavrila-Florescu, L.; Morjan, R.-E.; Prodan, G.; Fleaca, C.; Sandu, I.; Voicu, I.; Dumitrache, F.; Popovici, E.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by catalytic laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (C-LCVD) was investigated. C-LCVD uses both ex situ synthesized catalyst nanoparticles and the controlled decomposition of gas-phase hydrocarbon mixtures. As catalysts, Fe/C composites of the core-shell type were used. A continuous-wave CO 2 laser was employed to irradiate the ethylene/acetylene hydrocarbon precursors and to simultaneously heat a silicon substrate on which the carbon nanotubes were grown. The effects on carbon nanotube growth of both the iron-based nanocomposite particles and of the ethylene concentration were studied. The analysis suggests the feasibility of the C-LCVD process, in which the core-shell Fe/C catalysts comply with the prerequisite conditions of the CNT growth namely dispersion and supersaturation.

  6. Determination of metformin in mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard; Peter, Raimund M

    2010-11-02

    A simple, rapid and robust high-throughput assay for the quantitative analysis of metformin in plasma from different species using laser diode thermal desorption interfaced with atmospheric chemical pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MSMS) was developed for use in a pharmaceutical discovery environment. In order to minimize sample preparation a generic protein precipitation method was used to extract metformin from the plasma. Laser diode thermal desorption is a relatively new sample introduction method, the optimization of the instrumental parameters are presented. The method was successfully applied to spiked mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples and was subsequently used to determine the oral pharmacokinetics of metformin after dosing to male rats in order to support drug discovery projects. The deviations for intra-assay accuracy and precision across the four species were less than 30% at all calibration and quality control levels.

  7. Direct Chemical Analysis of Solids by Laser Ablation in an Ion-Storage Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G L; Grant, P M; Andresen, B D; Russo, R E

    2003-09-29

    A laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer system is described for the direct analysis of solids, particles, and fibers. The system uses a quadrupole ion trap operated in an ion-storage (IS) mode, coupled with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The sample is inserted radially into the ring electrode and an imaging system allows direct viewing and selected analysis of the sample. Measurements identified trace contaminants of Ag, Sn, and Sb in a Pb target with single laser-shot experiments. Resolution (m/{micro}m) of 1500 and detection limits of approximately 10 pg have been achieved with a single laser pulse. The system configuration and related operating principles for accurately measuring low concentrations of isotopes are described.

  8. Atmospheric pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyadong, Leonard; McKenna, Amy M; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel nonresonant laser-based matrix-free atmospheric pressure ionization technique, atmospheric pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption chemical ionization (AP/LIAD-CI). The technique decouples analyte desorption from subsequent ionization by reagent ions generated from a corona discharge initiated in ambient air or in the presence of vaporized toluene as a CI dopant at room temperature. Analyte desorption is initiated by a shock wave induced in a titanium foil coated with electrosprayed sample, irradiated from the rear side by high-energy laser pulses. The technique enables facile and independent optimization of the analyte desorption, ionization, and sampling events, for coupling to any mass analyzer with an AP interface. Moreover, the generated analyte ions are efficiently thermalized by collisions with atmospheric gases, thereby reducing fragmentation. We have coupled AP/LIAD-CI to ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR MS to generate predominantly [M + H](+) or M(+•) ions to resolve and identify thousands of elemental compositions from organic mixtures as complex as petroleum crude oil distillates. Finally, we have optimized the AP/LIAD CI process and investigated ionization mechanisms by systematic variation of placement of the sample, placement of the corona discharge needle, discharge current, gas flow rate, and inclusion of toluene as a dopant.

  9. Optimization of chemical and instrumental parameters in hydride generation laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for the determination of arsenic, antimony, lead and germanium in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşiller, Semira Unal; Yalçın, Serife

    2013-04-03

    A laser induced breakdown spectrometry hyphenated with on-line continuous flow hydride generation sample introduction system, HG-LIBS, has been used for the determination of arsenic, antimony, lead and germanium in aqueous environments. Optimum chemical and instrumental parameters governing chemical hydride generation, laser plasma formation and detection were investigated for each element under argon and nitrogen atmosphere. Arsenic, antimony and germanium have presented strong enhancement in signal strength under argon atmosphere while lead has shown no sensitivity to ambient gas type. Detection limits of 1.1 mg L(-1), 1.0 mg L(-1), 1.3 mg L(-1) and 0.2 mg L(-1) were obtained for As, Sb, Pb and Ge, respectively. Up to 77 times enhancement in detection limit of Pb were obtained, compared to the result obtained from the direct analysis of liquids by LIBS. Applicability of the technique to real water samples was tested through spiking experiments and recoveries higher than 80% were obtained. Results demonstrate that, HG-LIBS approach is suitable for quantitative analysis of toxic elements and sufficiently fast for real time continuous monitoring in aqueous environments.

  10. Kinetics and Kinetic Spectroscopy of the Sn/N(sub 2)O Electronic Transition Chemical Laser Candidate Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    coefficient, k1, and rate coefficients for quenching of SnO(a(3) sigma (+)) and (A(3)pi) were performed as were mechanistic studies and a determination of absolute photon yields. The results are evaluated in terms of laser development .

  11. Photoexcitation of lasers and chemical reactions for NASA missions: A theoretical study. [optical pumping in high pressure gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan, A.; Guerra, M.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining CW laser oscillation by optical pumping in the infrared at an elevated gas pressure is reviewed. A specific example utilizing a mixture of CO and NO gases is included. The gas pressures considered are in excess of several atmospheres. Laser frequency tuning over a broad region becomes possible at such elevated gas pressures due to collisional broadening of the amplifying transitions. The prior-rate and surprisal analysis are applied to obtain detailed VV and VT rates for CO and NO molecules and the transfer rates in a CO-NO gas mixture. The analysis is capable of giving temperature dependence of the rate constants. Computer estimates of the rates are presented for vibrational levels up to v = 50. The results show that in the high-lying vibrational states the VV transfer rates with Delta nu = 2 become appreciable.

  12. Development of a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for in situ multi-element chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Blair; Takahashi, Tomoko; Sato, Takumi; Sakka, Tetsuo; Tamura, Ayaka; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ohki, Toshihiko; Ohki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy is emerging as a technique that can expand the envelope of modern oceanographic sensors. The selectivity of spectroscopic techniques enables a single instrument to measure multiple components of the marine environment and can form the basis for versatile tools to perform in situ geochemical analysis. We have developed a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (ChemiCam) and successfully deployed the instrument from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to perform in situ multi-element analysis of both seawater and mineral deposits at depths of over 1000 m. The instrument consists of a long-nanosecond duration pulse-laser, a spectrometer and a high-speed camera. Power supply, instrument control and signal telemetry are provided through a ROV tether. The instrument has two modes of operation. In the first mode, the laser is focused directly into seawater and spectroscopic measurements of seawater composition are performed. In the second mode, a fiber-optic cable assembly is used to make spectroscopic measurements of mineral deposits. In this mode the laser is fired through a 4 m long fiber-optic cable and is focused onto the target's surface using an optical head and a linear stage that can be held by a ROV manipulator. In this paper, we describe the instrument and the methods developed to process its measurements. Exemplary measurements of both seawater and mineral deposits made during deployments of the device at an active hydrothermal vent field in the Okinawa trough are presented. Through integration with platforms such as underwater vehicles, drilling systems and subsea observatories, it is hoped that this technology can contribute to more efficient scientific surveys of the deep-sea environment.

  13. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  14. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  15. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  16. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagoev, K., E-mail: kblagoev@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grozeva, M., E-mail: margo@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Malcheva, G., E-mail: bobcheva@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Neykova, S., E-mail: sevdalinaneikova@abv.bg [National Institute of Archaeology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2 Saborna, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893–972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts. - Highlights: ► LIBS, XRF and XRD analyses of medieval white-clay ceramic tiles fragments are done. ► Different elements and phases, presented in the ceramics fragments were determined. ► Differences in the tiles' raw material mineral composition are found. ► Information of the tiles' production process and the raw clay deposits is obtained.

  17. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements.

  18. Sensitive determinations of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr elements in aqueous solutions using chemical replacement combined with surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X Y; Hao, Z Q; Li, C M; Li, J M; Yi, R X; Shen, M; Li, K H; Guo, L B; Li, X Y; Lu, Y F; Zeng, X Y

    2016-06-13

    In this study, chemical replacement combined with surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CR-SENLIBS) was for the first time applied to improve the detection sensitivities of trace heavy metal elements in aqueous solutions. Utilizing chemical replacement effect, heavy metal ions in aqueous solution were enriched on the magnesium alloy surface as a solid replacement layer through reacting with the high chemical activity metallic magnesium (Mg) within 1 minute. Unitary and mixed solutions with Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr elements were prepared to construct calibration curves, respectively. The CR-SENLIBS showed a much better detection sensitivity and accuracy for both unitary and mixed solutions. The coefficients of determination R2 of the calibration curves were above 0.96, and the LoDs were of the same order of magnitude, i.e., in the range of 0.016-0.386 μg/mL for the unitary solution, and in the range of 0.025-0.420 μg/mL for the mixed solution. These results show that CR-SENLIBS is a feasible method for improving the detection sensitivity of trace element in liquid sample, which definitely provides a way for wider application of LIBS in water quality monitoring.

  19. Evaluation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for determination of the chemical composition of copper concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łazarek, Łukasz, E-mail: lukasz.lazarek@pwr.wroc.pl [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Drzymała, Jan [Faculty of Geoengineering, Mining and Geology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Abramski, Krzysztof M. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), like many other spectroscopic techniques, is a comparative method. Typically, in qualitative analysis, synthetic certified standard with a well-known elemental composition is used to calibrate the system. Nevertheless, in all laser-induced techniques, such calibration can affect the accuracy through differences in the overall composition of the chosen standard. There are also some intermediate factors, which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure and thermal conductivity. In this work the calibration performed for the LIBS technique utilizes pellets made directly from the tested materials (old well-characterized samples). This choice produces a considerable improvement in the accuracy of the method. This technique was adopted for the determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates, standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for three elements: silver, cobalt and vanadium. We also proposed a method of post-processing the measurement data to minimize matrix effects and permit reliable analysis. It has been shown that the described technique can be used in qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates. It was noted that the final validation of such methodology is limited mainly by the accuracy of the characterization of the standards. - Highlights: • A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique is introduced for composition monitoring in industrial copper concentrates. • Calibration samples consisted of pellets produced from the tested materials. • The proposed method of post-processing significantly minimizes matrix effects. • The possible uses of this technique are limited mainly by accurate characterization of the standard samples.

  20. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  1. Comparison of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with a chemical vapour deposition bur and conventional techniques for cavity preparation: a microleakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Yıldırım, Zeren; Antonson, Sibel A; Kilinc, Evren; Koch, Daniele; Antonson, Donald E; Dayangaç, Berrin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) bur cavity preparation with conventional preparation methods including a diamond bur and a carbide bur on the microleakage with two different adhesive systems. A total of 40 extracted human premolars were randomly assigned to four experimental groups according to the cavity preparation technique: group I diamond bur (Diatech); group II carbide bur (Diatech); group III Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase Millennium II); and group IV CVD bur (CVDentUS). Using the different preparation techniques, Class V standardized preparations were performed on the buccal and lingual surfaces with gingival margins on the dentin and occlusal margins on the enamel. Each preparation group was randomly assigned to two subgroups (five teeth, ten preparations) according to the type of adhesive: an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), and a single-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE One). All preparations were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin in a single increment. Following thermocycling (×500; 5-55°C), the teeth were immersed in basic fuchsin and sectioned in the orovestibular direction. Dye penetration was evaluated under a light microscope by two blinded examiners. Data were statistically analysed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (p0.05). Comparing the enamel and dentin leakage scores within each group, no statistically significant differences were found (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser cavity preparation did not differ from preparation with CVD, diamond or carbide bur in terms of microleakage with the different adhesive systems.

  2. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  3. Laser synthesis, structure and chemical properties of colloidal nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles for the substitution of noble metals in heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzun, Galina; Levish, Alexander; Mackert, Viktor; Kallio, Tanja; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    Platinum and iridium are rare and expensive noble metals that are used as catalysts for different sectors including in heterogeneous chemical automotive emission catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion. Nickel and its alloys are promising materials to substitute noble metals. Nickel based materials are cost-effective with good availability and show comparable catalytic performances. The nickel-molybdenum system is a very interesting alternative to platinum in water electrolysis. We produced ligand-free nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles by laser ablation in water and acetone. Our results show that segregated particles were formed in water due to the oxidation of the metals. X-ray diffraction shows a significant change in the lattice parameter due to a diffusion of molybdenum atoms into the nickel lattice with increasing activity in the electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction. Even though the solubility of molecular oxygen in acetone is higher than in water, there were no oxides and a more homogeneous metal distribution in the particles in acetone as seen by TEM-EDX. This showed that dissolved molecular oxygen does not control oxide formation. Overall, the laser ablation of pressed micro particulate mixtures in liquids offers a combinational synthesis approach that allows the screening of alloy nanoparticles for catalytic testing and can convert micro-mixtures into nano-alloys.

  4. Ground state lasing at 1.30 microm from InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimard, Denis; Ishida, Mitsuru; Bordel, Damien; Li, Lin; Nishioka, Masao; Tanaka, Yu; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Sudo, Hisao; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Hayato; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2010-03-12

    We investigated the effects of post-growth annealing on the photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The onset temperature at which both the peak linewidth and the PL intensity degraded and the blueshift of the ground state emission wavelength occurred was found to depend on both the QD density and the In composition of the capping layer. This behavior is particularly important in view of QD integration in photonic devices. From the knowledge of the dependences of the PL characteristics after annealing on the QD and capping growth conditions, ground state lasing at 1.30 microm could be demonstrated from InAs/GaAs QDs grown by MOCVD. Finally, we compared the laser characteristics of InAs/GaAs QDs with those of InAs/Sb:GaAs QDs, grown according to the antimony-mediated growth technique, and showed that InAs/Sb:GaAs QDs are more appropriate for laser fabrication at 1.3 microm by MOCVD.

  5. Ground state lasing at 1.30 {mu}m from InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimard, Denis; Ishida, Mitsuru; Bordel, Damien; Li Lin; Nishioka, Masao; Arakawa, Yasuhiko [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Tanaka, Yu; Kondo, Hayato; Sugawara, Mitsuru [QD Laser Inc., 1-8-1 Ohtemachi, Chyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0004 (Japan); Ekawa, Mitsuru; Sudo, Hisao; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: dguimard@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Fujitsu Laboratories Limited, 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0197 (Japan)

    2010-03-12

    We investigated the effects of post-growth annealing on the photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The onset temperature at which both the peak linewidth and the PL intensity degraded and the blueshift of the ground state emission wavelength occurred was found to depend on both the QD density and the In composition of the capping layer. This behavior is particularly important in view of QD integration in photonic devices. From the knowledge of the dependences of the PL characteristics after annealing on the QD and capping growth conditions, ground state lasing at 1.30 {mu}m could be demonstrated from InAs/GaAs QDs grown by MOCVD. Finally, we compared the laser characteristics of InAs/GaAs QDs with those of InAs/Sb:GaAs QDs, grown according to the antimony-mediated growth technique, and showed that InAs/Sb:GaAs QDs are more appropriate for laser fabrication at 1.3 {mu}m by MOCVD.

  6. Chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and explosives in fingermarks using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Chemical analysis of latent fingermarks, "touch chemistry," has the potential of providing intelligence or forensically relevant information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used as an analytical platform for obtaining mass spectra and chemical images of target drugs and explosives in fingermark residues following conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix processing. There were two main purposes of this research: (1) develop effective laboratory methods for detecting drugs and explosives in fingermark residues and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting drugs and explosives after casual contact with pills, powders, and residues. Further, synthetic latent print reference pads were evaluated as mimics of natural fingermark residue to determine if the pads could be used for method development and quality control. The results suggest that artificial amino acid and sebaceous oil residue pads are not suitable to adequately simulate natural fingermark chemistry for MALDI/TOF MS analysis. However, the pads were useful for designing experiments and setting instrumental parameters. Based on the natural fingermark residue experiments, handling whole or broken pills did not transfer sufficient quantities of drugs to allow for definitive detection. Transferring drugs or explosives in the form of powders and residues was successful for preparing analytes for detection after contact with fingers and deposition of fingermark residue. One downfall to handling powders was that the analyte particles were easily spread beyond the original fingermark during development. Analyte particles were confined in the original fingermark when using transfer residues. The MALDI/TOF MS was able to detect procaine, pseudoephedrine, TNT, and RDX from contact residue under laboratory conditions with the integration of conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix. MALDI/TOF MS is a nondestructive

  7. Calcium phosphate thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition: Physico-chemical characterization and in vitro cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)]. E-mail: mihailes@ifin.nipne.ro; Torricelli, P. [Servizio di Chirurgia Sperimentale-Istituto di Ricerca Codivilla PuttiIOR, Bologna (Italy); Bigi, A. [Department of Chemistry ' G. Ciamician' , University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Mayer, I. [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Iliescu, M. [Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Werckmann, J. [Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Socol, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Miroiu, F. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Cuisinier, F. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, 67085 Strasbourg (France); Elkaim, R. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, 67085 Strasbourg (France); Hildebrand, G. [IBA e.V., Department of Biomaterials, Rosenhof, D-37308 Heilbad Heiligenstadt (Germany)

    2005-07-30

    We review the progress made by us using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of two bioactive calcium phosphates: octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and Mn doped carbonated hydroxyapatite (Mn-CHA). Coatings of these materials well suited for biomimetic medical prostheses and pivots were synthesized on titanium substrates with a pulsed KrF* UV laser source. The best deposition conditions for Mn-CHA thin films were 13 Pa O{sub 2}, 400 deg. C with post heat treatment of 6 h in air enriched with water vapours. The coatings are stoichiometric and crystalline. For OCP, deposition at 150 deg. C in 50 Pa water vapor atmosphere, post treated by 6 h annealing in hot flux of water vapours, resulted in stoichiometric, but poorly-crystallized films. Degradation tests show different behavior for the OCP and Mn-CHA coatings. In vitro cell growth shows excellent adherence and biocompatibility of osteoblasts and fibroblasts in both OCP and Mn-CHA coatings. Human osteoblasts display normal proliferation and viability, and good differentiation behaviour.

  8. Laser Processing and Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bäuerle, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the fundamentals and applications of laser-matter interactions, in particular with regard to laser material processing. Special attention is given to laser-induced physical and chemical processes at gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid interfaces. Starting with the background physics, the book proceeds to examine applications of lasers in “standard” laser machining and laser chemical processing (LCP), including the patterning, coating, and modification of material surfaces. This fourth edition has been enlarged to cover the rapid advances in the understanding of the dynamics of materials under the action of ultrashort laser pulses, and to include a number of new topics, in particular the increasing importance of lasers in various different fields of surface functionalizations and nanotechnology. In two additional chapters, recent developments in biotechnology, medicine, art conservation and restoration are summarized. Graduate students, physicists, chemists, engineers, a...

  9. Multivariate approach to the chemical mapping of uranium in sandstone-hosted uranium ores analyzed using double pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klus, Jakub; Mikysek, Petr; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Prochazková, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Trojek, Tomáš; Novotný, Karel; Slobodník, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to provide high resolution mapping of uranium in sandstone-hosted uranium ores using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. In order to obtain chemical image with highest possible spatial resolution, LIBS system in orthogonal double pulse (DP LIBS) arrangement was employed. Owing to this experimental arrangement the spot size of 50 μm in diameter resulting in lateral resolution of 100 μm was reached. Despite the increase in signal intensity in DP LIBS modification, the detection of uranium is challenging. The main cause is the high density of uranium spectral lines, which together with broadening of LIBS spectral lines overreaches the resolution of commonly used spectrometers. It results in increased overall background radiation with only few distinguishable uranium lines. Three different approaches in the LIBS data treatment for the uranium detection were utilized: i) spectral line intensity, ii) region of apparent background and iii) multivariate data analysis. By utilizing multivariate statistical methods, a specific specimen features (in our case uranium content) were revealed by processing complete spectral information obtained from broadband echelle spectrograph. Our results are in a good agreement with conventional approaches such as line fitting and show new possibilities of processing spectral data in mapping. As a reference technique to LIBS was employed X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). The XRF chemical images used in this paper have lower resolution (approximately 1-2 mm per image point), nevertheless the elemental distribution is apparent and corresponds to presented LIBS experiments.

  10. $\\beta$-decay study of very neutron-rich Cd isotopes with a chemically selective laser ion source

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Following our test measurements of N=82-84 Cd isotopes with a specifically developed laser ion source (CERN/ISC 97-16, ISC/I 22), we now propose detailed spectroscopic studies of the decay of $^{130}$Cd to $\\,^{132}\\!$Cd, and at least the determination of some gross properties of the new N=85-86 nuclides $^{133}\\!$Cd and $\\,^{134}\\!$Cd. The main nuclear-structure objective of this experiment is the identification of the energies of the single-hole (SH) proton states in $^{131}$In. Nearly all of the other single-nucleon shell-model basis energies around doubly magic $^{132}$Sn are known by now, except those $\\pi$SH in Z=49 $\\,^{131}$In. Theoretical agreement on these values has not been achieved so far. Of particular interest is the depth of the $\\pi$f$_{5/3}$ hole and the p$_{3/2}$ - p$_{1/2}$ spin-orbit splitting. A second important goal is the determination of the position of the lowest-energy 1$^+\\,$ level in $^{130}$In predominantly populated in the Gamow-Teller (GT) decay of N=82 $^{130}\\!$Cd. Apart from...

  11. Confocal laser scanning microscopy elucidation of the micromorphology of the leaf cuticle and analysis of its chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiminti, Pavani P; Rookes, James E; Boyd, Ben J; Cahill, David M

    2015-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been invaluable tools for the study of the micromorphology of plant cuticles. However, for electron microscopy, the preparation techniques required may invariably introduce artefacts in cuticle preservation. Further, there are a limited number of methods available for quantifying the image data obtained through electron microscopy. Therefore, in this study, optical microscopy techniques were coupled with staining procedures and, along with SEM were used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the ultrastructure of plant leaf cuticles. Leaf cryosections of Triticum aestivum (wheat), Zea mays (maize), and Lupinus angustifolius (lupin) were stained with either fat-soluble azo stain Sudan IV or fluorescent, diarylmethane Auramine O and were observed under confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). For all the plant species tested, the cuticle on the leaf surfaces could be clearly resolved in many cases into cuticular proper (CP), external cuticular layer (ECL), and internal cuticular layer (ICL). Novel image data analysis procedures for quantifying the epicuticular wax micromorphology were developed, and epicuticular waxes of L. angustifolius were described here for the first time. Together, application of a multifaceted approach involving the use of a range of techniques to study the plant cuticle has led to a better understanding of cuticular structure and provides new insights into leaf surface architecture.

  12. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D{sub 2}O ice beneath a H{sub 2}O ice layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui, E-mail: ryang73@ustc.edu; Gudipati, Murthy S., E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov [Science Division, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 183-301, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D{sub 2}O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D{sub 2}O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D{sub 2}O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D{sub 2}O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H{sub 2}O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and

  13. Effect of working pressure and annealing temperature on microstructure and surface chemical composition of barium strontium titanate films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahra Saroukhani; Nemat Tahmasebi; Seyed Mohammad Mahdavi; Ali Nemati

    2015-10-01

    Barium strontium titanate (BST, Ba1−SrTiO3) thin films have been extensively used in many dielectric devices such as dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). To optimize its characteristics, a microstructural control is essential. In this paper, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 thin film has been deposited on the SiO2/Si substrate by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique at three different oxygen working pressures of 100, 220 and 350 mTorr. Then the deposited thin films at 100 mTorr oxygen pressure were annealed for 50 min in oxygen ambient at three different temperatures: 650, 720 and 800°C. The effect of oxygen working pressure during laser ablation and thermal treatment on the films was investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis methods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was used to determine the surface chemical composition of the samples. The results indicate that the deposited BST film at low working pressure (100 mTorr) in PLD chamber shows a lower surface roughness than other working pressures (220 and 350 mTorr). The as-deposited films show an amorphous structure and would turn into polycrystalline structure at annealing temperature above 650°C. Increase of temperature would cause the formation of cubic and per-ovskite phases, improvement in crystalline peaks and also result in the decomposition of BST at high temperature (above 800°C). In addition, rising of temperature leads to the increase in size of grains and clusters. Therefore more roughness was found at higher temperatures as a result of a more heterogeneous growth and less tensions.

