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Sample records for chemical ionization mass

  1. Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes some aspects of Negative Chemical Ionization (NCI) mass spectrometry. The reasons for the growing interest in NCI are: (i) to extend the basic knowledge of negative ions and their reactions in the gas phase; (ii) to investigate whether or not this knowledge of negative ions can be used successfully to elucidate the structure of molecules by mass spectrometry. (Auth.)

  2. Quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Spencer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS enables online, fast, in situ detection and quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. Two different CIMS approaches are demonstrated employing the strengths of single quadrupole mass spectrometry and triple quadrupole (tandem mass spectrometry. Both methods are capable of the measurement of hydroxyacetone, an analyte with minimal isobaric interferences. Tandem mass spectrometry provides direct separation of the isobaric compounds glycolaldehyde and acetic acid using distinct, collision-induced dissociation daughter ions. Measurement of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde by these methods was demonstrated during the ARCTAS-CARB 2008 campaign and the BEARPEX 2009 campaign. Enhancement ratios of these compounds in ambient biomass burning plumes are reported for the ARCTAS-CARB campaign. BEARPEX observations are compared to simple photochemical box model predictions of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation at the site.

  3. Mass spectrometry analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls: chemical ionization and selected ion chemical ionization using methane as a reagent gas

    OpenAIRE

    RAYMOND E. MARCH; MILA D. LAUSEVIC; TATJANA M. VASILJEVIC

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, coupled with a gas chromatograph, was used to compare the electron impact ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (Cl) technique, in terms of their selectivity in polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) quantitative analysis. The experiments were carried out with a modified Varian SATURN III quadrupole ion-storage mass spectrometer equipped with Varian waveform generator, coupled with a gas chromatograph with DB-5 capillary column. The di...

  4. Peroxy radical observations using chemical ionization mass spectrometry during TOPSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Christopher A.; Edwards, G. D.; Stephens, S.; Mauldin, L.; Kosciuch, E.; Zondlo, M.; Eisele, F.

    2003-03-01

    Peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) were measured by chemical conversion-chemical ionization mass spectroscopy in the TOPSE (Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox) campaign that took place February through May 2000. Instrumentation for these measurements was deployed on the NCAR/NSF C-130 aircraft that flew at latitudes from 40 to 85°N, and altitudes from the surface to 7.5 km over the North American continent. The measurements demonstrate the evolution of photochemical activity as time progresses through the study period due to increases in free radical source rates. The increase in average peroxy radical concentration moves northward as the maximum solar elevation and length of sunlit days increase. HOxROx (HO2 + RO2) concentrations are distributed lognormally with means of 11.5 and 7.8 pptv for the middle-latitude band (MLB) and high-latitude band (HLB), respectively. The observations agree well on average with steady state derived concentrations; measurement-model concentration ratios are 1.04 (MLB) and 0.94 (HLB). Concentrations within a given latitude band and altitude region sometimes appear to increase with NOx concentrations, but this correlation nearly disappears at low and moderate NOx levels when the data are parsed by radical production rate; lower radical levels are observed at the highest NOx levels measured (near 1 ppbv). These data are compared with results from other recent observations utilizing a variety of platforms.

  5. Chemical Aspects of the Extractive Methods of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2013-04-01

    Ambient ionization techniques allow complex chemical samples to be analyzed in their native state with minimal sample preparation. This brings the obvious advantages of simplicity, speed, and versatility to mass spectrometry: Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), for example, is used in chemical imaging for tumor margin diagnosis. This review on the extractive methods of ambient ionization focuses on chemical aspects, mechanistic considerations, and the accelerated chemical reactions occurring in charged liquid droplets generated in the spray process. DESI uses high-velocity solvent droplets to extract analytes from surfaces. Nano-DESI employs liquid microjunctions for analyte dissolution, whereas paper-spray ionization uses DC potentials applied to wet porous material such as paper or biological tissue to field emit charged analyte-containing solvent droplets. These methods also operate in a reactive mode in which added reagents allow derivatization during ionization. The accelerated reaction rates seen in charged microdroplets are useful in small-scale rapid chemical synthesis.

  6. Characterization of nonpolar lipids and steroids by using laser-induced acoustic desorption/chemical ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z; Daiya, S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H{sub 2}O) upon reaction with the ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H{sub 2}O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H{sub 2}O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids.

  7. Instrumental aspects of positive and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Stafford, G C

    1980-01-01

    Differences in recording positive and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectra on a quadrupole mass spectrometer are discussed. An analog positive and negative ion electron multiplier detector is described which is well suited for a quadrupole instrument. This detector significantly reduces baseline noise in the negative ion mode and improves positive ion high mass sensitivity.

  8. Characterization of typical chemical background interferences in atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Xinghua; Bruins, Andries P.; Covey, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    The structures and origins of typical chemical background noise ions in positive atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (API LC/MS) are investigated and summarized in this study. This was done by classifying chemical background ions using precursor and product ion sc

  9. Direct Laser Ablation and Ionization of Solids for Chemical Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Nelson, E J; Klunder, G L

    2005-09-02

    A laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer system is described for the direct chemical analysis of solids. An Nd:YAG laser is used for ablation and ionization of the sample in a quadrupole ion trap operated in an ion-storage (IS) mode that is coupled with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Single pulse experiments have demonstrated simultaneous detection of up to 14 elements present in glasses in the ppm range. However, detection of the components has produced non-stoichiometric results due to difference in ionization potentials and fractionation effects. Time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) was used to spatially map elemental species on the surface and provide further evidence of fractionation effects. Resolution (m/Dm) of 1500 and detection limits of approximately 10 pg have been achieved with a single laser pulse. The system configuration and related operating principles for accurately measuring low concentrations of isotopes are described.

  10. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH3OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH3OOH with CF3O- clustering chemistry. CH3OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H2O is ±80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H2O is estimated to be better than ±40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

  11. Real-Time Flavor Release from French Fries Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Burgering, M.J.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Flavor release from French fries was measured with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) using both assessors (in vivo) and a mouth model system (in vitro). Several volatiles measured with APCI were identified with MS-MS. The effect of frying time, salt addition, and a

  12. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    L. Rondo; Flagan, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantita...

  13. Quantitative analysis of abused drugs in physiological fluids by gas chromatography/chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods have been developed for quantitative analysis of commonly abused drugs in physiological fluids using gas chromatography/chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The methods are being evaluated in volunteer analytical and toxicological laboratories, and analytical manuals describing the methods are being prepared. The specific drug and metabolites included in this program are: Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, methadone, phencyclidine, methaqualone, morphine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, mescaline, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methyl amphetamine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, diazepam, and N-desmethyldiazepam. The current analytical methods utilize relatively conventional instrumentation and procedures, and are capable of measuring drug concentrations as low as 1 ng/ml. Various newer techniques such as sample clean-up by high performance liquid chromatography, separation by glass capillary chromatography, and ionization by negative ion chemical ionization are being investigated with respect to their potential for achieving higher sensitivity and specificity, as well as their ability to facilitate simultaneous analysis of more than one drug and metabolite. (Auth.)

  14. Ambient diode laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry of nonvolatile chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Schilling, Michael; Ahlmann, Norman; Michels, Antje; Hayen, Heiko; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F; Franzke, Joachim

    2013-03-19

    In this work, the combined use of desorption by a continuous wave near-infrared diode laser and ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge-based probe (laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry (LD-DBDI-MS)) is presented as an ambient ionization method for the mass spectrometric detection of nonvolatile chemicals on surfaces. A separation of desorption and ionization processes could be verified. The use of the diode laser is motivated by its low cost, ease of use, and small size. To achieve an efficient desorption, the glass substrates are coated at the back side with a black point (target point, where the sample is deposited) in order to absorb the energy offered by the diode laser radiation. Subsequent ionization is accomplished by a helium plasmajet generated in the dielectric barrier discharge source. Examples on the application of this approach are shown in both positive and negative ionization modes. A wide variety of multiclass species with low vapor pressure were tested including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and explosives (reserpine, roxithromycin, propazine, prochloraz, spinosad, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, enrofloxacin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, spinosad, cyclo-1,3,5,7-tetramethylene tetranitrate (HMX), and cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene trinitramine (RDX)). A comparative evaluation revealed that the use of the laser is advantageous, compared to just heating the substrate surface. PMID:23419061

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim

    2013-10-01

    Rationale Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) are detrimental species for refining processes in petroleum industry. Current mass spectrometric Methods that determine their composition are often preceded by derivatization and dopant addition approaches. Different ionization Methods have different impact on the molecular assignment of complex PASHs. The analysis of such species under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is still considered limited due to uncontrolled ion generation with low- and high-mass PASHs. Methods The ionization behavior of a model mixture of five selected PASH standards was investigated using an APCI source with nitrogen as the reagent gas. A complex thiophenic fraction was separated from a vacuum gas oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same ionization pattern was observed for the real thiophenic sample. It was found that S1 class species were the major sulfur-containing species found in the VGO sample. These species indicated the presence of alkylated benzothiophenic (BT), dibenzothiophenic (DBT) and benzonaphthothiophenic (BNT) series that were detected by APCI-FTICR MS. CONCLUSIONS This study provides an established APCI-FTICR MS method for the analysis of complex PASHs. PASHs were detected without using any derivatization and without fragmentation. The method can be used for the analysis of S-containing crude oil samples. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Thornberg, Steven Michael

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  17. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gas Analysis Lab.; Owen, T. [Intel Corp., Rio Rancho, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

  18. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  19. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring. PMID:16642989

  20. A Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for the In Situ Measurement of Aerosol Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberry, T.; Murphy, D. M.; Lovejoy, E. R.

    2005-12-01

    Organic material has been observed to comprise a significant fraction of organic aerosol mass in many regions of the troposphere. The organic compounds that comprise the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosol have the potential to affect the radiative and microphysical properties of the aerosol, with concomitant impacts on the role of the aerosol in climate forcing through direct and indirect effects. Knowledge of the organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols and their spatial distribution is needed to determine their effect on aerosol properties as well as to elucidate the role of aerosols in the chemistry of the atmosphere. The speciated measurement of aerosol organic compounds poses a significant experimental challenge due to the complexity and large number of organic species, and the low concentration at which individual species are present. A prototype instrument has been designed and built to make in situ speciated measurements of aerosol organic compounds. The instrument is composed of an aerosol collection/thermal desorption inlet coupled to a custom chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer. Aerosols are collected over a variable time by impaction on a target stage. The stage is then rapidly heated to volatilize the organic compounds into a small flow of helium carrier gas and conveyed to an ion-molecule reaction drift tube where proton transfer from H3O+ is used to softly ionize organic species. The ionized analyte molecules are then trapped and mass analyzed using a quadrupole ion trap. Results from preliminary experiments using laboratory-generated aerosol will be discussed

  1. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27098411

  2. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As+) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH+) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As+ through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As+ signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH+ signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As+.

  3. Determination of sulfonamides in meat by liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) has been used for the determination of sulfonamides in meat. Five typical sulfonamides were selected as target compounds, and beef meat was selected as a matrix sample. As internal standards, sulfapyridine and isotope labeled sulfamethazine (13C6-SMZ) were used. Compared to the results of recent reports, our results have shown improved precision to a RSD of 1.8% for the determination of sulfamethazine spiked with 75 ng/g level in meat

  4. Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Ammonia from an Airborne Miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casados, K.; Schill, S.; Freeman, S.; Zoerb, M.; Bertram, T. H.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia is emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources such as trees, ocean, diary fields, biomass burning, and fuel emissions. Previous studies have investigated the environmental impacts of atmospheric ammonia which can include chemical reactivity, nucleation of fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5 ), and implications for human health, but its chemical nature and relatively short lifetime make direct measurement of atmospheric ammonia difficult. During the 2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) an airborne miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS) was deployed on the NASA DC-8 flying laboratory in the Southern California region. The spatial and temporal variability of measured atmospheric ammonia concentrations will be discussed.

  5. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-01

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources. PMID:27281271

  6. Secondary ionization of chemical warfare agent simulants: atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Wes E; Clowers, Brian H; Haigh, Paul E; Hill, Herbert H

    2003-11-15

    For the first time, the use of a traditional ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (radioactive nickel ((63)Ni) beta emission ionization) and three alternative ionization sources (electrospray ionization (ESI), secondary electrospray ionization (SESI), and electrical discharge (corona) ionization (CI)) were employed with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility orthogonal reflector time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM(tof)MS) to detect chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants from both aqueous- and gas-phase samples. For liquid-phase samples, ESI was used as the sample introduction and ionization method. For the secondary ionization (SESI, CI, and traditional (63)Ni ionization) of vapor-phase samples, two modes of sample volatilization (heated capillary and thermal desorption chamber) were investigated. Simulant reference materials, which closely mimic the characteristic chemical structures of CWA as defined and described by Schedule 1, 2, or 3 of the Chemical Warfare Convention treaty verification, were used in this study. A mixture of four G/V-type nerve simulants (dimethyl methylphosphonate, pinacolyl methylphosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and 2-(butylamino)ethanethiol) and one S-type vesicant simulant (2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide) were found in each case (sample ionization and introduction methods) to be clearly resolved using the IM(tof)MS method. In many cases, reduced mobility constants (K(o)) were determined for the first time. Ion mobility drift times, flight times, relative signal intensities, and fragmentation product signatures for each of the CWA simulants are reported for each of the methods investigated. PMID:14615983

  7. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  8. Demonstration of real-time monitoring of a photolithographic exposure process using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowry, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Analytical Chemistry Dept.

    1998-02-01

    Silicon wafers are coated with photoresist and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light in a laboratory to simulate typical conditions expected in an actual semiconductor manufacturing process tool. Air is drawn through the exposure chamber and analyzed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI/MS). Species that evaporate or outgas from the wafer are thus detected. The purpose of such analyses is to determine the potential of CI/MS as a real-time process monitoring tool. Results demonstrate that CI/MS can remotely detect the products evolved before, during, and after wafer UV exposure; and that the quantity and type of products vary with the photoresist coated on the wafer. Such monitoring could provide semiconductor manufacturers benefits in quality control and process analysis. Tool and photoresist manufacturers could also realize benefits from this measurement technique with respect to new tool, method, or photoresist development. The benefits realized can lead to improved device yields and reduced product and development costs.

  9. Sensitivity effects in Uk'37 paleotemperature estimation by chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaler, R; Grimalt, J O; Pelejero, C; Calvo, E

    2000-12-15

    Analysis of C37 alkenone mixtures by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID) and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in the chemical ionization mode (CI) shows that the later is useful for paleotemperature estimation when ammonia is used as reagent gas. Conversely, the use of isobutane gives rise to Uk'37 readings that are dependent on the amount of C37 alkenones introduced in the system, being unreliable for paleoclimatic studies. However, ammonia CI GC/MS may produce Uk'37 measurements that deviate from those obtained by GC-FID, the method calibrated for temperature estimation from algal cultures and marine sedimentary data. The differences result from changes in relative sensitivity between the di- and triunsaturated alkenones and depend on the instrument used and operational conditions. This problem is solved in the present study by determination of the response factor linear equations for each alkenone and their average relative sensitivity (R) using mixtures of known composition. These parameters allow the transformation of the GC/MS readings into the GC-FID equivalents using the following equation: UG = R x UM/(1 - UM(1 - R)). Examples of the suitability of this approach are given. PMID:11140754

  10. A chemical ionization mass spectrometer for continuous underway shipboard analysis of dimethylsulfide in near-surface seawater

    OpenAIRE

    E. S. Saltzman; W. J. De Bruyn; Lawler, M J; Marandino, C. A.; McCormick, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    A compact, low-cost atmospheric pressure, chemical ionization mass spectrometer ("mini-CIMS") has been developed for continuous underway shipboard measurements of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in seawater. The instrument was used to analyze DMS in air equilibrated with flowing seawater across a porous Teflon membrane equilibrator. The equilibrated gas stream was diluted with air containing an isotopically-labeled internal standard. DMS is ionized at atmospheric pressure via proton transfer ...

  11. Tracing origins of complex pharmaceutical preparations using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinglei; Jia, Bin; Huang, Keke; Hu, Bin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Huanwen

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy to trace the origins of commercial pharmaceutical products has been developed based on the direct chemical profiling of the pharmaceutical products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Besides the unambiguous identification of active drug components, various compounds present in the matrixes are simultaneously detected without sample pretreatment, providing valuable information for drug quality control and origin differentiation. Four sources of commercial amoxicillin products made by different manufacturers have been successfully differentiated. This strategy has been extended to secerning six sources of Liuwei Dihuang Teapills, which are herbal medicine preparations with extremely complex matrixes. The photolysis status of chemical drug products and the inferior natural herd medicine products prepared with different processes (e.g., extra heating) were also screened using the method reported here. The limit of detection achieved in the MS/MS experiments was estimated to be 1 ng/g for amoxicillin inside the capsule product. Our experimental data demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, showing promising perspectives for tracking the entire pharmaceutical supply chain to prevent counterfeit intrusions. PMID:20809628

  12. Investigation of the Reactivity of Oligodeoxynucleotides with Glyoxal and KMnO4 Chemical Probes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Parr, Carol; Pierce, Sarah E.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2011-01-01

    The reactions of two well-known chemical probes, glyoxal and potassium permanganate (KMnO4), with oligodeoxynucleotides were monitored by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry to evaluate the influence of the sequence of DNA, its secondary structure, and interactions with associated ligands on the reactivity of the two probes. Glyoxal, a guanine-reactive probe, incorporated a mass shift of 58 Da, and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) is a thymine-reactive probe that resulted in a mass ...

  13. Capillary liquid chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Jäntti, Sirkku; Grigoras, Kestas; Saarela, Ville; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-07-01

    A miniaturized nebulizer chip for capillary liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS) is presented. The APCI chip consists of two wafers, a silicon wafer and a Pyrex glass wafer. The silicon wafer has a DRIE etched through-wafer nebulizer gas inlet, an edge capillary insertion channel, a stopper, a vaporizer channel and a nozzle. The platinum heater electrode and pads for electrical connection were patterned on to the Pyrex glass wafer. The two wafers were joined by anodic bonding, creating a microchip version of an APCI-source. The sample inlet capillary from an LC column is directly connected to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle in the microchip forms a narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona needle, and the formed ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The nebulizer chip enables for the first time the use of low flow rate separation techniques with APCI-MS. The performance of capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS was tested with selected neurosteroids. The capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS provides quantitative repeatability and good linearity. The limits of detection (LOD) with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 in MS/MS mode for the selected neurosteroids were 20-1000 fmol (10-500 nmol l(-1)). LODs (S/N = 3) with commercial macro APCI with the same compounds using the same MS were about 10 times higher. Fast heat transfer allows the use of the optimized temperature for each compound during an LC run. The microchip APCI-source provides a convenient and easy method to combine capillary LC to any API-MS equipped with an APCI source. The advantages and potentials of the microchip APCI also make it a very attractive interface in microfluidic APCI-MS. PMID:16804601

  14. Airborne observations of formic acid using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The first airborne measurements of formic acid mixing ratios over the United Kingdom were measured on the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft on 16 March 2010 with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer using I reagent ions. The I ionization scheme was able to measure formic acid mixing ratios at 1 Hz in the boundary layer.

    In-flight standard addition calibrations from a formic acid source were used to determine the instrument sensitivity of 35 ± 6 ion counts pptv−1 s−1 and a limit of detection of 25 pptv. Routine measurements were made through a scrubbed inlet to determine the instrumental background. Three plumes of formic acid were observed over the UK, originating from London, Humberside and Tyneside. The London plume had the highest formic acid mixing ratio throughout the flight, peaking at 358 pptv. No significant correlations of formic acid with NOx and ozone were found, but a positive correlation was observed between CO and HCOOH within the two plumes where coincident data were recorded.

    A trajectory model was employed to determine the sources of the plumes and compare modelled mixing ratios with measured values. The model underestimated formic acid concentrations by up to a factor of 2. This is explained by missing sources in the model, which were considered to be both primary emissions of formic acid of mainly anthropogenic origin and a lack of precursor emissions, such as isoprene, from biogenic sources, whose oxidation in situ would lead to formic acid formation.

  15. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. PMID:3379116

  16. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the analysis of chemical food contaminants in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Hooijerink, H.; Zomer, P.; Mol, J.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) has been mainly applied in pharmaceutical and forensic analysis. We expect that DESI will find its way in many different fields, including food analysis. In this review, we summarize DESI developments aimed at c

  17. A field-deployable, chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Bertram

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a new chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-TOFMS that measures atmospheric trace gases in real time with high sensitivity. We apply the technique to the measurement of formic acid via negative-ion proton transfer, using acetate as the reagent ion. A novel high pressure interface, incorporating two RF-only quadrupoles is used to efficiently focus ions through four stages of differential pumping before analysis with a compact TOFMS. The high ion-duty cycle (>20 % of the TOFMS combined with the efficient production and transmission of ions in the high pressure interface results in a highly sensitive (>300 ions s−1 pptv−1 formic acid instrument capable of measuring and saving complete mass spectra at rates faster than 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficient transfer and detection of both bare ions and ion-molecule clusters, and characterize the instrument during field measurements aboard the R/V Atlantis as part of the CalNex campaign during the spring of 2010. The in-field short-term precision is better than 5 % at 1 pptv (pL/L, for 1-s averages. The detection limit (3 σ, 1-s averages of the current version of the CI-TOFMS, as applied to the in situ detection of formic acid, is limited by the magnitude and variability in the background determination and was determined to be 4 pptv. Application of the CI-TOFMS to the detection of other inorganic and organic acids, as well as the use of different reagent ion molecules (e.g. I, CF3O, CO3 is promising, as we have demonstrated efficient transmission and detection of both bare ions and their associated ion-molecule clusters.

  18. Study of 2-Iodo-3-( phenylsulfinyl)-2-propen-1-ol and its Analogues by Self-chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Fang(张芳); ZHANG,Fang; GUO,Yin-Long (郭寅龙); GUO,Yin-Long; WEI,Qi(魏琦); WEI,Qi; MA,Sheng-Ming (麻生明); MA,Sheng-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Tne self-chemical ionization (SCI) in quadrupole mass spectrometry was developed to determine the structure of ( E)-2-iodo-3-( phenylslfinyl)-2-propen-1-ol and its 6 analogues.Some techniques that increase the sample quantity and heating speed and shorten vaporization time to obtain high pressure in the ion source were applied to increase the chance of ionmolecule reactions. Tne structures of these compounds were identified by mass spectral data of MH+ and stone characteristic fragment ions. Conpared with the mass spectra for 2-iodo-3-(phenylsulfinyl)-2-propen-1-ols obtained in electron impact ionization (EI), SCI showed more information, in particular, an improvement in amount of information at the high mass area. Tne absence of reagent gas makes the spectrumdean and sinple.

  19. [Development of a chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jian; Hua, Lei; Hou, Ke-Yong; Jiang, Lei; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Chen, Ping; Wang, Wei-Guo; Di, Tian; Li, Hai-Yang

    2014-05-01

    A home-made chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) has been developed for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical. Based on the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization technique, an ionization source with orthogonal dual tube structure was adopted in the instrument, which minimized the interference between the reagent gas ionization and the titration reaction. A 63Ni radioactive source was fixed inside one of the orthogonal tubes to generate reactant ion of NO(-)(3) from HNO3 vapor. Hydroxyl radical was first titrated by excess SO2 to form equivalent concentrations of H2SO4 in the other orthogonal tube, and then reacted with NO(-)(3) ions in the chemical ionization chamber, leading to HSO(-)(4) formation. The concentration of atmospheric hydroxyl radical can be directly calculated by measuring the intensities of the HSOj product ions and the NO(-)(3) reactant ions. The analytical capability of the instrument was demonstrated by measuring hydroxyl radical in laboratory air, and the concentration of the hydroxyl radical in the investigated air was calculated to be 1.6 x 106 molecules*cm ', based on 5 seconds integration. The results have shown that the instrument is competent for in situ continuous measurements of atmospheric trace radical. PMID:25055654

  20. Analysis of insect triacylglycerols using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Edita; Cvačka, Josef; Jiroš, Pavel; Sýkora, D.; Valterová, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 5 (2009), s. 519-525. ISSN 1438-7697 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055403; GA MŠk 2B06007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : atmospheric pressure chemical ionization * bumblebees * fat body * NARP-HPLC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.831, year: 2009

  1. Atmospheric amines and ammonia measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. You

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report ambient measurements of amines and ammonia with a~fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS in a southeastern US forest in Alabama and a~moderately polluted Midwestern site during the summer. In the Alabama forest, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv were detected on a daily basis. C3-amines and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends and temperature and wind direction dependences, and were not associated with transported CO and SO2 plumes. Consistent with temperature dependences, amine and ammonia in the gas and aerosol phases showed opposite diurnal trends, indicating gas-to-particle partitioning of amines and ammonia. Temperature dependences also imply reversible processes of amines and ammonia evaporation from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition of amines and ammonia to soil surfaces at nighttime. Various amines (C1–C6 at the pptv level were observed in the transported biomass burning plumes, showing that biomass burning can be a substantial source of amines in the Southeast US. At the moderately polluted Kent site, higher concentrations of amines (C1–C6, from pptv to tens of pptv and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv were detected. Diurnal variations of C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed abrupt increases during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Lower amine concentrations at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic sources of amines.

  2. Atmospheric Amines and Ammonia Measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Y.; Kanawade, V. P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Madronich, Sasha; Sierra-Hernandez, M. R.; Lawler, M.; Smith, James N.; Takahama, S.; Ruggeri, G.; Koss, A.; Olson, K.; Baumann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Guo, H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Porcelli, L.; Brune, W. H.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Lee, S.-H

    2014-11-19

    We report ambient measurements of amines and ammonia with a fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) in a Southeastern U.S. forest in Alabama and a moderately polluted Midwestern site during the summer. In the Alabama forest, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv) were detected on a daily basis. C3-amines and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends and temperature and wind direction dependences, and were not associated with transported CO and SO2 plumes. Consistent with temperature dependences, amine and ammonia in the gas and aerosol phases showed opposite diurnal trends, indicating gas-to-particle partitioning of amines and ammonia. Temperature dependences also imply reversible processes of amines and ammonia evaporation from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition of amines and ammonia to soil surfaces at nighttime. Various amines (C1-C6) at the pptv level were observed in the transported biomass burning plumes, showing that biomass burning can be a substantial source of amines in the Southeast U.S. At the moderately polluted Kent site, higher concentrations of amines (C1-C6, from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv) were detected. Diurnal variations of C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed abrupt increases during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Lower amine concentrations at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic sources of amines.

  3. Quantitative analysis of adenosine using Liquid Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS/MS)

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dycke, Annelies; Verstraete, Alain; Pil, Kristof; Raedt, Robrecht; Vonck, Kristl; Boison, Detlev; Boon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine-secreting cellular brain implants constitute a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of epilepsy. To engineer neural stem cells for therapeutic adenosine delivery, a reliable and fast analytical method is necessary to quantify cell-based adenosine release. Here we describe the development, optimization and validation of adenosine measurement using liquid chromatography – atmospheric pressure chemical ionization – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS in posit...

  4. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) may not measure all gas-phase sulfuric acid if base molecules are present

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtén, T.; T. Petäjä; Smith,J; Ortega, I.K.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; M. Ehn; Vehkamäki, H.; Mauldin, L.; Worsnop, D.R.; M. Kulmala

    2010-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. Using computed proton affinities and reaction thermodynamics for the relevant charging reactions, we show that in the presence of strong bases such as amines, which tend to cluster with the sulfuric acid molecules, a significant fraction of the total gas-phase sulfuric acid may not be measured by a CIMS instrument. If this is the c...

  5. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  6. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  7. On-line characterization of gaseous and particulate organic analytes using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion source is applied for direct analysis of volatile or low volatile organic compounds in air. The method is based on the direct introduction of the analytes in the gas phase and/or particle phase into the ion source of a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer. Two methods are employed for the production of primary ions at atmospheric pressure, photoionization and corona discharge. It is shown that in the presence of a dopant, photoionization can be a highly efficient ionization method also for real-time analysis with detection limits for selected analytes in the lower ppt-range. Using corona discharge for the production of primary ions, which is instrumentally easier since no additional chemicals have to be added to the sample flow, we demonstrate the analytical potential of on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for reaction monitoring experiments. To do so, an atmospherically relevant gas phase reaction is carried out in a 500 l reaction chamber and gaseous and particulate compounds are monitored in the positive and negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer

  8. A chemical ionization mass spectrometer for continuous underway shipboard analysis of dimethylsulfide in near-surface seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Saltzman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A compact, low-cost atmospheric pressure, chemical ionization mass spectrometer ("mini-CIMS" has been developed for continuous underway shipboard measurements of dimethylsulfide (DMS in seawater. The instrument was used to analyze DMS in air equilibrated with flowing seawater across a porous Teflon membrane equilibrator. The equilibrated gas stream was diluted with air containing an isotopically-labeled internal standard. DMS is ionized at atmospheric pressure via proton transfer from water vapor, then declustered, mass filtered via quadrupole mass spectrometry, and detected with an electron multiplier. The instrument described here is based on a low-cost residual gas analyzer (Stanford Research Systems, which has been modified for use as a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The mini-CIMS has a gas phase detection limit of 220 ppt DMS for a 1 min averaging time, which is roughly equivalent to a seawater DMS concentration of 0.1 nM DMS at 20°C. The mini-CIMS has the sensitivity, selectivity, and time response required for underway measurements of surface ocean DMS over the full range of oceanographic conditions. The simple, robust design and relatively low cost of the instrument are intended to facilitate use in process studies and surveys, with potential for long-term deployment on research vessels, ships of opportunity, and large buoys.

  9. A chemical ionization mass spectrometer for continuous underway shipboard analysis of dimethylsulfide in near-surface seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Saltzman

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A compact, low-cost atmospheric pressure, chemical ionization mass spectrometer ("mini-CIMS" has been developed for continuous underway shipboard measurements of dimethylsulfide (DMS in seawater. The instrument was used to analyze DMS in air equilibrated with flowing seawater across a porous Teflon membrane equilibrator. The equilibrated gas stream was diluted with air containing an isotopically-labeled internal standard. DMS is ionized at atmospheric pressure via proton transfer from water vapor, then declustered, mass filtered via quadrupole mass spectrometry, and detected with an electron multiplier. The instrument described here is based on a low-cost residual gas analyzer (Stanford Research Systems, which has been modified for use as a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The mini-CIMS has a gas phase detection limit of 170 ppt DMS for a 1 min averaging time, which is roughly equivalent to a seawater DMS concentration of 0.1 nM DMS at 20°C. The mini-CIMS has the sensitivity, selectivity, and time response required for underway measurements of surface ocean DMS over the full range of oceanographic conditions. The simple, robust design and relatively low cost of the instrument are intended to facilitate use in process studies and surveys, with potential for long-term deployment on research vessels, ships of opportunity, and large buoys.

  10. Confirmation of phorate, terbufos, and their sulfoxides and sulfones in water by capillary gas chromatography/chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method capable of confirming phorate, terbufos, their sulfoxides, and sulfones in water is reported. Parents and their metabolites are separated in less than 5 min using a short capillary GC column and high carrier gas linear velocities. Positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry generates (M + H) ions indicative of the different molecular weights of the analytes and at least one confirmatory fragment ion for each analyte. Residues have been qualitatively confirmed at the 1 ppb level in fortified water samples from a variety of sources. Apparent residues in control water were less than 0.1 ppb

  11. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Shiea, Jentaie, E-mail: jetea@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {yields} Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. {yields} We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. {yields} The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  12. Chemical derivatization for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 1. Alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, thiols, and amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirke, J.M.E.; Adams, C.L.; Van Berkel, G.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-04-15

    Derivatization strategies and specific derivatization reactions for conversion of simple alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, thiols, and amines to ionic or solution-ionizable derivatives, that is [open quotes]electrospray active[close quotes] (ES-active) forms of the analyte, are presented. Use of these reactions allows detection of analytes among those listed that are not normally amenable to analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ES-MS). In addition, these reactions provide for analysis specificity and flexibility through functional group specific derivatization and through the formation of derivatives that can be detected in positive ion or in negative ion mode. For a few of the functional groups, amphoteric derivatives are formed that can be analyzed in either positive or negative ion modes. General synthetic strategies for transformation of members of these five compound classes to ES-active species are presented along with illustrative examples of suitable derivatives. Selected derivatives were prepared using model compounds and the ES mass spectra obtained for these derivatives are discussed. The analytical utility of derivatization for ES-MS analysis is illustrated in three experiments: (1) specific detection of the major secondary alcohol in oil of peppermint, (2) selective detection of phenols within a synthetic mixture of phenols, and (3) identification of the medicinal amines within a commercially available cold medication as primary, secondary or tertiary. 65 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  14. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment. PMID:26554601

  15. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information. PMID:26560682

  16. Fast gas chromatography and negative-ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry for forensic analysis of cannabinoids in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aurélien; Widmer, Christèle; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Staub, Christian

    2007-11-01

    The present work describes a fast gas chromatography/negative-ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric assay (Fast GC/NICI-MS/MS) for analysis of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in whole blood. The cannabinoids were extracted from 500 microL of whole blood by a simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and then derivatized by using trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) and hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) as fluorinated agents. Mass spectrometric detection of the analytes was performed in the selected reaction-monitoring mode on a triple quadrupole instrument after negative-ion chemical ionization. The assay was found to be linear in the concentration range of 0.5-20 ng/mL for THC and THC-OH, and of 2.5-100 ng/mL for THC-COOH. Repeatability and intermediate precision were found less than 12% for all concentrations tested. Under standard chromatographic conditions, the run cycle time would have been 15 min. By using fast conditions of separation, the assay analysis time has been reduced to 5 min, without compromising the chromatographic resolution. Finally, a simple approach for estimating the uncertainty measurement is presented. PMID:17913432

  17. An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Edmund C; Macek, Paul V; Perera, Inoka E; Luxbacher, Kray D; McNair, Harold M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely used as a tracer gas because of its detectability at low concentrations. This attribute of SF6 allows the quantification of both small-scale flows, such as leakage, and large-scale flows, such as atmospheric currents. SF6's high detection sensitivity also facilitates greater usage efficiency and lower operating cost for tracer deployments by reducing quantity requirements. The detectability of SF6 is produced by its high molecular electronegativity. This property provides a high potential for negative ion formation through electron capture thus naturally translating to selective detection using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS). This paper investigates the potential of using gas chromatography (GC) with NCI-MS for the detection of SF6. The experimental parameters for an ultra-trace SF6 detection method utilizing minimal customizations of the analytical instrument are detailed. A method for the detection of parts per trillion (ppt) level concentrations of SF6 for the purpose of underground ventilation tracer gas analysis was successfully developed in this study. The method utilized a Shimadzu gas chromatography with negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry system equipped with an Agilent J&W HP-porous layer open tubular column coated with an alumina oxide (Al2O3) S column. The method detection limit (MDL) analysis as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency of the tracer data showed the method MDL to be 5.2 ppt. PMID:25452581

  18. Chemical Analysis of Organic Aerosols Using Reactive Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Nizkorodov, S.

    2013-12-01

    Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization (nano-DESI) technique integrated with high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) enables molecular level analysis of organic aerosol (OA) samples. In nano-DESI, analyte is desorbed into a small volume solvent bridge formed between two capillaries positioned in contact with analyte and enables fast and efficient characterization of OA collected on substrates without sample preparation. We report applications of the nano-DESI/HR-MS approach in a number of our recent studies focused on molecular identification of organic compounds in laboratory and in field collected OA samples. Reactive nano-DESI approach where selected reagent is added to the solvent is used for examining the presence of individual species containing specific functional groups and for their quantification within complex mixtures of OA. Specifically, we use the Girard's reagent T (GT) to probe and quantify carbonyl compounds in the SOA mixtures. We estimate for the first time the amounts of dimers and trimers in the SOA mixtures. We found that the most abundant dimer in limonene/O3 SOA was detected at the ˜0.5 pg level and the total amount of dimers and trimers in the analyzed sample was ˜11 pg. Understanding of the OA composition at the molecular level allowed us to identify key aging reactions, including the transformation of carbonyls to imines and carbonyl-imine oligomerization, that may contribute to the formation of brown carbon in the atmosphere.

  19. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spetrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC–(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promo

  20. Quantitative determination of terbutaline and orciprenaline in human plasma by gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionization/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, H J; Gleispach, H; Nitsche, V; Malle, E

    1990-06-01

    A method for the determination of unconjugated terbutaline and orciprenaline in human plasma is described. The assay is based on stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionization/mass spectrometry. An inexpensive and rapid method for preparation of stable isotope labelled analogues as well as their use in quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is shown. A highly efficient sample work-up procedure with product recoveries of more than 95% is presented. The method developed permits quantitative measurement of terbutaline and orciprenaline in human plasma down to 100 pg ml-1, using 1 ml of sample. Plasma levels of terbutaline after oral administration of 5 mg of terbutaline sulphate were estimated. PMID:2357489

  1. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  2. Regioisomers of octanoic acid-containing structured triacylglycerols analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using ammonia negative ion chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurvinen, J.P.; Mu, Huiling; Kallio, H.;

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ammonia negative ion chemical ionization and sample introduction via direct exposure probe was applied to analysis of regioisomeric structures of octanoic acid containing structured triacylglycerols (TAG) of type MML, MLM, MLL, and LML (M, medium-chain fatty acid......; L, long-chain fatty acid). Collision-induced dissociation of deprotonated parent TAG with argon was used to produce daughter ion spectra with appropriate fragmentation patterns for structure determination. Fatty acids constituting the TAG molecule were identified according to [RCO2](-) ions in the...... daughter ion spectra. With the standard curve for ratios of [M - H - RCO2H - 100](-) ions corresponding to each [RCO2](-) ion, determined with known mixtures of sn-1/3 and sn-2 regioisomers of structured TAG, it was possible to determine the proportions of different regioisomers in unknown samples. The...

  3. Comparative analysis of different plant oils by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Annamaria; Héberger, Károly; Forgács, Esther

    2002-11-01

    Different vegetable oil samples (almond, avocado, corngerm, grapeseed, linseed, olive, peanut, pumpkin seed, soybean, sunflower, walnut, wheatgerm) were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. A gradient elution technique was applied using acetone-acetonitrile eluent systems on an ODS column (Purospher, RP-18e, 125 x 4 mm, 5 microm). Identification of triacylglycerols (TAGs) was based on the pseudomolecular ion [M+1]+ and the diacylglycerol fragments. The positional isomers of triacylglycerol were identified from the relative intensities of the [M-RCO2]+ fragments. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as a common multivariate mathematical-statistical calculation was successfully used to distinguish the oils based on their TAG composition. LDA showed that 97.6% of the samples were classified correctly. PMID:12462617

  4. Quantitative analysis of methadone in biological fluids using deuterium-labeled methadone and GLC-chemical-ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackey, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Kreek, M.J.; Mattson, D.H.

    1977-11-01

    The (+)-, (-)-, and (+-)-/sup 2/H/sub 5/-methadones, which contained five deuterium atoms in one aromatic ring, were synthesized for use in clinical pharmacological studies and as internal standards. GLC--chemical-ionization mass spectrometry was used to determine plasma and urinary methadone levels by an inverse isotope dilution assay. Plasma drug levels could be determined to 10 pmoles/ml, and urine levels could be measured to 5 pmoles/ml. Plasma methadone levels were examined in several patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy. These levels generally ranged between 100 and 400 ng/ml (320 to 1300 pmoles/ml) after an average oral dose of 1 mg/kg/day. The methadone half-life was 28.8 +- 4.8 hr.

  5. Non-linear effects in the determination of paleotemperature U37(k') alkenone ratios by chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaler, R; Villanueva, J; Grimalt, J O

    2003-09-12

    The performance of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the positive chemical ionization mode using ammonia as reagent gas (GC-PCI-MS) in the analysis of C37 alkenones for paleotemperature estimation has been re-evaluated. In some conditions, the discrepancies observed in the measurement of the U37(k') index with this technique as compared with GC equipped with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) cannot be explained by differences in sensitivity between the tri- and diunsaturated alkenones. Thus, at low (currently 0.4) U37(k') values the GC-PCI-MS determinations may be observed to be lower or higher, respectively, than those measured with GC-FID. As shown by analysis of a series of synthetic C37 alkenone standards these discrepant results can be explained by non linear effects in the GC-PCI-MS response factors. Second-order polynomial functions provide equations that describe better the signal to amount of analyte ratios. Users of GC-PCI-MS should calibrate their instruments with standards of known C37 alkenone composition in order to minimize non-linear effects. PMID:14509345

  6. Highly sensitive and selective analysis of urinary steroids by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with positive chemical ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) provides greater separation space than conventional GC. Because of fast peak elution, a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) is the usual structure-specific detector of choice. The quantitative capabilities of a novel GC×GC fast quadrupole MS were investigated with electron ionization (EI), and CH4 or NH3 positive chemical ionization (PCI) for analysis of endogenous urinary steroids targeted in anti-doping tests. Average precisions ...

  7. Laser ionization mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardez, Luis J., III; Siekhaus, W. J.

    1989-10-01

    Laser Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (LIMS) is a simple technique with several advantages and disadvantages over standard mass spectroscopy techniques. The LIMS technique uses a laser to vaporize a small portion of a sample. The vapor from the sample consists of a mixture of charged and neutral atoms or fragments. Using electrostatic grids, the ions (positive or negative) are given a known amount of kinetic energy and sent down a time-of-flight tube. The time it takes the ions to travel down the flight tube is recorded. Knowing the ions' energy, the length of the flight tube, and the time it takes the ions to travel that distance, the masses of the ions can be calculated. The instrument used is a LIMA 3 made by Cambridge Mass Spectrometry. It has a Quanta Ray DCR-11 Nd:YAG laser, which was frequency-quadrupled to 266 nm. The laser spot size is typically between 2 and 5 microns in diameter and the pulse width is between 5 and 10 nanoseconds. The energy of the laser is continually variable between 0.1 and 3.0 millijoules. The detector is a 17-stage venetian-blind multiplier made by Thorn EMI. The analysis is carried out under vacuum, usually between 10(exp -8) and 10(exp -9) Torr. The LIMA 3 has several useful features such as: a He-Ne pilot laser used to target the Nd:YAG laser; a microscope (which is used to view the sample through the laser optics); and a precision sample stage for accurate sample alignment.

  8. An aircraft-borne chemical ionization – ion trap mass spectrometer (CI-ITMS for fast PAN and PPN measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schlager

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An airborne chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer instrument (CI-ITMS has been developed for tropospheric and stratospheric fast in-situ measurements of PAN (peroxyacetyl nitrate and PPN (peroxypropionyl nitrate. The first scientific deployment of the FASTPEX instrument (FASTPEX = Fast Measurement of Peroxyacyl nitrates took place in the Arctic during 18 missions aboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon, within the framework of the POLARCAT-GRACE campaign in the summer of 2008. The FASTPEX instrument is described and characteristic properties of the employed ion trap mass spectrometer are discussed. Atmospheric data obtained at altitudes of up to ~12 km are presented, from the boundary layer to the lowermost stratosphere. Data were sampled with a time resolution of 2 s and a 2σ detection limit of 25 pmol mol−1. An isotopically labelled standard was used for a permanent on-line calibration. For this reason the accuracy of the PAN measurements is better than ±10% for mixing ratios greater than 200 pmol mol−1. PAN mixing ratios in the summer Arctic troposphere were in the order of a few hundred pmol mol−1 and generally correlated well with CO. In the Arctic boundary layer and lowermost stratosphere smaller PAN mixing ratios were observed due to a combination of missing local sources of PAN precursor gases and efficient removal processes (thermolysis/photolysis. PPN, the second most abundant PAN homologue, was measured simultaneously. Observed PPN/PAN ratios range between ~0.03 and 0.3.

