WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical imaging high-resolution

  1. Localizing chemical groups while imaging single native proteins by high-resolution atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Hilbert, Manuel; Steinmetz, Michel O; Müller, Daniel J

    2014-05-14

    Simultaneous high-resolution imaging and localization of chemical interaction sites on single native proteins is a pertinent biophysical, biochemical, and nanotechnological challenge. Such structural mapping and characterization of binding sites is of importance in understanding how proteins interact with their environment and in manipulating such interactions in a plethora of biotechnological applications. Thus far, this challenge remains to be tackled. Here, we introduce force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) for the high-resolution imaging of SAS-6, a protein that self-assembles into cartwheel-like structures. Using functionalized AFM tips bearing Ni(2+)-N-nitrilotriacetate groups, we locate specific interaction sites on SAS-6 at nanometer resolution and quantify the binding strength of the Ni(2+)-NTA groups to histidine residues. The FD-based AFM approach can readily be applied to image any other native protein and to locate and structurally map histidine residues. Moreover, the surface chemistry used to functionalize the AFM tip can be modified to map other chemical interaction sites. PMID:24766578

  2. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20–30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

  3. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, R.; Reinhardt, J.; Hofmann, G.;

    2013-01-01

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From these...... data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to...

  4. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  5. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  6. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  7. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  8. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloyeau, D.; Oikawa, T.; Nelayah, J.; Wang, G.; Ricolleau, C.

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  9. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  10. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  11. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  12. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling th

  13. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Xiangqian; Mugler, Dale H; Yu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this letter we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 {\\mu}m. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle income countries.

  14. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  15. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images. PMID:27475069

  16. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  17. GRANULOMETRIC MAPS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Mering

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of land cover mapping from satellite images using granulometric analysis is presented here. Discontinuous landscapes such as steppian bushes of semi arid regions and recently growing urban settlements are especially concerned by this study. Spatial organisations of the land cover are quantified by means of the size distribution analysis of the land cover units extracted from high resolution remotely sensed images. A granulometric map is built by automatic classification of every pixel of the image according to the granulometric density inside a sliding neighbourhood. Granulometric mapping brings some advantages over traditional thematic mapping by remote sensing by focusing on fine spatial events and small changes in one peculiar category of the landscape.

  18. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  19. Fourier Transform Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging, High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Detection of Single Cancer Cells and Single Viral Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu,I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T

    2004-01-01

    Single Cancer Cells from Human tumors are being detected and imaged by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR)Hyperspectral Imaging and Fluorescence Correlation Microspectroscopy. The first FT-NIR chemical, microscopic images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are here reported. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are also presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos as well as 99% accurate calibrations are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such high-resolution, 400 MHz H-1 NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. >~20%) compared to the average levels in non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monito...

  20. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Stolzenberg, U; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the $X$/$X_0$ imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of $X$/$X_0$ imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of ...

  1. Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging and High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Soybean Seeds, Somatic Embryos and Single Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T; AOCS 94th Meeting, Kansas

    2002-01-01

    Novel methodologies are currently being developed and established for the chemical analysis of soybean seeds, embryos and single cells by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR) Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence and High-Resolution NMR (HR-NMR). The first FT-NIR chemical images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are presented here. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such 400 MHz 1H NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. ~20%) compared to non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monitored by FT-NIR with a precision ...

  2. High resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human brain in vivo at 1.5 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Madhwesha; Stewart, Neil J.; Norquay, Graham; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Upon inhalation, xenon diffuses into the bloodstream and is transported to the brain, where it dissolves in various compartments of the brain. Although up to five chemically distinct peaks have been previously observed in 129Xe rat head spectra, to date only three peaks have been reported in the human head. This study demonstrates high resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging (CSI) of 129Xe dissolved in the human head at 1.5 Tesla. Methods A 129Xe radiofrequency coil was built in‐house and 129Xe gas was polarized using spin‐exchange optical pumping. Following the inhalation of 129Xe gas, NMR spectroscopy was performed with spectral resolution of 0.033 ppm. Two‐dimensional CSI in all three anatomical planes was performed with spectral resolution of 2.1 ppm and voxel size 20 mm × 20 mm. Results Spectra of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head showed five distinct peaks at 188 ppm, 192 ppm, 196 ppm, 200 ppm, and 217 ppm. Assignment of these peaks was consistent with earlier studies. Conclusion High resolution spectroscopy and CSI of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head has been demonstrated. For the first time, five distinct NMR peaks have been observed in 129Xe spectra from the human head in vivo. Magn Reson Med 75:2227–2234, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27080441

  3. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  4. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  5. High-resolution ophthalmic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Scot S.; Carrano, Carmen J.

    2007-12-04

    A system for providing an improved resolution retina image comprising an imaging camera for capturing a retina image and a computer system operatively connected to the imaging camera, the computer producing short exposures of the retina image and providing speckle processing of the short exposures to provide the improved resolution retina image. The system comprises the steps of capturing a retina image, producing short exposures of the retina image, and speckle processing the short exposures of the retina image to provide the improved resolution retina image.

  6. High resolution neutron imaging for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution neutron imaging system (NIS) is developed and tested on the OMEGA laser facility for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. This diagnostic uses a coded imaging technique with a high resolution neutron camera. Over the past few years, this detector was improved and neutron images can now be acquired on OMEGA with a 20 μm spatial resolution in the source plane and good signal to noise ratio with both a penumbral and an annular imaging technique. (authors)

  7. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related m...

  8. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  9. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  10. High-resolution colorimetric imaging of paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kirk; Cupitt, John; Saunders, David R.

    1993-05-01

    With the aim of providing a digital electronic replacement for conventional photography of paintings, a scanner has been constructed based on a 3000 X 2300 pel resolution camera which is moved precisely over a 1 meter square area. Successive patches are assembled to form a mosaic which covers the whole area at c. 20 pels/mm resolution, which is sufficient to resolve the surface textures, particularly craquelure. To provide high color accuracy, a set of seven broad-band interference filters are used to cover the visible spectrum. A calibration procedure based upon a least-mean-squares fit to the color of patches from a Macbeth Colorchecker chart yields an average color accuracy of better than 3 units in the CMC uniform color space. This work was mainly carried out as part of the VASARI project funded by the European Commission's ESPRIT program, involving companies and galleries from around Europe. The system is being used to record images for conservation research, for archival purposes and to assist in computer-aided learning in the field of art history. The paper will describe the overall system design, including the selection of the various hardware components and the design of controlling software. The theoretical basis for the color calibration methodology is described as well as the software for its practical implementation. The mosaic assembly procedure and some of the associated image processing routines developed are described. Preliminary results from the research will be presented.

  11. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  12. Light energy matching method in high-resolution image reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Wang(王凌); Zhihai Xu(徐之海); Huajun Feng(冯华君); Ping Zhang(张平)

    2003-01-01

    Many approaches for high-resolution image reconstruction have been proposed in some literatures. One ofthe most commonly ways is to reconstruct a high-resolution image from a number of rotated and translatedimages with low resolution. In this process, the exposure difference among original images will decreasethe quality of the reconstructed image. In order to remove the influence of the exposure difference, alight energy matching method is proposed in this paper. The theoretical analysis is illustrated in details.Experimental results show that the theoretical analysis is correct and the proposed method is valid.

  13. Virtual microscope interface to high resolution histological images

    OpenAIRE

    Feit, Josef; Matyska, Luděk; Ulman, Vladimír; HEJTMÁNEK, Lukáš; Jedličková, Hana; Ježová, Marta; Moulis, Mojmír; Feitová, Věra

    2008-01-01

    The Hypertext atlas of Dermatopathology, the Atlas of Fetal and Neonatal Pathology and Hypertext atlas of Pathology (this one in Czech only) are available at . These atlases offer many clinical, macroscopic and microscopic images, together with short introductory texts. Most of the images are annotated and arrows pointing to the important parts of the image can be activated. The Virtual Microscope interface is used for the access to the histological images obtained in high resolution using au...

  14. Texture analysis of high-resolution FLAIR images for TLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Elisevich, Kost

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the texture information of high-resolution FLAIR images of the brain with the aim of determining the abnormality and consequently the candidacy of the hippocampus for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) surgery. Intensity and volume features of the hippocampus from FLAIR images of the brain have been previously shown to be useful in detecting the abnormal hippocampus in TLE. However, the small size of the hippocampus may limit the texture information. High-resolution FLAIR images show more details of the abnormal intensity variations of the hippocampi and therefore are more suitable for texture analysis. We study and compare the low and high-resolution FLAIR images of six epileptic patients. The hippocampi are segmented manually by an expert from T1-weighted MR images. Then the segmented regions are mapped on the corresponding FLAIR images for texture analysis. The 2-D wavelet transforms of the hippocampi are employed for feature extraction. We compare the ability of the texture features from regular and high-resolution FLAIR images to distinguish normal and abnormal hippocampi. Intracranial EEG results as well as surgery outcome are used as gold standard. The results show that the intensity variations of the hippocampus are related to the abnormalities in the TLE.

  15. Automatic Matching of High Resolution Satellite Images Based on RFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JI Shunping

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A matching method for high resolution satellite images based on RFM is presented.Firstly,the RFM parameters are used to predict the initial parallax of corresponding points and the prediction accuracy is analyzed.Secondly,the approximate epipolar equation is constructed based on projection tracking and its accuracy is analyzed.Thirdly,approximate 1D image matching is executed on pyramid images and least square matching on base images.At last RANSAC is imbedded to eliminate mis-matching points and matching results are obtained.Test results verified the method more robust and with higher matching rate,compared to 2D gray correlation method and the popular SIFT matching method,and the method preferably solved the question of high resolution satellite image matching with different stereo model,different time and large rotation images.

  16. High-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the development of high-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging. A pinhole collimator has been used for high-resolution animal SPECT to provide better spatial resolution and detection efficiency in comparison with a parallel-hole collimator. The theory of imaging characteristics of the pinhole collimator is presented and the designs of the pinhole aperture are discussed. The detector technologies used for the development of small-animal SPECT and the recent advances are presented. The evolving trend of small-animal SPECT is toward a multi-pinhole and a multi-detector system to obtain a high resolution and also a high detection efficiency.

  17. High resolution field imaging with atomic vapor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I report on the development of imaging techniques in atomic vapor cells. This is a relatively unexplored area, despite the ubiquitous use of imaging in experiments with ultracold atoms. Our main focus is in high resolution imaging of microwave near fields, for which there is currently no satisfactory established technique. We detect microwave fields through Rabi oscillations driven by the microwave on atomic hyperfine transitions. The technique can be easily modified to also i...

  18. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: high resolution imaging requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiao-Lei; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W; Liao, Kai; Marshall, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as "Einstein Rings" in high resolution images. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope $\\gamma'$ of the...

  19. Land Cover Semantic Annotation Derived from High Resolution SAR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Dumitru, Corneliu Octavian; Schwarz, Gottfried; Datcu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Users of remote sensing images analyzing land cover characteristics are very much interested in classification schemes that define a consistent set of target categories. Up to now, a number of established classification schemes are mainly being used by interpreters of medium-resolution optical satellite image focusing on large-scale land cover. In contrast, we concentrate in this publication on the definition of a new classification scheme for high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (S...

  20. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embyros (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) creates isotropic 3D imaging of tissue. Two approaches exist today: Wide-field OPT illuminates the entire sample and acquires projection images with a camera; Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) generates the projection with a moving laser beam and point detector. SLOT has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for tissue fluorescence imaging. Regardless the approach, traditional OPT has to compromise between the resolution and the depth of view. In traditional SLOT, the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging through a large volume specimen. We report using Bessel beam instead of Gaussian beam to perform SLOT. By illuminating samples with a narrow Bessel beam throughout an extended depth, high-resolution projection images can be measured in large volume. Under Bessel illumination, the projection image contains signal from annular-rings of the Bessel beam. Traditional inverse Radon transform of these projections will result in ringing artifacts in reconstructed imaging. Thus a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm is developed to perform tomography reconstructing of Bessel-illuminated projection images. The resulting 3D imaging is free of artifact and achieved cellular resolution in extended sample volume. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove Bessel SLOT a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  1. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  2. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  3. High resolution surface plasmon microscopy for cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoul, F.; Monier, K.; Roland, T.; Elezgaray, J.; Berguiga, L.

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a new non-labeling high resolution microscopy method for cellular imaging. This method called SSPM (Scanning Surface Plasmon Microscopy) pushes down the resolution limit of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) to sub-micronic scales. High resolution SPRi is obtained by the surface plasmon lauching with a high numerical aperture objective lens. The advantages of SPPM compared to other high resolution SPRi's rely on three aspects; (i) the interferometric detection of the back reflected light after plasmon excitation, (ii) the twodimensional scanning of the sample for image reconstruction, (iii) the radial polarization of light, enhancing both resolution and sensitivity. This microscope can afford a lateral resolution of - 150 nm in liquid environment and - 200 nm in air. We present in this paper images of IMR90 fibroblasts obtained with SSPM in dried environment. Internal compartments such as nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, cellular and nuclear membrane can be recognized without labelling. We propose an interpretation of the ability of SSPM to reveal high index contrast zones by a local decomposition of the V (Z) function describing the response of the SSPM.

  4. Multispectral high-resolution hologram generation using orthographic projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, I.; Guo, C.; Sheridan, J. T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new method of synthesizing a digital hologram of three-dimensional (3D) real-world objects from multiple orthographic projection images (OPI). A high-resolution multiple perspectives of 3D objects (i.e., two dimensional elemental image array) are captured under incoherent white light using synthetic aperture integral imaging (SAII) technique and their OPIs are obtained respectively. The reference beam is then multiplied with the corresponding OPI and integrated to form a Fourier hologram. Eventually, a modified phase retrieval algorithm (GS/HIO) is applied to reconstruct the hologram. The principle is validated experimentally and the results support the feasibility of the proposed method.

  5. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  6. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  7. Detection of engineering vehicles in high-resolution monitoring images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun LIU; Yin ZHANG; San-yuan ZHANG; Ying WANG; Zhong-yan LIANG; Xiu-zi YE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel formulation for detecting objects with articulated rigid bodies from high-resolution monitoring images, particularly engineering vehicles. There are many pixels in high-resolution monitoring images, and most of them represent the background. Our method fi rst detects object patches from monitoring images using a coarse detection process. In this phase, we build a descriptor based on histograms of oriented gradient, which contain color frequency information. Then we use a linear support vector machine to rapidly detect many image patches that may contain object parts, with a low false negative rate and a high false positive rate. In the second phase, we apply a refi nement classifi cation to determine the patches that actually contain objects. In this stage, we increase the size of the image patches so that they include the complete object using models of the object parts. Then an accelerated and improved salient mask is used to improve the performance of the dense scale-invariant feature transform descriptor. The detection process returns the absolute position of positive objects in the original images. We have applied our methods to three datasets to demonstrate their effectiveness.

  8. High-resolution Imaging Techniques for the Assessment of Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Roland; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The importance of assessing the bone’s microarchitectural make-up in addition to its mineral density in the context of osteoporosis has been emphasized in a number of publications. The high spatial resolution required to resolve the bone’s microstructure in a clinically feasible scan time is challenging. Currently, the best suited modalities meeting these requirements in vivo are high-resolution peripheral quantitative imaging (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas HR-pQCT is limited to peripheral skeleton regions like the wrist and ankle, MRI can also image other sites like the proximal femur but usually with lower spatial resolution. In addition Multidetector-CT has been used for high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone structure, however, the radiation dose is a limiting factor. This article provides an overview of the different modalities, technical requirements and recent developments in this emerging field. Details regarding imaging protocols as well as image post-processing methods for bone structure quantification are discussed. PMID:20609895

  9. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Dengler, Robert J. (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional imaging radar operating at high frequency e.g., 670 GHz, is disclosed. The active target illumination inherent in radar solves the problem of low signal power and narrow-band detection by using submillimeter heterodyne mixer receivers. A submillimeter imaging radar may use low phase-noise synthesizers and a fast chirper to generate a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) waveform. Three-dimensional images are generated through range information derived for each pixel scanned over a target. A peak finding algorithm may be used in processing for each pixel to differentiate material layers of the target. Improved focusing is achieved through a compensation signal sampled from a point source calibration target and applied to received signals from active targets prior to FFT-based range compression to extract and display high-resolution target images. Such an imaging radar has particular application in detecting concealed weapons or contraband.

  10. Coregistration of high-resolution Mars orbital images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    The systematic orbital imaging of the Martian surface started 4 decades ago from NASA's Viking Orbiter 1 & 2 missions, which were launched in August 1975, and acquired orbital images of the planet between 1976 and 1980. The result of this reconnaissance was the first medium-resolution (i.e. ≤ 300m/pixel) global map of Mars, as well as a variety of high-resolution images (reaching up to 8m/pixel) of special regions of interest. Over the last two decades NASA has sent 3 more spacecraft with onboard instruments for high-resolution orbital imaging: Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) having onboard the Mars Orbital Camera - Narrow Angle (MOC-NA), Mars Odyssey having onboard the Thermal Emission Imaging System - Visual (THEMIS-VIS) and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) having on board two distinct high-resolution cameras, Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). Moreover, ESA has the multispectral High resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard ESA's Mars Express with resolution up to 12.5m since 2004. Overall, this set of cameras have acquired more than 400,000 high-resolution images, i.e. with resolution better than 100m and as fine as 25 cm/pixel. Notwithstanding the high spatial resolution of the available NASA orbital products, their accuracy of areo-referencing is often very poor. As a matter of fact, due to pointing inconsistencies, usually form errors in roll attitude, the acquired products may actually image areas tens of kilometers far away from the point that they are supposed to be looking at. On the other hand, since 2004, the ESA Mars Express has been acquiring stereo images through the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), with resolution that is usually 12.5-25 metres per pixel. The achieved coverage is more than 64% for images with resolution finer than 20 m/pixel, while for ~40% of Mars, Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) have been produced with are co-registered with MOLA [Gwinner et al., 2010]. The HRSC images and DTMs

  11. Quantifying and containing the curse of high resolution coronal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Delouille

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Future missions such as Solar Orbiter (SO, InterHelioprobe, or Solar Probe aim at approaching the Sun closer than ever before, with on board some high resolution imagers (HRI having a subsecond cadence and a pixel area of about (80 km2 at the Sun during perihelion. In order to guarantee their scientific success, it is necessary to evaluate if the photon counts available at these resolution and cadence will provide a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR.

    For example, if the inhomogeneities in the Quiet Sun emission prevail at higher resolution, one may hope to locally have more photon counts than in the case of a uniform source. It is relevant to quantify how inhomogeneous the quiet corona will be for a pixel pitch that is about 20 times smaller than in the case of SoHO/EIT, and 5 times smaller than TRACE.

    We perform a first step in this direction by analyzing and characterizing the spatial intermittency of Quiet Sun images thanks to a multifractal analysis. We identify the parameters that specify the scale-invariance behavior. This identification allows next to select a family of multifractal processes, namely the Compound Poisson Cascades, that can synthesize artificial images having some of the scale-invariance properties observed on the recorded images.

    The prevalence of self-similarity in Quiet Sun coronal images makes it relevant to study the ratio between the SNR present at SoHO/EIT images and in coarsened images. SoHO/EIT images thus play the role of "high resolution" images, whereas the "low-resolution" coarsened images are rebinned so as to simulate a smaller angular resolution and/or a larger distance to the Sun. For a fixed difference in angular resolution and in Spacecraft-Sun distance, we determine the proportion of pixels having a SNR preserved at high resolution given a particular increase in effective area. If scale-invariance continues to prevail at smaller scales, the conclusion reached

  12. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  13. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  14. Detection of Barchan Dunes in High Resolution Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaoui, M. A.; Adnani, M.; El Belrhiti, H.; Chaouki, I. E.; Masmoudi, C.

    2016-06-01

    Barchan dunes are the fastest moving sand dunes in the desert. We developed a process to detect barchans dunes on High resolution satellite images. It consisted of three steps, we first enhanced the image using histogram equalization and noise reduction filters. Then, the second step proceeds to eliminate the parts of the image having a texture different from that of the barchans dunes. Using supervised learning, we tested a coarse to fine textural analysis based on Kolomogorov Smirnov test and Youden's J-statistic on co-occurrence matrix. As an output we obtained a mask that we used in the next step to reduce the search area. In the third step we used a gliding window on the mask and check SURF features with SVM to get barchans dunes candidates. Detected barchans dunes were considered as the fusion of overlapping candidates. The results of this approach were very satisfying in processing time and precision.

  15. High Resolution Image Correspondences for Video Post-Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Magnor

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for estimating dense image correspondences. Our versatile approach lends itself to various tasks typical for video post-processing, including image morphing, optical flow estimation, stereo rectification, disparity/depth reconstruction, and baseline adjustment. We incorporate recent advances in feature matching, energy minimization, stereo vision, and data clustering into our approach. At the core of our correspondence estimation we use Efficient Belief Propagation for energy minimization. While state-of-the-art algorithms only work on thumbnail-sized images, our novel feature downsampling scheme in combination with a simple, yet efficient data term compression, can cope with high-resolution data. The incorporation of SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform features into data term computation further resolves matching ambiguities, making long-range correspondence estimation possible. We detect occluded areas by evaluating the correspondence symmetry, we further apply Geodesic matting to automatically determine plausible values in these regions.

  16. High Resolution Image Correspondences for Video Post-Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Magnor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for estimating dense image correspondences. Our versatile approach lends itself to various tasks typical for video post-processing, including image morphing, optical flow estimation, stereo rectification, disparity/depth reconstruction, and baseline adjustment. We incorporate recent advances in feature matching, energy minimization, stereo vision, and data clustering into our approach. At the core of our correspondence estimation we use Efficient Belief Propagation for energy minimization. While state-of-the-art algorithms only work on thumbnail-sized images, our novel feature downsampling scheme in combination with a simple, yet efficient data term compression, can cope with high-resolution data. The incorporation of SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform features into data term computation further resolves matching ambiguities, making long-range correspondence estimation possible. We detect occluded areas by evaluating the correspondence symmetry, we further apply Geodesic matting to automatically determine plausible values in these regions.