  14. Analysis of trimethoprim, lincomycin, sulfadoxin and tylosin in swine manure using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solliec, Morgan; Massé, Daniel; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    A new extraction method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the determination of four veterinary antibiotics. The analytes belong to different groups of antibiotics such as chemotherapeutics, sulfonamides, lincosamides and macrolides. Trimethoprim (TMP), sulfadoxin (SFX), lincomycin (LCM) and tylosin (TYL) were extracted from lyophilized manure using a sonication extraction. McIlvaine buffer and methanol (MeOH) were used as extraction buffers, followed by cation-exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) for clean-up. Analysis was performed by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical-ionization (LDTD-APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection. The LDTD is a high throughput sample introduction method that reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample, compared to minutes when using traditional liquid chromatography (LC). Various SPE parameters were optimized after sample extraction: the stationary phase, the extraction solvent composition, the quantity of sample extracted and sample pH. LDTD parameters were also optimized: solvent deposition, carrier gas, laser power and corona discharge. The method limit of detection (MLD) ranged from 2.5 to 8.3 µg kg(-1) while the method limit of quantification (MLQ) ranged from 8.3 to 28µgkg(-1). Calibration curves in the manure matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥ 0.996) for all analytes and the interday and intraday coefficients of variation were below 14%. Recoveries of analytes from manure ranged from 53% to 69%. The method was successfully applied to real manure samples.

  15. Laser-assisted one-pot fabrication of calcium phosphate-based submicrospheres with internally crystallized magnetite nanoparticles through chemical precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Maki; Oyane, Ayako; Sakamaki, Ikuko; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Kawaguchi, Kenji

    2015-04-14

    In this paper, we have further developed our simple (one-pot) and rapid (short irradiation time) laser fabrication process of submicrometer spheres composed of amorphous calcium iron phosphate. In our previous process, laser irradiation was applied to a calcium phosphate (CaP) reaction mixture supplemented with ferric ions (Fe(3+)) as a light-absorbing agent. Because the intention of the present study was to fabricate magnetite-encapsulated CaP-based submicrometer spheres, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) were used as a light-absorbing agent rather than ferric ions. The ferrous ions served as a light-absorbing agent and facilitated the fabrication of submicrometer and micrometer spheres of amorphous calcium iron phosphate. The sphere formation and growth were better promoted by the use of ferrous ions as compared with the use of ferric ions. The chemical composition of the spheres was controllable through adjustment of the experimental conditions. By the addition of sodium hydroxide to the CaP reaction mixture supplemented with ferrous ions, fabrication of CaP-based magnetic submicrometer spheres was successfully achieved. Numerous magnetite and wüstite nanoparticles were coprecipitated or segregated into the CaP-based spherical amorphous matrix via light-material interaction during the CaP precipitation process. The magnetic properties of the magnetite and wüstite formed in the CaP-based spheres were investigated by magnetization measurements. The present process and the resulting CaP-based spheres are expected to have great potential for biomedical applications.

  16. Optical-chemical-microphysical relationships and closure studies for mixed carbonaceous aerosols observed at Jeju Island; 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer, particle sizing, and filter analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Flowers

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Transport of aerosols in pollution plumes from the mainland Asian continent was observed in situ at Jeju, South Korea during the Cheju Asian Brown Cloud Plume-Asian Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX field campaign throughout August and September 2008 using a 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer (PASS-3, chemical filter analysis, and size distributions. The PASS-3 directly measures the effects of morphology (e.g. coatings on light absorption that traditional filter-based instruments are unable to address. Transport of mixed sulfate, carbonaceous, and nitrate aerosols from various Asian pollution plumes to Jeju accounted for 74% of the deployment days, showing large variations in their measured chemical and optical properties. Analysis of eight distinct episodes, spanning wide ranges of chemical composition, optical properties, and source regions, reveals that episodes with higher organic carbon (OC/sulfate (SO42− and nitrate (NO3/SO42− composition ratios exhibit lower single scatter albedo at shorter wavelengths (ω405. We infer complex refractive indices (n–ik as a function of wavelength for the high, intermediate, and low OC/SO42− pollution episodes by using the observed particle size distributions and the measured optical properties. The smallest mean particle diameter corresponds to the high OC/SO42− aerosol episode. The imaginary part of the refractive index (k is greater for the high OC/SO42− episode at all wavelengths. A distinct, sharp increase in k at short wavelength implies enhanced light absorption by OC, which accounts for 50% of the light absorption at 405 nm, in the high OC/SO42− episode. Idealized analysis indicates increased absorption at 781 nm by factors greater than 3 relative to denuded black carbon in the laboratory. We hypothesize

  17. Influence of plasma density on the chemical composition and structural properties of pulsed laser deposited TiAlN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Camps, Enrique [Departamento de Física, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, México D.F. C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, México D.F. C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Flores, M. [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Apdo. Postal 307, C.P. 45101 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); Campos-González, E. [Departamento de Física, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, México D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    Incorporation of substitutional Al into the TiN lattice of the ternary alloy TiAlN results in a material with improved properties compared to TiN. In this work, TiAlN thin films were grown by the simultaneous ablation of Ti and Al targets in a nitrogen containing reactive atmosphere. The deposit was formed on silicon substrates at low deposition temperature (200 °C). The dependence of the Al content of the films was studied as a function of the ion density of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of the Al target. The plasma parameters were measured by means of a planar Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical composition of the films was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed a strong dependence of the amount of aluminum incorporated in the films with the plasma density. The structural characterization of the deposits was carried out by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, where the substitutional incorporation of the Al into the TiN was demonstrated.

  18. Carbamazepine in municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge: ultrafast quantification by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the distribution of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in wastewater (WW) and aqueous and solid phases of wastewater sludge (WWS) was carried out. A rapid and reliable method enabling high-throughput sample analysis for quicker data generation, detection, and monitoring of CBZ in WW and WWS was developed and validated. The ultrafast method (15s per sample) is based on the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The optimization of instrumental parameters and method application for environmental analysis are presented. The performance of the novel method was evaluated by estimation of extraction recovery, linearity, precision and detection limit. The method detection limits was 12 ng L(-1) in WW and 3.4 ng g(-1) in WWS. The intra- and inter-day precisions were 8% and 11% in WW and 6% and 9% in WWS, respectively. Furthermore, three extraction methods, ultrasonic extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with three different solvent condition such as methanol, acetone and acetonitrile:ethyle acetate (5:1, v/v) were compared on the basis of procedural blank and method recovery. Overall, ASE showed the best extraction efficiency with methanol as compared to USE and MAE. Furthermore, the quantification of CBZ in WW and WWS samples showed the presence of contaminant in all stages of the treatment plant.

  19. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, G; Crum, R; Prikhodko, S V; Seif, D; Po, G; Ghoniem, N; Kodambaka, S; Gupta, V

    2013-02-28

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>10(7) s(-1)), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (∼1.20 μm in tall and ∼0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  20. Metastable alloy nanoparticles, metal-oxide nanocrescents and nanoshells generated by laser ablation in liquid solution: influence of the chemical environment on structure and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2015-11-14

    Alloy nanoparticles are characterized by the combination of multiple interesting properties, which are attractive for technological and scientific purposes. A frontier topic of this field is nanoalloys with compositions not thermodynamically allowed at ordinary temperature and pressure (i.e. metastable), because they require out-of-equilibrium synthetic approaches. Recently, laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) was successfully applied for the realization of metastable nanoalloys because of the fast kinetics of nanoparticle formation. However, the role played by the chemical environment on the final composition and structure of laser generated nanoalloys still has to be fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of different synthetic conditions on the LASiS of metastable nanoalloys composed of Au and Fe, such as the use of water instead of ethanol, the bubbling of inert gases and the addition of a few vol% of H2O2 and H2O. The two elements showed different reactivity when LASiS was performed in water instead of ethanol, while minor effects were observed from bubbling pure gases such as N2, Ar and CO2 in the liquid solution. Moreover, the plasmonic response and the structure of the nanoalloys were sensibly modified by adding H2O2 to water. We also found that nanoparticle production is dramatically influenced just by adding 0.2% of H2O in ethanol. These results suggest that the formation of a cavitation bubble with long lifetime and large size during LASiS is useful for the preservation of the metastable alloy composition, whereas an oxidative environment hampers the formation of metastable alloy nanoparticles. Overall, by acting on the type of solvent and solutes, we were able to switch from a traditional synthetic approach for the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys to one using a reactive environment, which gives unconventional structures such as metal@iron-oxide nanoshells and nanocrescents of oxide supported on metal nanospheres. These results

  1. Metallurgical and chemical characterization of copper alloy reference materials within laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Method development for minimally-invasive analysis of ancient bronze objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaszek, Damian, E-mail: damian.walaszek@empa.ch [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Senn, Marianne [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Faller, Markus [Laboratory for Jointing Technology and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Philippe, Laetitia [Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Ulrich, Andrea [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of ancient metal objects provides important information for manufacturing studies and authenticity verification of ancient copper or bronze artifacts. Non- or minimal-destructive analytical methods are preferred to mitigate visible damage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) enables the determination of major elements as well as impurities down to lower ppm-levels, however, accuracy and precision of analysis strongly depend on the homogeneity of reference materials used for calibration. Moreover, appropriate analytical procedures are required e.g. in terms of ablation strategies (scan mode, spot size, etc.). This study reviews available copper alloy (certified) reference materials — (C)RMs from different sources and contributes new metallurgical data on homogeneity and spatial elemental distribution. Investigations of the standards were performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) for the following copper alloy and bronze (certified) reference materials: NIST 454, BAM 374, BAM 211, BAM 227, BAM 374, BAM 378, BAS 50.01-2, BAS 50.03-4, and BAS 50.04-4. Additionally, the influence of inhomogeneities on different ablation and calibration strategies is evaluated to define an optimum analytical strategy in terms of line scan versus single spot ablation, variation of spot size, selection of the most appropriate RMs or minimum number of calibration reference materials. - Highlights: ► New metallographic data for copper alloy reference materials are provided. ► Influence of RMs homogeneity on quality of LA-ICPMS analysis was evaluated. ► Ablation and calibration strategies were critically discussed. ► An LA-ICPMS method is proposed for analyzing most typical ancient copper alloys.

  2. Laser machining of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dahotre, Narendra B

    2011-01-01

    Advanced materialsIntroductionApplicationsStructural ceramicsBiomaterials CompositesIntermetallicsMachining of advanced materials IntroductionFabrication techniquesMechanical machiningChemical Machining (CM)Electrical machiningRadiation machining Hybrid machiningLaser machiningIntroductionAbsorption of laser energy and multiple reflectionsThermal effectsLaser machining of structural ceramicsIntrodu

  3. Laser Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Laser Resurfacing Uses for Laser Resurfacing Learn more about specific conditions where laser ... skin Scars Sun-damaged skin Wrinkles What is laser resurfacing? Laser resurfacing is a procedure that uses ...

  4. Análise química e morfológica do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio durante a colagem ortodôntica Chemical and morphological analysis of the human dental enamel treated with argon laser during orthodontic bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra Guimarães

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: as principais utilizações do laser argônio na Ortodontia são a redução do tempo de polimerização durante a colagem ortodôntica e o aumento da resistência à cárie do esmalte dentário. OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as alterações químicas e morfológicas do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio nos parâmetros da colagem ortodôntica. MÉTODOS: quinze primeiros pré-molares hígidos, extraídos por indicação ortodôntica, foram selecionados e seccionados no sentido do longo eixo em dois segmentos iguais. Uma metade de cada elemento dentário foi tratada e a outra permaneceu sem tratamento. Um total de 30 amostras foi analisado, criando o grupo laser (n = 15 e o grupo controle (n = 15. O tratamento foi feito com laser argônio com 250mW de potência por 5 segundos, com densidade de energia de 8J/cm². RESULTADOS: a análise de difração de raios X demonstrou duas fases em ambos os grupos, as fases apatita e monetita. A redução da fase monetita foi significativa após o tratamento com laser, sugerindo maior cristalinidade. A análise de Espectroscopia de Energia Dispersiva (EDS indicou aumento na razão cálcio-fósforo no grupo laser, compatível com a diminuição da fase monetita. A morfologia superficial do esmalte dentário apresentou-se mais lisa após o tratamento com laser argônio. CONCLUSÕES: o aumento de cristalinidade e a lisura superficial do esmalte no grupo laser são fatores sugestivos de aumento de resistência à cárie no esmalte dentário.INTRODUCTION: The main utilities of the argon laser in orthodontics are the high speed curing process in orthodontic bonding and the caries resistance promotion of the tooth enamel. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical and morphological changes in the tooth enamel treated with the argon laser in the orthodontic bonding parameters. METHODS: Fifteen sound human first premolars, removed for orthodontic

  5. Contribution to the study of physico-chemical properties of surfaces modified by laser treatment. Application to the enhancement of localized corrosion resistance of stainless steels; Contribution a l'etude des proprietes physico-chimiques des surfaces modifiees par traitement laser. Application a l'amelioration de la resistance a la corrosion localisee des aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacquentin, W.

    2011-11-25

    Metallic materials are more and more used in severe conditions with particularly strong request for improving their behavior in aggressive environment and especially over long periods. The objective of this PhD work is to estimate the potentiality of a laser surface melting treatment on the improvement of the stainless steel 304L corrosion resistance, surface treatments by laser can be revisited on the basis of a recent change in the laser technology. In the frame of this work, a nano-pulsed laser fiber was chosen: it allows the treated surface to be melted for few microns in depth, followed by an ultra-fast solidification occurring with cooling rates up to 1011 K/s. The combination of these processes leads to the elimination of the surface defects, the formation (trapping) of metastable phases, the segregation of chemical elements and the growth of a new oxide layer which properties are governed by the laser parameters. To correlate these latter to the electrochemical reactivity of the surface, the influence of two laser parameters on the physico-chemical properties of the surface was studied: the laser power and the overlap of the laser impacts. To support this approach, the pitting corrosion resistance of the samples was determined by standard electrochemical tests. For specific laser parameters, the pitting potential of a 304L stainless steel was increased by more than 500 mV corresponding to an important enhancement in localized corrosion resistance in chloride environment. The interdependence of the different phenomena resulting from the laser treatment lead to a quite complex prioritization of their role on the sensibility of the 304L. However, it was demonstrated that the nature of the thermal oxide formed during the laser surface melting and the induced defects are first-order parameters for the initiation of pits. (author) [French] Les materiaux metalliques sont utilises dans des conditions de plus en plus severes et doivent presenter une parfaite

  6. History of Laser Weapon Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    surgery/medicine, hair re- moval, presentation pointers, law enforcement, ranging and sighting devices, welding applications, and much more. Using...other laser technology develop- ments. The first chemical laser, hydrogen fluoride ( HF ), was built in 1965, producing 1 kW. It was then that DoD became...energy laser (HEL) weapons. In industry, the more powerful CO2 lasers are used for weld - ing, drilling, and cutting. There are many different types

  7. 电激励连续波DF化学激光器输出功率的实验研究%Experimental Study on Output Power of Discharge Exited CW DF Chemical Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘现魁; 赵海涛; 孟昭荣; 王振华; 周小红

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between output power of discharge exited CW I)F chemical Laser when mass flux controller is used as flux monitoring system and N2, main-He, NF3, assistant-He, D2 is investigated. Considering output instability of the laser and measurement error of power meter, maximum output power about 12.5W and continuous running time about 30min of the laser fundamental mode is realized. Compared with output power of the same laser when rotameter in use, higher mass flux stability was got and the laser ran output higher power and has the better output -stability when mass flux controller in use.%电激励连续波DF化学激光器使用质量流量控制器作为流量监控系统时,对其输出功率与N2气、主He、NF3气、副He、D2气的流量关系进行了研究.考虑到激光器的输出不稳定性和功率计的测量误差,实现了激光器基模最大输出功率约为12.5 W,连续运行时间约30 min.并与使用浮子流量计做为流量监控系统的同一激光器的输出功率进行了比较,结果显示,使用质量流量控制器时,流量稳定性更高,激光器可以输出更高功率,且具有更好的功率稳定性.

  8. In vitro study of morphological and chemical modification threshold of bovine dental enamel irradiated by the holmium laser; Estudo in vitro das alteracoes morfologicas e quimicas do esmalte dental bovino irradiado pelo laser de holmio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduardo, Patricia Lerro de Paula

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Ho:YLF laser effects on the dental enamel surface with regards to its morphology, thermal variations during its irradiation in the pulp chamber and its increased resistance to demineralization through quantitative analysis of calcium and phosphorous atoms reactive concentrations in samples. Twenty samples of bovine enamel were used and divided in four groups: control - acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) application followed by demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (100 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (350 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid: and irradiation with Ho:YLF laser ( 450 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid. Ali samples were quantified according to their calcium and phosphorous atoms relative concentrations before and after the treatments above. X-Ray fluorescence spectrochemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. It was observed an increase on the calcium and phosphorous atoms concentration ratio and therefore the enamel demineralization reduction as a result of the lactic acid treatment in the samples irradiated with the holmium laser followed by the APF application. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this study for clinical purposes, morphological changes caused by the holmium laser irradiation were analyzed. Such modifications were characterized by melted and re-solidified regions of the enamel with consequent changes on its permeability and solubility. Temperature changes of ten human pre-molars teeth irradiated with 350 J/cm{sup 2} and 450 J/cm{sup 2} were also monitored in the pulp chamber in real time. Temperature increases over 4,20 C did not occur. The results obtained from this study along with the results from previous

  9. Airborne Laser (ABL): Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-09

    bulbous turret on the front of the aircraft, but the COIL (Chemical Oxygen Iodine laser) is located in the aft section of the aircraft. System Overview...Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser). COIL generates its energy through an onboard chemical reaction of oxygen and iodine molecules. Because this laser...The Air Force, and other Services, frequently complain about the onerous and disproportionate O&S (Operations and Support) costs of “high demand, low

  10. femtosecond laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Margetic, Vanja

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation was investigated as a solid sampling method for elemental chemical analysis. In comparison to the sampling with longer laser pulses, two aspects could be improved by using ultrashort pulses: elimination of the elemental fractionation from the ablation crater, which is necessary for an accurate quantitative analysis, and better control of the material removal (especially for metals), which increases the spatial resolution of microanalysis. Basic aspects of ultrashort...

  11. Application of laser induced electron impact ionization to the deposition chemistry in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process with SiH4-NH3 gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustergerling, Brett; Hèden, Martin; Shi, Yujun

    2007-11-01

    The application of a laser-induced electron impact (LIEI) ionization source in studying the gas-phase chemistry of the SiH(4)/NH(3) hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) system has been investigated. The LIEI source is achieved by directing an unfocused laser beam containing both 118 nm (10.5 eV) vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and 355 nm UV radiations to the repeller plate in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Comparison of the LIEI source with the conventional 118 nm VUV single-photon ionization (SPI) method has demonstrated that the intensities of the chemical species with ionization potentials (IP) above 10.5 eV, e.g., H(2), N(2) and He, have been significantly enhanced with the incorporation of the LIEI source. It is found that the SPI source due to the 118 nm VUV light coexists in the LIEI source. This allows simultaneous observations of parent ions with enhanced intensity from VUV SPI and their "fingerprint" fragmentation ions from LIEI. It is, therefore, an effective tool to diagnose the gas-phase chemical species involved with both NH(3) and SiH(4) in the HWCVD reactor. In using the LIEI source to SiH(4), NH(3) and their mixtures, it has been shown that the NH(3) decomposition is suppressed with the addition of SiH(4) molecules. Examination of the NH(3) decomposition percentage and the time to reach the N(2) and H(2) steady-state intensities for various NH(3)/SiH(4) mixtures suggests that the extent of the suppression is enhanced with more SiH(4) content in the mixture. With increasing filament temperatures, the negative effect of SiH(4) becomes less important.

  12. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Frederico A; Milne, Christopher J; Amarasinghe, Dimali C V; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; van der Veen, Renske M; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Johnson, Steven L; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; van Mourik, Frank; Abela, Rafael; Chergui, Majed

    2011-06-01

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  13. Exogenous bleaching evaluation on dentin using chemical activated technique compared with diode laser technique; Avaliacao do clareamento exogeno sobre a dentina realizado pela tecnica por ativacao quimica comparada com a tecnica por ativacao pelo laser de diodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Breno Carnevalli Franco de

    2003-07-01

    This in vitro study compared the results of different exogenous bleaching proceedings on dentin after treatment of enamel surface. Thirty human canine were hewn preserving the vestibular half of the crown and 3 mm of root, showing a vestibular-lingual thickness average of 3,5 mm, measuring in the third middle of the crown. Ali teeth were maintained in wet chamber during the experiment. Digital photographs were taken of the dentin surface at 3 experimental times (LI: initial record, L0: immediate pos-bleaching record and L 15: 15 days after bleaching). The teeth were divided into 3 experimental groups of 10 teeth in each. The Control Group did not receive any kind of treatment. The Laser Group received 2 session of laser bleaching, with 3 applications each, using 35% hydrogen peroxide, activated by diode laser during 30 seconds, by scanning the enamel surface from incisal edge to the top of the crown, from mesial to distal portion of the crown and circularly, each movement during 10 seconds. The following parameters being adopted: wavelength of 808 nm, power of 1,5 W and optic fiber with 600 {mu}m (core). The Peroxide Group received 28 daily applications, during 4 hours each application, using 16% carbamide peroxide. The bleaching records were analysed using a computer, through RGBK (red, green , blue and black). The K averages (K=100% for black and K=0% for white) of the records for Control Group were: LI=50,1 %, L0=50,3% and L 15=50,6%. For Laser Group the K averages were LI=48,5%, L0=50,0% and L 15=47,7%. And for the Peroxide Group were LI=50,5%, L0=35,9% and L 15=37,3%. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference of the K between the Control Group and the Laser Group, as to LI, L0 and L 15. Only Peroxide Group showed significant statistical difference between LI with L0 and L 15 (0,1%), and L0 in comparison with L 15 did not show any difference. (author)

  14. Lasers technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Lasers Technology Program of IPEN is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of optical materials and new technologies, as well to laser applications in several areas: Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. The Program is basically divided into two main areas: Material and Laser Development and Laser Applications.

  15. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  16. Fault analysis of chemical oxygen iodine laser based on fault tree%基于故障树的氧碘化学激光器故障分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张政; 曹益平; 沈志康; 关小伟

    2011-01-01

    The paper establishes a fault tree model for chemical oxygen iodine laser(COIL) considering power abnormity as its peak affair of fault, and then makes down-way qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis with the minimum cut-set theory. It is indicated that the reliability of iodine supply subsystem is minimum, followed by the chlorine supply subsystem, in the seven subsystems of COIL. The probability at which the power of COIL is abnormal is 3. 99%, that is, the reliability of laser is 96.01%.%为方便快捷地查找出氧碘化学激光器故障发生的原因,以氧碘化学激光器常见故障为例,建立了其功率失常的故障树模型,用最小割集理论按下行法对模型进行了定性分析和定量分析.分析表明:氧碘化学激光器7个子系统中,碘供给子系统的可靠性最低,氯气供给子系统次之,这与实际情况相符.计算出的氧碘化学激光器出光不正常发生概率为3.99%,其可靠度为96.01%.