  9. The Use of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry with High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Other Separation Techniques for Identification of Triacylglycerols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Sigler, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2007), s. 252-271. ISSN 1573-4110 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : triacylglycerols * atmospheric presssure chemical ionization * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2007

  10. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acq

  11. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  12. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS, in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 105 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for OH and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  13. Qualitative analysis of some carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helale, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2002-05-17

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the determination of carboxylic acids has been developed. A mixture of formic, acetic, propionic, valeric, isovaleric, isobutyric, and isocaproic acids has been separated on a polymethacrylate-based weak acidic cation-exchange resin (TSK gel OA pak-A) based on an ion-exclusion chromatographic mechanism with detection using UV-photodiode array, conductivity and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). A mobile phase consisting of 0.85 mM benzoic acid in 10% aqueous methanol (pH 3.89) was used to separate the above carboxylic acids in about 40 min. For LC-MS, the APCI interface was used in the negative ionization mode. Linear plots of peak area versus concentration were obtained over the range 1-30 mM (r2=0.9982) and 1-30 mM (r2=0.9958) for conductimetric and MS detection, respectively. The detection limits of the target carboxylic acids calculated at S/N=3 ranged from 0.078 to 2.3 microM for conductimetric and photometric detection and from 0.66 to 3.82 microM for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The reproducibility of retention times was 0.12-0.16% relative standard deviation for ion-exclusion chromatography and 1.21-2.5% for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The method was applied to the determination of carboxylic acids in red wine, white wine, apple vinegar, and Japanese rice wine. PMID:12108651

  14. [Determination of 16 polychlorinated biphenyls in fish oil by gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Shushu; Zhang, Zhan; Wang, Shoulin; Li, Lei

    2015-08-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of 16 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish oil was developed. PCBs were extracted from fish oil with n-hexane, purified by sulfuric acid and determined by using gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) in selected ion-monitoring (SIM) mode. A good linear relationship (r > 0.99) was observed with the PCBs concentrations from 0.01 µg/L to 10 µg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N = 10) were between 3 pg/g and 67 pg/g for different kinds of PCBs. The average recoveries ranged from 62.3% to 121.8% with the relative standard deviations ( RSDs, n = 3) smaller than 12%. Compared with the traditional pre-treatment of multiple material solid phase extraction, this new method is simple, rapid and less organic solvent usage. Meanwhile the method has good selectivity and sensitivity, and it is suitable for the determination of multiple trace PCBs in fish oil. PMID:26749866

  15. Simultaneous enantioselective determination of amphetamine and congeners in hair specimens by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Liliane; Yegles, Michel; Chung, Heesun; Wennig, Robert

    2005-10-15

    Enantioselective quantification of amphetamine (AM), methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) enantiomers in hair using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Hair specimens were digested with 1M sodium hydroxide at 100 degrees C for 30 min and extracted by a solid phase procedure using Cleanscreen ZSDAU020. Extracted analytes were derivatised with (S)-heptafluorobutyrylprolyl chloride and the resulting diastereoisomers were quantified by GC-MS operating in the negative chemical ionization mode. Extraction yields were between 73.0 and 97.9%. Limits of detection varied in the range of 2.1-45.9 pg/mg hair, whereas the lowest limits of quantification varied between 4.3 and 91.8 pg/mg hair. Intra- and inter-assay precision and respective accuracy were acceptable. The enantiomeric ratios (R versus S) of AM, MA, MDA, MDMA and MDEA were determined in hair from suspected amphetamine abusers. Only MA and AM enantiomers were detectable in this collective and the quantification data showed in most cases higher concentrations of (R)-MA and (R)-AM than those of the corresponding (S)-enantiomers. PMID:16154523

  16. An improved reagent for determination of aliphatic amines with fluorescence and online atmospheric chemical ionization-mass spectrometry identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved reagent named 2-[2-(dibenzocarbazole)-ethoxy] ethyl chloroformate (DBCEC-Cl) for the determination of aliphatic amines by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection and post-column online atmospheric chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) identification has been developed. DBCEC-Cl could easily and quickly label aliphatic amines. Derivatives were stable enough to be efficiently analyzed by HPLC and showed an intense protonated molecular ion corresponding m/z [M+H]+ under APCI-MS in positive-ion mode. The ratios for fluorescence responses were IDBCEC-amine/IBCEC-amine = 1.02-1.60; IDBCEC-amine/IBCEOC-amine = 1.30-2.57; and IDBCEC-amine/IFMOC-amine = 2.20-4.12 (here, I was relative fluorescence intensity). The ratios for MS responses were ICDBCEC-amine/ICBCEC-amine = 4.16-29.31 and ICDBCEC-amine/ICBCEOC-amine = 1.23-2.47 (Here, IC: APCI-MS ion current intensity). Detection limits calculated from 0.0244 pmol injection, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, were 0.3-3.0 fmol. The relative standard deviations for within-day determination (n = 6) were 0.045-0.081% for retention time and 0.86-1.03% for peak area for the tested aliphatic amines. The mean intra- and inter-assay precision for all amine levels were 0.9991.

  17. Gaseous and particulate composition of fresh and aged emissions of diesel, RME and CNG buses using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psichoudaki, Magda; Le Breton, Michael; Hallquist, Mattias; Watne, Ågot; Hallquist, Asa

    2016-04-01

    . A Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) was employed to monitor the concentration of different organic species present in the fresh and aged emissions. This instrument is capable of identifying the molecular formulas of species in the gas phase. The FIGAERO inlet, also enabled the characterisation of the particle phase, as particles were simultaneously collected on a filter, from which they could then be thermally desorbed and detected. Acetate (negative) ionization was utilised to allow high sensitivity measurements of organic acids, aldehydes, ketones, diols and halogenated species. The H2O, O3 and NOx concentrations inside the PAM flow reactor were monitored, and an organic tracer for OH exposure was also continuously measured. The concentrations of dominant species in both fresh and aged gaseous and particulate bus emissions from the different fuel types will be presented as well as their emission factors, calculated from concurrent CO2 measurements.

  18. Online measurement of biogenic organic acids in the boreal forest using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, A. L.; Brüggemann, M.; ńijälä, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Russell, L. M.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) by vegetation in the boreal forest and their subsequent atmospheric oxidation leads to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which has important impacts on climate and human health. Oxidation of BVOCs produces a variety of mostly unidentified species in oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA). Presently aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) are able to determine quantitative information about the relative oxygen to carbon content of organic aerosols and thereby reveal the photochemical age and volatility of organic aerosol by distinguishing between low volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA) and hydrocarbon like organic aerosol (HOA)[1]. However, the AMS can usually not be used to measure and quantify single organic compounds such as individual biogenic organic marker compounds. Here we show the results of online measurements of gas and particle phase biogenic acids during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 at Hyytiälä, Finland. This was achieved by coupling a self built miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES) as described by Geller et al. [2] with an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (APCI IT MS; Hoffmann et al., [3]). The benefits of the on-line APCI-MS are soft ionization with little fragmentation compared to AMS, high measurement frequency and less sampling artifacts than in the common procedure of taking filter samples, extraction and detection with LC-MS. Furthermore, the ion trap of the instrument allows MS/MS experiments to be performed by isolation of single m/z ratios of selected molecular species. By subsequent addition of energy, the trapped ions form characteristic fragments which enable structural insight on the molecular level. Comparison of APCI-MS data to AMS data, acquired with a C-ToF-AMS [4], revealed a good correlation coefficient for total organics and sulphate. Furthermore, data show

  19. Measurements of tropospheric HO2 and RO2 by oxygen dilution modulation and chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Olson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An improved method for the measurement of hydroperoxy radicals (HO2 and organic peroxy radicals (RO2, where R is any organic group has been developed that combines two previous chemical conversion/chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS peroxy radical measurement techniques. Applicable to both ground-based and aircraft platforms, the method provides good separation between HO2 and RO2, and frequent measurement capability with observations of both HO2 and HO2 + RO2 amounts each minute. These improvements allow for analyses of measured [HO2]/[HO2 + RO2] ratios on timescales relevant to tropospheric photochemistry. By varying both [NO] and [O2] simultaneously in the chemical conversion region of the PeRCIMS (Peroxy Radical CIMS inlet, the method exploits the changing conversion efficiency of RO2 to HO2 under different inlet [NO]/[O2] to selectively observe either primarily HO2 or the sum of HO2 and RO2. Two modes of operation have been established for ambient measurements: in the first half of the minute, RO2 radicals are measured at close to 100% efficiency along with HO2 radicals (low [NO]/[O2] = 2.53 × 10−5 and in the second half of the minute, HO2 is detected while the majority of ambient RO2 radicals are measured with low efficiency, approximately 15% (high [NO]/[O2] = 6.80 × 10−4. The method has been tested extensively in the laboratory under various conditions and for a variety of organic peroxy radicals relevant to the atmosphere and the results of these tests are presented. The modified PeRCIMS instrument has been deployed successfully using the new measurement technique on a number of aircraft campaigns, including on the NSF/NCAR C-130 during the MIRAGE-Mex and NASA INTEX-B field campaigns in the spring of 2006. A brief comparison of the peroxy radical measurements during these campaigns to a photochemical box model indicates good agreement under tropospheric conditions where NOx (NO + NO2 concentrations are lower than 0.5 ppb

  20. Measurements of tropospheric HO2 and RO2 by oxygen dilution modulation and chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Olson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An improved method for the measurement of hydroperoxy radicals (HO2 and organic peroxy radicals (RO2, where R is any organic group has been developed that combines two previous chemical conversion/chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS peroxy radical measurement techniques. Applicable to both ground-based and aircraft platforms, the method provides good separation between HO2 and RO2 and frequent measurement capability with observations of both HO2 and HO2 + RO2 amounts each minute. This allows for analyses of measured [HO2]/[HO2 + RO2] ratios on timescales relevant to tropospheric photochemistry. By varying both [NO] and [O2] simultaneously in the chemical conversion region of the PeRCIMS (Peroxy Radical CIMS inlet, the method exploits the changing conversion efficiency of RO2 to HO2 under different inlet [NO]/[O2] to selectively observe either primarily HO2 or the sum of HO2 and RO2. Two modes of operation have been established for ambient measurements: in the first half of the minute, RO2 radicals are measured at close to 100% efficiency along with HO2 radicals (low [NO]/[O2] = 2.53 × 10−5 and in the second half of the minute, HO2 is detected while the majority of ambient RO2 radicals are measured with approximately 15% efficiency (high [NO]/[O2] = 6.80 × 10−4. The method has been tested extensively in the laboratory under various conditions and for a variety of organic peroxy radicals relevant to the atmosphere and the results of these tests are presented. The modified PeRCIMS instrument has been deployed successfully using the current measurement technique on a number of aircraft campaigns, including on the NSF/NCAR C-130 during the MIRAGE-Mex and NASA INTEX-B field campaigns in the spring of 2006. A brief comparison of the peroxy radical measurements during these campaigns to a photochemical box model confirms that the PeRCIMS is able to successfully separate and measure HO2 and RO2 under the majority of tropospheric conditions.

  1. Measurements of tropospheric HO2 and RO2 by oxygen dilution modulation and chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Olson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method for the measurement of hydroperoxy radicals (HO2 and organic peroxy radicals (RO2, where R is any organic group has been developed that combines two previous chemical conversion/chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS peroxy radical measurement techniques. Applicable to both ground-based and aircraft platforms, the method provides good separation between HO2 and RO2 and frequent measurement capability with observations of both HO2 and HO2+RO2 amounts each minute. This allows for analyses of measured [HO2]/[HO2+RO2] ratios on timescales relevant to tropospheric photochemistry. By varying both [NO] and [O2] simultaneously in the chemical conversion region of the PeRCIMS (Peroxy Radical CIMS inlet, the method exploits the changing conversion efficiency of RO2 to HO2 under different inlet [NO]/[O2] to selectively observe either primarily HO2 or the sum of HO2 and RO2. Two modes of operation have been established for ambient measurements: in the first half of the minute, RO2 radicals are measured at close to 100% efficiency along with HO2 radicals (low [NO]/[O2] = 2.53×10−5 and in the second half of the minute, HO2 is detected while the majority of ambient RO2 radicals are measured with low efficiency, approximately 15% (high [NO]/[O2] = 6.80×10−4. The method has been tested extensively in the laboratory under various conditions and for a variety of organic peroxy radicals relevant to the atmosphere and the results of these tests are presented. The modified PeRCIMS instrument has been deployed successfully using the new measurement technique on a number of aircraft campaigns, including on the NSF/NCAR C-130 during the MIRAGE-Mex and NASA INTEX-B field campaigns in the spring of 2006. A brief comparison of the peroxy radical measurements during these campaigns to a photochemical box model indicates good agreement under tropospheric conditions where NOx (NO+NO2 concentrations are lower than 0.5 ppbV (parts per billion by

  2. Positron ionization mass spectrometry: An organic mass spectrometrist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are currently engaged in a research program to study the ionization of polyatomic molecules by positrons. We refer to the technique herein as positron ionization mass spectrometry which includes all of the possible ionization mechanisms. In the course of this work we will attempt to characterize each of the important ionization mechanisms. Our ultimate objective is to explore the use of positron ionization mass spectrometry for chemical analysis. Several other groups have also begun to pursue aspects of positron ionization in parallel with our efforts although with somewhat different approaches and, perhaps with slightly different emphases. Recently, for example, Passner et al. have acquired mass spectra in a Penning trap resulting from the ionization of several different polyatomic molecules by near thermal kinetics energy positrons. Our research involves studying the different types of ionizing interactions of positrons with organic molecules, as a function of positron kinetic energy. For ionization of polyatomic molecules by positrons, several possible mechanisms are apparent from lifetime and scattering cross-section data. These mechanisms are discussed

  3. The effect of H2SO4 – amine clustering on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) measurements of gas-phase sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtén, T.; T. Petäjä; Smith,J; Ortega, I.K.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; M. Ehn; Vehkamäki, H.; Mauldin, L.; Worsnop, D.R.; M. Kulmala

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. We have assessed the possible effect of the sulfuric acid molecules clustering with base molecules on CIMS measurements using computational chemistry. From the computational data, three conclusions can be drawn. First, a significant fraction of the gas-phase sulfuric acid molecules are very likely clustered with amines i...

  4. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  5. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisin, J. R.

    Some of the problems related to chemical protection against ionizing radiation are discussed with emphasis on : definition, classification, degree of protection, mechanisms of action and toxicity. Results on the biological response modifyers (BRMs) and on the combination of nontoxic (i.e. low) doses of sulphydryl radioprotectors and BRMs are presented.

  6. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51). PMID:26805597

  7. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The setup is elaborated for the trace detection of transuranium elements by the three-step laser resonance ionization combined with the time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The setup efficiency for detection of plutonium was measured to be about 0.5 centre dot 10-8 ion/atom, and its selectivity relative to atoms of another elements has the order of 1013 atom/atom

  8. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Mol, Johannes G J; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Félix

    2014-04-25

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promoted by the APCI source allows effective and wide-scope screening based on the investigation of the molecular ion and/or protonated molecule. This is in contrast to electron ionization (EI) where ionization typically results in extensive fragmentation, and diagnostic ions and/or spectra need to be known a priori to facilitate detection of the analytes in the raw data. Around 170 organic contaminants from different chemical families were initially investigated by both approaches, i.e. GC-(EI)TOF and GC-(APCI)QTOF, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and a notable number of pesticides and relevant metabolites. The new GC-(APCI)QTOF MS approach easily allowed widening the number of compounds investigated (85 additional compounds), with more pesticides, personal care products (UV filters, musks), polychloronaphthalenes (PCNs), antimicrobials, insect repellents, etc., most of them considered as emerging contaminants. Both GC-(EI)TOF and GC-(APCI)QTOF methodologies have been applied, evaluating their potential for a wide-scope screening in the environmental field. PMID:24674644

  9. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  10. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zuber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS. Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols.

  11. Constraining the sensitivity of iodide adduct chemical ionization mass spectrometry to multifunctional organic molecules using the collision limit and thermodynamic stability of iodide ion adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Iyer, Siddarth; Mohr, Claudia; Lee, Ben H.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Kurtén, Theo; Thornton, Joel A.

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ions formed per number density of analytes) is fundamentally limited by the collision frequency between reagent ions and analytes, known as the collision limit, the ion-molecule reaction time, and the transmission efficiency of product ions to the detector. We use the response of a time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) to N2O5, known to react with iodide at the collision limit, to constrain the combined effects of ion-molecule reaction time, which is strongly influenced by mixing and ion losses in the ion-molecule reaction drift tube. A mass spectrometric voltage scanning procedure elucidates the relative binding energies of the ion adducts, which influence the transmission efficiency of molecular ions through the electric fields within the vacuum chamber. Together, this information provides a critical constraint on the sensitivity of a ToF-CIMS towards a wide suite of routinely detected multifunctional organic molecules for which no calibration standards exist. We describe the scanning procedure and collision limit determination, and we show results from the application of these constraints to the measurement of organic aerosol composition at two different field locations.

  12. Computational and Experimental Assessment of Benzene Cation Chemistry for the Measurement of Marine Derived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds with Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerb, M.; Kim, M.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is a highly selective and sensitive technique for the measurement of trace gases in the atmosphere. However, competing side reactions and dependence on relative humidity (RH) can make the transition from the laboratory to the field challenging. Effective implementation of chemical ionization requires a thorough knowledge of the elementary steps leading to ionization of the analyte. We have recently investigated benzene cations for the detection of marine derived biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), such isoprene and terpene compounds, from algal bloom events. Our experimental results indicate that benzene ion chemistry is an attractive candidate for field measurements, and the RH dependence is weak. To further understand the advantages and limitations of this approach, we have also used electronic structure theory calculations to compliment the experimental work. These theoretical methods can provide valuable insight into the physical chemistry of ion molecule reactions including thermodynamical information, the stability of ions to fragmentation, and potential sources of interference such as dehydration to form isobaric ions. The combined experimental and computational approach also allows validation of the theoretical methods and will provide useful information towards gaining predictive power for the selection of appropriate reagent ions for future experiments.

  13. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 40 years have passed since the research of the Manhattan Project suggested the possibility of chemical protection against ionizing radiation. During that time, much has been learned about the nature of radiation-induced injury and the factors governing the expression of that injury. Thousands of compounds have been tested for radioprotective efficacy, and numerous theories have been proposed to account for these actions. The literature on chemical radioprotection is large. In this article, the authors consider several of the mechanisms by which chemicals may protect against radiation injury. They have chosen to accent this view of radioprotector research as opposed to that research geared toward developing specific molecules as protective agents because they feel that such an approach is more beneficial in stimulating research of general applicability. This paper describes the matrix of biological factors upon which an exogenous radioprotector is superimposed, and examines evidence for and against various mechanisms by which these agents may protect biological systems against ionizing radiation. It concludes with a brief outlook for research in chemical radioprotection

  14. Acanthocephalan fish parasites (Rhadinorhynchidae Lühe, 1912) as potential biomarkers: Molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinertz, S.; Eckhardt, K.-U.; Theisen, S.; Palm, H. W.; Leinweber, P.

    2016-07-01

    The present study represents the first molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry applied on fish parasites. A total of 71 fishes from Balinese fish markets, 36 Auxis rochei (Risso, 1810) and 35 A. thazard (Lacepède, 1800), were studied for their acanthocephalan parasites. This is the first record of Rhadinorhynchus zhukovi in Balinese waters, Indonesia, and we describe for the first time A. rochei and A. thazard as R. zhukovi hosts. Using this method, small scale variations within the chemical compounds of acanthocephalans could be detected. Using this methodology it will be possible to generate additional, pollutant specific information from aquatic habitats in future with the potential of a new bioindicator application for parasite/host origin and/or environmental pollution.

  15. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuland, M. B.; Grimaudo, V.; Mezger, K.; Moreno-García, P.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2016-03-01

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface.

  16. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface. (paper)

  17. Characterization of Organic Nitrate Formation in Limonene Secondary Organic Aerosol using High-Resolution Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxon, Cameron; Hammes, Julia; Peng, Jianfei; Hallquist, Mattias; Pathak, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that organic nitrates (RONO2) are prevalent in the boundary layer, and can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Monoterpenes, including limonene, have been shown to be precursors for the formation of these organic nitrates. Limonene has two double bonds, either of which may be oxidized by NO3 or O3. This leads to the generation of products that can subsequently condense or partition into the particle phase, producing secondary organic aerosol. In order to further elucidate the particle and gas phase product distribution of organic nitrates forming from the reactions of limonene and the nitrate radical (NO3), a series of experiments were performed in the Gothenburg Flow Reactor for Oxidation Studies at Low Temperatures (G-FROST), described by previous work. N2O5 was used as the source for NO3 and NO2, and a characterized diffusion source was used to introduce limonene into the flow reactor. All experiments were conducted in the absence of light, and the concentration of limonene was increased step-wise throughout each experiment to modify the ratio of N2O5to limonene. The experiments were conducted such that both limonene- and N2O5-limited regimes were present. Gas and particle phase products were measured using an iodide High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) coupled to a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO, and particle size and SOA mass concentrations were derived using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). CIMS measurement techniques have previously been employed for the measurement of organic nitrate products of such compounds using multiple reagent ions. The use of this instrumentation allowed for the identification of chemical formulas for gas and particle phase species. The findings from the experiments will be presented in terms of the relative gas-particle partitioning of major products and the effects of N2O5/limonene ratios on product distributions. Additionally, a

  18. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions in asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-07-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt fractions has been developed. The 14 compounds determined, characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings, are expected to be present in asphalt and are considered carcinogenic and mutagenic. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 346.5 μg/L and the limits of quantification ranged from 1.7 to 1550 μg/L. The method was validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (NIST SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations agreed with the certified values. The method was applied to asphalt samples after its fractionation according to ASTM D4124 and the method of Green. The concentrations of the seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified in the sample ranged from 0.86 mg/kg for benzo[ghi]perylene to 98.32 mg/kg for fluorene. PMID:25885756

  19. An evaluation of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the rapid and simultaneous measurement of carbamate pesticides and organophorus pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface (LC/APCI/MS) is evaluated for the simultaneous determination of carbamate pesticides and organophosphorus pesticides in a single chromatographic analysis. APCI mass spectra of those compounds were obtained to study their ionization characteristics. APCI provided abundant ions such as protonated molecules and characteristic fragment ions for carbamate pesticides and organophosphorus pesticides. To evaluate the feasibility of the LC/APCI/MS for a routine quantitative analysis, the linearity and repeatability of LC/APCI/MS were examined by measuring standard solution mixtures of five carbamate pesticides and four organophosphorus pesticides over the range of 1 to 100 μg/mL. The peak areas in chromatograms of characteristic ions for those compounds showed less than 3% of variation from run to tun. The standard calibration curves for the nine pesticides show good linearity in the concentration range. The detection limits of the LC/APCI/MS system for those compounds range from 0.006 to 0.2 ng

  20. Chemical Investigation of Saponins in Different Parts of Panax notoginseng by Pressurized Liquid Extraction and Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Jia Hong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A pressurized liquid extraction (PLE and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was developed for the qualitative determination of saponins in different parts of P. notoginseng, including rhizome, root, fibre root, seed, stem, leaf and flower. The samples were extracted using PLE. The analysis was achieved on a Zorbax SB-C18 column with gradient elution of acetonitrile and 8 mM aqueous ammonium acetate as mobile phase. The mass spectrometer was operated in the negative ion mode using the electrospray ionization, and a collision induced dissociation (CID experiment was also carried out to aid the identification of compounds. Forty one saponins were identified in different parts of P. notoginseng according to the fragmentation patterns and literature reports, among them, 21 saponins were confirmed by comparing the retention time and ESI-MS data with those of standard compounds. The results showed that the chemical characteristics were obviously diverse in different parts of P. notoginseng, which is helpful for pharmacological evaluation and quality control of P. notoginseng.

  1. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  2. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a

  3. Application of high resolution Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-ToFMS to study SOA composition: focus on formation of oxygenated species via aqueous phase processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Aljawhary

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the capabilities of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS to study secondary organic aerosol (SOA composition with a high resolution (HR time-of-flight mass analyzer (aerosol-CI-ToFMS. In particular, by studying aqueous oxidation of Water Soluble Organic Compounds (WSOC extracted from α-pinene ozonolysis SOA, we assess the capabilities of three common CIMS reagent ions: (a protonated water clusters (H2OnH+, (b acetate CH3C(OO− and (c iodide water clusters I(H2On− to monitor SOA composition. As well, we report the relative sensitivity of these reagent ions to a wide range of common organic aerosol constituents. We find that (H2OnH+ is more selective to the detection of less oxidized species, so that the range of O/C and OSC (carbon oxidation state in the SOA spectra is considerably lower than those measured using CH3C(OO− and I(H2On−. Specifically, (H2OnH+ ionizes organic compounds with OSC ≤ 1.3, whereas CH3C(OO− and I(H2On− both ionize highly oxygenated organics with OSC up to 4 with I(H2On− being more selective towards multi-functional organic compounds. In the bulk O/C and H/C space, i.e. in a Van Krevelen plot, there is a remarkable agreement in both absolute magnitude and oxidation trajectory between CI-ToFMS data and those from a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS. This indicates that the CI-ToFMS data captures much of the chemical change occurring in the particle and that gas phase species, which are not detected by the HR-AMS, do not dominate the overall ion signal. Finally, the data illustrate the capability of aerosol-CI-ToFMS to monitor specific chemical change, including the fragmentation and functionalization reactions that occur during organic oxidation, and the oxidative conversion of dimeric SOA species into monomers. Overall, aerosol-CI-ToFMS is a valuable, selective complement to some common SOA characterization methods, such as AMS and spectroscopic techniques. Both

  4. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected. PMID:26772132

  5. Use of a hand-portable gas chromatograph-toroidal ion trap mass spectrometer for self-chemical ionization identification of degradation products related to O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate (VX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Philip A., E-mail: Smith.Philip.A@dol.gov [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD, 20814 (United States); Lepage, Carmela R. Jackson [Defence R and D Canada - Suffield, Box 400, Station Main, Medicine Hat, Alberta, T1A 8K6 (Canada); Savage, Paul B. [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT, 84602 (United States); Bowerbank, Christopher R.; Lee, Edgar D. [Torion Technologies Inc., 796 East Utah Valley Drive, Suite 200, American Fork, UT, 84003 (United States); Lukacs, Michael J. [Defence R and D Canada - Suffield, Box 400, Station Main, Medicine Hat, Alberta, T1A 8K6 (Canada)

    2011-04-01

    The chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate (VX) and many related degradation products produce poorly diagnostic electron ionization (EI) mass spectra by transmission quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thus, chemical ionization (CI) is often used for these analytes. In this work, pseudomolecular ([M+H]{sup +}) ion formation from self-chemical ionization (self-CI) was examined for four VX degradation products containing the diisopropylamine functional group. A person-portable toroidal ion trap mass spectrometer with a gas chromatographic inlet was used with EI, and both fixed-duration and feedback-controlled ionization time. With feedback-controlled ionization, ion cooling (reaction) times and ion formation target values were varied. Evidence for protonation of analytes was observed under all conditions, except for the largest analyte, bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide which yielded [M+H]{sup +} ions only with increased fixed ionization or ion cooling times. Analysis of triethylamine-d{sub 15} provided evidence that [M+H]{sup +} production was likely due to self-CI. Analysis of a degraded VX sample where lengthened ion storage and feedback-controlled ionization time were used resulted in detection of [M+H]{sup +} ions for VX and several relevant degradation products. Dimer ions were also observed for two phosphonate compounds detected in this sample.

  6. Identification and Characterization of the Major Chemical Constituents in Fructus Akebiae by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electrospray Ionization-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yun; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Dan-dan; Chen, Fei; Kong, Xiu-hua; Liao, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Fructus Akebiae (FA), the dry fruit of Akebia quinata (THUNB.) DECNE., possesses potent antidepressant properties. Owing to the structural complexity, high polarity and thermal lability in plants, it is difficult and time-consuming to analyze the major chemical constituents by traditional strategies that involve extraction, isolation, purification and identification by chemical manipulations and spectroscopic methods. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS-MS) method was established for quickly identifying the chemical constituents in the extract of Fructus Akebiae. The main saponin components in the extract of Fructus Akebiae were detected with the HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS-MS in negative-ion mode. These components were further analyzed by MS(2) spectra, and compared with the corresponding reference substances and literature data. Nineteen saponins in the extract of Fructus Akebiae were well separated in one run. The new method is accurate and rapid. It can be used to identify the main chemical constituents in the extract of Fructus Akebiae and can be suitable for the quality control of Fructus Akebiae. PMID:26311648

  7. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, C.;

    2000-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS) method is described for the determination and quantification of 12 dietary flavonoid glycosides and aglycons in human urine samples. Chromatographic separation of the analytes of interest was achieved by...... column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring in...... variation for the analysis of the 12 different flavonoids in quality control urine samples were 12.3% on average (range 11.0-13.7%, n = 24, reproducibility) and the repeatability of the assay were 5.0% (mean, range 0.1-14.8%, it = 12). A subset of 10 urine samples from a human dietary intervention study...

  8. Laboratory and Ambient Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds in the Gas Phase Using Nitrate Ion Chemical Ionization Coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Lambe, A. T.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Kimmel, J.; Kroll, J. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is a widely used technique for molecular level characterization of inorganic and organic gas phase species. Here we present laboratory and ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry, which recently has proven capable of selectively detecting oxidized organic molecules in the gas-phase via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. Such low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOC, ELVOC) have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest site in Centreville, AL (June 1 - July 15, 2013), where emissions were dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), occasionally mixing with anthropogenic emissions. During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected oxidation products of both isoprene (typically C5 LVOC) and terpenes (typically C10 ELVOC). The isoprene-related LVOC showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, while two groups of terpene ELVOC were identified, one peaking at night and one peaking during the day. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analyses are applied to the dataset to further interpret these observations. The effect of anthropogenic pollution on the biogenic-dominated environment was also investigated during periods of elevated nitrous and sulfur dioxide levels. To further aid in interpretation of the SOAS dataset, oxidized organic molecules were produced via OH and O3 initiated oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors in targeted laboratory studies and detected using the HR-ToF-CIMS. Spectra were obtained in these studies over a range of simulated atmospheric conditions.

  9. Quantitation of triacylglycerols in edible oils by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-24

    In this investigation, off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column has been applied for the identification and quantification of triacylglycerols in edible oils. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this off-line two-dimensional separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column combined the features of traditional C18 and silver-ion columns, which could provide hydrophobic interactions with triacylglycerols under acetonitrile conditions and can offer π-π interactions with triacylglycerols under methanol conditions. When compared with traditional off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography employing two different chromatographic columns (C18 and silver-ion column) and using elution solvents comprised of two phases (reversed-phase/normal-phase) for triacylglycerols separation, the novel off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column can be achieved by simply altering the mobile phase between acetonitrile and methanol, which exhibited a much higher selectivity for the separation of triacylglycerols with great efficiency and rapid speed. In addition, an approach based on the use of response factor with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for triacylglycerols quantification. Due to the differences between saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, the use of response factors significantly improves the quantitation of triacylglycerols. This two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was successfully applied for the profiling of triacylglycerols in soybean oils, peanut oils and lord oils. A total of 68 triacylglycerols including 40 triacylglycerols in soybean oils, 50 triacylglycerols in peanut oils and 44 triacylglycerols in lord oils have been identified and quantified. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data were analyzed

  10. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15: Hydroxyl Radical (OH) Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Saewung [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The University of California, Irvine, science team (Dr. Saewung Kim, Dr. Roger Seco, Dr. Alex Guenther, and Dr. Jim Smith) deployed a chemical ionization mass spectrometer system for hydroxyl radical (OH) and sulfuric acid quantifications. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/15 field campaign. Hydroxyl radical determines tropospheric oxidation capacity and had been expected to be very low in the pristine rain forest region such as the Brazilian Amazon because of the presence of significant levels of highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds and very low levels of NO, which is an OH recycling agent. However, several recent in situ OH observations provided by a laser-induced fluorescence system reported unaccountably high OH concentrations. To address this discrepancy, a series of laboratory and theoretical studies has postulated chemical reaction mechanisms of isoprene that may regenerate OH in photo-oxidation processes. Along with these efforts, potential artifacts on the laser induced fluorescence system from isoprene and its oxidation products also have been explored. Therefore, the first chemical ionization mass spectrometer observations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, are expected to provide a critical experimental constraint to address uncertainty in constraining oxidation capacity over pristine rain forest environments. In addition, we deployed a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer to characterize atmospheric volatile organic compound levels, especially isoprene and its oxidation products, which are critical input parameters for box modeling to simulate OH with different isoprene photo-oxidation schemes. As there has been no report on noticeable new particle formation events, our first in situ sulfuric acid observations in the Amazon rain forest were expected to constrain the

  11. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected. PMID:26446274

  12. Determination of talinolol in human plasma using automated on-line solid phase extraction combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Grivet, Chantal; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2005-06-01

    A specific LC-MS/MS assay was developed for the automated determination of talinolol in human plasma, using on-line solid phase extraction system (prospekt 2) combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) tandem mass spectrometry. The method involved simple precipitation of plasma proteins with perchloric acid (contained propranolol) as the internal standard (IS) and injection of the supernatant onto a C8 End Capped (10 mmx2 mm) cartridge without any evaporation step. Using the back-flush mode, the analytes were transferred onto an analytical column (XTerra C18, 50 mmx4.6 mm) for chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry detection. One of the particularities of the assay is that the SPE cartridge is used as a column switching device and not as an SPE cartridge. Therefore, the same SPE cartridge could be used more than 28 times, significantly reducing the analysis cost. APCI ionization was selected to overcome any potential matrix suppression effects because the analyte and IS co-eluted. The mean precision and accuracy in the concentration range 2.5-200 ng/mL was found to be 103% and 7.4%, respectively. The data was assessed from QC samples during the validation phase of the assay. The lower limit of quantification was 2.5 ng/mL, using a 250 microL plasma aliquot. The LC-MS/MS method provided the requisite selectivity, sensitivity, robustness accuracy and precision to assess pharmacokinetics of the compound in several hundred human plasma samples. PMID:15866498

  13. Chemical analysis of raw and processed Fructus arctii by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunming Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, raw and processed herbs are used to treat the different diseases. Fructus Arctii, the dried fruits of Arctium lappa l. (Compositae, is widely used in the TCM. Stir-frying is the most common processing method, which might modify the chemical compositions in Fructus Arctii. Materials and Methods: To test this hypothesis, we focused on analysis and identification of the main chemical constituents in raw and processed Fructus Arctii (PFA by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Results: The results indicated that there was less arctiin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. however, there were higher levels of arctigenin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. Conclusion: We suggest that arctiin reduced significantly following the thermal conversion of arctiin to arctigenin. In conclusion, this finding may shed some light on understanding the differences in the therapeutic values of raw versus PFA in TCM.

  14. Chlorine activation by N2O5: simultaneous, in situ detection of ClNO2 and N2O5 by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Thornton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for the simultaneous in situ detection of nitryl chloride (ClNO2 and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS. The technique relies on the formation and detection of iodide ion-molecule clusters, I(ClNO2− and I(N2O5−. The novel N2O5 detection scheme is direct. It does not suffer from high and variable chemical interferences, which are associated with the typical method of nitrate anion detection. We address the role of water vapor, electric field strength, and instrument zero determinations, which influence the overall sensitivity and detection limit of this method. For both species, the method demonstrates high sensitivity (>1 Hz/pptv, precision (~10% for 100 pptv in 1 s, and accuracy (~20%, the latter ultimately determined by the nitrogen dioxide (NO2 cylinder calibration standard and characterization of inlet effects. For the typically low background signals (<10 Hz and high selectivity, we estimate signal-to-noise (S/N ratios of 2 for 1 pptv in 60 s averages, but uncertainty associated with the instrumental zero currently leads to an ultimate detection limit of ~5 pptv for both species. We validate our approach for the simultaneous in situ measurement of ClNO2 and N2O5 while on board the Research Vessel (RV Knorr as part of the ICEALOT 2008 Field Campaign.

  15. Chlorine activation by N2O5: simultaneous, in situ detection of ClNO2 and N2O5 by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Thornton

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for the simultaneous in situ detection of nitryl chloride (ClNO2 and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS. The technique relies on the formation and detection of iodide ion-molecule clusters, I(ClNO2− and I(N2O5−. The novel N2O5 detection scheme is direct. It does not suffer from high and variable chemical interferences, which are associated with the typical method of nitrate anion detection. We address the role of water vapor, CDC electric field strength, and instrument zero determinations, which influence the overall sensitivity and detection limit of this method. For both species, the method demonstrates high sensitivity (>1 Hz/pptv, precision (~10% for 100 pptv in 1 s, and accuracy (~20%, the latter ultimately determined by the nitrogen dioxide (NO2 cylinder calibration standard and characterization of inlet effects. For the typically low background signals (S/N ratios of 2 for 1 pptv in 60 s averages, but uncertainty associated with the instrumental zero currently leads to an ultimate detection limit of ~5 pptv for both species. We validate our approach for the simultaneous in situ measurement of ClNO2 and N2O5 while on board the R/V Knorr as part of the ICEALOT 2008 Field Campaign.

  16. Quantification of low levels of organochlorine pesticides using small volumes (≤100 μl) of plasma of wild birds through gas chromatography negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid phase extraction and gas chromatography with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in scan mode (GC-NCI-MS) method was developed to identify and quantify for the first time low levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCs) in plasma samples of less than 100 μl from wild birds. The method detection limits ranged from 0.012 to 0.102 pg/μl and the method reporting limit from 0.036 to 0.307 pg/μl for α, γ, β and δ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, endosulfan I, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan-II, endrin-aldehyde and endosulfan-sulfate. Pesticide levels in small serum samples from individual Falco sparverius, Sturnella neglecta, Mimus polyglottos and Columbina passerina were quantified. Concentrations ranged from not detected (n/d) to 204.9 pg/μl for some OC pesticides. All levels in the food web in and around cultivated areas showed the presence of pesticides notwithstanding the small areas for agriculture existing in the desert of Baja California peninsula. - This technique allows small birds to be used as indicators of chemical contamination in habitats because pesticides can be quantified in very small volumes of plasma

  17. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, Karolina; Bosáková, Zuzana; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    A method for localizing double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was developed. The technique was based on collision-induced dissociation or pulsed Q collision-induced dissociation of the C3H5N(+•) adducts ([M + 55](+•)) formed in the presence of acetonitrile in the APCI source. The spectra were investigated using a large series of standards obtained from commercial sources and prepared by randomization. The fragmentation spectra made it possible to determine (i) the total number of carbons and double bonds in the molecule, (ii) the number of carbons and double bonds in acyls, (iii) the acyl in the sn-2 position on the glycerol backbone, and (iv) the double-bond positions in acyls. The double-bond positions were determined based on two types of fragments (alpha and omega ions) formed by cleavages of C-C bonds vinylic to the original double bond. The composition of the acyls and their positions on glycerol were established from the masses and intensities of the ions formed by the elimination of fatty acids from the [M + 55](+•) precursor. The method was applied for the analysis of triacylglycerols in olive oil and vernix caseosa. PMID:25701424

  18. Atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MINATROC field campaign 2000 on Monte Cimone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bunz

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The EU-project MINATROC (MINeral dust And TROpospheric Chemistry aims at enabling an estimation of the influence of mineral dust, a major, but to date largely ignored component of tropospheric aerosol, on tropospheric oxidant cycles. Within the scope of this project continuous atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 were conducted in June and July 2000 at the CNR WMO station, situated on Monte Cimone (MTC (44° 11' N -- 10° 42' E, 2165 m asl, Italy. African air transporting dust is occasionally advected over the Mediterranean Sea to the site, thus mineral aerosol emitted from Africa will encounter polluted air masses and provide ideal conditions to study their interactions. HNO3 and SO2 were measured with an improved CIMS (chemical ionization mass spectrometry system for ground-based measurements that was developed and built at MPI-K Heidelberg. Since HNO3 is a very sticky compound special care was paid for the air-sampling and background-measurement system. Complete data sets could be obtained before, during and after major dust intrusions. For the first time these measurements might provide a strong observational indication of efficient uptake of gas-phase HNO3 by atmospheric mineral-dust aerosol particles.

  19. Development of a High-Resolution H3O+ Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Gas-phase Hydrocarbons and its Application During the 2015 SONGNEX Aircraft Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Stark, H.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (ToF-CIMS) using H3O+ reagent ion chemistry (PTR-MS) are a relatively new technique in detection of gas-phase hydrocarbons, and recent improvements in instrument sensitivity, mass resolution, and ease of field deployment have expanded their use in atmospheric chemistry. The comparatively low-energy H3O+ ionization technique is ideal for measuring complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, and, compared to conventional quadrupole PTRMS, the newest generation of ToF-CIMS measure many more species simultaneously and with a sensitivity that is as high as a quadrupole PTR-MS. We describe here the development of a commercially available ToF CIMS into an H3O+CIMS suitable for deployment on aircraft, and its application during an aircraft campaign studying emissions from oil and natural gas extraction industry. We provide an overview of instrument development and specifications, including design, characterization, and field operation. We then discuss data processing and interpretation. First, we investigate determination of intensities of poorly resolved peaks. The mass resolution of the present instrument (m/Δm ~4500) enables separate analysis of many isobaric peaks, but peaks are also frequently not fully resolved. Using results from laboratory tests, we quantify how the accuracy can be limited by the overlap in neighboring peaks, and compare to theoretical predictions from literature. We then briefly describe our method for quality assurance of reported compounds, and correction for background and humidity effects. Finally, we present preliminary results from the first field deployment of this instrument during the Spring 2015 SONGNEX aircraft campaign. This campaign sampled emissions from oil and natural gas extraction regions and associated infrastructure in the Western and Central United States. We will highlight results that illustrate (1) new scientific capability from improved mass resolution, which

  20. Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorinated sulfonamides determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Rosales, Luis E; Sancho, Juan V; Santos, F Javier; Moyano, Encarnación

    2015-09-25

    Ionization and in source-fragmentation behavior of four fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOH) (4:2 FTOH, 6:2 FTOH, 8:2 FTOH and 10:2 FTOH) and four N-alkyl fluorooctane sulfonamides/-ethanols (N-MeFOSA, N-EtFOSA, N-MeFOSE and N-EtFOSE) by APCI has been studied and compared with the traditionally used EI and CI. Protonated molecule was the base peak of the APCI spectrum in all cases giving the possibility of selecting it as a precursor ion for MS/MS experiments. Following, CID fragmentation showed common product ions for all FOSAs/FOSEs (C4F7 and C3F5). Nevertheless, the different functionality gave characteristic pattern fragmentations. For instance, FTOHs mainly loss H2O+HF, FOSAs showed the losses of SO2 and HF while FOSEs showed the losses of H2O and SO2. Linearity, repeatability and LODs have been studied obtaining instrumental LODs between 1 and 5fg. Finally, application to river water and influent and effluent waste water samples has been carried out in order to investigate the improvements in detection capabilities of this new source in comparison with the traditionally used EI/CI sources. Matrix effects in APCI have been evaluated in terms of signal enhancement/suppression when comparing standards in solvent and matrix. No matrix effects were observed and concentrations found in samples were in the range of 1-100pgL(-1) far below the LODs achieved with methods previously reported. Unknown related perfluoroalkyl substances, as methyl-sulfone and methyl-sulfoxide analogues for FTOHs, were also discovered and tentatively identified. PMID:26298605

  1. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry-Based Measurements of HO2 and RO2 During TRACE-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Christopher A.; Eisele, Fred L.