  17. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil-brine interfacial tension and droplet formation: new results using new high resolution imaging setup and weathered oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelifa, Ali [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada (Canada)], email: ali.khelifa@ec.gc.ca; Charron, Danielle Marie; Tong, Tsz-Shan; Roshan Singh, Nigel [University of Waterloo (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a two- phase R and D project which has been conducted on the quantitative understanding of oil dispersion. Crude oils were discussed in the first part of this study while weathered oils are addressed in the second part. The two study phases present ways to separate the direct effects of chemical dispersants on oil properties and the effects of mixing on the dispersion of chemically treated oil. Results are presented for both tested crude and weathered oils. The results demonstrate that oil weathering can lead to a reduction of the efficacy of chemical dispersants in decreasing interfacial tension. When interfacial tension declines to a specific value, more dispersant is needed for weathered than for crude oils. Previous studies have already shown the translation of this effect to the resulting size distribution. Nevertheless, oil weathering also has a great impact on the viscosity of the oil and the dispersion process.

  18. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Frank M., E-mail: frank.gagliardi@wbrc.org.au [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia and School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia); Cornelius, Iwan [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Blencowe, Anton [Division of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia and Division of Information Technology, Engineering and the Environment, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Franich, Rick D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Geso, Moshi [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  19. High-resolution imaging methods in array signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki

    in active sonar signal processing for detection and imaging of submerged oil contamination in sea water from a deep-water oil leak. The submerged oil _eld is modeled as a uid medium exhibiting spatial perturbations in the acoustic parameters from their mean ambient values which cause weak scattering......The purpose of this study is to develop methods in array signal processing which achieve accurate signal reconstruction from limited observations resulting in high-resolution imaging. The focus is on underwater acoustic applications and sonar signal processing both in active (transmit and receive......-of-arrival (DOA) of the associated wavefronts from a limited number of observations. Usually, there are only a few sources generating the acoustic wavefield such that DOA estimation is essentially a sparse signal reconstruction problem. Conventional methods for DOA estimation (i.e., beamforming) suffer from...

  20. High resolution imaging of dynamic surface processes from the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, A.; Green, J. J.; De Jong, E. M.; Knight, R.; Bills, B.; Arrowsmith, R.

    Spaceborne persistent multi-angle imaging allows staring at selected targets during an orbit pass. From its vantage point on the International Space Station (ISS) a persistent Earth imaging telescope would provide hundreds of high-resolution images simultaneously. Observations could be in visible and SWIR bands as it stares at a scene of interest. These images provide rich multi-angle stereo views enabling understanding of rapidly changing Earth features with many applications to Earth science and disaster response. Current academic state-of-the-art is driven by single images taken with a near nadir view. Persistent imaging could address NASA's goal of understanding how and why the Earth's environment is changing, and could be used for forecasting and mitigating the effects of natural disasters. Specifically such a mission could be used to answer the questions: 1) How are Earth's vulnerable systems reflecting changes in climate? and 2) What processes and features characterize the magnitude and extent of disasters? A mission would meet geomorphologists' requirements observing changing features such as landslides, earthquakes, floods, volcanoes, and glaciers.

  1. A high-resolution radio image of a young supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supernovae in our own Galaxy are so rare that images of their remnants can show only the late aftermath of an explosion that occurred anything from a few hundred to several tens of thousands of years ago. Young supernovae are seen frequently in other galaxies, but because they are more distant it has not been possible until now to obtain high-resolution images that would reveal details of the explosion and the immediate development of the ejected material. Here we present a very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) radio image of the bright supernova 1986J, which occurred in the galaxy NGC891 at a distance of ∼12 Mpc. No detailed image of any supernova or remnant has been obtained before so soon after the explosion. Our image shows a shell of emission with jet-like protrusions. Their analysis should advance our understanding of the dynamics of the expanding debris, the dissipation of energy into the surrounding circumstellar medium, and the evolution of the supernova into the remnant. (author)

  2. Ultrasound-aided high-resolution biophotonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-10-01

    We develop novel biophotonic imaging for early-cancer detection, a grand challenge in cancer research, using nonionizing electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves. Unlike ionizing x-ray radiation, nonionizing electromagnetic waves such as optical waves are safe for biomedical applications and reveal new contrast mechanisms and functional information. For example, our spectroscopic oblique-incidence reflectometry can detect skin cancers based on functional hemoglobin parameters and cell nuclear size with 95% accuracy. Unfortunately, electromagnetic waves in the nonionizing spectral region do not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as do x-rays. Consequently, high-resolution tomography based on nonionizing electromagnetic waves alone, as demonstrated by our Mueller optical coherence tomography, is limited to superficial tissue imaging. Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, furnishes good imaging resolution but has poor contrast in early-stage tumors and has strong speckle artifacts as well. We developed ultrasound-mediated imaging modalities by combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically. The hybrid modalities yield speckle-free electromagnetic-contrast at ultrasonic resolution in relatively large biological tissue. In ultrasound-modulated (acousto)-optical tomography, a focused ultrasonic wave encodes diffuse laser light in scattering biological tissue. In photo-acoustic (thermo-acoustic) tomography, a low-energy laser (RF) pulse induces ultrasonic waves in biological tissue due to thermoelastic expansion.

  3. High resolution imaging with impulse based thermoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Hajiaboli, Amir; Sergiadis, George; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-07-01

    Existing imaging modalities like microwave- or radiofrequency (RF) induced thermoacoustic tomography systems show the potential for resolving structures deep inside tissue due to the high penetration properties of RF. However, one of the major drawbacks of existing thermoacoustic tomography systems with pulse modulated carrier frequency excitation is the compromise between efficient signal generation and attainable spatial resolution. In order to overcome limitations of conventional thermoacoustic imaging methods, we herein present and experimentally validate our novel approach towards high resolution thermoacoustic tomography. Instead of carrier-frequency amplification, we utilize ultrahigh-energy electromagnetic impulses at nanosecond duration with near-field energy coupling, thus maintaining thermoacoustic signal strength without compromising spatial resolution. Preliminary experiments on highly absorbing objects, consisting of copper wires with characteristic sizes of ~100 μm, reveal the resolution performance which yields 160 μm. Furthermore, benefits like its cost effectiveness, simplicity and compactness with the potential application in small animal imaging as well as human body imaging show that thermoacoustic tomography with impulse excitation is a promising imaging modality which has a broad range of applications.

  4. A high-resolution radio image of a young supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, N.; Rupen, M.P.; Shapiro, I.I. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA)); Preston, R.A. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Rius, A. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Astronomia y Geodesia)

    1991-03-21

    Supernovae in our own Galaxy are so rare that images of their remnants can show only the late aftermath of an explosion that occurred anything from a few hundred to several tens of thousands of years ago. Young supernovae are seen frequently in other galaxies, but because they are more distant it has not been possible until now to obtain high-resolution images that would reveal details of the explosion and the immediate development of the ejected material. Here we present a very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) radio image of the bright supernova 1986J, which occurred in the galaxy NGC891 at a distance of {similar to}12 Mpc. No detailed image of any supernova or remnant has been obtained before so soon after the explosion. Our image shows a shell of emission with jet-like protrusions. Their analysis should advance our understanding of the dynamics of the expanding debris, the dissipation of energy into the surrounding circumstellar medium, and the evolution of the supernova into the remnant. (author).

  5. Monitoring of vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li; Li Li-juan; Liang Li-qiao; Li Jiu-yi

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of vegetation coverage on a small scale is the foundation for the monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage and of the inversion model of monitoring vegetation coverage on a large scale by remote sensing. Using the object-oriented analytical software,Definiens Professional 5,a new method for calculating vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images(aerial photographs or near-surface photography)is proposed. Our research supplies references to remote sensing measurements of vegetation coverage on a small scale and accurate fundamental data for the inversion model of vegetation coverage on a large and intermediatc scale to improve the accuracy of remote sensing monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage.

  6. High-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of the individual steps in metastasis is crucial if insights at the molecular level are to be linked to the cell biology of cancer. A technical hurdle to achieving the analysis of the individual steps of metastasis is the fact that, at the gross level, tumors are heterogeneous in both animal models and patients. Human primary tumors show extensive variation in all properties ranging from growth and morphology of the tumor through tumor-cell density in the blood and formation and growth of metastases. Methods capable of the direct visualization and analysis of tumor-cell behavior at single-cell resolution in vivo have become crucial in advancing the understanding of mechanisms of metastasis, the definition of microenvironment, and the markers related to both. This article discusses the use of high-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors (specifically breast tumors in mice) in vivo.

  7. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: High resolution imaging requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiao -Lei [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Treu, Tommaso [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Agnello, Adriano [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Auger, Matthew W. [Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Liao, Kai [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marshall, Philip J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ``Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρtot∝ r–γ' for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. Furthermore, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive

  8. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  9. High resolution mm-VLBI imaging of Cygnus A

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, Bia; Bach, Uwe; Ros, Eduardo; Zensus, J Anton

    2015-01-01

    At a distance of 249 Mpc ($z$=0.056), Cygnus A is the only powerful FR II radio galaxy for which a detailed sub-parsec scale imaging of the base of both jet and counter-jet can be obtained. Observing with VLBI at millimeter wavelengths is fundamental for this object, as it uncovers those regions which appear self-absorbed or free-free absorbed by a circumnuclear torus at longer wavelengths. We performed 7 mm Global VLBI observations, achieving ultra-high resolution imaging on scales down to 90 $\\mu$as. This resolution corresponds to a linear scale of only $\\sim$400 Schwarzschild radii. We studied the transverse structure of the jets through a pixel-based analysis, and kinematic properties of the main emission features by modeling the interferometric visibilities with two-dimensional Gaussian components. Both jets appear limb-brightened, and their opening angles are relatively large ($\\phi_\\mathrm {j}\\sim 10^{\\circ}$). The flow is observed to accelerate within the inner-jet up to scales of $\\sim$1 pc, while lo...

  10. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  11. High Resolution Imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy: Contribution of short-range force to the imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Toyoaki; Kotone, Akiyama; Masanori, Ono; Toshio, Sakurai; Yukio, Hasegawa

    2003-03-01

    Recent developments in force detection technique have made us possible to obtain atomically resolved images of the Si(111)-(7x7) surface by AFM. Compared with STM, however, its spatial resolution remains limited. In this presentation, we demonstrate that with careful pretreatment and appropriate experimental parameters, the structure of the rest-atom layer can be imaged using AFM by detecting the short-range force due to the single chemical bonding. The detection of the short-range force is verified by analysis of the frequency-shift versus distance curve (force curve). This unprecedented high resolution is achieved by reducing background forces due to the long-range interactions with small oscillation amplitude of the cantilever and an atomically sharp tip. The high temperature annealing of the cantilever assists in obtaining a bare silicon tip on the cantilever without unwanted tip-blunting, and improving the Q-factor of the cantilever. This study implies that characterization of the AFM tip in nanometer scale, not only on the apex atoms but also its shape near the apex, is important and critical for AFM high resolution imaging.

  12. High Resolution Image Reconstruction from Projection of Low Resolution Images DIffering in Subpixel Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareboyana, Manohar; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Bennett, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple algorithm that projects low resolution (LR) images differing in subpixel shifts on a high resolution (HR) also called super resolution (SR) grid. The algorithm is very effective in accuracy as well as time efficiency. A number of spatial interpolation techniques using nearest neighbor, inverse-distance weighted averages, Radial Basis Functions (RBF) etc. used in projection yield comparable results. For best accuracy of reconstructing SR image by a factor of two requires four LR images differing in four independent subpixel shifts. The algorithm has two steps: i) registration of low resolution images and (ii) shifting the low resolution images to align with reference image and projecting them on high resolution grid based on the shifts of each low resolution image using different interpolation techniques. Experiments are conducted by simulating low resolution images by subpixel shifts and subsampling of original high resolution image and the reconstructing the high resolution images from the simulated low resolution images. The results of accuracy of reconstruction are compared by using mean squared error measure between original high resolution image and reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested on remote sensing images and found to outperform previously proposed techniques such as Iterative Back Projection algorithm (IBP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and Maximum a posterior (MAP) algorithms. The algorithm is robust and is not overly sensitive to the registration inaccuracies.

  13. Special issue on high-resolution optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter J. S.; Davis, Ilan; Galbraith, Catherine G.; Stemmer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The pace of development in the field of advanced microscopy is truly breath-taking, and is leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of molecular machines and cell function. This special issue of Journal of Optics draws attention to a number of interesting approaches, ranging from fluorescence and imaging of unlabelled cells, to computational methods, all of which are describing the ever increasing detail of the dynamic behaviour of molecules in the living cell. This is a field which traditionally, and currently, demonstrates a marvellous interplay between the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, where apparent boundaries to resolution dissolve and living cells are viewed in ever more clarity. It is fertile ground for those interested in optics and non-conventional imaging to contribute high-impact outputs in the fields of cell biology and biomedicine. The series of articles presented here has been selected to demonstrate this interdisciplinarity and to encourage all those with a background in the physical sciences to 'dip their toes' into the exciting and dynamic discoveries surrounding cell function. Although single molecule super-resolution microscopy is commercially available, specimen preparation and interpretation of single molecule data remain a major challenge for scientists wanting to adopt the techniques. The paper by Allen and Davidson [1] provides a much needed detailed introduction to the practical aspects of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, including sample preparation, image acquisition and image analysis, as well as a brief description of the different variants of single molecule localization microscopy. Since super-resolution microscopy is no longer restricted to three-dimensional imaging of fixed samples, the review by Fiolka [2] is a timely introduction to techniques that have been successfully applied to four-dimensional live cell super-resolution microscopy. The combination of multiple high-resolution techniques

  14. High-Resolution Imaging of Asteroids/Satellites with AO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, William

    2012-02-01

    We propose to make high-resolution observations of asteroids using AO, to measure size, shape, and pole position (spin vectors), and/or to search for satellites. We have demonstrated that AO imaging allows determination of the pole/dimensions in 1 or 2 nights on a single target, rather than the years of observations with lightcurve inversion techniques that only yield poles and axial ratios, not true dimensions. Our new technique (KOALA) combines AO imaging with lightcurve and occultation data for optimum size/shape determinations. We request that LGS be available for faint targets, but using NGS AO, we will measure several large and intermediate asteroids that are favorably placed in spring/summer of 2012 for size/shape/pole. Accurately determining the volume from the often-irregular shape allows us to derive densities to much greater precision in cases where the mass is known, e.g., from the presence of a satellite. We will search several d! ozen asteroids for the presence of satellites, particularly in under-studied populations, particularly NEOs (we have recently achieved the first-ever optical image of an NEO binary [Merline et al. 2008b, IAUC 8977]). Satellites provide a real-life lab for testing collisional models. We will search for satellites around special objects at the request of lightcurve observers, and we will make a search for debris in the vicinity of Pluto, in support of the New Horizons mission. Our shape/size work requires observations over most of a full rotation period (typically several hours).

  15. High resolution Doppler imager on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, W.R.; Hays, P.B.; Grassl, H.J.; Gell, D.A.; Burrage, M.D.; Marshall, A.R.; Ortland, D.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite has been providing measurements of the wind field in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere since November 1991. Examination of various calibration data indicates the instrument has remained remarkably stable since launch. The instrument has a thermal drift of about 30 m/s/{degree}C (slightly dependent on wavelength) and a long-term temporal drift that has amounted to about 80 m/s since launch. These effects are removed in the data processing leaving an uncertainty in the instrument stability of {minus}2 nVs. The temperature control of the instrument has improved significantly since launch as a new method was implemented. The initial temperature control held the instrument temperature at about {+-}1{degree}C. The improved method, which holds constant the temperature of the optical bench instead of the radiator, keeps the instrument temperature at about 0.2{degree}C. The calibrations indicate very little change in the sensitivity of the instrument. The detector response has shown no degradation and the optics have not changed their transmittance.

  16. Preparation of cell membranes for high resolution imaging by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cell membrane structure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been limited because of the softness of cell membranes. Here, we utilize a new technique of sample preparation to lay red blood cell membranes on the top of a mica surface to obtain high resolution images by in-situ AFM on both sides of cell membranes. Our results indicate that the location of oligosaccharides and proteins in red blood cell membranes might be different from the current membrane model. The inner membrane leaflet is covered by dense proteins with fewer free lipids than expected. In contrast, the outer membrane leaflet is quite smooth; oligosaccharides and peptides supposed to protrude out of the outer membrane leaflet surface might be actually hidden in the middle of hydrophilic lipid heads; transmembrane proteins might form domains in the membranes revealed by PNGase F and trypsin digestion. Our result could be significant to interpret some functions about red blood cell membranes and guide to heal the blood diseases related to cell membranes.

  17. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  18. High resolution Ceres HAMO atlas derived from Dawn FC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chris T.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the orbit of dwarf planet Ceres in March 2015, and will characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Ceres. One of the major goals of the mission is a global mapping of Ceres. Data: The Dawn mission was mapping Ceres in HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 1475 km altitude) between August and October 2015. The framing camera took about 2,600 clear filter images with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during these cycles. The images were taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We selected images from one cycle (cycle #1) for the mosaicking process to have similar viewing and illumination conditions. Very minor gaps in the coverage were filled with a few images from cycle #2. Data Processing: The first step of the processing chain towards the cartographic products is to ortho-rectify the images to the proper scale and map projec-tion type. This process requires detailed information of the Dawn orbit and attitude data and of the topography of the targets. Both, improved orientation and a high-resolution shape model, are provided by stereo processing (bundle block adjustment) of the HAMO stereo image dataset [3]. Ceres's HAMO shape model was used for the calculation of the ray intersection points while the map projection itself was done onto the reference sphere of Ceres with a radius of 470 km. The final step is the controlled mosaicking) of all images to a global mosaic of Ceres, the so-called basemap. Ceres map tiles: The Ceres atlas was produced in a scale of 1:750,000 and consists of 15 tiles that conform to the quadrangle scheme proposed by Greeley and Batson [4]. A map scale of 1:750,000 guarantees a mapping at the highest available Dawn resolution in HAMO. The individual tiles were extracted from the global mosaic and reprojected. Nomenclature: The Dawn team proposed 81 names for geological features. By international

  19. High-resolution radio imaging of young supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Alberdi, A; Ros, E; Guirado, J C; Lara, L; Mantovani, F; Stockdale, C J; Weiler, K W; Diamond, P J; Van Dyk, S D; Lundqvist, P; Panagia, N; Shapiro, I I; Sramek, R

    2004-01-01

    The high resolution obtained through the use of VLBI gives an unique opportunity to directly observe the interaction of an expanding radio supernova with its surrounding medium. We present here results from our VLBI observations of the young supernovae SN 1979C, SN 1986J, and SN 2001gd.

  20. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  1. High-resolution Image Reconstruction by Neural Network and Its Application in Infrared Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; JIN Wei-qi; SU Bing-hua

    2005-01-01

    As digital image techniques have been widely used, the requirements for high-resolution images become increasingly stringent. Traditional single-frame interpolation techniques cannot add new high frequency information to the expanded images, and cannot improve resolution in deed. Multiframe-based techniques are effective ways for high-resolution image reconstruction, but their computation complexities and the difficulties in achieving image sequences limit their applications. An original method using an artificial neural network is proposed in this paper. Using the inherent merits in neural network, we can establish the mapping between high frequency components in low-resolution images and high-resolution images. Example applications and their results demonstrated the images reconstructed by our method are aesthetically and quantitatively (using the criteria of MSE and MAE) superior to the images acquired by common methods. Even for infrared images this method can give satisfactory results with high definition. In addition, a single-layer linear neural network is used in this paper, the computational complexity is very low, and this method can be realized in real time.

  2. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  3. High-resolution EUV imaging tools for resist exposure and aerial image monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, M.; Brisco, O.; Brunton, A.; Cashmore, J.; Elbourn, P.; Elliner, G.; Gower, M.; Greuters, J.; Grunewald, P.; Gutierrez, R.; Hill, T.; Hirsch, J.; Kling, L.; McEntee, N.; Mundair, S.; Richards, P.; Truffert, V.; Wallhead, I.; Whitfield, M.; Hudyma, R.

    2005-05-01

    Key features are presented of two high-resolution EUV imaging tools: the MS-13 Microstepper wafer exposure and the RIM-13 reticle imaging microscope. The MS-13 has been developed for EUV resist testing and technology evaluation at the 32nm node and beyond, while the RIM-13 is designed for actinic aerial image monitoring of blank and patterned EUV reticles. Details of the design architecture, module layout, major subsystems and performance are presented for both tools.

  4. A new high-resolution electromagnetic method for subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wanjie

    For most electromagnetic (EM) geophysical systems, the contamination of primary fields on secondary fields ultimately limits the capability of the controlled-source EM methods. Null coupling techniques were proposed to solve this problem. However, the small orientation errors in the null coupling systems greatly restrict the applications of these systems. Another problem encountered by most EM systems is the surface interference and geologic noise, which sometimes make the geophysical survey impossible to carry out. In order to solve these problems, the alternating target antenna coupling (ATAC) method was introduced, which greatly removed the influence of the primary field and reduced the surface interference. But this system has limitations on the maximum transmitter moment that can be used. The differential target antenna coupling (DTAC) method was proposed to allow much larger transmitter moments and at the same time maintain the advantages of the ATAC method. In this dissertation, first, the theoretical DTAC calculations were derived mathematically using Born and Wolf's complex magnetic vector. 1D layered and 2D blocked earth models were used to demonstrate that the DTAC method has no responses for 1D and 2D structures. Analytical studies of the plate model influenced by conductive and resistive backgrounds were presented to explain the physical phenomenology behind the DTAC method, which is the magnetic fields of the subsurface targets are required to be frequency dependent. Then, the advantages of the DTAC method, e.g., high-resolution, reducing the geologic noise and insensitive to surface interference, were analyzed using surface and subsurface numerical examples in the EMGIMA software. Next, the theoretical advantages, such as high resolution and insensitive to surface interference, were verified by designing and developing a low-power (moment of 50 Am 2) vertical-array DTAC system and testing it on controlled targets and scaled target coils. At last, a

  5. Towards Adaptive High-Resolution Images Retrieval Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourgli, A.; Sebai, H.; Bouteldja, S.; Oukil, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, content-based image-retrieval techniques constitute powerful tools for archiving and mining of large remote sensing image databases. High spatial resolution images are complex and differ widely in their content, even in the same category. All images are more or less textured and structured. During the last decade, different approaches for the retrieval of this type of images have been proposed. They differ mainly in the type of features extracted. As these features are supposed to efficiently represent the query image, they should be adapted to all kind of images contained in the database. However, if the image to recognize is somewhat or very structured, a shape feature will be somewhat or very effective. While if the image is composed of a single texture, a parameter reflecting the texture of the image will reveal more efficient. This yields to use adaptive schemes. For this purpose, we propose to investigate this idea to adapt the retrieval scheme to image nature. This is achieved by making some preliminary analysis so that indexing stage becomes supervised. First results obtained show that by this way, simple methods can give equal performances to those obtained using complex methods such as the ones based on the creation of bag of visual word using SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) descriptors and those based on multi scale features extraction using wavelets and steerable pyramids.