  17. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  18. Influence of physical properties and chemical composition of sample on formation of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond laser ablation at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa, E-mail: mhola@sci.muni.c [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Konecna, Veronika [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikuska, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, Jozef [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of sample properties and composition on the size and concentration of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser ablation at 213 nm was investigated for three sets of different materials, each containing five specimens with a similar matrix (Co-cemented carbides with a variable content of W and Co, steel samples with minor differences in elemental content and silica glasses with various colors). The concentration of ablated particles (particle number concentration, PNC) was measured in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 mum) using an optical aerosol spectrometer. The shapes and volumes of the ablation craters were obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by an optical profilometer, respectively. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using SEM. The results of particle concentration measurements showed a significant dominance of particles smaller than 250 nm in comparison with larger particles, irrespective of the kind of material. Even if the number of particles larger than 0.25 mum is negligible (up to 0.1%), the volume of large particles that left the ablation cell can reach 50% of the whole particle volume depending on the material. Study of the ablation craters and the laser-generated particles showed a various number of particles produced by different ablation mechanisms (particle splashing or condensation), but the similar character of released particles for all materials was observed by SEM after particle collection on the membrane filter. The created aerosol always consisted of two main structures - spherical particles with diameters from tenths to units of micrometers originally ejected from the molten surface layer and mum-sized 'fibres' composed of primary agglomerates with diameters in the range between tens and hundreds of nanometers. The shape and structure of ablation craters were in good agreement with particle concentration

  19. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  20. Laser therapy of muscle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Munqith S; Al-Salihi, Anam Rasheed; Qasim, Amenah Wala'a

    2013-05-01

    Low-level lasers are used in general therapy and healing process due to their good photo-bio-stimulation effects. In this paper, the effects of diode laser and Nd:YAG laser on the healing process of practically managed skeletal muscle trauma has been successfully studied. Standard impact trauma was induced by using a specially designed mechanical device. The impacted muscle was left for 3 days for complete development of blunt trauma. After that it was irradiated by five laser sessions for 5 days. Two types of lasers were used; 785-nm diode laser and 1.064-nm Nd:YAG laser, both in continuous and pulsed modes. A special electronic circuit was designed and implemented to modulate the diode laser for this purpose. Tissue samples of crushed skeletal muscle have been dissected from the injured irradiated muscle then bio-chemically analyzed for the regeneration of contractile and collagenous proteins using Lowry assay for protein determination and Reddy and Enwemeka assay for hydroxyproline determination. The results showed that both lasers stimulate the regeneration capability of traumatized skeletal muscle. The diode laser in CW and pulsed modes showed better results than the Nd:YAG in accelerating the preservation of the normal tissue content of collagenous and contractile proteins beside controlling the regeneration of non-functional fibrous tissue. This study proved that the healing achieved by the laser treatment was faster than the control group by 15-20 days.

  1. Blue Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  2. A tomographic technique for the simultaneous imaging of temperature, chemical species, and pressure in reactive flows using absorption spectroscopy with frequency-agile lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F., E-mail: cfk23@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    This paper proposes a technique that can simultaneously retrieve distributions of temperature, concentration of chemical species, and pressure based on broad bandwidth, frequency-agile tomographic absorption spectroscopy. The technique holds particular promise for the study of dynamic combusting flows. A proof-of-concept numerical demonstration is presented, using representative phantoms to model conditions typically prevailing in near-atmospheric or high pressure flames. The simulations reveal both the feasibility of the proposed technique and its robustness. Our calculations indicate precisions of ∼70 K at flame temperatures and ∼0.05 bars at high pressure from reconstructions featuring as much as 5% Gaussian noise in the projections.

  3. Effect of the manufacturing parameters on the structure of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes produced by catalytic laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morjan, Iuliana P., E-mail: iulianasoare@yahoo.com; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Morjan, Ion; Luculescu, Catalin [Plasma and Radiation Physics, National Institute for Lasers (Romania); Vasile, Eugeniu [METAV-R and D (Romania); Osiceanu, Petre [“Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy (Romania); Scarisoreanu, Monica [Plasma and Radiation Physics, National Institute for Lasers (Romania); Demian, Gabriela [University of Craiova, Faculty of Mechanics (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    Nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (CNx-NTs), with a relatively high level of nitrogen doping were prepared by the catalytic laser-induced CVD method. The nanotubes were catalytically grown directly on a silicon substrate from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} gaseous precursors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) give firm evidence for the nitrogen doping. As determined by XPS, the N concentration for the prepared CNx-NTs increases from 3.6 to 30.6 at.% with increasing ammonia concentration and pressure. TEM images indicate that the nanotubes are bamboo like. As the nitrogen content increases, there is a transition from the bamboo shape with few defects and little distortion to a corrugated structure with a much larger number of defects. Raman spectroscopy revealed that with increasing nitrogen concentration, there is more disorder and defects, together with an increase in I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio. By energy-filtering TEM, a higher N concentration was found on the outer amorphous nanolayer than in the compartment core of the nanotubes.

  4. Laser processing and analysis of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, W W

    1983-01-01

    It has often been said that the laser is a solution searching for a problem. The rapid development of laser technology over the past dozen years has led to the availability of reliable, industrially rated laser sources with a wide variety of output characteristics. This, in turn, has resulted in new laser applications as the laser becomes a familiar processing and analytical tool. The field of materials science, in particular, has become a fertile one for new laser applications. Laser annealing, alloying, cladding, and heat treating were all but unknown 10 years ago. Today, each is a separate, dynamic field of research activity with many of the early laboratory experiments resulting in the development of new industrial processing techniques using laser technology. Ten years ago, chemical processing was in its infancy awaiting, primarily, the development of reliable tunable laser sources. Now, with tunability over the entire spectrum from the vacuum ultraviolet to the far infrared, photo­ chemistry is undergo...

  5. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  6. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  7. Heat transfer performance of water jet cooled mirror and its application in high power chemical lasers%射流式水冷镜换热性能及在高能化学激光器中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌; 李兰; 焦路光; 刘亮; 周琼; 袁圣付; 刘文广

    2012-01-01

    加工了射流式水冷铜镜模型,采用红外热像仪测量了冷却过程中镜面温度分布云图,证明了射流式水冷镜冷却的均匀性.采用热电偶较精确地测量了铜镜冷却过程中镜面温度的变化,实验结果与数值模拟吻合较好,验证了射流式水冷镜数值模型的可靠性.结合高能化学激光器中水冷镜实际情况,对直线沟槽型水冷镜和射流式水冷镜的形变特性进行了分析.计算结果表明,高能化学激光器水冷镜必须承压加工才能使用,射流式水冷镜可以很好地应用于高能化学激光器.此外,进一步分析了冷却孔直径和数量这两个参数对大口径射流式水冷镜形变的影响,结果表明:在孔数一定的情况下,采用更大口径的冷却孔,镜面冷却速度快、镜面最大温度低,可以获得更小的镜面形变;采用更多的冷却孔可以获得更好的冷却效果.%The test model of water jet cooled copper mirror was made and temperature measurement of the mirror was carried out. The temperature uniformity of the water jet cooled copper mirror was proved by the measurements of infrared camera and experimental results of thermocouples agree well with the results of numerical simulation, which verified the reliability of the numerical model. The deformation characteristics of the water jet cooled mirror and the linear-channel water cooled mirror were analyzed in the scenario of high power chemical lasers. The results show that the water jet cooled mirror can be well used in high power chemical lasers and the mirror must be processed under certain pressure. In addition, the diameter and number of cooling holes were further analyzed to explore their effects on the deformation of water jet cooled mirror in high power chemical lasers. More holes with larger diameter lead to better cooling effects.

  8. Polymer photonic crystal dye lasers as optofluidic cell sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers are chemically activated to covalently bind bio-molecules or for HeLa cell attachment using an anthraquinone (AQ) UV activated photolinker. The lasers change emission wavelength linearly with inhomogeneous cell coverage.......Hybrid polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers are chemically activated to covalently bind bio-molecules or for HeLa cell attachment using an anthraquinone (AQ) UV activated photolinker. The lasers change emission wavelength linearly with inhomogeneous cell coverage....

  9. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  10. Lasers technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners.

  11. Lasers (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1969-01-01

    A laser is an instrument that produces an enormously intense pencil-thin beam of light. In this booklet we shall learn what there is about the laser that gives it so much promise. We shall investigate what it is, how it works, and the different kinds of lasers there are.

  12. Laser ablation studies of nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Mkrtychev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The first experimental measurements of the threshold energy density values for the laser ablation of glass nanocomposites with nanodimensional coatings have been carried out under the action of the YAG–Nd laser power pulse radiation. The coatings in question were of different compositions and had been created by the sol–gel technology. The procedure for determining the laser ablation threshold energy density values was worked out on the base of the breakdown probability level of 0.5. The statistical processing of the measurement data over all the samples allowed obtaining the dependence of the ablation destruction threshold energy parameters on the coating physical and chemical properties such as the sample transmission in the visible region of the spectrum, coating thickness, the chemical composition of the film-forming solution, and on the pulse duration of laser radiation.

  13. Fs-laser processing of polydimethylsiloxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, Petar A., E-mail: paatanas@ie.bas.bg; Nedyalkov, Nikolay N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Shose, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Valova, Eugenia I.; Georgieva, Zhenya S.; Armyanov, Stefan A.; Kolev, Konstantin N. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Amoruso, Salvatore; Wang, Xuan; Bruzzese, Ricardo [CNR-SPIN, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sawczak, Miroslaw; Śliwiński, Gerard [Photophysics Department, The Szewalski Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, 14 Fiszera St, 80-231 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2014-07-14

    We present an experimental analysis on surface structuring of polydimethylsiloxane films with UV (263 nm) femtosecond laser pulses, in air. Laser processed areas are analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, and μ-Raman spectroscopy. The laser-treated sample shows the formation of a randomly nanostructured surface morphology. μ-Raman spectra, carried out at both 514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, prior and after laser treatment allow evidencing the changes in the sample structure. The influence of the laser fluence on the surface morphology is studied. Finally, successful electro-less metallization of the laser-processed sample is achieved, even after several months from the laser-treatment contrary to previous observation with nanosecond pulses. Our findings address the effectiveness of fs-laser treatment and chemical metallization of polydimethylsiloxane films with perspective technological interest in micro-fabrication devices for MEMS and nano-electromechanical systems.

  14. Laser polishing of niobium for SRF applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael [W& M

    2013-09-01

    Smooth interior surfaces are desired for niobium SRF cavities, now obtained by buffered chemical polish (BCP) and/or electropolish (EP). Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from chemistry and in-process inspection. Here we show that laser polishing can produce smooth topography with Power Spectral Density (PSD) measurements similar to that obtained by EP. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damaging it. Computational modeling was used to simulate the surface temperature and explain the mechanism of laser polishing.

  15. VUV laser photoionization of laser-stimulated desorbed species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthiez, T.; Gibert, T.; Brault, P.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Olivero, C.; Castex, M. C.

    We report here first results about single-photon VUV laser photoionization of desorbed species from a silicon surface irradiated by a pulsed and tunable UV laser (290-300 nm). The combination of VUV photoionization at 10 eV with laser-induced surface desorption offers a largely non-destructive and sensitive method for quantitative analysis. Indeed it allows mass spectrometry measurements with uniform sensitivity and without breaking the chemical bonds in the probed species. The energy of the VUV photons (9.91 eV) is above the ionization limits of a number of molecules and fragments. Moreover, adjustment of the delay between the desorbing and the probe lasers allows the measurement of the time-of- flight distribution of the ejected species. Data extracted from these measurements are fundamental for a better understanding of laser-surface interaction phenomena.

  16. Laser device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  17. Methods for determining optical power, for power-normalizing laser measurements, and for stabilizing power of lasers via compliance voltage sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A method is disclosed for power normalization of spectroscopic signatures obtained from laser based chemical sensors that employs the compliance voltage across a quantum cascade laser device within an external cavity laser. The method obviates the need for a dedicated optical detector used specifically for power normalization purposes. A method is also disclosed that employs the compliance voltage developed across the laser device within an external cavity semiconductor laser to power-stabilize the laser mode of the semiconductor laser by adjusting drive current to the laser such that the output optical power from the external cavity semiconductor laser remains constant.

  18. Industrial applications of laser diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Deguchi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Tighter regulations of harmful substances such as NOx, CO, heavy metals, particles, emissions from commercial plants and automobiles reflect a growing demand for lowering the anthropogenic burdens on the environment. It is equally important to monitor controlling factors to improve the operation of industrial machinery and plants. Among the many methods for doing this, laser diagnostics stands out. Taking a practical approach, Industrial Applications of Laser Diagnostics discusses how to apply laser diagnostics to engines, gas turbines, thermal and chemical plant systems, and disposal faciliti

  19. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  20. High Energy Laser Propagation in Various Atmospheric Conditions Utilizing a New Accelerated Scaling Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    littoral combat ship MIRACL mid-infrared advanced chemical laser MLD maritime laser demonstrator MODTRAN moderate resolution atmospheric...Advanced Chemical Laser ( MIRACL ), the Laser Weapon System (LAWS), and the Maritime Laser Demonstrator (MLD). The MIRACL system, first made...Equation (72) as 3reqD meltP Q    sec. (81) Of course , the actual dwell times depend upon the specifics of the target. The following studies

  1. 化学激光器环形与线形分流管道对比的数值分析%Numerical Investigation of Comparing Annular with Linear Distribution Flow Pipeline in Chemical Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳冬欢; 刘文广; 陈星; 陆启生; 赵伊君

    2011-01-01

    环柱型化学激光器中使用的分流管道的总管为环形弯曲管道,支管分布在内侧圆弧或外侧圆弧上,结构与线形分流管道有较大差别.应用计算流体力学方法,对上述各分流管道进行了三维的数值模拟及对比分析.结果表明,线形分流管道总管内的总压高于支管分布在外侧圆弧上的环形管道,但低于支管分布在内侧圆弧上的环形管道;无论是支管分流,抑或环形管道内的二次流现象都会使总管截面上产生径向速度,使得流体流动呈现明显的三维特征;分流管道各支管流量沿主流流动方向基本上是上升的,这与总管的总压分布趋势相反,而与总管的静压分布趋势相似;比较而言,支管分布在外侧圆弧上的环形分流管道的支管流量波动幅度最小,在均匀分配气流方面最具优势,线形分流管道居中,支管分布在内侧圆弧上的环形分流管道最差.%Distribution flow pipeline used in cylindrical chemical laser is composed of an annular general pipeline and a limited quantity of branch pipelines that are connected with the inner or outer circular arc of general pipeline. Its structure and flow field characteristics differ from thooe of linear distribution flow pipeline used in conventional chemical laser. Flow field characteristics of above-mentioned three kinds of distribution flow pipelines were analyzed contrastively based on three-dimension computational fluid dynamics methods. The numerical simulation results clemonstrate that total pressuue of general pipeline in linear distribution flow pipeline is higher than that in outer-circular-arc annular pipeline, but lower than that in inner-circular-arc annular pipeline. Both distribution flows of branch pipelines and secondary flows produced in annular general pipeline can excite radial velocity on the section plane of general pipeline. These phenomena enable the ges flow of general pipeline to have remarkable three

  2. A laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, N.; Syundzo, Yo.

    1984-06-19

    It is reported that an improved gas laser design using pumping of the active medium has been developed. A diagram of the laser system is given in graph form and its principle of operation is briefly described. A special sealing element is used in such lasers to seal the reservoir containing the oil in the pump which pumps the gas active medium. When the sealing element fails, there is the danger of oil penetration into the active laser medium. It is proposed that an additional pump which continually evacuates the oil reservoir during laser system operation be used. Thus, a low pressure is maintained in the reservoir. If the sealing element fails, the secondary pump generates a gas flow from the pumping system to the reservoir and eliminates gas penetration into the laser medium.

  3. Newer trends in laser tattoo removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil D Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Q switched lasers are the current gold standard for laser tattoo removal. Though these systems are generally quite effective in clearing tattoos & have an established safety record, certain limitations exist while following the standard protocol. To overcome these limitation newer techniques such as multipass method, combination treatments with chemical agent and other laser have been introduced. These methods help in faster, less painful and complication free tattoo removal.

  4. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision.

  5. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51).

  6. Biocavity Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  7. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  8. Laser cleaning on Roman coins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Karydas, A. G.; Klinkenberg, B.; Kokkoris, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Stavrou, E.; Vlastou, R.; Zarkadas, C.

    Ancient metal objects react with moisture and environmental chemicals to form various corrosion products. Because of the unique character and high value of such objects, any cleaning procedure should guarantee minimum destructiveness. The most common treatment used is mechanical stripping, in which it is difficult to avoid surface damage when employed. Lasers are currently being tested for a wide range of conservation applications. Since they are highly controllable and can be selectively applied, lasers can be used to achieve more effective and safer cleaning of archaeological artifacts and protect their surface details. The basic criterion that motivated us to use lasers to clean Roman coins was the requirement of pulsed emission, in order to minimize heat-induced damages. In fact, the laser interaction with the coins has to be short enough, to produce a fast removal of the encrustation, avoiding heat conduction into the substrate. The cleaning effects of three lasers operating at different wavelengths, namely a TEA CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 μm, an Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm, and a 2ω-Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm have been compared on corroded Romans coins and various atomic and nuclear techniques have also been applied to evaluate the efficiency of the applied procedure.

  9. Direct frequency comb laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Jayich, A M; Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) lasers are the enabling technology for producing ultracold atoms and molecules through laser cooling and trapping. The resulting pristine samples of slow moving particles are the de facto starting point for both fundamental and applied science when a highly-controlled quantum system is required. Laser cooled atoms have recently led to major advances in quantum information, the search to understand dark energy, quantum chemistry, and quantum sensors. However, CW laser technology currently limits laser cooling and trapping to special types of elements that do not include highly abundant and chemically relevant atoms such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Here, we demonstrate that Doppler cooling and trapping by optical frequency combs may provide a route to trapped, ultracold atoms whose spectra are not amenable to CW lasers. We laser cool a gas of atoms by driving a two-photon transition with an optical frequency comb, an efficient process to which every comb tooth coherently cont...

  10. Modification of Hydroxyapatite Crystal Using IR Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Saburoh; Goto, M; Guan, W; Hayashi, N; Ihara, S; Yamabe, C; Yamaguchi, Y

    2004-01-01

    The first application of laser technology to dentistry was for the removal of caries. However, reports of laser application on improvement of dental surface were emerged, much attention has been focused on the laser’s potential to enhance enamel’s hardness and resistance to acid. Most of the previous reports concentrated on the photo issue interaction. Few research has pursued the photochemical phenomenon occurred during laser irradiation on biological tissues. In order to find a creative method to remineralize the dissociating enamel and exposed coronal of dentine, the authors developed a novel procedure during laser irradiation. Slice of sound molar and artificial HAp pellet were irradiated separately, with CO2 laser under different laser parameters. Tow series of samples covered with saturation calcium ion solution were irradiated separately. To investigate the crystal morphology, XRD pattern were surveyed. The comparison of each cases show that the chemical coating affected the ablation process evidentl...

  11. Probabilistic Model for Laser Damage to the Human Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    of the eye. As an infant, the eye is disproportionately small causing light rays to be directed behind the retinal plane by the cornea and lens...the Nd:YAG laser used on 4-21 the ABL platform. Additionally, future laser systems such as the ABL’s megawatt- class chemical oxygen iodine laser that

  12. Temperature field modeling in laser-heated metals for laser cleaning of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oane, Mihai; Apostol, Ileana; Timcu, Adrian

    2003-10-01

    Laser induced surface cleaning is the adequate method in a large variety of industrial domains as microelectronics, optics, photonics. By comparison to chemical and/or mechanical cleaning, laser cleaning has the advantage of a very good selectivity on the surface and in depth of the material, no surface contamination, without stress in the material volume and environmental safe. It seems that laser cleaning can be developed in a method to be currently used in microelectronic industry. For an efficient laser cleaning of metallic thin films without damage of the silicon wafer, a careful optimization of the incident laser energy, fluence, intensity and number of laser pulses is needed. We have developed an analytical procedure to study the temperature fields in pulsed laser heated solids, for a deeper knowledge of the laser-thin film substrate interaction.

  13. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  14. Micro Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    correlation of Sieder and Tate [44] for laminar flow (Reynolds number NRe < 2100) through a cylindrical pipe, assuming constant coolant viscosity: w D...and the Effect of Manufacturing Tolerances and Channel Blockage. Chem. Eng. J. 2004; 101:379-390. 44. Sieder , E.N. and G.E. Tate. Heat Transfer and

  15. Deposition and alignment of cells on laser-patterned quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Sajan D., E-mail: sajan.george@manipal.edu [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Ladiwala, Uma, E-mail: brainwave@cbs.ac.in [UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Kalina Campus, Mumbai 400 098 (India); Thomas, John; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Chidangil, Santhosh [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Mathur, Deepak [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Linear grooves have been laser-written on quartz surfaces using ultrashort (50 fs) pulses of 800 nm light. Measurements of water contact angle indicate that laser patterning makes the quartz surface more hydrophilic. Fibroblast cells were cultured on such laser-written surfaces; they were observed to align preferentially along the direction of the laser written grooves (width ∼2 μm. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that there are no chemical changes induced in the surface upon our laser writing. Most unexpectedly, there are also no chemical changes induced in the cells that are spatially aligned along the laser-written grooves. Atomic force microscopy measurements confirm that our laser-writing induces dramatic enhancement of surface roughness along the grooves, and the cells appear to respond to this. Thus, cell alignment seems to be in response to physical cues rather than chemical signals.

  16. Laser yellowing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B Sai Prasad; Salvatore Siano

    2010-12-01

    Over the past few years there has been an increasing interest in researches related to the application of lasers in conservation, analysis and diagnostics of artwork surfaces. Among the many interesting problems to be tackled, one issue was drawing more interest because of the limitations it can impose on the use of lasers. Laser yellowing is a phenomenon wherein artwork surfaces assume a yellow hue when cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) lasers in particular. Here the effect of yellowing has been studied and quantified for artwork surfaces (marble) using SFR Nd:YAG and LQS Nd:YAG lasers. Colorimetric measurements by employing a spectroradiometer helps to quantify the effect of yellowing by analysing three variables (chromaticity coordinates) of interest.

  17. Probing Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KLEYN, A.W.; KLEYN, A.W

    2001-01-01

    An account is given of recent progress concerning chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The goal is to elucidate the reaction dynamics at the molecular level, both as time and distance is concerned. The methods of study include molecular beam scattering, scanning tunnelling microscopy, and (femtosecond) laser spectroscopy. Systems studied include elementary interactions of NO, CO, and O2 at single crystal metal surfaces.

  18. Optical waveguides in laser crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the recent research on different types of planar and channel crystalline optical waveguides, fabrication methods such as liquid phase epitaxy, pulsed laser deposition, thermal bonding, reactive ion or ion beam etching, wet chemical etching, ion in-diffusion, proton exchange, ion

  19. High throughput laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2016-12-27

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  20. [Lipolysis lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, J-M

    2009-10-01

    We use lipolysis lasers for around five years. The principle of those lasers is that, for some wavelengths, the fat, located in the adipocytes reacts as a chromophor. In order to allow the direct exposure of the adipocytes to the optical fiber (around 1mm diameter), this has to be inserted in the hypodermis, then move back and forth inside the treated areas. The theorical benefits, compared to the liposuction procedures are related to the fact that the thermal effect of the laser emission allows to avoid laxity, sometimes observed after a liposuction. If we consider the first publications related to this emerging procedure, the profile of tolerance seems good, and even possibly better than the liposuctions. Nevertheless, this procedure with lasers is still a surgical procedure, exposing theorically to the side effects related in and after each surgery: infections, ecchymosis... Recently, some cases of severe side effects (infection of the skin, and necrosis) have been reported. They seem to be related to a homogeneous distribution of the energy inducing an excessive thermal injury. Some new improvements, with the last generation lasers, could allow us to avoid, or at least to dramatically reduce those side effects. The efficacy of those lasers is visibly satisfying; the key question is to precise the optimal modalities of use : in a surgery room, after an optimal training, with the last generation lasers?

  1. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  2. Semiconductor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K.; Shyuue, M.