    2004-01-01

    The Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) mission extends NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) series of campaigns. TRACE-P was an aircraft-based campaign that was part of a larger ground-based and aircraft-based program (APARE) under the auspices of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) program. TRACE-P was designed to (1) determine the chemical composition of Asian outflow over the western Pacific, and to (2) determine the chemical evolution of the Asian outflow. These objectives were addressed through a variety of observations and numerical modeling exercises. In particular, the goals included sampling strategies that would improve understanding of the budgets of odd hydrogen species (OH and HO2), budgets of NOx (NO, NO2, and their reservoirs), and impacts of oxidants produced in the outflow on air quality in the United States. The NASA DC-8 and P-3B aircraft were deployed in the March and April, 2001 out of primary bases of operation in Hong Kong and Yokota Air Base in Japan. These two aircraft have complementary capabilities which allow high altitude and long range impacts, as well as low altitude, local impacts to be assessed. In order to quantify the composition and evolution of Asian outflow, it is important to quantify as many species as possible including photochemically active species (e.g. NO2, CH2O, O3, acetone, etc.), sources species (VOCs, CO, NOx, SO2, aerosols), reactive intermediates including free radicals (OH, HO2, RO2, and their reservoirs), and end products (nitric acid, sulfuric acid, secondary aerosols, etc.). The more complete the measurement suite, the more tightly constrained the numerical modeling can be (within the uncertainties of the measurements). The numerical models range in sophistication from simple steady state box models (as employed in this study) to multi-dimensional chemical transport models. Data were collected on approximately 20 flights of the DC-8 and 21 flights of the P-3B

  2. Analysis of vitamin K-1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot...

  3. Quantification of trace fatty acid methyl esters in diesel fuel by using multidimensional gas chromatography with electron and chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R L; Rawson, P M; Evans, D J; Marriott, P J

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of contamination of marine and naval diesel fuels (arising from product mixing or adulteration) with biodiesel or fatty acid methyl esters can be problematic, especially at very low levels. A suitable solution for this task for trace amounts of individual fatty acid methyl esters with resolution and quantification can be achieved by using a multidimensional gas chromatographic approach with electron and chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection. A unique column set comprising a 100 m methyl-siloxane nonpolar first dimension column and high-temperature ionic liquid column in the second dimension enabled identification of individual fatty acid methyl esters at below the lowest concentrations required to be reported in a diesel fuel matrix. Detection limits for individual fatty acid methyl esters compounds ranged from 0.5 to 5.0 mg/L, with excellent linearity up to 5000 mg/L and repeatability of the method from 1.3 to 3.2%. The method was applied to the analysis of diesel fuel samples with suspected biodiesel contamination. Contamination at 568 mg/L was calculated for an unknown sample and interpretation of the results permitted the determination of a likely source of the contamination. PMID:27159197

  4. Analysis of vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific analytical method to study vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables. Accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. Quantification was done by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot. The repeatability was 5.2% and the internal reproducibility was 6.2%. Recovery was in the range 90-120%. No significant difference was observed between the results obtained by the present method and by a method using the same principle as the CEN-standard i.e. liquid-liquid extraction and post-column zinc reduction with fluorescence detection. Limit of quantification was estimated to 0.05 μg/100g fresh weight. PMID:26304366

  5. Quantification of low levels of organochlorine pesticides using small volumes (chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Rodríguez, Laura B; Rodríguez-Estrella, Ricardo; Ellington, James Jackson; Evans, John J

    2007-07-01

    A solid phase extraction and gas chromatography with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in scan mode (GC-NCI-MS) method was developed to identify and quantify for the first time low levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCs) in plasma samples of less than 100 microl from wild birds. The method detection limits ranged from 0.012 to 0.102 pg/microl and the method reporting limit from 0.036 to 0.307 pg/microl for alpha, gamma, beta and delta-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, endosulfan I, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan-II, endrin-aldehyde and endosulfan-sulfate. Pesticide levels in small serum samples from individual Falco sparverius, Sturnella neglecta, Mimus polyglottos and Columbina passerina were quantified. Concentrations ranged from not detected (n/d) to 204.9 pg/microl for some OC pesticides. All levels in the food web in and around cultivated areas showed the presence of pesticides notwithstanding the small areas for agriculture existing in the desert of Baja California peninsula. PMID:17240024

  6. Carbamazepine in municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge: ultrafast quantification by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the distribution of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in wastewater (WW) and aqueous and solid phases of wastewater sludge (WWS) was carried out. A rapid and reliable method enabling high-throughput sample analysis for quicker data generation, detection, and monitoring of CBZ in WW and WWS was developed and validated. The ultrafast method (15s per sample) is based on the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The optimization of instrumental parameters and method application for environmental analysis are presented. The performance of the novel method was evaluated by estimation of extraction recovery, linearity, precision and detection limit. The method detection limits was 12 ng L(-1) in WW and 3.4 ng g(-1) in WWS. The intra- and inter-day precisions were 8% and 11% in WW and 6% and 9% in WWS, respectively. Furthermore, three extraction methods, ultrasonic extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with three different solvent condition such as methanol, acetone and acetonitrile:ethyle acetate (5:1, v/v) were compared on the basis of procedural blank and method recovery. Overall, ASE showed the best extraction efficiency with methanol as compared to USE and MAE. Furthermore, the quantification of CBZ in WW and WWS samples showed the presence of contaminant in all stages of the treatment plant. PMID:22967548

  7. Determination of the mycotoxin moniliformin in cultures of Fusarium subglutinans and in naturally contaminated maize by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewram, V; Nieuwoudt, T W; Marasas, W F; Shephard, G S; Ritieni, A

    1999-07-01

    A LC-MS method employing triethylamine as ion-pairing reagent for the determination of moniliformin in culture material and naturally contaminated maize samples is described. Mass spectrometric detection of moniliformin was accomplished following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to yield the deprotonated molecular ion [M-H]- at m/z 97. The moniliformin response was found to be linear over the injected range 10 ng to 700 ng and a detection limit of 10 ng was attainable at a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 4. Five South African strains of Fusarium subglutinans were grown on maize kernels and moniliformin extracted with an acetonitrile-water (95:5) mixture. Following sample clean up with reversed-phase (C18) solid-phase extraction cartridges, the extracts were subjected to LC-MS analysis. Triethylamine was used as an ion-pair reagent and found to improve the retention characteristics of moniliformin without any detrimental effects to the instrument. Moniliformin concentrations ranged between 130 mg/kg and 1460 mg/kg culture. Application of this method to naturally contaminated maize samples from Transkei showed that it was capable of measuring moniliformin levels down to 10 micrograms/kg in selected moldy maize cobs. This is the first report on the application of LC-MS to the analysis of moniliformin in cultures of F. subglutinans and in naturally contaminated maize. PMID:10427758

  8. Quantitative determination of dexamethasone in bovine milk by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherlet, Marc; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick

    2004-06-01

    Dexamethasone (DXM) is a synthetic glucocorticoid that is authorized for therapeutic use in veterinary medicine. The European Community (EC) fixed a maximum residue limit (MRL) at 2ng/g for liver, 0.75ng/g for muscle and kidney tissues, and 0.3ng/ml for milk, while its use as growth-promoter is completely banned. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a simple and reliable method to determine DXM residues in bovine milk. Milk proteins were removed by the addition of concentrated trichloroacetic acid and paper filtration. Solid-phase extraction clean-up on a C18 reversed phase column was performed to obtain an extract suitable for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Chromatographic separation of DXM and the internal standard desoximetasone, was achieved on a PLRP-S polymeric reversed phase column, using a mixture of 0.1% (v/v) acetic acid in water (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B) as the mobile phases. They were identified using the MS/MS detection technique, and were subsequently quantified. The method has been validated according to the requirements of the EC at 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60ng/ml (being half the MRL, the MRL and double the MRL levels fixed by the EC). Calibration graphs were prepared in the 0.15-5ng/ml range and good linearity was achieved (r>or=0.99 and goodness of fit

  9. Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Dawei; Jogsten, Ingrid Ericson; Dunstan, Jody; Hagberg, Jessika; Wang, Thanh; Ruzzin, Jerome; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; van Bavel, Bert

    2016-07-01

    A method using a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC/APCI) to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention is presented. One microliter injection of a six-point calibration curve of native PCBs and OCPs, ranging from 0.04 to 300pg/μL, was performed. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) was less than 15% with a coefficient of determination (r(2))>0.995. Meanwhile, two calibration solutions (CS), CS 2 (0.4pg/μL) and CS 3 (4pg/μL) were analyzed to study the repeatability calculated for both area and RRFs. The RSD for RRF ranged from 3.1 to 16% and 3.6 to 5.5% for CS 2 and CS 3, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) determined by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 were compared between the GC/APCI/MS/MS and a GC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) system. GC/APCI/MS/MS resulted in lower LOD for most of the compounds, except for PCB#74, cis-chlordane and trans-chlordane. GC/APCI/MS/MS and GC/HRMS were also compared by performing analysis on 75 human serum samples together with eight QA/QC serum samples. The comparison between GC/APCI/MS/MS system and GC/HRMS system for 16 of the targeted compounds was carried out. No statistically significant difference was discovered. Due to increased sensitivity and user friendly operation under atmospheric pressure, GC/APCI/MS/MS is a powerful alternative technique that can easily meet the specification of GC/HRMS. PMID:27236485

  10. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  11. Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds during SOAS 2013 using nitrate ion chemical ionization coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Cnagaratna, M.; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J. P.; Mauldin, R.; Ehn, M.; Sipila, M.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry. This technique allows to selectively detect oxidized gas-phase species, e.g., oxidized organic molecules and sulfuric acid via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. The capability of making such measurements is important because both sulfuric acid and organic gas molecules have a recognized key role in new particle formation (NPF) processes and likely have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest supersite in Centreville, AL, from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The main goal of the SOAS campaign was to investigate the composition and sources of SOA in the Southeast US, where emissions are mainly represented by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emissions and in less extent by anthropogenic emissions (AVOC). During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected a range of organic ions that based on previous literature could be identified as oxidation products of both isoprene and terpenes. The isoprene products were 5 to 10 times more abundant than the terpene products. The isoprene-related molecules showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, typically after 1500 local time, while the terpene products were higher at night (between 2000 and 0600 local time). These results are consistent with the diurnal trends of primary BVOC emissions from other co-located instruments. The ambient data are also compared to laboratory measurements where oxidized organic vapors are produced using a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor by the OH oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors (isoprene, a-pinene) over multiple days of equivalent atmospheric exposure.

  12. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid) b...

  13. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic ac...

  14. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Applicability of GC-(APCI)QTOF MS as new tool for wide-scope screening of pesticides in fruits and vegetables demonstrated. • Validation of screening method according to SANCO/12571/2013. • Detection of the pesticides based on the presence of M+·/MH+ in most cases. • Screening detection limit 0.01 mg kg−1 for 77% of the pesticides investigated. • Successful identification at 0.01 mg kg−1 for 70% of the pesticides/matrix combinations. - Abstract: A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MSE). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg−1. For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01 mg kg−1 level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01 mg kg−1 for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5 ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01 mg kg−1 level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg−1 level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second ion was the main reason for the inability to

  15. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portolés, T. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Mol, J.G.J. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sancho, J.V.; López, Francisco J. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); Hernández, F., E-mail: hernandf@uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Applicability of GC-(APCI)QTOF MS as new tool for wide-scope screening of pesticides in fruits and vegetables demonstrated. • Validation of screening method according to SANCO/12571/2013. • Detection of the pesticides based on the presence of M+·/MH+ in most cases. • Screening detection limit 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. • Successful identification at 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 70% of the pesticides/matrix combinations. - Abstract: A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MS{sup E}). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1}. For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5 ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1} level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second

  16. A field-deployable, chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer: application to the measurement of gas-phase organic and inorganic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Bertram

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a new field-deployable chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-TOFMS for the direct measurement of trace gases in the atmosphere. We apply the technique to the measurement of gas-phase inorganic and organic acids via negative-ion proton transfer, using acetate as the reagent ion. A novel high pressure interface, incorporating two RF-only quadrupoles is used to efficiently focus ions through four stages of differential pumping before analysis with a compact TOFMS. The high ion-duty cycle (>20% of the TOFMS, coupled to efficient production and transmission of ions in the high pressure interface results in a highly sensitive (>300 ions s−1 pptv−1 instrument capable of the fast measurement of atmospheric gases at trace levels. We demonstrate the efficient transfer and detection of both bare ions and ion-molecule clusters, and characterize the instrument during field measurements aboard the R/V Atlantis as part of the CalNex campaign during the spring of 2010. The in-field short-term precision is better than 5% at 1 pptv (pL/L, for 1-second averages. The detection limit (3σ, 1-second averages of the current version of the CI-TOFMS, as applied to the in situ detection of gas-phase acids, is limited by the magnitude and variability in the background determination and was determined to be 4 pptv.

  17. A high-performance liquid chromatographic-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric method for determination of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, David E; Laycock, John D; Huang, Wei; Foltz, Rodger L

    2004-09-01

    Risperidone, a benzisoxazole derivative, is an antipsychotic agent used for the treatment of schizophrenia. We developed a liquid chromatographic-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-APCI-MS-MS) method with improved sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range for determination of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma. A structural analogue of risperidone, RO68808 (5 ng/mL), is added as the internal standard to 1 mL of human plasma. Plasma is made basic, extracted with pentane/methylene chloride (3:1), the organic phase evaporated to dryness, and the residue is reconstituted in water with 0.1% formic acid/acetonitrile (20:1). For LC-MS-MS analysis, a Metachem Inertsel HPLC column (2.1 x 150 mm, 5-microm particle size) is connected to a Finnigan TSQ7000 tandem MS via the Finnigan API interface. Both electrospray (ESI) and APCI produced predominantly MH(+) ions for the two analytes and the internal standard. Ions detected by selected reaction monitoring correspond to the following transitions: m/z 411 to 191 for risperidone, m/z 427 to 207 for 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and m/z 421 to 201 for the internal standard. APCI provided a larger dynamic range (0.1 to 25 ng/mL) and better precision and accuracy than ESI. Intrarun accuracy and precision determined at 0.1, 0.25, 2.5, and 15 ng/mL were within 12% of target with %CVs not exceeding 10.9%. Interrun accuracy and precision determined at the same concentrations were within 9.6% of target with %CVs not exceeding 6.7%. Analytes were stable in plasma after 24 h at room temperature, 2 freeze-thaw cycles, and 490 days at -20 degrees C. PMID:15516302

  18. Phenolic Compounds of Pinus brutia Ten.: Chemical Investigation and Quantitative Analysis Using an Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electrospray Ionization Source

    OpenAIRE

    İbrahim Kıvrak; Şeyda Kıvrak; Mansur Harmandar; Yunus Çetintaş

    2013-01-01

    In this study, phenolic content of Pinus brutia ’s bark was examined using an ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization source (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) working in multiple reaction monitoring mode. U ltrasonic extraction method with 50% ethanol solution was used for the extraction of bark. The bark of Pinus brutia consisted of 15 compounds: gallic acid, gentisic acid, protocatechuic acid, 4-hydroxy benzoic acid, catechin hydrate, vanillic acid, caff...

  19. Chemical analysis of surfaces by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy associated to ionic pulverization; Analyse chimique de surfaces par spectrometrie d`ionisation resonante associee a la pulverisation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, P.

    1995-12-19

    This work shows that if resonance ionization mass spectroscopy was first applied in isotopic separation, it`s also an analyzing method adapted to the study of semi-conductor materials and thin foils. We have improved this technic: a neodymium laser coupled with a dye laser, a new argon ions gun, a gallium ions gun and a new collection optic for the secondary ions quadrupole spectrometer to allow quantitative and selective measurements. (S.G.). 84 refs.

  20. Chemical Investigation of Saponins in Different Parts of Panax notoginseng by Pressurized Liquid Extraction and Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Jia Hong; Peng Li; Yi-Tao Wang; Shao-Ping Li; Qing-Wen Zhang; Jian-Bo Wan

    2012-01-01

    A pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for the qualitative determination of saponins in different parts of P. notoginseng, including rhizome, root, fibre root, seed, stem, leaf and flower. The samples were extracted using PLE. The analysis was achieved on a Zorbax SB-C18 column with gradient elution of acetonitrile and 8 mM aqueous ammonium acet...

  1. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  2. The effect of H2SO4 – amine clustering on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) measurements of gas-phase sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Worsnop, D.R.; Mauldin, L.; Vehkamäki, H.; M. Ehn; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Ortega, I.K.; Smith,J; T. Petäjä; Kurtén, T.; M. Kulmala

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. We have assessed the possible effect of the sulfuric acid molecules clustering with base molecules on CIMS measurements using computational chemistry. From the computational data, three conclusions can be drawn. First, a significant fraction of the gas-phase sulfuric acid molecules are very likely clustered with amines if the amine concen...

  3. Determination of eight nitrosamines in water at the ng L{sup -1} levels by liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripolles, Cristina; Pitarch, Elena; Sancho, Juan V.; Lopez, Francisco J. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Hernandez, Felix, E-mail: felix.hernandez@qfa.uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {center_dot} Eight N-nitrosamines in water by LC(APCI)MS/MS QqQ analysis. {center_dot} Validation at two levels: 10 ng L{sup -1} (LOQ) and 100 ng L{sup -1} in drinking water. {center_dot} Developed method applied to different types of water samples. {center_dot} NDMA was the analyte more frequently detected and at the highest concentration levels. - Abstract: In this work, we have developed a sensitive method for detection and quantification of eight N-nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMor), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosopirrolidine (NPyr), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPip), N-nitroso-n-dipropylamine (NDPA) and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBA) in drinking water. The method is based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive mode with a triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ). The simultaneous acquisition of two MS/MS transitions in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) for each compound, together with the evaluation of their relative intensity, allowed the simultaneous quantification and reliable identification in water at ppt levels. Empirical formula of the product ions selected was confirmed by UHPLC-(Q)TOF MS accurate mass measurements from reference standards. Prior to LC-MS/MS QqQ analysis, a preconcentration step by off-line SPE using coconut charcoal EPA 521 cartridges (by passing 500 mL of water sample) was necessary to improve the sensitivity and to meet regulation requirements. For accurate quantification, two isotope labelled nitrosamines (NDMA-d{sub 6} and NDPA-d{sub 14}) were added as surrogate internal standards to the samples. The optimized method was validated at two concentration levels (10 and 100 ng L{sup -1}) in drinking water samples, obtaining satisfactory recoveries (between 90 and 120%) and precision (RSD < 20%). Limits of detection were found to be in the range of 1-8 ng L{sup -1

  4. Determination of benzoylurea insecticide residues in tomatoes by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-diode array and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoglou, Anastasios N; Bempelou, Eleftheria D; Liapis, Konstantinos S; Ziogas, Basil N

    2007-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method using high-performance liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 5 benzoylurea insecticides-diflubenzuron, triflumuron, teflubenzuron, lufenuron, and flufenoxuron-in tomatoes. Residues were successfully separated on a C18 column by methanol-water isocratic elution. Detection was carried out by an ultraviolet diode array detector (UV-DAD) coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in negative-ion mode. The main ions were the deprotonated molecules [M-H]- for triflumuron, and the anions formed by elimination of hydrofluoric acid [M-H-HF]- for diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron, and [M-2H-HF] for lufenuron and teflubenzuron. The calibration plots were linear for both detectors over the range 0.05 to 10 microg/mL, and the method presented good quality parameters. The limits of detection for standard solutions were 0.008-0.01 mg/L (equivalent to 0.08-0.1 ng injected) for both detectors, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were approximately 10 times lower than national maximum residue levels (MRLs). Depending on the compound and the detector, the LOQ values ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 ng injected. The optimum LC-UV-DAD/APCI-MS conditions were applied to the analysis of benzoylureas in tomatoes. The obtained recoveries from fortified tomato samples (50 g), extracted with ethyl acetate and purified by solid-phase extraction on silica sorbent, were 88-100 and 92.9-105% for the UV-DAD and MS detectors, respectively, with precision values (relative standard deviations) of 2.9-11 and 3.7-14%, respectively. The method was applied to 12 tomato samples from local markets, and diflubenzuron and lufenuron were detected in only one sample at concentrations lower than the MRLs. The results indicate that the developed LC/MS method is accurate, precise, and sensitive for quantitative and qualitative analysis at low levels of benzoylureas

  5. Measurements of HNO3 and N2O5 using ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tie

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available An ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS was deployed in Mexico City between 7 and 31 March to measure gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA-2006 field campaign. The observation site was located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo in the northern part of Mexico City urban area with major emissions of pollutants from residential, vehicular and industrial sources. Diurnally, HNO3 was less than 200 parts per trillion (ppt during the night and early morning. The concentration of HNO3 increased steadily from around 09:00 a.m. central standard time (CST, reached a peak value of 0.5 to 3 parts per billion (ppb in the early afternoon, and then declined sharply to less than half of the peak value near 05:00 p.m. CST. An inter-comparison between the ID-CIMS and an ion chromatograph/mass spectrometer (ICMS showed a good agreement between the two HNO3 measurements (R2=0.75. The HNO3 mixing ratio was found to anti-correlate with submicron-sized aerosol nitrate, suggesting that the gas-particle partitioning process was a major factor in determining the gaseous HNO3 concentration. Losses by irreversible reactions with mineral dust and via dry deposition also could be important at this site. Most of the times during the MCMA 2006 field campaign, N2O5 was found to be below the detection limit (about 30 ppt for a 10 s integration time of the ID-CIMS, because of high NO mixing ratio at the surface (>100 ppb during the night. An exception occurred on 26 March 2006, when about 40 ppt N2O5 was observed during the late afternoon and early evening hours under cloudy conditions before the build-up of NO at the surface site. The results revealed that during the MCMA-2006 field campaign HNO3 was primarily produced from the reaction of OH with NO2 and regulated by gas/particle transfer and dry deposition. The production of HNO3 from N2O5 hydrolysis during the nighttime was small

  6. Measurements of HNO3 and N2O5 using ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Fortner, E. C.; Volkamer, R. M.; Molina, L.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gaeggeler, K.; Dommen, J.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Tie, X.

    2008-11-01

    An ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS) was deployed in Mexico City between 7 and 31 March to measure gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA)-2006 field campaign. The observation site was located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo in the northern part of Mexico City urban area with major emissions of pollutants from residential, vehicular and industrial sources. Diurnally, HNO3 was less than 200 parts per trillion (ppt) during the night and early morning. The concentration of HNO3 increased steadily from around 09:00 a.m. central standard time (CST), reached a peak value of 0.5 to 3 parts per billion (ppb) in the early afternoon, and then declined sharply to less than half of the peak value near 05:00 p.m. CST. An inter-comparison between the ID-CIMS and an ion chromatograph/mass spectrometer (ICMS) showed a good agreement between the two HNO3 measurements (R2=0.75). The HNO3 mixing ratio was found to anti-correlate with submicron-sized aerosol nitrate, suggesting that the gas-particle partitioning process was a major factor in determining the gaseous HNO3 concentration. Losses by irreversible reactions with mineral dust and via dry deposition also could be important at this site. Most of the times during the MCMA 2006 field campaign, N2O5 was found to be below the detection limit (about 30 ppt for a 10 s integration time) of the ID-CIMS, because of high NO mixing ratio at the surface (>100 ppb) during the night. An exception occurred on 26 March 2006, when about 40 ppt N2O5 was observed during the late afternoon and early evening hours under cloudy conditions before the build-up of NO at the surface site. The results revealed that during the MCMA-2006 field campaign HNO3 was primarily produced from the reaction of OH with NO2 and regulated by gas/particle transfer and dry deposition. The production of HNO3 from N2O5 hydrolysis during the nighttime was small because of

  7. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) has been used for the sensitive detection of uranium. The apparatus consists of a laser system with three dye lasers and two pulsed copper vapour lasers and a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The uranium atoms are ionized in a three step excitation with the third step leading to an autoionizing state. Several excitation schemes were investigated and for two schemes all three transitions could be saturated with the available laser power. The hyperfine structure splitting (HFS) of 235U, the isotopic shift (IS) between 235U and 238U as well as isotopic ratios in uranium samples were determined. (Author)

  8. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of opiates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key words: surface ionization, adsorption, heterogeneous reactions, surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy, thermoemitter, opiates, extracts of biosamples. Subjects of study. The mass - spectrometric study of thermal - ion emission: surface ionization of opiates by on the surface of oxidized refractory metals. Purpose of work is to establish the regularities of surface ionization (SI) of multi-atomic molecule opiates and their mixtures develop the scientific base of SI methods for high sensitive and selective detection and analysis of these substances in the different objects, including biosamples. Methods of study: surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy. The results obtained and their novelty. For the first time, SI of molecule opiates on the oxidized tungsten surface has been studied and their SI mass-spectra and temperature dependences of ion currents have been obtained, the characteristic heterogeneous reactions of an adsorbed molecules and the channels of monomolecular decays vibrationally-excited ions on their way in mass-spectrometry have been revealed, sublimation energy has been defined, the activation energy of Eact, of these decays has been estimated for given period of time. Additivity of the SI mass-spectra of opiate mixtures of has been established under conditions of joint opiate adsorption. High selectivity of SI allows the extracts of biosamples to be analyzed without their preliminary chromatographic separation. The opiates are ionized by SI with high efficiency (from 34 C/mol to 112 C/mol), which provides high sensitivity of opiate detection by SI/MS and APTDSIS methods from - 10-11 g in the samples under analysis. Practical value. The results of these studies create the scientific base for novel SI methods of high sensitive detection and analysis of the trace amounts of opiates in complicated mixtures, including biosamples without their preliminary

  9. Simultaneous determination of hydroxycinnamates and catechins in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Sandström, B.

    2003-01-01

    atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) MS using single ion monitoring (SIM) in negative mode. Linear calibration graphs were achieved in the dynamic range of 10-1000 ng/ml urine. The inter- and intraassay coefficients of variation (C.V.%) for the analysis of the four compounds in quality control...... urine samples were between 7.8 and 10.9, n=17 (reproducibility), and the repeatability of the assay was between 2.5 and 5.0% (n = 12). Analyses of urine samples from a human dietary intervention study with intake of 600 g of fruits and vegetables were demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first...

  10. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, Claus;

    2000-01-01

    column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring in...... variation for the analysis of the 12 different flavonoids in quality control urine samples were 12.3% on average (range 11.0-13.7%, n = 24, reproducibility) and the repeatability of the assay were 5.0% (mean, range 0.1-14.8%, it = 12). A subset of 10 urine samples from a human dietary intervention study...

  11. Chlorine activation by N2O5: simultaneous, in situ detection of ClNO2 and N2O5 by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, J. A.; Kercher, J. P.; T. P. Riedel

    2009-01-01

    We report a new method for the simultaneous in situ detection of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). The technique relies on the formation and detection of iodide ion-molecule clusters, I(ClNO2)− and I(N2O5)−. The novel N2O5 detection scheme is direct. It does not suffer from high and variable chemical interferences, which are associated with the typical method of nitrate anion detection. We address the role o...

  12. Peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2 measurements during the UBWOS 2013 and 2014 studies using iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Veres

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory work is reported here establishing iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (I− CIMS as a sensitive method for the unambiguous detection of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2, PNA. A~dynamic calibration source for HO2NO2, HO2, and HONO was developed and calibrated using a~novel total NOy detector (NOy CaRDS. Photochemical sources of these species were used for the calibration and validation of the I− CIMS instrument for detection of HO2NO2. A dual inlet system was developed to determine differences in the instrument response when using a heated inlet dissociator (150 °C and a "cold" room-temperature inlet. HO2NO2 was detected as I-HO2− (m/z 160, NO3− (m/z 62 and I-HO2NO2− (m/z 206. The I− CIMS normalized sensitivity to peroxynitric acid was 2.0 Hz pptv−1 with a detection limit (3σ of 40 pptv via detection of the I-HO2− (m/z 160 cluster ion using an inlet dissociator at a temperature of 150 °C. Alternatively, PNA was detected via I− CIMS with a cold inlet at both the NO3− (m/z 62 and I-HO2NO2− (m/z 206 ions with normalized detection sensitivities of 144 and 0.4 Hz pptv−1 respectively. The cold inlet sensitivity of iodide CIMS towards the detection of HO2 radicals, also via detection at the I-HO2− cluster ion, a potential HO2NO2 interference, was approximately 2.6 Hz pptv−1 with an instrumental detection limit (3σ of 20 pptv. Ambient observations of HO2NO2 using I− CIMS were made during the 2013 and 2014 Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Study (UBWOS are presented. Strong inversions leading to a build-up of many primary and secondary pollutants as well as low temperatures drove daytime HO2NO2 as high as 1.5 ppbv during the 2013 study. A comparison of HO2NO2 observations to mixing ratios predicted using a chemical box model describing an ozone formation event observed during the 2013 wintertime shows agreement in the daily maxima HO2NO2 mixing ratio, but a significant difference os several hours in the timing

  13. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Isselhardt, Brett Hallen

    2011-01-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with aut...

  14. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectra of Dipeptide Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO, Zaigang; ZENG, Chengchu; YANG, Daoshan; HUANG, Yali; WANG, Fang; DU, Hongguang; HU, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Based on the structure of the HIV integrase core domain, dipeptide derivatives, as a type of HIV integrase in- hibitor, were synthesized, and their fragmentation pathways were investigated by electrospray ionization mass spec- trometry (ESI-MSN) in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). In order to better understand the fragmentation pathways, the MS2 and MS3 spectra of the title compound were obtained. The main fragmentation pathways occur by the cleavage of the C-CO bonds between N-(benzothiazol-2-yl)aminocarbonyl and methylene, NH-CO bonds between the NH groups and carbonyl groups. Electrospray ionization was proven to be a good method for the structural characterization and identification of this kind of compound.

  15. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry of indol-3yl-acetic acid and cis-abscisic acid: evaluation of negative ion detection and quantification of cis-abscisic acid in growing maize roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass spectra of the derivatives of indol-3yl-acetic acid and cis-abscisic acid were obtained in electron impact and chemical ionization positive ion and negative ion modes. The respective merits of methane, isobutane, and ammonia as reagent gases for structure determination and sensitive detection were compared using the methyl esters. From one to 10 fluorine atoms were attached to IAA to improve the electron-capturing properties of the molecule. The best qualitative information was obtained when using positive ion chemical ionization with methane. However, the most sensitive detection, with at least two ions per molecule, was achieved by electron impact on the IAA-HFB-ME derivative and by negative ion chemical ionization with NH3 on the ABA-methyl ester derivative. p ]Quantitative analyses of ABA in different parts of maize (Zea mays cv. LG 11) root tips were performed by the latter technique. It was found that the cap and apex contained less ABA than the physiologically older parts of the root such as the elongation zone and the more differentiated tissues. This technique was also used to show a relation between maize root growth and the endogenous ABA level of the elongation zone and root tip: there is more ABA in the slowly growing roots than in the rapidly growing ones. (author)

  16. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Soumabha; Hendricks, P.I. [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Reynolds, J.C. [Centre for Analytical Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Cooks, R.G., E-mail: cooks@purdue.edu [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • In-situ derivatization and simultaneous ionization used to detect aldehydes. • Biogenic aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes reacted with 4-aminophenol. • Derivatized products yield structurally characteristic fragment ions. • This measurement demonstrated using a miniaturized portable mass spectrometer. - Abstract: Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer.

  17. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In-situ derivatization and simultaneous ionization used to detect aldehydes. • Biogenic aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes reacted with 4-aminophenol. • Derivatized products yield structurally characteristic fragment ions. • This measurement demonstrated using a miniaturized portable mass spectrometer. - Abstract: Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer

  18. The effect of H2SO4 - amine clustering on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) measurements of gas-phase sulfuric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurten, T.; Petaja, T.; Smith, J.;

    2011-01-01

    chemistry. From the computational data, three conclusions can be drawn. First, a significant fraction of the gas-phase sulfuric acid molecules are very likely clustered with amines if the amine concentration is around or above a few ppt. Second, some fraction of these acid-amine clusters may not be charged...... by the CIMS instrument, though the most reliable computational methods employed predict this fraction to be small; on the order of ten percent or less. Third, the amine molecules will evaporate practically immediately after charging, thus evading detection. These effects may need to be taken into...... account in the interpretation of atmospheric measurement data obtained using chemical ionization methods. The purpose of this study is not to criticize the CIMS method, but to help understand the implications of the measured results....

  19. Comparative analysis of sweat patches for cocaine (and metabolites) by radioimmunoassay and gas chromatography-positive ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, David E; Spanbauer, Alan C; Taccogno, James L; Smith, Elizabeth K

    2004-03-01

    Immunoassays are commonly used to screen samples prior to confirmation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This serves two purposes: it provides a second method for positive samples, and it allows exclusion of negative samples from further confirmatory testing. In addition, immunoassay results can be used in some cases to determine if dilution of the sample will be required during the confirmatory assay. We used 878 sweat patches worn by 38 subjects receiving treatment for cocaine dependence to compare analysis of the extracts of the patches for cocaine immuno-equivalents by radioimmunoassay (RIA) with determination of cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), and ecgonine methyl ester (EME) by GC-MS. Preliminary validation experiments demonstrate that the GC-MS method using positive ion chemical ionization had sufficient specificity and recovery to support a lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of 4 ng/patch and was precise and accurate across a linear range up to 500 ng/patch. Cocaine ranging from the LLOQ to 31,900 ng/patch was found in 660 of the samples; BE ranging from the LLOQ to 3470 ng/patch was found in 530 of the samples; and EME ranging from the LLOQ to 2280 ng/patch was found in 476 of the samples. In a subset of 238 samples semiquantitative use of the RIA gave results that agreed with GC-MS with a correlation coefficient of 0.986, but averaged approximately 23% lower. Although this accuracy of the RIA supported its use as a sole quantitative assay, the limited linear range of the RIA (4-200 ng/patch) proved impractical for this purpose. Receiver operator characteristic analysis of the cutoffs of the RIA and GC-MS suggested optimal cutoffs of 5 and 4 ng/patch, respectively. At these cutoffs, the RIA had sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity of 92.2%. For samples that had RIA results greater than the high calibrator (N = 228), various dilution schemes were assessed for their ability to predict retention of either cocaine alone or cocaine and both

  20. A multi-residue method for pesticides analysis in green coffee beans using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, Andre; Dickow Cardoso, Carmem; Reichert, Bárbara; de Kroon, Marijke; Wind, Wouter; Weber Righi, Laís; Caiel da Silva, Rosselei

    2012-08-17

    In this study, a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using the very selective negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode, was developed and applied in combination with a modified acetonitrile-based extraction method (QuEChERS) for the analysis of a large number of pesticide residues (51 pesticides, including isomers and degradation products) in green coffee beans. A previously developed integrated sample homogenization and extraction method for both pesticides and mycotoxins analysis was used. An homogeneous slurry of green milled coffee beans and water (ratio 1:4, w/w) was prepared and extracted with acetonitrile/acetic acid (1%), followed by magnesium sulfate addition for phase separation. Aliquots from this extract could be used directly for LC-MS/MS analysis of mycotoxins and LC-amenable pesticides. For GC-MS analysis, a further clean-up was necessary. C18- and PSA-bonded silica were tested as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents, separate and as a mixture, and the best results were obtained using C18-bonded silica. For the optimal sensitivity and selectivity, GC-MS detection in the NCI-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode had to be used to allow the fast analysis of the difficult coffee bean matrix. The validation was performed by analyzing recovery samples at three different spike concentrations, 10, 20 and 50 μg kg(-1), with 6 replicates (n=6) at each concentration. Linearity (r(2)) of calibration curves, estimated instrument and method limits of detection and limits of quantification (LOD(i), LOD(m), LOQ(i) and LOQ(m), respectively), accuracy (as recovery %), precision (as RSD%) and matrix effects (%) were determined for each individual pesticide. From the 51 analytes (42 parent pesticides, 4 isomers and 5 degradation products) determined by GC-MS (NCI-SIM), approximately 76% showed average recoveries between 70-120% and 75% and RSD ≤ 20% at the lowest spike concentration of 10 μg kg(-1), the target method LOQ. For the

  1. Phenolic Compounds of Pinus brutia Ten.: Chemical Investigation and Quantitative Analysis Using an Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electrospray Ionization Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Kıvrak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, phenolic content of Pinus brutia ’s bark was examined using an ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization source (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS working in multiple reaction monitoring mode. U ltrasonic extraction method with 50% ethanol solution was used for the extraction of bark. The bark of Pinus brutia consisted of 15 compounds: gallic acid, gentisic acid, protocatechuic acid, 4-hydroxy benzoic acid, catechin hydrate, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, myricetin, resveratrol, luteolin, naringenin, kaempferol. Major compound detected was catechin hydrate (28.305 mg 100 g -1 extract. The phenolic compounds of Pinus brutia extract and pycnogenol were compared, and it is shown that both of them consisted of considerable amount of phenolic compounds.

  2. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred P M

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  4. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references

  5. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  6. Diagnostic ion filtering strategy for chemical characterization of Guge Fengtong Tablet with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Su-Ling; Liu, Xin-Guang; Lai, Chang-Jiang-Sheng; Liu, E-Hu; Li, Ping

    2015-05-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the chemical constituents of Guge Fengtong Tablet (GGFTT). Based on the chromatographic retention behavior, fragmentation pathways of chemical components and the published literatures, a diagnostic ion filtering strategy with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS) was established to identify the multiple bioactive constituents of GGFTT. The rapid identification of forty-seven components, including 18 phenolic acids, 8 saponins, 14 gingerol-related compounds, and 7 diarylhepatonoids, was accomplished using this newly developed method. The coupling of HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS with the diagnostic ion filtering strategy was useful and efficient for the in-depth structural elucidation of chemical compounds of GGFTT. PMID:25986289

  7. Electrostatic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Sartor, Romain; Gasilova, Natalia; Lu, Yu; Tobolkina, Elena; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-09-01

    An electrostatic-spray ionization (ESTASI) method has been used for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of samples deposited in or on an insulating substrate. The ionization is induced by a capacitive coupling between an electrode and the sample. In practice, a metallic electrode is placed close to but not in direct contact with the sample. Upon application of a high voltage pulse to the electrode, an electrostatic charging of the sample occurs leading to a bipolar spray pulse. When the voltage is positive, the bipolar spray pulse consists first of cations and then of anions. This method has been applied to a wide range of geometries to emit ions from samples in a silica capillary, in a disposable pipet tip, in a polymer microchannel, or from samples deposited as droplets on a polymer plate. Fractions from capillary electrophoresis were collected on a polymer plate for ESTASI MS analysis. PMID:22876737

  8. The updated bottom up solution applied to atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) was recently applied to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) of triacylglycerols (TAGs). This report demonstrates that the UBUS applies equally well to atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS and to electrospray ionizatio...

  9. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D2O ice beneath a H2O ice layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D2O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D2O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H2O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H2O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D2O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D2O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H2O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be

  10. Characterization of gamma-irradiated polyethylene terephthalate by liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-molecular-weight (low-MW) constituents of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with 6Co gamma rays at 25 and 50 kGy, were analyzed by HPLC-MS with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI). Consistent with earlier results, the concentrations of the major compounds that are present in the non-irradiated PET do not change perceptibly. However, we find a small but significant increase in terephthalic acid ethylester, from less than 1 mg/kg in the non-irradiated control to ca. 2 mg/kg after 50 kGy, which has not been described before. The finding is important because it gives an impression of the sensitivity of the analytical method. Additionally, it shows that even very radiation-resistant polymers can form measurable amounts of low-MW radiolysis products. The potential and limitations of LC-MS for the analysis of radiolysis products and unidentified migrants are briefly discussed in the context of the question: How can we validate our analytical methods for unknown analytes?

  11. The role of physical and chemical properties of Pd nanostructured materials immobilized on inorganic carriers on ion formation in atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-06-01

    Fundamental parameters influencing the ion-producing efficiency of palladium nanostructures (nanoparticles [Pd-NP], nanoflowers, nanofilms) during laser irradiation were studied in this paper. The nanostructures were immobilized on the surface of different solid inorganic carrier materials (porous and mono-crystalline silicon, anodic porous aluminum oxide, glass and polished steel) by using classical galvanic deposition, electroless local deposition and sputtering. It was the goal of this study to investigate the influence of both the nanoparticular layer as well as the carrier material on ion production for selected analyte molecules. Our experiments demonstrated that the dimensions of the synthesized nanostructures, the thickness of the active layers, surface disorders, thermal conductivity and physically or chemically adsorbed water influenced signal intensities of analyte ions during surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) while no effects such as plasmon resonance, photoelectric effect or catalytic activity were expected to occur. Excellent LDI abilities were seen for Pd-NPs immobilized on steel, while Pd nanoflowers on porous silicon exhibited several disadvantages; viz, strong memory effects, dependency of the analytical signal on amount of physically and chemically adsorbed water inside porous carrier, reduced SALDI activity from unstable connections between Pd and semiconductor material, decrease of the melting point of pure silicon after Pd immobilization and resulting strong laser ablation of metal/semiconductor complex, as well as significantly changed surface morphology after laser irradiation. The analytical performance of Pd-NP/steel was further improved by applying a hydrophobic coating to the steel surface before galvanic deposition. This procedure increased the distance between Pd-NPs, thus reducing thermal stress upon LDI; it simultaneously decreased spot sizes of deposited sample solutions. PMID:24913399

  12. Evaluation of the capabilities of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls in complex-matrix food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, T; Sales, C; Abalos, M; Sauló, J; Abad, E

    2016-09-21

    The use of the novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography (GC) coupled to triple quadrupole using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and its potential for the simultaneous determination of the 12 dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs) in complex food and feed matrices has been evaluated. In first place, ionization and fragmentation behavior of DL-PCBs on the APCI source under charge transfer conditions has been studied followed by their fragmentation in the collision cell. Linearity, repeatability and sensitivity have been studied obtaining instrumental limits of detection and quantification of 0.0025 and 0.005 pg μL(-1) (2.5 and 5 fg on column) respectively for every DL-PCB. Finally, application to real samples has been carried out and DL-PCB congeners (PCB 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169, 189) have been detected in the different samples in the range of 0.40-10000 pg g(-1). GC-(APCI)MS/MS has been proved as a suitable alternative to the traditionally accepted confirmation method based on the use of high resolution mass spectrometry and other triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry techniques operating with electron ionization. The development of MS/MS methodologies for the analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs is nowadays particularly important, since this technique was included as a confirmatory method in the present European Union regulations that establish the requirements for the determination of these compounds in food and feed matrices. PMID:27590550

  13. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Soumabha; Hendricks, P I; Reynolds, J C; Cooks, R G

    2015-02-20

    Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer. PMID:25682245

  14. Dynamic Reactive Ionization with Cluster Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have been tuned to enhance secondary ion yields by doping small gas molecules such as CH4, CO2, and O2 into an Ar cluster projectile, Arn + ( n = 1000-10,000) to form a mixed cluster. The `tailored beam' has the potential to expand the application of secondary ion mass spectrometry for two- and three-dimensional molecular specific imaging. Here, we examine the possibility of further enhancing the ionization by doping HCl into the Ar cluster. Water deposited on the target surface facilitates the dissociation of HCl. This concerted effect, occurring only at the impact site of the cluster, arises since the HCl is chemically induced to ionize to H+ and Cl- , allowing improved protonation of neutral molecular species. This hypothesis is confirmed by depth profiling through a trehalose thin film exposed to D2O vapor, resulting in ~20-fold increase in protonated molecules. The results show that it is possible to dynamically maintain optimum ionization conditions during depth profiling by proper adjustment of the water vapor pressure. H-D exchange in the trehalose molecule M was monitored upon deposition of D2O on the target surface, leading to the observation of [Mn* + H]+ or [Mn* + D]+ ions, where n = 1-8 hydrogen atoms in the trehalose molecule M have been replaced by deuterium. In general, we discuss the role of surface chemistry and dynamic reactive ionization of organic molecules in increasing the secondary ion yield.

  15. Substrate-Enhanced Micro Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodyne Research, Inc. and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst will collaborate to develop laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric analysis of...

  16. Targeted metabolomic analysis of Escherichia coli by desorption electrospray ionization and extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ayanna U; Werner, Sean R; Talaty, Nari; Song, Yishu; Campbell, Karinna; Cooks, R Graham; Morgan, John A

    2008-04-15

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was utilized to monitor the presence of targeted central carbon metabolites within bacterial cell extracts and the quench supernatant of Escherichia coli. The targeted metabolites were identified through tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) product ion scans using collision-induced dissociation in the negative ion mode. Picogram detection limits were achieved for a majority of the metabolites during MS/MS analysis of standard metabolite solutions. In a [U-(13)C]glucose pulse experiment, where uniformly labeled glucose was fed to E. coli, the corresponding fragment ions from labeled metabolites in extracts were generally observed. There was evidence of matrix effects including moderate suppression by other metabolites within the spectra of the labeled and unlabeled extracts. To improve the specificity and sensitivity of detection, optimized in situ ambient chemical reactions using DESI and extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) were carried out for targeted compounds. This study provides the first indication of the potential to perform in situ targeted metabolomics of a bacterial sample via ambient ionization mass spectrometry. PMID:18243123

  17. A high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer utilizing hydronium ions (H3O+ ToF-CIMS) for measurements of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bin; Koss, Abigail; Warneke, Carsten; Gilman, Jessica B.; Lerner, Brian M.; Stark, Harald; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2016-07-01

    Proton transfer reactions between hydronium ions (H3O+) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) provide a fast and highly sensitive technique for VOC measurements, leading to extensive use of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in atmospheric research. Based on the same ionization approach, we describe the development of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) utilizing H3O+ as the reagent ion. The new H3O+ ToF-CIMS has sensitivities of 100-1000 cps ppb-1 (ion counts per second per part-per-billion mixing ratio of VOC) and detection limits of 20-600 ppt at 3σ for a 1 s integration time for simultaneous measurements of many VOC species of atmospheric relevance. The ToF analyzer with mass resolution (m/Δm) of up to 6000 allows the separation of isobaric masses, as shown in previous studies using similar ToF-MS. While radio frequency (RF)-only quadrupole ion guides provide better overall ion transmission than ion lens system, low-mass cutoff of RF-only quadrupole causes H3O+ ions to be transmitted less efficiently than heavier masses, which leads to unusual humidity dependence of reagent ions and difficulty obtaining a humidity-independent parameter for normalization. The humidity dependence of the instrument was characterized for various VOC species and the behaviors for different species can be explained by compound-specific properties that affect the ion chemistry (e.g., proton affinity and dipole moment). The new H3O+ ToF-CIMS was successfully deployed on the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for the SONGNEX campaign in spring of 2015. The measured mixing ratios of several aromatics from the H3O+ ToF-CIMS agreed within ±10 % with independent gas chromatography measurements from whole air samples. Initial results from the SONGNEX measurements demonstrate that the H3O+ ToF-CIMS data set will be valuable for the identification and characterization of emissions from various sources, investigation of secondary

  18. Trace level determination of organochlorine, organophosphorus and pyrethroid pesticides in lanolin using gel permeation chromatography followed by dual gas chromatography and gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometric confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, Eric; Bayona, Josep Maria

    2002-03-15

    A methodology for multi-class pesticide determination at trace level in lanolin is presented. Gel permeation chromatography on a Bio-Beads SX-3 column followed by a dual GC chromatographic determination has been developed. The effluent of the analytical column (50% diphenyl-methyl- or 14% cyanopropyl-phenylpolysiloxane) was split into an electron-capture and a nitrogen-phosphorus detection system. The chromatographic system was optimised for 28 pesticides commonly used to control sheep pests and corresponding to organochlorine, organophosphorus and pyretroid classes. Identification has been carried out by gas chromatography coupled to negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Recoveries ranged from 72 to 94% and the detection limits from 20 to 97 ng/g depending on the pesticide class, the RSDs were below 10%. Finally, the developed analytical methodology has been successfully applied to the determination of pesticides in several lanolin samples. PMID:11990995

  19. Application of Gas Chromatography-Negative Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry in Food Sefety Analysis%气相色谱-负化学离子源质谱法在食品安全分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨君; 王建华; 刘靖靖; 颜冬云

    2012-01-01

    气相色谱-负化学源质谱法(GC-NCI-MS)技术被广泛应用于环境、人体组织、食品等样品中污染物的定性分析和定量测定.综述了近年来气相色谱-负化学源质谱技术在食品安全分析如农药残留、兽药残留和污染物测定中的应用.%Gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) technology is widely used in environmental, human tissue, food and other contaminants qualitative analysis and quantitative determination. The research progress of GC-NCI-MS application in food safety analysis such as pesticide residues, veterinary drug residues and pollutants detection in recent years.

  20. Direct and Convenient Mass Spectrometry Sampling with Ambient Flame Ionization

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Pan Liu; Hao-Yang Wang; Jun-Ting Zhang; Meng-Xi Wu; Wan-Shu Qi; Hui Zhu; Yin-Long Guo

    2015-01-01

    Recent innovations in ambient ionization technology for the direct analysis of various samples in their native environment facilitate the development and applications of mass spectrometry in natural science. Presented here is a novel, convenient and flame-based ambient ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of organic compounds, termed as the ambient flame ionization (AFI) ion source. The key features of AFI ion source were no requirement of (high) voltages, laser beams and spray g...

  1. Ionization energy of acetone by vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer using coherent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing (FWDFM) in Kr has been constructed and utilized to obtain the accurate ionization energy of acetone. From the MATI onsets measured from various applied pulsed fields, the ionization energy to the ionic ground state of acetone has been determined to be 9.7074 ± 0.0019 eV.