  6. High Resolution Linear Polarimetric Imaging for the Event Horizon Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chael, Andrew A; Narayan, Ramesh; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Wardle, John F C; Bouman, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    Images of the linear polarization of synchrotron radiation around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) identify their projected magnetic field lines and provide key data for understanding the physics of accretion and outflow from supermassive black holes. The highest resolution polarimetric images of AGN are produced with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Because VLBI incompletely samples the Fourier transform of the source image, any image reconstruction that fills in unmeasured spatial frequencies will not be unique and reconstruction algorithms are required. In this paper, we explore extensions of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to linear polarimetric VLBI imaging. In contrast to previous work, our polarimetric MEM algorithm combines a Stokes I imager that uses only bispectrum measurements that are immune to atmospheric phase corruption with a joint Stokes Q and U imager that operates on robust polarimetric ratios. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique on 7- and 3-mm wavelength quasar observat...

  7. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  8. How much can we trust high-resolution spectroscopic stellar chemical abundances?

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S; Heiter, U; Jofré, P; Masseron, T; Casamiquela, L; Tabernero, H M; Bhat, S S; Casey, A R; Meléndez, J; Ramírez, I

    2016-01-01

    To study stellar populations, it is common to combine chemical abundances from different spectroscopic surveys/studies where different setups were used. These inhomogeneities can lead us to inaccurate scientific conclusions. In this work, we studied one aspect of the problem: When deriving chemical abundances from high-resolution stellar spectra, what differences originate from the use of different radiative transfer codes?

  9. High resolution image reconstruction with constrained, total-variation minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Duchin, Yuval; Ullberg, Christer; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with applying iterative image reconstruction, based on constrained total-variation minimization, to low-intensity X-ray CT systems that have a high sampling rate. Such systems pose a challenge for iterative image reconstruction, because a very fine image grid is needed to realize the resolution inherent in such scanners. These image arrays lead to under-determined imaging models whose inversion is unstable and can result in undesirable artifacts and noise patterns. There are many possibilities to stabilize the imaging model, and this work proposes a method which may have an advantage in terms of algorithm efficiency. The proposed method introduces additional constraints in the optimization problem; these constraints set to zero high spatial frequency components which are beyond the sensing capability of the detector. The method is demonstrated with an actual CT data set and compared with another method based on projection up-sampling.

  10. High-resolution Imaging of Living Retina through Optic Adaptive Retinal Imaging System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunhui Jiang; Wenji Wang; Ning Ling; Gezhi Xu; Xuejun Rao; Xinyang Li; Yudong Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the possibility as well as the usage of adaptive optics in high-resolution retinal imaging.Methods:From March to November 2001, the fundus of 25 adults were checked by using Optic Adaptive Retinal Imaging System (OAS). The age of the subjects varied from 18~48 years. All had normal visual acuity from 0.9 to 1.0. No abnormality was found in the ocular examination, and their medical as well as ocular history was unremarkable. Results: High-resolution images of the retinal cells, photoreceptor and bipolar cell, were analysed. In these images, the cells are clearly resolved. The density of the photoreceptor at area 1.5 degree from the foveloa is around 40 000~50 000/mm2. At area 3 degree, it drops to less than 30 000/mm2.Conclusion:Optic Adaptive Retinal Imaging System (AOS) is able to get high-resolution image of retinal cells in living human eyes. It may be widely used in ophthalmology experimentally and clinically.

  11. Change detection in very high resolution multisensor optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Correa, Yady T.; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    This work aims at developing an approach to the detection of changes in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The main steps of the proposed method are: i) multisensor data homogenization; and ii) change detection in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The proposed approach takes advantage of: the conversion to physical quantities suggested by Pacifici et. al.1 , the framework for the design of systems for change detection in VHR images presented by Bruzzone and Bovolo2 and the framework for unsupervised change detection presented by Bovolo and Bruzzone3. Multisensor data homogenization is achieved during pre-processing by taking into account differences in both radiometric and geometric dimensions. Whereas change detection was approached by extracting proper features from multisensor images such that they result to be comparable (at a given level of abstraction) even if extracted from images acquired by different sensors. In order to illustrate the results, a data set made up of a QuickBird and a WorldView-2 images - acquired in 2006 and 2010 respectively - over an area located in the Trentino region of Italy were used. However, the proposed approach is thought to be exportable to multitemporal images coming from passive sensors other than the two mentioned above. The experimental results obtained on the QuickBird and WorlView-2 image pair are accurate. Thus opening to further experiments on multitemporal images acquired by other sensors.

  12. Very high resolution satellite data: New challenges in image analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathe, P.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    with the exception that a ground-based view covers the entire optical range from 400 to 700 nm while satellite images will be wavelength-specific. Although the images will not surpass details observed by a human eye, they will, in principle, be comparable with aerial...

  13. Production of High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images for Navigation Information Infrastructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhijun; Djemel Ziou; Costas Armenakis

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the image fusion approach of multi-resolution analysis-based intensity modulation (MRAIM) to produce the high-resolution multi-spectral images from high-resolution panchromatic image and low-resolution multi-spectral images for navigation information infrastructure. The mathematical model of image fusion is derived according to the principle of remote sensing image formation. It shows that the pixel values of a high-resolution multi-spectral images are determined by the pixel values of the approximation of a high-resolution panchromatic image at the resolution level of low-resolution multi-spectral images, and in the pixel valae computation the M-band wavelet theory and the à trous algorithm are then used. In order to evaluate the MRAIM approach, an experiment has been carried out on the basis of the IKONOS 1 m panchromatic image and 4 m multi-spectral images. The result demonstrates that MRAIM image fusion approach gives promising fusion results and it can be used to produce the high-resolution remote sensing images required for navigation information infrastructures.

  14. High-resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Campos, J. D.; Johnson, K. G.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-09-01

    Optical imaging systems are used extensively in the life and physical sciences because of their ability to non-invasively capture details on the microscopic and nanoscopic scales. Such systems are often limited by source or detector noise, image distortions and human operator misjudgement. Here, we report a general, quantitative method to analyse and correct these errors. We use this method to identify and correct optical aberrations in an imaging system for single atoms and realize an atomic position sensitivity of ˜0.5 nm Hz-1/2 with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus three-dimensional particle tracking, imaging of atoms in three-dimensional optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10-24 N) scale.

  15. High-resolution light field reconstruction using a hybrid imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Lin; Hou, GuangQi

    2016-04-01

    Recently, light field cameras have drawn much attraction for their innovative performance in photographic and scientific applications. However, narrow baselines and constrained spatial resolution of current light field cameras impose restrictions on their usability. Therefore, we design a hybrid imaging system containing a light field camera and a high-resolution digital single lens reflex camera, and these two kinds of cameras share the same optical path with a beam splitter so as to achieve the reconstruction of high-resolution light fields. The high-resolution 4D light fields are reconstructed with a phase-based perspective variation strategy. First, we apply complex steerable pyramid decomposition on the high-resolution image from the digital single lens reflex camera. Then, we perform phase-based perspective-shift processing with the disparity value, which is extracted from the upsampled light field depth map, to create high-resolution synthetic light field images. High-resolution digital refocused images and high-resolution depth maps can be generated in this way. Furthermore, controlling the magnitude of the perspective shift enables us to change the depth of field rendering in the digital refocused images. We show several experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  16. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  17. High-resolution apertureless near-field optical imaging using gold nanosphere probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Zee Hwan; Leone, Stephen R

    2006-10-12

    An apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (ANSOM) that utilizes the enhanced field around a gold nanosphere, which is attached to the end of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, is used to image the local dielectric constant of the patterned metallic surfaces and local electric field around plasmonic nanosphere samples. A colloidal gold nanosphere (approximately 50 nm diameter) is linked to the extremity of the conventional etched-silicon probe. The scattering of laser radiation (633 or 532 nm) is modulated by the oscillating nanosphere-functionalized silicon tip, and the scattered radiation is detected. The approach curve (scattering intensity as a function of the tip-sample distance), the polarization dependence (scattering intensity as a function of the excitation polarization direction), and ANSOM image contrast confirm that the spherical nanosphere attached to the silicon tip acts as a point dipole that interacts with the sample surface via a dipole-dipole coupling, in which the dipole created by the field at the tip interacts with its own image dipole in the sample. The image obtained with the nanoparticle functionalized tip provides a dielectric map of the sample surface with a spatial resolution better than 80 nm. In addition, we show that the functionalized tip is capable of imaging the local electric field distribution above the plasmonic nanosphere samples. Overall, the result shows that high-resolution ANSOM is possible without the aid of the lightning-rod effect. With an improved tip-fabrication method, we believe that the method can provide a versatile high-resolution chemical imaging that is not available from usual forms of ANSOM. PMID:17020365

  18. High Resolution Global Topography of Eros from NEAR Imaging and LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Robert W.; Konopliv, A.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Scheeres, D.

    2006-01-01

    Principal Data Products: Ensemble of L-maps from SPC, Spacecraft state, Asteroid pole and rotation. Secondary Products: Global topography model, inertia tensor, gravity. Composite high resolution topography. Three dimensional image maps.

  19. On-demand optical immobilization of Caenorhabditis elegans for high-resolution imaging and microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Krajniak, Jan; Matsunaga, Yohei; Benian, Guy M; Lu, Hang

    2014-09-21

    This paper describes a novel selective immobilization technique based on optical control of the sol-gel transition of thermoreversible Pluronic gel, which provides a simple, versatile, and biocompatible approach for high-resolution imaging and microinjection of Caenorhabditis elegans.

  20. Black phosphorus photodetector for multispectral, high-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Avouris, Phaedon

    2014-11-12

    Black phosphorus is a layered semiconductor that is intensely researched in view of applications in optoelectronics. In this letter, we investigate a multilayer black phosphorus photodetector that is capable of acquiring high-contrast (V > 0.9) images both in the visible (λVIS = 532 nm) as well as in the infrared (λIR = 1550 nm) spectral regime. In a first step, by using photocurrent microscopy, we map the active area of the device and we characterize responsivity and gain. In a second step, by deploying the black phosphorus device as a point-like detector in a confocal microsope setup, we acquire diffraction-limited optical images with submicron resolution. The results demonstrate the usefulness of black phosphorus as an optoelectronic material for hyperspectral imaging applications.

  1. Progress in BazookaSPECT: High-Resolution, Dynamic Scintigraphy with Large-Area Imagers

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.; Liu, Zhonglin; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2012-01-01

    We present recent progress in BazookaSPECT, a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray detector. It is a new class of scintillation detector that combines columnar scintillators, image intensifiers, and CCD (charge-coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) sensors for high-resolution imaging. A key feature of the BazookaSPECT paradigm is the capability to easily design custom detectors in terms of the desired intrinsic detector resolution and event detection rate. T...

  2. The origin of high-resolution IETS-STM images of organic molecules with functionalized tips

    OpenAIRE

    Hapalpa, Prokop; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, Stefan; Jelinek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the family of high-resolution scanning probe imaging techniques using decorated tips has been complimented by a method based on inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The new technique resolves the inner structure of organic molecules by mapping the vibrational energy of a single carbonmonoxide (CO) molecule positioned at the apex of a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) tip. Here, we explain high-resolution IETS imaging by extending the model developed earlier for STM a...

  3. Fast, High-Resolution Terahertz Radar Imaging at 25 Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria; Talukder, Ashit; Panangadan, Anand V.; Peay, Chris S.; Siegel, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    We report improvements in the scanning speed and standoff range of an ultra-wide bandwidth terahertz (THz) imaging radar for person-borne concealed object detection. Fast beam scanning of the single-transceiver radar is accomplished by rapidly deflecting a flat, light-weight subreflector in a confocal Gregorian optical geometry. With RF back-end improvements also implemented, the radar imaging rate has increased by a factor of about 30 compared to that achieved previously in a 4 m standoff prototype instrument. In addition, a new 100 cm diameter ellipsoidal aluminum reflector yields beam spot diameters of approximately 1 cm over a 50x50 cm field of view at a range of 25 m, although some aberrations are observed that probably arise from misaligned optics. Through-clothes images of a concealed threat at 25 m range, acquired in 5 seconds, are presented, and the impact of reduced signal-to-noise from an even faster frame rate is analyzed. These results inform the system requirements for eventually achieving sub-second or video-rate THz radar imaging.

  4. Virtual ultrasound sources in high-resolution ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    beamforming procedure for 3D ultrasound imaging. The position of the virtual source, and the created waveform are investigated with simulation, and with pulse-echo measurements. There is good agreement between the estimated wavefront and the theoretically tted one. Several examples of the use of virtual...

  5. Building identification from very high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Stephane

    Urbanisation still remains one of the main problems worldwide. The extent and rapidity of the urban growth induce a number of socio-economic and environmental conflicts everywhere. In order to reduce these problems, urban planners need to integrate spatial information in planning tools. Actually high expectations are made on Very High Spatial Resolution imagery (VHSR). These high-spatial resolution images are available at a reasonable price and due to short revisit periods, they offer a high degree of actuality. However, interpretation methods seem not to be adapted to this new type of images. The aim of our study is to develop a new method for semi-automatic building extraction with VHSR. The different steps performed to achieve our objective are each presented in a chapter. In the first chapter, the general context of our research is described with the definition of our objective. After a short historical review of urbanisation, we focus on urban growth and associated problems. In the following we discuss the possible contributions of geography to reduce these problems. After discussing concepts, theories and methodologies of geographical analysis in urban areas, we present existing general urban planning tools. Finally, we show the special interest of our study that is due to a growing need to integrate spatial information in these decision support tools. In the second chapter we verify the possibility of reaching our objective by analysing the technical characteristics of the images, the noise and the distortions which affect the images. Quality and interpretability of the studied image is analysed in order to show the capacity of these image to represent urban objects as close to reality as possible. The results confirm the potential of VHSR Imagery for urban objects analysis. The third chapter deal with the preliminary steps necessary for the elaboration of our method of building extraction. First, we evaluate the quality of the Sherbrooke Ikonos image

  6. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cloud imaging using ground-based whole sky imagers is essential for a fine-grained understanding of the effects of cloud formations, which can be useful in many applications. Some such imagers are available commercially, but their cost is relatively high, and their flexibility is limited. Therefore, we built a new daytime Whole Sky Imager (WSI) called Wide Angle High-Resolution Sky Imaging System. The strengths of our new design are its simplicity, low manufacturing cost and high resolution. Our imager captures the entire hemisphere in a single high-resolution picture via a digital camera using a fish-eye lens. The camera was modified to capture light across the visible as well as the near-infrared spectral ranges. This paper describes the design of the device as well as the geometric and radiometric calibration of the imaging system.

  7. High-resolution orientation imaging of nano-twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Pantleon, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The challenges of investigating the internal structure of materials containing features on the nano-scale can be met by combining the methods of electron backscatter diffraction, EBSD, and ion channeling imaging, ICI. While both EBSD and ICI are routinely applied for microstructure analysis, they......-sized features. The methodology of combining both techniques for that purpose is demonstrated on the example of electrodeposited nickel with numerous nano-twins in the microstructure....

  8. Fast and high resolution single-cell BRET imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Elise Goyet; Nathalie Bouquier; Vincent Ollendorff; Julie Perroy

    2016-01-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET)-based technologies are used to report protein-protein interactions in living cells. Among them, Bioluminescence-initiated RET (BRET) provides excellent sensitivity but the low light intensity intrinsic to the bioluminescent process hampers its use for the localization of protein complexes at the sub-cellular level. Herein we have characterized the methodological conditions required to reliably perform single-cell BRET imaging using an extremely bright luciferas...

  9. A dedicated high resolution PET imager for plant sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PET provides in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that is crucial to studying the interaction of plant with changing environment at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager that features high spatial resolution, housed in a fully controlled environment provided by a plant growth chamber (PGC). The system currently contains two types of detector modules: 84 microPET R4 block detectors with 2.2 mm crystals to provide a large detecting area; and 32 Inveon block detectors with 1.5 mm crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. Outputs of the four microPET block detectors in a modular housing are concatenated by a custom printed circuit board to match the output characteristics of an Inveon detector. All the detectors are read out by QuickSilver electronics. The detector modules are configured to full rings with a 15 cm diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Potentially, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to qua...

  10. ERIS: the exoplanet high-resolution image simulator for CHARIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Mary Anne; Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. J.; Brandt, Timothy; Mede, Kyle; Loomis, Craig; Hayashi, Masahiko; Takato, Naruhisa

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is an image simulator for CHARIS, the high-contrast exoplanet integral field spectrograph (IFS) being built at Princeton University for the Subaru telescope. We present here the software design and implementation of the ERIS code. ERIS simulates CHARIS FITS images and data cubes that are used for developing the data reduction pipeline and verifying the expected CHARIS performance. Components of the software include detailed models of the light source (such as a star or exoplanet), atmosphere, telescope, adaptive optics systems (AO188 and SCExAO), CHARIS IFS and the Hawaii2-RG infrared detector. Code includes novel details such as the phase errors at the lenslet array, optical wavefront error maps and pinholes for reducing crosstalk, just to list a few. The details of the code as well as several simulated images are presented in this paper. This IFS simulator is critical for the CHARIS data analysis pipeline development, minimizing troubleshooting in the lab and on-sky and the characterization of crosstalk.

  11. High-resolution panoramic images with megapixel MWIR FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboucher, Vincent; Aubry, Gilles

    2014-06-01

    In the continuity of its current strategy, HGH maintains a deep effort in developing its most recent product family: the infrared (IR) panoramic 360-degree surveillance sensors. During the last two years, HGH optimized its prototype Middle Wave IR (MWIR) panoramic sensor IR Revolution 360 HD that gave birth to Spynel-S product. Various test campaigns proved its excellent image quality. Cyclope, the software associated with Spynel, benefitted from recent image processing improvements and new functionalities such as target geolocalization, long range sensor slue to cue and facilitated forensics analysis. In the frame of the PANORAMIR project sustained by the DGA (Délégation Générale de l'Armement), HGH designed a new extra large resolution sensor including a MWIR megapixel Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector (1280×1024 pixels). This new sensor is called Spynel-X. It provides outstanding resolution 360-degree images (with more than 100 Mpixels). The mechanical frame of Spynel (-S and -X) was designed with the collaboration of an industrial design agency. Spynel got the "Observeur du Design 2013" label.

  12. Improved SOT (Hinode mission) high resolution solar imaging observations

    CERN Document Server

    Goodarzi, Hadis; Adjabshirizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    We consider the best today available observations of the Sun free of turbulent Earth atmospheric effects, taken with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode spacecraft. Both the instrumental smearing and the observed stray light are analyzed in order to improve the resolution. The Point Spread Function (PSF) corresponding to the blue continuum Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) near 450 nm is deduced by analyzing i/ the limb of the Sun and ii/ images taken during the transit of the planet Venus in 2012. A combination of Gaussian and Lorentzian functions is selected to construct a PSF in order to remove both smearing due to the instrumental diffraction effects (PSF core) and the large-angle stray light due to the spiders and central obscuration (wings of the PSF) that are responsible for the parasitic stray light. A Max-likelihood deconvolution procedure based on an optimum number of iterations is discussed. It is applied to several solar field images, including the granulation near the limb. The norma...

  13. High Speed and High Resolution Table-Top Nanoscale Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tadesse, G K; Demmler, S; HÄdrich, S; Wahyutama, I; Steinert, M; Spielmann, C; ZÜrch, M; TÜnnermann, A; Limpert, J; Rothhardt, J

    2016-01-01

    We present a table-top coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiment based on high-order harmonics generated at 18 nm by a high average power femtosecond fiber laser system. The high photon flux, narrow spectral bandwidth and high degree of spatial coherence allow for ultra-high sub-wavelength resolution imaging at a high numerical aperture. Our experiments demonstrate a half-pitch resolution of 13.6 nm, very close to the actual Abbe-limit of 12.4 nm, which is the highest resolution achieved from any table-top XUV or X-ray microscope. In addition, 20.5 nm resolution was achieved with only 3 sec of integration time bringing live diffraction imaging and 3D tomography on the nanoscale one step closer to reality. The current resolution is solely limited by the wavelength and the detector size. Thus, table-top nanoscopes with only a few-nm resolutions are in reach and will find applications in many areas of science and technology.

  14. Bathymetric Extraction Using WORLDVIEW-2 High Resolution Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deidda, M.; Sanna, G.