    1982-09-25

    A distributed feedback semiconductor laser is proposed which generates several beams with equal wavelengths in different directions. For this purpose, 1 millimeter grooves are cut into the surface of an n-type conductance GaAs plate in three different directions; these grooves form a diffraction grating. The center of this plate has no grooves and is bombarded by an He/Ne laser beam. The diffraction gratings provide resonance properties and generate laser beams with wavelengths of 8850, 9000 and 9200 angstroms.

  3. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  4. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  5. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  6. Growth of ferroelectric Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} epitaxial films by ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of chemical solution derived precursor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queraltó, A.; Pérez del Pino, A., E-mail: aperez@icmab.es; Mata, M. de la; Tristany, M.; Gómez, A.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Arbiol, J. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-06-29

    Highly crystalline epitaxial Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (BST) thin-films are grown on (001)-oriented LaNiO{sub 3}-buffered LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser irradiation of solution derived barium-zirconium-titanium precursor layers using a UV Nd:YAG laser source at atmospheric conditions. The structural analyses of the obtained films, studied by X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy, demonstrate that laser processing allows the growth of tens of nm-thick BST epitaxial films with crystalline structure similar to that of films obtained through conventional thermal annealing methods. However, the fast pulsed nature of the laser employed leads to crystallization kinetic evolution orders of magnitude faster than in thermal treatments. The combination of specific photothermal and photochemical mechanisms is the main responsible for the ultrafast epitaxial laser-induced crystallization. Piezoresponse microscopy measurements demonstrate equivalent ferroelectric behavior in laser and thermally annealed films, being the piezoelectric constant ∼25 pm V{sup −1}.

  7. [Laser myringotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassmann-Poznańska, Elzbieta; Skotnicka, Bozena

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was assessment of the qualities of laser-assisted myringotomy (LAM) as a treatment for acute and secretory otitis media. Laser-assisted myringotomy was performed on 65 children (113 ears) mean age 6.2 years diagnosed with secretory otitis media (80%), recurrent secretory otitis media (11%) and acute otitis media (9%). Myringotomy was performed under general anesthesia using the OtoLAM device (ESC/Sharplan, Israel). In 64 ears pressure equalisation tubes were inserted after fenestration of the tympanic membrane with laser. Adenoidectomy alone or with tonsillectomy was performed at the same time in 51 cases. Laser tympanostomies remained patent for 7-32 days. All tympanostomies healed with no noticeable scarring. LAM appears to be a safe, and easy to performed, alternative technique in the treatment of otitis media.

  8. Laser Refractography

    CERN Document Server

    Rinkevichyus, B.S; Raskovskaya, I.L

    2010-01-01

    This book describes the basic principles of laser refractography, a flexible new diagnostic tool for measuring optically inhomogeneous media and flows. Laser refractography is based on digital imaging and computer processing of structured laser beam refraction (SLR) in inhomogeneous transparent media. Laser refractograms provide both qualitative and quantitative measurements and can be used for the study of fast and transient processes. In this book, the theoretical basis of refractography is explored in some detail, and experimental setups are described for measurement of transparent media using either 2D (passed radiation) or 3D (scattered radiation) refractograms. Specific examples and applications are discussed, including visualization of the boundary layer near a hot or cold metallic ball in water, and observation of edge effects and microlayers in liquids and gases. As the first book to describe this new and exciting technique, this monograph has broad cross-disciplinary appeal and will be of interest t...

  9. A laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, N.

    1984-06-19

    It is reported that an improved laser design employing pumping of the active gas medium has been developed. A diagram of the laser system is given and its principle of operation is described in detail. Gas pumping is achieved using a pump whose oil reservoir is sealed by a sealing element. When the sealing element fails, the oil from the reservoir pollutes the laser substance. It is proposed that an additional oil reservoir pumping loop be used to maintain a lower pressure. The reservoir pressure is recorded by a sensor. When the sealing element fails, the pressure in the reservoir increases. The sensor records the change in pressure and generates a signal which shuts down the laser system. Thus, the possibility for oil penetration into the gas system is totally eliminated.

  10. Theoretical analysis of one dimensional gas dynamics of total pressure losses for combustion-driven continuous wave DF/HF chemical lasers%燃烧驱动CWDF/HF化学激光器总压损失的一维气体动力学理论分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐力铁; 李艳娜; 赵乐至

    2016-01-01

    The pressure recovery system is one of the key techniques for the high energy chemical lasers. Total pressure losses affect the key specification of lasers, such as the output ability, the size and weight of laser systems. The total pressure losses for combustion-driven continuous wave DF/HF chemical lasers were proposed according to the theory analysis of one dimensional gas exhausting. The analysis of the main factors of total pressure losses in the gain generator of the laser is the foundation of the research of recovering the gain generator with high pressure. Two major factors of total pressure losses caused by viscous friction and the temperature rise caused by chemical reaction in optical cavity were discussed in this paper. The result shows that temperature rise caused by burning has obvious influence on system's performance of pressure recovery.%压力恢复系统是目前高能化学激光器的关键部件,它的总压损失会影响到整个激光器系统的出光能力和全系统的体积重量等关键技术指标。为了研究燃烧驱动CW DF/HF化学激光器总压损失,从一维气体动力学进行了理论分析。分析在激光器增益发生器内引起总压损失的主要因素,是研究高压力恢复激光器增益发生器的基础。主要讨论了引起总压损失的两个主要原因:第一,由于粘性摩擦引起的总压损失;第二,由于光学谐振腔中化学反应放热升温引起的总压损失。计算结果表明,燃烧升温对系统的压力恢复能力有较大的影响。

  11. Green lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2010-01-01

    Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range......Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range...

  12. Trends In Materials Processing With Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herziger, G.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1989-04-01

    The objectives of reactive chemical and nonreactive thermal processing with laser radiation are outlined giving indication that processing with laser radiation is governed by a hierarchy of time constants originating from photon-matter interaction, phase transition dynamics, laser source excitation fluctuations,, and optical feedback in combination with the influence of beam delivery systems, processing/shielding gas flow configurations, robotics, production lines and environment. The minimization of losses by heat flow, reflection and transmission and the stringent need for quality assurance require as first approach the control of processing, which is mainly due to the capability of laser radiation source. The current status of laser radiation sources is reported giving information on the state of the art of processing with laser radiation in combination with subsequent demonstration of future trends and developments with respect to radiation sources, beam delivery, beam shaping, materials, processing and quality assurance.

  13. Trends in materials processsing with laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herziger, Gerd; Kreutz, Ernst W.

    1989-03-01

    The objectives of reactive chemical and nonreactive thermal processing with laser radiation are outlined giving indication that processing with laser radiation is governed by a hierarchy of time constants originating from photon-matter interaction, phase transition dynamics, laser source excitation fluctuations, and optical feedback in combination with the influence of beam delivery systems, processing/shielding gas flow configurations, robotics, production lines and environment. The minimization of losses by heat flow, reflection and transmission and the stringent need for quality assurance require as first approach the control of processing, which is mainly due to the capability of laser radiation source. The current status of laser radiation sources is reported giving information on the state of the art of processing with laser radiation in combination with subsequent demonstration of future trends and developments with respect to radiation sources, beam delivery, beam shaping, materials, processing and quality assurance.

  14. Laser Physics and Laser Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Other types of laser-assisted materials process- Planck Institute for Quantum Optics. Garching . West ing and machining, including laser cutting, welding...detectors with microstructured electrodes, 134[ G. N. Maracas. G. L. Harrs, C. A. Lee. and R. A. McFarlane. Opt. Le’tt., vol. 7, pp. 575-577, Dcc . 1982...A. E. Siegman Max-Planck Institut f’r Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching , West Germany and E. L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford

  15. Gas and metal vapor lasers and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 22, 23, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    Various papers on gas and metal vapor lasers and applications are presented. Individual topics addressed include: high-power copper vapor laser development, modified off-axis unstable resonator for copper vapor laser, industrial applications of metal vapor lasers, newly developed excitation circuit for kHz pulsed lasers, copper vapor laser precision processing, development of solid state pulse power supply for copper vapor laser, multiple spectral structure of the 578.2-nm line for copper vapor laser, adsorption of bromine in CuBr laser, processing of polytetrafluoroethylene with high-power VUV laser radiation, characterization of a subpicosecond XeF(C - A) excimer laser, X-ray preionization for high-repetition-rate discharge excimer lasers. Also discussed are: investigation of microwave-pumped excimer and rare-gas laser transitions, influence of gas composition of XeCl laser performance, output power stabilization of a XeCl excimer laser by HCl gas injection, excimer laser machining of optical fiber taps, diagnostics of a compact UV-preionized XeCl laser with BCl3 halogen donor, blackbody-pumped CO32 lasers using Gaussian and waveguide cavities, chemical problems of high-power sealed-off CO lasers, laser action of Xe and Ne pumped by electron beam, process monitoring during CO2 laser cutting, double-pulsed TEA CO2 laser, superhigh-gain gas laser, high-power ns-pulse iodine laser provided with SBS mirror. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  16. Features of femtosecond laser pulses interaction with laser nanoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestryakov, E. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Trunov, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Merzliakov, M. A.; Laptev, A. V.

    2007-06-01

    In this work we have performed the experimental researches of features for the generation of supercontinuum in laser materials with identical chemical composition: Yb:YAG crystal and Yb:YAG laser nanoceramics. Dependence of width of supercontinuum spectrum in 515-1100 nm spectral range on femtosecond radiation intensity was investigated. At laser intensity ~1.2•10 14 W/cm2 the short-wave wing of a spectrum for nanoceramics has greater intensity and more flat shape in comparison with crystal. Experiments were made at lens focusing of the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system radiation with energy up to 0.5 mJ in explored sample that was inside of integrating optical sphere. Also we investigated the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses and the generation of supercontinuum in Nd:Y IIO 3 nanoceramics. The maximum value of laser intensity in experiments was restricted by optical breakdown on target output surface, i.e. was below threshold of ablation of sample substance.

  17. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  18. Theory of the magnetronic laser

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, M

    2003-01-01

    We determine the total power of radiation of electron moving in the planar magnetron fields and the power spectrum generated by a single electron and by a system of N electrons moving coherently in the planar magnetron. We argue that for large N and high intensity of electric and magnetic fields, the power of radiation of such magnetronic laser, MAL, can be sufficient for application in the physical, chemical, biological and medicine sciences. In medicine, the magnetronic laser, can be used for the therapy of the localized cancer tumors. The application of MAL in CERN as an ion source for LHC is not excluded.

  19. Laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  20. Laser textured surface gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  1. Header For Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1990-01-01

    Header designed to contain laser diode. Output combined incoherently with outputs of other laser diodes in grating laser-beam combiner in optical communication system. Provides electrical connections to laser diode, cooling to thermally stabilize laser operation, and optomechanical adjustments that steer and focus laser beam. Range of adjustments provides for correction of worst-case decentering and defocusing of laser beam encountered with laser diodes. Mechanical configuration made simple to promote stability and keep cost low.

  2. Dyestuff laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, U.; Raue, R.; Schellhammer, C.; Telle, H.

    1981-06-16

    Laser light in the wavelength range of 400 - 480 nm is obtained with a dyestuff laser containing a dyestuff of the general formula wherein E denotes one of the radicals R1-R4 independently of one another denote hydrogen, alkyl, trifluoromethyl, alkoxy, aralkoxy, halogen, alkenyloxy, the carboxyl, cyano, alkylsulphone, arylsulphone, carboxamide or sulphonamide group or the carboxylic acid ester group, or R1 and R2, or R3 and R4, conjointly represent a fused benzene ring and M and N independently of one another denote 0, 1 or 2, with the proviso that the radical E contains at least one sulphonic acid group if M and N represent 0, and wherein the radical E can be further substituted, in a solvent which does not interfere with the emission, at a concentration, which emits laser beams, of, preferably, 10-2 to 10-5 mols/liter.

  3. A laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, N.

    1984-06-19

    The development of an improved gas laser system employing pumping of the active gaseous medium is reported. The layout of the design is given and its principle of operation is described in detail. The oil reservoir in the vacuum pump which pumps the gas through the laser system is separated by a sealing element; when this element fails, the oil may pollute the active medium. It is proposed that an additional oil reservoir pumping loop be used with the pump that operates continuously and maintains a lower pressure in the reservoir. The pressure in the reservoir is monitored by a special sensor. When the sealing element fails, the pressure sensor records the pressure drop in the oil reservoir. A signal is then generated and the laser system ceases operation, and eliminates the possibility for the oil penetrating into the pumping system.

  4. Laser Heterodyning

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopov, Vladimir V

    2009-01-01

    Laser heterodyning is now a widespread optical technique, based on interference of two waves with slightly different frequencies within the sensitive area of a photo-detector. Its unique feature – preserving phase information about optical wave in the electrical signal of the photo-detector – finds numerous applications in various domains of applied optics and optoelectronics: in spectroscopy, polarimetry, radiometry, laser radars and Lidars, microscopy and other areas. The reader may be surprised by a variety of disciplines that this book covers and satisfied by detailed explanation of the phenomena. Very well illustrated, this book will be helpful for researches, postgraduates and students, working in applied optics.

  5. Laser barometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  6. Chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  7. Monolithic optofluidic ring resonator lasers created by femtosecond laser nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrahalim, Hengky; Chen, Qiushu; Said, Ali A; Dugan, Mark; Fan, Xudong

    2015-05-21

    We designed, fabricated, and characterized a monolithically integrated optofluidic ring resonator laser that is mechanically, thermally, and chemically robust. The entire device, including the ring resonator channel and sample delivery microfluidics, was created in a block of fused-silica glass using a 3-dimensional femtosecond laser writing process. The gain medium, composed of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dissolved in quinoline, was flowed through the ring resonator. Lasing was achieved at a pump threshold of approximately 15 μJ mm(-2). Detailed analysis shows that the Q-factor of the optofluidic ring resonator is 3.3 × 10(4), which is limited by both solvent absorption and scattering loss. In particular, a Q-factor resulting from the scattering loss can be as high as 4.2 × 10(4), suggesting the feasibility of using a femtosecond laser to create high quality optical cavities.

  8. Dye laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telle, H.; Schieder, R.; Raue, R.; Eckstein, U.

    1980-05-22

    For a laser radiating in the range of wavelengths from 420 to 480 nm dye solutions are proposed. The dyes are produced by transformation of 4,4'-biphenylene-bis-(methylenoxy-2-benzaldehydes) or their bisaniles in bipolar aprotic solvents adding strongly basic alkali compounds to the benzofurans and subsequent sulfonation.

  9. Laser device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source for light circuits on a silicon platform. A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region arranged between a first mirror structure and a second mirror structure, both acting as mirrors, by forming a grating region including an active material...

  10. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  11. Chemical intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven;

    2015-01-01

    Chemical intolerance (CI) is a term used to describe a condition in which the sufferer experiences a complex array of recurrent unspecific symptoms attributed to low-level chemical exposure that most people regard as unproblematic. Severe CI constitutes the distinguishing feature of multiple...... chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI...

  12. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  13. Excimer Laser Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Basting, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive survey on Excimer Lasers investigates the current range of the technology, applications and devices of this commonly used laser source, as well as the future of new technologies, such as F2 laser technology. Additional chapters on optics, devices and laser systems complete this compact handbook. A must read for laser technology students, process application researchers, engineers or anyone interested in excimer laser technology. An effective and understandable introduction to the current and future status of excimer laser technology.

  14. Diamond: a material for laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, M. C.; Riedel, D.; Museur, L.; Chardonnet, Christian; Gicquel, Alix; Foulon, Francois; Borel, C.; Bergonzo, P.; Jany, C.

    1998-10-01

    Diamond polycrystalline films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition techniques present interesting feature for laser spectroscopy due to several advantages arising from their optical, electronic, thermal and mechanical properties. Their wide transmission band from the far IR to the UV make them attractive as optical devices for high-power laser beam. Moreover, with a wide band gap, a short carrier lifetime and a high damage threshold, diamond is an ideal semiconductor material for the fabrication of fast and solar blind VUV detectors. We report here results of laser studies performed with tow different objectives. With use of a pulsed VUV laser at 125 nm we have determined the photoconductive response of polycrystalline diamond detectors. With a CO2 laser we have investigated the polarization properties of auto-supported films having thicknesses smaller than the wavelength.

  15. Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

  16. Laser Boronizing of Stainless Steel with Direct Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuhara, Takayoshi; Morimoto, Junji; Abe, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    Boronizing is a thermo-chemical surface treatment in which boron atoms are diffused into the surface of a work piece to form borides with the base material. When applied to the metallic materials, boronizing provides wear and abrasion resistance comparable to sintered carbides. However conventional boronizing is carried out at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1050°C and takes from one to several hours. The structure and properties of the base material is influenced considerably by the high temperature and long treatment time. In order to avoid these drawbacks of conventional boronizing, laser-assisted boronizing is investigated which activates the conventional boronizing material and the work piece with a high density laser power. In this study, effect of laser characteristics was examined on the laser boronizing of stainless steel. After laser boronizing, the microstructure of the boride layer was analyzed with an optical microscope, electron probe micro analyser(EPMA) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The mechanical properties of borided layer were evaluated using Vickers hardness tester and sand erosion tester. Results showed that the boride layer was composed of NiB, CrB, FeB and Fe2B, and get wear resistance.

  17. Chemical Laser Systems: An Engineering Approach. Volume I. Chemical Laser Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-31

    9f13.6** I**,T66**T*O ..,F13%*9* ofli/ mflLOS lNov -T3p,.W4WP m*,fl3.AT66#%XAXP 00,113.6) OUTLOS 1SO0 71* VflWA~.OT?.’ API IN[TH CAVITY FLOW MA% CHOWfn...PROAPAN (Cf API %USNOUTINI Wtr% OVERLAY PMS PAGE 0-41 L CUtPROUTItNP OSVSPW,0.(lMWSMWP.T%fltP0,MI.MB)I.ArAPI.LI4TT, iSiS 01100 P w~wSP.LiM*.flMMWP...VAW m*’El3.6,. M30/6 OUTSCS 1110 _T3?**MCS w*9El3*6s* X60 *.766vVCS m.,E13.*0, M3Os’, OUTSCS 1170 -T3?9*MOPT *0sE13*6o0 XKsT66**VOPY m~vE13*6v* ŗ*9/t

  18. Application of laser technology in high efficiency silicon solar cell manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, W.X.; Tu, J.L.; Wang, Z.G.; Cui, H.Y.; Deng, J.L.; Liu, Z.M.; Liao, H. [Yunnan Normal Univ., Yunnan (China). Solar Energy Research Inst., Education Ministry Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technology

    2008-07-01

    This paper examined the use of laser processing applications in solar cell fabrication. Laser processing is used to improve the electrical performance of solar cells as well as to reduce their manufacturing cost. Laser processes included laser scribing and cutting; laser fired contacts; wrap through technology; laser chemical processing; and the application of thin film devices. The study also examined the use of laser-fired contact (LFC) process schemes for the production of silicon (Si) Results of the study indicated that the lasers resulted in decreased wafer thickness and increased wafer sizes. LFC schemes can be applied on almost all advanced solar cell structures, including metal or emitter wrap-through cells and interdigitated back contact cells. Laser doping and via hole drilling techniques are also feasible in industrial applications. The use of laser technologies is expected to reduce costs. It was concluded that laser technologies are an appropriate choice for solar cell manufacturing processes. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Laser Development for Laser Fusion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    SLL 80 676 copy 1 SAN D78-2306 Unlimited Release UC-21 aM* m ml 8 H Laser Development for Laser Fusion Applications Research Progress...Printed Copy $6.00; Microfiche $3.00 Accession Number: 3885 Publication Date: Dec 01,1978 Title: Laser Development for Laser Fusion Applications...Document: Archive, RRI, DEW Descriptors, Keywords: Laser Development Fusion Application Oscillator Amplifier Geometry Electron Beam Iodine Hydrogen

  20. Dissipative Structures At Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanai, Laszlo

    1989-05-01

    The questions which are discussed in this lecture refer to one of sections of laser-solid interactions, namely: to formation of different dissipative structures on the surface of metals and semiconductors when they are irradiated by intensive laser light in chemically active media (f.e.air). Some particular examples of the development at different spatial and time instabilities, periodic and stochastic structures, auto-wave processes are present-ed using testing materials vanadium metal and semiconducting V205 single crystals and light sources: cw and pulsed CO2 and YAG lasers.

  1. Underwater laser cutting of metal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfille, J.P.; Prunele, D. de [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Pilot, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de l`Environnement et des Installations; Fredrick, P.; Ramaswami, V.S.; Muys, P. [Radius Engineering, Gent (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    Cutting tests were carried out on stainless steel (304L) in air and under 7 meters of water (application to reactor pools), using CO{sub 2} and YAG lasers; results concerned cutting speed, quality of cut, cutting thickness. By-products of sectioning operations using a CO{sub 2} laser were studied: dross, aerosols, suspended particles in water, gas analysis, chemical analysis of the aerosols. Same measurements are currently being taken in the case of the YAG laser with beam transported via optical fiber. (from author). 16 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  2. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hema Ramachandran

    2002-02-01

    Experimental realization of mirrorless lasers in the last decade have resulted in hectic activity in this field, due to their novelty, simplicity and ruggedness and their great potential for application. In this article, I will review the various developments in this field in roughly chronological order, and discuss some possible applications of this exciting phenomenon, also termed as ‘random lasing’.

  3. Nanowire Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Couteau C.; Larrue A.; Wilhelm C.; Soci C.

    2015-01-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, fl...

  4. Investigation of the Periodic Microstructure Induced by a 355 nm UV Polarized Laser on a Polyimide Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅; 路庆华; 印杰; 罗售余; 王宗光

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a periodic microstructure induced by a 355 nm ultraviolet polarized laser on a polyimide surface and the dependence of the structures on laser parameters. Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) of sub-micrometre size were generated on three kinds of polyimide films by a polarized Nd:YAG laser of 355nm within a wide range of laser fluence. The chemical structure of the polyimide, the film-making process, the number of laser pulses and the laser fluence greatly influenced the formation of LIPSS. The periodicity of LIPSS was decided by the wavelength, the incidence angle of the laser beam and the apparent refractive index of the material.

  5. Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Phase Laser Development Acknowledgement of Support and Disclaimer This material is based upon work supported by Air Force Office of Scientific...00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Sciences Inc. Role of Optical Diagnostics in High Energy Gas Laser Development  Chemically rich, energetic, reacting flow with competing phenomena

  6. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  7. Laser-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, Y. van de

    2014-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LACVD) is an attractive maskless process for growing locally carbon nanotubes at selected places on substrates that may contain temperature-sensitive components. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the reported research with respect to laser assist

  8. Gas dynamic lasers. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-07-01

    The citations cover research on kinetic and energy transfer processes, design, optics, nozzles, and performance of gas and chemical lasers relying on gas dynamic effects for lasing enhancement. Diffusion and flow studies specifically applicable to such lasers are also included. This updated bibliography contains 253 citations, 6 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  9. Detonation of CHO working substances in a laser jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageichik, A. A.; Repina, E. V.; Rezunkov, Yu. A.; Safronov, A. L.

    2009-03-01

    Laser-induced ablation of materials (including polymers and a variety of polycrystalline substances with a CHO chemical composition) is studied theoretically and experimentally. Based on experimental data, a parametric physicochemical model of detonation of these materials is put forward with the aim to estimate the efficiency of laser thrust formation in jet engines.

  10. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  11. Laser therapy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  12. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  13. Lasers in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viherkoski, E

    1990-01-01

    Since its discovery, the laser has been intensively investigated and used in medicine, first in ophthalmology then in ear, nose and throat surgery, gynaecology, neurosurgery etc. Development spans from the ruby and argon lasers in outpatient eye surgery to the carbon dioxide and Nd:YAG lasers in the operating theatres and further on to the PDT-dye lasers, excimer and solid state angioplasty lasers or flash lamp pumped "gallstone cracker" lasers. The CO2-Nd: YAG laser combination will be described as the state-of-art surgical laser. This simultaneous, coaxial and coherent combination laser offers a new possibility to cut and coagulate effectively at the same time. Operating times are shortened and bleeding volumes minimised. The CO2-Nd: YAG laser represents a new type of interaction between laser and tissue, laser enhanced tissue absorption, which will be described.