  2. Analysis of secondary organic aerosol using a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, M.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) which is coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS), and its application in laboratory and field measurements. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS allows the quantification of organic acids and other oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on a semi-continuous basis. Furthermore, the vapor pressure and saturation concentration of the particle components can be estimated. The MOVI was first described in 2010 by Yatavelli and Thornton (Yatavelli and Thornton, 2010). It is a single stage, multi-nozzle impactor with 100 nozzles, each having a diameter of 150 μm. At a flow-rate of 10 L·min-1 air is drawn through the MOVI and particles are collected on a deposition plate. The cut-point diameter (d50, diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 130 nm. A low pressure-drop of only 5.3% of atmospheric pressure behind the nozzles allows collecting not only low-volatile but even semi-volatile compounds, which are an important part of SOA. After collecting particles hydrocarbon-free synthetic air is led over the collection surface into the APCI-IT/MS and the collection surface is heated up to 120 ° C in less than 200 s, volatilizing the sampled SOA. The vaporized compounds are transferred into the ion source and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry. Due to the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure the obtained mass spectra show only low fragmentations and can easily be interpreted. In laboratory experiments the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was used for the chemical analysis of SOA generated from α-pinene-ozonolysis in a smog chamber. The limit of detection was found at 7.3 ng for pinic acid. The vapor pressure log p0 and the saturation concentration C25* for pinic acid were calculated from the desorption temperature using the method presented by Faulhaber et al. (Faulhaber et al., 2009

  3. High-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection characterization of Delta5-polyenoic fatty acids in triacylglycerols from conifer seed oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal; Rezanka, Tomás; Kabátová, Nadezda

    2007-03-30

    Edible conifer seeds can serve as a source of triacylglycerols (TGs) with unusual Delta5 unsaturated polymethylene interrupted fatty acids (UPIFAs), such as cis-5,9-octadecadienoic (taxoleic), cis-5,9,12-octadecatrienoic (pinolenic), cis-5,11-eicosadienoic (keteleeronic) and cis-5,11,14-eicosatrienoic acids (sciadonic). Conifer seed oils from European Larch (Larix decidua), Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and European Silver Fir (Abies alba) have been analyzed by non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NARP-HPLC) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-MS detection. The influence of different positions of double bonds in Delta5-UPIFAs on the retention and fragmentation behavior is described and used for the successful identification of TGs in each oil. TGs containing Delta5-UPIFAs have a higher retention in comparison with common TGs found in plant oils with single methylene interrupted Delta6(9)-FAs and also significantly changed relative abundances of fragment ions in APCI mass spectra. Results obtained from HPLC/MS analyses are supported by validated GC/FID analyses of fatty acid methyl esters after the transesterification. The total content of Delta5-UPIFAs is about 32% for European Larch, 27% for Norway Spruce and 20% for European Silver Fir. In total, 20 FAs with acyl chain lengths from 16 to 24 carbon atoms and from 0 to 3 double bonds have been identified in 64 triacylglycerols from 3 conifer seed oils. PMID:17307191

  4. Simultaneous extraction of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid from human plasma and simultaneous estimation by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry detection. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Ajjala, Devender; Suraneni, Ramakrishna; Thoddi, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in atmospheric chemical ionization mode (APCI) for the simultaneous estimation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, CAS 50-78-2) and its active metabolite salicylic acid (SA, CAS 69-72-7) in human plasma has been developed and validated. ASA and SA were analyzed simultaneously despite differences in plasma concentration ranges of ASA and SA after oral administration of ASA. In spite of having different chemical, ionization and chromatographic properties, ASA and SA were extracted simultaneously from the plasma sample using acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase column with rapid gradient program using mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate buffer and methanol. The structural analogue diclofenac was used as an internal standard. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions m/z 179 --> 137 for ASA, m/z 137 --> 65 for SA and m/z 294 --> 250 for IS were used. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-10 microg/mL for ASA and 0.1-50 microg/mL for SA. The between-batch precision (%CV) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9% for ASA and from 0.2 to 5.2% for SA. The between-batch accuracy ranged from 95.4 to 96.7% for ASA and from 94.6 to 111.3% for SA. The validated method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA after single oral administration of 650 mg test formulation versus two 325 mg reference formulations of ASA in human subjects. PMID:21755814

  5. Desorption electrospray ionization with a portable mass spectrometer: in situ analysis of ambient surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher C; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-04-28

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is implemented on a portable mass spectrometer and used to demonstrate in situ detection of active ingredients in pharmaceutical preparations, alkaloids in plant tissues, explosives, chemical warfare agent simulants and agricultural chemicals from a variety of surfaces; air monitoring applications using DESI are also introduced. PMID:16609779

  6. Chemical analysis of raw and processed Fructus arctii by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kunming Qin; Qidi Liu; Hao Cai; Gang Cao; Tulin Lu; Baojia Shen; Yachun Shu; Baochang Cai

    2014-01-01

    Background: In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), raw and processed herbs are used to treat the different diseases. Fructus Arctii, the dried fruits of Arctium lappa l. (Compositae), is widely used in the TCM. Stir-frying is the most common processing method, which might modify the chemical compositions in Fructus Arctii. Materials and Methods: To test this hypothesis, we focused on analysis and identification of the main chemical constituents in raw and processed Fructus Arctii (PFA) by hig...

  7. Development of a new corona discharge based ion source for high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to measure gaseous H2SO4 and aerosol sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Dongsen; Ma, Yan; Chen, Mindong; Cheng, Jin; Li, Shizheng; Wang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    A new corona discharge (CD) based ion source was developed for a commercial high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) (Aerodyne Research Inc.) to measure both gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and aerosol sulfate after thermal desorption. Nitrate core ions (NO3-) were used as reagent ions and were generated by a negative discharge in zero air followed by addition of excess nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to convert primary ions and hydroxyl radicals (OH) into NO3- ions and nitric acid (HNO3). The CD-HRToF-CIMS showed no detectable interference from hundreds parts per billion by volume (ppbv) of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Unlike the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) ToF-CIMS, the CD ion source was integrated onto the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) chamber and which made it possible to measure aerosol sulfate by coupling to a filter inlet for gases and aerosols (FIGAERO). Moreover, compared with a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer, the desired HSO4- signal was detected by its exact mass of m/z 96.960, which was well resolved from the potential interferences of HCO3-ṡ(H2O)2 (m/z 97.014) and O-ṡH2OṡHNO3 (m/z 97.002). In this work, using laboratory-generated standards the CD-HRToF-CIMS was demonstrated to be able to detect as low as 3.1 × 105 molecules cm-3 gaseous H2SO4 and 0.5 μg m-3 ammonium sulfate based on 10-s integration time and two times of the baseline noise. The CD ion source had the advantages of low cost and a simple but robust structure. Since the system was non-radioactive and did not require corrosive HNO3 gas, it can be readily field deployed. The CD-HRToF-CIMS can be a powerful tool for both field and laboratory studies of aerosol formation mechanism and the chemical processes that were critical to understand the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  8. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2007-01-30

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  9. Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: powerful analytical tools in recombinant protein chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Svensson, B; Roepstorff, P

    1996-01-01

    Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy is...

  10. Quality classification of Spanish olive oils by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and metabolomics-based statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, C; Cervera, M I; Gil, R; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Beltran, J

    2017-02-01

    The novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source has been used in combination with gas chromatography (GC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for determination of volatile components of olive oil, enhancing its potential for classification of olive oil samples according to their quality using a metabolomics-based approach. The full-spectrum acquisition has allowed the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in olive oil samples, including Extra Virgin, Virgin and Lampante qualities. A dynamic headspace extraction with cartridge solvent elution was applied. The metabolomics strategy consisted of three different steps: a full mass spectral alignment of GC-MS data using MzMine 2.0, a multivariate analysis using Ez-Info and the creation of the statistical model with combinations of responses for molecular fragments. The model was finally validated using blind samples, obtaining an accuracy in oil classification of 70%, taking the official established method, "PANEL TEST", as reference. PMID:27596432

  11. A switchable reagent ion high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer for real-time measurement of gas phase oxidized species: characterization from the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brophy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel configuration of the Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS as a switchable reagent ion (SRI HR-TOF-CIMS is presented and described along with data collected at the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS during the summer of 2013. The calibration system and reduced pressure gas-phase inlet are characterized. The average limit of detection and limit of quantification for formic acid during SOAS are 82 and 863 ppt, respectively, corresponding to an average sensitivity of 13 ± 5 Hz ppt−1. Hourly background determinations and calibrations are shown to be essential for tracking instrument performance and accurately quantifying formic acid. Maximum daytime formic acid concentrations of 10 ppb are reported during SOAS, and a strong diel cycle is observed leading to night time concentrations below the limit of quantification. Other species presented exhibit diel behavior similar to formic acid. The concept of the mass defect enhancement plot and the use of signal-to-noise are described in detail as a method for investigating HR-TOF-CIMS spectra in an effort to reduce data complexity.

  12. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two approaches to Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory are discussed. The first is the use of continuous-wave dye lasers as the ionization source, and the use of pulse counting detection; and results are presented for lutetium and technetium. The second approach is the use of multiphoton resonances in the pulsed laser excitation of atoms. Experiments with 2 + 1 [photons to resonance plus photons to ionize] RIMS schemes for several elements are discussed. (author)

  13. Analysis of 1,2-diol diesters in vernix caseosa by high-performance liquid chromatography - atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šubčíková, L.; Hoskovec, Michal; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Čmelíková, T.; Háková, Eva; Míková, Radka; Coufal, P.; Doležal, A.; Plavka, R.; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1378, Jan 23 (2015), s. 8-18. ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0750 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : skin lipids * neutral lipids * lipidomics * mass spectrometry * double-bond position Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.169, year: 2014

  14. Odd-numbered very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae identified by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Nedbalová, Linda; Sigler, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 16 (2008), s. 2849-2855. ISSN 0031-9422 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : amphidinium carterae * marine dinoflagellate * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2008

  15. Identification of very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from Amphidinium carterae by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Nedbalová, L.; Sigler, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 12 (2008), s. 2391-2399. ISSN 0031-9422 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : amphidinium carterae * very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2008

  16. Analysis of 1,2-diol diesters in vernix caseosa by high-performance liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvačka, Josef; Šubčíková, L.; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hoskovec, Michal; Míková, Radka; Čmelíková, T.

    Puerto de la Cruz : Universidad de La Laguna, 2013. s. 258-258. [ITP 2013. International Symposium on Electro- and Liquid Phase- Separation Techniques /20./. 06.10.2013-09.10.2013, Puerto de la Cruz] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0750 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : lipids * lipidomics * tandem mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  17. Isotopic analysis of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a methodology for isotopic analysis of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique through the ion intensity measurement of Na2BO+2 in H3BO3, Bo and B4C. The samples were loaded on single tantalum filaments by different methods. In the case of H3BO3, the method of neutralization with NaOH was used. For B4C the alcaline fusion with Na2CO3 and for Bo dissolution with 1:1 nitric sulfuric acid mixture followed by neutralization with NaOH was used. The isotopic ratio measurements were obtained by the use of s Faraday cup detector with external precision of ±0,4% and accuracy of ±0,1%, relative to H3BO3 isotopic standard NBS 951. The effects of isotopic fractionation was studied in function of the time during the analyses and the different chemical forms of deposition. (author)

  18. Carbohydrate and steroid analysis by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Talaty, Nari; Jackson, Ayanna U; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-06-21

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is applied to the analysis of carbohydrates and steroids; the detection limits are significantly improved by the addition of low concentrations of salts to the spray solvent. PMID:18535704

  19. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation: a survey of possible mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative survey is given of the hypotheses which have been proposed to explain the protecting and sensitizing action of chemical substances towards ionizing radiation such as gamma radiation or x radiation

  20. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was evaluated for the detection of proteins ranging in molecular mass from 12 to 66 kDa. Proteins were uniformly deposited on a solid surface without pretreatment and analyzed with a DESI source coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spec...

  1. Gas Chromatography/Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Oligomeric Polyethylene Glycol Mono Alkyl Ethers

    OpenAIRE

    Adebayo O. Onigbinde; Burnaby Munson; Bamidele M.W. Amos-tautua

    2013-01-01

    Polyethylene Glycol Monoalkyl Ethers, CxH2x+1 (OC2H4)n OH, (PEGMAE), are polar compounds like Polyethylene Glycols (PEG) and they undergo microbial degradation which produces toxic substances that are potentially dangerous to the environment. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to carry out proper identification and characterization of these compounds. The Electron Ionization (EI) and Chemical Ionization (CI) spectra of various PEGMAE were obtained by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry ...

  2. Matrix Assisted Ionization Vacuum (MAIV), a New Ionization Method for Biological Materials Analysis Using Mass Spectrometry*

    OpenAIRE

    Inutan, Ellen D.; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for the mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and proteins had a dramatic impact on biological science. We now report that a wide variety of compounds, including peptides, proteins, and protein complexes, are transported directly from a solid-state small molecule matrix to gas-phase ions when placed into the vacuum of a mass spectrometer without the use of high voltage, a laser, or adde...

  3. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry for isotopic abundance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a relatively new laser-based technique for the determination of isotopic abundances. The resonance ionization process depends upon the stepwise absorption of photons from the laser, promoting atoms of the element of interest through progressively higher electronic states until an ion is formed. Sensitivity arises from the efficiency of the resonant absorption process when coupled with the power available from commercial laser sources. Selectivity derives naturally from the distinct electronic structure of different elements. This isobaric discrimination has provided the major impetus for development of the technique. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used for analysis of the isotopic abundances of the rare earth lutetium. Isobaric interferences from ytterbium severely effect the ability to measure small amounts of the neutron-deficient Lu isotopes by conventional mass spectrometric techniques. Resonance ionization for lutetium is performed using a continuous-wave laser operating at 452 nm, through a sequential two-photon process, with one photon exciting the intermediate resonance and the second photon causing ionization. Ion yields for microgram-sized quantities of lutetium lie between 10(6) and 10(7) ions per second, at overall ionization efficiencies approaching 10(-4). Discrimination factors against ytterbium greater than 10(6) have been measured. Resonance ionization for technetium is also being explored, again in response to an isobaric interference, molybdenum. Because of the relatively high ionization potential for Tc, three-photon, two-color RIMS processes are being developed.

  4. Method development for the determination of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma without derivatization by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Kakehi, Masaaki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Kamiguchi, Hidenori; Jinno, Fumihiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface to determine 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a major metabolite of cholesterol formed by cytochrome P450 family 46A1, in human plasma without any derivatization step. Phosphate buffered saline including 1% Tween 80 was used as the surrogate matrix for preparation of calibration curves and quality control samples. The saponification process to convert esterified 24S-hydroxycholesterol to free sterols was optimized, followed by liquid-liquid extraction using hexane. Chromatographic separation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol from other isobaric endogenous oxysterols was successfully achieved with gradient mobile phase comprised of 0.1% propionic acid and acetonitrile using L-column2 ODS (2 μm, 2.1 mm id × 150 mm). This assay was capable of determining 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma (200 μL) ranging from 1 to 100 ng/mL with acceptable intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The potential risk of in vitro formation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol by oxidation from endogenous cholesterol in human plasma was found to be negligible. The stability of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in relevant solvents and human plasma was confirmed. This method was successfully applied to quantify the plasma concentrations of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in male and female volunteers. PMID:26249017

  5. Matrix isolation studies of the interactions of BF3 with water and substituted diethyl ethers. Chemical ionization mass spectrometric determination of the proton affinity of (CF3CH2)2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David W.; Zehe, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    BF3 was co-condensed with H2O, D2O, (C2H5)2O, (CF3CH2)2O, and (C2F5)2O in excess argon at 15 K. Infrared spectra of BF3/water isolated in solid argon provided a more complete analysis of the BF3--H2O complex than previously published. Infrared spectra of the matrices showed a definite Lewis acid-base interaction between BF3 and diethyl ether; a weak but definite interaction with bis (2,2,2-trifluorodiethyl) ether, and no observable interaction with perfluorodiethyl ether. Thus, the ether data indicate a clear trend between strength of interaction with BF3 and the degree of F substitution. To support and explain the emerging relationship between interaction strength and the basicity of the oxygen-containing molecule, the proton affinity of (CF3CH2)2O was measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The implications of the results for lubricant/metal oxide surface interactions are discussed.

  6. Principle and analytical applications of resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a very sensitive analytical technique for the detection of trace elements. This method is based on the excitation and ionization of atoms with resonant laser light followed by mass analysis. It allows element and, in some cases, isotope selective ionization and is applicable to most of the elements of the periodic table. A high selectivity can be achieved by applying three step photoionization of the elements under investigation and an additional mass separation for an unambiguous isotope assignment. An effective facility for resonance ionization mass spectrometry consists of three dye lasers which are pumped by two copper vapor lasers and of a linear time-of-flight spectrometer with a resolution better than 2500. Each copper vapor laser has a pulse repetition rate of 6,5 kHz and an average output power of 30 W. With such an apparatus measurements with lanthanide-, actinide-, and technetium-samples have been performed. By saturating the excitation steps and by using autoionizing states for ionization step a detection efficiency of 4 x 10-6 and 2,5 x 10-6 has been reached for plutonium and technetium, respectively, leading to a detection limit of less than 107 atoms in the sample. Measurements of isotope ratios of plutonium samples were in good agreement with mass-spectrometric data. The high elemental selectivity of the resonance ionization spectrometry could be demonstrated. (Authors)

  7. Use of the chemical ionization technique for deltametrin by GC/MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical methodology for the determination of synthetic pyrethroid deltametrin is described. The gas chromatography coupled with the mass spectrometry GC/MS technique, using the chemical ionization technique as ions generator is used for deltametrin analysis, and methane is used as reactant gas chemical ionization. Impurities were detected with the electron impact ionization technique. Dichloromethane grade HPLC was used as deltametrin solvent.Deltametrin concentration in 1 μg/ml were detected by injecting 1 μl sample in the GC/MS. From the obtained chromatograms it is observed a deltametrin molecule retention time of 42.5 min in chromatography column. The mass spectra were obtained with mass intervals between 40 and 620 u.m.a., with 1 u.m.a. resolution. Details of the sample preparation are presented. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision. PMID:23140957

  9. Determination of ultra-low levels of uranium using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of isotopic composition of actinides like U and Pu is important, due to their distribution in the environment as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fuel reprocessing, reactor operations and to a smaller extent from accidental releases. The analytical methods like fission track analysis (FTA), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have evolved as sensitive techniques. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry yields rapid isotopic signature data for material containing actinides without requiring time-consuming sample preparation and chemical separation procedures. In this paper, authors presented the details of the methodology and results for low-level detection of uranium using RIMS

  10. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step excitation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1·10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2·106 atoms of 239Pu

  11. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, N.; Albus, F.; Deiβenberger, R.; Eberhardt, K.; Funk, H.; Hasse, H.-U.; Herrmann, G.; Huber, G.; Kluge, H.-J.; Köhler, S.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Urban, F.-J.

    1995-04-01

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step exciation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1ṡ10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2ṡ106 atoms of 239Pu.

  12. Identification of chemical warfare agents from vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hisayuki; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagoya, Tomoki; Ikeda, Toru; Kurimata, Naoko; Unoke, Shohei; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    A field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Hapsite ER system) was evaluated for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the vapor phase. The system consisted of Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler (trapping time: 3s(-1)min), a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary gas chromatography column capable of raising temperatures up to 200°C, a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump for data acquisition, and a personal computer for data analysis. Sample vapors containing as little as 22μg sarin (GB), 100μg soman (GD), 210μg tabun (GA), 55μg cyclohexylsarin (GF), 4.8μg sulfur mustard, 390μg nitrogen mustard 1, 140μg of nitrogen mustard 2, 130μg nitrogen mustard 3, 120μg of 2-chloroacetophenone and 990μg of chloropicrin per cubic meter could be confirmed after Tri-Bed micro-concentration (for 1min) and automated AMDIS search within 12min. Using manual deconvolution by background subtraction of neighboring regions on the extracted ion chromatograms, the above-mentioned CWAs could be confirmed at lower concentration levels. The memory effects were also examined and we found that blister agents showed significantly more carry-over than nerve agents. Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the detection of GB and GD, raising the concentration limits for confirmation in the presence of gasoline by both AMDIS search and manual deconvolution; however, GA and GF were not subject to interference by gasoline. Lewisite 1, and o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile could also be confirmed by gas chromatography, but it was hard to quantify them. Vapors of phosgene, chlorine, and cyanogen chloride could be confirmed by direct mass spectrometric detection at concentration levels higher than 2, 140, and 10mg/m(3) respectively, by bypassing the micro-concentration trap and gas chromatographic separation. PMID:26118803

  13. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .1. INSTRUMENTATION AND IONIZATION TECHNIQUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. Such low-pressure ion sources can make use of a range of different ionization methods and are in routine use in analytical mass spectrometers. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, and may b

  14. Examination and Manipulation of Protein Surface Charge in Solution with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Deborah S.; Van Ryswyk, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful tool for examining the charge of proteins in solution. The charge can be manipulated through choice of solvent and pH. Furthermore, solution-accessible, protonated lysine side chains can be specifically tagged with 18-crown-6 ether to form noncovalent adducts. Chemical derivatization…

  15. Spectroscopic study of thorium using continuous-wave resonance ionization mass spectrometry with ultraviolet ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent results on an improved method of ionization for the cw-RIMS process for thorium (Th). This method involves the application of a high power ultraviolet (UV) argon ion laser for the second step in a two-step (1 + 1) (photon-to-resonance plus photon-to-ionization) ionization scheme. Over 90 thorium transitions are identified for use in a (1 + 1) continuous-wave resonance ionization mass spectrometry (cw-RIMS) ionization scheme. The excitation cross-section of several strong transitions was determined to be 10-13cm2. The optimum cw excitation scheme was with the resonant laser tuned to the 384.08 nm (26 036 cm-1 transition when when using the multi-line UV argon ion laser for signal enhancement. For thorium, the increase in ionization efficiency was documented to be a minimum of one order-of-magnitude improvement that achieved by conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The measured total ionization efficiency (detected ion signal/sample atoms loaded) was as high as 0.41%, which easily provided signals levels for efficiency measurements on sample sizes down to 25 ng, and should provide sufficient signal for isotopic analysis of volcanic-like samples as small as 1-5 ng of thorium. Based on geometric overlap considerations, the cw-RIMS ionization efficiency within the laser focal volume approaches ∼ 100%. This cw-RIMS ionization efficiency promises to provide ample signal for the 230Th/232Th isotope ratio analysis of nanogram volcanic-like samples. The ability to determine accurately and precisely the 230Th/232Th isotopic ratios for nanogram samples represents an improvement over the TIMS technique, and is anticipated to have a significant effect on uranium-series disequilibrium measurements important in geochemistry and geochronology. (Author)

  16. What do Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectra Reveal about Ionization Mechanisms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papantonakis, Michael R.(VISITORS); Kim, Jun S.(ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Hess, Wayne P.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Haglund, Richard F.(Vanderbilt University)

    2002-06-01

    We describe the results of experiments designed to test several of the most widely discussed mechanistic models for matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization. By comparing ion mass spectra from the same matrix-analyte systems across various wavelengths from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and pulse durations from nanosecond to femtosecond, we have evaluated the plausibility of such ion-formation mechanisms as multiphoton ionization, excited state ionization, and photothermal ionization. We conclude that some of these models are not plausible for the matrix-analyte systems we studied. However, the fundamental principles of the laser-materials interaction also suggest that inspection of the mass spectra alone can only serve to exclude certain mechanisms, not to establish which of several competing mechanisms is actually occurring. This is particularly true with respect to variations in pulse duration and wavelength.

  17. Laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different instruments using laser ionization techniques will be described. Results from the SARISA instrument with a demonstrated figure of merit of .05 (atoms detected/atoms sputtered) for resonance ionization; detection of Fe at the sub-part-per-billion level in ultrapure Si; and features of the instrument such as energy and angle refocusing time-of-flight (EARTOF) mass spectrometer and multiplexing for simultaneous detection of secondary ions and neutrals. 12 refs., 3 figs

  18. Fish and chips: Analytical applications of resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry is becoming recognized as an analytical technique for a wide range of applications. The extremely high element specificity and sensitivity of the resonance ionization (RI) process is especially valuable for ultratrace element analysis in samples where the complexity of the matrix is frequently a serious source of interferences. In this paper, we will describe the implementation of sputter-initiated resonance ionization microprobe (SIRIMP) and laser atomization RIMP (LARIMP) to solve a number of analytical problems and illustrate the technique's salient characteristics with applications ranging from environmental monitoring using fish scales to semiconductor device and DNA diagnostics chips

  19. Advanced quantification of plutonium ionization potential to support nuclear forensic evaluations by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lensegrav, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Ongoing work seeks to apply the technology of resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of the debris from nuclear detonations. As part of this effort, modeling and simulation methods are being applied to analyze and predict the potential for ionization by laser excitation of isotopes of both uranium and plutonium. Early work focused on ...

  20. Direct and Convenient Mass Spectrometry Sampling with Ambient Flame Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Pan; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Wu, Meng-Xi; Qi, Wan-Shu; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Yin-Long

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in ambient ionization technology for the direct analysis of various samples in their native environment facilitate the development and applications of mass spectrometry in natural science. Presented here is a novel, convenient and flame-based ambient ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of organic compounds, termed as the ambient flame ionization (AFI) ion source. The key features of AFI ion source were no requirement of (high) voltages, laser beams and spray gases, but just using small size of n-butane flame (height approximately 1 cm, about 500 oC) to accomplish the rapid desorption and ionization for direct analysis of gaseous-, liquid- and solid-phase organic compounds, as well as real-world samples. This method has high sensitivity with a limit of detection of 1 picogram for propyphenazone, which allows consuming trace amount of samples. Compared to previous ionization methods, this ion source device is extremely simple, maintain-free, low-cost, user-friendly so that even an ordinary lighter (with n-butane as fuel) can achieve efficient ionization. A new orientation to mass spectrometry ion source exploitation might emerge from such a convenient, easy and inexpensive AFI ion source.

  1. Chemical effects of ionizing radiation and sonic energy in the context of chemical evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation and sonic energy are considered as sources for chemical evolution processes. These sources have still a modest place in the interdisciplinary approach for the prebiological synthesis of organic compounds. Studies in Radiation Chemistry and Sonochemistry can provide a deeper insight into the chemical processes that may have importance for prebiotic chemistry. The present work concerns the analysis of some chemical reactions induced by ionizing radiation or cavitation in aqueous media that may be relevant to chemical evolution studies. (author)

  2. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michelle J.; Zoerb, Matthew C.; Campbell, Nicole R.; Zimmermann, Kathryn J.; Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Bertram, Timothy H.

    2016-04-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e., DMS, β-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, α-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt-1) to DMS, isoprene, and α-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a much weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion-molecule reactions likely proceed through a combination of ligand-switching and direct charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (validated against an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer, where measurements from the two instruments were highly correlated (R2 > 0.95, 10 s averages) over a wide range of sampling conditions.

  3. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy with neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonance ionization mass spectroscopy was one of the methods used for detection of the actinides. The principles of the method are: atoms of the elements to be measured are excited step by step through resonant irradiation with laser light, and are thus ionized. The ions are accelerated by electrical fields and can then be detected. The equipment for this process comprised a pulsed laser system consisting of two copper vapor lasers and three dye lasers, and a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a mass resolution M/ΔM of approx. 1500. Due to a two-step resonant excitation of atomic energy levels and subsequent population of an autoionized state, the three-step ionization method is particularly element-selective. Use of powerful lasers with a high pulse repetition rate yield a high sensitivity and thus allow low detection limits. (orig./BBR)

  4. Part-per-trillion level determination of antifouling pesticides and their byproducts in seawater samples by off-line solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, K; Ferrer, I; Barceló, D

    2000-05-19

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of antifouling pesticides and some of their byproducts such as dichlofluanid, diuron and its byproducts [demethyldiuron and 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea], (2-thiocyanomethylthio)ben: zothiazole, chlorothalonil, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol 1051 and one of its byproducts (2-methylthio-4-tert.-butylamino-s-triazine) in seawater was developed. The extraction of these compounds from the filtered seawater samples was performed off-line with different solid-phase extraction sorbents using (I) a 500 mg graphitized carbon black cartridge (ENVI-Carb) and (II) 200 mg polymeric cartridges (LiChrolut EN and Isolute ENV+) and passing 500 ml of the sample through these cartridges. The detection was carried out by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry both in the negative and positive ion modes. The recovery ranged from 76 to 96% for the whole antifouling group with the ENVI-Carb cartridges and the detection limit was at the part-per-trillion level except for TCMTB. The method utilizing the polymeric cartridge proved to be very useful, time saving and with good recoveries when only Irgarol and its byproduct, Sea-nine 211 and diuron and its byproducts, have to be analyzed. The different cartridges were applied to the analysis of these pesticides in different marinas of the Catalan coast; diuron, dichlofluanid, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol as well as demethyldiuron and the Irgarol byproduct being the must ubiquitous pollutants. Maximum concentration levels were 2-3.5 microg/l of diuron and Sea-nine 211, respectively. PMID:10870693

  5. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isselhardt, Brett H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  6. Choosing between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization interfaces for the HPLC/MS analysis of pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of over 75 pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) clearly shows that different classes of pesticides are more sensitive using either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). For example, neutral and basic pesticides (phenylureas, triazines) are more sensitive using APCI (especially positive ion). While cationic and anionic herbicides (bipyridylium ions, sulfonic acids) are more sensitive using ESI (especially negative ion). These data are expressed graphically in a figure called an ionization-continuum diagram, which shows that protonation in the gas phase (proton affinity) and polarity in solution, expressed as proton addition or subtraction (pKa), is useful in selecting APCI or ESI. Furthermore, sodium adduct formation commonly occurs using positive ion ESI but not using positive ion APCI, which reflects the different mechanisms of ionization and strengthens the usefulness of the ionization-continuum diagram. The data also show that the concept of "wrong-way around" ESI (the sensitivity of acidic pesticides in an acidic mobile phase) is a useful modification of simple pKa theory for mobile-phase selection. Finally, this finding is used to enhance the chromatographic separation of oxanilic and sulfonic acid herbicides while maintaining good sensitivity in LC/MS using ESI negative.

  7. Analysis of ketamine and norketamine in urine by automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) and positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-mi; Lee, Ju-seon; Choi, Sang-kil; Lim, Mi-ae; Chung, Hee-sun

    2008-01-30

    Ketamine (KT) is widely abused for hallucination and also misused as a "date-rape" drug in recent years. An analytical method using positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS) with an automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) apparatus was studied for the determination of KT and its major metabolite, norketamine (NK), in urine. Six ketamine suspected urine samples were provided by the police. For the research of KT metabolism, KT was administered to SD rats by i.p. at a single dose of 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, respectively, and urine samples were collected 24, 48 and 72 h after administration. For the detection of KT and NK, urine samples were extracted on an automatic SPE apparatus (RapidTrace, Zymark) with mixed mode type cartridge, Drug-Clean (200 mg, Alltech). The identification of KT and NK was by PCI-GC-MS. m/z238 (M+1), 220 for KT, m/z 224 (M+1), 207 for NK and m/z307 (M+1) for Cocaine-D(3) as internal standard were extracted from the full-scan mass spectrum and the underlined ions were used for quantitation. Extracted calibration curves were linear from 50 to 1000 ng/mL for KT and NK with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) was 25 ng/mL for KT and NK. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 50 ng/mL for KT and NK. The recoveries of KT and NK at three different concentrations (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL) were 53.1 to 79.7% and 45.7 to 83.0%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day run precisions (CV) for KT and NK were less than 15.0%, and the accuracies (bias) for KT and NK were also less than 15% at the three different concentration levels (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL). The analytical method was also applied to real six KT suspected urine specimens and KT administered rat urines, and the concentrations of KT and NK were determined. Dehydronorketamine (DHNK) was also confirmed in these urine samples, however the concentration of DHNK was not calculated. SPE is simple, and needs less organic solvent than liquid

  8. Comparison of various liquid chromatographic methods involving UV and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection for the efficient trace analysis of phenylurea herbicides in various types of water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heeft, E; Dijkman, E; Baumann, R A; Hogendoorn, E A

    2000-05-19

    The performance of mass spectrometric (MS) detection and UV detection in combination with reversed-phase liquid chromatography without and with the use of coupled column RPLC (LC-LC) has been compared for the trace analysis of phenylurea herbicides in environmental waters. The selected samples of this comparative study originated from an inter-laboratory study. For both detection modes, a 50 mm x 4.6 mm I.D. column and a 100 mm x 4.6 mm I.D. column packed with 3 microm C18 were used as the first (C-1) and second (C-2) column, respectively. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry was performed on a magnetic sector instrument. The LC-LC-MS analysis was carried out on-line by means of direct large volume (11.7 ml) injection (LVI). The performance of both on-line (LVI, 4 ml of sample) and off-line LC-LC-UV (244 nm) analysis was investigated. The latter procedure consisted of a solid-phase extraction (SPE) of 250 ml of water sample on a 500 mg C18 cartridge. The comparative study showed that LC-LC-MS is more selective then LC-LC-UV and, in most cases, more sensitive. The LVI-LC-LC-MS approach combines direct quantification and confirmation of most of the analytes down to a level of 0.01 microg/l in water samples in less then 30 min. As regards LC-LC-UV, the off-line method appeared to be a more viable approach in comparison with the on-line procedure. This method allows the screening of phenylurea's in various types of water samples down to a level of at least 0.05 microg/l. On-line analysis with LVI provided marginal sensitivity (limits of detection of about 0.1 microg/l) and selectivity was sometimes less in case of surface water samples. Both the on-line LVI-LC-LC-MS method and the LC-LC-UV method using off-line SPE were validated by analysing a series of real-life reference samples. These samples were part of an inter-laboratory test and contained residues of herbicides ranging from 0.02 to 0.8 microg/l. Beside good correlation between the methods

  9. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  10. Non disturbing characterization and quantification of natural organic matter (NOM) contained in clay rock pore water by mass spectrometry using electro-spray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    formation is of great importance. In this context, establishing accurate sequencing of structural units for the DOM shall be attempted. The present work is focused on small organic molecules that are present in the COx formation and that could also play a key role in the migration processes. It would be valuable to develop rapid analytical methods that require only a small sample volume and minimal pretreatment. Of particular importance is the ability to analyze bulk pore water samples as opposed to samples subjected to specific extraction techniques, fractionation, and/or concentration. Mass Spectrometry with either the Electro-Spray or the Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization modes has been proved to be a powerful tool for aquatic humic substances since it allows the determination of the molecular weight distribution and the access to the different molecular weights. In this study, we have employed ESI-MS and APCI-MS to identify the chemical composition of NOM contained in the pore water from the argillite clay rock. Due to the very small quantities of COx pore water available from boreholes, these techniques are thus very suitable. The DOM in pore water has never been characterized on a well preserved pore water sample. The following aspects were considered in the present work: (1) the use of either ESI or APCI to select the most appropriated mode of ionization for providing the best information depending on the class of compound examined (2) a unique and original experimental process developed to get pore water from a core sample (3) the determination of concentration of dissolved organic matter and the evaluation of the organic matter maturity by Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and (4) the application of the proposed instrumental methods for the characterization of organic components from natural pore waters. For the first time to our knowledge, a quite exhaustive inventory of the small organic compounds presents is given without proceeding to any

  11. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Mark W.; Roder, Heinrich; Hunsucker, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the essential characteristics of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), especially as they relate to its applications in quantitative analysis. Approaches to quantification by MALDI-TOF MS are presented and published applications are critically reviewed.

  12. A Bragg curve ionization chamber for acceleration mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization chamber based on the Bragg curve spectrometry method to be used as the final detector in a accelerator mass spectrometry system is described. The first tests with a Cl beam give energy resolution of 1% and Z resolving power of 72 at Z=17

  13. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. PMID:25601688

  14. Cesium ion desorption ionization with Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium ions (Cs+) are used for the production of the feed ions necessary to obtain Fourier transform mass spectra (FTMS). The molecule chosen for the initial study of this Cs+ desorption ionization (DI-FTMS) was vitamin B-12 because of its nonvolatile, thermally labile character. 21 references

  15. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  16. Filament power regulator for thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device has been developed that will control the filament temperature in a thermal ionization mass spectrometer. The arrangement is superior to past methods to control this critical parameter. The operating principle lies in the feature of filament power control as contrasted with the formerly used voltage or current controls. Reproducibility and stability of ion beams showed great improvement. The mass spectrometer was developed to analyze for parts-per-billion concentrations of uranium in water samples

  17. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Highly Reactive Glycosyl Halides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajos Kovács

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly reactive glycosyl chlorides and bromides have been analysed by a routine mass spectrometric method using electrospray ionization and lithium salt adduct-forming agents in anhydrous acetonitrile solution, providing salient lithiated molecular ions [M+Li]+, [2M+Li]+ etc. The role of other adduct-forming salts has also been evaluated. The lithium salt method is useful for accurate mass determination of these highly sensitive compounds.

  18. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1976 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  19. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1979 and 1980 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research estimated. (author)

  20. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1975 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  1. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1978 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research appreciated. (author)

  2. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1974 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  3. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and electrospray ionization combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Staneke, Paul O.; Nibbering, Nico M. M.

    1997-01-01

    During recent years, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) are successfully employed to analyze biomolecules and polymers. In combination with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, high mass resolution and mass measurement accuracy can be achieved to enable the determination of molecular weights and structural characterization of biochemical compounds larger than 10 kDa.

  4. Pharmaceutical Analysis by Solid-Substrate Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry with Wooden Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunyun; Deng, Jiewei; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) using wooden tips as solid substrates allows direct ionization of various samples and their simple and efficient analyses by mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, wooden-tip ESI-MS was used for pharmaceutical analysis. A wide variety of active components present in pharmaceuticals with forms of tablets, capsules, granules, dry suspensions, suspensions, drops, and oral liquids, etc., were all successfully ionized directly for mass spectrometric analysis. Trace degradation products were also sensitively detected using wooden-tip ESI-MS. This strategy was extended to construct chemical fingerprints of herbal products containing complex and unknown components, and the fingerprints provided valuable information for their quality assessment and origin tracing. Our experimental data demonstrated that wooden-tip ESI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, with high sensitivity and wide applicability, showing promising perspectives for quality assessment and control, authentication, and origin tracing of pharmaceuticals.

  5. Rapid Screening of Inferior Quality Oils by Surface Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry%表面解吸常压化学电离质谱法快速筛查劣质食用油

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方小伟; 张丽丽; 贾滨; 张兴磊; 陈焕文

    2011-01-01

    采用自行研制的表面解吸常压化学电离源(SDAPCI),在无需样品预处理的前提下用质谱法直接分析不同品质油品(地沟油、市售品牌食用油),获得其化学指纹图谱,并通过主成分分析(PCA)方法,对指纹谱图信息进行数据分析,进而对不同品质油品进行筛查。结果表明:(1)地沟油与品牌食用油的指纹谱图间存在差异(;2)SDAPCI-MS结合PCA方法,能较好地将地沟油样品与正常的食用油样品进行区分(;3)本方法无需前处理、灵敏度高,分析速度快(单个样品分析时间约1.0 min),实现了高通量油样的快速筛查,为食品安全中快速筛查地沟油提供了一种快速、高效、灵敏的分析方法。%By using a home-made surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source,illicit cooking oils and normal edible oils were directly analyzed by mass spectrometry without any sample pretreatment.The MS data were further analyzed using principal component analysis(PCA).The SDAPCI-MS fingerprints of illicit cooking oils were different from those of normal edible oils.With the application of PCA,illicit cooking oils were successfully differentiated from normal oils.The method developed here is attractive by showing the advantages of no need for sample pretreatment,high sensitivity and high analytical speed(1.0 min per sample),and thus provides a fast and effective method to screen illicit cooking oils for the sake of food safety.

  6. Gasification and Ionization of Chemically Complex Liquids for FRC Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael; Hill, Carrie

    2014-10-01

    Ion thrusters provide reliable and efficient spacecraft propulsion but are limited to noble gas propellants to limit chemical attack of components. However, thrusters based on Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas are becoming a reality. High beta compact-toroids are generated within an FRC thruster and then expelled to provide thrust. The closed field lines restrict the plasma from attacking thruster components. More convenient propellants such as water are therefore possible. The FRC thruster would generate a series of compact-toroids (plasmoids) to develop continuous spacecraft thrust. Each plasmoid ejection would empty the discharge region. The feed system would then refill the discharge region with partially ionized gas for the next discharge. The ionization part of this feed system is the subject of this paper. The question is how to produce a uniform, chemically complex, ionized gas within the discharge region that optimizes compact-toroid formation? We will be measuring chemical state, ionization state, and uniformity as the propellant enters the discharge region.

  7. Plasma ionization under simulated ambient Mars conditions for quantification of methane by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghioskoui, Mazdak; Zaghloul, Mona

    2016-03-21

    Ambient ionization techniques enable ion production in the native sample environment for mass spectrometry, without a need for sample preparation or separation. These techniques provide superior advantages over conventional ionization methods and are well developed and investigated for various analytical applications. However, employing ambient ionization techniques for in situ extra-terrestrial chemical analysis requires these techniques to be designed and developed according to the ambient conditions of extra-terrestrial environments, which substantially differ from the ambient conditions of Earth. Here, we report a plasma ionization source produced under simulated ambient Mars conditions for mass spectrometry. The plasma ionization source was coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of trace amounts of methane, as an analyte of interest in Mars discovery missions, were demonstrated. The miniature plasma source was operational at a net power as low as ∼1.7 W in the pressure range of 4-16 Torr. A detection limit as low as ∼0.15 ppm (v/v) at 16 Torr for methane was demonstrated. PMID:26947458

  8. Laser-Induced Ionization Efficiency Enhancement On A Filament For Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-14

    The evaluation of trace Uranium and Plutonium isotope ratios for nanogram to femtogram material quantities is a vital tool for nuclear counter-proliferation and safeguard activities. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) is generally accepted as the state of the art technology for highly accurate and ultra-trace measurements of these actinide ratios. However, the very low TIMS ionization yield (typically less than 1%) leaves much room for improvement. Enhanced ionization of Nd and Sm from a TIMS filament was demonstrated using wavelength resonance with a nanosecond (pulse width) laser operating at 10 Hz when light was directed toward the filament.1 For this study, femtosecond and picosecond laser capabilities were to be employed to study the dissociation and ionization mechanisms of actinides/lanthanides and measure the enhanced ionization of the metal of interest. Since the underlying chemistry of the actinide/lanthanide carbides produced and dissociated on a TIMS filament is not well understood, the experimental parameters affecting the photodissociation and photoionization with one and two laser beams were to be investigated.

  9. Development of a Portable Single Photon Ionization-Photoelectron Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A vacuum ultraviolet lamp based single photon ionization- (SPI- photoelectron ionization (PEI portable reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS was designed for online monitoring gas samples. It has a dual mode ionization source: SPI for analyte with ionization energy (IE below 10.6 eV and PEI for IE higher than 10.6 eV. Two kinds of sampling inlets, a capillary inlet and a membrane inlet, are utilized for high concentration and trace volatile organic compounds, respectively. A mass resolution of 1100 at m/z 64 has been obtained with a total size of 40 × 31 × 29 cm, the weight is 27 kg, and the power consumption is only 70 W. A mixture of benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX, SO2, and discharging products of SF6 were used to test its performance, and the result showed that the limit of quantitation for BTX is as low as 5 ppbv (S/N = 10 : 1 with linear dynamic ranges greater than four orders of magnitude. The portable TOFMS was also evaluated by analyzing volatile organic compounds from wine and decomposition products of SF6 inside of a gas-insulated switchgear.

  10. A high efficiency thermal ionization source adapted to mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tungsten crucible thermal ionization source mounted on a quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The crucible is a disposable rod with a fine hole bored in one end; it is heated by electron bombardment. The schematic design of the assembly, including water cooling, is described and depicted. Historically, the design is derived from that of ion sources used on ion separators at Los Alamos and Dubna, but the crucible is made smaller and simplified. 10 refs., 4 figs

  11. Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Uranium Chemistry Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huanwen; Luo, Mingbiao; Xiao, Saijin; OUYANG Yongzhong; Zhou, Yafei; Zhang, Xinglei

    2013-01-01

    Uranium chemistry is of sustainable interest. Breakthroughs in uranium studies make serious impacts in many fields including chemistry, physics, energy and biology, because uranium plays fundamentally important roles in these fields. Substantial progress in uranium studies normally requires development of novel analytical tools. Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) is a sensitive technique for trace detection of various analytes in complex matrices without sample pre...