    2012-07-01

    The fundamental principle underlying the methods used to extract bathymetric information from remote-sensed imagery is that different wavelengths of the solar light penetrate the water body to different depths. In order to extract bathymetric values from multispectral satellite imagery we implemented the Jupp method (Jupp, 1988), in IDL language and integrated it in the ENVI menu structure. In this experiment we apply this method to two images of the Poetto beach in Cagliari (Sardinia, Italy) acquired from the new-generation WorldView-2 sensor. Launched in October 2009, the WorldView-2 sensor provides, among others, one (named Coastal) that was designed specifically for this kind of analysis; we chose to use the Coastal band in place of the Blue one when applying the model. The images (a stereoscopic pair) were acquired on June 17, 2011. The 5419 scene was pre-processed in order to separate the sea bottom classes. This class was then georeferenced to overlap on the 5318 scene. A traditional bathymetric survey was performed, up to 1,50 m, planned and carried out in order to calibrate the model. For each scene, 10 calibration areas were selected, and for each of them a digital model of the sea bottom was generated. Precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated by analyzing the results extracted from the stereo-pairs and by examining the correlation between the surveyed depth values and the calculated ones, between the different models calculated from the same scene using different calibration areas, and between the models obtained from the two images.

  15. SPI: A high resolution imaging spectrometer for INTEGRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPI (Spectrometer for INTEGRAL) is a high spectral resolution gamma-ray telescope using cooled germanium detectors that will be flown on board the INTEGRAL mission in 2001. It consists of an array of 19 closely-packed germanium detectors surrounded by an active bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield. The instrument operates over the energy range 20 keV to 8 MeV with an energy resolution of 1-5 keV. A tungsten coded-aperture mask located 1.7 m from the detector array provides imaging over a 15 deg. fully-coded field-of-view with an angular resolution of ∼3 deg. The point source narrow-line sensitivity is estimated to be 3-7x10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 over most of the range of the instrument (E>200 keV) for a 106 s observation. With its combination of high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and imaging, SPI will improve significantly over the performance of previous instruments such as HEAO-3, OSSE, and Comptel. It can be expected to take a major step forward in experimental studies in nuclear astrophysics. The SPI instrument is being developed under the auspices of the European Space Agency by a large international team of scientists and engineers in both Europe and the United States

  16. High resolution hyperspectral imaging with a high throughput virtual slit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Gunn, Thomas; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) device users often require both high spectral resolution, on the order of 1 nm, and high light-gathering power. A wide entrance slit assures reasonable étendue but degrades spectral resolution. Spectrometers built using High Throughput Virtual Slit™ (HTVS) technology optimize both parameters simultaneously. Two remote sensing use cases that require high spectral resolution are discussed. First, detection of atmospheric gases with intrinsically narrow absorption lines, such as hydrocarbon vapors or combustion exhaust gases such as NOx and CO2. Detecting exhaust gas species with high precision has become increasingly important in the light of recent events in the automobile industry. Second, distinguishing reflected daylight from emission spectra in the visible and NIR (VNIR) regions is most easily accomplished using the Fraunhofer absorption lines in solar spectra. While ground reflectance spectral features in the VNIR are generally quite broad, the Fraunhofer lines are narrow and provide a signature of intrinsic vs. extrinsic illumination. The High Throughput Virtual Slit enables higher spectral resolution than is achievable with conventional spectrometers by manipulating the beam profile in pupil space. By reshaping the instrument pupil with reflective optics, HTVS-equipped instruments create a tall, narrow image profile at the exit focal plane, typically delivering 5X or better the spectral resolution achievable with a conventional design.

  17. High Resolution WFPC2 Imaging of IRAS 09104+4109

    CERN Document Server

    Armus, L; Neugebauer, G

    1999-01-01

    With a infrared luminosity of nearly 10^13 Lsuns, IRAS 09104+4109 is the most luminous galaxy with z<0.5 in the IRAS All Sky Survey. A radio-loud Seyfert 2 type optical spectrum, a cD host galaxy in a rich cluster, and a massive cooling flow make IRAS 09104+4109 unique among ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Cannibalized cluster members and the cooling intercluster medium may contribute both the fuel and the dust needed to re-radiate the power of IRAS 09104+4109 into the far-infrared. We have imaged IRAS 09104+4109 in the WFPC2 F622W, F814W, and FR680N filters on the HST to obtain rest frame 4300A, 5700A, and [OIII] emission line images on sub-kpc scales. IRAS 09104+4109 displays a complex morphology on the smallest scales, with radiating filaments, an asymmetric [OIII] nebula, and a number of very faint, irregular blue objects surrounding the cD galaxy. We discuss the nature and possible interplay between the enshrouded QSO nucleus, the cD host galaxy and the irregular cluster.

  18. Fast and high resolution single-cell BRET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyet, Elise; Bouquier, Nathalie; Ollendorff, Vincent; Perroy, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET)-based technologies are used to report protein-protein interactions in living cells. Among them, Bioluminescence-initiated RET (BRET) provides excellent sensitivity but the low light intensity intrinsic to the bioluminescent process hampers its use for the localization of protein complexes at the sub-cellular level. Herein we have characterized the methodological conditions required to reliably perform single-cell BRET imaging using an extremely bright luciferase, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With this, we achieved an unprecedented performance in the field of protein-protein interaction imaging in terms of temporal and spatial resolution, duration of signal stability, signal sensitivity and dynamic range. As proof-of-principle, an Nluc-containing BRET-based sensor of ERK activity enabled the detection of subtle, transient and localized variations in ERK activity in neuronal dendritic spines, induced by the activation of endogenous synaptic NMDA receptors. This development will improve our comprehension of both the spatio-temporal dynamics of protein-protein interactions and the activation patterns of specific signaling pathways. PMID:27302735

  19. High-resolution in-depth imaging of optically cleared thick samples using an adaptive SPIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Aurore; Escande, Paul; Frongia, Céline; Clouvel, Grégory; Ducommun, Bernard; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2015-11-01

    Today, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) makes it possible to image fluorescent samples through depths of several hundreds of microns. However, LSFM also suffers from scattering, absorption and optical aberrations. Spatial variations in the refractive index inside the samples cause major changes to the light path resulting in loss of signal and contrast in the deepest regions, thus impairing in-depth imaging capability. These effects are particularly marked when inhomogeneous, complex biological samples are under study. Recently, chemical treatments have been developed to render a sample transparent by homogenizing its refractive index (RI), consequently enabling a reduction of scattering phenomena and a simplification of optical aberration patterns. One drawback of these methods is that the resulting RI of cleared samples does not match the working RI medium generally used for LSFM lenses. This RI mismatch leads to the presence of low-order aberrations and therefore to a significant degradation of image quality. In this paper, we introduce an original optical-chemical combined method based on an adaptive SPIM and a water-based clearing protocol enabling compensation for aberrations arising from RI mismatches induced by optical clearing methods and acquisition of high-resolution in-depth images of optically cleared complex thick samples such as Multi-Cellular Tumour Spheroids.

  20. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  1. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm;

    2014-01-01

    work describes a method to automatically estimate the atomic structure in two-dimensional materials. As an example graphene is chosen, in which the positions of the carbon atoms are reconstructed. Lattice parameters are extracted in the frequency domain and an initial atom positioning is estimated....... Next, a plausible neighborhood structure is estimated. Finally, atom positions are adjusted by simulation of a Markov random field model, integrating image evidence and the strong geometric prior. A pristine sample with high regularity and a sample with an induced hole are analyzed. False discovery...... with a preferred orientation, suggesting either strain in the structure or a buckling of the graphene sheet. The precision of the method is demonstrated on simulated model structures and by its application to multiple exposures of the two graphene samples....

  2. Information Extraction of High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on the Calculation of Optimal Segmentation Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongchun; Cai, Lijie; Liu, Haiying; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scale image segmentation and the selection of optimal segmentation parameters are the key processes in the object-oriented information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing images. The accuracy of remote sensing special subject information depends on this extraction. On the basis of WorldView-2 high-resolution data, the optimal segmentation parameters methodof object-oriented image segmentation and high-resolution image information extraction, the following processes were conducted in this study. Firstly, the best combination of the bands and weights was determined for the information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing image. An improved weighted mean-variance method was proposed andused to calculatethe optimal segmentation scale. Thereafter, the best shape factor parameter and compact factor parameters were computed with the use of the control variables and the combination of the heterogeneity and homogeneity indexes. Different types of image segmentation parameters were obtained according to the surface features. The high-resolution remote sensing images were multi-scale segmented with the optimal segmentation parameters. Ahierarchical network structure was established by setting the information extraction rules to achieve object-oriented information extraction. This study presents an effective and practical method that can explain expert input judgment by reproducible quantitative measurements. Furthermore the results of this procedure may be incorporated into a classification scheme.

  3. High-resolution two-dimensional image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We consider a technique for high-resolution image upconversion of thermal light. Experimentally, we demonstrate cw upconversion with a resolution of more than 200 × 1000 pixels of thermally illuminated objects. This is the first demonstration (to our knowledge) of high-resolution cw image...... upconversion. The upconversion method promises an alternative route to high-quantum-efficiency all-optical imaging in the mid-IR wavelength region and beyond using standard CCD cameras. A particular advantage of CCD cameras compared to state-of-the-art thermal cameras is the possibility to tailor and tune...... the spectral response leading to functional spectral imaging....

  4. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; SUGIHARA, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm × 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm × 16 or 0.5 mm × 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images fr...

  5. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Ryutaro Kakinuma; Noriyuki Moriyama; Yukio Muramatsu; Shiho Gomi; Masahiro Suzuki; Hirobumi Nagasawa; Masahiko Kusumoto; Tomohiko Aso; Yoshihisa Muramatsu; Takaaki Tsuchida; Koji Tsuta; Akiko Miyagi Maeshima; Naobumi Tochigi; Shun-Ichi Watanabe; Naoki Sugihara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from...

  6. High resolution mosaic image of capillaries in human retina by adaptive optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Ling; Yudong Zhang; Xuejun Rao; Cheng Wang; Yiyun Hu; Wenhan Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) has been proved as a powerful means for high resolution imaging of human retina.Because of the pixel number of charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, the field of view is limited to 1°.In order to have image of capillaries around vivo human fovea, we use mosaic method to obtain high resolution image in area of 6°× 6°. Detailed structures of capillaries around fovea with resolution of 2.3μm are clearly shown. Comparison shows that this method has a much higher resolution than current clinic retina imaging methods.

  7. Updating Object for GIS Database Information Using High Resolution Satellite Images: a Case Study Zonguldak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, M.; Arca, D.; Bayik, Ç.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays Geographic Information Systems (GIS) uses Remote Sensing (RS) data for a lot of applications. One of the application areas is the updating of the GIS database using high resolution imagery. In this context high resolution satellite imagery data is very important for many applications areas today's and future. And also, high resolution satellite imagery data will be used in many applications for different purposes. Information systems needs to high resolution imagery data for updating. Updating is very important component for the any of the GIS systems. One of this area will be updated and kept alive GIS database information. High resolution satellite imagery is used with different data base which serve map information via internet and different aims of information systems applications in future topographic and cartographic information systems will very important in our country in this sense use of the satellite images will be unavoidable. In this study explain to how is acquired to satellite images and how is use this images in information systems for object and roads. Firstly, pan-sharpened two of the IKONOS's images have been produced by fusion of high resolution PAN and MS images using PCI Geomatica v9.1 software package. Automatic object extraction has been made using eCognition v4.0.6. On the other hand, these objects have been manually digitized from high resolution images using ArcGIS v9.3. software package. Application section of in this study, satellite images data will be compared each other and GIS objects and road database. It is also determined which data is useful in Geographic Information Systems. Finally, this article explains that integration of remote sensing technology and GIS applications.

  8. Experimental validation of a high-resolution diffuse optical imaging modality: photomagnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouizi, Farouk; Luk, Alex; Thayer, Dave; Lin, Yuting; Ha, Seunghoon; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental results that validate our imaging technique termed photomagnetic imaging (PMI). PMI illuminates the medium under investigation with a near-infrared light and measures the induced temperature increase using magnetic resonance imaging. A multiphysics solver combining light and heat propagation is used to model spatiotemporal distribution of temperature increase. Furthermore, a dedicated PMI reconstruction algorithm has been developed to reveal high-resolution optical absorption maps from temperature measurements. Being able to perform measurements at any point within the medium, PMI overcomes the limitations of conventional diffuse optical imaging. We present experimental results obtained on agarose phantoms mimicking biological tissue with inclusions having either different sizes or absorption contrasts, located at various depths. The reconstructed images show that PMI can successfully resolve these inclusions with high resolution and recover their absorption coefficient with high-quantitative accuracy. Even a 1-mm inclusion located 6-mm deep is recovered successfully and its absorption coefficient is underestimated by only 32%. The improved PMI system presented here successfully operates under the maximum skin exposure limits defined by the American National Standards Institute, which opens up the exciting possibility of its future clinical use for diagnostic purposes.

  9. High Resolution Imaging Spectroscopy for Characterizing Soil Properties over Large Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, D.; Kumar, P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative mapping of high resolution surface soil texture (percentage sand, silt and clay), soil organic matter and chemical constituents are important for understanding infiltration, runoff and other surficial hydrologic processes at different scales. The Visible Near Infrared Analysis (VNIRA) method, which is a combination of imaging spectroscopy and laboratory chemical analysis with an underlying statistical model, has been established for the quantification of soil properties from imaging spectrometer data. In this study we characterize the feasibility of quantifying soil properties over large areas with the aim that these methods may be extended to space-borne sensors such as HyspIRI. Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) is a space-borne NASA mission concept having 10nm contiguous bands in the VSWIR region (380nm to 2500nm) of the electromagnetic spectra. High resolution (7.6m) Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected by NASA immediately after the massive 2011 Mississippi River floods at the Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway, coupled with in situ samples obtained at the time of the flight, is used to generate HyspIRI like data at 60m resolution. The VNIRA method is applied in a data-mining framework for quantification of the different soil textural properties and chemical constituents. The empirical models are further used for creating quantitative maps of the soil properties for the entire BPNM floodway. These maps are compared with the fine resolution AVIRIS maps of the same area for the different legacy landscape features and spatial correlations with the underlying topography immediately disturbed by the flooding event. The scales of variation in the soil constituents captured by the fine resolution data are also compared to the scales of variation captured by coarser resolution data. This study further explores the issues of applicability, challenges (such as the sensitivity of NDVI from mixed neighborhood pixels

  10. Image Segmentation By Cluster Analysis Of High Resolution Textured SPOT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, M.; Roux, C.; Hillion, A.

    1986-04-01

    Textural analysis is now a commonly used technique in digital image processing. In this paper, we present an application of textural analysis to high resolution SPOT satellite images. The purpose of the methodology is to improve classification results, i.e. image segmentation in remote sensing. Remote sensing techniques, based on high resolution satellite data offer good perspectives for the cartography of littoral environment. Textural information contained in the pan-chromatic channel of ten meters resolution is introduced in order to separate different types of structures. The technique we used is based on statistical pattern recognition models and operates in two steps. A first step, features extraction, is derived by using a stepwise algorithm. Segmentation is then performed by cluster analysis using these extracted. features. The texture features are computed over the immediate neighborhood of the pixel using two methods : the cooccurence matrices method and the grey level difference statistics method. Image segmentation based only on texture features is then performed by pixel classification and finally discussed. In a future paper, we intend to compare the results with aerial data in view of the management of the littoral resources.

  11. High-resolution X-ray imaging for microbiology at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exciting new applications of high-resolution x-ray imaging have emerged recently due to major advances in high-brilliance synchrotrons sources and high-performance zone plate optics. Imaging with submicron resolution is now routine with hard x-rays: the authors have demonstrated 150 run in the 6--10 keV range with x-ray microscopes at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons radiation facility. This has fueled interest in using x-ray imaging in applications ranging from the biomedical, environmental, and materials science fields to the microelectronics industry. One important application they have pursued at the APS is a study of the microbiology of bacteria and their associated extracellular material (biofilms) using fluorescence microanalysis. No microscopy techniques were previously available with sufficient resolution to study live bacteria (∼1 microm x 4 microm in size) and biofilms in their natural hydrated state with better than part-per-million elemental sensitivity and the capability of determining g chemical speciation. In vivo x-ray imaging minimizes artifacts due to sample fixation, drying, and staining. This provides key insights into the transport of metal contaminants by bacteria in the environment and potential new designs for remediation and sequestration strategies

  12. High-resolution MR imaging of talar osteochondral lesions with new classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, James Francis; Lau, Domily Ting Yi; Yeung, David Ka Wai [Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Shatin, NT (China); Wong, Margaret Wan Nar [Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2012-04-15

    Retrospective review of high-resolution MR imaging features of talar dome osteochondral lesions and development of new classification system based on these features. Over the past 7 years, 70 osteochondral lesions of the talar dome from 70 patients (49 males, 21 females, mean age 42 years, range 15-62 years) underwent high-resolution MR imaging with a microscopy coil at 1.5 T. Sixty-one (87%) of 70 lesions were located on the medial central aspect and ten (13%) lesions were located on the lateral central aspect of the talar dome. Features evaluated included cartilage fracture, osteochondral junction separation, subchondral bone collapse, bone:bone separation, and marrow change. Based on these findings, a new five-part grading system was developed. Signal-to-noise characteristics of microscopy coil imaging at 1.5 T were compared to dedicated ankle coil imaging at 3 T. Microscopy coil imaging at 1.5 T yielded 20% better signal-to-noise characteristics than ankle coil imaging at 3 T. High-resolution MR revealed that osteochondral junction separation, due to focal collapse of the subchondral bone, was a common feature, being present in 28 (45%) of 61 medial central osteochondral lesions. Reparative cartilage hypertrophy and bone:bone separation in the absence of cartilage fracture were also common findings. Complete osteochondral separation was uncommon. A new five-part grading system incorporating features revealed by high-resolution MR imaging was developed. High-resolution MRI reveals clinically pertinent features of talar osteochondral lesions, which should help comprehension of symptomatology and enhance clinical decision-making. These features were incorporated in a new MR-based grading system. Whenever possible, symptomatic talar osteochondral lesions should be assessed by high-resolution MR imaging. (orig.)

  13. High-resolution MRI of spinal cords by compressive sensing parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng Li; Xiangdong Yu; Griffin, Jay; Levine, Jonathan M; Jim Ji

    2015-08-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a common injury due to diseases or accidents. Noninvasive imaging methods play a critical role in diagnosing SCI and monitoring the response to therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), by the virtue of providing excellent soft tissue contrast, is the most promising imaging method for this application. However, spinal cord has a very small cross-section, which needs high-resolution images for better visualization and diagnosis. Acquiring high-resolution spinal cord MRI images requires long acquisition time due to the physical and physiological constraints. Moreover, long acquisition time makes MRI more susceptible to motion artifacts. In this paper, we studied the application of compressive sensing (CS) and parallel imaging to achieve high-resolution imaging from sparsely sampled and reduced k-space data acquired by parallel receive arrays. In particular, the studies are limited to the effects of 2D Cartesian sampling with different subsampling schemes and reduction factors. The results show that compressive sensing parallel MRI has the potential to provide high-resolution images of the spinal cord in 1/3 of the acquisition time required by the conventional methods.

  14. A High Resolution Color Image Restoration Algorithm for Thin TOMBO Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar A. El-Sallam

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a blind image restoration algorithm to reconstruct a high resolution (HR color image from multiple, low resolution (LR, degraded and noisy images captured by thin (< 1mm TOMBO imaging systems. The proposed algorithm is an extension of our grayscale algorithm reported in [1] to the case of color images. In this color extension, each Point Spread Function (PSF of each captured image is assumed to be different from one color component to another and from one imaging unit to the other. For the task of image restoration, we use all spectral information in each captured image to restore each output pixel in the reconstructed HR image, i.e., we use the most efficient global category of point operations. First, the composite RGB color components of each captured image are extracted. A blind estimation technique is then applied to estimate the spectra of each color component and its associated blurring PSF. The estimation process is formed in a way that minimizes significantly the interchannel cross-correlations and additive noise. The estimated PSFs together with advanced interpolation techniques are then combined to compensate for blur and reconstruct a HR color image of the original scene. Finally, a histogram normalization process adjusts the balance between image color components, brightness and contrast. Simulated and experimental results reveal that the proposed algorithm is capable of restoring HR color images from degraded, LR and noisy observations even at low Signal-to-Noise Energy ratios (SNERs. The proposed algorithm uses FFT and only two fundamental image restoration constraints, making it suitable for silicon integration with the TOMBO imager.

  15. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  16. High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

  17. Ultra-high resolution of radiocesium distribution detection based on Cherenkov light imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki; Suzui, Nobuo; Yin, Yong-Gen; Fujimaki, Shu [Radiotracer Imaging Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2015-03-21

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiocesium contamination became a serious scientific concern and research of its effects on plants increased. In such plant studies, high resolution images of radiocesium are required without contacting the subjects. Cherenkov light imaging of beta radionuclides has inherently high resolution and is promising for plant research. Since {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs emit beta particles, Cherenkov light imaging will be useful for the imaging of radiocesium distribution. Consequently, we developed and tested a Cherenkov light imaging system. We used a high sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Hamamatsu Photonics, ORCA2-ER) for imaging Cherenkov light from {sup 137}Cs. A bright lens (Xenon, F-number: 0.95, lens diameter: 25 mm) was mounted on the camera and placed in a black box. With a 100-μm {sup 137}Cs point source, we obtained 220-μm spatial resolution in the Cherenkov light image. With a 1-mm diameter, 320-kBq {sup 137}Cs point source, the source was distinguished within 2-s. We successfully obtained Cherenkov light images of a plant whose root was dipped in a {sup 137}Cs solution, radiocesium-containing samples as well as line and character phantom images with our imaging system. Cherenkov light imaging is promising for the high resolution imaging of radiocesium distribution without contacting the subject.

  18. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  19. Can nanofluidic chemical release enable fast, high resolution neurotransmitter-based neurostimulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Jones

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial chemical stimulation could provide improvements over electrical neurostimulation. Physiological neurotransmission between neurons relies on the nanoscale release and propagation of specific chemical signals to spatially-localized receptors. Current knowledge of nanoscale fluid dynamics and nanofluidic technology allows us to envision artificial mechanisms to achieve fast, high resolution neurotransmitter release. Substantial technological development is required to reach this goal. Nanofluidic technology — rather than microfluidic — will be necessary; this should come as no surprise given the nanofluidic nature of neurotransmission.This perspective reviews the state of the art of high resolution electrical neuroprostheses and their anticipated limitations. Chemical release rates from nanopores are compared to rates achieved at synapses and with iontophoresis. A review of microfluidic technology justifies the analysis that microfluidic control of chemical release would be insufficient. Novel nanofluidic mechanisms are discussed, and we propose that hydrophobic gating may allow control of chemical release suitable for mimicking neurotransmission. The limited understanding of hydrophobic gating in artificial nanopores and the challenges of fabrication and large-scale integration of nanofluidic components are emphasized. Development of suitable nanofluidic technology will require dedicated, long-term efforts over many years.