  14. Posibilities Of Appliance Of Therapeutic Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnikowski, I.; Spiechowicz, E.

    1987-10-01

    The appliance of a therapeutic laser also known as soft laser has gained wider scope in the latest years. The main characteristics of the laser radiation, namely its monochromatic and coherent nature render the photochemic activity selecive especially on the intracelluar level, stimulating the dynamics of the oxido-reductive changes in a cell. The action of the laser beam upon living tissue depends on the power of the used laser as well as upon the physical properties of the object itself i.e. its optical, mechanical, chemical properties. The use of a high powered laser causes a big rise in the temperature and prescure inside tissue which leads to denaturation of protein and than to evaporation and destruction of the cell. It is possible to gain quite diffrent effects using a soft /or therapeutic/ laser which in the course of stimulating the biological changes in a cell causes its regeneration and not its degradation. There exist three main phenomena on the level of the radiation emition. These are absorption, reflection and penetration. The most important from the medical point of view are penetration and absorption, for the direct biological changes depend upon these very parameters. The action of the laser beam upon tissue in fig. 1.

  15. Investigation on orientation, epitaxial growth and microstructure of a-axis-, c-axis-, (103)/(110)- and (113)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ films prepared on (001), (110) and (111) SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by spray atomizing and coprecipitating laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Wang, Ying; Huang, Zhi liang; Mao, Yangwu; Xu, Yuan Lai

    2015-04-01

    a-axis-, c-axis-, (103)/(110)- and (113)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films were pareared by spray atomizing and coprecipitating laser chemical vapor deposition. The surface of the a-axis-oriented YBCO film consisted of rectangular needle-like grains whose in-plane epitaxial growth relationship was YBCO [100] // STO [001] (YBCO [001] // STO [100]), and that of the c-axis-oriented YBCO film consisted of dense flat surface with epitaxial growth relationship of YBCO [001] // STO [001] (YBCO [100] //STO [100]). For the (103)/(110)-oriented and (113)-oriented YBCO film, they showed wedge-shaped and triangle-shaped grains, with corresponding in-plane epitaxial growth relationship of YBCO [110] // STO [110] (YBCO [010] // STO [010]) and YBCO [100] // STO [100] (YBCO [113] // STO [111], respectively.

  16. The Laser Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, C. B.

    1986-11-01

    The total value of all lasers sold during 1986 in the non-Communist world will exceed US $600 million. This paper examines these sales and categorizes them according to application and according to type of laser. The results are presented both in terms of numbers of lasers sold, and in terms of the value of those lasers. The data are based on extensive interviews with laser manufacturers and laser users.

  17. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  18. Gasdynamic lasers: an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.D. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are covered: elementary physics, thermodynamics and vibrational kinetics of the CO/sub 2/--N/sub 2/--H/sub 2/O or He gasdynamic laser, calculation of gasdynamic laser performance, comparison between theory and experiment, inversions behind normal shock waves, CO/sub 2/--N/sub 2/ gasdynamic lasers: state-of-the-art, the carbon monoxide gasdynamic laser, downstream mixing gasdynamic lasers, optical cavity considerations for gasdynamic lasers, aerodynamic windows, and diffusers. (MHR)

  19. Tunable lasers and their application in analytical chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The impact that laser techniques might have in chemical analysis is examined. Absorption, scattering, and heterodyne detection is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the advantages of using frequency-tunable sources, and dye solution lasers are regarded as the outstanding example of this type of laser. Types of spectroscopy that can be carried out with lasers are discussed along with the ultimate sensitivity or minimum detectable concentration of molecules that can be achieved with each method. Analytical applications include laser microprobe analysis, remote sensing and instrumental methods such as laser-Raman spectroscopy, atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry, fluorescence assay techniques, optoacoustic spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. The application of lasers to spectroscopic methods of analysis would seem to be a rewarding field both for research in analytical chemistry and for investments in instrument manufacturing.

  20. Chemical Mahjong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  1. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  2. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  3. Laser biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This issue of Quantum Electronics presents the papers that reflect the state-of-the-art of laser technologies used in biomedical studies and medical practice. Among the new technologies, one can note the methods of correlation and Doppler spectroscopy, as well as THz spectroscopy, in which biologically significant molecules are characterised by specific resonances. The latter topic is considered in the paper by Nazarov et al., where the dielectric function of aqueous solutions of glucose and albumin is studied using pulsed THz spectroscopy.

  4. Laser fusion project second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumbaugh, W.H.; Morgan, D.W.; Flannery, J.E.

    1978-11-10

    This research program is devoted to the preparation and characterization of fluoride glasses for laser fusion. The overall objective is to explore and characterize fluoride glass systems to find a glass with the lowest possible nonlinear refractive index, satisfactory chemical durability, and physical properties which enable coating large optical quality pieces. (MOW)

  5. Chemical engineering design of CO oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    How a chemical reaction engineer would approach the challenge of designing a CO oxidation catalyst for pulsed CO2 lasers is described. CO oxidation catalysts have a long history of application, of course, so it is instructive to first consider the special requirements of the laser application and then to compare them to the characteristics of existing processes which utilize CO oxidation catalysts. All CO2 laser applications require a CO oxidation catalyst with the following characteristics: (1) active at stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO, (2) no inhibition by CO2 or other components of the laser environment, (3) releases no particulates during vibration or thermal cycling, and (4) long lifetime with a stable activity. In all applications, low consumption of power is desirable, a characteristic especially critical in aerospace applications and, thus, catalyst activity at low temperatures is highly desirable. High power lasers with high pulse repetition rates inherently require circulation of the gas mixture and this forced circulation is available for moving gas past the catalyst. Low repetition rate lasers, however, do not inherently require gas circulation, so a catalyst that did not require such circulation would be favorable from the standpoint of minimum power consumption. Lasers designed for atmospheric penetration of their infrared radiation utilize CO2 formed from rare isotopes of oxygen and this application has the additional constraint that normal abundance oxygen isotopes in the catalyst must not exchange with rare isotopes in the gas mixture.

  6. Laser spectroscopy of atomic radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Alexander; Jungmann, Klaus; Santra, Bodhaditya; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth elements radium (Ra) offers a unique sensitivity to a parity and time reversal violating permanent electric dipole moments (EDM). In particular, Ra exhibits the largest known atomic enhancements factors for EDMs. The intrinsic sensitivity arises from the specific atomic and nuclear structure of Ra. All Ra isotopes with nuclear spin I are radioactive. The lifetimes are shorter than 15 d. Several Ra isotopes are available at the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI. For the exploitation of the sensitivity Ra atoms have to be collected in a neutral atom trap. The main laser cooling is done on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 482.7 nm, similar to the laser cooling and trapping of the chemical homologue barium. Laser spectroscopy of the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transitions is presented. The light at this wavelength is provided by frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire laser in a KNbO{sub 3} crystal. Of particular interest is the decay branching of the excited state to the metastable D-states. Such measurements are indispensable input for current atomic structure calculations, which are necessary for the analysis of a EDM measurement using Ra.

  7. Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

    2010-03-25

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

  8. Obstacles to Laser Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K

    2005-04-25

    The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

  9. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    FIBER LASERS I. Nd:YAG FIBER LASER FABRICATION .............. 5 A. FIBER GROWTH .......................... 5 B. FIBER PROCESSING 7...1.32 pm FIBER LASERS I. Nd:YAG FIBER LASER FABRICATION A. FIBER GROWTH The single crystal fibers used in this work were grown at Stanford University

  10. Lasers in cosmetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Lasers have become a necessary instrument in the esthetic restorative armamentarium. This article presents smile design guidelines for soft tissue lasers, as well as an overview of hard tissue procedures that may be performed using all-tissue lasers. The goal is to help dentists determine the appropriate laser for a given clinical situations.

  11. Visible Solid State Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikmet, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Diode lasers can be found in various applications most notably in optical communication and optical storage. Visible lasers were until recently were all based on IR diode lasers. Using GaN, directly blue and violet emitting lasers have also been introduced to the market mainly in the area of optical

  12. Applications of Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Te; SUN Yan-fang; NING Yong-qiang; WANG Li-jun

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the applications of semiconductor lasers is presented. Diode lasers are widely used today,and the most prevalent use of the laser is probably in CD and DVD drives for computers and audio/video media systems. Semiconductor lasers are also used in many other fields ranging from optical fiber communications to display,medicine and pumping sources.

  13. Management of gingival hyperpigmentation by semiconductor diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Geeti

    2011-09-01

    Gingival hyperpigmentation is caused by excessive deposition of melanin in the basal and suprabasal cell layers of the epithelium. Although melanin pigmentation of the gingiva is completely benign, cosmetic concerns are common, particularly in patients having a very high smile line (gummy smile). Various depigmentation techniques have been employed, such as scalpel surgery, gingivectomy, gingivectomy with free gingival autografting, cryosurgery, electrosurgery, chemical agents such as 90% phenol and 95% alcohol, abrasion with diamond burs, Nd:YAG laser, semiconductor diode laser, and CO(2) laser. The present case report describes simple and effective depigmentation technique using semiconductor diode laser surgery - for gingival depigmentation, which have produced good results with patient satisfaction.

  14. On-chip three-dimensional high-Q microcavities fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jintian; Yu, Shangjie; Ma, Yaoguang; Fang, Wei; Fei HE; Qiao, Lingling; Tong, Limin; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) high-Q whispering gallery microcavities on a fused silica chip by femtosecond laser microfabriction, enabled by the 3D nature of femtosecond laser direct writing. The processing mainly consists of formation of freestanding microdisks by femtosecond laser direct writing and subsequent wet chemical etching. CO2 laser annealing is followed to smooth the microcavity surface. Microcavities with arbitrary tilting angle, lateral and vertical pos...

  15. FAST CARS: Engineering a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A.V.(Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia); Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromole...

  16. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  17. FY 2005 Laser Development Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2005-12-01

    The Laser Development Task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Remote Spectroscopy project (PL211I) is focused on the development of novel laser technology for a new generation of standoff and in-situ chemical sensors for detecting the proliferation of nuclear weapons. These lasers will improve the sensitivity, flexibility, or range of active standoff sensors, enable ultra-trace in situ sensors with enhanced selectivity, as well as greatly improve calibration of passive standoff sensors. In particular, laser transmitters with minimal size, weight, and power consumption (SWAP) are needed to meet the requirements for a variety of in situ or short-range stand-off sensors and sensors for small UAVs or other platforms. These laser transmitters need to be rugged and free of requirements for consumables such as liquid nitrogen. Many sensing techniques also require lasers that produce a single narrow wavelength (single longitudinal mode). Lasers that provide high continuous-wave (CW) output power on a single line at operating temperatures accessible with thermoelectric (TE) cooling are therefore essential for sensor applications.

  18. Multibeam fiber laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Hansen, Klaus Schütt; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2009-01-01

    The appearance of the high power high brilliance fiber laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating Cutting laser, the CO2 laser. However, quality problems in fiber-laser...... cutting have until now limited its application to metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle Studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness and short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multibeam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from two single mode fiber lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W...

  19. Multibeam Fibre Laser Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    The appearance of the high power high brilliance fibre laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating cutting laser, the CO2-laser. However, quality problems in fibre-laser...... cutting have until now limited its application in metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multi beam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from 2 single mode fibre lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W of single...

  20. Chemical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair - i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.A sociedade obtém numerosos benefícios da utilização de compostos químicos. A aplicação dos pesticidas, por exemplo, permitiu obter alimento em quantidade suficiente para satisfazer as necessidades alimentares de milhões de pessoas, condição relacionada com o aumento da esperança de vida. Os benefícios estão, por

  1. High power fiber lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Qi-hong; ZHOU Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this review article, the development of the double cladding optical fiber for high power fiber lasers is reviewed. The main technology for high power fiber lasers, including laser diode beam shaping, fiber laser pumping techniques, and amplification systems, are discussed in de-tail. 1050 W CW output and 133 W pulsed output are ob-tained in Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, China. Finally, the applications of fiber lasers in industry are also reviewed.

  2. Laser Hardening of Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Institute for Laser Physics; V.A.Serebryakov; K.V.Gratzianov; A.S.Eremenko; A.A.Timopheev; SPBSUITMO; M.V.Volkov

    2006-01-01

    Results of experiments on laser hardening of various materials with intensity 109~1010W/cm2 are represented. Nd:glass laser with energy up to 45J with a pulse duration ~30ns was used as a source of ra diation. Comparative researches of the laser peening for the various target areas are fulfilled. Results of laser hardening were determined by the microstructure analysis. The new approach to creation of the industrial laser for peening is discussed.

  3. The laser in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Alfons G.

    2002-10-01

    Laser is an acronym for a physical principle and means: Light Amplification by stimulated Emission of Radiation. This principle offers a lot of tissue/light effects caused by the parameters: power density/time and the special qualities of the laser light. Nowadays for diagnosis and therapy following lasers are used in urology: Krypton- and Dye-lasers as well as the Neodymium-YAG- (nd:YAG-), Holmium-YAG (Ho:YAG-), Diode-, Argon- and the CO2-lasers.

  4. Zeolite-dye micro lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Vietze, U; Laeri, F; Ihlein, G; Schüth, F; Limburg, B; Abraham, M

    1998-01-01

    We present a new class of micro lasers based on nanoporous molecular sieve host-guest systems. Organic dye guest molecules of 1-Ethyl-4-(4-(p-Dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl)-pyridinium Perchlorat were inserted into the 0.73-nm-wide channel pores of a zeolite AlPO$_4$-5 host. The zeolitic micro crystal compounds where hydrothermally synthesized according to a particular host-guest chemical process. The dye molecules are found not only to be aligned along the host channel axis, but to be oriented as well. Single mode laser emission at 687 nm was obtained from a whispering gallery mode oscillating in a 8-$\\mu$m-diameter monolithic micro resonator, in which the field is confined by total internal reflection at the natural hexagonal boundaries inside the zeolitic microcrystals.

  5. Biostimulative Effect Of Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, E.

    1981-05-01

    We report on experiences gained in healing clinical cases treated with He-Ne and Argon-laser grouped according to etiology. In order to elucidate the action mechanism of the bioregulatory process, the following experiments were carried out: 1. Serial electron-microscopic and radioactivity studies of samples obtained from human ulcers; 2. Chemical transfer of stimulating substrate on human leukocyte population; 3. Enzyme histochemical studies in experiments on rats; 4. Study of vascularization with the "ear chamber" technique carried out on rabbit's ear; 5. The increase of tensile strength in rats; 6. Biochemical demonstration of the RNA, DNA, albumin synthesis on human fibrocyte-cultures; 7.a, 7.b, Immunological studies; 8. Prostaglandin producing effect. The discovery of laser opened up new prospects in the field of the biological research and medical use.

  6. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  7. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  8. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  9. HCl yield and chemical kinetics study of the reaction of Cl atoms with CH3I at the 298K temperature using the infra-red tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R C; Blitz, M; Wada, R; Seakins, P W

    2014-07-15

    Pulsed ArF excimer laser (193 nm)-CW infrared (IR) tunable diode laser Herriott type absorption spectroscopic technique has been made for the detection of product hydrochloric acid HCl. Absorption spectroscopic technique is used in the reaction chlorine atoms with methyl iodide (Cl+CH3I) to the study of kinetics on reaction Cl+CH3I and the yield of (HCl). The reaction of Cl+CH3I has been studied with the support of the reaction Cl+C4H10 (100% HCl) at temperature 298 K. In the reaction Cl+CH3I, the total pressure of He between 20 and 125 Torr at the constant concentration of [CH3I] 7.0×10(14) molecule cm(-3). In the present work, we estimated adduct formation is very important in the reaction Cl+CH3I and reversible processes as well and CH3I molecule photo-dissociated in the methyl [CH3] radical. The secondary chemistry has been studied as CH3+CH3ICl = product, and CH3I+CH3ICl = product2. The system has been modeled theoretically for secondary chemistry in the present work. The calculated and experimentally HCl yield nearly 65% at the concentration 1.00×10(14) molecule cm(-3) of [CH3I] and 24% at the concentration 4.0×10(15) molecule cm(-3) of [CH3I], at constant concentration 4.85×10(12) molecule cm(-3) of [CH3], and at 7.3×10(12) molecule cm(-3) of [Cl]. The pressure dependent also studied product of HCl at the constant [CH3], [Cl] and [CH3I]. The experimental results are also very good matching with the modelling work at the reaction CH3+CH3ICl = product (k = (2.75±0.35)×10(-10) s(-1)) and CH3I+CH3ICl = product2 (k = 1.90±0.15)×10(-12) s(-1). The rate coefficients of the reaction CH3+CH3ICl and CH3I+CH3ICl has been made in the present work. The experimental results has been studied by two method (1) phase locked and (2) burst mode.

  10. Excimer laser pretreatment and metallization of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, H.; Beil, S.; Wesner, D. A.; Weichenhain, R.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1999-05-01

    Metal/polymer adhesion is a crucial factor of many applications in microelectronic or microsystem technologies. It depends on chemical and structural properties of the interface, often involving just a few atomic layers. Adhesion can be influenced by various pretreatments prior to metal deposition, e.g. thermal treatment, chemical etching or exposure to reactive plasmas. Irradiation with pulsed UV-laser radiation and or UV-excimer lamps can also affect adhesion and offers several technical advantages, among them area selective pretreatment and subsequent metallization. The pretreatment of polymer surfaces by UV-radiation is investigated as an alternative technique to common wet chemical, plasma or other pretreatment methods. Chemical and morphological changes in the polymer surface are investigated with poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) as a model substance, containing UV-absorbing (aromatic) chromophoric groups. Chemical changes in the surface are investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Analysis of the morphological changes in the polymer surface is done via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The metallization of polymers pretreated by excimer laser radiation is performed via electroless plating of nickel followed by electrolytically deposited copper. The influence of excimer laser irradiation of the polymer on the adhesion of the metal overlayers is measured by tape and peel tests.

  11. Selective laser extraction of the Pt group metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadeeva, S.; Krynetsky, B.; Prokhorov, A.; Zhidkov, A. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-15

    The interest to the platinum-group metals extraction from solutions, especially industry waste, is stimulated by their extraordinary chemical inert. The traditional chemical methods of the extraction are uneffective. Have been investigated process of the extraction of metal Pt-group from acid solutions. Discussed processes reduction of noble metals by resonance laser action.

  12. Chemical fingerprint of iron oxides related to iron enrichment of banded iron formation from the Cauê Formation - Esperança Deposit, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil: a laser ablation ICP-MS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilia Aparecida Ramos de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Chemical signatures of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite and high-grade iron ore from the Esperança deposit, located in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, indicate that polycyclic processes involving changing of chemical and redox conditions are responsible for the iron enrichment on Cauê Formation from Minas Supergroup. Variations of Mn, Mg and Sr content in different generations of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite, high-grade iron ore and syn-mineralization quartz-carbonate-hematite veins denote the close relationship between high-grade iron ore formation and carbonate alteration. This indicates that dolomitic itabirite is the main precursor of the iron ore in that deposit. Long-lasting percolation of hydrothermal fluids and shifts in the redox conditions have contributed to changes in the Y/Ho ratio, light/heavy rare earth elements ratio and Ce anomaly with successive iron oxide generations (martite-granular hematite, as well as lower abundance of trace elements including rare earth elements in the younger specularite generations.

  13. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  14. Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Federico

    2004-03-01

    QC lasers have emerged in recent years as the dominant laser technology for the mid-to far infrared spectrum in light of their room temperature operation, their tunability, ultrahigh speed operation and broad range of applications to chemical sensing, spectroscopy etc. (Ref. 1-3). After briefly reviewing the latter, I will describe a new class of mid-infrared QC lasers, Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal Surface Emitting Lasers (QCPCSELS), that combine electronic and photonic band structure engineering to achieve vertical emission from the surface (Ref. 4). Devices operating on bandedge mode and on defect modes will be discussed. Exciting potential uses of these new devices exist in nonlinear optics, microfluidics as well as novel sensors. Finally a bird's eye view of other exciting areas of QC laser research will be given including broadband QCLs and new nonlinear optical sources based on multiwavelength QCLs. 1. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, D. L. Sivco, and A. Y. Cho, Physics Today 55, 34 (May 2002) 2. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, R. Paiella, A. Tredicucci, A. L. Hutchinson, D. L. Sivco, J. N. Baillargeon, A. Y. Cho and H. C. Liu, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 6, 931 (2000). 3. F. Capasso, R. Paiella, R. Martini, R. Colombelli, C. Gmachl, T. L. Myers, M. S. Taubman, R. M. Williams, C. G. Bethea, K. Unterrainer, H. Y. Hwang, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho, A. M. Sergent, H. C. Liu, E. A. Whittaker, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 38, 511 (2002) 4. R. Colombelli, K. Srivasan, M. Troccoli, O. Painter, C. Gmachl, D. M. Tennant, A. M. Sergent, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho and F. Capasso, Science 302, 1374 (2003)

  15. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  16. Laser-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  17. Chemical Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    As a preliminary study on the effects of chemical aging of polymer materials MERL and TRI have examined two polymeric materials that are typically used for offshore umbilical applications. These two materials were Tefzel, a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene, and Coflon, polyvinylidene fluoride. The Coflon specimens were cut from pipe sections and exposed to H2S at various temperatures and pressures. One of these specimens was tested for methane permeation, and another for H2S permeation. The Tefzel specimens were cut from .05 mm sheet stock material and were exposed to methanol at elevated temperature and pressure. One of these specimens was exposed to methanol permeation for 2 days at 100 C and 2500 psi. An additional specimen was exposed to liquid methanol for 3 days at 150 C and 15 Bar. Virgin specimens of each material were similarly prepared and tested.

  18. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  19. Controlling Chaotic Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gills, Zelda; Roy, Rajarshi

    1995-01-01

    Irregular fluctuations in intensity have long plagued the operation of a wide variety of solid-state lasers. We are exploring the possibility of exploiting rather than avoiding a laser's chaotic output. As an important step in that direction, we have applied a novel control technique to stabilize a solid state laser. By making small periodic changes in only one input parameter of the laser, we are able to stabilize complex periodic waveforms and steady state behavior in the laser output. We demonstrate the application of this approach in a diode pumped Nd:/YAG laser system.

  20. Lasers in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  1. A review of laser and light therapy in melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Trivedi, BS, BA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melasma is a dysregulation of the homeostatic mechanisms that control skin pigmentation and excess pigment is produced. Traditional treatment approaches with topical medications and chemical peels are commonly used but due to the refractory and recurrent nature of melasma, patients often seek alternative treatment strategies such as laser and light therapy. Several types of laser and light therapy have been studied in the treatment of melasma. Intense pulsed light, low fluence Q-switched lasers, and non-ablative fractionated lasers are the most common lasers and light treatments that are currently performed. They all appear effective but there is a high level of recurrence with time and some techniques are associated with an increased risk for postinflammatory hyper- or hypopigmentation. The number and frequency of treatments varies by device type but overall, Q-switched lasers require the greatest number of treatment applications to see a benefit. Vascular-specific lasers do not appear to be effective for the treatment of melasma. Ablative fractionated lasers should be used with caution because they have a very high risk for postinflammatory hypo- and hyperpigmentation. The use of nonablative fractionated laser treatments compared with other laser and light options may result in slightly longer remission intervals. Picosecond lasers, fractional radiofrequency, and laser-assisted drug delivery are promising future approaches to treat melasma. The goal of this review is to summarize the efficacy and safety of the most commonly used laser and light therapies to treat melasma, briefly present future laser-based treatment options for patients with melasma, and provide recommendations for treatment on the basis of the reviewed information.

  2. 372-mJ long pulse pyrotechnically pumped laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Xiao; Zongfu Jiang; Weihong Hua; Shengfu Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A pyrotechnically pumped Nd glass laser is demonstrated by the use of pyrotechnic flashlamps composed of several chemical materials arranged in a stable plane concave resonator cavity. The flashlamp was made of chemical mixture with oxidant, fuel, and binder. The emission spectrum of pyrotechnic flame covered most of the absorption bands of Nd3+ in phosphate glass. Under 4.56-g chemical mixture pumping, long pulse output power of about 5.5 W was achieved.