  12. Detection of explosives on skin using ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justes, Dina R; Talaty, Nari; Cotte-Rodriguez, Ismael; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-06-01

    Single nanogram amounts of the explosives TNT, RDX, HMX, PETN and their mixtures were detected and identified in a few seconds on the surface of human skin without any sample preparation by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) using a spray solution of methanol-water doped with sodium chloride to form the chloride adducts with RDX, HMX, and PETN while TNT was examined as the radical anion and tandem mass spectrometry was used to confirm the identifications. PMID:17520116

  13. Nanostructured silicon surface modifications for as a selective matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C W; Lin, C H; Cheng, Y C; Chien, C C; Chang, C C; Chen, W Y

    2012-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry is an established soft ionization method that is widely applied to analyze biomolecules. The UV-absorbing organic matrix is essential for biomolecule ionization; however, it also creates matrix background interference, which results in problematic analyses of biomolecules of less than 700 Da. Therefore, this study investigates hydrophilic, hydrophobic cationic, anionic and immobilized metal ion surface chemical modifications to advance nanostructured silicon mass spectrometry performance (nSi-MS). This investigation provides information required for a possible novel mass spectroscopy that combines surface-enhanced and nanostructured silicon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the selective detection of specific compounds of a mixture. PMID:22531330

  14. Development and applications of ionization techniques in ambient mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef

    Prague : Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, 2014 - (Nesměrák, K.), s. 37-38 ISBN 978-80-7444-030-4. [International Students Conference "Modern Analytical Chemistry" /10./. Praha (CZ), 22.09.2014-23.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0750 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ambient mass spectrometry * desorption electrospray ionization * desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * thin-layer chromatography * insect defense compounds * mass spectrometry imaging Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  15. Continuous wave laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have observed two-color, three step resonance ionization of technetium with cw lasers. High power argon-ion lasers were used to pump two tunable, broad-band (≅cm-1) cw dye lasers. The first laser generated ≅400 mW in the spectral region near 420 nm, while the second generated ≅300 mW near 610nm. Technetium samples were prepared by electroplating onto rhenium filaments. Tc atoms were vaporized by resistive heating in the source region of a 12-in., 900 magnetic mass spectrometer. An electron multiplier and counting electronics were used to process the signal. Ionization proceeded through various sublevels of the z6po and e6S states for the sequential 3 photon process. Technetium count rates ≥104 sec -1 were generated for several hours in samples containing ≅1is contained ing of technetium, 10 ng samples gave proportionally smaller signals. No interfering laser-generated ions were detected, although thermal Tc ions were observed. A measurement of ionization efficiency on a traced (95/sup m/Tc) sample indicated that speciation severely limits ionization efficiency. It appears that less than 1 part in 103 of the technetium evaporates in the atomic ground state. This may prove to be a significant limitation to the application of RIMS for the solar neutrino experiment; alternative atomization sources are being explored

  16. Multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Imasaka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-08-01

    In order to suppress the fragmentation and improve the sensitivity for determination of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs), the mechanism of multiphoton ionization was studied for the following representative NPAHs, 9-nitroanthracene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, and 1-nitropyrene. The analytes were extracted from the PM2.5 on the sampling filter ultrasonically, and were measured using gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry with a femtosecond tunable laser in the range from 267 to 405 nm. As a result, a molecular ion was observed as the major ion and fragmentation was suppressed at wavelengths longer than 345 nm. Furthermore, the detection limit measured at 345 nm was measured to be the subpicogram level. The organic compounds were extracted from a 2.19 mg sample of particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5), and the extract was subjected to multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry after gas chromatograph separation. The background signals were drastically suppressed at 345 nm, and the target NPAHs, including 9-nitroanthracene and 1-nitropyrene, were detected, and their concentrations were determined to be 5 and 3 pg/m(3), respectively. PMID:26048831

  17. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  18. Analysis technology of high ionization potential element palladium by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: 107Pd is an important long-lived fission product of Palladium isotope which is important in cosmology, nuclear technology and environmental studies. The analysis of Pd by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) is difficult because Pd has high ionization potential (8.33 eV). Purpose: The paper attempts to improve mass efficiency of Palladium in TIMS. Methods: Three loading reagents including TaF5, colloidal graphite and phosphate silica-gel are compared. In the three loading reagents, colloidal graphite and phosphate silica-gel are better than TaF5, their mass efficiency can reach 10-7. Using V-type filament, the most of mass efficiency reaches 4.55×10-7 which is twice as high as that by using single filament. Results: The isotope ratio of 2-μg Pd sample was measured with the loading reagent of phosphate silica-gel, 106Pd/108Pd deviated 0.36% with standard value, RSD was 0.14% (n=10). Conclusion: The experimental results show that the measurement of microgram Palladium sample can obtain good accuracy and precision by using appropriate loading reagents and V-type filament. (authors)

  19. Glow discharge electron impact ionization source for miniature mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Song, Qingyu; Noll, Robert J; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    A glow discharge electron impact ionization (GDEI) source was developed for operation using air as the support gas. An alternative to the use of thermoemission from a resistively heated filament electron source for miniature mass spectrometers, the GDEI source is shown to have advantages of long lifetime under high-pressure operation and low power consumption. The GDEI source was characterized using our laboratory's handheld mass spectrometer, the Mini 10. The effects of the discharge voltage and pressure were investigated. Design considerations are illustrated with calculations. Performance is demonstrated in a set of experimental tests. The results show that the low power requirements, mechanical ruggedness, and quality of the data produced using the small glow discharge ion source make it well-suited for use with a portable handheld mass spectrometer. PMID:17441220

  20. Electrode-assisted desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Abdil; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2010-10-01

    A new ion source has been developed for rapid, noncontact analysis of materials at ambient conditions. The method provides desorption of analytes under ambient conditions directly from different surfaces with little or no sample preparation. The new method, termed electrode-assisted desorption electrospray ionization (EADESI), is on the basis of the ionization of molecules on different surfaces by highly charged droplets produced on a sharp-edged high voltage tip, and ions produced are introduced into the mass spectrometer through a capillary. The EADESI technique can be applied to various samples including amino acids, peptides, proteins, drugs and human fluids such as urine and blood. EADESI is promising for routine analyses in different fields such as forensic, environmental and material sciences. EADESI interface can be fit to a conventional ion-trap mass spectrometer. It can be used for various types of samples with a broad mass range. EADESI can also provide real-time analysis which is very valuable for biomedical applications. PMID:20857387

  1. Exploring the high-mass components of humic acid by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilom, Gabriela; Chilom, Ovidiu; Rice, James A

    2008-05-01

    Leonardite and Elliot soil humic acids have been analyzed by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) in the m/z 4000-200,000 range. Positive ion mass spectra for each humic acid obtained under optimum conditions showed a broad high-mass distribution between m/z 20,000 and 80,000. The dependence of the mass distribution on instrumental parameters and solution conditions was used to investigate the nature of the high-mass peaks from humic acid spectra. Our data suggests that macromolecular ions and humic acid aggregates have the same probability of occurrence while cluster ion formation has a low probability of occurrence. PMID:18421699

  2. Capillary electrophoresis - electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in small diameter capillaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, J.H.; Goodlett, D.R.; Udseth, H.R.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Methods (such as small inner diameter capillaries) are being explored to increase analyte sensitivity in capillary electrophoresis- electrospray ionization/mass spectroscopy(CE-ESI/MS). Results are reported for melittin in a protein mixture, with 10 to 100 {mu}m ID capillaries; and for a mixture of aprotinin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and carbonic anhydrase, with 5 to 50 {mu}m ID capillaries. It is shown that an increase in solute sensitivity occurs when small ID capillaries ({lt} 20 {mu}m) are used in CE-ESI/MS for both a peptide and a protein mixture. 3 figs. (DLC)

  3. Monitoring of wine aging process by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland Sawaya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of wine samples by direct insertion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, without pre-treatment or chromatographic separation, in a process denominated fingerprinting, has been applied to several samples of wine produced with grapes of the Pinot noir, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon varieties from the state o Rio Grande do Sul, in Brazil. The ESI-MS fingerprints of the samples detected changes which occurred during the aging process in the three grape varieties. Principal Component Analysis (PCA of the negative ion mode fingerprints was used to group the samples, pinpoint the main changes in their composition, and indicate marker ions for each group of samples.

  4. Determination of triacetone triperoxide using ultraviolet femtosecond multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A UV ultrashort laser pulse was useful for ionization of triacetone triperoxide. • A molecular ion was strongly enhanced in multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. • Triacetone triperoxide in the human blood was measured without any interferences. • An organic compound of phorone was formed in the human blood from acetone. - Abstract: Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an explosive compound, was measured using gas chromatography combined with multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI-TOFMS). By decreasing the pulse width of a femtosecond laser from 80 to 35 fs, a molecular ion was drastically enhanced and was measured as one of the major ions in the mass spectrum. The detection limits obtained using the molecular (M·+) and fragment (C2H3O+) ions were similar or slightly superior to those obtained using conventional mass spectrometry based on electron and chemical ionization. In order to improve the reliability, an isotope of TATP, i.e., TATP-d18, was synthesized and used as an internal standard in the trace analysis of TATP in a sample of human blood. TATP could be identified in a two-dimensional display, even though numerous interfering compounds were present in the sample. Acetone, which is frequently used as a solvent in sampling TATP, produced a chemical species with a retention time nearly identical to that of TATP and provided a C2H3O+ fragment ion that was employed for measuring a chromatogram of TATP in conventional MS. This compound, the structure of which was assigned as phorone, was clearly differentiated from TATP based on a molecular ion observable in MPI-TOFMS

  5. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  6. Isotopic bias effects in resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is developing into a useful method for isotope ratio measurements with high selectivity and sensitivity of the technique for a large number of elements. The sensitivity of the technique relies on a number of experimental factors. Of primary importance is the proper coupling of the tunable laser output with the atomization source, which is most often a thermal filament. Use of pulsed thermal atomization can also improve efficiency. An increase in temporal efficiency can be achieved by using a continuous wave (CW) laser coupled to a continuous atomization source. CW lasers, in general, therefore must be tightly focused to saturate the ionization step in a resonance ionization process. However, this results in a lowered efficiency due to geometrical factors. The accuracy of isotope ratio measurements is also influenced by the choice of laser system for RIMS. The combination of isotope shifts and the analyte element with the spectral output of the laser will result in wavelength-dependant bias effects which must be controlled to obtain optimum analytical results. This problem has been studied and the results for both pulsed and CW lasers are given. (author)

  7. Interfacing Capillary-Based Separations to Mass Spectrometry Using Desorption Electro-spray Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The powerful hybrid analysis method of capillary-based separations followed by mass spectrometric analysis gives substantial chemical identity and structural information. It is usually carried out using electro-spray ionization. However, the salts and detergents used in the mobile phase for electrokinetic separations suppress ionization efficiencies and contaminate the inlet of the mass spectrometer. This report describes a new method that uses desorption electro-spray ionization (DESI) to overcome these limitations. Effluent from capillary Columns is deposited on a rotating Teflon disk that is covered with paper. As the surface rotates, the temporal separation of the eluting analytes (i.e., the electro-pherogram) is spatially encoded on the surface. Then, using DESI, surface-deposited analytes are preferentially ionized, reducing the effects of ion suppression and inlet contamination on signal. With the use of this novel approach, two capillary-based separations were performed; a mixture of the rhodamine dyes at milligram/milliliter levels in a 10 mM sodium borate solution was separated by capillary electrophoresis, and a mixture of three cardiac drugs at milligram/milliliter levels in a 12.5 mM sodium borate and 12.5 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate solution was separated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography. In both experiments, the negative effects of detergents and salts on the MS analyses were minimized. (authors)

  8. Laser resonant-ionization mass spectrometry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser resonant-ionization mass spectrometry has been used to determine small amounts of actinides. The high sensitivity and selectivity of this method has been achieved by three-step photoionization of actinide atoms followed by time-of-flight measurement. The laser system for photoionization consists of a pulsed copper vapour laser of 30 W average power at a pulse repetition rate of 6.5 kHz which is coupled to three dye lasers. The time-of-flight spectrometer has a mass resolution of about 2500. Resonance signals with count rates of several kilohertz were obtained with actinide samples of 1010-1012 atoms yielding a detection limit of 108 atoms in the sample. With some improvements a detection sensitivity of about 106 atoms of plutonium, americium and curium should be reached. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of tear glucose concentration with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Christopher R; Baca, Justin T; Asher, Sanford A; Grabowski, Joseph J; Finegold, David N

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method that allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 microL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 muL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting nondiabetic subject to be 13 to 51 microM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different nondiabetic subject to be 211 to 256 microM. PMID:17084090

  10. Desorption and ionization processes in laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis results are reported from a study on the desorption- and ionization process initiated by infra-red laser irradiation (LDMS) or ion bombardment (SIMS) of thin organic sample layers. The study is especially focused on the formation of quasimolecular ions under these conditions. Results of these investigations can be used for a better optimization of the LDMS and SIMS techniques in organic mass spectrometry. First, an overview is given of laser desorption mass spectrometry. Next, the coupling of the laser energy into the organic sample layer is investigated. It is concluded that the laser energy is primarily absorbed by the substrate material and not by the organic overlayer. The formation of quasi-molecular ions, either in the gas phase or in the substrate surface is investigated. The final section reports kinetic energy distributions for ions sputtered from organic solids and liquids. (Auth.)

  11. Development and applications of ionization techniques in ambient mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef

    Brno : Institute of Analytical Chemistry AS CR, 2014 - (Foret, F.; Křenková, J.; Drobníková, I.; Guttman, A.; Klepárník, K.), s. 97-98 ISBN 978-80-904959-2-0. [CECE 2014. International Interdisciplinary Meeting on Bioanalysis /11./. Brno (CZ), 20.10.2014-22.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-25137P; GA ČR GAP206/12/0750 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ambient mass spectrometry * desorption electrospray ionization * desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * thin-layer chromatography * insect defense compounds * mass spectrometry imaging Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  12. All-solid-state deep ultraviolet laser for single-photon ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengqian; Liu, Xianhu; Zeng, Chenghui; Zhang, Hanyu; Jia, Meiye; Wu, Yishi; Luo, Zhixun; Fu, Hongbing; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-02-01

    We report here the development of a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer utilizing single-photon ionization based on an all-solid-state deep ultraviolet (DUV) laser system. The DUV laser was achieved from the second harmonic generation using a novel nonlinear optical crystal KBe2BO3F2 under the condition of high-purity N2 purging. The unique property of this laser system (177.3-nm wavelength, 15.5-ps pulse duration, and small pulse energy at ˜15 μJ) bears a transient low power density but a high single-photon energy up to 7 eV, allowing for ionization of chemicals, especially organic compounds free of fragmentation. Taking this advantage, we have designed both pulsed nanospray and thermal evaporation sources to form supersonic expansion molecular beams for DUV single-photon ionization mass spectrometry (DUV-SPI-MS). Several aromatic amine compounds have been tested revealing the fragmentation-free performance of the DUV-SPI-MS instrument, enabling applications to identify chemicals from an unknown mixture.

  13. Chemical protection and sensitization to ionizing radiation:molecular investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical radioprotection and radiosensitization are induced by the presence of certain chemical compounds, which reduce or enhance the effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms. Such substances are either naturally present or may be artificially introduced in the living cells. Chemical radioprotectors are interesting for possible application in the health protection of both professionally exposed workers and patients treated by radiation for diagnostic and thereapeutic purposes. Interest in chemical radiosensitization has increased recently because of its potential application in the radiotherapy of tumours. Both radioprotection and radiosensitization occur by means of complicated mechanisms, which at first correspond to very fast reactions. The mechanism of the interaction between such substances and radiation-induced biological radicals has been investigated by means of pulse radiolysis and rapid mixing techniques. Examples of the application of these techniques are given to illustrate how information has been obtained on the molecular basis of radiation chemical modi-fication at the cellular level. In particular some interactions between model systems of biological interest (DNA, DNA components, enzymes, amino acids, etc.) and sulphur-containing radioprotectors (glutathione, cysteine, etc.) and/or electroaffinic radiosensitizers, are described. (H.K.)

  14. Mechanism of Interaction between Ionizing Radiation and Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies for 'Mechanism of Interaction between ionizing radiation and chemicals. Several biological end-points were assessed in experimental organisms such as higher plants, rats, cell lines and yeast cells to establish proper bioassay techniques. The Tradescantia somatic cell mutation assay was carried out, and immunohistochemistry and hormone assays were done in Fisher 344 rats and cell lines to analyse the combined effect of ionizing radiation with mercury chloride. Using the common regularities of combined actions of two factors, a theoretical model was established, and applied to the thermo radiation action and synergism between two chemicals, as well. The model approach made it possible to predict the condition under which the maximum synergism could be attained. The research results were published in high standard journals and presented in the scientific conferences to verify KAERI's current technology level. The experience of collaboration can be used as a fundamental tool for multinational collaboration, and make the role of improving relationship between Korea and Poland

  15. Mechanism of Interaction between Ionizing Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, B. H.; Shin, H. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies for 'Mechanism of Interaction between ionizing radiation and chemicals{sup .} Several biological end-points were assessed in experimental organisms such as higher plants, rats, cell lines and yeast cells to establish proper bioassay techniques. The Tradescantia somatic cell mutation assay was carried out, and immunohistochemistry and hormone assays were done in Fisher 344 rats and cell lines to analyse the combined effect of ionizing radiation with mercury chloride. Using the common regularities of combined actions of two factors, a theoretical model was established, and applied to the thermo radiation action and synergism between two chemicals, as well. The model approach made it possible to predict the condition under which the maximum synergism could be attained. The research results were published in high standard journals and presented in the scientific conferences to verify KAERI's current technology level. The experience of collaboration can be used as a fundamental tool for multinational collaboration, and make the role of improving relationship between Korea and Poland.

  16. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization mode for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Tao; Guan, Lili

    2013-04-01

    A simple and economical method for the determination of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-28, 47, 99, 100,153,154,183, and 209) in water was developed. This method involves the use of ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with GC-MS in negative chemical ionization mode. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, salt concentration, extraction time, and ultrasonic time, were investigated. A volume of 1.0 mL of acetone (dispersive solvent) containing 10 μL tetrachloroethylene (extraction solvent) was injected into 5.0 mL of water samples and then emulsified by ultrasound for 2.0 min to produce the cloudy solution. Under the optimal condition, the enrichment factors for the eight PBDEs were varied from 845- to 1050-folds. Good linearity was observed in the range of 1.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-28, 47, 99, and 100; 5.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-153, 154, and 183; and 5.0-500 ng L(-1) for BDE-209. The RSD values were in the range of 2.5-8.4% (n = 5) and the LODs ranged from 0.40 to 2.15 ng L(-1) (S/N = 3). The developed method was applied for the determination of eight BPDEs in the river and lake water samples, and the mean recoveries at spiking levels of 5.0 and 50.0 ng L(-1) were in the range of 70.6-105.1%. PMID:23483741

  17. Threshold ionization mass spectrometry in the presence of excited silane radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of excited radicals in plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition silane processes leads to overestimation of radical densities in threshold ionization mass spectrometry analysis. A method to discriminate the signal due to excited radicals is proposed and applied to estimate the relative density trends of the ground-state silane radicals (SiHx, x x/SiH4 density trends with hydrogen input show a turning point where SiH becomes dominant, in the process region where nc-Si layers were previously obtained. (fast track communication)

  18. Analysis of sexual assault evidence by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Mario F; Chramow, Alexander; Cabral, Elaine C; Ifa, Demian R

    2013-07-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is employed in the forensic analysis of chemical components present in condoms and imaging of latent fingerprints as circumstantial evidence of sexual assault. Polymers such as nonoxynol-9, polyethylene glycol, and polydimethylsiloxane, as well as small molecules additives such as N-methylmorpholine, N-octylamine, N,N-dibutyl formamide, and isonox 132, commonly used in lubricated condom formulations, were successfully characterized by DESI. The results suggest that DESI-MS is useful for identification of this type of evidence, and it has advantages over conventional extractive techniques, in terms of speed of analysis and ease of use. PMID:23832933

  19. Determination of triacetone triperoxide using ultraviolet femtosecond multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Ryota; Imasaka, Tomoko; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an explosive compound, was measured using gas chromatography combined with multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI-TOFMS). By decreasing the pulse width of a femtosecond laser from 80 to 35 fs, a molecular ion was drastically enhanced and was measured as one of the major ions in the mass spectrum. The detection limits obtained using the molecular (M(+)) and fragment (C2H3O(+)) ions were similar or slightly superior to those obtained using conventional mass spectrometry based on electron and chemical ionization. In order to improve the reliability, an isotope of TATP, i.e., TATP-d18, was synthesized and used as an internal standard in the trace analysis of TATP in a sample of human blood. TATP could be identified in a two-dimensional display, even though numerous interfering compounds were present in the sample. Acetone, which is frequently used as a solvent in sampling TATP, produced a chemical species with a retention time nearly identical to that of TATP and provided a C2H3O(+) fragment ion that was employed for measuring a chromatogram of TATP in conventional MS. This compound, the structure of which was assigned as phorone, was clearly differentiated from TATP based on a molecular ion observable in MPI-TOFMS. PMID:25467497

  20. Identification of the Related Substances in Ampicillin Capsule by Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Zhang; Xian Long Cheng; Yang Liu; Miao Liang; Honghuan Dong; Beiran Lv; Wenning Yang; Zhiqiang Luo; Mingmin Tang

    2014-01-01

    Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (RRLC-ESI-MSn) was used to separate and identify related substances in ampicillin capsule. The fragmentation behaviors of related substances were used to identify their chemical structures. Finally, a total of 13 related substances in ampicillin capsule were identified, including four identified components for the first time and three groups of isomers on the basis of the exact mass, fragmenta...

  1. Actual trends in chip electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to revolutionize carbohydrate research and help in understanding of how post-translational events such as glycosylation affect biomolecular activities. In the past decade, capillary nanoelectrospray (nanoESI) MS developed as an effective means in glycomics. However, the disadvantages of the method include low sample throughput, potential sample carryover, and poor reproducibility due to the variable shape of the spray tip. The recent introduction of chip-based nano and microESI in biological MS is driven by the high performance, efficiency, throughput, sensitivity and speed of analysis. The analytical potential of these assemblies were lately largely proven in proteomics, direct bioanalyses of drugs, drug development and small molecule characterization. For the MS ionization/separation of quantity-limited complex carbohydrates derived from biological matrices, our group implemented in the last few years an arsenal of novel methodologies based on microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip systems. In this study microfluidic ESI systems operating in the negative ion mode, in combination with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) at 9.4 Tesla and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are introduced for glycolipidomic surveys in biomedical research. Two different chip ESI systems: a fully automated chip-based nanoESI robot and a thin chip microsprayer have been coupled each to both a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) MS and a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS at 9.4 T. The feasibility of the chip MS approaches was tested for the determination of ganglioside differential expression in human brain regions and elucidation of the topospecific structures. The obtained data indicate that the high sensitivity and ionization efficiency provided at nano- and microscale level by the chip MS infusion in combination with tandem MS make this new approach ideal for studies

  2. Gas phase studies on terpenes by ion mobility spectrometry using different atmospheric pressure chemical ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Stone, J. A.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    The ionization pathways and drift behavior were determined for sets of constitutional isomeric and stereoisomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (unsaturated monocyclic terpenes, unsaturated and saturated bicyclic terpenes) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to assess how structural and stereochemical differences influence ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed for constitutional isomers using ion mobility spectrometry with photoionization (PI) and corona discharge (CD) ionization. Photoionization provides ion mobility spectra containing one major peak for saturated compounds while at two peaks were observed for unsaturated compounds, which can be assigned to product ions related to monomer and dimer ions. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found depending on the position of the double bond. Although IMS using corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra are complex and differ from those obtained using photoionization. Additional cluster ions and fragment ions were detected. Only small differences in ion mobility spectra were observed for the diastereomers while the enantiomers provide identical spectra. The structure of the product ions formed was checked by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS).

  3. Desorption electrospray ionization using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer: Exact mass measurements on drugs and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qizhi; Talaty, Nari; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is implemented on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The ion source is described and applications which utilize the high-resolution capabilities of the Orbitrap are emphasized, including the characterization of peptides and active ingredients in pharmaceutical tablets. Measurements are made in less than 1 s at a resolution of 60,000. The implications of the data for the mechanisms of DESI are discussed. PMID:17051609

  4. Multistage Reactive Transmission-Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kevin C; Comi, Troy J; Perry, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Elucidating reaction mechanisms is important for advancing many areas of science such as catalyst development. It is often difficult to probe fast reactions at ambient conditions with high temporal resolution. In addition, systems involving reagents that cross-react require analytical methods that can minimize interaction time and specify their order of introduction into the reacting system. Here, we explore the utility of transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI) for reaction monitoring by directing a microdroplet spray towards a series of meshes with micrometer-sized openings coated with reagents, an approach we call multistage reactive TM-DESI (TM (n) -DESI, where n refers to the number of meshes; n = 2 in this report). Various stages of the reaction are initiated at each mesh surface, generating intermediates and products in microdroplet reaction vessels traveling towards the mass spectrometer. Using this method, we investigated the reactivity of iron porphyrin catalytic hydroxylation of propranolol and other substrates. Our experimental results indicate that TM (n) -DESI provides the ability to spatially separate reagents and control their order of introduction into the reacting system, thereby minimizing unwanted reactions that lead to catalyst deactivation and degradation products. In addition, comparison with DESI-MS analyses (the Zare and Latour laboratories published results suggesting accessible reaction times <1 ms) of the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by L-ascorbic acid suggest that TM (1) -DESI can access reaction times less than 1 ms. Multiple meshes allow sequential stages of desorption/ionization per MS scan, increasing the number of analytes and reactions that can be characterized in a single experiment. PMID:26091888

  5. Multistage Reactive Transmission-Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kevin C.; Comi, Troy J.; Perry, Richard H.

    2015-09-01

    Elucidating reaction mechanisms is important for advancing many areas of science such as catalyst development. It is often difficult to probe fast reactions at ambient conditions with high temporal resolution. In addition, systems involving reagents that cross-react require analytical methods that can minimize interaction time and specify their order of introduction into the reacting system. Here, we explore the utility of transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI) for reaction monitoring by directing a microdroplet spray towards a series of meshes with micrometer-sized openings coated with reagents, an approach we call multistage reactive TM-DESI (TM n -DESI, where n refers to the number of meshes; n = 2 in this report). Various stages of the reaction are initiated at each mesh surface, generating intermediates and products in microdroplet reaction vessels traveling towards the mass spectrometer. Using this method, we investigated the reactivity of iron porphyrin catalytic hydroxylation of propranolol and other substrates. Our experimental results indicate that TM n -DESI provides the ability to spatially separate reagents and control their order of introduction into the reacting system, thereby minimizing unwanted reactions that lead to catalyst deactivation and degradation products. In addition, comparison with DESI-MS analyses (the Zare and Latour laboratories published results suggesting accessible reaction times <1 ms) of the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by L-ascorbic acid suggest that TM 1 -DESI can access reaction times less than 1 ms. Multiple meshes allow sequential stages of desorption/ionization per MS scan, increasing the number of analytes and reactions that can be characterized in a single experiment.

  6. Dehydrodimerization of pterostilbene during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2013-04-30

    RATIONALE Pterostilbene is a member of the hydroxystilbene family of compounds commonly found in plants such as blueberry and grapes. During the analysis of this compound by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), an ion was observed that corresponds to the dehydrodimer of pterostilbene in mass-to-charge ratio. Since such unexpected dimerization may lead to decreased monomer signal during quantitative analysis, it was of interest to identify the origin and structure of the observed pterostilbene dimer and examine the experimental conditions that influence its formation. METHODS Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) were used to examine the origin of the dimerization products. The structure of the formed pterostilbene dimer was examined by performing MSn analysis on the dimer ion. Effects of solvent composition, analyte concentration, radical scavenger, and other experimental conditions on the dimerization were also studied. RESULTS LC/MS and NMR analyses clearly showed that the starting solution did not contain the pterostilbene dimer. Solvent type and radical scavenger concentration were found to have pronounced effects on the dimer formation. Particularly, presence of acetonitrile or ammonium acetate had favorable effects on the extent of dimerization during ESI-MS analysis whereas hydroquinone and butylated hydroquinone had negative effects. Dimer formation decreased at high flow rates and when fused-silica capillary was used as the spray needle. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that this dimerization occurs as a result of solution-phase electrochemical reactions taking place during the electrospray process. A possible structure for this dimer was proposed based on the MSn analysis and was similar to that of the enzymatically derived pterostilbene dehydrodimer already reported in the literature. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  7. Computational Prediction of Electron Ionization Mass Spectra to Assist in GC/MS Compound Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Felicity; Pon, Allison; Greiner, Russ; Wishart, David

    2016-08-01

    We describe a tool, competitive fragmentation modeling for electron ionization (CFM-EI) that, given a chemical structure (e.g., in SMILES or InChI format), computationally predicts an electron ionization mass spectrum (EI-MS) (i.e., the type of mass spectrum commonly generated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry). The predicted spectra produced by this tool can be used for putative compound identification, complementing measured spectra in reference databases by expanding the range of compounds able to be considered when availability of measured spectra is limited. The tool extends CFM-ESI, a recently developed method for computational prediction of electrospray tandem mass spectra (ESI-MS/MS), but unlike CFM-ESI, CFM-EI can handle odd-electron ions and isotopes and incorporates an artificial neural network. Tests on EI-MS data from the NIST database demonstrate that CFM-EI is able to model fragmentation likelihoods in low-resolution EI-MS data, producing predicted spectra whose dot product scores are significantly better than full enumeration "bar-code" spectra. CFM-EI also outperformed previously reported results for MetFrag, MOLGEN-MS, and Mass Frontier on one compound identification task. It also outperformed MetFrag in a range of other compound identification tasks involving a much larger data set, containing both derivatized and nonderivatized compounds. While replicate EI-MS measurements of chemical standards are still a more accurate point of comparison, CFM-EI's predictions provide a much-needed alternative when no reference standard is available for measurement. CFM-EI is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/cfm-id/ for download and http://cfmid.wishartlab.com as a web service. PMID:27381172

  8. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  9. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  10. Advanced liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry interface based on electron ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, A; Famiglini, G; Pierini, E; Palma, P; Trufelli, H

    2007-07-15

    Major progress in interfacing liquid chromatography and electron ionization mass spectrometry is presented. The minimalism of the first prototype, called the Direct-EI interface, has been widely refined, improved, and applied to modern instrumentation. The simple interfacing principle is based on the straight connection between a nanoHPLC system and a mass spectrometer equipped with an EI source forming a solid and reliable unicum resembling the immediacy and straightforwardness of GC/MS. The interface shows a superior performance in the analysis of small-medium molecular weight compounds, especially when compared to its predecessors, and a unique trait that excels particularly in the following aspects: (1) It delivers high-quality, fully library matchable mass spectra of most sub-1 kDa molecules amenable by HPLC. (2) It is a chemical ionization free interface (unless operated intentionally) with accurate reproduction of the expected isotope ion abundances. (3) Response is never influenced by matrix components in the sample or in the mobile phase (nonvolatile salts are also well accepted). A deep evaluation of these aspects is presented and discussed in detail. Other characteristics of the interface performance such as limits of detections, range of linear response, and intra- and interday signal stability were also considered. The usefulness of the interface has been tested in a few real-world applications where matrix components played a detrimental role with other LC/MS techniques. PMID:17569502

  11. Determination of isotope abundance and elemental concentration of lithium by thermal ionization mass spechometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical method for the determination of the isotope abundance and elemental concentration of lithium by mass spectrometry has been developed. A study, envolving the optimization of the various experimental parameters aimed at reducing the isotope fractionation that occur during evaporation, has been made. The experimental parameters optimized are: type of filament arrangement, accelerating voltage of the ions, quantity and chemical form of the samples deposited and the temperature of ionization. The effect of isotope fractionation on the isotope ratio measurements has been studied and compared with the theoretical model of Kanno and correction has been applied based on the variation of the isotope ratio of lithium with the time of analysis. The concentration of lithium in a sample of uranyl nitrate and an U.S.G.S. rock standard has been determined by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique using a tracer enriched in lithium-6. (Author)

  12. Fast magnetic peak switching for thermal ionization mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Common practice in thermal ionization mass spectrometry is to make repeated and rapid comparisons between isotopes of interest by switching the magnetic deflection field sequentially between the values required to deflect each isotope through the collector slit. After each step in the field value (peak switch) it is necessary to pause before logging data, in order to allow the system response to settle to the point where it does not affect the precision of the isotopic ratio determination. The dynamics of the field stabilization system are the principle contributors to this delay period. The system characteristics applicable to a field-controlled magnet system are analyzed in this paer. Possible areas where the step response may be improved by the application of modern control theory are outlined. It is shown that any field-stabilized magnet system can be optimized for step response by the synthesis of a discrete control system. Discrete digital control, i.e. a software implementation, allows system optimization without the necessity for hardware modification, which would be difficult, expensive and possibility in some cases impractical. (orig.)

  13. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  14. Quantitative depth profiling by laser-ionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yasuhiro

    1999-01-01

    Depth profiling by laser-ionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) is reviewed. The matrix effects, including surface and interface effects, in laser-ionization SNMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are compared with each other and discussed. Laser-ionization SNMS can provide depth profiles with much smaller matrix effects than conventional SIMS. Depth resolution can effectively be improved by using grazing incidence for the primary ion beam with little interfacial effect. The quantification method in laser-ionization SNMS is also mentioned.

  15. Mass distributions of a macromolecular assembly based on electrospray ionization mass spectrometric masses of the constituent subunits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leonid Hanin; Brian Green; Franck Zal; Serge Vinogradov

    2003-09-01

    Macromolecular assemblies containing multiple protein subunits and having masses in the megadalton (MDa) range are involved in most of the functions of a living cell. Because of variation in the number and masses of subunits, macromolecular assemblies do not have a unique mass, but rather a mass distribution. The giant extracelular erythrocruorins (Ers), ∼ 3.5 MDa, comprized of at least 180 polypeptide chains, are one of the best characterized assemblies. Three-dimensional reconstructions from cryoelectron microscopic images show them to be hexagonal bilayer complexes of 12 subassemblies, each comprised of 12 globin chains, anchored to a subassembly of 36 nonglobin linker chains. We have calculated the most probable mass distributions for Lumbricus and Riftia assemblies and their globin and linker subassemblies, based on the Lumbricus Er stoichiometry and using accurate subunit masses obtained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The expected masses of Lumbricus and Riftia Ers are 3.517 MDa and 3.284 MDa, respectively, with a possible variation of ∼ 9% due to the breadth of the mass distributions. The Lumbricus Er mass is in astonishingly good agreement with the mean of 23 known masses, 3.524 ± 0.481 MDa.

  16. Origin of the chemical noise in ambient mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumental background of ambient mass spectrometry, (API-MS) is analyzed and the possible potential origins of the background noise is identified. According to the mass spectra obtained using the API-MS instruments by different manufacturers, the characteristic fragment ions all indicated that the background noise are resulted from the phthalates such as diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and silicones such as decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6). These chemicals are probably released from the polymeric materials used in the ionization sources, such as O-type sealing ring etc. In addition, the instrumental background has to be considered especially during the analysis of phthalate and peptide compounds. (authors)

  17. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  18. A combined desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S; Miller, Scott A; Attygalle, Athula B

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H](+) or [M + metal](+) ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies. PMID:21472555

  19. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  20. Analytical conditions for field ionization mass spectrometry of diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadao Ogawa [Toyota Central R& amp; D Labs., Inc., Aichi-ken (Japan). Materials Analysis and Evaluation Division

    2005-11-01

    Field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) was investigated to establish a method for clarifying the compositions of hydrocarbons in diesel fuels. Firstly, the influences of reservoir temperature, ion source temperature, emitter current, cathode voltage and ion focusing mode on ion intensities and double bond equivalence value (DBE) distributions were examined to define the analytical conditions for obtaining almost the same carbon number distribution of n-paraffins (DBE=0) as that obtained by gas chromatography. Secondly, the origin of the memory background and the measures to minimize it were examined to obtain the ion intensities of high reproducibility. As a result, variation coefficients of less than 6.4 and 5.1% were obtained for the ion intensity of each hydrocarbon and the sums of the ion intensities of the hydrocarbons with the same DBE, respectively. Finally, two fuels, which were similar in H/C but considerably different in the backend fraction at a distillation temperature of 290{sup o}C (R{sub 290}), were analyzed by FIMS established in this study, to explain the reasons why these fuels yielded nearly the same particulate emissions. FIMS results showed that a fuel with low R{sub 290} consisted of low carbon number aliphatic hydrocarbons and high carbon number aromatic hydrocarbons, both of which have low inflammability. The fuel was found to yield more HC emission than another fuel with high R{sub 290}. The amount of the particulate emission was larger than that expected from R{sub 290}. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Interlayer spray ionization mass spectrometry for the simple direct analysis of low amounts of sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Tang, Fei; Guo, Cheng'an; Huo, Xinming; Zhang, Sichun; Wang, Xiaohao

    2016-07-01

    Interlayer spray is proposed as a convenient ionization source for direct analysis by mass spectrometry. Two slices of non-absorbent substrate hold the liquid sample to form a sandwich structure. By applying a high voltage to the sample, spray is generated at the tip of the substrate. The sampling procedure can be operated easily in an open condition and the spray is processed in a semi-enclosed condition, which leads to a relatively stable process. An ultralow amount (target are maintained. Less influence from the substrate is achieved compared with the spray methods based on porous absorbent materials, which results in a sensitivity enhancement of large molecule samples. It is demonstrated that the interlayer spray is applicable for the analysis of various compounds, including therapeutic drugs, peptides, and proteins. Good linearity can be obtained at a concentration as low as 50 ng/mL in the quantitative analysis for imatinib. We also show the ability to identify the chemical residuals on surfaces with high sensitivity by the "wipe-spray" method, which is useful for the fast screening of illicit substances. Interlayer spray working with mass spectrometry provides a promising method for direct analysis in an ambient environment. Graphical Abstract The schematic of the interlayer spray ionization source. PMID:27173393

  2. The determination of trace technetium-99 in soil samples by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry and isotope dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry technology of measuring 99Tc using 97Tc as the spike was developed. The chemical separation procedure of Tc is established, the recovery rate was more than 70% for the overall process. 97 Te was prepared by irradiation of natural Ruthenium metal, then was calibrated by IDMS with 99Tc standard material as the spike. Based on MgCl2 + Ba (OH)2 as the loading reagent, the Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Technetium was established. which detection sensitivity was pg/g. Then, 99Tc in the soil samples was quantitatively determined by Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Isotope Dilution Method. The combined standard un- certainty was better than 3%. (authors)

  3. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45 degrees. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N2O and SF6. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF6 for example, the process SF6 → SF6+ + e- → SF5+ + F + e-. The SF5+ ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution

  4. Analysis of abused drugs by selected ion monitoring: quantitative comparison of electron impact and chemical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison was made of the relative sensitivities of electron impact and chemical ionization when used for selected ion monitoring analysis of commonly abused drugs. For most of the drugs examined chemical ionization using ammonia as the reactant gas gave the largest single m/e ion current response per unit weight of sample. However, if maximum sensitivity is desired it is important to evaluate electron impact and chemical ionization with respect to both maximum response and degree of interference from background and endogenous materials

  5. Enhanced capabilities for imaging gangliosides in murine brain with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to ion mobility separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrášková, Karolina; Claude, Emmanuelle; Jones, Emrys A; Towers, Mark; Ellis, Shane R; Heeren, Ron M A

    2016-07-15

    The increased interest in lipidomics calls for improved yet simplified methods of lipid analysis. Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been established as a powerful technique for the analysis of molecular distribution of a variety of compounds across tissue surfaces. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI is widely used to study the spatial distribution of common lipids. However, a thorough sample preparation and necessity of vacuum for efficient ionization might hamper its use for high-throughput lipid analysis. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is a relatively young MS technique. In DESI, ionization of molecules occurs under ambient conditions, which alleviates sample preparation. Moreover, DESI does not require the application of an external matrix, making the detection of low mass species more feasible due to the lack of chemical matrix background. However, irrespective of the ionization method, the final information obtained during an MSI experiment is very complex and its analysis becomes challenging. It was shown that coupling MSI to ion mobility separation (IMS) simplifies imaging data interpretation. Here we employed DESI and MALDI MSI for a lipidomic analysis of the murine brain using the same IMS-enabled instrument. We report for the first time on the DESI IMS-MSI of multiply sialylated ganglioside species, as well as their acetylated versions, which we detected directly from the murine brain tissue. We show that poly-sialylated gangliosides can be imaged as multiply charged ions using DESI, while they are clearly separated from the rest of the lipid classes based on their charge state using ion mobility. This represents a major improvement in MSI of intact fragile lipid species. We additionally show that complementary lipid information is reached under particular conditions when DESI is compared to MALDI MSI. PMID:26922843

  6. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  7. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ∼0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10(-6)-5.0 × 10(-2) Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2 ) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10(-6) Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning. PMID:27036832

  8. Production and Utilization of CO3- Produced by a Corona Discharge in Air for Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-12-14

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization is a multistep ionization process used in mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The formation of product ions depends upon interactions with the analyte and the reactant ion species formed in the ionization source. The predominant reactant ion observed in a point-to-plane corona discharge in air occurs at m/z 60. There have been multiple references in the literature to the identity of this ion with some disagreement. It was postulated to be either CO3- or N2O2-. The identity of this ion is important as it is a key to the ionization of analytes. It was determined here to be CO3- through the use of 18O labeled oxygen. Further confirmation was provided through MS/MS studies. The ionization of nitroglycerine (NG) with CO3- produced the adduct NG•CO3-. This was compared to ionization with NO3- and Cl- reactant ions that also formed adducts with NG. The fragmentation patterns of these three adducts provides insight into the charge distribution and indicates that CO3- has a relatively high electron affinity similar to that of nitrate.

  9. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy to ultralow-level counting and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to directly detect a daughter atom, using resonance ionization spectroscopy, in delayed time coincidence with the decay of a parent species promises to drastically reduce the background in low-level counting experiments. Resonance ionization can also be used as an ion source for a mass spectrometer system that is capable of discriminating between isobars

  10. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Yu-chen

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent.

  11. Thermal ionization mass spectrometric study of U-Pu-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First inference from a thermal ionization mass spectrometric study of samples corresponding to the ternary U-Pu-O system, especially if high surface ionization temperatures are employed, is likely to be at variance with that from equilibrium vaporization thermodynamic studies, that the atomic species U and Pu dominate the vapor phase

  12. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range. PMID:19682922

  13. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here

  14. Quality control for total evaporation technique by surface/thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the measurement of uranium and plutonium isotopic composition, the surface/thermal ionization mass spectrometry is widely used at the both nuclear facilities and safeguards verification laboratories. The progress of instrument specification makes higher sensitivity. The total evaporation technique is one of the latest measurement techniques by using this progress, in which all of uranium or plutonium on the filament would be evaporated by increasing the filament current. The accuracy and precision of this technique is normally checked by using the certified isotope reference materials measurement. But the fluctuation of ion beam is very different by each filament, depending on the chemical form of evaporation. So, it should be considered how to check the measurement quality of unknown samples which has no certified values. This presentation is focused on the monitoring of ion yields and pattern of isotope ratio fluctuation to attain the traceability between reference material and unknown sample as quality control approach of total evaporation technique. (author)

  15. Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using ordered silicon nanopillar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhmoud, Hashim Z; Guinan, Taryn M; Elnathan, Roey; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-11-21

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) is ideally suited for the high-throughput analysis of small molecules in bodily fluids (e.g. saliva, urine, and blood plasma). A key application for this technique is the testing of drug consumption in the context of workplace, roadside, athlete sports and anti-addictive drug compliance. Here, we show that vertically-aligned ordered silicon nanopillar (SiNP) arrays fabricated using nanosphere lithography followed by metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) are suitable substrates for the SALDI-MS detection of methadone and small peptides. Porosity, length and diameter are fabrication parameters that we have explored here in order to optimize analytical performance. We demonstrate the quantitative analysis of methadone in MilliQ water down to 32 ng mL(-1). Finally, the capability of SiNP arrays to facilitate the detection of methadone in clinical samples is also demonstrated. PMID:25268849

  16. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Han, S. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here.

  17. Real Time Online Correction of Mass Shifts and Intensity Fluctuations in Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Yu, Miao; Chen, Jian; Liu, Chunxiao; Shi, Jianbo; Chen, Huanwen; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-12-15

    Real time online calibration of mass shift and intensity fluctuation to improve the accuracy of measurements for identification and quantitation in trace mass spectrometric analysis was demonstrated using extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS). The signals of authentic compounds (e.g., lysine (Lys), proline (Pro), and histidine (His)) spiked into the extractive solution for the EESI process were used as the references to calibrate the signal of analytes (e.g., methionine (Met)) in the untreated sample solution. The intensity of the analyte signal was recorded simultaneously with the reference signals. The analyte signals at a given time point were calibrated on the basis of these correlation factors and real time signal response of the reference. The calibrated signal of Met at 10 μg L(-1) was improved with a better signal-to-noise ratio (S/N from 2.3 to 4.3), better linearity (R(2) from 0.9758 to 0.9980), and reduced relative standard deviation (RSD from 9.8% to 6.0%). The shift of mass-to-charge ratio of Met signal between the detected and theoretical values was decreased from 247 ± 133 to -7 ± 167 ppm for 50 min of detection using a linear ion trap mass analyzer and was reduced from -0.27 ± 0.60 to -0.12 ± 0.23 ppm for 50 min of detection using an Orbitrap mass analyzer (P = 95%). This method has been validated using a certified standard amino acids solution (GBW(E)100062) and applied for quantitative detection of amino acids in chicken feed, urine, nutritional drink, and facial mask samples, showing that the method is useful to improve the accuracy of mass spectrometric analysis. PMID:26595410

  18. Characterization of Proanthocyanidins from Parkia biglobosa (Jacq. G. Don. (Fabaceae by Flow Injection Analysis — Electrospray Ionization Ion Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Vilegas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the chemical composition of the African plant Parkia biglobosa (Fabaceae roots and barks by Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization and Direct Injection Tandem Mass Spectrometry analysis. Mass spectral data indicated that B-type oligomers are present, namely procyanidins and prodelphinidins, with their gallate and glucuronide derivatives, some of them in different isomeric forms. The analysis evidenced the presence of up to 40 proanthocyanidins, some of which are reported for the first time. In this study, the antiradical activity of extracts of roots and barks from Parkia biglobosa was evaluated using DPPH method and they showed satisfactory activities.

  19. Direct, trace level detection of explosives on ambient surfaces by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takáts, Zoltán; Cotte-Rodriguez, Ismael; Talaty, Nari; Chen, Huanwen; Cooks, R Graham

    2005-04-21

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry is used to detect trace amounts of explosives present on a variety of ambient surfaces in 5-second analysis times without any sample preparation. PMID:15834468

  20. Rapid ambient mass spectrometric profiling of intact, untreated bacteria using desorption electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yishu; Talaty, Nari; Tao, W Andy; Pan, Zhengzheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) allows the rapid acquisition of highly reproducible mass spectra from intact microorganisms under ambient conditions; application of principal component analysis to the data allows sub-species differentiation. PMID:17279261

  1. Determination of plutonium traces isotopic composition by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium isotopic composition has been determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. An ion counting detector has been used. It allows to noticeably reduce the sample quantity to use. The accuracy of the obtained measures are very good

  2. Containment of a diffuse ionized mass orbiting around a magnetized central body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The containment of a diffused and ionized mass orbiting around a magnetized central body is studied and the condition equation is established. Some qualitative and quantitative applications to the planetary cosmogony problems are developed. (Auth.)