  20. High resolution wide swath revisit synthetic aper ture radar imaging mode and algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Zuo; Yiming Pi; Rui Min

    2015-01-01

    Based on the squint mode, a high resolution wide swath revisit synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode is pro-posed. The transmitting antennas are configured as the single phase center multiple azimuth beams (SPC MAB). The formed two beams point to two different directions to obtain two images of the observed scenario. The receiving antennas are configured as displaced phase center multiple azimuth beams (DPC MAB) to decrease the required pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The de-creased PRF can ensure the high resolution wide swath imaging. Based on the analysis of the character of the return signal, a pro-cessing method named multiple beam multiple channel algorithm (MBMCA) is proposed to separate the aliased sub-beams’ echoes. The separated echoes are focused respectively to get the revisit imaging to the observed scenario. The simulation experiments ve-rify the validity and correctness of the proposed imaging mode and processing algorithm.

  1. High resolution quantitative phase imaging of live cells with constrained optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Khare, Kedar; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) aims at studying weakly scattering and absorbing biological specimens with subwavelength accuracy without any external staining mechanisms. Use of a reference beam at an angle is one of the necessary criteria for recording of high resolution holograms in most of the interferometric methods used for quantitative phase imaging. The spatial separation of the dc and twin images is decided by the reference beam angle and Fourier-filtered reconstructed image will have a very poor resolution if hologram is recorded below a minimum reference angle condition. However, it is always inconvenient to have a large reference beam angle while performing high resolution microscopy of live cells and biological specimens with nanometric features. In this paper, we treat reconstruction of digital holographic microscopy images as a constrained optimization problem with smoothness constraint in order to recover only complex object field in hologram plane even with overlapping dc and twin image terms. We solve this optimization problem by gradient descent approach iteratively and the smoothness constraint is implemented by spatial averaging with appropriate size. This approach will give excellent high resolution image recovery compared to Fourier filtering while keeping a very small reference angle. We demonstrate this approach on digital holographic microscopy of live cells by recovering the quantitative phase of live cells from a hologram recorded with nearly zero reference angle.

  2. High-resolution thermal imaging methodology for non-destructive evaluation of historic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Michael; Vanoni, David; Petrovic, Vid; Kuester, Falko

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a methodology for automated, portable thermography, for the acquisition of high-resolution thermal image mosaics supporting the non-destructive evaluation of historic structures. The presented approach increases the spatial resolution of thermal surveys to a level of detail needed for building scale analysis. The integration of a robotic camera platform enables automated alignment of multiple images into a high-resolution thermal image mosaic giving a holistic view of the structure while maintaining a level of detail equaling or exceeding that of traditional spot surveys using existing cameras. Providing a digital workflow for automated data and metadata recording increases the consistency and accuracy of surveys regardless of the location or operator. An imaging workflow and instrumentation are shown for a case-study on buildings in Florence, Italy demonstrating the effectiveness of this methodology for structural diagnostics.

  3. Is Your System Calibrated? MRI Gradient System Calibration for Pre-Clinical, High-Resolution Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    James O'Callaghan; Jack Wells; Simon Richardson; Holly Holmes; Yichao Yu; Simon Walker-Samuel; Bernard Siow; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    High-field, pre-clinical MRI systems are widely used to characterise tissue structure and volume in small animals, using high resolution imaging. Both applications rely heavily on the consistent, accurate calibration of imaging gradients, yet such calibrations are typically only performed during maintenance sessions by equipment manufacturers, and potentially with acceptance limits that are inadequate for phenotyping. To overcome this difficulty, we present a protocol for gradient calibration...

  4. Chemical Analysis of Exhaled Human Breath Using High Resolution Mm-Wave Rotational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianle; Branco, Daniela; Thomas, Jessica; Medvedev, Ivan; Dolson, David; Nam, Hyun-Joo; O, Kenneth

    2014-06-01

    High resolution rotational spectroscopy enables chemical sensors that are both sensitive and highly specific, which is well suited for analysis of expired human breath. We have previously reported on detection of breath ethanol, methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde using THz sensors. This paper will outline our present efforts in this area, with specific focus on our ongoing quest to correlate levels of blood glucose with concentrations of a few breath chemicals known to be affected by elevated blood sugar levels. Prospects, challenges and future plans will be outlined and discussed. Fosnight, A.M., B.L. Moran, and I.R. Medvedev, Chemical analysis of exhaled human breath using a terahertz spectroscopic approach. Applied Physics Letters, 2013. 103(13): p. 133703-5.

  5. Fast blood flow visualization of high-resolution laser speckle imaging data using graphics processing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shusen; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2008-09-15

    Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a non-invasive, full-field optical technique that produces two-dimensional map of blood flow in biological tissue by analyzing speckle images captured by CCD camera. Due to the heavy computation required for speckle contrast analysis, video frame rate visualization of blood flow which is essentially important for medical usage is hardly achieved for the high-resolution image data by using the CPU (Central Processing Unit) of an ordinary PC (Personal Computer). In this paper, we introduced GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) into our data processing framework of laser speckle contrast imaging to achieve fast and high-resolution blood flow visualization on PCs by exploiting the high floating-point processing power of commodity graphics hardware. By using GPU, a 12-60 fold performance enhancement is obtained in comparison to the optimized CPU implementations.

  6. High resolution imaging using scanning ion conductance microscopy with improved distance feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Li; Nicholas Johnson; Victor Ostanin; Andrew Shevchuk; Liming Ying; Yuri Korchev; David Klenerman

    2008-01-01

    Microscopy is an essential technique for observation on living cells. There is currently great interest in applying scanning probe microscopy to image-living biological cells in their natural environment at the nanometer scale. Scanning ion conductance microscopy is a new form of scanning probe microscopy, which enables non-contact high-resolution imaging of living biological cells. Based on a scanned nanopipette in physiological buffer, the distance feedback control uses the ion current to control the distance between the pipette tip and the sample surface. However, this feedback control has difficulties over slopes on convoluted cell surfaces, which limits its resolution. In this study, we present an improved form of feedback control that removes the contribution of up to the third-order slope from the ion current signal, hence providing a more accurate signal for controlling the distance. We show that this allows faster and lower noise topographic high-resolution imaging.

  7. High resolution crustal image of South California Continental Borderland: Reverse time imaging including multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, A.; Gantela, C.

    2014-12-01

    Strong multiples were observed in marine seismic data of Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE).It is crucial to eliminate these multiples in conventional ray-based or one-way wave-equation based depth image methods. As long as multiples contain information of target zone along travelling path, it's possible to use them as signal, to improve the illumination coverage thus enhance the image quality of structural boundaries. Reverse time migration including multiples is a two-way wave-equation based prestack depth image method that uses both primaries and multiples to map structural boundaries. Several factors, including source wavelet, velocity model, back ground noise, data acquisition geometry and preprocessing workflow may influence the quality of image. The source wavelet is estimated from direct arrival of marine seismic data. Migration velocity model is derived from integrated model building workflow, and the sharp velocity interfaces near sea bottom needs to be preserved in order to generate multiples in the forward and backward propagation steps. The strong amplitude, low frequency marine back ground noise needs to be removed before the final imaging process. High resolution reverse time image sections of LARSE Lines 1 and Line 2 show five interfaces: depth of sea-bottom, base of sedimentary basins, top of Catalina Schist, a deep layer and a possible pluton boundary. Catalina Schist shows highs in the San Clemente ridge, Emery Knoll, Catalina Ridge, under Catalina Basin on both the lines, and a minor high under Avalon Knoll. The high of anticlinal fold in Line 1 is under the north edge of Emery Knoll and under the San Clemente fault zone. An area devoid of any reflection features are interpreted as sides of an igneous plume.

  8. INTERACTIVE CHANGE DETECTION USING HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BASED ON ACTIVE LEARNING WITH GAUSSIAN PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  9. Interactive Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning with Gaussian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Hui; Yu, Huai; Huang, Pingping; Yang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  10. Interval TYPE-2 Fuzzy Based Neural Network for High Resolution Remote Sensing Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyan; Xu, Aigong; Li, Chao; Zhao, Xuemei

    2016-06-01

    Recently, high resolution remote sensing image segmentation is a hot issue in image procesing procedures. However, it is a difficult task. The difficulties derive from the uncertainties of pixel segmentation and decision-making model. To this end, we take spatial relationship into consideration when constructing the interval type-2 fuzzy neural networks for high resolution remote sensing image segmentation. First, the proposed algorithm constructs a Gaussian model as a type-1 fuzzy model to describe the uncertainty contained in the image. Second, interval type-2 fuzzy model is obtained by blurring the mean and variance in type-1 model. The proposed interval type-2 model can strengthen the expression of uncertainty and simultaneously decrease the uncertainty in the decision model. Then the fuzzy membership function itself and its upper and lower fuzzy membership functions of the training samples are used as the input of neuron network which acts as the decision model in proposed algorithm. Finally, the relationship of neighbour pixels is taken into consideration and the fuzzy membership functions of the detected pixel and its neighbourhood are used to decide the class of each pixel to get the final segmentation result. The proposed algorithm, FCM and HMRF-FCM algorithm and an interval type-2 fuzzy neuron networks without spatial relationships are performed on synthetic and real high resolution remote sensing images. The qualitative and quantitative analyses demonstrate the efficient of the proposed algorithm, especially for homogeneous regions which contains a great difference in its gray level (for example forest).

  11. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  12. Road Extraction from High-resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Multiple Information Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiao-feng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Road extraction from high-resolution remote sensing images has been considered to be a significant but very difficult task.Especially the spectrum of some buildings is similar with that of roads,which makes the surfaces being connect with each other after classification and difficult to be distinguished.Based on the cooperation between road surfaces and edges,this paper presents an approach to purify roads from high-resolution remote sensing images.Firstly,we try to improve the extraction accuracy of road surfaces and edges respectively.The logic cooperation between these two binary images is used to separate road and non-road objects.Then the road objects are confirmed by the cooperation between surfaces and edges.And the effective shape indices(e.g.polar moment of inertia and narrow extent index are applied to eliminate non-road objects.So the road information is refined.The experiments indicate that the proposed approach is efficient for eliminating non-road information and extracting road information from high-resolution remote sensing image.

  13. A fast and automatic mosaic method for high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongshun; He, Hui; Xiao, Hongyu; Huang, Jing

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a fast and fully automatic mosaic method for high-resolution satellite images. First, the overlapped rectangle is computed according to geographical locations of the reference and mosaic images and feature points on both the reference and mosaic images are extracted by a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm only from the overlapped region. Then, the RANSAC method is used to match feature points of both images. Finally, the two images are fused into a seamlessly panoramic image by the simple linear weighted fusion method or other method. The proposed method is implemented in C++ language based on OpenCV and GDAL, and tested by Worldview-2 multispectral images with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. Results show that the proposed method can detect feature points efficiently and mosaic images automatically.

  14. River pollution remediation monitored by optical and infrared high-resolution satellite images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivero, Paolo; Borasi, Maria; Biamino, Walter; Cavagnero, Marco; Rinaudo, Caterina; Bonansea, Matias; Lanfri, Sofia

    2013-09-01

    The Bormida River Basin, located in the northwestern region of Italy, has been strongly contaminated by the ACNA chemical factory. This factory was in operation from 1892 to 1998, and contamination from the factory has had deleterious consequences on the water quality, agriculture, natural ecosystems and human health. Attempts have been made to remediate the site. The aims of this study were to use high-resolution satellite images combined with a classical remote sensing methodology to monitor vegetation conditions along the Bormida River, both upstream and downstream of the ACNA chemical factory site, and to compare the results obtained at different times before and after the remediation process. The trends of the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) along the riverbanks are used to assess the effect of water pollution on vegetation. NDVI and EVI values show that the contamination produced by the ACNA factory had less severe effects in the year 2007, when most of the remediation activities were concluded, than in 2006 and 2003. In 2007, the contamination effects were noticeable up to 6 km downstream of the factory, whereas in 2003 and 2006 the influence range was up to about 12 km downstream of the factory. The results of this study show the effectiveness of remediation activities that have been taking place in this area. In addition, the comparison between NDVI and EVI shows that the EVI is more suitable to characterise the vegetation health and can be considered an additional tool to assess vegetation health and to monitor restoration activities. PMID:23456221

  15. High-resolution Ceres High Altitude Mapping Orbit atlas derived from Dawn Framing Camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Th.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The Dawn spacecraft Framing Camera (FC) acquired over 2400 clear filter images of Ceres with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during the six cycles in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase between August 18 and October 21, 2015. We ortho-rectified the images from the first cycle and produced a global, high-resolution, controlled photomosaic of Ceres. This global mosaic is the basis for a high-resolution Ceres atlas that consists of 15 tiles mapped at a scale of 1:750,000. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Dawn team and was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The full atlas is available to the public through the Dawn Geographical Information System (GIS) web page

  16. Unsupervised Semantic Labeling Framework for Identification of Complex Facilities in High-resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear proliferation is a major national security concern for many countries. Existing feature extraction and classification approaches are not suitable for monitoring proliferation activity using high-resolution multi-temporal remote sensing imagery. In this paper we present an unsupervised semantic labeling framework based on the Latent Dirichlet Allocation method. This framework is used to analyze over 70 images collected under different spatial and temporal settings over the globe representing two major semantic categories: nuclear and coal power plants. Initial experimental results show a reasonable discrimination of these two categories even though they share highly overlapping and common objects. This research also identified several research challenges associated with nuclear proliferation monitoring using high resolution remote sensing images.

  17. High-resolution imaging of (100) kyanite surfaces using friction force microscopy in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Carlos; Gnecco, Enrico; Pina, Carlos M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present high-resolution friction force microscopy (FFM) images of the (100) face of kyanite (Al2SiO5) immersed in water. These images show an almost rectangular lattice presumably defined by the protruding oxygen of AlO6 polyhedra. Surface lattice parameters measured on two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D-FFT) plots of recorded high-resolution friction maps are in good agreement with lattice parameters calculated from the bulk mineral structure. Friction measurements performed along the [001] and [010] directions on the kyanite (100) face provide similar friction coefficients μ ≈ 0.10, even if the sequences of AlO6 polyhedra are different along the two crystallographic directions.

  18. Detailed chemical abundances of extragalactic globular clusters using high resolution, integrated light spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Janet E.

    Globular clusters (GCs) are luminous, observationally accessible objects that are good tracers of the total star formation and evolutionary history of galaxies. We present the first detailed chemical abundances for GCs in M31 using a new abundance analysis technique designed for high resolution, integrated light (IL) spectra of GCs. This technique has recently been developed using a training set of old GCS in the Milky Way (MW), and makes possible detailed chemical evolution studies of distant galaxies, where high resolution abundance analysis of individual stars are not obtainable. For the 5 M31 GCs presented here, we measure abundances of 14 elements: Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, and Ba. We find the M31 GCs have ages (>10 Gyr) and chemical properties similar to MW GCs, including an enhancement in the alpha-elements Ca, Ti and Si of [alpha/Fe]˜ +0.4. In this thesis, we also further develop this IL abundance analysis method to include GCs of ages 10 Myr--12 Gyrs using GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which contains the necessary sample of clusters over this wide age range. This work demonstrates for the first time that this IL abundance analysis method can be used on clusters of all ages, and that ages can be constrained to within 1--2 Gyr for clusters with ages of ˜2 Gyr and within a few 100 Myr for clusters with ages chemical abundances of 22 elements are reported for six LMC clusters.

  19. High-resolution near-infrared imaging of the Orion 114-426 silhouette disk

    OpenAIRE

    McCaughrean, Mark J.; Chen, Hua; Bally, John; Erickson, Ed; Thompson, Rodger; Rieke, Marcia; Schneider, Glenn; Stolovy, Susan; Young, Erick

    1997-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution near-infrared images of the edge-on silhouette circumstellar disk, Orion 114-426, made using NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Images taken against the bright nebular background of the ionized hydrogen Pa$\\alpha$ line at 1.87 micron show the major axis of the disk to be approximately 20% smaller than at 0.6 micron, from which we deduce the structure of the edge of the disk. Continuum images of diffuse polar lobes above and below the plane of the disk s...

  20. The Role of Imaging for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Segmental Approach to High-Resolution MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeburg, Daniel P; Northcutt, Benjamin; Aygun, Nafi; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution MRI affords exquisite anatomic detail and allows radiologists to scrutinize the entire course of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve [CN] V). This article focuses first on the normal MRI appearance of the course of CN V and how best to image each segment. Special attention is then devoted to the role of MRI in presurgical evaluation of patients with neurovascular conflict and in identifying secondary causes of trigeminal neuralgia, including multiple sclerosis. Fundamental concepts in postsurgical imaging after neurovascular decompression are also addressed. Finally, how imaging has been used to better understand the etiology of trigeminal neuralgia is discussed. PMID:27324998

  1. Attempt of alpine glacier flow modeling based on correlation measurements of high resolution SAR images

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yajing; Ferro-Famil, Laurent; Gay, Michel; Fallourd, Renaud; Trouvé, Emmanuel; Vernier, Flavien

    2013-01-01

    International audience In this paper, an attempt of Alpine glacier flow modeling is performed based on a series of high resolution TerraSAR-X SAR images and a Digital Elevation Model. First, a glacier flow model is established according to the fluid mechanics theory in a simplified framework. Second, the displacement field over the glacier obtained from the sub-pixel image correlation of a series of TerraSAR-X SAR images is used to refine the model obtained previously. The comparison betwe...

  2. HIGH RESOLUTION AIRBORNE SAR IMAGE CHANGE DETECTION IN URBAN AREAS WITH SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT ACQUISITION GEOMETRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mendez Dominguez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Before applying change detection, high resolution SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery benefits from advanced denoising mechanisms to preserve details and minimize speckle. We propose a change detector based on a MCA (Morphological Components Analysis of a difference image (DI. With MCA, the data is decomposed into image features utilizing sparse representations of the image content. By introducing a priori knowledge of the content of the scenes, and exploiting shape information corresponding to the changes provided by MCA, we can significantly improve performance under adverse conditions, such as inconsistent acquisition geometries.

  3. High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, D S [NIST; Jacobson, D L [NIST; Arif, M [NIST

    2009-01-01

    Water transport in the ionomeric membrane, typically Nafion{reg_sign}, has profound influence on the performance of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in terms of internal resistance and overall water balance. In this work, high resolution neutron imaging of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane is presented in order to measure water content and through-plane gradients in situ under disparate temperature and humidification conditions.

  4. High-resolution diffusion kurtosis imaging at 3T enabled by advanced post-processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siawoosh eMohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI is more sensitive to microstructural differences and can be related to more specific micro-scale metrics (e.g. intra-axonal volume fraction than diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, offering exceptional potential for clinical diagnosis and research into the white and gray matter. Currently DKI is acquired only at low spatial resolution (2-3 mm isotropic, because of the lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and higher artifact level associated with the technically more demanding DKI. Higher spatial resolution of about 1mm is required for the characterization of fine white matter pathways or cortical microstructure. We used restricted-field-of-view imaging in combination with advanced post-processing methods to enable unprecedented high-quality, high-resolution DKI (1.2 mm isotropic on a clinical 3T scanner. Post-processing was advanced by developing a novel method for Retrospective Eddy current and Motion ArtifacT Correction in High-resolution, multi-shell diffusion data (REMATCH. Furthermore, we applied a powerful edge preserving denoising method, denoted as multi-shell orientation-position-adaptive smoothing (msPOAS. We demonstrated the feasibility of high-quality, high-resolution DKI and its potential for delineating highly myelinated fiber pathways in the motor cortex. REMATCH performs robustly even at the low SNR level of high-resolution DKI, where standard EC and motion correction failed (i.e. produced incorrectly aligned images and thus biased the diffusion model fit. We showed that the combination of REMATCH and msPOAS increased the contrast between gray and white matter in mean kurtosis (MK maps by about 35% and at the same time preserves the original distribution of MK values, whereas standard Gaussian smoothing strongly biases the distribution.

  5. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  6. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging analysis of breast cancer xenograft on the chick chorioallantoic membrane

    OpenAIRE

    ZUO, ZHI

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis an age-adapted cooling regime for immobilization of the chick embryo is proposed. Reliable immobilization completely avoided motion artifacts, enabling high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chicken embryo and also tumor xenograft on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Tumor growth monitoring was firstly evaluated after xenotransplantation of MDA-MB-231 cells on the CAM. Tumor volumes were monitored from day 4 to day 9 after grafting applying a T2-weighted R...

  7. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Infrared and Electro-Optic Signals for High Resolution Night Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Lawrence

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Electro-optic (EO image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1 inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2 EO image edge detection; (3 registration; and (4 blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available.

  8. Neutron imaging of inertial confinement fusion target plasmas using high-resolution gel bubble detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently developed gel bubble detectors with higher detection efficiency look attractive for high-resolution neutron imaging of inertial confinement target plasmas. Bubble detectors can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution as small as 5 μm. By allowing high-resolution imaging of National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) Facility targets without the need for ≥25 m line-of-sight paths, bubble detectors should allow views in multiple and orthogonal directions from the target. Earlier proof-of-principle tests on OMEGA were limited by the very low (8x10-6 bubbles/n) detection efficiency of the then available gel detectors. Detectors with ∼100 times higher efficiency per centimeter of thickness are now available. At the high bubble densities expected in the new detectors, the spatial distribution of the bubbles must be measured by a line integral technique such as x-ray transmission. This avoids the need for optically transparent detectors, allowing much higher densities of superheated drops, smaller drop diameters, and detector thicknesses of several centimeters. It now appears that high-resolution images of NIF and LMJ target plasmas at neutron yields ≥1013 may be possible using high efficiency gel bubble detectors

  9. Investigation of Image Fusion Between High-Resolution Image and Multi-spectral Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pingxiang; WANG Zhijun

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of a thorough understanding of the physical characteristics of remote sensing image, this paper employs the theories of wavelet transform and signal sampling to develop a new image fusion algorithm. The algorithm has been successfully applied to the image fusion of SPOT PAN and TM of Guangdong province, China. The experimental results show that a perfect image fusion can be built up by using the image analytical solution and re-construction in the image frequency domain based on the physical characteristics of the image formation. The method has demonstrated that the results of the image fusion do not change spectral characteristics of the original image.