  3. Direct-write waveplates using femtosecond lasers

    CERN Document Server

    McMillen, Ben; Bellouard, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The use of femtosecond lasers to introduce controlled stress states has recently been demonstrated in silica glass. We use this principle in combination with chemical etching to demonstrate direct-write wave plates with precisely tailored retardance levels. In this work, we achieve sufficient retardance to act as a quarter-wave plate, producing a broadband device with a clear aperture free of any laser modifications. We analyze and model the stress distribution within the clear aperture, providing a generic template that can be applied to form multiple retardance levels within the same substrate.

  4. Femtosecond laser crystallization of amorphous Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Kürüm, Ulaş; Yaglioglu, H. Gul; Elmali, Ayhan; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-06-01

    Ultrafast crystallization of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) in ambient has been studied. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown a-Ge was irradiated with single femtosecond laser pulses of various durations with a range of fluences from below melting to above ablation threshold. Extensive use of Raman scattering has been employed to determine post solidification features aided by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Linewidth of the Ge optic phonon at 300 cm-1 as a function of laser fluence provides a signature for the crystallization of a-Ge. Various crystallization regimes including nanostructures in the form of nanospheres have been identified.

  5. 2009 Laser Diagnostics in Combustion GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volker Sick

    2009-08-16

    Non-intrusive laser diagnostics for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of temperature, chemical composition, and flow parameters have emerged over the last few decades as major tools for the study of both fundamental and applied combustion science. Many of the important advances in the field can be attributed to the discussions and ideas emanating from this meeting. This conference, originating in 1981 and held biennially, focuses on laser-based methods for measurement of both macroscopic parameters and the underlying microscale physical and chemical processes. Applications are discussed primarily to elucidate new chemical and physical issues and/or interferences that need to be addressed to improve the accuracy and precision of the various diagnostic approaches or to challenge the community of diagnosticians to invent new measurement techniques. Combustion environments present special challenges to the optical diagnostics community as they address measurements relevant to turbulence, spray and mixture formation, or turbulence/chemistry interactions important in practical combustion systems as well as fundamental chemical reactions in stationary laminar flames. The diagnostics considered may be generally classed as being incoherent, where the signals are radiated isotropically, or coherent, where the signals are generated in a directed, beam-like fashion. Both of the foregoing may employ either electronic or Raman resonance enhancement or a combination of both. Prominent incoherent approaches include laser induced fluorescence (LIF), spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, laser induced incandescence, molecular flow tagging, and Mie scattering and their two- and three-dimensional imaging variants. Coherent approaches include coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM), polarization spectroscopy (PS), laser induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) and laser-based absorption spectroscopy. Spectroscopic

  6. Laser dye toxicity, hazards, and recommended controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosovsky, J.A.

    1983-05-06

    Laser dyes are complex fluorescent organic compounds which, when in solution with organic solvents, form a lasing medium. The wavelength of a dye laser's output beam can vary with different dyes, concentrations, and solvents, giving it a tunable feature capable of emitting ultraviolet, visible, or infrared radiation. Toxicity information on the approximately 100 commercially available laser dyes is very scarce. Limited animal experimentation has been performed with only a few dyes. This paper summarizes what is known about laser dye toxicity, and offers recommendations for controlling dye hazards. The laser dyes investigated have been categorized according to their central chemical structures. These include the xanthenes (rhodamines and fluoresceins), polymethines (cyanines and carbocyanines), coumarins, and stilbenes. A few other miscellaneous dyes that do not fall into one of these categories have also been investigated. Prepared laser dye solutions usually contain very small quantities of dye--typical dye concentrations are 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -5/ molar. For this reason, the solvent in which the dye is dissolved plays an important role when defining potential hazards. Practically all the solvents used are flammable and toxic by inhalation and skin absorption, and therefore must be controlled properly.

  7. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  8. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  9. Laser in operative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yasini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Today laser has a lot of usage in medicine and dentistry. In the field of dentistry, laser is used in soft tissue surgery, sterilization of canals (in root canal therapy and in restorative dentistry laser is used for cavity preparation, caries removal, sealing the grooves (in preventive dentistry, etching enamel and dentin, composite polymerization and removal of tooth sensitivity. The use of Co2 lasers and Nd: YAG for cavity preparation, due to creating high heat causes darkness and cracks around the region of laser radiation. Also due to high temperature of these lasers, pulp damage is inevitable. So today, by using the Excimer laser especially the argon floride type with a wavelength of 193 nm, the problem of heat stress have been solved, but the use of lasers in dentistry, especially for cavity preparation needs more researches and evaluations.

  10. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vascular Access for Hemodialysis Ventricular Assist Devices Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Like every other organ or tissue in ... bypass surgery, there is a procedure called transmyocardial laser revascularization, also called TMLR or TMR. TMLR cannot ...

  11. Wavelength sweepable laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength sweepable laser source is disclosed, wherein the laser source is a semiconductor laser source adapted for generating laser light at a lasing wavelength. The laser source comprises a substrate, a first reflector, and a second reflector. The first and second reflector together defines...... and having a rest position, the second reflector and suspension together defining a microelectromechanical MEMS oscillator. The MEMS oscillator has a resonance frequency and is adapted for oscillating the second reflector on either side of the rest position.; The laser source further comprises electrical...... connections adapted for applying an electric field to the MEMS oscillator. Furthermore, a laser source system and a method of use of the laser source are disclosed....

  12. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  13. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  14. Chemical information science coverage in Chemical Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, G

    1987-02-01

    For many years Chemical Abstracts has included in its coverage publications on chemical documentation or chemical information science. Although the bulk of those publications can be found in section 20 of Chemical Abstracts, many relevant articles were found scattered among 39 other sections of CA in 1984-1985. In addition to the scattering of references in CA, the comprehensiveness of Chemical Abstracts as a secondary source for chemical information science is called into question. Data are provided on the journals that contributed the most references on chemical information science and on the languages of publication of relevant articles.

  15. Laser removal of tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman-Beade, M; Levine, V J; Ashinoff, R

    2001-01-01

    Tattoos are placed for different reasons. A technique for tattoo removal which produces selective removal of each tattoo pigment, with minimal risk of scarring, is needed. Nonspecific methods have a high incidence of scarring, textural, and pigmentary alterations compared with the use of Q-switched lasers. With new advances in Q-switched laser technology, tattoo removal can be achieved with minimal risk of scarring and permanent pigmentary alteration. There are five types of tattoos: amateur, professional, cosmetic, medicinal, and traumatic. Amateur tattoos require less treatment sessions than professional multicolored tattoos. Other factors to consider when evaluating tattoos for removal are: location, age and the skin type of the patient. Treatment should begin by obtaining a pre-operative history. Since treatment with the Q-switched lasers is painful, use of a local injection with lidocaine or topical anaesthesia cream may be used prior to laser treatment. Topical broad-spectrum antibacterial ointment is applied immediately following the procedure. Three types of lasers are currently used for tattoo removal: Q-switched ruby laser (694 nm), Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 1064 nm), and Q-switched alexandrite laser (755 nm). The Q-switched ruby and alexandrite lasers are useful for removing black, blue and green pigments. The Q-switched 532 nm Nd:YAG laser can be used to remove red pigments and the 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser is used for removal of black and blue pigments. The most common adverse effects following laser tattoo treatment with the Q-switched ruby laser include textural change, scarring, and pigmentary alteration. Transient hypopigmentation and textural changes have been reported in up to 50 and 12%, respectively, of patients treated with the Q-switched alexandrite laser. Hyperpigmentation and textural changes are infrequent adverse effects of the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and the incidence of hypopigmentary changes is much lower than with the ruby laser

  16. CO2 laser modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  17. Laser cutting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  18. Tunable laser optics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2015-01-01

    This Second Edition of a bestselling book describes the optics and optical principles needed to build lasers. It also highlights the optics instrumentation necessary to characterize laser emissions and focuses on laser-based optical instrumentation. The book emphasizes practical and utilitarian aspects of relevant optics including the essential theory. This revised, expanded, and improved edition contains new material on tunable lasers and discusses relevant topics in quantum optics.

  19. Nature's chemicals and synthetic chemicals: comparative toxicology.

    OpenAIRE

    Ames, B N; Profet, M; Gold, L S

    1990-01-01

    The toxicology of synthetic chemicals is compared to that of natural chemicals, which represent the vast bulk of the chemicals to which humans are exposed. It is argued that animals have a broad array of inducible general defenses to combat the changing array of toxic chemicals in plant food (nature's pesticides) and that these defenses are effective against both natural and synthetic toxins. Synthetic toxins such as dioxin are compared to natural chemicals, such as indole carbinol (in brocco...

  20. Excimer laser irradiation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, Grant

    In this work a new method of enhancing CO2 laser processing by modifying the radiative properties of a metal surface is studied. In this procedure, an excimer laser (XeCl) or KrF) exposes the metal surface to overlapping pulses of high intensity, 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) W cm(exp -2), and short pulse duration, 30 nsec FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum), to promote structural and chemical change. The major processing effect at these intensities is the production of a surface plasma which can lead to the formation of a laser supported detonation wave (LSD wave). This shock wave can interact with the thin molten layer on the metal surface influencing to a varying degree surface oxidation and roughness features. The possibility of the expulsion, oxidation and redeposition of molten droplets, leading to the formation of micron thick oxide layers, is related to bulk metal properties and the incident laser intensity. A correlation is found between the expulsion of molten droplets and a Reynolds number, showing the interaction is turbulent. The permanent effects of these interactions on metal surfaces are observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transient calorimetric measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Observed surface textures are related to the scanning procedures used to irradiate the metal surface. Fundamental radiative properties of a metal surface, the total hemispherical emissivity, the near-normal spectral absorptivity, and others are examined in this study as they are affected by excimer laser radiation. It is determined that for heavily exposed Al surface, alpha' (10.6 microns) can be increased to values close to unity. Data relating to material removal rates and chemical surface modification for excimer laser radiation is also discussed. The resultant reduction in the near-normal reflectivity solves the fundamental problem of coupling laser radiation into highly reflective and conductive metals such as copper and aluminum. The

  1. Application of Various Lasers to Laser Trimming Resistance System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ji-feng

    2007-01-01

    Though the laser trimming resistance has been an old laser machining industry for over 30 years, the development of technology brings new alternative lasers which can be used for the traditional machining. The paper describes application of various lasers to laser trimming resistance system including early traditional krypton arc lamp pumped Nd:YAG to laser, modern popular diode pumped solid state laser and the present advanced harmonic diode pumped solid state laser. Using the new alternative lasers in the laser trimming resistance system can dramatically improve the yields and equipment performance.

  2. Zeeman laser gyroscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarova, V V; Golyaev, Yu D; Saveliev, I I [Open Joint-Stock Company M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-28

    The history of invention and development of Zeeman laser gyroscopes, specific features of their optical scheme and operation principle are described. The construction and element base of modern laser angular velocity sensors with Zeeman-based frequency biasing are considered. The problems and prospects of their development are discussed. (laser gyroscopes)

  3. On g -ray laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review various possibilities for realizing a g-ray laser. We conclude that, similar to the free-electron laser, it is practical to generate the g-ray laser by the stimulated emission of radiation from wiggling positrons channelled in a periodically bent crystal. It is the time to research this possi-bility both theoretically and experimentally with big efforts.

  4. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  5. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  6. Laser power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Edmund J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of previous studies related to laser power transmission is presented. Particular attention is given to the use of solar pumped lasers for space power applications. Three general laser mechanisms are addressed: photodissociation lasing driven by sunlight, photoexcitation lasing driven directly by sunlight, and photoexcitation lasing driven by thermal radiation.

  7. LaserFest Celebration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  8. Diode laser and endoscopic laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullins, Kenneth E

    2002-05-01

    Two functionally important differences exist between the diode laser and the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (used more commonly in small animal surgery). Diode laser energy is delivered through a quartz fiber instead of being reflected through an articulated arm or waveguide. Quartz fibers are generally more flexible and resilient than waveguides and can be inserted through an endoscope for minimally invasive procedures. Laser-tissue interaction is the other significant difference. The CO2 laser is completely absorbed by water, which limits the effect to visible tissue. The diode wavelength is minimally absorbed by water and may affect tissue as deep as 10 mm below the surface in the free-beam mode. With proper respect for the tissue effect, these differences can be used to the advantage of the patient.

  9. X-ray laser; Roentgenlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Emil J.; Breiby, Dag W.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  10. Photoionization in alkali lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knize, R J; Zhdanov, B V; Shaffer, M K

    2011-04-11

    We have calculated photoionization rates in alkali lasers. The photoionization of alkali atoms in the gain medium of alkali lasers can significantly degrade the laser performance by reducing the neutral alkali density and with it the gain. For a ten atmosphere Rb laser and a Cs exciplex laser, the photoionization induced alkali atom loss rates are greater than 10(5) sec(-1). These high loss rates will quickly deplete the neutral alkali density, reducing gain, and may require fast, possibly, supersonic flow rates to sufficiently replenish the neutral medium for CW operation.

  11. Coherent laser beam combining

    CERN Document Server

    Brignon, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the improvement of diode pumping in solid state lasers and the development of double clad fiber lasers have allowed to maintain excellent laser beam quality with single mode fibers. However, the fiber output power if often limited below a power damage threshold. Coherent laser beam combining (CLBC) brings a solution to these limitations by identifying the most efficient architectures and allowing for excellent spectral and spatial quality. This knowledge will become critical for the design of the next generation high-power lasers and is of major interest to many industrial, environme

  12. Lasers In Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth. S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The uses of Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three & a half decades of the 20th century. Initially it was used for ablating the hard tissues for acid etch treatment. Later Lasers were used for cutting, coagulation & cauterization of the soft tissues. It is also been used for the diagnosis of carious lesions& to test pulp vitality with Doppler. There are more than 40 uses for Laser. Initially Lasers were very expensive, but now they have become much cheaper. Portable models are available which have increased its versatility. Lasers will be the main weapon in the armamentarium of the dental surgeons.

  13. Quantum well lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zory, Jr, Peter S; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the information necessary for the reader to achieve a thorough understanding of all aspects of QW lasers - from the basic mechanism of optical gain, through the current technolgoical state of the art, to the future technologies of quantum wires and quantum dots. In view of the growing importance of QW lasers, this book should be read by all those with an active interest in laser science and technology, from the advanced student to the experienced laser scientist.* The first comprehensive book-length treatment of quantum well lasers* Provides a detailed treatment

  14. Tunable laser applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2008-01-01

    Introduction F. J. Duarte Spectroscopic Applications of Tunable Optical Parametric Oscillators B. J. Orr, R. T. White, and Y. He Solid-State Dye Lasers Costela, I. García-Moreno, and R. Sastre Tunable Lasers Based on Dye-Doped Polymer Gain Media Incorporating Homogeneous Distributions of Functional Nanoparticles F. J. Duarte and R. O. James Broadly Tunable External-Cavity Semiconductor Lasers F. J. Duarte Tunable Fiber Lasers T. M. Shay and F. J. Duarte Fiber Laser Overview and Medical Applications

  15. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  16. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Shuman, E S; DeMille, D

    2011-01-01

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a vast array of fields. Unfortunately laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for many applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments which lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures make ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulation of condensed matter systems and quantum computation. Also ultracold molecules may provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme re...

  17. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  18. Stainless steel surface wettability control via laser ablation in external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkov, A. A.; Shafeev, G. A.; Barmina, E. V.; Loufardaki, A.; Stratakis, E.

    2016-12-01

    Laser ablation of stainless steel in external electric field (up to 10 kV/cm) is experimentally studied. The dependencies of both morphology and chemical properties of surface structures on laser parameters and electric field strength are investigated. Surface wettability properties of the laser-treated samples are considered by means of contact angle measurement. It is shown that under certain conditions laser irradiation in external electric field can render the surface superhydrophobic. Influence of electric field on the laser surface treatment is discussed on basis of its impact on melt solidification and oxidation processes.

  19. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrieva, O., E-mail: o.dmitrieva@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Choi, P., E-mail: p.choi@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Gerstl, S.S.A. [Imago Scientific Instruments, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Ponge, D.; Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected. -- Research highlights: {yields} Changing the laser pulse energy in pulsed-laser atom probe could induce some changes in the analysis results of complex steels. {yields} Decreases in the evaporation fields and the ++/+ charge state ratios were detected with raising laser energy. {yields} Chemical composition of the intermetallic precipitates and the interface sharpness were not influenced by changing the laser energy.

  20. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  1. Lasers in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalcaci, Ruhi; Cokakoglu, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Many types of dental lasers are currently available that can be efficiently used for soft and hard tissue applications in the field of orthodontics. For achieving the desired effects in the target tissue, knowledge of laser characteristics such as power, wavelength and timing, is necessary. Laser therapy is advantageous because it often avoids bleeding, can be pain free, is non-invasive and is relatively quick. The high cost is its primary disadvantage. It is very important to take the necessary precautions to prevent possible tissue damage when using laser dental systems. Here, we reviewed the main types and characteristics of laser systems used in dental practice and discuss the applications of lasers in orthodontics, harmful effects and laser system safety. PMID:24966719

  2. Flexible Laser Metal Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Sigurd; Jørgensen, Steffen Nordahl; Kristiansen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new flexible and fast approach to laser cutting called ROBOCUT. Combined with CAD/CAM technology, laser cutting of metal provides the flexibility to perform one-of-a-kind cutting and hereby realises mass production of customised products. Today’s laser cutting techniques...... possess, despite their wide use in industry, limitations regarding speed and geometry. Research trends point towards remote laser cutting techniques which can improve speed and geometrical freedom and hereby the competitiveness of laser cutting compared to fixed-tool-based cutting technology...... such as punching. This paper presents the concepts and preliminary test results of the ROBOCUT laser cutting technology, a technology which potentially can revolutionise laser cutting....

  3. Mode selection laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a semiconductor mode selection laser, particularly to a VCSEL laser (200) having mode selection properties. The mode selection capability of the laser is achieved by configuring one of the reflectors (15,51) in the resonance cavity so that a reflectivity of the reflector...... (15) varies spatially in one dimension or two dimensions. Accordingly, the reflector (15) with spatially varying reflectivity is part both of the resonance cavity and the mode selection functionality of the laser. A plurality of the lasers configured with different mode selectors, i.e. different...... spatial reflector variations, may be combined to generate a laser beam containing a plurality of orthogonal modes. The laser beam may be injected into a few- mode optical fiber, e.g. for the purpose of optical communication. The VCSEL may have intra-cavity contacts (31,37) and a Tunnel junction (33...

  4. ORION laser target diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K. [Plasma Physics Department, Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-10-15

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  5. Nanofabrication with pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashin, Av; Delaporte, Ph; Pereira, A; Grojo, D; Torres, R; Sarnet, Th; Sentis, M

    2010-02-24

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  6. Raman fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supradeepa, V. R.; Feng, Yan; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.

    2017-02-01

    High-power fiber lasers have seen tremendous development in the last decade, with output powers exceeding multiple kilowatts from a single fiber. Ytterbium has been at the forefront as the primary rare-earth-doped gain medium owing to its inherent material advantages. However, for this reason, the lasers are largely confined to the narrow emission wavelength region of ytterbium. Power scaling at other wavelength regions has lagged significantly, and a large number of applications rely upon the diversity of emission wavelengths. Currently, Raman fiber lasers are the only known wavelength agile, scalable, high-power fiber laser technology that can span the wavelength spectrum. In this review, we address the technology of Raman fiber lasers, specifically focused on the most recent developments. We will also discuss several applications of Raman fiber lasers in laser pumping, frequency conversion, optical communications and biology.

  7. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  8. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleasance, L.D.

    1979-11-01

    Over the past few years, several laser systems have been considered as possible laser fusion drivers. Recently, there has been an increasing effort to evaluate these systems in terms of a reactor driver application. The specifications for such a system have become firmer and generally more restrictive. Several of the promising candidates such as the group VI laser, the metal vapor excimers and some solid state lasers can be eliminated on the basis of inefficiency. New solid state systems may impact the long range development of a fusion driver. Of the short wavelength gas lasers, the KrF laser used in conjunction with Raman compression and pulse stacking techniques is the most promising approach. Efficiencies approaching 10% may be possible with this system. While technically feasible, these approaches are complex and costly and are unsatisfying in an aethetic sense. A search for new lasers with more compelling features is still needed.

  9. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  10. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  11. Parameter Optimization for Laser Polishing of Niobium for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Klopf, John Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Surface smoothness is critical to the performance of SRF cavities. As laser technology has been widely applied to metal machining and surface treatment, we are encouraged to use it on niobium as an alternative to the traditional wet polishing process where aggressive chemicals are involved. In this study, we describe progress toward smoothing by optimizing laser parameters on BCP treated niobium surfaces. Results shows that microsmoothing of the surface without ablation is achievable.

  12. Lasers in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Forbes, A.; Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Mathye, A.

    2008-05-01

    A variety of laser applications in space, past, present, future and far future are reviewed together with the contributions of some of the scientists and engineers involved, especially those that happen to have South African connections. Historically, two of the earliest laser applications in space, were atmospheric LIDAR and lunar ranging. These applications involved atmospheric physicists, several astronauts and many of the staff recruited into the Soviet and North American lunar exploration programmes. There is a strong interest in South Africa in both LIDAR and lunar ranging. Shortly after the birth of the laser (and even just prior) theoretical work on photonic propulsion and space propulsion by laser ablation was initiated by Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz and Eugen Saenger. Present or near future experimental programs are developing in the following fields: laser ablation propulsion, possibly coupled with rail gun or gas gun propulsion; interplanetary laser transmission; laser altimetry; gravity wave detection by space based Michelson interferometry; the de-orbiting of space debris by high power lasers; atom laser interferometry in space. Far future applications of laser-photonic space-propulsion were also pioneered by Carl Sagan and Robert Forward. They envisaged means of putting Saenger's ideas into practice. Forward also invented a laser based method for manufacturing solid antimatter or SANTIM, well before the ongoing experiments at CERN with anti-hydrogen production and laser-trapping. SANTIM would be an ideal propellant for interstellar missions if it could be manufactured in sufficient quantities. It would be equally useful as a power source for the transmission of information over light year distances. We briefly mention military lasers. Last but not least, we address naturally occurring lasers in space and pose the question: "did the Big Bang lase?"

  13. Tunable lasers for waste management photochemistry applications. [Dye lasers, excimer lasers, IR lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, F.T. (comp.)

    1978-09-01

    A review of lasers with potential photochemical applications in waste management indicates that dye lasers, as a class, can provide tunable laser output through the visible and near-uv regions of the spectrum of most interest to photochemistry. Many variables can affect the performance of a specific dye laser, and the interactions of these variables, at the current state of the art, are complex. The recent literature on dye-laser characteristics has been reviewed and summarized, with emphasis on those parameters that most likely will affect the scaling of dye lasers in photochemical applications. Current costs are reviewed and correlated with output power. A new class of efficient uv lasers that appear to be scalable in both energy output and pulse rate, based on rare-gas halide excimers and similar molecules, is certain to find major applications in photochemistry. Because the most important developments are too recent to be adequately described in the literature or are the likely outcome of current experiments, the basic physics underlying the class of excimer lasers is described. Specific cost data are unavailable, but these new gas lasers should reflect costs similar to those of existing gas lasers, in particular, the pulsed CO/sub 2/ lasers. To complete the survey of tunable-laser characteristics, the technical characteristics of the various classes of lasers in the ir are summarized. Important developments in ir laser technology are being accelerated by isotope-separation research, but, initially at least, this portion of the spectrum is least likely to receive emphasis in waste-management-oriented photochemistry.

  14. Optical coatings for fiber lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Dong-mei; ZHU Zhen; YUE Wei

    2005-01-01

    Fiber laser is the future development direction for the high energy lasers. This paper describs two kinds of optical coatings for fiber laser, including long and short wave pass filters. The one characteristic of fiber laser coatings lies in that coatings should separate two closely wavelength light including laser pump wavelength (980 nm) and laser irradiation wavelength(1 050~1 100 nm). At the same time, the coatings should have high laser damage threshold.