  3. Ionizing radiation effects in Acai oil analysed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Acai fruit is a well know Brazilian seed plant used in large scale as a source of feed stock, specially in the Brazilian North-east region. The Acai oil is use in many purposes from fuel sources to medicine. The scope of this paper is to analyzed the chemical structures modification of the acai oil after the ionizing radiation. The radiation were set in the range of 10 to 25 kGy in the extracted Acai oil. The analyses were made by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry techniques. A GC/MS Shimatzu QP-5000 equipped with 30 meters DB-5 capillary column with internal diameter of 0.25 mm and 0.25 μm film thickness was used. Helium was used as carried gas and gave a column head pressure of 12 p.s.i. (1 p.s.i. = 6894.76 Pa) and an average flux of 1 ml/min. The temperature program for the GC column consisted of a 4-minutes hold at 75 deg C, a 15 deg C /min ramp to 200 deg C, 8 minutes isothermal. 20 deg C/min ramp to 250 deg C, 2 minutes isothermal. The extraction of the fatty acids was based on liquid-liquid method using chloroform as solvent. The chromatograms resulted shows the presences of the oleic acid and others fatty acids identify by the mass spectra library (NIST-92). The ionization radiation deplete the fatty acids presents in the Acai oil. Details on the chemical qualitative analytical is present as well in this work. (author)

  4. Ionizing radiation effects in Acai oil analysed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valli, Felipe; Fernandes, Carlos Eduardo; Moura, Sergio; Machado, Ana Carolina; Furasawa, Helio Akira; Pires, Maria Aparecida Faustino; Bustillos, Oscar Vega [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: ovega@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    The Acai fruit is a well know Brazilian seed plant used in large scale as a source of feed stock, specially in the Brazilian North-east region. The Acai oil is use in many purposes from fuel sources to medicine. The scope of this paper is to analyzed the chemical structures modification of the acai oil after the ionizing radiation. The radiation were set in the range of 10 to 25 kGy in the extracted Acai oil. The analyses were made by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry techniques. A GC/MS Shimatzu QP-5000 equipped with 30 meters DB-5 capillary column with internal diameter of 0.25 mm and 0.25 {mu}m film thickness was used. Helium was used as carried gas and gave a column head pressure of 12 p.s.i. (1 p.s.i. = 6894.76 Pa) and an average flux of 1 ml/min. The temperature program for the GC column consisted of a 4-minutes hold at 75 deg C, a 15 deg C /min ramp to 200 deg C, 8 minutes isothermal. 20 deg C/min ramp to 250 deg C, 2 minutes isothermal. The extraction of the fatty acids was based on liquid-liquid method using chloroform as solvent. The chromatograms resulted shows the presences of the oleic acid and others fatty acids identify by the mass spectra library (NIST-92). The ionization radiation deplete the fatty acids presents in the Acai oil. Details on the chemical qualitative analytical is present as well in this work. (author)

  5. Enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of mass spectrometry by Doppler-free resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of two-photon Doppler-free excitation in atomic resonance ionization offers the possibility of considerable enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of conventional mass spectrometry. In some applications of interest, e.g. carbon dating, this technique may provide sensitivity comparable to that presently attained by accelerator-based high energy mass spectrometry. The basic physics underlying the method is discussed and preliminary experimental work on three-photon ionization of atomic carbon is described. (author)

  6. Unusual Fragmentation of Peptide and Protein in Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsuo Takayama

    2001-01-01

    Unusual amine - bond fragmentation on the peptide/protein backbone has been reported using matrix - assisted laser desorption/ionization time - of- flight mass spectrometry (MALDI - TOFMS)The amine - bond cleavage occurred without metastable decay, while the peptide - bond cleavage occurred with metastable decay of peptide ions in a drift region of TOF mass analyzer. It was presumed that the amine - bond cleavage occurred as a non - ergodic process independent of the ionization under MALDI conditions.

  7. Development of failed fuel detection and location technique using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of experiments on justification of the procedure for failed element detection and localization using resonance ionization mass spectroscopy of Xe and Kr isotopes in gas probes at the JOYO fast research reactor and MONJU prototype unit (Japan) is presented. Selectivity and range of applicability of the resonance ionization mass spectroscopy and gas label methods were studied. Agreement between experimental values of the Kr and Xe isotopes abundance and known data is proof that the method is fitness for work

  8. Applications of a versatile technique for trace analysis: atmospheric pressure negative chemical ionization.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, B A; Davidson, W R; Lovett, A M

    1980-01-01

    The ability to use ambient air as a carrier and reagent gas in an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source allows instantaneous air analysis to be combined with hypersensitivity toward a wide variety of compounds. The TAGA (Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser) is an instrument which is designed to use both positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for trace gas analysis; this paper describes several applications of negative APCI which demonstrates that the techni...

  9. Determination of low specific activity iodine-129 off-gas concentrations by GC separation and negative ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the final report of the laboratory development of a method for determining the specific activity of the 129I emitted from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The technique includes cryogenic sample collection, chemical form separation, quantitation by gas chromatography, and specific activity measurement of each chemical species by negative ionization mass spectrometry. The major conclusions were that both organic and elemental iodine can be quantitatively collected without fractionation and that specific activity measurements as low as one atom of 129I per 105 atoms of 127I are possible

  10. Nucleic acid analysis using liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of fast, reliable and sensitive methods for the analysis of biomolecules, especially nucleic acids, proteins, and peptides, is at the same time a deciding motor and has to keep pace with the steady progress of biochemical, molecular biological, and medical science. Miniaturized chromatographic separation methods are frequently the method of choice for the separation and characterization of complex biopolymer mixtures, when the amount of sample is limited. The concept of monolithic chromatographic separation media is especially favorable for the fabrication of capillary columns. Chemical immobilization of the monolith at the capillary wall eliminates the tedious preparation of retaining frits; the continuous porous polymer exhibits favorable mass transfer properties, enabling excellent separation efficiency. We prepared monolithic columns within the confines of fused silica capillaries of 200 μm i.d. by copolymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the presence of a suitable porogen mixture of 1-decanol and tetrahydrofuran. Different chemical and physical parameters that influence the morphology, porosity and separation efficiency of the obtained monolithic chromatographic columns were investigated, specifically the influence of the amount of cross-linking monomer, of different porogens and porogen mixtures, of polymerization temperature, and finally of the amount of radical initiator. The prepared monolithic columns were characterized by measurement of permeability with different solvents, determination of the pore size distribution by inverse size exclusion chromatography, examination of the morphology by scanning electron micrographs, and finally by chromatographic testing and determination of the separation parameters. Finally, the developed separation systems were applied to the separation of DNA ladder markers, of PCR amplified DNA fragments containing sequence-tagged sites used in the genotyping of individuals and of amplified short

  11. Improving the Sensitivity of Matrix-Assisted Ionization (MAI) Mass Spectrometry Using Ammonium Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubatyi, Nicholas D; McEwen, Charles N

    2015-10-01

    In matrix-assisted ionization (MAI), analyte incorporated in a small molecule matrix is introduced into an aperture linking atmospheric pressure with the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Gas-phase analyte ions are spontaneously produced without use of a laser or high voltage. Here we investigate analyte and background ion abundances upon addition of ammonium salts to various MAI matrix/analyte solutions. Regardless of the ammonium salt or matrix used, chemical background ions are suppressed and/or analyte ion abundance improved for basic small molecules, peptides, and proteins. Background ion abundances increase with increasing inlet temperature, but are suppressed with addition of any of a variety of ammonium salts without much effect on the total ion abundances of the analyte ions. However, at lower inlet temperature using the matrices 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol, 1,2-dicyanobenzene, and 3-nitrobenzonitrile (3-NBN), analyte ion abundance increases and any chemical background decreases upon addition of ammonium salt. The improvement in sensitivity using 3-NBN with ammonium salt allows full acquisition mass spectra consuming as little as 1 fmol of ubiquitin. More complete peptide coverage for 100 fmol of a BSA tryptic digest, and increased sensitivity of drugs spiked in urine and saliva were observed after ammonium salt addition to the 3-NBN matrix. PMID:26122522

  12. Role of ionizing radiation in chemical evolution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the role of ionizing radiation in radiation-induced reactions in prebiotic chemistry. The use of ionizing radiation as an energy source is based on its unique qualities, its specific manner of energy deposition and its abundance in the Earth's crust. As an example of radiation-induced reactions, the radiolysis of malonic acid was investigated. Malonic acid is converted into other carboxylic acids. The results obtained have been correlated with the ready formation of this compound in prebiotic experiments. (author)

  13. Secondary ozonides of endo-cyclic alkenes analyzed by atmospheric sampling Townsend discharge ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøjgaard, J. K.; Nørgaard, A. W.; Wolkoff, P.

    2007-05-01

    Secondary ozonides (SOZ) of cyclohexene, 1-methylcyclohexene, 4-isopropyl-1-methylcyclohexene and d-limonene were cryo-synthesized by ozonolysis in pentane and purified on a silica gel column. The mass spectra obtained by atmospheric sampling Townsend discharge ionization (ASTDI) and collision activated dissociation (CAD) of the protonized SOZ showed characteristic losses evident of the ozonide structure. Oxygen was eliminated as, e.g., O and O2, and loss of (HCHO + HCHO) or (O + CO2) corresponded to the SOZ base-peak for the substituted cyclohexenes by ASTDI-MS. The CAD spectra of the protonized species by use of methane as chemical ionization gas, showed consecutive losses of three oxygen atoms. Elimination of hydroxy-methyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) was particular important for the protonized SOZ, unlike consecutive loss of (HCHO + HCHO) or (O + CO2). In addition, the spectra of d-limonene were characterized by an unique loss of H2O2. These losses appear to be useful for identification of SOZ in gas-phase ozonolysis mixtures of endo-cyclic alkenes, which makes ASTDI an alternative to other on-line techniques for analysis of SOZ in ozonolysis mixtures.

  14. Characterization of gallotannins from Astronium species by flow injection analysis- electrospray ionization-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of- flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Viviane Cândida; Napolitano, Assunta; Eletto, Daniela; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; Pizza, Cosimo; Vilegas, Wagner

    2011-01-01

    The species Astronium urundeuva (Allemao) Engl. and Astronium graveolens Jacq., which are used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat allergies, inflammation, diarrhea and ulcers, were investigated for their composition. The aim of this study was to define a rapid and reliable analytical approach, based on the flow-injection analysis-electrospray ionization-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (FIA-ESI-IT-MS-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS), to investigate the full range of hydrolyzable tannins present in the extracts of these Astronium species. The MALDI-ToF-MS analysis allowed us to ascertain the presence of hydrolysable tannins in both Astronium species as a series of gallotannins with degrees of polymerization of 7 to 13 galloyl units. Moreover, the analysis by FIA-ESI-IT-MS-MS, as well as confirming this result and chemically defining gallotannins as galloylglucose compounds, highlighted the presence of further classes of hydrolysable tannins, such as hexahydrodiphenoyl esters of glucose and some gallic acid derivatives, providing information about their structure by a careful study of their fragmentation patterns. Finally, the evaluation of the number of positional isomers of gallotannins occurring in both Astronium species was obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-IT-MS). This is the first mass spectrometric evidence relating to the existence of gallotannins in Astronium genus. PMID:22006629

  15. Chemical-ionization visible and ultraviolet gas lasers: A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudenslager, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions or Penning ionization reactions are used to produce population inversions between electronic states of molecular ions which should result in stimulated emission in ultraviolet and visible regions. Such lasers could be used in study of short-lived reaction intermediates, crystal structure and scattering, and photolysis.

  16. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a reagent for complex mixture analysis by negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Juyal, Priyanka; McKenna, Amy M; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2013-08-20

    Ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) enables the direct characterization of complex mixtures without prior fractionation. High mass resolution can distinguish peaks separated by as little as 1.1 mDa), and high mass accuracy enables assignment of elemental compositions in mixtures that contain tens of thousands of individual components (crude oil). Negative electrospray ionization (ESI) is particularly useful for the speciation of the most acidic petroleum components that are implicated in oil production and processing problems. Here, we replace conventional ammonium hydroxide by tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH, a much stronger base, with higher solubility in toluene) to more uniformly deprotonate acidic components of complex mixtures by negative ESI FTICR MS. The detailed compositional analysis of four crude oils (light to heavy, from different geographical locations) reveals that TMAH reagent accesses 1.5-6 times as many elemental compositions, spanning a much wider range of chemical classes than does NH4OH. For example, TMAH reagent produces abundant negative electrosprayed ions from less acidic and neutral species that are in low abundance or absent with NH4OH reagent. More importantly, the increased compositional coverage of TMAH-modified solvent systems maintains, or even surpasses, the compositional information for the most acidic species. The method is not limited to petroleum-derived materials and could be applied to the analysis of dissolved organic matter, coal, lipids, and other naturally occurring compositionally complex organic mixtures. PMID:23919350

  17. Identification of the Related Substances in Ampicillin Capsule by Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (RRLC-ESI-MSn was used to separate and identify related substances in ampicillin capsule. The fragmentation behaviors of related substances were used to identify their chemical structures. Finally, a total of 13 related substances in ampicillin capsule were identified, including four identified components for the first time and three groups of isomers on the basis of the exact mass, fragmentation behaviors, retention time, and chemical structures in the literature. This study avoided time-consuming and complex chemosynthesis of related substances of ampicillin and the results could be useful for the quality control of ampicillin capsule to guarantee its safety in clinic. In the meantime, it provided a good example for the rapid identification of chemical structures of related substances of drugs.

  18. Identification of the related substances in ampicillin capsule by rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Xian Long; Liu, Yang; Liang, Miao; Dong, Honghuan; Lv, Beiran; Yang, Wenning; Luo, Zhiqiang; Tang, Mingmin

    2014-01-01

    Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (RRLC-ESI-MS(n)) was used to separate and identify related substances in ampicillin capsule. The fragmentation behaviors of related substances were used to identify their chemical structures. Finally, a total of 13 related substances in ampicillin capsule were identified, including four identified components for the first time and three groups of isomers on the basis of the exact mass, fragmentation behaviors, retention time, and chemical structures in the literature. This study avoided time-consuming and complex chemosynthesis of related substances of ampicillin and the results could be useful for the quality control of ampicillin capsule to guarantee its safety in clinic. In the meantime, it provided a good example for the rapid identification of chemical structures of related substances of drugs. PMID:25530907

  19. A corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source with selective NO(+) formation and its application for monoaromatic VOC detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Martin; Matejčík, Štefan

    2013-11-21

    We have developed a new type of corona discharge (CD) for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for application in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as well as in mass spectrometry (MS). While the other CD-APCI sources are able to generate H3O(+)·(H2O)n as the major reactant ions in N2 or in zero air, the present CD-APCI source has the ability to generate up to 84% NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions in zero air. The change of the working gas from zero air to N2 allows us to change the major reactant ions from NO(+)·(H2O)n to H3O(+)·(H2O)n. In this paper we present the description of the new CD-APCI and discuss the processes associated with the NO(+) formation. The selective formation of NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions offers chemical ionization based on these ions which can be of great advantage for some classes of chemicals. We demonstrate here a significant increase in the sensitivity of the IMS-MS instrument for monoaromatic volatile organic compound (VOC) detection upon NO(+)·(H2O)n chemical ionization. PMID:24081306

  20. Coupling corona discharge for ambient extractive ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Zhang, Xinglei; Li, Ming; Peng, Xuejiao; Han, Jing; Yang, Shuiping; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Huanwen

    2011-12-01

    Unlike the extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) technique described elsewhere, a corona discharge instead of electrospray ionization has been utilized to charge a neutral solvent spray under ambient conditions for the generation of highly charged microdroplets, which impact a neutral sample plume for the extractive ionization of the analytes in raw samples without any sample pretreatment. Using the positive ion mode, molecular radical cations were easily generated for the detection of non-polar compounds (e.g., benzene, cyclohexane, etc.), while protonated molecular ions of polar compounds (e.g., acetonitrile, acetic ether) were readily produced for the detection. By dispensing the matrix in a relatively large space, this method tolerates highly complex matrices. For a given sample such as lily fragrances, more compounds were detected by the method established here than the EESI technique. An acceptable relative standard deviation (RSD 8.9%, n = 11) was obtained for the direct measurement of explosives (10 ppb) in waste water samples. The experimental data demonstrate that this method could simultaneously detect both polar and non-polar analytes with high sensitivity, showing promising applications for the rapid detection of a wide variety of compounds present in complex matrices. PMID:21971289

  1. Toward a Fieldable Atomic Mass Spectrometer for Safeguards Applications: Sample Preparation and Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Jones, Sarah MH; Manard, Benjamin T.

    2014-10-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for the development of new methods to detect misuse at nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing and enrichment plants. At enrichment plants, for example, the IAEA’s contemporary safeguards approaches are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include collection of UF6 samples from in-process material and selected cylinders for subsequent analyses. These analyses include destructive analysis (DA) in a laboratory (typically by mass spectrometry [MS]) for isotopic characterization, and environmental sampling (ES) for subsequent laboratory elemental and isotopic analysis (also both typically by MS). One area of new method development includes moving this kind of isotope ratio analytical capability for DA and ES activities into the field. Some of the reasons for these developments include timeliness of results, avoidance of hazardous material shipments, and guidance for additional sample collecting. However, this capability does not already exist for several reasons, such as that most lab-based chemical and instrumental methods rely on laboratory infrastructure (highly trained staff, power, space, hazardous material handling, etc.) and require significant amounts of consumables (power, compressed gases, etc.). In addition, there are no currently available, fieldable instruments for atomic or isotope ratio analysis. To address these issues, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and collaborator, Clemson University, are studying key areas that limit the fieldability of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for atomic ions: sample preparation and ionization, and reducing the physical size of a fieldable mass spectrometer. PNNL is seeking simple and robust techniques that could be effectively used by inspectors who may have no expertise in analytical MS. In this report, we present and describe the preliminary findings for three candidate

  2. Screening of agrochemicals in foodstuffs using low-temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Joshua S; García-Reyes, Juan F; Harper, Jason D; Charipar, Nicholas A; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-05-01

    Low-temperature plasma (LTP) permits direct ambient ionization and mass analysis of samples in their native environment with minimal or no prior preparation. LTP utilizes dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) to create a low power plasma which is guided by gas flow onto the sample from which analytes are desorbed and ionized. In this study, the potential of LTP-MS for the detection of pesticide residues in food is demonstrated. Thirteen multi-class agricultural chemicals were studied (ametryn, amitraz, atrazine, buprofezin, DEET, diphenylamine, ethoxyquin, imazalil, isofenphos-methyl, isoproturon, malathion, parathion-ethyl and terbuthylazine). To evaluate the potential of the proposed approach, LTP-MS experiments were performed directly on fruit peels as well as on fruit/vegetable extracts. Most of the agrochemicals examined displayed remarkable sensitivity in the positive ion mode, giving limits of detection (LOD) for the direct measurement in the low picogram range. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to confirm identification of selected pesticides by using for these experiments spiked fruit/vegetable extracts (QuEChERS, a standard sample treatment protocol) at levels as low as 1 pg, absolute, for some of the analytes. Comparisons of the data obtained by direct LTP-MS were made with the slower but more accurate conventional LC-MS/MS procedure. Herbicides spiked in aqueous solutions were detectable at LODs as low as 0.5 microg L(-1) without the need for any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that ambient LTP-MS can be applied for the detection and confirmation of traces of agrochemicals in actual market-purchased produce and in natural water samples. Quantitative analysis was also performed in a few selected cases and displayed a relatively high degree of linearity over four orders of magnitude. PMID:20419245

  3. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of drugs in the thermal and hyperthermal energy range -- a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv; Fujü, Toshihiro

    1995-12-01

    Thermal and hyperthermal surface ionization (SI) mass spectra of nicotine, caffeine and lidocaine were obtained using a rhenium oxide surface. Thermal surface ionization was studied on an oxidized surface positioned inside an electron impact ion source, while hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) was obtained upon seeding the compounds into a hydrogen or helium supersonic molecular beam that scattered from the rhenium oxide surface. Both HSI and SI provide rich, informative and complementary mass spectral information. The results indicate that SI follows thermal dissociation processes on the surface prior to the desorption of the ion, while in HSI no thermal equilibrium is established and the ionization process is impulsive, followed by mostly unimolecular ion dissociation. HSI mass spectra are similar to electron impact mass spectra in the fragment ion masses, but the observed relative intensities are different. HSI is a softer ionization method compared to SI, and enables the degree of ion fragmentation to be tuned so that it can be minimized to a low level at low molecular kinetic energy. In SI, limited control over the degree of fragmentation is possible through the surface temperature. The analytical mass spectrometric applications of SI and HSI are briefly mentioned.

  4. Ambient mass spectrometry imaging: plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Baosheng; Zhang, Jialing; Chang, Cuilan; Li, Liping; Li, Min; Xiong, Xingchuang; Guo, Chengan; Tang, Fei; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-05-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been widely used in many research areas for the advantages of providing informative molecular distribution with high specificity. Among the recent progress, ambient MSI has attracted increasing interests owing to its characteristics of ambient, in situ, and nonpretreatment analysis. Here, we are presenting the ambient MSI for traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and authentication of work of art and documents using plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PALDI-MS). Compared with current ambient MSI methods, an excellent average resolution of 60 μm × 60 μm pixel size was achieved using this system. The feasibility of PALDI-based MSI was confirmed by seal imaging, and its authentication applications were demonstrated by imaging of printed Chinese characters. Imaging of the Radix Scutellariae slice showed that the two active components, baicalein and wogonin, mainly were distributed in the epidermis of the root, which proposed an approach for distinguishing TCMs' origins and the distribution of active components of TCMs and exploring the environmental effects of plant growth. PALDI-MS imaging provides a strong complement for the MSI strategy with the enhanced spatial resolution, which is promising in many research fields, such as artwork identification, TCMs' and botanic research, pharmaceutical applications, etc. PMID:24670045

  5. Analysis of solvent dyes in refined petroleum products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Solvent dyes are used to color refined petroleum products to enable differentiation between gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels. Analysis for these dyes in the hydrocarbon product is difficult due to their very low concentrations in such a complex matrix. Flow injection analysis/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry in both negative and positive mode was used to optimize ionization of ten typical solvent dyes. Samples of hydrocarbon product were analyzed under similar conditions. Positive electrospray ionization produced very complex spectra, which were not suitably specific for targeting only the dyes. Negative electrospray ionization produced simple spectra because aliphatic and aromatic moieties were not ionized. This enabled screening for a target dye in samples of hydrocarbon product from a spill.

  6. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.; Chen, D.; Suits, A.G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45{degrees}. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6}. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF{sub 6} for example, the process SF{sub 6} {r_arrow} SF{sub 6}{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} SF{sub 5}{sup +} + F + e{sup {minus}}. The SF{sub 5}{sup +} ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution.

  7. Direct imaging of plant metabolites in leaves and petals by Desorption Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Janfelt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Publication date: Available online 24 April 2013 Source:International Journal of Mass Spectrometry Author(s): Bin Li , Steen Honoré Hansen , Christian Janfelt Two different approaches to direct imaging of plant material with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry are presented...

  8. Investigation of formation and ageing of biogenic secondary aerosols by soft ionization aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lars; Reinnig, Marc-Christopher; Vogel, Alexander; Mentel, Thomas; Tillmann, Ralf; Schlosser, E.; Wahner, Andreas; Donahue, Neil; Saathoff, Harald; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    The knowledge of the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol is one essential key to understand the significance and fate of SOA in the atmosphere. However, the chemical evolution of SOA, from the very first condensing/nucleating molecules to the final oxidation products is still insufficiently understood and object of current research [1-3]. Consequently, the formation and photochemical ageing of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated in a series of reaction chamber experiments by applying on-line aerosol mass spectrometry (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI/MS)) as well as off-line high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In a set of experiments, performed in the large outdoor reaction chamber SAPHIR (Jülich, Germany), SOA was generated from a boreal mixture of biogenic VOCs. During a two-day experiment the generated biogenic SOA was exposed to OH-radicals and the temporal evolution of the chemical composition was characterized. The applied on-line MS method not only provides highly time resolved chemical information (such as an AMS) but also allows molecular identification/quantification of specific marker compounds. Several first and higher generation BSOA products were identified. Among the higher generation products, especially a tricarboxylic acid (3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid) [2] was observed as an eye-catching oxidative processing marker. A more detailed investigation of hydroxyl radical induced SOA aging at the AIDA chamber facility in Karlsruhe, again using terpenes as SOA precursors, clearly showed that the formation of the tricarboxylic acid takes place in the gas phase by the reaction of semivolatile first generation products and hydroxyl radicals. Actually, there were no indications for OH induced oxidation of compounds in the condensed phase. The consequences of these results will be discussed in the contribution. 1. Rudich, Y., N.M. Donahue, and T.F. Mentel

  9. Analysis of pesticides by gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry was utilized for analysis. → A standard mixture sample containing 49 pesticides and 4 real samples were measured. → Third-harmonic emission of a Ti:sapphire laser (100 fs) was employed as an ionization source. → Most of the pesticides were softly ionized by the femtosecond laser. → Three pesticides were found, although some of them were not detected by GC/EI/MS-MS. - Abstract: Gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI/TOFMS) was utilized for analysis of a standard mixture sample containing 49 pesticides and 4 real samples using the third-harmonic emission (267 nm) of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (100 fs) as the ionization source. A sample of a standard mixture of n-alkane was also measured for calibration of the retention time indices of the pesticides. Two photons are required for the excitation of n-alkane due to an absorption band located in the far ultraviolet region (140 nm). The n-alkane molecule in the excited state was subsequently ionized either directly or by absorbing another photon because of a high ionization potential. Due to a large excess of energy, the molecular ion was decomposed and formed many fragment ions. Compared to n-alkanes, most of the pesticides were softly ionized by the femtosecond laser; one photon was used for excitation and another was used for the subsequent ionization. The pesticides with no conjugated double bond had a lower ionization efficiency. The present analytical instrument was applied to several samples prepared from a variety of vegetables and a single fruit after pretreatment with solid-phase extraction. Three pesticides were found in these samples, although some of them were not detected by conventional GC/EI/MS-MS due to insufficient sensitivity and selectivity.

  10. Comparison of Three Plasma Sources for Ambient Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Kirsty; Salter, Tara L.; Bowfield, Andrew; Walsh, James L.; Gilmore, Ian S.; Bradley, James W.

    2014-09-01

    Plasma-based desorption/ionization sources are an important ionization technique for ambient surface analysis mass spectrometry. In this paper, we compare and contrast three competing plasma based desorption/ionization sources: a radio-frequency (rf) plasma needle, a dielectric barrier plasma jet, and a low-temperature plasma probe. The ambient composition of the three sources and their effectiveness at analyzing a range of pharmaceuticals and polymers were assessed. Results show that the background mass spectrum of each source was dominated by air species, with the rf needle producing a richer ion spectrum consisting mainly of ionized water clusters. It was also seen that each source produced different ion fragments of the analytes under investigation: this is thought to be due to different substrate heating, different ion transport mechanisms, and different electric field orientations. The rf needle was found to fragment the analytes least and as a result it was able to detect larger polymer ions than the other sources.

  11. Effect of pH and dissociation on the fate and exposure of ionizable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Ionizable organic chemicals comprise an important fraction of pharmaceuticals, pesticides as well as industrial chemicals. It has been estimated that 33% of the preregistered REACH substances is mostly ionized at pH 7. To extend the appliccability of existing exposure models, a Multimedia Activity...... Model for Ionics (MAMI) was recently developed and tested. In the present study, the impact of the parameters describing ionization was assessed by performing the sensitivity and the uncertainty analysis on MAMI for the acids 2,4-D, pentachlorophenol, bisphenol-A, perfluorooctanoic acid and the bases...... parameters. The sensitivity analysis showed that the parameters describing ionization, pH and the dissociation constant (pKa), are among the most sensitive model parameters. The uncertainty analysis, however, indicated that these parameters are not the major source of uncertainty, which statistically...

  12. Application of gas chromatography–(triple quadrupole) massspectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for thedetermination of multiclass pesticides in fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherta, L.; Portoles, T.; Beltran, J.; Pitarch, E.; Mol, J.G.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-residue method for the determination of 142 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables has been developed using a new atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for coupling gas chromatography (GC) to tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode has bee

  13. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  14. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy to ultralow-level counting and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it is shown that the ability to directly detect a daughter atom, using resonance ionization spectroscopy, in delayed time coincidence with the decay of a parent species promises to drastically reduce the background in low-level counting experiments. In addition, resonance ionization can also be used as an ion source for a mass spectrometer system that is capable of discriminating between isobars

  15. Drug Detection and Quantification Directly from Tissue using Novel Ionization Methods for Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Beixi; Dearring, Chenelle L.; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Solvent assisted ionization inlet (SAII) and matrix assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) were used to rapidly quantify an antipsychotic drug, clozapine, directly from surfaces with minimal sample preparation. This simple surface analysis method based on SAII- and MAIV-mass spectrometry (MS) was developed to allow detection of endogenous lipids, metabolites, and clozapine directly from mouse brain tissue sections. Rapid surface assessment was achieved by SAII with the assistance of heat on the ma...

  16. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS) using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrumen...

  17. Characterizing Bacterial Volatiles using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SESI-MS)

    OpenAIRE

    Bean, Heather D.; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Hill, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) is a method developed for the rapid detection of volatile compounds, without the need for sample pretreatment. The method was first described by Fenn and colleagues1 and has been applied to the detection of illicit drugs2 and explosives3-4, the characterization of skin volatiles5, and the analysis of breath6-7. SESI ionization occurs by proton transfer reactions between the electrospray solution and the volatile analyte, and is the...

  18. Development of high resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry for trace analysis of 93mNb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    93Nb(n, n′)93mNb reaction allows retrospective estimation of integrated fast neutron dose in nuclear reactor. We proposed isomer-selective trace analysis of 93mNb by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) combined with a gas-jet atomic source and an injection locked Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at several kHz. Resonant ionization spectroscopy of Nb in gas-jet using Ti:Sapphire laser was demonstrated.

  19. Field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) applied to tracer studies and isotope dilution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonfragmenting nature of field ionization mass spectrometry makes it a preferred technique for the isotopic analysis of multilabeled organic compounds. The possibility of field ionization of nonvolatile thermolabile materials significantly extends the potential uses of this technique beyond those of conventional ionization methods. Multilabeled tracers may be studied in biological systems with a sensitivity comparable to that of radioactive tracers. Isotope dilution analysis may be performed reliably by this technique down to picogram levels. These techniques will be illustrated by a number of current studies using multilabeled metabolites and drugs. The scope and limitations of the methodology are discussed

  20. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  1. Metabolic profiling directly from the Petri dish using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Jeramie; Roach, Patrick; Heath, Brandi; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-11-01

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin. PMID:24047514

  2. Comprehensive assignment of mass spectral signatures from individual Bacillus atrophaeus spores in matrix-free laser desorption/ionization bioaerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abneesh; Pitesky, Maurice E; Steele, Paul T; Tobias, Herbert J; Fergenson, David P; Horn, Joanne M; Russell, Scott C; Czerwieniec, Gregg A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Gard, Eric E; Frank, Matthias

    2005-05-15

    We have fully characterized the mass spectral signatures of individual Bacillus atrophaeus spores obtained using matrix-free laser desorption/ionization bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS). Mass spectra of spores grown in unlabeled, 13C-labeled, and 15N-labeled growth media were used to determine the number of carbon and nitrogen atoms associated with each mass peak observed in mass spectra from positive and negative ions. To determine the parent ion structure associated with fragment ion peaks, the fragmentation patterns of several chemical standards were independently determined. Our results confirm prior assignments of dipicolinic acid, amino acids, and calcium complex ions made in the spore mass spectra. The identities of several previously unidentified mass peaks, key to the recognition of Bacillus spores by BAMS, have also been revealed. Specifically, a set of fragment peaks in the negative polarity is shown to be consistent with the fragmentation pattern of purine nucleobase-containing compounds. The identity of m/z = +74, a marker peak that helps discriminate B. atrophaeus from Bacillus thuringiensis spores grown in rich media is [N1C4H12]+. A probable precursor molecule for the [N1C4H12]+ ion observed in spore spectra is trimethylglycine (+N(CH3)3CH2COOH), which produces a m/z = +74 peak when ionized in the presence of dipicolinic acid. A clear assignment of all the mass peaks in the spectra from bacterial spores, as presented in this work, establishes their relationship to the spore chemical composition and facilitates the evaluation of the robustness of "marker" peaks. This is especially relevant for peaks that have been used to discriminate Bacillus spore species, B. thuringiensis and B. atrophaeus, in our previous studies. PMID:15889924

  3. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives using alternating current corona discharge ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, D T; Chen, L C; Yu, Z; Yamabe, S; Sakaki, S; Hiraoka, K

    2015-04-01

    The high-sensitive detection of explosives is of great importance for social security and safety. In this work, the ion source for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry using alternating current corona discharge was newly designed for the analysis of explosives. An electromolded fine capillary with 115 µm inner diameter and 12 mm long was used for the inlet of the mass spectrometer. The flow rate of air through this capillary was 41 ml/min. Stable corona discharge could be maintained with the position of the discharge needle tip as close as 1 mm to the inlet capillary without causing the arc discharge. Explosives dissolved in 0.5 µl methanol were injected to the ion source. The limits of detection for five explosives with 50 pg or lower were achieved. In the ion/molecule reactions of trinitrotoluene (TNT), the discharge products of NOx (-) (x = 2,3), O3 and HNO3 originating from plasma-excited air were suggested to contribute to the formation of [TNT - H](-) (m/z 226), [TNT - NO](-) (m/z 197) and [TNT - NO + HNO3 ](-) (m/z 260), respectively. Formation processes of these ions were traced by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26149109

  4. Electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, G.J.; Glish, G.L.; McLuckey, S.A. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Ions from a variety of molecules, formed via electrospray, have been injected into and analyzed with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Examples are shown in which one or more stages of mass spectrometry (e.g., mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) have been performed on both multiply charged anions and cations. Compounds for which data are described include the disodium salt of 2-hydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid, Direct Red 81, bradykinin, melittin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and bovine albumin. For some compounds, notable the sulfonates, evidence is presented for the injection of highly solvated ions that desolvate within the ion trap. The cations derived from the peptides, on the other hand, appear to be essentially desolvated prior to injection into the ion trap.

  5. Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct ambient analysis of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiea, Jentaie; Huang, Min-Zon; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Chi-Yang; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Beech, Iwona; Sunner, Jan

    2005-01-01

    A new method of electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry, which combines laser desorption with post-ionization by electrospray, was applied to rapid analysis of solid materials under ambient conditions. Analytes were desorbed from solid metallic and insulating substrata using a pulsed nitrogen laser. Post-ionization produced high-quality mass spectra characteristic of electrospray, including protein multiple charging. For the first time, mass spectra of intact proteins were obtained using laser desorption without adding a matrix. Bovine cytochrome c and an illicit drug containing methaqualone were chosen in this study to demonstrate the applicability of ELDI to the analysis of proteins and synthetic organic compounds. PMID:16299699

  6. Optimization of an indigenous thermal ionization mass spectrometer for field application in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprocessing of spent fuels is an important step in the entire nuclear fuel cycle for a sustained nuclear energy programme in our country. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has been recognized as the most reliable and suitable method for Input Accountability of plutonium and uranium in reprocessing plant. To meet this requirement, a thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS-3) has been developed indigenously by TPPED, BARC, Mumbai, India and is installed at Accountability laboratory of KARP, Kalpakkam. Instrument has been designed based on user specifications which is in line with current generation commercial thermal ionization mass spectrometer. The objective of this present work is to evaluate performance characteristics of the instrument and optimize its capabilities to make it suitable for regular application in the reprocessing plant. Some of the performances of this instrument and the quality of analytical out-put has been already discussed. Present paper discusses the further works carried out in standardizing the instrument with various calibrations and arbitration

  7. Chemical changes in food packaging resulting from ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent approvals of food irradiation processes by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have led to a search for packaging approved for use with ionizing radiation. Though 13 packaging materials were approved several years ago as food contactants for gamma irradiation up to 10 kGy at refrigeration temperatures and 4 packaging materials were approved for up to 60 kGy at cryogenic temperatures, no currently used packaging is approved for irradiated foods. Extensive research was conducted by the U.S. Army and others on the suitability of both flexible packaging and metal cans for packaging irradiated foods. The results of the studies of packaging for irradiated foods will be described and discussed in context of currently used packaging materials for non-irradiated meats and poultry

  8. Analysis of triazines and associated metabolites with electrospray ionization field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mie, Axel; Sandulescu, Madaline; Mathiasson, Lennart;

    2008-01-01

    Triazines comprise an important pollutant class owing to continued use in certain countries, and owing to strong environmental persistence that leads to problems even in countries like Sweden where the use of triazines has been prohibited for some years. We investigated mass-selective detection...... for ion sorting and discrimination against the considerable "chemical noise", nonspecific cluster and fragment ions, which are typically generated in electrospray ionization. This paper presents results of a pilot study of triazines and some metabolites in ideal solvents. Our long-range goal is automated...

  9. Sample preparation and direct electrospray ionization on a tip column for rapid mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Qing; You, Jin-Qing; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2012-10-01

    A handheld pipette tip column electrospray ionization source (PTC-ESI source) was developed for rapid mass spectrometry analysis at ambient pressure. The PTC-ESI source was made up of three main component parts including a micro DC high voltage (HV) power supply, a micropipette and a disposable micropipette tip filled with a plug of adsorbent. A DC high voltage was applied to the sharp point of the micropipette tip column to induce electrospray ionization. The PTC-ESI source was successfully used for direct analysis of basic organic compounds, organic acids and peptides in a simple matrix. In the case of complex samples, micro-extraction based on the adsorbent phase filled in the pipette tip was used to remove impurities and concentrate target analytes prior to ionization. The eluting solution was not pipetted out, but directly dispersed in the form of electrospray from the pipette tip for ionization. The effectiveness of the PTC-ESI source has been further demonstrated by fast analysis of therapeutic compounds and endogenous bioactive chemicals in complex biological samples. PMID:22898704

  10. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry on nanostructured semiconductor substrates: DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the era of systems biology, new analytical platforms are under demand. Desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) is a promising high throughput laser mass spectrometry approach that has attracted a lot of attention, and has been commercialized. Another substrate material manufactured by physical method has also been made commercially available under the trade name of QuickMass(TM). These two commercial substrates, DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM), were investigated independently from the manufacturers and were characterized by a number of advanced surface techniques. This work determined (1) the correlation between the substrate physicochemical properties and their LDI activity, (2) the feasibility of metabolic profiling from complex biological matrices and (3) the laser desorption/ionization mechanism. The DIOS(TM) substrate was characterized with a thick nano-sized porous layer, a high surface concentration of fluorocarbon and silicon oxides and super-hydrophobicity. In contrast, the QuickMass(TM) substrate consisted of a non-porous germanium thin-film. The relatively high ionization efficiency obtained from the DIOS(TM) substrate was contributed to the fluorosilane manufacturing processes and its porous morphology. Despite the QuickMass(TM) substrate being less effective, it was noted that the use of germanium affords a self-cleaning mechanism and suppresses background interference of mass spectra. The suitability of DIOS(TM) substrates for metabolic profiling of complex biological matrices was demonstrated. DIOS mass spectra of human blood plasma, human urine and animal liver tissue extracts were produced. Suitable extraction methods were found to be important, but relatively simplified approaches were sufficient. Further investigations of the DIOS desorption/ionization mechanism were carried out. The previously proposed sub-surface state reaction could be a molten-solid interfacial state reaction of the substrate and this had a significant

  11. Multi photon ionization mass spectrometry of carbamate pesticides, herbicides and fungicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesticides and herbicides are useful for a wide range of applications today. The determination of these substances either in the pure form or in complex matrices is of high analytical interest. Especially since these substances can by found in every day products. The combination of multi photon ionization (MUPI) and time of flight laser mass spectrometry may be a powerful tool for achieving fast well interpretable mass spectra for analytical purposes. In this paper we will discuss the mass spectra of several pesticides and herbicides accessed by MUPI-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The influence of the laser pulse duration on the mass spectra are discussed

  12. Surface-ionization mass-spectrometry of psychotropic preparations:tricyclic antidepressants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper the results of the surface-ionization mass-spectrometry(SI/MS) of psychotropic preparations - tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptiline and imizine - on thermoemitters from oxidized W and Re band have been presented. The mass spectra of surface ionization, the temperature dependencies of ion currents have been obtained, the characteristics heterogeneous reactions of adsorbed molecules and the channels of monomolecular decays of oscillatory-excited polyatomic ions while their moving in the mass spectrometer have been revealed. It has been shown that the high efficiency of ion formation, the few lines in and the special character of the SI mass spectra make it possible to analyze trace amounts of amitriptiline and imizine in complex biosolutions with no preliminary chromatographic separation with the limit detection of 10-12g. The sensitivity of SI/MS is essentially higher than that of chromato-mass-spectrometer HP-6890. (author)

  13. Direct protein detection from biological media through electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Jen-Yih; Jeng, Jingyueh; Shiea, Jentaie

    2006-05-01

    We report here using a novel technology-electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization (ELDI)/mass spectrometry-for the rapid and sensitive detection of the major proteins that exist in dried biological fluids (e.g., blood, tears, saliva, serum), bacterial cultures, and tissues (e.g., porcine liver and heart) under ambient conditions. This technique required essentially no sample pretreatment. The proteins in the samples were desorbed using a pulsed nitrogen laser without the assistance of an organic matrix. The desorbed protein molecules were then post-ionized through their fusion into the charged solvent droplets produced from the electrospray of an acidic methanol solution; electrospray ionization (ESI) proceeded from the newly formed droplets to generate the ESI-like protein ions. This new ionization approach combines some of the features of electrospray ionization with those of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), that is, sampling of a solid surface with spatial resolution, generating ESI-like mass spectra of the desorbed proteins, and operating under ambient conditions. PMID:16674100

  14. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrument. The results suggested that REMPI is superior to electron impact ionization method for soft ionization and suppresses the background signal due to aliphatic hydrocarbons. Thus, GC/REMPI-TOFMS is a more reliable method for the determination of PAHs present in the environment.

  15. Experimental Concept for a Precision Measurement of Nuclear Recoil Ionization Yields for Low Mass WIMP Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the response of dark matter detectors at the lowest recoil energies is important for correctly interpreting data from current experiments or predicting the sensitivity of future experiments to low mass weakly interacting massive particles. In particular, the ionization yield is essential for determining the correct recoil energy of candidate nuclear recoil events; however, few measurements in cryogenic crystals exist below 1 keV. Using the voltage-assisted calorimetric ionization detection technique with a mono-energetic neutron source, we show that it is possible to determine the ionization yield in cryogenic crystals down to an energy to 100 eV. This measurement will also determine the statistics of ionization production at these low energies.

  16. Deblurring molecular images using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, R. Mitchell; Galhena, Asiri S.; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional imaging techniques for studying the spatial distribution of biological molecules such as proteins, metabolites, and lipids, require the a priori selection of a handful of target molecules. Imaging mass spectrometry provides a means to analyze thousands of molecules at a time within a tissue sample, adding spatial detail to proteomic, metabolomic, and lipidomic studies. Compared to traditional microscopic images, mass spectrometric images have reduced spatial resolution and require a destructive acquisition process. In order to increase spatial detail, we propose a constrained acquisition path and signal degradation model enabling the use of a general image deblurring algorithm. Our analysis shows the potential of this approach and supports prior observations that the effect of the sprayer focuses on a central region much smaller than the extent of the spray. PMID:19963935

  17. Soft Supercharging of Biomolecular Ions in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingin, Konstantin; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen

    2014-06-01

    The charge states of biomolecular ions in ESI-MS can be significantly increased by the addition of low-vapor supercharging (SC) reagents into the spraying solution. Despite the considerable interest from the community, the mechanistic aspects of SC are not well understood and are hotly debated. Arguments that denaturation accounts for the increased charging observed in proteins sprayed from aqueous solutions containing SC reagent have been published widely, but often with incomplete or ambiguous supporting data. In this work, we explored ESI MS charging and SC behavior of several biopolymers including proteins and DNA oligonucleotides. Analytes were ionized from 100 mM ammonium acetate (NH4Ac) aqueous buffer in both positive (ESI+) and negative (ESI-) ion modes. SC was induced either with m-NBA or by the elevated temperature of ESI capillary. For all the analytes studied we, found striking differences in the ESI MS response to these two modes of activation. The data suggest that activation with m-NBA results in more extensive analyte charging with lower degree of denaturation. When working solution with m-NBA was analyzed at elevated temperatures, the SC effect from m-NBA was neutralized. Instead, the net SC effect was similar to the SC effect achieved by thermal activation only. Overall, our observations indicate that SC reagents enhance ESI charging of biomolecules via distinctly different mechanism compared with the traditional approaches based on analyte denaturation. Instead, the data support the hypothesis that the SC phenomenon involves a direct interaction between a biopolymer and SC reagent occurring in evaporating ESI droplets.

  18. Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Mass Spectrometry (REMPI-MS): Applications for Process Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Process analysis is an emerging discipline in analytical sciences that poses special requirements on analytical techniques, especially when conducted in an online manner. Mass spectrometric methods seem exceedingly suitable for this task, particularly if a soft ionization method is applied. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) provides a selective and sensitive means for monitoring (poly)aromatic compounds in process flows. The properties of REMPI and various variations of the ionization process are presented. The potential of REMPI for process analysis is highlighted with several examples, and drawbacks of the method are also noted. Applications of REMPI-TOFMS for the detection and monitoring of aromatic species in a large variety of combustion processes comprising flames, vehicle exhaust, and incinerators are discussed. New trends in technical development and combination with other analytical methods are brought forward.

  19. Can clouds enhance long-range transport of low volatile, ionizable and surface-active chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    potential of non-volatile substances. The liquid water content of clouds and the high specific surface of frozen or liquid cloud droplets can significantly contribute to the total activity capacity (i.e. the capacity to sorb chemicals) of the atmosphere for non-volatile, ionizable and surface active...... volatile or ionizable chemicals to investigate the potential of clouds to enhance the atmospheric transport potential. Probability density functions were derived for input substance properties and environmental parameters to quantify uncertainty and variability and probabilistic simulations at steady state...... were run for a constant emission to the atmospheric boundary layer to identify key model inputs. The degradation rate, the duration of dry and wet periods and the parameters describing air-water bulk partitioning (KAW and T) and ionization (pKa and pH) determine the residence time in the ABL. In the...

  20. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  1. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  2. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Erik T; Dulay, Maria T; Zare, Richard N

    2016-06-21

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected. PMID:27249533

  3. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected. PMID:27249533

  4. Role of thermal ionization mass spectrometer in nuclear fuel fabrication process at NFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is an inevitable option for meeting the ever-increasing demand of electricity without degrading the environment. Water-cooled reactors are currently in operation in our country where uranium dioxide fuel in the form of pellet encapsulated in zircaloy clad fuel pins are used. Nuclear fuel production is an established industry in our country and the fuel required is produced at NFC, Hyderabad for both Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) and Boiled Water Reactor (BWR). The raw material in the form of Magnesium diuranate (MDU) also known as yellow cake is received from UCIL Jaduguda and is processed through ADU route to produce ceramic grade UO2 powder, which is subsequently pelletised. The pellets are loaded in Zircaloy tubes and resistance welded with end caps to fuel element for subsequent supply in the form of fuel bundles to the reactors. The quality of the fuel supplied has to be ensured with respective to chemical composition and various other parameters like isotopic assay, mechanical strength and leak test for helium, etc. Thus determination of isotopic assay is an important part of the quality assurance programme. The isotopic assay is being carried out using Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) at Control Laboratory

  5. Comparison of extraction techniques and mass spectrometric ionization modes in the analysis of wine volatile carbonyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Julian; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura; Cacho, Juan [Laboratory for Flavor Analysis and Enology, Institute of Engineering of Aragon, I3A, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Ferreira, Vicente, E-mail: vferre@unizar.es [Laboratory for Flavor Analysis and Enology, Institute of Engineering of Aragon, I3A, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    This work presents a comparative study of the analytical characteristics of two methods for the analysis of carbonyl compounds in wine, both based on the derivatization with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA). In the first method derivatives are formed in the solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge in which the analytes have been previously isolated, while in the second method derivatives are formed in a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibre saturated with vapors of the reagent and exposed to the sample headspace. In both cases detection has been carried out by electron impact (EI) or negative chemical ionization (NCI) mass spectrometry. The possibility of determining haloanisols simultaneously has been also considered. The method based on SPE presents, in general, better analytical properties than the SPME one. Although linearity was satisfactory for both methods (R{sup 2} > 0.99), repeatability of the SPE method (RSD < 10%) was better than that obtained with SPME (9% < RSD < 20%). Detection limits obtained with EI are better for the SPE method except for trihaloanisols, while with NCI detection limits for both strategies are comparable, although the SPME strategy presents worse results for ketones and methional. Detection limits are always lower with NCI, being the improvement most notable for SPME. Recovery experiments show that in the case of SPE, uncertainties are lower than 12% in all cases, while with the SPME method the imprecision plus the existence of matrix effects make the global uncertainty to be higher than 15%.