  10. High Resolution Imaging of Satellites with Ground-Based 10-m Astronomical Telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marois, C

    2007-01-04

    High resolution imaging of artificial satellites can play an important role in current and future space endeavors. One such use is acquiring detailed images that can be used to identify or confirm damage and aid repair plans. It is shown that a 10-m astronomical telescope equipped with an adaptive optics system (AO) to correct for atmospheric turbulence using a natural guide star can acquire high resolution images of satellites in low-orbits using a fast shutter and a near-infrared camera even if the telescope is not capable of tracking satellites. With the telescope pointing towards the satellite projected orbit and less than 30 arcsec away from a guide star, multiple images of the satellite are acquired on the detector using the fast shutter. Images can then be shifted and coadded by post processing to increase the satellite signal to noise ratio. Using the Keck telescope typical Strehl ratio and anisoplanatism angle as well as a simple diffusion/reflection model for a satellite 400 km away observed near Zenith at sunset or sunrise, it is expected that such system will produced > 10{sigma} K-band images at a resolution of 10 cm inside a 60 arcsec diameter field of view. If implemented, such camera could deliver the highest resolution satellite images ever acquired from the ground.

  11. FFT-enhanced IHS transform method for fusing high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y.; Ehlers, M.; Usery, E.L.; Madden, M.

    2007-01-01

    Existing image fusion techniques such as the intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) transform and principal components analysis (PCA) methods may not be optimal for fusing the new generation commercial high-resolution satellite images such as Ikonos and QuickBird. One problem is color distortion in the fused image, which causes visual changes as well as spectral differences between the original and fused images. In this paper, a fast Fourier transform (FFT)-enhanced IHS method is developed for fusing new generation high-resolution satellite images. This method combines a standard IHS transform with FFT filtering of both the panchromatic image and the intensity component of the original multispectral image. Ikonos and QuickBird data are used to assess the FFT-enhanced IHS transform method. Experimental results indicate that the FFT-enhanced IHS transform method may improve upon the standard IHS transform and the PCA methods in preserving spectral and spatial information. ?? 2006 International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Inc. (ISPRS).

  12. Optimization of post-classification processing of high-resolution satellite image: A case study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Rencai; DONG; Jiajia; WU; Gang; DENG; Hongbing

    2006-01-01

    The application of remote sensing monitoring techniques plays a crucial role in evaluating and governing the vast amount of ecological construction projects in China. However, extracting information of ecological engineering target through high-resolution satellite image is arduous due to the unique topography and complicated spatial pattern on the Loess Plateau of China. As a result, enhancing classification accuracy is a huge challenge to high-resolution image processing techniques. Image processing techniques have a definitive effect on image properties and the selection of different parameters may change the final classification accuracy during post-classification processing. The common method of eliminating noise and smoothing image is majority filtering. However, the filter function may modify the original classified image and the final accuracy. The aim of this study is to develop an efficient and accurate post-processing technique for acquiring information of soil and water conservation engineering, on the Loess Plateau of China, using SPOT image with 2.5 rn resolution. We argue that it is vital to optimize satellite image filtering parameters for special areas and purposes, which focus on monitoring ecological construction projects. We want to know how image filtering influences final classified results and which filtering kernel is optimum. The study design used a series of window sizes to filter the original classified image, and then assess the accuracy of each output map and image quality. We measured the relationship between filtering window size and classification accuracy, and optimized the post-processing techniques of SPOT5satellite images. We conclude that (1) smoothing with the majority filter is sensitive to the information accuracy of soil and water conservation engineering, and (2) for SPOT5 2.5 m image, the 5×5 pixel majority filter is most suitable kernel for extracting information of ecological construction sites in the Loess Plateau of

  13. Object-oriented recognition of high-resolution remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongyan; Li, Haitao; Chen, Hong; Xu, Yuannan

    2016-01-01

    With the development of remote sensing imaging technology and the improvement of multi-source image's resolution in satellite visible light, multi-spectral and hyper spectral , the high resolution remote sensing image has been widely used in various fields, for example military field, surveying and mapping, geophysical prospecting, environment and so forth. In remote sensing image, the segmentation of ground targets, feature extraction and the technology of automatic recognition are the hotspot and difficulty in the research of modern information technology. This paper also presents an object-oriented remote sensing image scene classification method. The method is consist of vehicles typical objects classification generation, nonparametric density estimation theory, mean shift segmentation theory, multi-scale corner detection algorithm, local shape matching algorithm based on template. Remote sensing vehicles image classification software system is designed and implemented to meet the requirements .

  14. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Kakinuma

    Full Text Available The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT scanners.This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from both scanners were reconstructed at 0.1-mm intervals; the slice thickness was 0.25 mm for the U-HRCT scanner and 0.5 mm for the C-HRCT scanners. For both scanners, the display field of view was 80 mm. The image noise of each scanner was evaluated using a phantom. U-HRCT and C-HRCT images of 53 images selected from 37 lung nodules were then observed and graded using a 5-point score by 10 board-certified thoracic radiologists. The images were presented to the observers randomly and in a blinded manner.The image noise for U-HRCT (100.87 ± 0.51 Hounsfield units [HU] was greater than that for C-HRCT (40.41 ± 0.52 HU; P < .0001. The image quality of U-HRCT was graded as superior to that of C-HRCT (P < .0001 for all of the following parameters that were examined: margins of subsolid and solid nodules, edges of solid components and pulmonary vessels in subsolid nodules, air bronchograms, pleural indentations, margins of pulmonary vessels, edges of bronchi, and interlobar fissures.Despite a larger image noise, the prototype U-HRCT scanner had a significantly better image quality than the C-HRCT scanners.

  15. Step-stare technique for airborne high-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Valerie; Chevrette, Paul C.; Ricard, Benot; Zaccarin, Andre

    2004-08-01

    The Infrared Eye project was developed at DRDC Valcartier to improve the efficiency of airborne search and rescue operations. A high performance opto-mechanical pointing system was developed to allow fast positioning of a narrow field of view with high resolution, used for search and detection, over a wide field of view of lower resolution that optimizes area coverage. This system also enables the use of a step-stare technique, which rapidly builds a large area coverage image mosaic by step-staring a narrow field camera and properly tiling the resulting images. The resulting image mosaic covers the wide field of the current Infrared Eye, but with the high resolution of the narrow field. For the desired application, the camera will be fixed to an airborne platform using a stabilized mount and image positioning in the mosaic will be calculated using flight data provided by an altimeter, a GPS and an inertial unit. This paper presents a model of the complete system, a dynamic step-stare strategy that generates the image mosaic, a flight image taking simulator for strategy testing and some results obtained with this simulator.

  16. Myocardial Infarction Area Quantification using High-Resolution SPECT Images in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos de [Divisão de Cardiologia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mejia, Jorge [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira de; Lataro, Renata Maria; Frassetto, Sarita Nasbine [Divisão de Cardiologia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Fazan, Rubens Jr.; Salgado, Hélio Cesar [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Simões, Marcus Vinícius, E-mail: msimoes@fmrp.usp.br [Divisão de Cardiologia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Imaging techniques enable in vivo sequential assessment of the morphology and function of animal organs in experimental models. We developed a device for high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging based on an adapted pinhole collimator. To determine the accuracy of this system for quantification of myocardial infarct area in rats. Thirteen male Wistar rats (250 g) underwent experimental myocardial infarction by occlusion of the left coronary artery. After 4 weeks, SPECT images were acquired 1.5 hours after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi. The tomographic reconstruction was performed by using specially developed software based on the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. The analysis of the data included the correlation between the area of perfusion defects detected by scintigraphy and extent of myocardial fibrosis assessed by histology. The images showed a high target organ/background ratio with adequate visualization of the left ventricular walls and cavity. All animals presenting infarction areas were correctly identified by the perfusion images. There was no difference of the infarct area as measured by SPECT (21.1 ± 21.2%) and by histology (21.7 ± 22.0%; p=0.45). There was a strong correlation between individual values of the area of infarction measured by these two methods. The developed system presented adequate spatial resolution and high accuracy for the detection and quantification of myocardial infarction areas, consisting in a low cost and versatile option for high-resolution SPECT imaging of small rodents.

  17. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  18. CHISL: The Combined High-resolution and Imaging Spectrograph for the LUVOIR Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    France, Kevin; Hoadley, Keri

    2016-01-01

    NASA is currently carrying out science and technical studies to identify its next astronomy flagship mission, slated to begin development in the 2020s. It has become clear that a Large Ultraviolet/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission (primary diameter 12 m, 1000 Ang - 2 micron spectroscopic bandpass) can carry out the largest number of NASA's exoplanet and astrophysics science goals over the coming decades. There are technical challenges for several aspects of the LUVOIR Surveyor concept, including component level technology readiness maturation and science instrument concepts for a broadly capable ultraviolet spectrograph. We present the scientific motivation for, and a preliminary design of, a multiplexed ultraviolet spectrograph to support both the exoplanet and astrophysics goals of the LUVOIR Surveyor mission concept, the Combined High-resolution and Imaging Spectrograph for the LUVOIR Surveyor (CHISL). CHISL includes a high-resolution (R 120,000; 1000 - 1700 Ang) point-source spectroscopy channel and a ...

  19. Feasibility analysis of high resolution tissue image registration using 3-D synthetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachna Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Registration of high-resolution tissue images is a critical step in the 3D analysis of protein expression. Because the distance between images (~4-5μm thickness of a tissue section is nearly the size of the objects of interest (~10-20μm cancer cell nucleus, a given object is often not present in both of two adjacent images. Without consistent correspondence of objects between images, registration becomes a difficult task. This work assesses the feasibility of current registration techniques for such images. Methods: We generated high resolution synthetic 3-D image data sets emulating the constraints in real data. We applied multiple registration methods to the synthetic image data sets and assessed the registration performance of three techniques (i.e., mutual information (MI, kernel density estimate (KDE method [1], and principal component analysis (PCA at various slice thicknesses (with increments of 1μm in order to quantify the limitations of each method. Results: Our analysis shows that PCA, when combined with the KDE method based on nuclei centers, aligns images corresponding to 5μm thick sections with acceptable accuracy. We also note that registration error increases rapidly with increasing distance between images, and that the choice of feature points which are conserved between slices improves performance. Conclusions: We used simulation to help select appropriate features and methods for image registration by estimating best-case-scenario errors for given data constraints in histological images. The results of this study suggest that much of the difficulty of stained tissue registration can be reduced to the problem of accurately identifying feature points, such as the center of nuclei.

  20. Phase contrast enhanced high resolution X-ray imaging and tomography of soft tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tabletop system for digital high resolution and high sensitivity X-ray micro-radiography has been developed for small-animal and soft-tissue imaging. The system is based on a micro-focus X-ray tube and the semiconductor hybrid position sensitive Medipix2 pixel detector. Transmission radiography imaging, conventionally based only on absorption, is enhanced by exploiting phase-shift effects induced in the X-ray beam traversing the sample. Phase contrast imaging is realized by object edge enhancement. DAQ is done by a novel fully integrated USB-based readout with online image generation. Improved signal reconstruction techniques make use of advanced statistical data analysis, enhanced beam hardening correction and direct thickness calibration of individual pixels. 2D and 3D micro-tomography images of several biological samples demonstrate the applicability of the system for biological and medical purposes including in-vivo and time dependent physiological studies in the life sciences

  1. A low-cost, high-resolution, video-rate imaging optical radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackos, J.T.; Nellums, R.O.; Lebien, S.M.; Diegert, C.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grantham, J.W.; Monson, T. [Air Force Research Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a unique type of portable low-cost range imaging optical radar (laser radar or LADAR). This innovative sensor is comprised of an active floodlight scene illuminator and an image intensified CCD camera receiver. It is a solid-state device (no moving parts) that offers significant size, performance, reliability, and simplicity advantages over other types of 3-D imaging sensors. This unique flash LADAR is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is well suited for many government and commercial uses. This paper presents an update of Sandia`s development of the Scannerless Range Imager technology and applications, and discusses the progress that has been made in evolving the sensor into a compact, low, cost, high-resolution, video rate Laser Dynamic Range Imager.

  2. High resolution in-vivo imaging of skin with full field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, E.; Bruhat, Alexis; Grieve, K.; Harms, F.; Martins, F.; Boccara, C.

    2014-03-01

    Full-field OCT (FFOCT) has the ability to provide en-face images with a very good axial sectioning as well as a very high transverse resolution (about 1 microns in all directions). Therefore it offers the possibility to visualize biological tissues with very high resolution both on the axial native view, and on vertical reconstructed sections. Here we investigated the potential dermatological applications of in-vivo skin imaging with FFOCT. A commercial FFOCT device was adapted for the in-vivo acquisition of stacks of images on the arm, hand and finger. Several subjects of different benign and pathological skin conditions were tested. The images allowed measurement of the stratum corneum and epidermis thicknesses, measurement of the stratum corneum refractive index, size measurement and count of the keratinocytes, visualization of the dermal-epidermal junction, and visualization of the melanin granules and of the melanocytes. Skins with different pigmentations could be discriminated and skin pathologies such as eczema could be identified. The very high resolution offered by FFOCT both on axial native images and vertical reconstructed sections allows for the visualization and measurement of a set of parameters useful for cosmetology and dermatology. In particular, FFOCT is a potential tool for the understanding and monitoring of skin hydration and pigmentation, as well as skin inflammation.

  3. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Jin Zhu; Wu Wang; Zun-Jing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis.Date Sources:We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015,using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI),high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging,intracranial arterial stenosis,black blood,and intracranial atherosclerosis.Study Selection:We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI.We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application.Results:VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size,and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously.Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening,enhancement,and vessel remodeling on VWI.This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis,identification of stroke mechanism,risk-stratifying patients,and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice.In addition,a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy.Conclusions:This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management.

  4. Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-06ER15835: Chemical Imaging with 100nm Spatial Resolution: Combining High Resolution Flurosecence Microscopy and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buratto, Steven K. [UC Santa Barbara

    2013-09-03

    We have combined, in a single instrument, high spatial resolution optical microscopy with the chemical specificity and conformational selectivity of ion mobility mass spectrometry. We discuss the design and construction of this apparatus as well as our efforts in applying this technique to thin films of molecular semiconductor materials.

  5. Vehicle extraction from high-resolution satellite image using template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, Dehchaiwong; Cao, Xiaoguang

    2015-12-01

    The process of vehicle examination by using satellite images is complicated and cumbersome process. At the present, the high definition satellite images are being used, however, the images of the vehicles can be seen as just a small point which is difficult to separate it out from the background that the image details are not sufficient to identify small objects. In this research, the techniques for the process of vehicle examination by using satellite images were applied by using image data from Pléiades which is the satellite image with high resolution of 0.40 m. The objective of this research is to study and develop the device for data extracting from satellite images, and the received data would be organized and created as Geospatial information by the concept of the picture matching with a pattern matching or Template Matching developed with Matlab program and Sum of Absolute Difference method collaborated with Neural Network technique in order to help evaluating pattern matching between template images of cars and cars' images which were used to examine from satellite images. The result obtained from the comparison with template data shows that data extraction accuracy is greater than 90%, and the extracted data can be imported into Geospatial information database. Moreover, the data can be displayed in Geospatial information Software, and it also can be searched by quantity condition and satellite image position.

  6. Batch Co-Registration of Mars High-Resolution Images to HRSC MC11-E Mosaic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Four NASA missions over the last forty years with onboard instruments for high-resolution orbital imaging have achieved both global coverage (with 6m CTX, 20m THEMIS-VIS and >8m Viking Orbiter cameras) as well as imaging with very high resolution in specific regions of interest (e.g. 25cm HiRISE and ≈1.5-12m MOC-NA cameras). Overall, this set of cameras have acquired more than 400,000 high-quality images of Mars with resolution between 25cm/pixel and 100m/pixel (Sidiropoulos and Muller, 2015). On the other hand, ESA has sent the only high-resolution stereo photogrammetric camera around Mars, HRSC onboard the Mars Express spacecraft, which has been mapping the Martian surface since 2004 with a resolution of 12.5 m/pixel (Jaumann et al., 2015). Initially the raw images are combined through an elaborate photogrammetric process to get (single-strip) 3D products (i.e. digital terrain models (DTMs) and derived orthorectified images (ORIs)). However, recently the processing chain has changed, and the single-strip product release was temporarily halted to be replaced by the production and release of mosaics of Mars quadrangles. The first product of this kind is the mosaic for the East part of quadrangle MC11 (i.e. the MC11-E mosaic), a product with 12.5 metres per pixel resolution in the panchromatic image and 50 metres per pixel resolution in the corresponding DTM (Gwinner et al., 2015). Such a product provides an excellent basemap to co-register and orthorectify all NASA high-resolution (≤100m/pixel) orbital images. The need for this co-registration to HRSC comes from their poor areo-referencing, which often leads to large deviations (reaching up to several kilometres) between the area they are supposed to image and the area they are actually imaging. After co-registration, all products are projected onto an common 3D coordinate system, which allows an examination of dynamic features of Mars through the changes that happen on its surface. In this work, we present the

  7. Spmk and Grabcut Based Target Extraction from High Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weihong; Wang, Guofeng; Feng, Chenyi; Zheng, Yiwei; Li, Jonathan; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Target detection and extraction from high resolution remote sensing images is a basic and wide needed application. In this paper, to improve the efficiency of image interpretation, we propose a detection and segmentation combined method to realize semi-automatic target extraction. We introduce the dense transform color scale invariant feature transform (TC-SIFT) descriptor and the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) & HSV descriptor to characterize the spatial structure and color information of the targets. With the k-means cluster method, we get the bag of visual words, and then, we adopt three levels' spatial pyramid (SP) to represent the target patch. After gathering lots of different kinds of target image patches from many high resolution UAV images, and using the TC-SIFT-SP and the multi-scale HOG & HSV feature, we constructed the SVM classifier to detect the target. In this paper, we take buildings as the targets. Experiment results show that the target detection accuracy of buildings can reach to above 90%. Based on the detection results which are a series of rectangle regions of the targets. We select the rectangle regions as candidates for foreground and adopt the GrabCut based and boundary regularized semi-auto interactive segmentation algorithm to get the accurate boundary of the target. Experiment results show its accuracy and efficiency. It can be an effective way for some special targets extraction.

  8. High-resolution ultrasound imaging and noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of blood variables in peripheral blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is being widely used in clinics to obtain diagnostic information non-invasively and in real time. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging platform, Vevo (VisualSonics, Inc.) provides in vivo, real-time images with exceptional resolution (up to 30 microns) using high-frequency transducers (up to 80 MHz). Recently, we built optoacoustic systems for probing radial artery and peripheral veins that can be used for noninvasive monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and concentration of important endogenous and exogenous chromophores (such as ICG). In this work we used the high-resolution ultrasound imaging system Vevo 770 for visualization of the radial artery and peripheral veins and acquired corresponding optoacoustic signals from them using the optoacoustic systems. Analysis of the optoacoustic data with a specially developed algorithm allowed for measurement of blood oxygenation in the blood vessels as well as for continuous, real-time monitoring of arterial and venous blood oxygenation. Our results indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic technique (unlike pure optical approaches and other noninvasive techniques) is capable of accurate peripheral venous oxygenation measurement; and 2) peripheral venous oxygenation is dependent on skin temperature and local hemodynamics. Moreover, we performed for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a comparative study of optoacoustic arterial oximetry and a standard pulse oximeter in humans and demonstrated superior performance of the optoacoustic arterial oximeter, in particular at low blood flow.

  9. MTRC compensation in high-resolution ISAR imaging via improved polar format algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hao; Li, Na; Xu, Shiyou; Chen, Zengping

    2014-10-01

    Migration through resolution cells (MTRC) is generated in high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. A MTRC compensation algorithm for high-resolution ISAR imaging based on improved polar format algorithm (PFA) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, in the situation that a rigid-body target stably flies, the initial value of the rotation angle and center of the target is obtained from the rotation of radar line of sight (RLOS) and high range resolution profile (HRRP). Then, the PFA is iteratively applied to the echo data to search the optimization solution based on minimum entropy criterion. The procedure starts with the estimated initial rotation angle and center, and terminated when the entropy of the compensated ISAR image is minimized. To reduce the computational load, the 2-D iterative search is divided into two 1-D search. One is carried along the rotation angle and the other one is carried along rotation center. Each of the 1-D searches is realized by using of the golden section search method. The accurate rotation angle and center can be obtained when the iterative search terminates. Finally, apply the PFA to compensate the MTRC by the use of the obtained optimized rotation angle and center. After MTRC compensation, the ISAR image can be best focused. Simulated and real data demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. In-vivo high resolution corneal imaging and analysis on animal models for clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jesmond; Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Baskaran, M.; Aung, Tin

    2015-07-01

    A simple and low cost optical probe system for the high resolution imaging of the cornea is proposed, based on a Gaussian beam epi-illumination configuration. Corneal topography is obtained by moving the scanning spot across the eye in a raster fashion whereas pachymetry data is achieved by reconstructing the images obtained at different depths. The proposed prototype has been successfully tested on porcine eye samples ex vivo and subsequently on laboratory animals, such as the New Zealand White Rabbit, in vivo. This proposed system and methodology pave the way for realizing a simple and inexpensive optical configuration for pachymetry and keratometry readings, with achievable resolution up to the cellular level. This novel and non-contact high resolution imaging modality demonstrates high intraobserver reproducibility and repeatability. Together with its sophisticated data analysis strategies and safety profile, it is believed to complement existing imaging modalities in the assessment and evaluation of corneal diseases, which enable a decrease in morbidity and improvement in the effectiveness of subsequent treatment.