  15. Optical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) during nanosecond laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankova, N. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Nikov, Ru. G.; Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Stoyanchov, T. R.; Fukata, N.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of effects of the process parameters on the medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer processed by laser source with irradiation at UV (266 and 355 nm), VIS (532 nm) and NIR (1064 nm). Systematic experiments are done to characterize how the laser beam parameters (wavelength, fluence, and number of pulses) affect the optical properties and the chemical composition in the laser treated areas. Remarkable changes of the optical properties and the chemical composition are observed. Despite the low optical absorption of the native PDMS for UV, VIS and NIR wavelengths, successful laser treatment is accomplished due to the incubation process occurring below the polymer surface. With increasing of the fluence and the number of the pulses chemical transformations are revealed in the entire laser treated area and hence decreasing of the optical transmittance is observed. The incubation gets saturation after a certain number of pulses and the laser ablation of the material begins efficiently. At the UV and VIS wavelengths the number of the initial pulses, at which the optical transmittance begins to reduce, decreases from 16 up to 8 with increasing of the laser fluence up to 1.0, 2.5 and 10 J cm-2 for 266, 355 and 532 nm, respectively. In the case of 1064 nm the optical transmittance begins to reduce at 11th pulse incident at a fluence of 13 J cm-2 and the number of the pulses decreases to 8 when the fluence reaches value of 16 J cm-2. The threshold laser fluence needed to induce incubation process after certain number of pulses of 8 is different for every wavelength irradiation as the values increase from 1.0 for 266 nm up to 16 J cm-2 for 1064 nm. The incubation and the ablation processes occur in the PDMS elastomer material during its pulsed laser treatment are a complex function of the wavelength, fluence, number of pulses and the material properties as well.

  16. Ultraviolet Raman scattering from persistent chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Wästerby, Pär.; Landström, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Laser induced Raman scattering at excitation wavelengths in the middle ultraviolet was examined using a pulsed tunable laser based spectrometer system. Droplets of chemical warfare agents, with a volume of 2 μl, were placed on a silicon surface and irradiated with sequences of laser pulses. The Raman scattering from V-series nerve agents, Tabun (GA) and Mustard gas (HD) was studied with the aim of finding the optimum parameters and the requirements for a detection system. A particular emphasis was put on V-agents that have been previously shown to yield relatively weak Raman scattering in this excitation band.

  17. New and Advanced Picosecond Lasers for Tattoo Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatto, Maurice A; Amir, Ruthie; Bhawalkar, Jayant; Sierra, Rafael; Bankowski, Richard; Rozen, Doran; Dierickx, Christine; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Early methods of tattoo removal ultimately resulted in unacceptable cosmetic outcomes. While the introduction of laser technology was an improvement over the existing chemical, mechanical, and surgical procedures, the use of nonselective tattoo removal with carbon dioxide and argon lasers led to scarring. Q-switched lasers with nanosecond (10-9) pulse domains were considered to have revolutionized tattoo treatment, by selectively heating the tattoo particles, while reducing the adverse sequelae to adjacent normal skin. Theoretical considerations of restricting pulse duration, to heat tattoo particles to higher temperatures, proposed the use of sub-nanosecond pulses to target particles with thermal relaxation times lower than the nanosecond pulses in Q-switched lasers. Initial studies demonstrated that picosecond (10-12) pulses were more effective than nanosecond pulses in clearing black tattoos. Advances in picosecond technology led to the development of commercially available lasers, incorporating several different wavelengths, to further refine pigment targeting.

  18. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  19. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, Jr.; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag+ concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  20. Laser additive manufacturing of high-performance materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    This book entitled “Laser Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance Materials” covers the specific aspects of laser additive manufacturing of high-performance new materials components based on an unconventional materials incremental manufacturing philosophy, in terms of materials design and preparation, process control and optimization, and theories of physical and chemical metallurgy. This book describes the capabilities and characteristics of the development of new metallic materials components by laser additive manufacturing process, including nanostructured materials, in situ composite materials, particle reinforced metal matrix composites, etc. The topics presented in this book, similar as laser additive manufacturing technology itself, show a significant interdisciplinary feature, integrating laser technology, materials science, metallurgical engineering, and mechanical engineering. This is a book for researchers, students, practicing engineers, and manufacturing industry professionals interested i...

  1. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  2. Laser Rewelding of 304L Stainless Steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, Michael Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodelas, Jeffrey [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Laser welding of 304L stainless steel during component fabrication has been found to alter the chemical composition of the steel due to material evaporation. During repair or rework, or during potential reuse/ rewelding of certain components, the potential exists to alter the composition to the extent that the material becomes prone to solidification cracking. This work aims to characterize the extent of this susceptibility in order to make informed decisions regarding rewelding practice and base metal chemistry allowances.

  3. Incoherent and Laser Photodeposition on Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    mixing system. Both a carbon dioxide and dry chemical fire extinguisher were on hand in case a fire was initiated by the compounds. The dimethvlzinc was...summarizes three months of experimental effort devoted toward the production of thin films by the photodissociation of organometallic molecules containing the...that the threshold wavelength for the photodissociation of both Zn- 0 and Se- (CH3 )2 was approximately 2420A. Consequently, these laser photodeposition

  4. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanawade, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Kanawade@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Mehari, Fanuel [Master Programme in Advanced Optical Technologies (MAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Glueckstrasse 11, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Tangermann-Gerk, Katja [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Michael [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS.

  5. Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy on laser-doped silicon with different surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Joon; Franklin, Evan; Fell, Andreas; Ernst, Marco; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Macdonald, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μ-PLS) is applied to investigate shallow layers of laser-processed silicon for solar cell applications. Micron-scale measurement (with spatial resolution down to 1 μm) enables investigation of the fundamental impact of laser processing on the electronic properties of silicon as a function of position within the laser-processed region, and in particular at specific positions such as at the boundary/edge of processed and unprocessed regions. Low-temperature μ-PLS enables qualitative analysis of laser-processed regions by identifying PLS signals corresponding to both laser-induced doping and laser-induced damage. We show that the position of particular luminescence peaks can be attributed to band-gap narrowing corresponding to different levels of subsurface laser doping, which is achieved via multiple 248 nm nanosecond excimer laser pulses with fluences in the range 1.5-4 J/cm2 and using commercially available boron-rich spin-on-dopant precursor films. We demonstrate that characteristic defect PL spectra can be observed subsequent to laser doping, providing evidence of laser-induced crystal damage. The impact of laser parameters such as fluence and number of repeat pulses on laser-induced damage is also analyzed by observing the relative level of defect PL spectra and absolute luminescence intensity. Luminescence owing to laser-induced damage is observed to be considerably larger at the boundaries of laser-doped regions than at the centers, highlighting the significant role of the edges of laser-doped region on laser doping quality. Furthermore, by comparing the damage signal observed after laser processing of two different substrate surface conditions (chemically-mechanically polished and tetramethylammonium hydroxide etched), we show that wafer preparation can be an important factor impacting the quality of laser-processed silicon and solar cells.

  6. Photobiomodulation in laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Rong, Dong-Liang; Huang, Jin; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Laser surgery provides good exposure with clear operating fields and satisfactory preliminary functional results. In contrast to conventional excision, it was found that matrix metalloproteinases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases -1 mRNA expression is higher, myofibroblasts appeared and disappeared slower in laser excision wounds. It has been suggested that the better anatomical and functional results achieved following laser cordectomy may be explained by the fact that such procedures result in better, more rapid healing processes to recover vocal cord for early glottic tumors and better. In this paper, the role of photobiomodulation in laser surgery will be discussed by the cultured monolayer normal human skin fibroblast model of the photobiomodulation of marginal irradiation of high intensity laser beam, the photobiomodulation related to the irradiated tissue, the biological information model of photobiomodulation and the animal models of laser surgery. Although high intensity laser beam is so intense that it destroys the irradiated cells or tissue, its marginal irradiation intensity is so low that there is photobiomodulation on non-damage cells to modulate the regeneration of partly damaged tissue so that the surgery of laser of different parameters results in different post-surgical recovery. It was concluded that photobiomodulation might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery, which might be used to design laser surgery.

  7. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  8. Laser treatment in gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  9. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected.

  10. Dermatological laser treatment. Dermatologisk laserbehandling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moerk, N.J.; Austad, J. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)); Helland, S. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway)); Thune, P. (Ullevaal Sykehus, Oslo (Norway)); Volden, G. (University and Regional Hospital, Trondheim (Norway)); Falk, E. (University and Regional Hospital, Tromsoe (Norway))

    1991-10-01

    The article reviews the different lasers used in dermatology. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of naevus flammeus (''portwine stain'') where lasers are the treatment of choice. Argon laser and pulsed dye laser are the main lasers used in vascular skin diseases, and the article focuses on these two types. Copper-vapour laser, neodymium-YAG laser and CO{sub 2} laser are also presented. Information is provided about the availability of laser technology in the different health regions in Norway. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  12. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [William and Mary College; Klopf, John M. [William and Mary College; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB

    2014-08-01

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  13. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  14. Lasers in Dermatology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Nouri, Keyvan

    2012-01-01

    Laser technology is constantly evolving and progressing. The use of laser therapy is vastly expanding and for this reason a medical book of this magnitude is necessary. Lasers and Light Therapy includes an up-to-date comprehensive look at lasers and light therapy not only in the field of Cutaneous Laser Surgery, but in other medical specialties as well.

  15. Influence of laser power on tensile properties and material characteristics of laser-sintered UHMWPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Yas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE has excellent properties, such as high mechanical performance, low friction, high wear and chemical resistance but so far there has been limited use in additive manufacturing (AM. Laser sintering of polymers is one of the most promising AM technologies due to its ability to produce complex geometries with accurate dimensions and good mechanical properties. Consequently, this study investigates the influence of laser power on physical and mechanical properties of UHMWPE parts produced by laser sintering. In particular mechanical properties, such as Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS, Young’s Modulus and elongation at break were evaluated alongside relative density, dilation and shrinkage. Finally, the fracture surface of the tensile test specimens was examined by electron microscopy. Results show that within a laser power range of 6–12 W there appears to be an optimum where tensile strength and relative density reach a maximum, dilation is minimised and where elongation increases with laser power. UTS up to 2.42 MPa, modulus up to 72.6 MPa and elongation at break up to 51.4% were observed. Relative density and part dimensions are also influenced by laser power.

  16. Setup for functional cell ablation with lasers: coupling of a laser to a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Sean T; Hidalgo, Alicia; de Belle, J Steven; Keshishian, Haig

    2012-06-01

    The selective removal of cells by ablation is a powerful tool in the study of eukaryotic developmental biology, providing much information about their origin, fate, or function in the developing organism. In Drosophila, three main methods have been used to ablate cells: chemical, genetic, and laser ablation. Each method has its own applicability with regard to developmental stage and the cells to be ablated, and its own limitations. The primary advantage of laser-based ablation is the flexibility provided by the method: The operations can be performed in any cell pattern and at any time in development. Laser-based techniques permit manipulation of structures within cells, even to the molecular level. They can also be used for gene activation. However, laser ablation can be expensive, labor-intensive, and time-consuming. Although live cells can be difficult to image in Drosophila embryos, the use of vital fluorescent imaging methods has made laser-mediated cell manipulation methods more appealing; the methods are relatively straightforward. This article provides the information necessary for setting up and using a laser microscope for lasesr ablation studies.

  17. Physical and Chemical Sciences Center - research briefs. Volume 1-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattern, P.L.

    1994-12-31

    This report provides brief summaries of research performed in chemical and physical sciences at Sandia National Laboratories. Programs are described in the areas of advanced materials and technology, applied physics and chemistry, lasers, optics, and vision, and resources and capabilities.

  18. Laser/tissue interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dederich, D N

    1991-01-01

    When laser light impinges on tissue, it can reflect, scatter, be absorbed, or transmit to the surrounding tissue. Absorption controls to a great degree the extent to which reflection, scattering and transmission occur, and wavelength is the primary determinant of absorption. The CO2 laser is consistently absorbed by most materials and tissues and the Nd-YAG laser wavelength is preferentially absorbed in pigmented tissues. The factors which determine the initial tissue effect include the laser wavelength, laser power, laser waveform, tissue optical properties, and tissue thermal properties. There are almost an infinite number of combinations of these factors possible, many of which would result in unacceptable damage to the tissues. This underscores the need to thoroughly test any particular combination of these factors on the conceptual, in-vitro, and in-vivo level before a treatment is offered.

  19. Principles of Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Svelto, Orazio

    2010-01-01

    This new Fifth Edition of Principles of Lasers incorporates corrections to the previous edition. The text’s essential mission remains the same: to provide a wide-ranging yet unified description of laser behavior, physics, technology, and current applications. Dr. Svelto emphasizes the physical rather than the mathematical aspects of lasers, and presents the subject in the simplest terms compatible with a correct physical understanding. Praise for earlier editions: "Professor Svelto is himself a longtime laser pioneer and his text shows the breadth of his broad acquaintance with all aspects of the field … Anyone mastering the contents of this book will be well prepared to understand advanced treatises and research papers in laser science and technology." (Arthur L. Schawlow, 1981 Nobel Laureate in Physics) "Already well established as a self-contained introduction to the physics and technology of lasers … Professor Svelto’s book, in this lucid translation by David Hanna, can be strongly recommended for...

  20. Laser Cutting, Development Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review of the development trends in laser cutting will be given.The technology, which is the fastest expanding industrial production technology will develop in both its core market segment: Flat bed cutting of sheet metal, as it will expand in heavy industry and in cutting o...... of 3-dimensional shapes.The CO2-laser will also in the near future be the dominating laser source in the market, although the new developments in ND-YAG-lasers opens for new possibilities for this laser type.......In this paper a short review of the development trends in laser cutting will be given.The technology, which is the fastest expanding industrial production technology will develop in both its core market segment: Flat bed cutting of sheet metal, as it will expand in heavy industry and in cutting...

  1. Laser materials production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianinoni, I.; Musci, M.

    1985-09-01

    The characteristics and the perspectives of the new photochemical laser techniques for materials production will be briefly analysed and some recent experimental results both on large area deposition of thin films and on synthesis of powders will be reported. As an example of an IR laser process, the cw CO 2 laser-induced deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon will be described in some detail. The results of some UV experiments for semiconductor, metal and insulating film depositions will also be discussed. The features of the process for laser-driven synthesis of powders and the characteristics of the produced particles will be evidenced, and some of their technological applications will be outlined. The requirements of the laser sources suitable for this kind of applications are in general the same as in gas-phase laser chemistry, however it will be pointed out how some parameters are more significant for this specific use.

  2. Lasers Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thyagarajan, K

    2010-01-01

    Lasers: Fundamentals and Applications, serves as a vital textbook to accompany undergraduate and graduate courses on lasers and their applications. Ever since their invention in 1960, lasers have assumed tremendous importance in the fields of science, engineering and technology because of their diverse uses in basic research and countless technological applications. This book provides a coherent presentation of the basic physics behind the way lasers work, and presents some of their most important applications in vivid detail. After reading this book, students will understand how to apply the concepts found within to practical, tangible situations. This textbook includes worked-out examples and exercises to enhance understanding, and the preface shows lecturers how to most beneficially match the textbook with their course curricula. The book includes several recent Nobel Lectures, which will further expose students to the emerging applications and excitement of working with lasers. Students who study lasers, ...

  3. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabashin AV

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3, is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  4. Lasers in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugumari Elavarasu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20 th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  5. Nuclear-pumped lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Prelas, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on Nuclear-Pumped Laser (NPL) technology and provides the reader with a fundamental understanding of NPLs, a review of research in the field, and exploration of large scale NPL system design and applications. Early chapters look at the fundamental properties of lasers, nuclear-pumping and nuclear reactions that may be used as drivers for nuclear-pumped lasers. The book goes on to explore the efficient transport of energy from the ionizing radiation to the laser medium and then the operational characteristics of existing nuclear-pumped lasers. Models based on Mathematica, explanations and a tutorial all assist the reader’s understanding of this technology. Later chapters consider the integration of the various systems involved in NPLs and the ways in which they can be used, including beyond the military agenda. As readers will discover, there are significant humanitarian applications for high energy/power lasers, such as deflecting asteroids, space propulsion, power transmission and mining....

  6. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  7. A gas laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sydzo, Y.; Norio, T.

    1984-04-02

    It is reported that an improved gas laser system with active medium circulation has been developed. The design of the gas laser is given in block diagram form, and its principle of operation is described in detail. The gaseous active medium flows through the inlet hole to the laser system, and is uniformly dispersed as it flows through the cylindrical diffuser. Thus, a near uniform distribution in the flow velocity of the gas flow in the laser discharge tube is achieved. The gas flow velocity along the edges of the discharge tube exceeds somewhat the flow velocity in the central section, which aids in generating and maintaining a stable and uniform pumping discharge. It is established experimentally that when using the proposed design, the parameters of the output emission from the gas laser are improved significantly. A relationship is given which demonstrates the near linear relationship between the pumping voltage and the output emission power from a gas laser.

  8. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  9. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  10. Arduino based laser control

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal Muñoz, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    ARDUINO is a vey usefull platform for prototypes. In this project ARDUINO will be used for controling a Semiconductor Tuneable Laser. [ANGLÈS] Diode laser for communications control based on an Arduino board. Temperature control implementation. Software and hardware protection for the laser implementation. [CASTELLÀ] Control de un láser de comunicaciones ópticas desde el ordenador utilizando una placa Arduino. Implementación de un control de temperatura y protección software y hardware ...

  11. Laser cutting plastic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  12. Precision laser aiming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Brandon R.; Todd, Steven N.

    2009-04-28

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.

  13. Laser precision microfabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Sugioka, Koji; Pique, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Miniaturization and high precision are rapidly becoming a requirement for many industrial processes and products. As a result, there is greater interest in the use of laser microfabrication technology to achieve these goals. This book composed of 16 chapters covers all the topics of laser precision processing from fundamental aspects to industrial applications to both inorganic and biological materials. It reviews the sate of the art of research and technological development in the area of laser processing.

  14. Semiconductor laser. Halbleiterlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuenstel, K.; Gohla, B.; Tegude, F.; Luz, G.; Hildebrand, O.

    1987-08-27

    A highly modulable semiconductor laser and a process for its manufacture are described. The semiconductor laser has a substrate, a stack of semiconductor layers and electrical contacts. To reduce the capacity, the width of the stack of semiconductor layers is reduced at the sides by anisotropic etching. The electrical contacts are situated on the same side of the substrate and are applied in the same stage of the process. The semiconductor laser is suitable for monolithic integration in other components.

  15. A gas laser design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syudzo, Y.; Nooya, Kh.

    1984-05-28

    A gas laser design that excludes direct contact between the gas medium and the atmosphere is proposed. The laser operates at a reduced gas pressure. After shutdown, a special system is used to increase the gas pressure inside the discharge chamber, which approaches atmospheric pressure. The laser employs an internal optical resonator. The electrical discharge which excites the gas medium originates from three electrodes located within the gas discharge tube.

  16. Lasers in Ophthalmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    In recent years,lasers have entered every fieldof medicine and especially so in ophthalmol-ogy.The scientific basis of lasers in ophthal-mology is based on three mechanisms:1.Photothermal effectLasers:argon,krypton,dye and diodeA thermal effect is generated when laserenergy is absorbed by pigment leading to in-creased vibration and therefore heat content.A

  17. Microspectral investigation of hair of one girl during six years by laser emission analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmenko, Elena L.; Sokolova, Tatiana N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2001-10-01

    Multiple chemical elements of clinical and nutritional interest were measured in the hair of a girl - cerebral palsy patient. Sixteen samples of hair were cut and investigated to determine time and nutrition trends by using laser and arc emission spectroscopy.

  18. Laser-Directed CVD 3D Printing of Refractory Metal Rocket Propulsion Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project, Ultramet will develop a three-dimensional (3D) laser-directed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) additive manufacturing system to build free-form...

  19. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deri, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  20. Tunable Microfluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Helbo, Bjarne; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a tunable microfluidic dye laser fabricated in SU-8. The tunability is enabled by integrating a microfluidic diffusion mixer with an existing microfluidic dye laser design by Helbo et al. By controlling the relative flows in the mixer between a dye solution and a solvent......, the concentration of dye in the laser cavity can be adjusted, allowing the wavelength to be tuned. Wavelength tuning controlled by the dye concentration was demonstrated with macroscopic dye lasers already in 1971, but this principle only becomes practically applicable by the use of microfluidic mixing...

  1. Principles of laser dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Khanin, YI

    1995-01-01

    This monograph summarizes major achievements in laser dynamics over the past three decades. The book begins with two introductory Chapters. Chapter 1 offers general considerations on quantum oscillators, formulates the requirements for the laser key elements and shows how these requirements are met in different laser systems. The second Chapter proposes the mathematical models used in semiclassical laser theory, discusses the approximations and simplifications in particular cases, and specifies the range of applicability of these models. In Chapters 3-5 attention is given primarily to the stea

  2. High power lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Niku-Lari, A

    1989-01-01

    The use of lasers for the working and treatment of materials is becoming increasingly common in industry. However, certain laser applications, for example, in welding, cutting and drilling, are more widely exploited than others. Whilst the potential of lasers for the surface treatment of metals is well recognised, in practice, this particular application is a relative newcomer. The 24 papers in this volume present the latest research and engineering developments in the use of lasers for processes such as surface melting, surface alloying and cladding, and machining, as well as discussing th

  3. Introduction to laser technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hitz, C Breck; Hecht, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The only introductory text on the market today that explains the underlying physics and engineering applicable to all lasersAlthough lasers are becoming increasingly important in our high-tech environment, many of the technicians and engineers who install, operate, and maintain them have had little, if any, formal training in the field of electro-optics. This can result in less efficient usage of these important tools. Introduction to Laser Technology, Fourth Edition provides readers with a good understanding of what a laser is and what it can and cannot do. The book explains what types of las.

  4. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  5. Dental lasers and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariasen, K L; Dederich, D N

    1991-07-01

    We have attempted to accomplish two purposes in this article. First, we have presented the case that extensive scientific investigation must form the base of our profession, that it must be an ongoing, continuous process and that laser dentistry must be developed through extensive scientific inquiry--as all of our treatment modalities should be. Second, we have presented many examples of the science involved in the development of laser dentistry. Lasers do have far-reaching potential for application to dentistry. We, as a profession, must insist that such laser development is done properly, not foisted upon us based on anecdotal reports and incomplete research.

  6. Physics of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mroziewicz, B; Nakwaski, W

    2013-01-01

    Written for readers who have some background in solid state physics but do not necessarily possess any knowledge of semiconductor lasers, this book provides a comprehensive and concise account of fundamental semiconductor laser physics, technology and properties. The principles of operation of these lasers are therefore discussed in detail with the interrelations between their design and optical, electrical and thermal properties. The relative merits of a large number of laser structures and their parameters are described to acquaint the reader with the various aspects of the semiconductor l

  7. Laser processing of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Dutta Majumdar; I Manna

    2003-06-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is a coherent and monochromatic beam of electromagnetic radiation that can propagate in a straight line with negligible divergence and occur in a wide range of wavelength, energy/power and beam-modes/configurations. As a result, lasers find wide applications in the mundane to the most sophisticated devices, in commercial to purely scientific purposes, and in life-saving as well as life-threatening causes. In the present contribution, we provide an overview of the application of lasers for material processing. The processes covered are broadly divided into four major categories; namely, laser-assisted forming, joining, machining and surface engineering. Apart from briefly introducing the fundamentals of these operations, we present an updated review of the relevant literature to highlight the recent advances and open questions. We begin our discussion with the general applications of lasers, fundamentals of laser-matter interaction and classification of laser material processing. A major part of the discussion focuses on laser surface engineering that has attracted a good deal of attention from the scientific community for its technological significance and scientific challenges. In this regard, a special mention is made about laser surface vitrification or amorphization that remains a very attractive but unaccomplished proposition.