  6. Ultrasensitive detection of actinides and technetium by laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry for the detection of extremely small numbers of atoms has been explored in the very recent years. High sensitivity and unambiguity in element and isotope identification can be achieved by three-step photoionization of the elements in the atomic state followed by time-of-flight mass analysis. The laser system for photoionization consists of three dye lasers which are pumped simultaneously by a copper vapor laser. For mass determination a time-of-flight spectrometer with a mass resolution better than 1500 is used. By ionization via autoionizing states and by saturation in each excitation step a detection limit of about 107 atoms of actinides or of technetium in the sample has been obtained

  7. Miniaturizing sample spots for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Tingting; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The trend of miniaturization in bioanalytical chemistry is shifting from technical development to practical application. In matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), progress in miniaturizing sample spots has been driven by the needs to increase sensitivity and speed, to interface with other analytical microtechnologies, and to develop miniaturized instrumentation.

  8. A Combined Laser Ablation-Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Surface Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, G.; Taylor, M. E.; Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.; Crown, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the development of an instrument for direct geochronologic measurements on rocks in situ will be described. The instrument integrates laser ablation sampling, resonance ionization, and mass spectrometry to directly measure concentrations of the Rb-Sr isotope system. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Identification of Bacteria Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedney, Mollie G.; Strunk, Kevin B.; Giaquinto, Lisa M.; Wagner, Jennifer A.; Pollack, Sidney; Patton, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or simply MALDI) has become ubiquitous in the identification and analysis of biomacromolecules. As a technique that allows for the molecular weight determination of otherwise nonvolatile molecules, MALDI has had a profound impact in the molecular…

  10. Identification of tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella oil by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetraacylglycerol (an acylglycerol estolide) contains an acyl chain attached to the hydroxyl group of another acyl chain attached to the glycerol backbone. Lequerolic acid (Ls, OH1420:111) is the main fatty acid in lequerella oil and can be used in industry. We have used electrospray ionization mass...

  11. Complexation between the fungicide tebuconazole and copper(II) probed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Jakl, M.; Schröder, Detlef; Čadková, E.; Komárek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 8 (2011), s. 1037-1042. ISSN 0951-4198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : copper * electrospray ionization * mass spectrometry * tebuconazole * soil solutions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.790, year: 2011

  12. Concise Synthesis of Photocleavable Molecular Tag for Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry via Fries Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gathirwa, Jeremiah W.; Maki, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    A new synthetic route for the photocleavable molecular tag for laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) was achieved using Fries reaction of 2,6-dimethylphenyl ester as its key reaction. Zirconium chloride was found as uniquely efficient adjuvant to promote the reaction. The molecular tag was obtained in 5 steps without chromatographic purification.

  13. Visualizing metabolite distribution and enzymatic conversion in plant tissues by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Baden, Camilla Knudsen; Hansen, Natascha Kristine Krahl;

    2013-01-01

    demonstrate that Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI) of tissue imprints on porous Teflon can be used to accurately image the distribution of even labile plant metabolites such as hydroxynitrile glucosides, which normally undergo enzymatic hydrolysis by specific ß...

  14. Rapid high mass resolution mass spectrometry using matrix-assisted ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Thawoos, Shameemah; Foley, Casey D; Woodall, Daniel W; Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Stemmer, Paul M

    2016-07-15

    Matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) is demonstrated to be a robust and sensitive analytical method capable of analyzing proteins such as cholera toxin B-subunit and pertussis toxin mutant from conditions containing relatively high amounts of inorganic salts, buffers, and preservatives without the need for prior sample clean-up or concentration. By circumventing some of the sample preparation steps, MAI simplifies and accelerates the analytical workflow for biological samples in complex media. The benefits of multiply charged ions characteristic of electrospray ionization (ESI) and the robustness of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) can be obtained from a single method, making it well suited for analysis of proteins and other biomolecules at ultra-high resolution as demonstrated on an Orbitrap Fusion where protein subunits were resolved for which MALDI-time-of-flight failed. MAI results are compared with those obtained with ESI, MALDI, and laserspray ionization methods and fundamental commonalities discussed. PMID:26835606

  15. Ion-molecule reactions of oxygenated chemical ionization reagents with vincamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, G F; Hall, B J; Tran, N V; Brodbelt, J S

    1996-03-01

    The ion-molecule reactions of ions from acetone, dimethyl ether, 2-methoxyethanol, and vinyl methyl ether with vincamine were investigated. Reactions with dimethyl ether result in [M+13](+) and [M+45](+) products, reactions with 2-methoxyethanol produce [M+13](+) and [M+89](+) ions, and reactions with acetone or vinyl methyl ether ions generate predominantly [M+43](+) ions. Collision-activated dissociation and deuterium labeling experiments allowed speculation about the product structures and mechanisms of dissociation. The methylene substitution process was shown to occur at the hydroxyl oxygen and the phenyl ring of vincamine for dimethyl ether reactions, but the methylene substitution process was not favored at the hydroxyl oxygen for the 2-methoxyethanol reactions, instead favored at the 12 phenyl position. The reaction site is likely different for the 2-methoxyethanol ion due to its capability for secondary hydrogen-bonding interactions. For the [M+45](+) and [M+89](+) ions, evidence suggests that charge-remote fragmentation processes occur from these products. In general, the use of dimethyl ether ions or 2-methoxyethanol ions for ionmolecule reactions prove highly diagnostic for the characterization of vincamine; both molecular weight and structural information are obtained. Limits of detection for vincamine with dimethyl ether chemical ionization via this technique on a benchtop ion trap gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer are in the upper parts per trillion range. PMID:24203296

  16. Development of a mass spectrometry sampling probe for chemical analysis in surgical and endoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Lin, Ziqing; Garimella, Sandilya; Zheng, Lingxing; Shi, Riyi; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-12-17

    A sampling probe based on ambient desorption ionization was designed for in vivo chemical analysis by mass spectrometry in surgical and endoscopic procedures. Sampling ionization of analytes directly from tissue was achieved by sealing the sampling tip against the tissue surface without allowing leakage of the auxiliary gas used for desorption ionization. The desorbed charged species were transferred over a long distance (up to 4 m) through a flexible tube of internal diameter as small as 1/16 in. to the inlet of the mass spectrometer used for analysis. The conditions used for desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) were optimized to achieve biocompatibility for clinical applications while obtaining adequate efficiency for the analysis. This optimization involved the removal of high voltage and use of pure water as a spray solvent instead of the organic solvents or aqueous mixtures normally used. Improved sensitivity was achieved under these conditions by increasing the gas flow rate in the transfer tube. The destructive effect on tissue surfaces associated with typical desorption ionization was avoided by altering the local gas dynamics in the sample area without compromising the overall analysis efficiency. PMID:24251679

  17. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) with Pulsed and CW-Lasers on Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, P.; Huber, G.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2005-04-01

    The detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in ultra-trace amounts by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a well-established routine method. Detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms and precise measurements of the isotopic composition have been achieved. In this work multi-step resonance ionization of plutonium atoms has been performed with tunable lasers having very different output intensities and spectral properties. In order to compare different ways for the resonance ionization of plutonium broadband pulsed dye and titanium:sapphire lasers as well as narrow-band cw-diode and titanium:sapphire lasers have been applied for a number of efficient excitation schemes. It has been shown, that for identical excitation schemes the optical isotope selectivity can be improved by using cw-lasers (bandwidths lasers (bandwidths > 2 GHz). Pulsed and cw-laser systems have been used simultaneously for resonance ionization enabling direct comparisons of pulsed and continuous ionization processes. So far, a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme has been proven to be most practical in terms of efficiency, selectivity and laser wavelengths. Alternatively a newly discovered three-step, two-color excitation scheme which includes a strong two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state yields similar ionization efficiencies. This two-photon transition was characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width.

  18. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) with Pulsed and CW-Lasers on Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in ultra-trace amounts by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a well-established routine method. Detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms and precise measurements of the isotopic composition have been achieved. In this work multi-step resonance ionization of plutonium atoms has been performed with tunable lasers having very different output intensities and spectral properties. In order to compare different ways for the resonance ionization of plutonium broadband pulsed dye and titanium:sapphire lasers as well as narrow-band cw-diode and titanium:sapphire lasers have been applied for a number of efficient excitation schemes. It has been shown, that for identical excitation schemes the optical isotope selectivity can be improved by using cw-lasers (bandwidths 2 GHz). Pulsed and cw-laser systems have been used simultaneously for resonance ionization enabling direct comparisons of pulsed and continuous ionization processes. So far, a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme has been proven to be most practical in terms of efficiency, selectivity and laser wavelengths. Alternatively a newly discovered three-step, two-color excitation scheme which includes a strong two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state yields similar ionization efficiencies. This two-photon transition was characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width.

  19. A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for polystyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Zhang; Zhen Wen Zhao; Lei Xiong; Bin Xin; Wei Hua Hu; Shao Xiang Xiong

    2007-01-01

    A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for polystyrene was reported.Compared to the conventional dried-droplet method, the efficiency of ionization and signal intensity of mass spectra were improved.The mechanism was also analyzed.

  20. Cell Recovery after Combined Action of Ionizing Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Roh, Chang Hyun; Ryu, Tae Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Komarova, Ludmila N.; Petin, Vladislav G. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Damage repair in malignant cells would be problematic in sterilization of microorganisms and treatment of cancer, as well. The inhibition of cell recovery and DNA single and double strand breaks repair by chemicals is expressed both as a deceleration of recovery rate and a lesser extent of recovery. Three possibilities are involved in the inhibition of cell recovery: (1) impairment of the recovery process itself, (2) increased irreversible damage, and (3) simultaneous exert of the two. There have been fee publications regarding these problems. The aim of this study was to determine which of these points are involved in the inhibition of cell recovery. In this study, a quantitative approach describing cell recovery from potentially lethal damage as a decrease in the effective dose was used

  1. Mass spectrometry in nuclear technology - a review of application of thermal ionization mass spectrometry in fuel reprocessing plants. PD-7-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass spectrometry finds the widespread application in nuclear science and technology due to the fact that it can be employed for isotope composition measurements of different elements of interest and also concentration measurements of these elements using isotope dilution techniques. Thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS), Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GC-MS) are the different types of mass spectrometers used in nuclear industry for the analyses of isotope composition of special nuclear material, trace impurities in nuclear fuels and components and characterization of various solvents respectively. Among them, TIMS plays a vital role in the nuclear fuel cycle in determining precisely the isotope composition of uranium, plutonium, D/H ratio in heavy water etc. TIMS is an indispensable analytical tool for nuclear material accounting at the input stage of a reprocessing plant by carrying out precise and accurate concentration measurement of plutonium and uranium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). It is the only accepted measurement technique for the purpose because of its high precision, better sensitivity and no quantitative separation is needed. The isotope abundance measurements of uranium and plutonium at this point are also useful for burn-up studies and isotope correlations. Mass spectrometric analysis of uranium and plutonium is also required for nuclear data measurements and calibrating other chemical methods

  2. Metabolism of halogenated compounds in the white rot fungus Bjerkandera adusta studied by membrane inlet mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Lauritsen, F.R.; Patrick, J.S.;

    1996-01-01

    Membrane inlet mass spectrometry has been used for the characterization of halogenated organic compounds produced by the fungus Bjerkandera adusta. Using this technique, electron impact-, chemical ionization-, electron capture negative chemical ionization-mass spectra and tandem mass spectra were...

  3. [Identification of high-lying odd energy levels of uranium by resonant ionization mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H; Shi, G; Huang, M; Jin, C

    2000-06-01

    Single-colour and two-colour multiphoton resonant ionization spectra of uranium atom were studied extensively with a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser atomic beam apparatus time-of-flight mass spectrometer in our laboratory. The energy locations of high-lying odd-parity levels in the region 33,003-34,264 cm-1, measured by a two-colour three-step ionization technique, were reported here. The angular momentum quantum number J was uniquely assigned for these levels by using angular momentum selection rules. PMID:12958925

  4. Mass spectrometric characterization of a pyrolytic radical source using femtosecond ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H.M.; Beaud, P.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P.; Tzannis, A.P.; Gerber, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Radicals play, as reactive species, an important role in the chemistry of combustion. In contrast to atmospheric flames where spectra are congested due to high vibrational and rotational excitation, experiments in the cold environment of a molecular beam (MB) yield clean spectra that can be easily attributed to one species by Resonantly Enhanced Multi Photon Ionization (REMP). A pyrolytic radical source has been set up. To characterize the efficiency of the source `soft` ionization with femto second pulses is applied which results in less fragmentation, simplifying the interpretation of the mass spectrum. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  5. Observation of autoionizing states of beryllium by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have made the first observations of the Be 2p21S state, and of high-lying members of the Rydberg series 2pnd 1P0 (n less than or equal to 16), by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). The energy of the 1S state agrees well with theoretical predictions, if corrections are made for intershell electron correlations. These results show that precision specroscopy can be performed by RIMS with samples of a few hundred atoms, and that direct multiphoton excitation of autoionizing states may be a useful new addition to the existing catalogue of resonance ionization schemes

  6. Electrospray Ionization Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry of Human Brain Gangliosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbu, Mirela; Robu, Adrian C; Ghiulai, Roxana M; Vukelić, Željka; Clemmer, David E; Zamfir, Alina D

    2016-05-17

    The progress of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), together with its association to mass spectrometry (MS), opened new directions for the identification of various metabolites in complex biological matrices. However, glycolipidomics of the human brain by IMS MS represents an area untouched up to now, because of the difficulties encountered in brain sampling, analyte extraction, and IMS MS method optimization. In this study, IMS MS was introduced in human brain ganglioside (GG) research. The efficiency of the method in clinical glycolipidomics was demonstrated on a highly complex mixture extracted from a normal fetal frontal lobe (FL37). Using this approach, a remarkably rich molecular ion pattern was discovered, which proved the presence of a large number of glycoforms and an unpredicted diversity of the ceramide chains. Moreover, the results showed for the first time the occurrence of GGs in the human brain with a much higher degree of sialylation than previously reported. Using IMS MS, the entire series starting from mono- up to octasialylated GGs was detected in FL37. These findings substantiate early clinical reports on the direct correlation between GG sialylation degree and brain developmental stage. Using IMS CID MS/MS, applied here for the first time to gangliosides, a novel, tetrasialylated O-GalNAc modified species with a potential biomarker role in brain development was structurally characterized. Under variable collision energy, a high number of sequence ions was generated for the investigated GalNAc-GQ1(d18:1/18:0) species. Several fragment ions documented the presence of the tetrasialo element attached to the inner Gal, indicating that GalNAc-GQ1(d18:1/18:0) belongs to the d series. PMID:27088833

  7. Determination of Aspartame and Caffeine in Carbonated Beverages Utilizing Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, H. Robert, III; Benson, Linda M.; Naylor, Stephen

    2000-10-01

    Mass spectrometry has undergone considerable changes in the past decade. The advent of "soft ionization" techniques such as electrospray ionization (ESI) affords the direct analysis of very polar molecules without need for the complex inefficient derivatization procedures often required in GC-MS. These ionization techniques make possible the direct mass spectral analysis of polar nonvolatile molecules such as DNA and proteins, which previously were difficult or impossible to analyze by MS. Compounds that readily take on a charge (acids and bases) lend themselves to ESI-MS analysis, whereas compounds that do not readily accept a charge (e.g. sugars) are often not seen or are seen only as inefficient adducts (e.g., M+Na+). To gain exposure to this state-of-the-art analytical procedure, high school students utilize ESI-MS in an analysis of aspartame and caffeine. They dilute a beverage sample and inject the diluted sample into the ESI-MS. The lab is procedurally simple and the results clearly demonstrate the potential and limitations of ESI-coupled mass spectrometry. Depending upon the instructional goals, the outlined procedures can be used to quantify the content of caffeine and aspartame in beverages or to understand the capabilities of electrospray ionization.

  8. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry as a sensitive analytical method for actinides and technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been investigated as a method for the determination of trace amounts of actinides and technetium. A high sensitivity and selectivity have been achieved by three-step photoionization of the elements in the atomic state followed by time-of-flight measurement for mass analysis. The system for photoionization consists of three dye lasers which are pumped simultaneously by a copper vapour laser of 30 W average power at a pulse repetition rate of 6.5 KHz. The time-of-flight spectrometer has a mass resolution better than 2500. By ionization via autoionization states and by saturation in each excitation step a detection limit of less than 108 atoms of actinides or of technetium in the sample can be reached. (author)

  9. High Sensitivity Analysis of Nanoliter Volumes of Volatile and Nonvolatile Compounds using Matrix Assisted Ionization (MAI) Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Khoa; Pophristic, Milan; Horan, Andrew J.; Johnston, Murray V.; McEwen, Charles N.

    2016-06-01

    First results are reported using a simple, fast, and reproducible matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) sample introduction method that provides substantial improvements relative to previously published MAI methods. The sensitivity of the new MAI methods, which requires no laser, high voltage, or nebulizing gas, is comparable to those reported for MALDI-TOF and n-ESI. High resolution full acquisition mass spectra having low chemical background are acquired from low nanoliters of solution using only a few femtomoles of analyte. The limit-of-detection for angiotensin II is less than 50 amol on an Orbitrap Exactive mass spectrometer. Analysis of peptides, including a bovine serum albumin digest, and drugs, including drugs in urine without a purification step, are reported using a 1 μL zero dead volume syringe in which only the analyte solution wetting the walls of the syringe needle is used in the analysis.

  10. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Picosecond Infrared Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (PIR-LAESI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Talbot, Francis; Tata, Alessandra; Ermini, Leonardo; Franjic, Kresimir; Ventura, Manuela; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard; Post, Martin; Ifa, Demian R; Jaffray, David; Miller, R J Dwayne; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-12-15

    A picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) is capable of cutting through biological tissues in the absence of significant thermal damage. As such, PIRL is a standalone surgical scalpel with the added bonus of minimal postoperative scar tissue formation. In this work, a tandem of PIRL ablation with electrospray ionization (PIR-LAESI) mass spectrometry is demonstrated and characterized for tissue molecular imaging, with a limit of detection in the range of 100 nM for reserpine or better than 5 nM for verapamil in aqueous solution. We characterized PIRL crater size using agar films containing Rhodamine. PIR-LAESI offers a 20-30 μm vertical resolution (∼3 μm removal per pulse) and a lateral resolution of ∼100 μm. We were able to detect 25 fmol of Rhodamine in agar ablation experiments. PIR-LAESI was used to map the distribution of endogenous methoxykaempferol glucoronide in zebra plant (Aphelandra squarrosa) leaves producing a localization map that is corroborated by the literature. PIR-LAESI was further used to image the distribution inside mouse kidneys of gadoteridol, an exogenous magnetic resonance contrast agent intravenously injected. Parallel mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were performed to corroborate PIR-LAESI images of the exogenous agent. We further show that PIR-LAESI is capable of desorption ionization of proteins as well as phospholipids. This comparative study illustrates that PIR-LAESI is an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry applications. As such, a future PIRL scalpel combined with secondary ionization such as ESI and mass spectrometry has the potential to provide molecular feedback to guide PIRL surgery. PMID:26561279

  11. Analysis of Norditerpenoid Alkaloids Extracted from Aconitum sinomantanum Nakai by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry(ESI-MS) was applied simultaneously in determining norditerpenoid alkaloids from the roots of Aconitum sinomantanum Nakai (RAS) based on molecular mass information. The tandem mass spectra(ESI-MSn) provided the alkaloidal structural information, through which the existence of these alkaloids was further confirmed. Accordingly, six known norditerpenoid alkaloids were simultaneously determined on the basis of their ESI-MSn spectra. Furthermore, based on the diagnostic fragmentation pathways of alkaloidal MSn, a rapid method for direct detection and characterization of alkaloids from an ethanolic extract of RAS was described.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  13. Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization of explosives and narcotics for ambient pressure mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Brewer, Tim M; Gillen, Greg

    2013-10-01

    Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization (DEFFI), a desorption-based ambient ion source, was developed, characterized, and evaluated as a possible source for field deployable ambient pressure mass spectrometry (APMS). DEFFI, based on an electro-flow focusing system, provides a unique configuration for the generation of highly charged energetic droplets for sample analysis and ionization. A concentrically flowing carrier gas focuses the liquid emanating from a capillary through a small orifice, generating a steady fluid jet. An electric field is applied across this jet formation region, producing high velocity charged droplets that impinge on an analyte laden surface. This configuration separates the jet charging region from the external environment, eliminating detrimental effects from droplet space charge or target surface charging. The sample desorption and ionization processes operate similar to desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). DEFFI demonstrated strong signal intensities and improved signal-to-noise ratios in both positive and negative mode mass spectrometry for narcotics, i.e., cocaine, and explosives, i.e., cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), respectively. A characterization of DEFFI ionization mechanisms identified operation regimes of both electrospray and corona discharge based analyte ionization, as well as limitations in overall signal. In addition, the DEFFI response was directly compared to DESI-MS under similar operating conditions. This comparison established a wider and more stable optimal operating range, while requiring an order of magnitude lower applied gas pressure and applied potential for DEFFI than DESI. These reductions are due to the physical mode of jet formation and geometric configuration differences between DEFFI and DESI, pointing to a potential benefit of DEFFI-MS for field implementation. PMID:23923127

  14. Resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis of thorium by external laser cavity enhancement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last several years, extensive effort has been directed towards the demonstration of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) as a generally-applicable isotopic analysis technique. The major problems in this task have been to achieve a high overall ionization efficiency as well as good sample utilization. Several aspects of these problems are apparent in the choice of the excitation and ionization sources for the selective RIMS process. Pulsed lasers have typically had low repetition rates, poor spectral and temporal behavior, and short pulse durations. These characteristics have limited the general utility of pulsed lasers because of the low duty cycle (low efficiency), pulse pile-up detection difficulties (limited dynamic range), and relatively poor stability (poor precision). In contrast, cw lasers offer 100% effective duty cycles, well-controlled laser profiles (spectrally, spatially and temporally), and excellent power stability. The main feature limiting the utility of cw lasers has been power. While sufficient intensity is available to saturate the resonant transition, efficient promotion of excited atoms to the ionization continuum is difficult. This last aspect is where the authors efforts have centered. Presently, they are pursuing an external cavity technique which will generate overall ionization efficiencies of tens of percent, as well as increase the available spectral range. Experimental aspects and process to date on thorium will be discussed in detail

  15. Efficient laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using excitation energy transfer from anthracene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Femtomolar detection of PAHs such as perylene and benzopyrene was achieved. ► Photoexcited anthracene molecules transferred their energy to PAHs. ► Electronically excited PAHs were then excited to be ions. ► Two-photon ionization process was necessary to complete the ionization process. ► The number of defect sites could be reduced by the annealing procedure. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as perylene and benzopyrene, doped at amounts on the order of femtomol (∼10−15 mol) in anthracene crystals could be detected by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Sensitivity was roughly 103 times higher than that of LDI method in our experimental conditions. It was revealed from the excitation power dependence of the peak intensity of PAHs on the mass spectra that two-photon excitation in one UV pulse was necessary to complete the ionization process. It was also clarified that the number of defect sites that trap excitons generated in anthracene crystals could be reduced by the annealing procedure, by which an efficient energy transfer between anthracene and PAHs became possible

  16. Efficient laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using excitation energy transfer from anthracene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Kensuke [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Fujino, Tatsuya, E-mail: fujino@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Femtomolar detection of PAHs such as perylene and benzopyrene was achieved. ► Photoexcited anthracene molecules transferred their energy to PAHs. ► Electronically excited PAHs were then excited to be ions. ► Two-photon ionization process was necessary to complete the ionization process. ► The number of defect sites could be reduced by the annealing procedure. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as perylene and benzopyrene, doped at amounts on the order of femtomol (∼10{sup −15} mol) in anthracene crystals could be detected by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Sensitivity was roughly 10{sup 3} times higher than that of LDI method in our experimental conditions. It was revealed from the excitation power dependence of the peak intensity of PAHs on the mass spectra that two-photon excitation in one UV pulse was necessary to complete the ionization process. It was also clarified that the number of defect sites that trap excitons generated in anthracene crystals could be reduced by the annealing procedure, by which an efficient energy transfer between anthracene and PAHs became possible.

  17. Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization and tandem mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ivory X; Shiea, Jentaie; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Loo, Joseph A

    2007-01-01

    We have constructed an electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) source which utilizes a nitrogen laser pulse to desorb intact molecules from matrix-containing sample solution droplets, followed by electrospray ionization (ESI) post-ionization. The ELDI source is coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and allows sampling under ambient conditions. Preliminary data showed that ELDI produces ESI-like multiply charged peptides and proteins up to 29 kDa carbonic anhydrase and 66 kDa bovine albumin from single-protein solutions, as well as from complex digest mixtures. The generated multiply charged polypeptides enable efficient tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS)-based peptide sequencing. ELDI-MS/MS of protein digests and small intact proteins was performed both by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and by nozzle-skimmer dissociation (NSD). ELDI-MS/MS may be a useful tool for protein sequencing analysis and top-down proteomics study, and may complement matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-based measurements. PMID:17639579

  18. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270863

  19. Exact Mass Measurements for a-Allenic Alcohol by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization/Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何萍; 郭寅龙; 陈国强; 徐代旺; 麻生明

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/time,of-flight mass speetrmtry (APEI/TOF-MS) was applied to determine the mass of five a.aIIenic alcohols via their vrotonated molecu.lar ions nslna Imsifive ion mode. Polyethylene Idycol (PEG) was used as the hlternal reference. All results were obtained under the resolution of about 5000 FWHM (full width at the half maximum). Solvent effects were studied and the satired results were obtained in acetonitrile. Comvared with the theoreflcal values, nun absolute errors were less thRn 1.0 mmu. The efTeets Of nozzle pote.Jldal, push pulse potential, pug pulse potentlai, puO bias potential and ic(lulsltion rate on exact mass determina/lon were also discussed. APCI/TOF.MS is proven to be a very semi/ire analytical technique and an alternative ionizafion mode in analytical technique lablle compounds with relatively weak polarity, such as a-allenic alcohol.

  20. Overview literature on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS): basics and its applications in characterizing polymeric materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Jagtap; A H Ambre

    2005-10-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS) is a technique which allows the measurement of molecular mass > 200,000 Daltons by ionization and vapourization without degradation. This technique is useful for the mass analysis of synthetic polymers, which have very low volatility. The basic principles of and its applications for polymer characterization have been discussed in this paper. In addition, the possibilities of combining MALDI MS with chromatographic and other analytical techniques have also been discussed.

  1. Food quality and authenticity screening via easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcari, Andreia M; Fernandes, Gabriel D; Barrera-Arellano, Daniel; Eberlin, Marcos N; Alberici, Rosana M

    2016-02-21

    This review is the first to summarize a decade of studies testing the use of easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS) and its several sister techniques, Venturi (V-EASI), thermal imprinting (TI-EASI) and Spartan (S-EASI) mass spectrometry in food quality control and authentication. Since minimal or no sample preparation is required, such ambient desorption/ionization techniques have been shown to provide direct, fast and selective fingerprinting characterization at the molecular level based on the pools of the most typical components. They have also been found to be applicable on intact, undisturbed samples or on simple solvent extracts. Fundamentals of EASI-MS and its sister techniques, including mechanisms, devices, parameters and strategies, as well as the many applications reported for food analysis, are summarized and discussed. PMID:26820190

  2. Direct analysis by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of mixtures of phosphatidyldiacylglycerols from Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, G M; Murga, M L; de Valdez, G F; Seldes, A M

    2000-12-01

    Electrospray ionization followed by collision-induced dissociation in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of mixtures of deprotonated phosphatidyldiacylglycerols afforded a group of three diagnostic ions of convenient abundance for each phosphatidyldiacylglycerol (PG) present in the mixture. Thus, it was possible to determine unmistakably the identity and substitution positions (sn-1 or sn-2) for both acyl groups of each PG present in the mixture. The method also allows the study of isomeric mixtures of PG and mixtures containing minor amounts of some PG from crude extracts of Lactobacillus acidophillus. The present results improve those of previous studies using fast atom bombardment and electrospray ionization tanden mass spectrometry, in which it was reported that it was possible to differentiate the identity and position of the sn-2 acyl substituent only by the presence of one ion, with variable abundance. PMID:11180636

  3. The research of lithium isotope ionization mass spectrometry using materials load technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method was studied for determining the ratio of 6Li+, 7Li+ ion currents emitted from Li3PO4 as a material loaded by thermal surface ionization mass spectrometry. The effects of analysis conditions, such as the sample acidity, the ionizing filament temperature, the vaporized sample filament temperature, the quantity of sample loaded and the ratio versus time were studied. A high precision lithium isotope analysis procedure was established. Using the procedure, the related standard deviation of lithium isotope ratio is better than 0.1%, and the best is up to 0.047%. The procedure has the advantages of simplicity of sample making, short time of analysis, no significant effects on the mass fractionation. (20 refs., 5 tabs.)

  4. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS. Graphical Abstract Carbon nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamond, etc.) can be used as novel matrices or probes in MALDI or SELDI MS. PMID:26753968

  5. Application of pyrolysis–mass spectrometry and pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization for characterization of crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Gas chromatography setup with two MS detectors applying different ionization methods. • In parallel structural information and sensitive detection of aromatic species. • Characterization of setup and application for crude oil samples. • Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons next to sulfur containing aromatics. - Abstract: A novel analytical system for gas-chromatographic investigation of complex samples has been developed, that combines the advantages of several analytical principles to enhance the analytical information. Decomposition of high molecular weight structures is achieved by pyrolysis and a high separation capacity due to the chromatographic step provides both an universal as well as a selective and sensitive substance detection. The latter is achieved by simultaneously applying electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (EI-QMS) for structural elucidation and [1 + 1]-resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization (REMPI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS). The system has been evaluated and tested with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) standards. It was applied to crude oil samples for the first time. In such highly complex samples several thousands of compounds are present and the identification especially of low concentrated chemical species such as PAH or their polycyclic aromatic sulfur containing heterocyclic (PASH) derivatives is often difficult. Detection of unalkylated and alkylated PAH together with PASH is considerably enhanced by REMPI–ToFMS, at times revealing aromatic structures which are not observable by EI-QMS due to their low abundance. On the other hand, the databased structure proposals of the EI-QMS analysis are needed to confirm structural information and isomers distinction. The technique allows a complex structure analysis as well as selective assessment of aromatic substances in one measurement. Information about the content of sulfur containing compounds plays a

  6. Application of pyrolysis–mass spectrometry and pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization for characterization of crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Stefan [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Streibel, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.streibel@uni-rostock.de [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center of Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Erdmann, Sabrina [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Sklorz, Martin [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center of Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schulz-Bull, Detlef [Marine Chemistry, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Seestrasse 15, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Zimmermann, Ralf [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center of Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Gas chromatography setup with two MS detectors applying different ionization methods. • In parallel structural information and sensitive detection of aromatic species. • Characterization of setup and application for crude oil samples. • Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons next to sulfur containing aromatics. - Abstract: A novel analytical system for gas-chromatographic investigation of complex samples has been developed, that combines the advantages of several analytical principles to enhance the analytical information. Decomposition of high molecular weight structures is achieved by pyrolysis and a high separation capacity due to the chromatographic step provides both an universal as well as a selective and sensitive substance detection. The latter is achieved by simultaneously applying electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (EI-QMS) for structural elucidation and [1 + 1]-resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization (REMPI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS). The system has been evaluated and tested with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) standards. It was applied to crude oil samples for the first time. In such highly complex samples several thousands of compounds are present and the identification especially of low concentrated chemical species such as PAH or their polycyclic aromatic sulfur containing heterocyclic (PASH) derivatives is often difficult. Detection of unalkylated and alkylated PAH together with PASH is considerably enhanced by REMPI–ToFMS, at times revealing aromatic structures which are not observable by EI-QMS due to their low abundance. On the other hand, the databased structure proposals of the EI-QMS analysis are needed to confirm structural information and isomers distinction. The technique allows a complex structure analysis as well as selective assessment of aromatic substances in one measurement. Information about the content of sulfur containing compounds plays a

  7. Comparison of electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization for a lipidomic analysis of Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Laurent; Gaudin, Mathieu; Libong, Danielle; Touboul, David; Abreu, Sonia; Loiseau, Philippe M; Laprévote, Olivier; Chaminade, Pierre

    2012-06-15

    A comparison of electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) for the analysis of a wide range of lipids has been performed on standard mixtures and extracts of Leishmania donovani promastigotes resistant to Amphotericin B (AmB). Calibration model, precision, limits of detection and quantification (LOD and LOQ) were assessed for each source. APPI provided the highest signal, signal-to-noise (S/N), and sensitivity for non-polar and low-polarity lipids, while ESI and APCI gave better results for the most polar ones. The linear model was valid for all lipids, except for one class with APPI, six classes with ESI, and eleven classes with APCI. LODs ranged from 0.2 to 20 μg mL(-1) for ESI, from 0.1 to 10 μg mL(-1) for APCI, and from 0.02 to 9.5 μg mL(-1) for APPI. LOQs ranged from 0.2 to 61 μg mL(-1) for ESI, from 0.4 to 31 μg mL(-1) for APCI, and from 0.1 to 29 μg mL(-1) for APPI. Each source provided similar lipid composition and variations in a comparison of three different L. donovani samples: miltefosine-treated, miltefosine-resistant and treated miltefosine-resistant parasites. A treated miltefosine-resistant sample was finally analyzed with each ion source in order to verify that the same lipid molecular species are detected. PMID:22560453

  8. Isotope ratio analysis of individual plutonium and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide particles by thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a continuous heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio analysis of individual plutonium and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) particles was performed using a combination of single particle transfer and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) with a continuous heating method, namely the particles were measured without any chemical treatment. Accurate values were obtained for all isotope ratios of the individual particles prepared from standard solution. As a consequence, it is confirmed that the combination method is useful for isotope ratio analysis of individual plutonium and MOX particles. (author)

  9. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  10. Influence of soil pH on the sorption of ionizable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Fu, Wenjing; Trapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The soil-water distribution coefficient of ionizable chemicals (K-d) depends on the soil acidity, mainly because the pH governs speciation. Using pH-specific K-d values normalized to organic carbon (K-OC) from the literature, a method was developed to estimate the K-OC of monovalent organic acids...... and bases. The regression considers pH-dependent speciation and species-specific partition coefficients, calculated from the dissociation constant (pK(a)) and the octanol-water partition coefficient of the neutral molecule (log P-n). Probably because of the lower pH near the organic colloid-water...... impact of pH on the total sorption is contrasting. In fact, the shortcomings of the model assumptions affect the predictive power for acids and for bases differently. We evaluated accuracy and limitations of the regressions for their use in the environmental fate assessment of ionizable chemicals....

  11. Laser-driven electron dynamics for circular dichroism in mass spectrometry: from one-photon excitations to multiphoton ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner, Dominik

    2015-07-15

    The distinction of enantiomers is a key aspect of chemical analysis. In mass spectrometry the distinction of enantiomers has been achieved by ionizing the sample with circularly polarized laser pulses and comparing the ion yields for light of opposite handedness. While resonant excitation conditions are expected to be most efficient, they are not required for the detection of a circular dichroism (CD) in the ion yield. However, the prediction of the size and sign of the circular dichroism becomes challenging if non-resonant multiphoton excitations are used to ionize the sample. Employing femtosecond laser pulses to drive electron wavepacket dynamics based on ab initio calculations, we attempt to reveal underlying mechanisms that determine the CD under non-resonant excitation conditions. Simulations were done for (R)-1,2-propylene oxide, using time-dependent configuration interaction singles with perturbative doubles (TD-CIS(D)) and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. Interactions between the electric field and the electric dipole and quadrupole as well as between the magnetic field and the magnetic dipole were explicitly accounted for. The ion yield was determined by treating states above the ionization potential as either stationary or non-stationary with energy-dependent lifetimes based on an approved heuristic approach. The observed population dynamics do not allow for a simple interpretation, because of highly non-linear interactions. Still, the various transition pathways are governed by resonant enantiospecific n-photon excitation, with preferably high transition dipole moments, which eventually dominate the CD in the ionized population. PMID:26151731

  12. Nontarget analysis of urine by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Daniel G; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2011-12-01

    Nearly a decade after first commercialization, high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has yet to find its place in routine chemical analysis. Prototypes have been used to demonstrate the utility of this separation technique combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Unfortunately, first generation commercial FAIMS instruments have gone practically unused by early adopters. Here, we show this to be due to poor ion transmission in the FAIMS-MS source interface. We present simple instrumental modifications and optimization of experimental conditions to achieve good performance from the first generation commercial FAIMS device (the Ionalytics Selectra) coupled to a high resolution Q-TOF-MS. In combination with nanospray ionization, we demonstrate for the first time the nontarget analysis of urine by FAIMS with minimal sample preparation. We show the unique suitability of electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS for identification of low abundance species such as urinary biomarkers of damage of nucleic acids in a complex biological matrix. The elimination of electrospray noise and matrix components by FAIMS and the continuous flow of analytes through FAIMS for accurate and tandem mass analysis produce high quality spectral data suitable for structural identification of unknowns. These characteristics make ESI-FAIMS-MS ideal for nontarget identification, even when compared to high efficiency LC-ESI-MS. PMID:21978137

  13. Study of molecular complexation of glycyrrhizic acid with chloramphenicol by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Vetrova, Elena V.; Lekar, Anna V.; Filonova, Olga V.; Borisenko, Sergey N.; Maksimenko, Elena V.; Borisenko, Nikolay I.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is a triterpene glycoside representing the main active component of licorice root extract obtained from plants of the Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and widely used as a complex-forming agent for the synthesis of new transport forms of the well-known drugs. Aims: For the first time, the complexation of GA with chloramphenicol antibiotic (ChlA) was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). Subjects and Methods: ESI MS was utilized in order to de...

  14. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of immobilized duplex DNA probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, K; Fu, D.; Kötter, S; Cotter, R J; Cantor, C R; Köster, H

    1995-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry was used to analyze short DNA duplex probes with one strand immobilized on solid supports (straptavidin-coated magnetic beads or controlled pore glass beads). Only the non-immobilized strand could be detected. Partial denaturation was found when the duplex probes were mixed with 3-hydroxypicolinic acid, ammonium citrate matrix. The strategy has several applications, such as fast DNA sequence analysis an...

  15. Dependences of Ratio of the Luminosity to Ionization on Velocity and Chemical Composition of Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narziev, M.

    2011-01-01

    On the bases of results simultaneous photographic and radio echo observations, the results complex radar and television observations of meteors and also results of laboratory modeling of processes of a luminescence and ionization, correlation between of luminous intensity Ip to linear electronic density q from of velocities and chemical structure are investigated. It is received that by increasing value of velocities of meteors and decrease of nuclear weight of substance of particles, lg Ip/q decreased more than one order.

  16. Identification of Microalgae by Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multiple Nanomatrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Shih, Chi-Yu; Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Chang, Jeng; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a simple method to identify microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) using three different substrates: HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe nanostructures. The fragmentation/ionization processes of complex molecules in algae varied according to the heat absorption and transfer efficiency of the nanostructured matrices (NMs). Therefore, the mass spectra obtained for microalgae showed different patterns of m/z values for different NMs. The spectra contained both significant and nonsignificant peaks. Constructing a Venn diagram with the significant peaks obtained for algae when using HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe NMs in m/z ratio range 100-1000, a unique relationship among the three sets of values was obtained. This unique relationship of sets is different for each species of microalgae. Therefore, by observing the particular relationship of sets, we successfully identified different algae such as Isochrysis galbana, Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nannochloris sp., Skeletonema cf. costatum, and Tetraselmis chui. This simple and cost-effective SALDI-MS analysis method coupled with multi-nanomaterials as substrates may be extended to identify other microalgae and microorganisms in real samples. Graphical Abstract Identification of microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry coupled with three different mercury-based nanosubstrates. PMID:26842733

  17. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of lipids using etched silver substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, Andreas; Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Koch, Annika; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2016-07-15

    Silver-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry can be used for the analysis of small molecules. For example, adduct formation with silver cations enables the molecular analysis of long-chain hydrocarbons, which are difficult to ionize via conventional matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). Here we used highly porous silver foils, produced by etching with nitric acid, as sample substrates for LDI mass spectrometry. As model system for the analysis of complex lipid mixtures, cuticular extracts of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) and worker bees (Apis mellifera) were investigated. The mass spectra obtained by spotting extract onto the etched silver substrates demonstrate the sensitive detection of numerous lipid classes such as long-chain saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, fatty acyl alcohols, wax esters, and triacylglycerols. MS imaging of cuticular surfaces with a lateral resolution of a few tens of micrometers became possible after blotting, i.e., after transferring lipids by physical contact with the substrate. The examples of pheromone-producing male hindwings of the squinting bush brown butterfly (Bicyclus anynana) and a fingermark are shown. Because the substrates are also easy to produce, they provide a viable alternative to colloidal silver nanoparticles and other so far described silver substrates. PMID:26827933

  18. Reduced matrix effects for anionic compounds with paired ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyue; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-03-17

    It is well-known that matrix effects in high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) can seriously compromise quantitative analysis and affect method reproducibility. Paired ion electrospray ionization (PIESI) mass spectrometry is an approach for analyzing ultra-low levels of anions in the positive ion mode. This approach uses a structurally optimized ion pairing reagent to post-column associate with the anionic analyte, subsequently forming positively charged complexes. These newly formed complex ions are often more surface-active as compared to either the native anion or the ion pairing reagent. No studies have examined whether or not the PIESI approach mitigates matrix effects. Consequently, a controlled study was done using five analytes in highly controlled and reproducible synthetic groundwater and urine matrices. In addition, two different mass spectrometers (linear ion trap and triple quadrupole) were used. Compared to the negative ion mode, the PIESI-MS approach was less susceptible to matrix effects when performed on two different MS platforms. Using PIESI-MS, less dilution of the sample is needed to eliminate ionization suppression which, in turn, permits lower limits of detection and quantitation. PMID:26920775

  19. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  20. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  1. The Need for Speed in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Boone M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has emerged as a powerful analytical tool enabling the direct molecular mapping of many types of tissue. Specifically, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization (MALDI) represents one of the most broadly applicable IMS technologies. In recent years, advances in solid state laser technology, mass spectrometry instrumentation, computer technology, and experimental methodology have produced IMS systems capable of unprecedented data acquisition speeds (>50 pixels/second). In applications of this technology, throughput is an important consideration when designing an IMS experiment. As IMS becomes more widely adopted, continual improvements in experimental setups will be important to address biologically and clinically relevant time scales.

  2. In vivo recognition of Bacillus subtilis by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yishu; Talaty, Nari; Datsenko, Kirill; Wanner, Barry L; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-05-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) of culture of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis as a biofilm growing on agar nutrient gives simple, high quality mass spectra dominated in both the positive and negative ion modes by signals due to the cyclic lipopeptide, Surfactin(C15). This in vivo experiment, performed by direct analysis of untreated microorganism samples under ambient conditions, allows rapid identification of this microorganism and the antibiotics that it produces. The result is suggestive of the capabilities of DESI-MS for in vivo microorganism characterization in general and for monitoring fermentation processes for the production of antibiotics and other biochemicals. PMID:19381372

  3. Imaging of plant materials using indirect desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janfelt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Indirect desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging is a method for imaging distributions of metabolites in plant materials, in particular leaves and petals. The challenge in direct imaging of such plant materials with DESI-MS is particularly the protective layer of...... interest from parts of their matrix while preserving the spatial information in the two dimensions. The imprint can then easily be imaged by DESI-MS. The method delivers simple and robust mass spectrometry imaging of plant material with very high success ratios....

  4. Mutation research with ionizing radiations and chemicals using drosophila: problems, results and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of mutagenesis studies with Drosophila are examined in order to inquire the extent to which the genetic responses to ionizing radiations and to chemical mutagens share common features, to identify those findings that may have validity beyond the confines of this species, and to assess the contributions and implications of Drosophila results to the problems of mutagenicity testing and of the evaluation of genetic hazards to man from exposure to environmental chemicals. The results obtained in the studies permit the estimation of X-irradiation equivalent doses of EMS for the induction of sex-linked recessive lethals and specific locus mutations in mature spermatozoa. (Auth.)

  5. Modelling the Fate of Ionizable Trace Organic Chemicals from Consumption to Food Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polesel, Fabio; Plósz, Benedek G.; Trapp, Stefan

    In this study, we developed and applied a simulation tool to comprehensively predict the fate of three ionizable trace chemicals (triclosan—TCS, furosemide—FUR, ciprofloxacin—CIP) from human consumption/excretion up to the accumulation in wheat, following application of sewage sludge or irrigation...... with river water. Highest translocation to wheat (4.3 μg kgDW-1 in grain) was calculated for FUR, being more significant with irrigation (>45% of emission to soil) than with sludge application (<30%). The simulation tool presented here can be used for estimating human exposure to trace chemicals via...