  11. Time-optimized high-resolution readout-segmented diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Reishofer

    Full Text Available Readout-segmented echo planar imaging with 2D navigator-based reacquisition is an uprising technique enabling the sampling of high-resolution diffusion images with reduced susceptibility artifacts. However, low signal from the small voxels and long scan times hamper the clinical applicability. Therefore, we introduce a regularization algorithm based on total variation that is applied directly on the entire diffusion tensor. The spatially varying regularization parameter is determined automatically dependent on spatial variations in signal-to-noise ratio thus, avoiding over- or under-regularization. Information about the noise distribution in the diffusion tensor is extracted from the diffusion weighted images by means of complex independent component analysis. Moreover, the combination of those features enables processing of the diffusion data absolutely user independent. Tractography from in vivo data and from a software phantom demonstrate the advantage of the spatially varying regularization compared to un-regularized data with respect to parameters relevant for fiber-tracking such as Mean Fiber Length, Track Count, Volume and Voxel Count. Specifically, for in vivo data findings suggest that tractography results from the regularized diffusion tensor based on one measurement (16 min generates results comparable to the un-regularized data with three averages (48 min. This significant reduction in scan time renders high resolution (1 × 1 × 2.5 mm(3 diffusion tensor imaging of the entire brain applicable in a clinical context.

  12. Analysis of heavy ion induced DNA damage site using high resolution immunofluorescence microscopy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion therapy is a promising cancer therapy for patients having tumors that cannot be surgically removed or chemotherapeutically treated. Carbon therapy shows less side-effect such as skin inflammation by specifically targeting tumors due to the Bragg peak. Although the clinical benefit is evident, molecular mechanisms underlying heavy ion induced DNA damage response and the repair are not fully understood. Ionizing radiation causes a DNA double strand break, which is one of the toxic DNA damages, leading to cell death if unrepaired. An advanced molecular biology technique enables the visualization of DSB site in individual cell by using immuno-fluorescence microscopy. DNA damage response protein, H2AX, is phosphorylated at DSB site, and it forms discrete focus. Since γH2AX focus represent a DSB site following X-irradiation, this focus assay is utilized as a sensitive technique to detect DSB. Furthermore, advanced microscope technologies enable us to visualize high resolution image by deconvolution which is a computationally intensive image processing technique that is being increasingly utilized for improving the contrast and resolution of digital images captured by the microscope. In this review, we describe our novel technique for DSB repair analysis using high resolution microscope images, and further we discuss an application possibilities of this useful technique for DNA repair research. (author)

  13. Imaging of pore networks and related interfaces in soil systems by using high resolution X-ray micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Gerhard; Eickhorst, Thilo; Schmidt, Hannes; Halisch, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Today's high-resolution X-ray CT with its powerful tubes and great detail detectability lends itself naturally to geological and pedological applications. Those include the non-destructive interior examination and textural analysis of rock and soil samples and their permeability and porosity - to name only a few. Especially spatial distribution and geometry of pores, mineral phases and fractures are important for the evaluation of hydrologic and aeration properties in soils as well as for root development in the soil matrix. The possibility to visualize a whole soil aggregate or root tissue in a non-destructive way is undoubtedly the most valuable feature of this type of analysis and is a new area for routine application of high resolution X-ray micro-CT. The paper outlines recent developments in hard- and software requirements for high resolution CT. It highlights several pedological applications which were performed with the phoenix nanotom m, the first 180 kV nanofocus CT system tailored specifically for extremely high-resolution scans of variable sized samples with voxel-resolutions down to micro-scale representing the space of microbial habitats. Therefore, soils were impregnated with resin and scanned via X-ray CT. Scans at higher resolution were obtained from sub-volumes cut from the entire resin impregnated block and from crop roots surrounded by rhizosphere soil. Within the scanned structures we will highlight interfaces i.e. pore-solid interface and soil-root interface. The latter will be linked to examples of fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy obtained from 2D sections revealing additional biological and chemical information in the respective microenvironment. Based on the combination of all 3D and 2D imaging data habitat features of soils can be characterized and combined with studies analyzing microbial rhizosphere colonization.

  14. Stochastic Method for De-shadowing and Objects Retrieval from High Resolution Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini.M,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing is emerging as a strong tool to extract information about the earth resources from the satellite imagery. But this information gets affected by shadow in urban areas. High-resolution satellite imagery offer great possibilities for urban mapping. Unfortunately, shadows cast by buildings in high-density urban environments obscure much of the information in the image leading to potentially corrupted classification results or blunders in interpretation. The principle problem caused by the shadows is either a reduction or total loss information in an image. Reduction ofinformation could potentially lead to the corruption of biophysical parameters derived from pixels values, such as vegetation indices. Total loss of information means that areas of the image cannot be interpreted, and value added products, such as digital terrain models, cannot be created. Keeping this in mind an attempt has been made in this project to study the effect of shadow and its impacts on high-resolution imagery of urban area. Panchromatic image of IKONOS satellite sensor is taken for analysis and its statistical parameters are studied. The image is segmented based on property based and image based techniques according to the spectral and geometric properties of images for detecting shadow regions. This segmentation detection technique is Region growing segmentation which misleads water contained image that is water pixel also identified as shadow pixel. This misleading is corrected with region filtering technique based on the simple logic that water body region have low variance than the shadow region. And from these detected shadow regions, different radiometric enhancement techniques (histogram matching, lightness recovery, gamma correction are applied to enhance the information under shadow regions and results are discussed.

  15. High-resolution Fourier hologram synthesis from photographic images through computing the light field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ni; Ren, Zhenbo; Lam, Edmund Y

    2016-03-01

    We present a technique for synthesizing the Fourier hologram of a three-dimensional scene from its light field. The light field captures the volumetric information of an object, and an important advantage is that it does not require coherent illumination, as in conventional holography. In this work, we show how to obtain a high-resolution digital hologram with the light field obtained from a series of photographic images captured along the optical axis. The method is verified both by simulations and experimentally captured light field.

  16. Simplified technique in high-resolution MR imaging of the shoulder: ZEPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fairly easy method for high resolution MR imaging of the shoulder is described. The combination of a defined arrangement of the gradients with a small-volume Helmholtz coil provides the possibility of a high zoom of structures apart from the magnet's centre. The maximal achievable zoom factor depends on the ratio of FOV/sensitive coil volume. The ZEPRA method acts by phase-encoded aliasing only. With this technique all interesting soft tissue of the shoulder may readily be visualized in every direction and with every type of sequence. (orig.)

  17. High-Resolution Chandra X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sigma Orionis Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, S.L.; Sokal, K. R.; Cohen, D. H.; Gagne, M.; Owocki, S.P.; Townsend, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the p...

  18. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Songxiang; Gupta, Rajiv; Kyprianou, Iacovos

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  19. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Gupta, Rajiv, E-mail: songxiang.gu@fda.hhs.gov, E-mail: rgupta1@partners.org, E-mail: iacovos.kyprianou@fda.hhs.gov [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  20. Reconstruction of High Resolution 3D Objects from Incomplete Images and 3D Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pacheco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To this day, digital object reconstruction is a quite complex area that requires many techniques and novel approaches, in which high-resolution 3D objects present one of the biggest challenges. There are mainly two different methods that can be used to reconstruct high resolution objects and images: passive methods and active methods. This methods depend on the type of information available as input for modeling 3D objects. The passive methods use information contained in the images and the active methods make use of controlled light sources, such as lasers. The reconstruction of 3D objects is quite complex and there is no unique solution- The use of specific methodologies for the reconstruction of certain objects it’s also very common, such as human faces, molecular structures, etc. This paper proposes a novel hybrid methodology, composed by 10 phases that combine active and passive methods, using images and a laser in order to supplement the missing information and obtain better results in the 3D object reconstruction. Finally, the proposed methodology proved its efficiency in two complex topological complex objects.

  1. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  2. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    This thesis concerns application specific 3D head tracking. The purpose is to improve motion correction in position emission tomography (PET) brain imaging through development of markerless tracking. Currently, motion correction strategies are based on either the PET data itself or tracking devices...... images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution...... of a few millimeters. Stateof- the-art hardware and software solutions are integrated into an operational device. This novel system is tested against a commercial tracking system popular in PET brain imaging. Testing and demonstrations are carried out in clinical settings. A compact markerless tracking...

  3. High resolution iridocorneal angle imaging system by axicon lens assisted gonioscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Shinde, Anant; Fu, Chan Yiu; Jeesmond Hong, Xun Jie; Baskaran, Mani; Aung, Tin; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Direct visualization and assessment of the iridocorneal angle (ICA) region with high resolution is important for the clinical evaluation of glaucoma. However, the current clinical imaging systems for ICA do not provide sufficient structural details due to their poor resolution. The key challenges in achieving high quality ICA imaging are its location in the anterior region of the eye and the occurrence of total internal reflection due to refractive index difference between cornea and air. Here, we report an indirect axicon assisted gonioscopy imaging probe with white light illumination. The illustrated results with this probe shows significantly improved visualization of structures in the ICA including TM region, compared to the current available tools. It could reveal critical details of ICA and expected to aid management by providing information that is complementary to angle photography and gonioscopy. PMID:27471000

  4. Nanocrystal Phase Identification by Lattice Fringe Fingerprinting from High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorge, Ruben; Seipel, Bjoern; Moeck, Peter; Fraundorf, Philip

    2006-05-01

    Lattice fringe fingerprinting is a novel and powerful method of identifying and characterizing nanocrystalline structures or materials based on images from direct space high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We examine Fourier transformed HRTEM images of nanocrystals in certain orientations (i.e. lattice fringes and cross fringes) in order to obtain a lattice fringe fingerprint plot. Such plots are used to identify a crystalline nanoparticle by comparing the experimental data with data that are derived from a comprehensive database. A lattice fringe fingerprint plot is similar to a classical X-ray powder diffractogram, but an important advantage is that the intersection angles of lattice fringes give us additional information. When transmission electron microscope image acquisition and data interpretation are automated and connected to a comprehensive database (such as our Nano-Crystallography Database, http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/), fringe fingerprinting will be able to compete with powder X-ray diffraction in identifying unknown nanocrystals on a routine basis.

  5. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Małgorzata G; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N; Lauridsen, Erik M; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Molaison, Jamie J; Santodonato, Louis J; Tremsin, Anton S; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components. PMID:26724075

  6. Optimal experimental design for nano-particle atom-counting from high-resolution STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; De wael, A.; Gonnissen, J.; Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be

    2015-04-15

    In the present paper, the principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for atom-counting from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. Binary and multiple hypothesis testing have been investigated in order to determine the limits to the precision with which the number of atoms in a projected atomic column can be estimated. The probability of error has been calculated when using STEM images, scattering cross-sections or peak intensities as a criterion to count atoms. Based on this analysis, we conclude that scattering cross-sections perform almost equally well as images and perform better than peak intensities. Furthermore, the optimal STEM detector design can be derived for atom-counting using the expression for the probability of error. We show that for very thin objects LAADF is optimal and that for thicker objects the optimal inner detector angle increases.

  7. Evolution of INO Uncooled Infrared Cameras Towards Very High Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Alain; Jerominek, Hubert; Chevalier, Claude; Le Noc, Loïc; Tremblay, Bruno; Alain, Christine; Martel, Anne; Blanchard, Nathalie; Morissette, Martin; Mercier, Luc; Gagnon, Lucie; Couture, Patrick; Desnoyers, Nichola; Demers, Mathieu; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Lévesque, Frédéric; Verreault, Sonia; Duchesne, François; Lambert, Julie; Girard, Marc; Savard, Maxime; Châteauneuf, François

    2011-02-01

    Along the years INO has been involved in development of various uncooled infrared devices. Todays, the infrared imagers exhibit good resolutions and find their niche in numerous applications. Nevertheless, there is still a trend toward high resolution imaging for demanding applications. At the same time, low-resolution for mass market applications are sought for low-cost imaging solutions. These two opposite requirements reflect the evolution of infrared cameras from the origin, when only few pixel-count FPAs were available, to megapixel-count FPA of the recent years. This paper reviews the evolution of infrared camera technologies at INO from the uncooled bolometer detector capability up to the recent achievement of 1280×960 pixels infrared camera core using INO's patented microscan technology.

  8. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowska, Małgorzata G., E-mail: malg@dtu.dk [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Lauridsen, Erik M. [Xnovo Technology ApS, Galoche Alle 15, Køge 4600 (Denmark); Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Tremsin, Anton S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grosse, Mirco [Institute for Applied Material Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe DE-76021 (Germany); Morgano, Manuel [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI CH-5232 (Switzerland); Kabra, Saurabh [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Strobl, Markus [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  9. High-resolution satellite image segmentation using Hölder exponents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debasish Chakraborty; Gautam Kumar Sen; Sugata Hazra

    2009-10-01

    Texture in high-resolution satellite images requires substantial amendment in the conventional segmentation algorithms. A measure is proposed to compute the Hölder exponent (HE) to assess the roughness or smoothness around each pixel of the image. The localized singularity information is incorporated in computing the HE. An optimum window size is evaluated so that HE reacts to localized singularity. A two-step iterative procedure for clustering the transformed HE image is adapted to identify the range of HE, densely occupied in the kernel and to partition Hölder exponents into a cluster that matches with the range. Hölder exponent values (noise or not associated with the other cluster) are clubbed to a nearest possible cluster using the local maximum likelihood analysis.

  10. πSPIM: high NA high resolution isotropic light-sheet imaging in cell culture dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theer, Patrick; Dragneva, Denitsa; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), also termed single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), enables live cell fluorescence imaging with optical sectioning capabilities superior to confocal microscopy and without any out-of-focus exposure of the specimen. However, the need of two objective lenses, one for light-sheet illumination and one for imaging, imposes geometrical constraints that require LSFM setups to be adapted to the specific needs of different types of specimen in order to obtain optimal imaging conditions. Here we demonstrate the use of an oblique light-sheet configuration adapted to provide the highest possible Gaussian beam enabled resolution in LSFM. The oblique light-sheet configuration furthermore enables LSFM imaging at the surface of a cover slip, without the need of specific sample mounting. In addition, the system is compatible with simultaneous high NA wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging of the specimen contained in a glass-bottom cell culture dish. This prevents cumbersome sample mounting and enables rapid screening of large areas of the specimen followed by high-resolution LSFM imaging of selected cells. We demonstrate the application of this microscope for in toto imaging of endocytosis in yeast, showing for the first time imaging of all endocytic events of a given cell over a period of >5 minutes with sub-second resolution. PMID:27619647

  11. A NUFFT Based Step-frequency Chirp Signal High Resolution Imaging Algorithm and Target Recognition Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radar Automatic Target Recognition (RATR is the key technique to be breaked through in the fuure development of intelligent weapon system. Compared to the 2-D SAR image target recognition, High Resolution Range Profile (HRRP target recognition has the advantage of low data dimension, low requirement of radar system's calculation and storage ability, and the imaging algorithm is also not complicated. HRRP imaging is the first and the key process in target recognition, its speed and imaging quality can directly influence the real-time capability and accuracy of target recognition. In this paper a new HRRP imaging algorithm — NUFFT algorithm is proposed, the derivation of mathematical expression is given, both for the echo simulation process and the imaging process. In the meantime, by analyzing each step's calculation complexity, we compared the calculation complexity of four different imaging algorithms, we also simulate two target's imaging and target recognition processing. Theoretical analysis and simulation both prove that the proposed algorithm's calculation complexity is improved in various degree compared with the others, thus can be effectively used in target recognition.

  12. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mmx1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 μm and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice.There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging.Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  13. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelley, Martin; Parsons, David; Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mm×1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 μm and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice. There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging. Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  14. Building Change Detection in Very High Resolution Satellite Stereo Image Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J.; Qin, R.; Cerra, D.; Reinartz, P.

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing demand for robust methods on urban sprawl monitoring. The steadily increasing number of high resolution and multi-view sensors allows producing datasets with high temporal and spatial resolution; however, less effort has been dedicated to employ very high resolution (VHR) satellite image time series (SITS) to monitor the changes in buildings with higher accuracy. In addition, these VHR data are often acquired from different sensors. The objective of this research is to propose a robust time-series data analysis method for VHR stereo imagery. Firstly, the spatial-temporal information of the stereo imagery and the Digital Surface Models (DSMs) generated from them are combined, and building probability maps (BPM) are calculated for all acquisition dates. In the second step, an object-based change analysis is performed based on the derivative features of the BPM sets. The change consistence between object-level and pixel-level are checked to remove any outlier pixels. Results are assessed on six pairs of VHR satellite images acquired within a time span of 7 years. The evaluation results have proved the efficiency of the proposed method.

  15. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in study of the skin: Normal patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sans, Nicolas, E-mail: sans.n@chu-toulouse.fr [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Purpan, Place du Dr Baylac, TSA 40031, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Faruch, Marie; Chiavassa-Gandois, Helene; Ribes, Catherine Lalande Champetier de [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Purpan, Place du Dr Baylac, TSA 40031, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Paul, Carle [Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Larrey, Toulouse (France); Railhac, Jean-Jacques [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Purpan, Place du Dr Baylac, TSA 40031, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To validate quantitative and qualitative criteria of normal healthy skin using high-resolution MR imaging. Materials and methods: FIESTA and spin echo sequences of the skin of the heel, back and calf were obtained in 31 healthy volunteers. A dedicated 3-in. coil for study of the skin was used to optimize reception sensitivity. Quantitative analysis was performed to measure skin thickness in these three sites and qualititative analysis aimed to differentiate the various skin layers. Results: With both sequences, the stratum corneum appeared as a hyperintense layer. The epidermis was visualized appeared as a fine, homogeneous, hyperintense line. The dermoepidermal junction was clearer particularly in the calf. The dermis was also identified in each sequence and in each anatomic site. The signal was hypointense in both sequences, homogeneous with spin echo and more heterogeneous with FIESTA. Moreover the interface between the papillary and the reticular dermis could be distinguished. The hypodermis was visualized in both sequences and in all sites and hypodermal inclusions in the dermis were seen particularly in the back and calf. Lastly, the pilosebaceous follicles and the deep vascular network of the reticular dermis were more clearly seen with FIESTA sequence. Measures of overall skin thickness and for each layer according to site, sex and MRI sequence were performed. Statistical analysis was then performed to seek significant differences between the results according to these parameters. Conclusion: MR imaging provides global analysis with high resolution of the various skin layers down to the hypodermis and the muscular fascia.

  16. High-resolution MR imaging of the knee at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to examine the practical feasibility of using a 3.0-T MR unit to obtain high-quality, high-resolution images of the knee joint, one human cadaveric and 5 porcine knees were imaged with the 3.0-T unit. Sets of T1-weighted spin echo images were obtained with in-plane resolution of 0.195x0.39 mm and an acquisition time of approximately 5 min. Two porcine knees were also imaged with the 1.0-T unit with an identical imaging protocol and the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios were measured on images at 3 T and 1 T. The 3-T MR system provided detailed delineation of the knees. Deep layers of the medial collateral ligament and associated fine fibers beneath the medial and lateral collateral ligament were demarcated. We observed precise demonstration of the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament, irregularity of the meniscal free edge, and conjoint tendon formation together with the lateral collateral ligament and the biceps femoris tendon. Compared to the 1-T unit, the S/N ratio with the 3-T unit was increased by a factor of 1.39 to 1.72. Due to the potential advantage of obtaining detailed images, the 3-T MR system suggests a practical utility for fine demonstration of the knee morphology

  17. Damage assessment framework for landslide disaster based on very high-resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Qihua; He, Jun; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Ying; Ge, Fengxiang

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that rapid building damage assessment is necessary for postdisaster emergency relief and recovery. Based on an analysis of very high-resolution remote-sensing images, we propose an automatic building damage assessment framework for rainfall- or earthquake-induced landslide disasters. The framework consists of two parts that implement landslide detection and the damage classification of buildings, respectively. In this framework, an approach based on modified object-based sparse representation classification and morphological processing is used for automatic landslide detection. Moreover, we propose a building damage classification model, which is a classification strategy designed for affected buildings based on the spectral characteristics of the landslide disaster and the morphological characteristics of building damage. The effectiveness of the proposed framework was verified by applying it to remote-sensing images from Wenchuan County, China, in 2008, in the aftermath of an earthquake. It can be useful for decision makers, disaster management agencies, and scientific research organizations.

  18. Imaging the Seattle Fault Zone with high-resolution seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, A.J.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Seattle fault, which trends east-west through the greater Seattle metropolitan area, is a thrust fault that, around 1100 years ago, produced a major earthquake believed to have had a magnitude greater than 7. We present the first high resolution image of the shallow P wave velocity variation across the fault zone obtained by tomographic inversion of first arrivals recorded on a seismic reflection profile shot through Puget Sound adjacent to Seattle. The velocity image shows that above 500 m depth the fault zone extending beneath Seattle comprises three distinct fault splays, the northernmost of which dips to the south at around 60??. The degree of uplift of Tertiary rocks within the fault zone suggests that the slip-rate along the northernmost splay during the Quaternary is 0.5 mm a-1, which is twice the average slip-rate of the Seattle fault over the last 40 Ma.

  19. Measurement of Two Phase Flow in Porous Medium Using High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lanlan; SONG Yongchen; LIU Yu; YANG Mingjun; ZHU Ningjun; WANG Xiaojing; DOU Binlin

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of two phase flow in porous medium for sequestration was carried out using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique.The porous medium was a packed bed of glass beads.Spin echo multi sequence was used to measure the distribution of CO2 and water in the porous medium.The intensity images show that the fluid distribution is non-uniform due to its viscosity and pore structure of porous medium.The velocity distribution of fluids is calculated from the saturation of water and porosity of porous medium.The experimental results show that fluid velocities vary with time and position.The capillary dispersion rate donated the effects of capillary,which was largest at water saturations of 0.45.The displacement process is different between in BZ-02 and BZ-2.The final water residual saturation depends on permeability and porosity.