  8. Trends in laser micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebler, Frank; van Nunen, Joris; Held, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Laser Micromachining is well established in industry. Depending on the application lasers with pulse length from μseconds to femtoseconds and wavelengths from 1064nm and its harmonics up to 5μm or 10.6μm are used. Ultrafast laser machining using pulses with pico or femtosecond duration pulses is gaining traction, as it offers very precise processing of materials with low thermal impact. Large-scale industrial ultrafast laser applications show that the market can be divided into various sub segments. One set of applications demand low power around 10W, compact footprint and are extremely sensitive to the laser price whilst still demanding 10ps or shorter laser pulses. A second set of applications are very power hungry and only become economically feasible for large scale deployments at power levels in the 100+W class. There is also a growing demand for applications requiring fs-laser pulses. In our presentation we would like to describe these sub segments by using selected applications from the automotive and electronics industry e.g. drilling of gas/diesel injection nozzles, dicing of LED substrates. We close the presentation with an outlook to micromachining applications e.g. glass cutting and foil processing with unique new CO lasers emitting 5μm laser wavelength.

  9. Laser enhanced hydrolysis of selected polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzts, Mary Paige

    This project serves as a preliminary examination of selectively enhancing bond cleavage during chemical reactions in biological molecules by using continuous wave infrared lasers. To analyze protein content, polypeptides are broken into their constituent amino acids through hydrolysis. The cleaving of the peptide bond has traditionally been accomplished under harsh conditions, 110°C in 6 N hydrochloric acid for 24 hours. In this project hydrolysis was strongly enhanced by irradiating the dipeptides, threonyl-aspartate and alanyl-alanine, for 30 minutes with coherent infrared radiation from a tunable carbon dioxide laser. The dipeptide tyrosyl-tyrosine, the chemical N- methylacetimide, and the protein BSA were successfully hydrolyzed with the laser. The effect of reaction parameters such as laser power and HCl concentration were studied, as well as the effect of the primary parameter, the beam wavelength. The samples were analyzed using standard biological methods for determining the amino acid concentration, thin layer chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. These methods gave consistent results for the irradiated samples as well as for standard amino acids and polypeptide samples. The results from these methods were used to create the hydrolysis spectra. The catalytic action of the laser was strongly wavelength dependent. The hydrolysis spectra of the molecules were compared to the absorption spectra of the samples. Laser enhanced hydrolysis occurred when the laser wavelength coincided with a line in the dipeptide spectra. This weak line in each of the dipeptide spectra is consistent both in position and strength with a line in NMA, which has been identified as a fundamental mode associated with the peptide bond. From the experimental results, the enhanced process appears to occur in the vapor phase. The initially liquid sample was progressively evaporated, and fully hydrolyzed material was carried to a collection trap by the vapor. It can, in principle

  10. Laser processing with specially designed laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asratyan, A. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Feofanov, I. N.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Lyabin, N. A.; Pogosyan, L. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Zakharyan, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using laser systems to form beams with special spatial configurations has been studied. The laser systems applied had a self-conjugate cavity based on the elements of copper vapor lasers (LT-5Cu, LT-10Cu, LT-30Cu) with an average power of 5, 10, or 30 W. The active elements were pumped by current pulses of duration 80-100 ns. The duration of laser generation pulses was up to 25 ns. The generator unit included an unstable cavity, where one reflector was a special mirror with a reflecting coating. Various original optical schemes used were capable of exploring spatial configurations and energy characteristics of output laser beams in their interaction with micro- and nanoparticles fabricated from various materials. In these experiments, the beam dimensions of the obtained zones varied from 0.3 to 5 µm, which is comparable with the minimum permissible dimensions determined by the optical elements applied. This method is useful in transforming a large amount of information at the laser pulse repetition rate of 10-30 kHz. It was possible to realize the high-precision micromachining and microfabrication of microscale details by direct writing, cutting and drilling (with the cutting width and through-hole diameters ranging from 3 to 100 µm) and produce microscale, deep, intricate and narrow grooves on substrate surfaces of metals and nonmetal materials. This system is used for producing high-quality microscale details without moving the object under treatment. It can also be used for microcutting and microdrilling in a variety of metals such as molybdenum, copper and stainless steel, with a thickness of up to 300 µm, and in nonmetals such as silicon, sapphire and diamond with a thickness ranging from 10 µm to 1 mm with different thermal parameters and specially designed laser beam.

  11. Millisecond laser machining of transparent materials assisted by nanosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Zhang, Hongchao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2015-01-26

    A new form of double pulse composed of a nanosecond laser and a millisecond laser is proposed for laser machining transparent materials. To evaluate its advantages and disadvantages, experimental investigations are carried out and the corresponding results are compared with those of single millisecond laser. The mechanism is discussed from two aspects: material defects and effects of modifications induced by nanosecond laser on thermal stress field during millisecond laser irradiation. It is shown that the modifications of the sample generated by nanosecond laser improves the processing efficiency of subsequent millisecond laser, while limits the eventual size of modified region.

  12. Laser Program annual report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W. (eds.)

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  13. Shipborne Laser Beam Weapon System for Defence against Cruise Missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Dudeja

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Sea-skim~ing cruise missiles pose the greatest threat to a surface ship in the present-day war scenario. The convenitional close-in-weapon-systems (CIWSs are becoming less reliable against these new challenges requiring extremely fast reaction time. Naval Forces see a high energy laser as a feasible andjeffective directed energy weapon against sea-skimming antiship cruise missiles becauseof its .ability to deliver destructive energy at the speed of light on to a distant target. The paper comparesthe technology and capability of deuterium fluoride (DF and chemical-oxygen-iodine laser (COIL in effectively performing the role of a shipborne CIWS altainst sea-skimming missiles. Out of these twolasers, it is argued that DF laser wo.uld be more effective a,s a shipborne weapon for defence against sea-skimmin,g cruise missiles. Besides the high energy laser as the primary (killing laser, othersub-systems required in the complete weapon system would be: A beacon laser to sense phase distor'ions in the primary laser, adaptive optics to compensate the atmospheric distortions, beam-directing optics, illuminating lasers, IRST sensors, surveillance and tracking radars, interfacing system, etc.

  14. Lasers for Treatment of Melasma and Post-Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Sarkar, Rashmi; Garg, Vijay K; Arya, Latika

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpigmentary disorders, especially melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), cause significant social and emotional stress to the patients. Although many treatment modalities have been developed for melasma and PIH, its management still remains a challenge due to its recurrent and refractory nature. With the advent of laser technology, the treatment options have increased especially for dermal or mixed melasma. To review the literature on the use of cutaneous lasers for melasma and PIH. We carried out a PubMed search using following terms “lasers, IPL, melasma, PIH”. We cited the use of various lasers to treat melasma and PIH, including Q-switched Nd:YAG, Q-switched alexandrite, pulsed dye laser, and various fractional lasers. We describe the efficacy and safety of these lasers for the treatment of hyperpigmentation. Choosing the appropriate laser and the correct settings is vital in the treatment of melasma. The use of latter should be restricted to cases unresponsive to topical therapy or chemical peels. Appropriate maintenance therapy should be selected to avoid relapse of melasma. PMID:23060704

  15. Lasers for treatment of melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpigmentary disorders, especially melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH, cause significant social and emotional stress to the patients. Although many treatment modalities have been developed for melasma and PIH, its management still remains a challenge due to its recurrent and refractory nature. With the advent of laser technology, the treatment options have increased especially for dermal or mixed melasma. To review the literature on the use of cutaneous lasers for melasma and PIH. We carried out a PubMed search using following terms "lasers, IPL, melasma, PIH". We cited the use of various lasers to treat melasma and PIH, including Q-switched Nd:YAG, Q-switched alexandrite, pulsed dye laser, and various fractional lasers. We describe the efficacy and safety of these lasers for the treatment of hyperpigmentation. Choosing the appropriate laser and the correct settings is vital in the treatment of melasma. The use of latter should be restricted to cases unresponsive to topical therapy or chemical peels. Appropriate maintenance therapy should be selected to avoid relapse of melasma.

  16. American Chemical Society: Twentieth northeast regional meeting. Program and Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings contain papers on the following topics: preparation, characterization, and applications of fine particles; multinuclear NMR spectroscopy; chemical aspects of wine making; organic electrochemistry; chemical education; laboratory information management systems; laser-based processing and diagnostics of materials; modern liquid chromatography; high-temperature superconductivity; organic chemistry; chemometrics; colloid and surface science; biological chemistry; environmental sciences; drug analysis; and organometallic chemistry. Papers within the scope of the Energy Data Base have been processed separately.

  17. Fingerprint fluorescence identifying by using the wide-band tunable laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liu; Zhou, Jinfeng; Yin, Baolu; Wang, Li; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Huan; Ai, Kangyun; Chan, Benian

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, we report the `Ultraviolet-Visible-Infrared Wide Band Tunable Pulse Laser' has been used in identifying the criminal's fingerprint. Different contaminator and secretion of fingerprint in different carrier can be reappeared by illuminating with different wavelength of laser beam. Separating off the laser beam from its induced fluorescence beam with different optical filter, the clear high signal noise ratio fluorescence picture is obtained in a dark background. A series of fluorescence fingerprint picture excited by different wavelength laser light is taken in our Lab. In addition, by using the wide band tunable laser, we test different fluorescence powder or reagent, which sensitivity in different wavelength, a lot of clear fluorescence picture is taken by correspondent wavelength laser beam injection. In this way, the wide band tunable laser offers a wide band of wavelength for develop high sensitivity new fluorescence powder or reagent in chemical field.

  18. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers operating in external ring cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Revin, D G; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2015-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode locked operation remains a challenge despite dedicated effort. Here we report the first demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents of a standard commercial laser chip.

  19. Laser Stabilization with Laser Cooled Strontium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Takashi Røjle

    The frequency stability of current state-of-the-art stabilized clock lasers are limited by thermal fluctuations of the ultra-stable optical reference cavities used for their frequency stabilization. In this work, we study the possibilities for surpassing this thermal limit by exploiting the nonli......The frequency stability of current state-of-the-art stabilized clock lasers are limited by thermal fluctuations of the ultra-stable optical reference cavities used for their frequency stabilization. In this work, we study the possibilities for surpassing this thermal limit by exploiting...... the nonlinear effects from coupling of an optical cavity to laser cooled atoms having a narrow transition linewidth. Here, we have realized such a system where a thermal sample of laser cooled strontium-88 atoms are coupled to an optical cavity. The strontium-88 atoms were probed on the narrow 1S0-3P1 inter......-combination line at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. The dynamics of the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the probe light were experimentally studied in details with the purpose of applications to laser stabilization. The atomic sample temperature was in the mK range which brought this system out...

  20. High-power pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  1. Laser safety tools and training

    CERN Document Server

    Barat, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Lasers perform many unique functions in a plethora of applications, but there are many inherent risks with this continually burgeoning technology. Laser Safety: Tools and Training presents simple, effective ways for users in a variety of facilities to evaluate the hazards of any laser procedure and ensure they are following documented laser safety standards.Designed for use as either a stand-alone volume or a supplement to Laser Safety Management, this text includes fundamental laser and laser safety information and critical laser use information rarely found in a single source. The first lase

  2. The chemical life(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    You write this narrative autoethnography to open up a conversation about our chemical lives. You go through your day with chemical mindfulness, questioning taken-for-granted ideas about natural and artificial, healthy and unhealthy, dependency and addiction, trying to understand the chemical messages we consume through the experiences of everyday life. You reflect on how messages about chemicals influence and structure our lives and why some chemicals are celebrated and some are condemned. Using a second-person narrative voice, you show how the personal is relational and the chemical is cultural. You write because you seek a connection, a chemical bond.

  3. Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achi...

  4. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mehari, Fanuel; Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures.

  5. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Fundamentals, Applications, and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Anabitarte, F.; Cobo, A.; J. M. Lopez-Higuera

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that provides an accurate in situ quantitative chemical analysis and, thanks to the developments in new spectral processing algorithms in the last decade, has achieved a promising performance as a quantitative chemical analyzer at the atomic level. These possibilities along with the fact that little or no sample preparation is necessary have expanded the application fields of LIBS. In this paper, we review the state of the ar...

  6. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  7. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  8. Laser spectroscopy of protonium

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    1999-01-01

    High-precision laser spectroscopy of protonium (pp) is one of the future experiments being considered by ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. A possible scheme to produce protonium in vacuum and to detect laser transitions is presented, and implications of reaching high precision are discussed. (7 refs).

  9. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  10. Lasers, A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-02

    TA1675 Muncheryan , Hrand 14. Laser Fundamentals and Applications, 1486 Indianapolis , IN: H.W. Sams , c1975 . 2...Francisco , CA: the cmd , 1970. • TK787 1.3 Van Pelt , W.F . , et al . Laser Fundamentals and Experiments . US Washington , DC: U.S. Bur of Radiological

  11. Learning about Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Larry

    2011-01-01

    The word laser is an acronym. It stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers, invented in 1958, are used to cut and fuse materials, accurately survey long distances, communicate across fiber-optic phone lines, produce 3D pictures, make special effects, help navigation, and read bar codes for cash registers. A laser…

  12. Exciton laser rate equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garkavenko A. S.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The rate equations of the exciton laser in the system of interacting excitons have been obtained and the inverted population conditions and generation have been derived. The possibility of creating radically new gamma-ray laser has been shown.

  13. Dielectric laser accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  14. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...

  15. Laser hair removal pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  16. Athermal laser launch telescopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphues, F.G.; Henselmans, R.; Rijnveld, N.; Lemmen, M.H.J.; Doelman, N.J.; Nijkerk, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    ESO has developed a concept for a compact laser guide star unit for use in future Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. A small powerful laser is combined with a telescope that launches the beam, creating a single modular unit that can be mounted directly on a large telescope. This approach solves several o

  17. Regenerative similariton laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault North

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-pulsating lasers based on cascaded reshaping and reamplification (2R are capable of initiating ultrashort pulses despite the accumulation of large amounts of nonlinearities in all-fiber resonators. The spectral properties of pulses in self-similar propagation are compatible with cascaded 2R regeneration by offset filtering, making parabolic pulses suitable for the design of a laser of this recently introduced class. A new type of regenerative laser giving birth to similaritons is numerically investigated and shows that this laser is the analog of regenerative sources based solely on self-phase modulation and offset filtering. The regenerative similariton laser does not suffer from instabilities due to excessive nonlinearities and enables ultrashort pulse generation in a simple cavity configuration.

  18. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...... W CW fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. Finally, we briefly touch upon the subject of photo darkening and its origin....

  19. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  20. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...... in the weld causing expulsion of the melt pool. Trailing beams were applied to melt additional material and ensure a melt pool. The method showed good results for increasing tolerances to impurities and reduction of scrapped parts from blowouts during laser welding....

  1. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 100 m single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to megawatt power levels. Furthermore, we describe the novel airclad-based pump combiners and their use in a completely...... monolithic 350 W cw fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. © 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)....

  2. Auricular Acupuncture with Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Round

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture is a method which has been successfully used in various fields of medicine especially in the treatment of pain relief. The introduction of lasers especially low-level lasers into medicine brought besides the already existing stimulation with needles and electricity an additional technique to auricular acupuncture. This literature research looks at the historical background, the development and the anatomical and neurological aspects of auricular acupuncture in general and auricular laser acupuncture in detail. Preliminary scientific findings on auricular acupuncture with laser have been described in detail and discussed critically in this review article. The results of the studies have shown evidence of the effect of auricular laser acupuncture. However, a comparison of these studies was impossible due to their different study designs. The most important technical as well as study parameters were described in detail in order to give more sufficient evidence and to improve the quality of future studies.

  3. Solid State Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  4. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  5. Ceramic laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  6. Discrete Thermodynamics of Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zilbergleyt, B

    2007-01-01

    The paper offers a discrete thermodynamic model of lasers. Laser is an open system; its equilibrium is based on a balance of two thermodynamic forces, one related to the incoming pumping power and another to the emitted light. The basic expression for such equilibrium is a logistic map, graphical solutions to which are pitchfork bifurcation diagrams. As pumping force increases, the relative populations on the ground and lasing branches tend to zero and unity correspondingly. An interesting feature of this model is the line spectrum of the up and down transitions between the branches beyond bifurcation point. Even in a simple case of 2-level laser with only 2 possible transition types (up and down), the spectra look like sets of the line packets, starting well before the population inversion. This effect is an independent confirmation of the Einstein's prohibition on practical realization of 2-level laser. Multilevel lasers may be approached by employing the idea of thermodynamic activity for the emitting atom...

  7. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  8. Dark state lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, Cale M

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new type of laser resonator based on imaginary "energy-level splitting" (imaginary coupling, or quality factor Q splitting) in a pair of coupled microcavities. A particularly advantageous arrangement involves two microring cavities with different free-spectral ranges (FSRs) in a configuration wherein they are coupled by "far-?field" interference in a shared radiation channel. A novel Vernier-like effect for laser resonators is designed where only one longitudinal resonant mode has a lower loss than the small signal gain and can achieve lasing while all other modes are suppressed. This configuration enables ultra-widely tunable single-frequency lasers based on either homogeneously or inhomogeneously broadened gain media. The concept is an alternative to the common external cavity configurations for achieving tunable single-mode operation in a laser. The proposed laser concept builds on a high-Q "dark state" that is established by radiative interference coupling and bears a direct analogy to parity...

  9. NASA Space Laser Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the next two decades, the number of space based laser missions for mapping, spectroscopy, remote sensing and other scientific investigations will increase several fold. The demand for high wall-plug efficiency, low noise, narrow linewidth laser systems to meet different systems requirements that can reliably operate over the life of a mission will be high. The general trends will be for spatial quality very close to the diffraction limit, improved spectral performance, increased wall-plug efficiency and multi-beam processing. Improved spectral performance will include narrower spectral width (very near the transform limit), increased wavelength stability and or tuning (depending on application) and lasers reaching a wider range of wavelengths stretching into the mid-infrared and the near ultraviolet. We are actively developing high efficiency laser transmitter and high-sensitivity laser receiver systems that are suitable for spaceborne applications.

  10. A gas laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sydzo, Y.

    1984-03-27

    It is reported that an improved design of a discharge tube for a gas laser is developed. A schematic of the discharge tube is given and its principle of operation is described in detail. In order to improve the flow of the gaseous active substance, it is proposed that tow additional incoming channels be used which are located between the primary incoming channels and the gas laser mirrors. The use of the additional incoming channels provides better circulation of the active medium in the regions near the laser mirrors. Thus, a more uniform heating of the region near the discharge tube is achieved due to the heat liberated from pumping discharge. It is noted that the proposed design serves to reduce the thermal deformation to the mirrors in the gas laser, and improves the laser efficiency.

  11. Longitudinal Mode Beat Intensities in a CW HF Chemical Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    explosions , magnetic storms, and solar activity on the earth’s atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere; the effects of optical, electromagnetic, and...W. R. Warren, Jr. M. A. Kwok J. S. Whittier • External SAMSO TRW Systems Group Lt. Col. Staubs (DYN) Lt. Col. J. R. Doughty (DYV) One

  12. Laser Induced Chemical Vapor Epitaxial Growth of Gallium Arsenide Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-23

    heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs. The important process parameters are: the substrate surface cleanliness , substrate temperature, composition and flow rate of the...hydrogen was used as the diluent and win.dw purging gas [9]. The important process parameters are: the substrate surface cleanliness , substrate temperature

  13. Small-Scale CW HF(DF) Chemical Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-03

    general public, including foreign nations. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publica - tion. Publication of this report does...Cco Lij L0 * cc LUz LUU =C C.CD -8O The discharge tahes place along a central core in the pyrex tube and terminates on a water-cooled Cu hole

  14. NCL(B) Based Short Wavelength Chemical Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-14

    Yield Measurement Results .......... 8 4.0 Derivation of Energy - Pooling Rate Constant ..... 10 5.0 Derivation of Gain Coefficient and Observation ...NCI(at A) at a rate of lxlO-1 1cm 3s-1 . It is desirable to confirm this rate measurement using an alternate methology . Although the emphasis of this...information about the kinetic processes involved in the underlying pumping energy transfer and pooling reactions. The dependence of the observed 665 nm

  15. Semiconductor Laser Diode Arrays by MOCVD (Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Roberts. N. J1. Mason. and M. Robinson, J. Cryst. Growth 68, 422 (1984). ’M. R. Leys. C. van Opdorp. M. P. A. .’iegers, and H. J. Talen -van der Mheen...geometry effects is and superlattices has been dominated obtained by including one measured by the MOCVD growth technology . data point in the analysis...Dapkus, Gallium : Arsenide Technology , D.K. Ferry, Ed., tices i Howard W. Sams and Co., Indianapolis, hetero- 1985, p. 79. s is nec- G . 4. G. Costrini and

  16. Phase Control of HF Chemical Lasers for Coherent Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    space vacuum and radiation effects on materials, lubrication and surface phenomena, photo- sensitive materials and sensors, high precision...3. PERFORMANCE INDEX .t£ J = 4 / (xTAx + uTBu)dt "’to 4. RICCATI EQUATION S = -SF - FTS - A + SGB -iGTs 5. OPTIMAL CONTROL GAINS C

  17. Laser-diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers; Laser diode reiki Nd:YAG lasear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, H.; Akiyama, Y.; Nakayama, M. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Laser-diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers are expected to be applied to laser processing fields such as welding, cutting, drilling, and marking due to their potential for high efficiency and compactness. We are designing and developing laser-diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers using numerical analysis simulation techniques such as ray tracing and thermal analysis. We have succeeded in achieving a laser power of more than 3 kW with 20% efficiency, which is the best ever obtained. In addition, we have developed a laser-diode pumped green laser by second harmonic generation, for precision machining on silicon wafers. (author)

  18. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milionis, Athanasios, E-mail: am2vy@virginia.edu [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Fragouli, Despina; Brandi, Fernando; Liakos, Ioannis; Barroso, Suset [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids.

  19. Laser conservation paleontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, John F.

    2001-10-01

    Just as lasers have found countless applications in science, industry, medicine, and entertainment, an array of real and potential uses for lasers in art-conservation analytes and practice have been investigated over the past thirty years. These include holographic recording, holographic recording, holographic nondestructive testing, laser-induced ultrasonic imaging, laser-scattering surface characterization, atomic and molecular analyses, photoacoustic spectroscopy, surface modification, as well as surface divestment and cleaning. The initial endeavors in exploring and assessing the utility of these tools for art conservation are recounted for investigations involving ruby, glass, ion, YAG, carbon dioxide, dye, and excimer lasers as well as high-intensity nonlaser light generators such as xenon flashlamps and argon pinchlamps. Initially, laser divestment/cleaning was, by general consensus, the least plausible laser application in art conservation. In the past ten years it has emerged to dominate all the other applications noted above. Today, at least a dozen firms supply user-friendly laser systems optimized for a range of art-conservation divestment applications. The first-generation laser-cleaning tools are essentially a laser, a beam-delivery device, and a debris- collection accessory. Advanced developmental work has turned in large measure to ancillary subsystems for more sophisticated process control. Of particular importance are acoustic, optical, spectral, EMP, and electronic-vision process control. Beam direction may be via manual, translational-scanner, or robotic beam positioning implemented by means of fiber optics, minors, or prisms and computer control. Substrate thermal alteration and debris redeposition may be minimized or avoided through the incorporation of a gas jet, fluid or fluid jet, or dry-ice blast.

  20. Study of silica coatings degradation under laser irradiation and in controlled environment; Etude de la degradation de couches minces de silice sous flux laser et en environnement controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S

    2006-11-15

    Performances of optical components submitted to high laser intensities are usually determined by their laser-induced damage threshold. This value represents the highest density of energy (fluence) sustainable by the component before its damage. When submitted to laser fluences far below this threshold, optical performances may also decrease with time. The degradation processes depend on laser characteristics, optical materials, and environment around the component. Silica being the most used material in optics, the aim of this study was to describe and analyse the physical-chemical mechanisms responsible for laser-induced degradation of silica coatings in controlled environment. Experimental results show that degradation is due to the growth of a carbon deposit in the irradiated zone. From these results, a phenomenological model has been proposed and validated with numerical simulations. Then, several technological solutions have been tested in order to reduce the laser-induced contamination of silica coatings. (author)