  6. Matrix-Assisted Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry: Selective Analysis of a Europium-PEG Complex in a Crude Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joshua L.; Lutomski, Corinne A.; El-Baba, Tarick J.; Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Weidner, Steffen M.; Falkenhagen, Jana; Allen, Matthew J.; Trimpin, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The analytical utility of a new and simple to use ionization method, matrix-assisted ionization (MAI), coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) is used to characterize a 2-armed europium(III)-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (Eu-PEG) complex directly from a crude sample. MAI was used with the matrix 1,2-dicyanobenzene, which affords low chemical background relative to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). MAI provides high ion abundance of desired products in comparison to ESI and MALDI. Inductively coupled plasma-MS measurements were used to estimate a maximum of 10% of the crude sample by mass was the 2-arm Eu-PEG complex, supporting evidence of selective ionization of Eu-PEG complexes using the new MAI matrix, 1,2-dicyanobenzene. Multiply charged ions formed in MAI enhance the IMS gas-phase separation, especially relative to the singly charged ions observed with MALDI. Individual components are cleanly separated and readily identified, allowing characterization of the 2-arm Eu-PEG conjugate from a mixture of the 1-arm Eu-PEG complex and unreacted starting materials. Size-exclusion chromatography, liquid chromatography at critical conditions, MALDI-MS, ESI-MS, and ESI-IMS-MS had difficulties with this analysis, or failed.

  7. High-resolution atmospheric pressure infrared laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging of biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römpp, Andreas; Schäfer, Karl Christian; Guenther, Sabine; Wang, Zheng; Köstler, Martin; Leisner, Arne; Paschke, Carmen; Schramm, Thorsten; Spengler, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging ion source has been developed that combines high spatial resolution and high mass resolution for the in situ analysis of biological tissue. The system is based on an infrared laser system working at 2.94 to 3.10 μm wavelength, employing a Nd:YAG laser-pumped optical parametrical oscillator. A Raman-shifted Nd:YAG laser system was also tested as an alternative irradiation source. A dedicated optical setup was used to focus the laser beam, coaxially with the ion optical axis and normal to the sample surface, to a spot size of 30 μm in diameter. No additional matrix was needed for laser desorption/ionization. A cooling stage was developed to reduce evaporation of physiological cell water. Ions were formed under atmospheric pressure and transferred by an extended heated capillary into the atmospheric pressure inlet of an orbital trapping mass spectrometer. Various phospholipid compounds were detected, identified, and imaged at a pixel resolution of up to 25 μm from mouse brain tissue sections. Mass accuracies of better than 2 ppm and a mass resolution of 30,000 at m/z = 400 were achieved for these measurements. PMID:23877173

  8. Gas chromatography interfaced with atmospheric pressure ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry by low-temperature plasma ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Asger W.; Kofoed-Sorensen, Vivi; Svensmark, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    A low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization interface between a gas chromatograph (GC) and an atmospheric pressure inlet mass spectrometer, was constructed. This enabled time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection of GC-eluting compounds. The performance of the setup was evaluated by injection of...... mixtures of common volatile organic compounds. Amounts down to ca. 0.5 ng (on column) could be detected for most compounds and with a chromatographic performance comparable to that of GC/EIMS. In the positive mode, LTP ionization resulted in a compound specific formation of molecular ions M+center dot...

  9. Ionization Suppression and Recovery in Direct Biofluid Analysis Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carolina; Spence, Corina; Zhang, Chengsen; Bills, Brandon J.; Manicke, Nicholas E.

    2016-04-01

    Paper spray mass spectrometry is a method for the direct analysis of biofluid samples in which extraction of analytes from dried biofluid spots and electrospray ionization occur from the paper on which the dried sample is stored. We examined matrix effects in the analysis of small molecule drugs from urine, plasma, and whole blood. The general method was to spike stable isotope labeled analogs of each analyte into the spray solvent, while the analyte itself was in the dried biofluid. Intensity of the labeled analog is proportional to ionization efficiency, whereas the ratio of the analyte intensity to the labeled analog in the spray solvent is proportional to recovery. Ion suppression and recovery were found to be compound- and matrix-dependent. Highest levels of ion suppression were obtained for poor ionizers (e.g., analytes lacking basic aliphatic amine groups) in urine and approached -90%. Ion suppression was much lower or even absent for good ionizers (analytes with aliphatic amines) in dried blood spots. Recovery was generally highest in urine and lowest in blood. We also examined the effect of two experimental parameters on ion suppression and recovery: the spray solvent and the sample position (how far away from the paper tip the dried sample was spotted). Finally, the change in ion suppression and analyte elution as a function of time was examined by carrying out a paper spray analysis of dried plasma spots for 5 min by continually replenishing the spray solvent.

  10. Characteristic Fragmentation Behavior of Steroidal Phosphoramidate Conjugates in Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI, San-Hao; JU, Yong; XIAO, Qiang; ZHAO, Yu-Fen

    2006-01-01

    Novel steroidal phosphoramidate conjugates of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) and amino acid esters were synthesized and determined by positive and negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The MS fragmentation behaviors of the steroidal phosphoramidate conjugates have been investigated in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry of ESI-MS/MS. There were three characteristic fragment ions in the positive ion ESI mass spectra, which were the Na adduct ions with loss of steroidal moiety, amino acid ester moiety from pseudo molecular ion (M+Na)+, and the phosphoamino acid methyl ester Na adduct ion by a-cleavage of the phosphoramidate respectively. The main fragment ions in negative ion ESI mass spectra were the ion (M-HN3)-, the ion (M - AZT - H)- , and the ion (M-steroidal moiety-H)- besides the pseudo molecular ion (M-H)-. The fragmentation patterns did not depend on the attached amino acid ester moiety.

  11. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdian, David C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  12. Plasma-based ambient sampling/ionization/transmission integrated source for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Ning; Li, Yafeng; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Chen, Yongtai; Nie, Zongxiu

    2014-11-01

    Better sensitivity and interface of ambient sampling/ionization mass spectrometry remain a challenge. Herein, a novel, plasma-based, ambient sampling/ionization/transmission (PASIT) integrated source in a pin-to-funnel configuration was developed for the sensitive analysis of complex samples. With the funnel sleeve directly affected by direct-current discharge plasma, PASIT combines the ability to sample/ionize analyte molecules and then efficiently collect/transport charged mass species under atmospheric pressure and consequently shows an improved sensitivity. The integrated source enhances the signal intensity by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with the previous pin-to-plate plasma source without significant background addition. A surface limit of detection (LOD) of 130 fmol mm-(2) (S/N = 3) has been achieved for clenbuterol on filter paper with an argon carrier gas. Demonstrated applications include the direct determination of active ingredients from drugs and symbolic compounds from natural plants and cholesterol from mouse brain tissue sections. PMID:25147876

  13. On-line monitoring of continuous flow chemical synthesis using a portable, small footprint mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Tony W T; Ray, Andrew D; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed. PMID:25106707

  14. Laser-Ionization TOF Mass Spectrometer Characterization of Benzene Destruction in Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiahong; XIAO Qingmei; WANG Liping; YAO Zhi; DING Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    Benzene is.a major industrial air pollutant and can cause serious human health disorders. In this paper an investigation on benzene destruction, in an atmospheric-pressure fast-flow pulsed DC-discharge by means of laser ionization combined with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, is reported. Most by-products including transient reactive species from the benzene discharge were characterized by molecular beam sampling combined with TOF mass spectrometry.It is showed that, with a gas mixture of 0.5% C6H6 in Ar, benzene can be effectively destroyed by discharge plasma. The intermediate species consisted of small fragments of CNHm (n=3~5,m =1~11), cycle-chain species of CNHm (n=6~9, m = 7~10) and polycyclic species CNHm (n ≥9,m = 8~12). The alternation of mass peaks (intensity) with even/odd electrons was observed in the measured mass spectra. The results indicated that the alternation is mainly due to the different ionization potentials of the open shell and close shell species. Based on the examination of the features of the species' composition, the primary reaction pathways are proposed and discussed.

  15. Ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for evaluating krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer that can be applied to evaluate krypton (Kr) contamination in xenon (Xe) dark matter detectors has been developed for measuring Kr at the parts-per-trillion (ppt) or sub-ppt level in Xe. The gas sample is introduced without any condensation into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer through a pulsed supersonic valve. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 212.6 nm, 84Kr atoms in the sample are resonantly ionized along with other Kr isotopes. 84Kr ions are then mass separated and detected by the mass spectrometer in order to measure the Kr impurity concentration. With our current setup, approximately 0.4 ppt of Kr impurities contained in pure argon (Ar) gas are detectable with a measurement time of 1000 s. Although Kr detection sensitivity in Xe is expected to be approximately half of that in Ar, our spectrometer can evaluate Kr contamination in Xe to the sub-ppt level

  16. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Keiji G [ORNL; Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  17. Trace analysis of actinides in the environment using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the resonant ionization of neutral atoms using laser radiation was applied and optimized for ultra-trace analysis of the actinides thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. The sensitive detection of these actinides is a challange for the monitoring and quantification of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities. Using resonance ionization spectroscopy combined with a newly developed quadrupole-mass-spectrometer, numerous energy levels in the atomic structure of these actinides could be identified. With this knowledge efficient excitation schemes for the mentioned actinides could be identified and characterised. The applied in-source-ionization ensures for a high detection efficiency due to the good overlap of laser radiation with the atomic beam and allows therefore for a low sample consumption which is required for the analysis of radio nuclides. The selective excitation processes in the resonant ionization method supresses unwanted contaminations and was optimized for analytical detection of ultra-trace amounts in environmental samples as well as for determination of isotopic compositions. The efficient in-source-ionization combined with high power pulsed laser radiation allows for detections efficiency up to 1%. For plutonium detection limits in the range of 104-105 atoms could be demonstrated for synthetic samples as well as for first environmental samples. The usage of narrow bandwidth continuous wave lasers in combination with a transversal overlap of the laser radiation and the free propagating atomic beam enable for resolving individual isotopic shifts of the resonant transitions. This results in a high selectivity against dominant neighboring isotopes but with a significant loss in detection efficiency. For the ultra-trace isotope 236U a detection limit down to 10-9 for the isotope ratio N (236U)/N (238U) could be determined.

  18. Introduction to computational mass transfer with applications to chemical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Kuo-Tsong

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a new computational methodology called Computational Mass Transfer (CMT). It offers an approach to rigorously simulating the mass, heat and momentum transfer under turbulent flow conditions with the help of two newly published models, namely the C’2—εC’ model and the Reynolds  mass flux model, especially with regard to predictions of concentration, temperature and velocity distributions in chemical and related processes. The book will also allow readers to understand the interfacial phenomena accompanying the mass transfer process and methods for modeling the interfacial effect, such as the influences of Marangoni convection and Rayleigh convection. The CMT methodology is demonstrated by means of its applications to typical separation and chemical reaction processes and equipment, including distillation, absorption, adsorption and chemical reactors. Professor Kuo-Tsong Yu is a Member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr. Xigang Yuan is a Professor at the School of Chemical Engine...

  19. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Investigation of Goldenseal Alkaloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cm x 10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed RF value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (ca. 5 ng each or 14 -28 pmol) in mass spectral full scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5 - 100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing RF value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values indicating the quantitative ability of

  20. Compound coverage enhancement of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry through the addition of a homemade needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shun; Qian, Shuai; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yufeng; Cheng, Yiyu

    2013-03-21

    The response of many previously low-detectable or undetectable compounds in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been enhanced by the addition of a simple, homemade needle into the traditional ESI interface. The needle located between the ESI emitter and the ion sweep cone (inlet of the detector) would ionize those neutral gaseous compounds, formed during electrospray, by a corona discharge process. The mobile phases, ESI parameters and positions of the needle were investigated and optimized. Several groups of compounds and herbal extracts were tested using the homemade set-up. Both the results of the flow injection and the hyphenated MS analyses showed significant enhancement effects of our homemade needle. The advantages of the proposed method include low cost, simplicity and practicality. PMID:23364279

  1. Selective isotope determination of lanthanum by diode-laser-initiated resonance-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diode-laser step has been incorporated into a resonance-ionization mass spectrometry optical excitation process to enhance the isotopic selectivity of the technique. Lanthanum isotope ratio enhancements as high as 103 were achieved by use of a single-frequency cw diode laser tuned to excite the first step of a three-step excitation--ionization optical process; the subsequent steps were excited by use of a pulsed dye laser. Applying the same optical technique, we measured atomic hyperfine constants for the high-lying even-parity 4D5/2 state of lanthanum at 30 354 cm--1. The general utility of this spectral approach is discussed

  2. A high repetition rate solid state laser system for resonance ionization mass spectrometry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, high repetition rate solid state laser system consisting of three Titanium-Sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers pumped by one Nd:YAG laser has been set up for resonance ionization mass spectrometry for routine trace analysis of actinides. Each Ti:Sa laser produces up to 4 W of laser light with a bandwidth of 2-6 GHz continuously tuneable in a range from 725 to 900 nm. Using a three step ionization scheme with λ1=420.76 nm, λ2=847.28 nm and λ3239Pu, the overall detection efficiency of the setup has been measured to be ε=8.0x10-6. Thus a detection limit of 1x107 atoms of 239Pu is derived and opens up the way to use a reliable and easy to handle laser system for routine applications of RIMS

  3. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  4. Time Resolved Studies of Interfacial Reactions of Ozone with Pulmonary Phospholipid Surfactants Using Field Induced Droplet Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hugh I.; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W.; Goddard, William A.; Heath, James R.; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS) comprises a soft ionization method to sample ions from the surface of microliter droplets. A pulsed electric field stretches neutral droplets until they develop dual Taylor cones, emitting streams of positively and negatively charged submicrometer droplets in opposite directions, with the desired polarity being directed into a mass spectrometer for analysis. This methodology is employed to study the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 1-pal...

  5. Primary Ion Depletion Kinetics (PIDK Studies as a New Tool for Investigating Chemical Ionization Fragmentation Reactions with PTR-MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Schuhfried

    Full Text Available We report on a new approach for studying fragmentation channels in Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS, which we name primary ion depletion kinetics (PIDK. PTR-MS is a chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CIMS technique deploying hydronium ions for the chemical ionization. Induced by extremely high concentrations of analyte M, depletion of the primary ions in the drift tube occurs. This is observed as quasi zero concentration of the primary ion H3O(+, and constant MH(+. Under these non-standard conditions, we find an overall changed fragmentation. We offer two explanations. Either the changed fragmentation pattern is the result of secondary proton transfer reactions. Or, alternatively, the fast depletion of H3O(+ leads to reduced heating of H3O(+ in the drift field, and consequently changed fragmentation following protonation of the analyte M. In any case, we use the observed changes in fragmentation as a successful new approach to fragmentation studies, and term it primary ion depletion kinetics, PIDK. PIDK easily yields an abundance of continuous data points with little deviation, because they are obtained in one experimental run, even for low abundant fragments. This is an advantage over traditional internal kinetic energy variation studies (electric field per number density (E/N variation studies. Also, some interpretation on the underlying fragmentation reaction mechanisms can be gleamed. We measure low occurring fragmentation (<2% of MH(+ of the compounds dimethyl sulfide, DMS, a compound that reportedly does not fragment, diethyl sulfide DES, and dipropyl sulfide DPS. And we confirm and complement the results with traditional E/N studies. Summing up, the new approach of primary ion depletion kinetics allows for the identification of dehydrogenation [MH(+ -H2] and adduct formation (RMH(+ as low abundant fragmentation channels in monosulfides.

  6. Determination of Organochlorine Pesticide Residues in Chinese Herbal Tea Granule by Accelerated Solvent Extraction Combined with Gas Chromatography Negative Chemical Ionization- Mass Spectrometry%加速溶剂萃取/气相色谱-负化学电离质谱法对广东凉茶冲剂中有机氯杀虫剂残留的测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓洁薇; 李娜; 杨运云

    2011-01-01

    建立了加速溶剂萃取/气相色谱-负化学电离质谱法( ASE/GC - NCI - MS)测定广东凉茶颗粒冲剂中有机氯杀虫剂(OcPs)含量的方法.采用ASE萃取冲剂中的OCPs,萃取溶剂为正己烷-二氯甲烷(1:1),萃取温度100℃,萃取压力10 MPa,萃取时间10 min×3.萃取液经SPE净化,浓缩定容后,经色谱柱DB-IMS(30 m×0.25 mm×0.1μm)分离,采用GC-NCI-MS测定其中OCPs的含量.25种OCPs的线性范围为1~500Pg,相关系数(r)均大于0.999,方法的检出限为1.0~34.4 pg/g,定量下限为3.4~114.6 pg/g,回收率为86%~105%.将该方法用于分析不同厂家和批次的凉茶颗粒冲剂样品,25种OCPs均未检出.该方法快速、灵敏,是广东凉茶中有机氯杀虫剂残留检测的有效手段.%A method was developed for the determination of organochlorine pesticide residues in Chinese herbal tea granule by accelerated solvent extraction combined with gas chromatography - negative chemical ionization - mass spectrometry ( ASE/GC - NCI - MS ). The samples were extracted with ASE for 10 min × 3 times using hexane - dichloromethane (1 : 1) as solvent at temperature of 100 ℃ and pressure of 10 Mpa. The extracts were purified by solid phase extraction using a SampliQ Silica column, concentrated with a gentle stream of nitrogen, and then separated on a DB-1MS column(30 m × 0. 25 mm × 0.1 μm). The quantitative analysis of 25 organochlorine pesticides was carried out by GC -NCI - MS under selected ion monitoring mode. The calibration curves of 25 organochlorine pesticides were linear in the range of 1 -500 pg, with correlation coefficients more than 0.999. The limits of detection and limits of quantitation were in the ranges of 1. 0 -34. 4 pg/g and 3.4 - 114. 6 pg/g, respectively. The spiked recoveries ranged from 86% to 105% . The method was applied in the determination of the Chinese herbal tea granule samples with different batches from different manufactures, and none of the 25 organochlorine

  7. 气相色谱-负化学源质谱法测定蜂蜜和王浆中4种杀虫剂的残留%Determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏广辉; 沈伟健; 余可垚; 吴斌; 张睿; 沈崇钰; 赵增运; 卞筱泓; 许激扬

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed for the determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry ( GC-NCI/MS). The honey and royal jelly samples were treated with different preparation methods as the result of the different components. The honey sample was extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up with primary second amine,and the royal jelly sample was extracted with acetoni-trile-water(1:1,v/v),and cleaned up with a C18 solid-phase extraction column. Finally,the extracts of the honey and royal jelly were analyzed by GC-NCI/MS in selected ion monitoring ( SIM)mode separately. External standard calibration method was used for quantification. The linearities of calibration curves of the four insecticides were good with the correlation coeffi-cients greater than 0. 99 in the range of 50-500 μg/L. The limits of the detection( LODs)of the four insecticides were in the range of 0. 12-5. 0 μg/kg,and the limits of the quantification ( LOQs)were in the range of 0. 40-16. 5 μg/kg. The recoveries of the four insecticides spiked in honey and royal jelly at three spiked levels(10,15 and 20 μg/kg)were in the range of 78. 2%-110. 0%,and the relative standard deviations( RSDs)were all below 14%. The sensitivity and selectivity of this method were good with no interfering peaks. The proposed method is simple, quick and effective to analyze the four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly.%建立了气相色谱-负化学源质谱( GC-NCI/MS)测定蜂蜜和王浆中4种杀虫剂残留量的方法。蜂蜜样品由乙酸乙酯提取、乙二胺-N-丙基硅烷(PSA)净化,而王浆样品经乙腈-水(1:1,v/v)提取、C18固相萃取柱净化,采用GC-NCI/MS测定,外标法定量。结果表明:在50~500μg/L范围内4种农药的线性良好;所有农药的LOD在0.12~5.0μg/kg之间,LOQ在0.40~16.5μg/kg之间;在10、15、20μg/kg 3个添加水平下,4

  8. In Situ Probing of Cholesterol in Astrocytes at the Single Cell Level using Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Colloidal Silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdian, D.C.; Cha, Sangwon; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-18

    Mass spectrometric imaging has been utilized to localize individual astrocytes and to obtain cholesterol populations at the single-cell level in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with colloidal silver. The silver ion adduct of membrane-bound cholesterol was monitored to detect individual cells. Good correlation between mass spectrometric and optical images at different cell densities indicates the ability to perform single-cell studies of cholesterol abundance. The feasibility of quantification is confirmed by the agreement between the LDI-MS ion signals and the results from a traditional enzymatic fluorometric assay. We propose that this approach could be an effective tool to study chemical populations at the cellular level.

  9. The mass dependence of the signal peak height of a Bragg-curve ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bragg-curve detector of the parallel plate ionization chamber type generates a signal that is a distorted replica of the original Bragg-curve. In result of this distortion, the signal peak height is not only a function of the atomic number of the heavy ion, as it is often stated, but also of the particle mass. This mass effect was studied with the aid of computer simulation, and it was found to be dependent on the Frisch grid to anode gap width and on the detector gas. The charge resolution of the detector is affected very significantly by this mass dependence of the signal peak height. Therefore, a careful selection of the detector gas and the grid to anode gap width is necessary, if good charge resolution over a wide range of heavy ions is required. (orig.)

  10. The mass dependence of the signal peak height of a Bragg-curve ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenhav, N. J.; Stelzer, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Bragg-curve detector of the parallel plate ionization chamber type generates a signal that is a distorted replica of the original Bragg-curve. In result of this distortion, the signal peak height is not only a function of the atomic number of the heavy ion, as it is often stated, but also of the particle mass. This mass effect was studied with the aid of computer simulation, and it was found to be dependent on the Frisch grid to anode gap width and on the detector gas. The charge resolution of the detector is affected very significantly by this mass dependence of the signal peak height. Therefore, a careful selection of the detector gas and the grid to anode gap width is necessary, if good charge resolution over a wide range of heavy ions is required.

  11. Combining desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance for differential metabolomics without sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanwen; Pan, Zhengzheng; Talaty, Nari; Raftery, Daniel; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are used to provide data on urine examined without sample preparation to allow differentiation between diseased (lung cancer) and healthy mice. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to shortlist compounds with potential for biomarker screening which are responsible for significant differences between control urine samples and samples from diseased animals. Similar PCA score plots have been achieved by DESI-MS and NMR, using a subset of common detected metabolites. The common compounds detected by DESI and NMR have the same changes in sign of their concentrations thereby indicating the usefulness of corroborative analytical methods. The effects of different solvents and surfaces on the DESI mass spectra are also evaluated and optimized. Over 80 different metabolites were successfully identified by DESI-MS and tandem mass spectrometry experiments, with no prior sample preparation. PMID:16628593

  12. Imaging of Lipids and Metabolites Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-17

    In recent years, mass spectroscopy imaging (MSI) has emerged as a foundational technique in metabolomics and drug screening providing deeper understanding of complex mechanistic pathways within biochemical systems and biological organisms. We have been invited to contribute a chapter to a new Springer series volume, entitled “Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules”. The volume is planned for the highly successful lab protocol series Methods in Molecular Biology, published by Humana Press, USA. The volume is aimed to equip readers with step-by-step mass spectrometric imaging protocols and bring rapidly maturing methods of MS imaging to life science researchers. The chapter will provide a detailed protocol of ambient MSI by use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization.

  13. Dual parallel mass spectrometry for lipid and vitamin D analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are numerous options for mass spectrometric analysis of lipids, including different types of ionization, and a wide variety of experiments using different scan modes that can be conducted. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) provide complementary ...

  14. Direct and Sensitive Detection of CWA Simulants by Active Capillary Plasma Ionization Coupled to a Handheld Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Etter, Raphael; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-07-01

    An active capillary plasma ionization (ACI) source was coupled to a handheld mass spectrometer (Mini 10.5; Aston Labs, West Lafayette, IN, USA) and applied to the direct gas-phase detection and quantification of chemical warfare agent (CWA) related chemicals. Complementing the discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI) of the Mini 10.5 mass spectrometer with an additional membrane pump, a quasi-continuous sample introduction through the ACI source was achieved. Nerve agent simulants (three dialkyl alkylphosphonates, a dialkyl phosporamidate, and the pesticide dichlorvos) were detected at low gas-phase concentrations with limits of detection ranging from 1.0 μg/m3 to 6.3 μg/m3. Our results demonstrate a sensitivity enhancement for portable MS-instrumentation by using an ACI source, enabling direct, quantitative measurements of volatile organic compounds. Due to its high sensitivity, selectivity, low power consumption (<80 W) and weight (<13 kg), this instrumentation has the potential for direct on-site CWA detection as required by military or civil protection.

  15. Direct and Sensitive Detection of CWA Simulants by Active Capillary Plasma Ionization Coupled to a Handheld Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Etter, Raphael; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-07-01

    An active capillary plasma ionization (ACI) source was coupled to a handheld mass spectrometer (Mini 10.5; Aston Labs, West Lafayette, IN, USA) and applied to the direct gas-phase detection and quantification of chemical warfare agent (CWA) related chemicals. Complementing the discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI) of the Mini 10.5 mass spectrometer with an additional membrane pump, a quasi-continuous sample introduction through the ACI source was achieved. Nerve agent simulants (three dialkyl alkylphosphonates, a dialkyl phosporamidate, and the pesticide dichlorvos) were detected at low gas-phase concentrations with limits of detection ranging from 1.0 μg/m(3) to 6.3 μg/m(3). Our results demonstrate a sensitivity enhancement for portable MS-instrumentation by using an ACI source, enabling direct, quantitative measurements of volatile organic compounds. Due to its high sensitivity, selectivity, low power consumption (<80 W) and weight (<13 kg), this instrumentation has the potential for direct on-site CWA detection as required by military or civil protection. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27020924

  16. State of the Art of Hard and Soft Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of hard and soft ionization sources, providing some details on the practical aspects of their uses as well as ionization mechanisms are discussed. The conditions and uses of hard ionization methods such as electron impact, thermal ionization and inductively coupled plasma techniques are discussed. Moreover, new generation of soft ionization methods such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electro spray ionization and direct analysis in real time are illustrated

  17. Hyphenation of two simultaneously employed soft photo ionization mass spectrometers with thermal analysis of biomass and biochar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► First simultaneous hyphenation of two time-of-flight mass spectrometers with different soft photo ionization techniques (SPI and REMPI) to Thermal Analysis using a newly developed prototype for EGA is presented. ► Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) enables sensitive and selective analysis of aromatic species. ► Single photon ionization (SPI) using VUV light supplied by an innovative electron-beam pumped excimer light source (EBEL) comprehensively ionizes (nearly) all organic molecules. ► The resulting mass spectra show distinct patterns for the evolved gases of the miscellaneous biomasses and chars thereof. ► The potential for detailed kinetic studies is apparent on account of the complex pyrolysis gas compositions. - Abstract: Evolved gas analysis (EGA) is a powerful and complementary tool for Thermal Analysis. In this context, two time-of-flight mass spectrometers with different soft photo-ionization techniques are simultaneously hyphenated to a thermo balance and applied in form of a newly developed prototype for EGA of pyrolysis gases from biomass and biochar. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) is applied for selective analysis of aromatic species. Furthermore, single photon ionization (SPI) using VUV light supplied by an electron-beam pumped excimer light source (EBEL) was used to comprehensively ionize (nearly) all organic molecules. The soft ionization capability of photo-ionization techniques allows direct and on-line analysis of the evolved pyrolysis gases. Characteristic mass spectra with specific patterns could be obtained for the miscellaneous biomass feeds used. Temperature profiles of the biochars reveal a desorption step, followed by pyrolysis as observed for the biomasses. Furthermore, the potential for kinetic studies is apparent for this instrumental setup.

  18. Radiation, chemical and biological protection. Mass destruction weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this text-book mass destruction weapons and radiation, chemical and biological protection are reviewed. The text-book contains the following chapter: (1) Mass destruction weapons; (2) Matter and material; (3) Radioactive materials; (4) Toxic materials; (5) Biological resources; (6) Nuclear energetic equipment; Appendices; References.

  19. Real-time monitoring of enzymatic DNA hydrolysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Gato, Sara; Versluis, Cees; Gerbaux, Pascal; Kleanthous, Colin; Heck, Albert J R

    2005-01-01

    A fast and direct method for the monitoring of enzymatic DNA hydrolysis was developed using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We incorporated the use of a robotic chip-based electrospray ionization source for increased reproducibility and throughput. The mass spectrometry method allows the detection of DNA fragments and intact non-covalent protein-DNA complexes in a single experiment. We used the method to monitor in real-time single-stranded (ss) DNA hydrolysis by colicin E9 DNase and to characterize transient non-covalent E9 DNase-DNA complexes present during the hydrolysis reaction. The mass spectra showed that E9 DNase interacts with ssDNA in the absence of a divalent metal ion, but is strictly dependent on Ni2+ or Co2+ for ssDNA hydrolysis. We demonstrated that the sequence selectivity of E9 DNase is dependent on the ratio protein:ssDNA or the ssDNA concentration and that only 3'-hydroxy and 5'-phosphate termini are produced. It was also shown that the homologous E7 DNase is reactive with Zn2+ as transition metal ion and that this DNase displays a different sequence selectivity. The method described is of general use to analyze the reactivity and specificity of nucleases. PMID:15956101

  20. Electroless plating of silver nanoparticles on porous silicon for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong; Xu, Ning; Huang, Wen-Yi; Han, Huan-Mei; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2009-03-01

    An improved DIOS (desorption ionization on porous silicon) method for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) by electroless plating of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on porous silicon (PSi) was developed. By addition of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) into the AgNO3 plating solution, the plating speed can be slowed down and simultaneously 4-ATP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on AgNPs (4-ATP/AgNPs) were formed. Both AgNPs and 4-ATP/AgNPs coated PSi substrates present much higher stability, sensitivity and reproducibility for LDI MS than the un-treated porous silicon ones. Their shelf life in air was tested for several weeks to a month and their mass spectra still displayed the same high quality and sensitivity as the freshly prepared ones. And more 4-ATP SAMs partly play a role of matrix to increase the ionization efficiency. A small organic molecule of tetrapyridinporphyrin (TPyP), oligomers of polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 and 2300), and a peptide of oxytocin were used as examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the silver-plated PSi as a matrix-free-like method for LDI MS. This approach can obtain limits of detection to femtomoles for TPyP, subpicomoles for oxytocin, and picomoles for PEG 400 and 2300, comparable to the traditional matrix method and much better than the DIOS method. It simplifies the sample preparation as a matrix-free-like method without addition of matrix molecules and homogenizes the sample spread over the spot for better and more even mass signals.

  1. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry of mixtures of triterpene glycosides with paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekar, A. V.; Vetrova, E. V.; Borisenko, N. I.; Yakovishin, L. A.; Grishkovets, V. I.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular complexation of paracetamol with hederagenin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (α-hederin) and its 28-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-O-β-Dglucopyranosyl ether (hederasaponin C) was investigated for the first time using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The glycosides form complexes with paracetamol in a 1:1 molar ratio. The hederasaponin C complex is more stable. The structures of the glycosides and paracetamol are concluded to have an impact on the complexation process.

  2. Activation energies for gas-phase dissociations of multiply charged ions from electrospay ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busman, M.; Rockwood, A.L.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-03-19

    The reactions of multiply protonated melittin molecular ions of various charge states produced from an electrospray ionization source have been studied. The flow of ions entrained in gas through a heated metal capillary inlet serves as a reaction vessel for gas-phase measurements of molecular ion reaction rates using mass spectrometry. Activation energies for the unimolecular dissociation reactions are calculated from the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics. The differences in activation energies for the reactions of the different charge states are attributed to the destabilizing effect of Coulombic repulsion for high charged ions. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Study of multi-photon ionization mass spectra of triethylamine at the laser of 266 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the four-harmonic YAG laser as excitation source, studying on the process of resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of triethylamine, the time-of-flight mass spectra of triethylamine is obtained. Parent ion and fragment ion reach as much as 29 kinds. Analyzing the abnormal variation of (C2H5)2N+ CH2(86+) show that when the signal ions' intensity are very strong, the 25-times instantaneous deceleration effort of 25 kinds of ions before 86+ are stronger than 3-times deceleration effort of 3 kinds of ions after 86+. (authors)

  4. High-resolution, three-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry of gadolinium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaum, K.; Bushaw, B. A.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Wendt, K.

    2001-08-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure triple-resonance autoionization (AI) spectra of gadolinium. Al resonances as narrow as 10 MHz have been observed and isotope shifts and hyperfine structure have been measured in selected AI states. The strongest AI state observed at 49663.576 cm-1 with a photoionization cross section of >3.6×10-15 cm2 was found to have an overall detection efficiency of >3×10-5, allowing application to a number of ultratrace determination problems. Analytical measurements with a diode-laser-based system have been successfully performed on bio-medical tissue samples.

  5. High-resolution, three-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure triple-resonance autoionization (AI) spectra of gadolinium. Al resonances as narrow as 10 MHz have been observed and isotope shifts and hyperfine structure have been measured in selected AI states. The strongest AI state observed at 49663.576 cm-1 with a photoionization cross section of >3.6x10-15 cm2 was found to have an overall detection efficiency of >3x10-5, allowing application to a number of ultratrace determination problems. Analytical measurements with a diode-laser-based system have been successfully performed on bio-medical tissue samples

  6. Cosmetic Analysis Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ramos Catharino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new “omic” platform—Cosmetomics—that proves to be extremely simple and effective in terms of sample preparation and readiness for data acquisition/interpretation is presented. This novel approach employing Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI for cosmetic analysis has proven to readily identify and quantify compounds of interest. It also allows full control of all the production phases, as well as of the final product, by integration of both analytical and statistical data. This work has focused on products of daily use, namely nail polish, lipsticks and eyeliners of multiple brands sold in the worldwide market.

  7. Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDI-MS) of Lipids with Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Coated Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Maiko; Kawabata, Shin-Ichirou; Tamura, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Daigou; Murouchi, Masato; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticle (NP)-coated target plates were employed for the direct detection and analysis of low molecular weight lipids by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). We have demonstrated that the use of the iron oxide NP-coated target provides a simple, direct, and rapid detection method for lipid standards and epidermal surface lipids without any cumbersome sample pretreatment as well as mass spectra that are free of background matrix peaks. Lipid standards (1-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-linoleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) were detected as either protonated or cationated species. Clean MS/MS spectra for each lipid were also successfully obtained. Pre-MS surface cleaning of the target plates with UV-ozone treatment successfully removed organic contaminants that would interfere with the mass spectra especially in the low molecular weight region. Preliminary application of the presented target plate to the detection of endogenous lipids in latent fingerprints showed promising results and for potential use in the visualization and chemical composition determination of latent fingerprints by nanoparticle assistance. PMID:24860715

  8. A comparison of alternating current and direct current electrospray ionization for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Scott A; Chetwani, Nishant; Dovichi, Norman J; Go, David B; Gartner, Carlos A

    2014-04-01

    A series of studies comparing the performance of alternating current electrospray ionization (AC ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and direct current electrospray ionization (DC ESI) MS have been conducted, exploring the absolute signal intensity and signal-to-background ratios produced by both methods using caffeine and a model peptide as targets. Because the high-voltage AC signal was more susceptible to generating gas discharges, the operating voltage range of AC ESI was significantly smaller than that for DC ESI, such that the absolute signal intensities produced by DC ESI at peak voltages were one to two orders of magnitude greater than those for AC ESI. Using an electronegative nebulizing gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), instead of nitrogen (N2) increased the operating range of AC ESI by ~50%, but did not appreciably improve signal intensities. While DC ESI generated far greater signal intensities, both ionization methods produced comparable signal-to-background noise, with AC ESI spectra appearing qualitatively cleaner. A quantitative calibration analysis was performed for two analytes, caffeine and the peptide MRFA. AC ESI utilizing SF6 outperforms all other techniques for the detection of MRFA, producing chromatographic limits of detection nearly one order of magnitude lower than that of DC ESI utilizing N2, and one-half that of DC ESI utilizing SF6. However, DC ESI outperforms AC ESI for the analysis of caffeine, indicating that improvements in spectral quality may benefit certain compounds or classes of compounds, on an individual basis. PMID:24464359

  9. Merits of online electrochemistry liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Wen Donq; Brown, Blake; Chamand, Laura; Brajter-Toth, Anna

    2016-03-01

    A new online electrochemistry/liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS) system with a simple electrochemical thin-layer flow-through cell was developed and tested using N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPA) as a model probe. Although oxidation of DMPA is observed as a result of ionization of LS in positive ion mode LS DESI, application of voltage to the online electrochemical (EC) cell in EC/LS DESI MS increases yields of oxidation products. An advantage of LS DESI MS is its sensitivity in aqueous electrolyte solutions, which improves efficiency of electrochemical reactions in EC/LS DESI MS. In highly conductive low pH aqueous buffer solutions, oxidation efficiency is close to 100 %. EC/ESI MS typically requires mixed aqueous/organic solvents and low electrolyte concentrations for efficient ionization in MS, limiting efficiency of electrochemistry online with MS. Independently, the results verify higher electrochemical oxidation efficiency during positive mode ESI than during LS DESI. Graphical abstract Detection of DMPA oxidation in online electrochemical cell with EC/LS DESI MS. PMID:26886744

  10. Application of pyrolysis-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization for characterization of crude oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Stefan; Streibel, Thorsten; Erdmann, Sabrina; Sklorz, Martin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-15

    A novel analytical system for gas-chromatographic investigation of complex samples has been developed, that combines the advantages of several analytical principles to enhance the analytical information. Decomposition of high molecular weight structures is achieved by pyrolysis and a high separation capacity due to the chromatographic step provides both an universal as well as a selective and sensitive substance detection. The latter is achieved by simultaneously applying electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (EI-QMS) for structural elucidation and [1+1]-resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization (REMPI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS). The system has been evaluated and tested with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) standards. It was applied to crude oil samples for the first time. In such highly complex samples several thousands of compounds are present and the identification especially of low concentrated chemical species such as PAH or their polycyclic aromatic sulfur containing heterocyclic (PASH) derivatives is often difficult. Detection of unalkylated and alkylated PAH together with PASH is considerably enhanced by REMPI-ToFMS, at times revealing aromatic structures which are not observable by EI-QMS due to their low abundance. On the other hand, the databased structure proposals of the EI-QMS analysis are needed to confirm structural information and isomers distinction. The technique allows a complex structure analysis as well as selective assessment of aromatic substances in one measurement. Information about the content of sulfur containing compounds plays a significant role for the increase of efficiency in the processing of petroleum. PMID:25542090

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation in the physico-chemical characteristics of red wine Cabernet Sauvignon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oenology in the current days is increasingly aimed obtain improvements on wine quality produced without there the deterioration of characteristics of the same, using new technologies for such order. The objective of present work will be the application of the radiation ionizing in wines Cabernet Sauvignon, with the interest of analyzing its effects on physic-chemical characteristics of this wines, such as quality, aging and etc. Were analyzed the following strands: degree alcoholic; dry extract; density and absorbance with spectrometer (420, 520 and 620 nm). (author)

  12. Molecular characterization of water soluble organic nitrogen in marine rainwater by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Altieri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON is a subset of the complex organic matter in aerosols and rainwater, which impacts cloud condensation processes and aerosol chemical and optical properties, and may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle of N. However, its sources, composition, connections to inorganic N, and variability are largely unknown. Rainwater samples were collected on the island of Bermuda (32.27° N, 64.87° W, which experiences both anthropogenic and marine influenced air masses. Samples were analyzed by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to chemically characterize the WSON. Elemental compositions of 2455 N containing compounds were determined over the mass range m/z+ 50 to 500. The five compound classes with the largest number of elemental formulas identified, in order from the highest number of formulas to the lowest, contained carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen (CHON+, CHON compounds that contained sulfur (CHONS+, CHON compounds that contained phosphorous (CHONP+, CHON compounds that contained both sulfur and phosphorous (CHONSP+, and compounds that contained only carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN+. No organonitrates or nitrooxy-organosulfates were detected, but there was an increased presence of organic S and organic P containing compounds in the marine rainwater. Compared to rainwater collected in the continental USA, average O:C ratios of all N containing compound classes were lower in the marine samples whereas double bond equivalent values were higher, suggesting a reduced role of secondary formation mechanisms. Cluster analysis showed a clear chemical distinction between samples collected during the cold season (October to March which have anthropogenic air mass origins and samples collected during the warm season (April to September with remote marine air mass origins. This, in conjunction with patterns

  13. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas B. Lentz

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln{sup 11}]-amyloid {beta}-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will become

  14. Electrospray ionization phenomena and the interface of capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently a new electrospray ionization interface for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectroscopy (CE-MS) has been developed. The interface uses a sheath flow of liquid to make electrical contact at the CZE terminus, thus defining both the CZE and electrospray field gradients. Ions created by the ESI process are sampled through a 1 mm nozzle into a region mechanically pumped at 50 L/s using a single-stage roots blower. The ions entering this region are sampled through a 2 mm dia skimmer orifice located 0.5 cm behind the nozzle orifice. Ions passing through the skimmer enter a radio frequency focusing quadrupole. This region is pumped by a cryopump. A mixture of four quaternary phosphonium salts is used to illustrate capillary electrophoresis separations with mass spectroscopy and their uses. 2 figs

  15. Identification of the Species of Origin for Meat Products by Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Julia; Perenyi, Dora; Guallar-Hoyas, Cristina; Egri, Attila; Pringle, Steven D; Stead, Sara; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Chris T; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-06-15

    Increasingly abundant food fraud cases have brought food authenticity and safety into major focus. This study presents a fast and effective way to identify meat products using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS). The experimental setup was demonstrated to be able to record a mass spectrometric profile of meat specimens in a time frame of <5 s. A multivariate statistical algorithm was developed and successfully tested for the identification of animal tissue with different anatomical origin, breed, and species with 100% accuracy at species and 97% accuracy at breed level. Detection of the presence of meat originating from a different species (horse, cattle, and venison) has also been demonstrated with high accuracy using mixed patties with a 5% detection limit. REIMS technology was found to be a promising tool in food safety applications providing a reliable and simple method for the rapid characterization of food products. PMID:27167240

  16. Desorption ElectroSpray Ionization - Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry of synthetic polymers and copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friia, Manel; Legros, Véronique; Tortajada, Jeanine; Buchmann, William

    2012-08-01

    Desorption ElectroSpray Ionization (DESI) - Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry (MS) was evaluated as a new tool for the characterization of various industrial synthetic polymers (poly(ethylene glycol), poly(propylene glycol), poly(methylmethacrylate), poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and copolymers, with masses ranging from 500 g.mol(-1) up to more than 20 000 g.mol(-1) . Satisfying results in terms of signal stability and sensitivity were obtained from hydrophobic surfaces (HTC Prosolia) with a mixture water/methanol (10/90) as spray solvent in the presence of sodium salt. Taking into account the formation of multiplied charged species by DESI-MS, a strategy based on the use of a deconvolution software followed by the automatic assignment of the ions was described allowing the rapid determination of M(n) , M(w) and PDI values. DESI-Orbitrap MS results were compared to those obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization- time-of-flight MS and gel permeation chromatography. An application of DESI-Orbitrap MS for the detection and identification of polymers directly from cosmetics was described. PMID:22899511

  17. Fast Screening of Chicken Egg Lysozyme in White Wine Products by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-quan; JIANG Jie; LI Ming; ZHAO Zhan-feng; FU Jun

    2012-01-01

    Fast detection of trace lysozyme,one of the most important food allergens in white wine samples,was achieved by extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry without sample pretreatment in this study.The multiply-charged ions of m/z 1587 were chosen for the quantitative detection of lysozyme in white wine,showing linear dynamic signal responses in a range of 5-75 μg/mL with a linearity coefficient of 0.999 and an acceptable relative standard deviation(RSD)of 8.0%-15.0% for directly measuring lysozyme in the complex food samples.The limit of detection for lysozyme in white wine sample was calculated to be 5 μg/mL,which was lower than the amounts that can provoke allergic reactions(oral test with 3 mg or labial test with 1 mg/mL).A single sample analysis was completed within 1 min.The data demonstrate that extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is a useful tool for fast screening lysozyme in the complex matrix,showing promising application in the rapid detection of food allergen.

  18. Drug detection and quantification directly from tissue using novel ionization methods for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beixi; Dearring, Chenelle L; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Solvent assisted ionization inlet (SAII) and matrix assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) were used to quantify rapidly an antipsychotic drug, clozapine, directly from surfaces with minimal sample preparation. This simple surface analysis method based on SAII- and MAIV-mass spectrometry (MS) was developed to allow the detection of endogenous lipids, metabolites, and clozapine directly from sections of mouse brain tissue. A rapid surface assessment was achieved by SAII with the assistance of heat applied to the mass spectrometer inlet. MAIV provided an improved reproducibility without the need of a heated inlet. In addition, isotope dilution and standard addition were used without sample clean-up, and the results correlate well with liquid chromatography tandem MS using sample work-up. Using the simple surface methods, standard solutions containing clozapine and a deuterated internal standard (clozapine-d8) at different concentration ratios were used in the extraction and quantification of clozapine from brain tissue sections of a drug-treated mouse using different tissue thicknesses. The amount of clozapine extracted by these surface methods was independent of tissue thickness. PMID:26307700

  19. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-01

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information. PMID:27505037

  20. Analysis of alcohols, as dimethylglycine esters, by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D W

    2001-03-01

    Dimethylglycine (DMG) esters are new derivatives for the rapid, sensitive and selective analysis of primary and secondary alcohols, in complex mixtures, by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Their development was inspired by the use of the complementary dimethylaminoethyl esters for the trace, rapid analysis of fatty acids. DMG esters are simply prepared by heating a dichloromethane solution of the imidazolide of dimethylglycine, containing triethylamine, and an alcohol. DMG esters of long-chain fatty alcohols, isoprenoidal alcohols and hydroxy-acids are analysed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry with a precursor ion of m/z 104 scan. Diols, glyceryl esters, glyceryl ethers and some sterols are analysed by a neutral loss of 103 Da scan. Trimethylglycine (TMG) ester iodides, prepared by alkylation of DMG esters with methyl iodide, are more sensitive derivatives for molecules containing secondary alcohol groups, such as cholesterol and gibberellic acid. They are analysed by a precursor ion of m/z 118 scan. DMG or TMG derivatives were shown to be at least comparable and sometimes an order of magnitude more sensitive than N-methylpyridyl ether derivatives for ESI-MS/MS analysis of the different classes of alcohols. Applications of these derivatives for the diagnosis of inherited disorders and the analysis of natural products are presented. PMID:11312519