  20. 3D imaging provides a high-resolution, volumetric approach for analyzing biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Matthew R; Policastro, Steven A; Strom, Matthew J; Riley, Scott C; Robbins-Wamsley, Stephanie H; Drake, Lisa A

    2014-01-01

    A volumetric approach for determining the fouling burden on surfaces is presented, consisting of a 3D camera imaging system with fine (5 μm) resolution. Panels immersed in an estuary on the southwest coast of Florida, USA were imaged and the data were used to quantify seasonal changes in the biofouling community. Test panels, which were submerged in seawater for up to one year, were analyzed before and after gentle scrubbing to quantify the biovolume of the total fouling community (ie soft and hard organisms) and the hard fouling community. Total biofouling ranged from 0.01 to 1.16 cm(3) cm(-2) throughout the immersion period; soft fouling constituted 22-87% of the total biovolume. In the future, this approach may be used to inform numerical models of fluid-surface interfaces and to evaluate, with high resolution, the morphology of fouling organisms in response to antifouling technologies.

  1. Two-photon luminescence thermometry: towards 3D high-resolution thermal imaging of waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruiyun; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Pedrola, Ginés Lifante; Chen, Feng; Jaque, Daniel

    2016-07-11

    We report on the use of the Erbium-based luminescence thermometry to realize high resolution, three dimensional thermal imaging of optical waveguides. Proof of concept is demonstrated in a 980-nm laser pumped ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide in Er:Yb phosphate glass. Multi-photon microscopy images revealed the existence of well confined intra-waveguide temperature increments as large as 200 °C for moderate 980-nm pump powers of 120 mW. Numerical simulations and experimental data reveal that thermal loading can be substantially reduced if pump events are separated more than the characteristic thermal time that for the waveguides investigated is in the ms time scale. PMID:27410882

  2. Change Detection of High Resolution SAR Images by the Fusion of Coherent/Incoherent Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang-li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at detecting the change regions of high resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images, we propose to use the Dempster-Shafer (D-S evidence theory to fuse coherent/incoherent features from sensors that form an integral part of the system. First, we use the Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC segmentation algorithm to implement multi-scale joint segmentation for multi-temporal SAR images. Second, we extract multiple intensity and coherence difference features on each segment level by SLIC using mean operator to complete the fusion of multi-scale features to get the multi-feature difference mapped by a ratio operator. Finally, we fuse the multi-feature difference maps to get the final change detection result using the D-S evidence theory. The experimental results in our study prove the effectiveness of our proposed computational algorithm.

  3. Underwater Digital Terrain Model with GPS-aided High-resolution Profile-scan Sonar Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-jun; KOU Xin-jian

    2008-01-01

    The whole procedures of underwater digital terrain model (DTM) were presented by building with the global positioning system (GPS) aided high-resolution profile-scan sonar images. The algorithm regards the digital image scanned in a cycle as the raw data. First the label rings are detected with the improved Hough transform (HT) method and followed by curve-fitting for accurate location; then the most probable window for each ping is detected with weighted neighborhood gray-level co-occurrence matrix; and finally the DTM is built by integrating the GPS data with sonar data for 3D visualization. The case of an underwater trench for immersed tube road tunnel is illustrated.

  4. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.

  5. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  6. High-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of prostate cancer using a reduced FOV technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reischauer, Carolin, E-mail: reischauer@biomed.ee.ethz.ch [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH and University of Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Wilm, Bertram J. [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH and University of Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Scientific Affairs, Winterthurerstrasse 92, CH-8006 Zurich (Switzerland); Gutzeit, Andreas [Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Brauerstrasse 15, CH-8401 Winterthur (Switzerland); Prikler, Ladislav; Gablinger, Roger [Uroviva, Specialist Hospital for Urology, Zuerichstrasse 5, CH-8180 Buelach (Switzerland); Boesiger, Peter [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH and University of Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Wentz, Klaus-Ulrich [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH and University of Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Muensterlingen, CH-8596 Muensterlingen (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers the promise of improved tumor localization in prostate cancer but the technique suffers from susceptibility-induced artifacts that limit the achievable resolution. The present work employs a reduced field-of-view technique that enables high-resolution DTI of the prostate at 3 T. Feasibility of the approach is demonstrated in a clinical study including 26 patients and 14 controls. Materials and methods: Reduced field-of-view acquisition was established by non-coplanar application of the excitation and the refocusing pulse in conjunction with outer volume suppression. Accuracy for cancer detection of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping and T{sub 2}-weighted imaging was calculated and compared with reference to the findings of trans-rectal ultrasound-guided octant biopsy. Mean ADCs and fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the patients with positive and negative biopsies were compared to each other and to the controls. Results: Fine anatomical details were successfully depicted on the ADC maps with sub-millimeter resolution. Accuracy for prostate cancer detection was 73.5% for ADC maps and 71% for T{sub 2}-weighted images, respectively. Cohen's kappa ({kappa} = 0.48) indicated moderate agreement of the two methods. The mean ADCs were significantly lower, the FA values higher, in the patients with positive biopsy than in the patients with negative biopsy and the controls. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the FA values, but not the ADCs, were slightly overestimated. Bootstrap analysis revealed that the ADC, but not the FA value, is a highly repeatable marker. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present work introduces a new approach for high-resolution DTI of the prostate enabling a more accurate detection of focal tumors especially useful in screening populations or as a potential navigator for image-guided biopsy.

  7. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  8. High-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of prostate cancer using a reduced FOV technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers the promise of improved tumor localization in prostate cancer but the technique suffers from susceptibility-induced artifacts that limit the achievable resolution. The present work employs a reduced field-of-view technique that enables high-resolution DTI of the prostate at 3 T. Feasibility of the approach is demonstrated in a clinical study including 26 patients and 14 controls. Materials and methods: Reduced field-of-view acquisition was established by non-coplanar application of the excitation and the refocusing pulse in conjunction with outer volume suppression. Accuracy for cancer detection of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping and T2-weighted imaging was calculated and compared with reference to the findings of trans-rectal ultrasound-guided octant biopsy. Mean ADCs and fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the patients with positive and negative biopsies were compared to each other and to the controls. Results: Fine anatomical details were successfully depicted on the ADC maps with sub-millimeter resolution. Accuracy for prostate cancer detection was 73.5% for ADC maps and 71% for T2-weighted images, respectively. Cohen's kappa (κ = 0.48) indicated moderate agreement of the two methods. The mean ADCs were significantly lower, the FA values higher, in the patients with positive biopsy than in the patients with negative biopsy and the controls. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the FA values, but not the ADCs, were slightly overestimated. Bootstrap analysis revealed that the ADC, but not the FA value, is a highly repeatable marker. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present work introduces a new approach for high-resolution DTI of the prostate enabling a more accurate detection of focal tumors especially useful in screening populations or as a potential navigator for image-guided biopsy.

  9. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 µm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons

  10. Chemical speciation of chlorine in atmospheric aerosol samples by high-resolution proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is a main elemental component of atmospheric particulate matter (APM). The knowledge of the chemical form of chlorine is of primary importance for source apportionment and for estimation of health effects of APM. In this work the applicability of high-resolution wavelength dispersive proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy for chemical speciation of chlorine in fine fraction atmospheric aerosols is studied. A Johansson-type crystal spectrometer with energy resolution below the natural linewidth of Cl K lines was used to record the high-resolution Kα and Kβ proton induced spectra of several reference Cl compounds and two atmospheric aerosol samples, which were collected for conventional PIXE analysis. The Kα spectra which refers to the oxidation state, showed very minor differences due to the high electronegativity of Cl. However, the Kβ spectra exhibited pronounced chemical effects which were significant enough to perform chemical speciation. The major chlorine component in two fine fraction aerosol samples collected during a 2010 winter campaign in Budapest was clearly identified as NaCl by comparing the high-resolution Cl Kβ spectra from the aerosol samples with the corresponding reference spectra. This work demonstrates the feasibility of high-resolution PIXE method for chemical speciation of Cl in aerosols. - Highlights: ► Chemical specation of Cl in aerosol samples by high resolution PIXE spectroscopy. ► Fine structure of Kα and Kβ lines of reference compounds and APM samples was given. ► Kα spectra were well aligned with each other confirming the same Cl oxidation state. ► Pronounced chemical effects were observed in the Kβ spectra. ► We showed that chemical speciation of Cl was possible on thin aerosol samples

  11. High-resolution application of YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce imaging detectors with a CCD X-ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touš, Jan; Horváth, Martin; Pína, Ladislav; Blažek, Karel; Sopko, Bruno

    2008-06-01

    A high-resolution CCD X-ray camera based on YAG:Ce or LuAG:Ce thin scintillators is presented. High-resolution in low-energy X-ray radiation is proved with several objects. The spatial resolution achieved in the images is about 1 μm. The high-resolution imaging system is a combination of a high-sensitivity digital CCD camera and an optical system with a thin scintillator-imaging screen. The screen can consist of YAG:Ce or LuAG:Ce inorganic scintillator [J.A. Mares, Radiat. Meas. 38 (2004) 353]. These materials have the advantages of mechanical and chemical stability and non-hygroscopicity. The high-resolution imaging system can be used with different types of radiation (X-ray, electrons, UV, and VUV [M. Nikl, Meas. Sci. Technol. 17 (2006) R37]). The objects used for the imaging tests are grids and small animals with features of several microns in size. The resolution capabilities were tested using different types of CCD cameras and scintillation imaging screens.

  12. Extraction of the urban green space based on the high resolution remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Miaomiao; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jian; Guo, Zheng; Jiang, Zishan

    2009-10-01

    High resolution image can be used to distinguish the small difference of the ground things. Texture information can avoid the matter of same spectral from different objective and different spectral with same objective which must be faced when making classification with only spectral information. The main objective of this research was to determine the capacity of high spatial resolution satellite image data to discriminate vegetation in urban area. A high spatial resolution IKONOS image, coincident field data covering the urban area of linping scenic region in Yuhang town, Zhejiang province in china, was used in this analysis. The vegetation of test region was classified as tea garden, masson pine, fir, broadleaves, and shrub/herb based on the field data. Semi-variograms were calculated to differentiate vegetation classes and assess which window sizes were most appropriate for calculation of grey-level co-occurrence texture measures. The texture analysis showed that co-occurrence mean, variance, contrast, and correlation texture measures provided the most significant statistical differentiation between vegetation classes. Subsequently, a decision tree classification was applied to spectral and textural transformations of the IKONOS image data to classify the vegetation. Using both spectral and textural image bands yielded the good classification accuracy (overall accuracy=81.72%). The results showed that it has the higher accuracy to extract the urban green space from IKONOS imagery with the spectral and texture information, as well as the vegetation index.

  13. Relating speech production to tongue muscle compressions using tagged and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Ye, Chuyang; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    The human tongue is composed of multiple internal muscles that work collaboratively during the production of speech. Assessment of muscle mechanics can help understand the creation of tongue motion, interpret clinical observations, and predict surgical outcomes. Although various methods have been proposed for computing the tongue's motion, associating motion with muscle activity in an interdigitated fiber framework has not been studied. In this work, we aim to develop a method that reveals different tongue muscles' activities in different time phases during speech. We use fourdimensional tagged magnetic resonance (MR) images and static high-resolution MR images to obtain tongue motion and muscle anatomy, respectively. Then we compute strain tensors and local tissue compression along the muscle fiber directions in order to reveal their shortening pattern. This process relies on the support from multiple image analysis methods, including super-resolution volume reconstruction from MR image slices, segmentation of internal muscles, tracking the incompressible motion of tissue points using tagged images, propagation of muscle fiber directions over time, and calculation of strain in the line of action, etc. We evaluated the method on a control subject and two postglossectomy patients in a controlled speech task. The normal subject's tongue muscle activity shows high correspondence with the production of speech in different time instants, while both patients' muscle activities show different patterns from the control due to their resected tongues. This method shows potential for relating overall tongue motion to particular muscle activity, which may provide novel information for future clinical and scientific studies.

  14. In vivo high-resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging of superficial vascular anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of a photoacoustic imaging instrument based upon a Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor to imaging the superficial vasculature is described. This approach provides a backward mode-sensing configuration that has the potential to overcome the limitations of current piezoelectric based detection systems used in superficial photoacoustic imaging. The system has been evaluated by obtaining non-invasive images of the vasculature in human and mouse skin as well as mouse models of human colorectal tumours. These studies showed that the system can provide high-resolution 3D images of vascular structures to depths of up to 5 mm. It is considered that this type of instrument may find a role in the clinical assessment of conditions characterized by changes in the vasculature such as skin tumours and superficial soft tissue damage due to burns, wounds or ulceration. It may also find application in the characterization of small animal cancer models where it is important to follow the tumour vasculature over time in order to study its development and/or response to therapy.

  15. A Saliency Guided Semi-Supervised Building Change Detection Method for High Resolution Remote Sensing Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bin; Wang, Yunhong; Liu, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    Characterizations of up to date information of the Earth's surface are an important application providing insights to urban planning, resources monitoring and environmental studies. A large number of change detection (CD) methods have been developed to solve them by utilizing remote sensing (RS) images. The advent of high resolution (HR) remote sensing images further provides challenges to traditional CD methods and opportunities to object-based CD methods. While several kinds of geospatial objects are recognized, this manuscript mainly focuses on buildings. Specifically, we propose a novel automatic approach combining pixel-based strategies with object-based ones for detecting building changes with HR remote sensing images. A multiresolution contextual morphological transformation called extended morphological attribute profiles (EMAPs) allows the extraction of geometrical features related to the structures within the scene at different scales. Pixel-based post-classification is executed on EMAPs using hierarchical fuzzy clustering. Subsequently, the hierarchical fuzzy frequency vector histograms are formed based on the image-objects acquired by simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) segmentation. Then, saliency and morphological building index (MBI) extracted on difference images are used to generate a pseudo training set. Ultimately, object-based semi-supervised classification is implemented on this training set by applying random forest (RF). Most of the important changes are detected by the proposed method in our experiments. This study was checked for effectiveness using visual evaluation and numerical evaluation.

  16. A study of equivalent source techniques for high-resolution EEG imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution EEG imaging has been an important topic in recent EEG research, and much work has been done on the two equivalent source imaging techniques: the equivalent distributed dipole-layer source imaging technique (EST) and the equivalent multipole source imaging technique (SAT). In this paper we first develop a forward density formula for a spherical equivalent distributed dipole layer of an arbitrary dipole in a three-concentric-sphere head model. It is clarified using the derived forward formula that the equivalent dipole-layer source and equivalent multipole source are interrelated in theory. Finally, simulation comparisons are conducted, the results of which suggest that EST has a higher spatial resolution than SAT when both of them are implemented by a truncated singular value decomposition algorithm. This is due to the different singularities of the inversion equations involved in the two techniques. An empirical VEP data study also shows that EST is better than SAT in providing higher spatial resolution EEG imaging. (author)

  17. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  18. A Method of Road Extraction from High-resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Shape Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Xiaoqi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Road extraction from high-resolution remote sensing image is an important and difficult task.Since remote sensing images include complicated information,the methods that extract roads by spectral,texture and linear features have certain limitations.Also,many methods need human-intervention to get the road seeds(semi-automatic extraction,which have the great human-dependence and low efficiency.The road-extraction method,which uses the image segmentation based on principle of local gray consistency and integration shape features,is proposed in this paper.Firstly,the image is segmented,and then the linear and curve roads are obtained by using several object shape features,so the method that just only extract linear roads are rectified.Secondly,the step of road extraction is carried out based on the region growth,the road seeds are automatic selected and the road network is extracted.Finally,the extracted roads are regulated by combining the edge information.In experiments,the images that including the better gray uniform of road and the worse illuminated of road surface were chosen,and the results prove that the method of this study is promising.

  19. Rapid hybrid encoding for high-resolution whole-brain fluid-attenuated imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonjae; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Jaeseok

    2013-12-01

    Single-slab three-dimensional (3D) turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging combined with inversion recovery (IR), which employs short, spatially non-selective refocusing pulses and signal prescription based variable refocusing flip angles (VFA) to increase imaging efficiency, was recently introduced to produce fluid-attenuated brain images for lesion detection. Despite the advantages, the imaging efficiency in this approach still remains limited because a substantially long time of inversion is needed to selectively suppress the signal intensity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) while fully recovering that of brain tissues. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel, rapid hybrid encoding method for highly efficient whole-brain fluid-attenuated imaging. In each time of repetition, volumetric data are continuously encoded using the hybrid modular acquisition in a sequential fashion even during IR signal transition, wherein reversed fast imaging with steady-state free precession (PSIF) is employed to encode intermediate-to-high spatial frequency signals prior to CSF nulling, while VFA-TSE is used to collect low-to-intermediate spatial frequency signals afterwards. Gradient-induced spin de-phasing between a pair of neighboring radio-frequency (RF) pulses in both PSIF and TSE modules is kept identical to avoid the occurrence of multiple echoes in a single acquisition window. Additionally, a two-step, alternate RF phase-cycling scheme is employed in the low spatial frequency region to eliminate free induction decay induced edge artifacts. Numerical simulations of the Bloch equations were performed to evaluate signal evolution of brain tissues along the echo train while optimizing imaging parameters. In vivo studies demonstrate that the proposed technique produces high-resolution isotropic fluid-attenuated whole-brain images in a clinically acceptable imaging time with substantially high signal-to-noise ratio for white matter while retaining lesion conspicuity.

  20. 3-Dimensional modelling of chick embryo eye development and growth using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Nicola; Kisiswa, Lilian; Prashar, Ankush; Faulkner, Stuart; Tokarczuk, Paweł; Singh, Krish; Erichsen, Jonathan T; Guggenheim, Jez; Halfter, Willi; Wride, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for generating 3-dimensional structural and functional image data. MRI has already proven valuable in creating atlases of mouse and quail development. Here, we have exploited high resolution MRI to determine the parameters necessary to acquire images of the chick embryo eye. Using a 9.4 Tesla (400 MHz) high field ultra-shielded and refrigerated magnet (Bruker), MRI was carried out on paraformaldehyde-fixed chick embryos or heads at E4, E6, E8, and E10. Image data were processed using established and custom packages (MRICro, ImageJ, ParaVision, Bruker and mri3dX). Voxel dimensions ranged from 62.5 microm to 117.2 microm. We subsequently used the images obtained from the MRI data in order to make precise measurements of chick embryo eye surface area, volume and axial length from E4 to E10. MRI was validated for accurate sizing of ocular tissue features by direct comparison with previously published literature. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of high resolution MRI for making accurate measurements of morphological changes due to experimental manipulation of chick eye development, thereby facilitating a better understanding of the effects on chick embryo eye development and growth of such manipulations. Chondroitin sulphate or heparin were microinjected into the vitreous cavity of the right eyes of each of 3 embryos at E5. At E10, embryos were fixed and various eye parameters (volume, surface area, axial length and equatorial diameter) were determined using MRI and normalised with respect to the un-injected left eyes. Statistically significant alterations in eye volume (p < 0.05; increases with chondroitin sulphate and decreases with heparin) and changes in vitreous homogeneity were observed in embryos following microinjection of glycosaminoglycans. Furthermore, in the heparin-injected eyes, significant disturbances at the vitreo-retinal boundary were observed as well as retinal folding and detachment

  1. Improving the Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Currents Using High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Images: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, M.-H.; Santoleri, R.; Giffa, A.; Piterbarg, L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of spatial and temporal ocean surface currents at high resolution is essential for a variety of applications. The altimeter observing system, by providing global and repetitive measurements of the Sea Surface Height, has been by far the most exploited system to estimate ocean surface currents in the past 20 years. However it does not allow observing currents departing from the geostrophic equilibrium, nor is capable to resolve the shortest spatial scales of the currents. In order to go beyond these limits, we investigate how the high spatial and temporal resolution information from Sea Surface Temperature (SST) images can improve the altimeter currents by adapting a method first proposed by [1]. It consists in inverting the SST evolution equation for the velocity by prescribing the source and sink terms and by using the altimeter currents as background. The method feasibility is tested using simulated data based on the Mercator-Ocean system.

  2. High Resolution Image Reconstruction Method for a Double-plane PET System with Changeable Spacing

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Li, Lin; Yin, Peng-Fei; Shang, Lei-Min; Yun, Ming-Kai; Lu, Zhen-Rui; Huang, Xian-Chao; Wei, Long

    2015-01-01

    Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) imaging systems with the ability in detection of millimeter-sized tumors were developed in recent years. And some of them have been well used in clinical applications. In consideration of biopsy application, a double-plane detector configuration is practical for the convenience of breast immobilization. However, the serious blurring effect in the double-plane system with changeable spacing for different breast size should be studied. Methods: We study a high resolution reconstruction method applicable for a double-plane PET system with a changeable detector spacing. Geometric and blurring components should be calculated at real time for different detector distance. Accurate geometric sensitivity is obtained with a tube area model. Resolution recovery is achieved by estimating blurring effects derived from simulated single gamma response information. Results: The results show that the new geometric modeling gives a more finite and smooth sensitivity weight in double-plane sy...

  3. High-resolution, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of Drosophila at 18.8 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Null

    Full Text Available High resolution MRI of live Drosophila was performed at 18.8 Tesla, with a field of view less than 5 mm, and administration of manganese or gadolinium-based contrast agents. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MR methods for imaging the fruit fly Drosophila with an NMR spectrometer, at a resolution relevant for undertaking future studies of the Drosophila brain and other organs. The fruit fly has long been a principal model organism for elucidating biology and disease, but without capabilities like those of MRI. This feasibility marks progress toward the development of new in vivo research approaches in Drosophila without the requirement for light transparency or destructive assays.

  4. Measurement of Fluid Flow in Pipe and Porous Media by High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lan-lan; SONG Yong-chen; LIU Yu; DOU Bin-lin; ZHU Ning-jun; ZHAO Jia-fei; BULITI Abudula

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the process of fluid flow in pipe and porous media with different pore structures.High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to visualize the pore structure and measure fluid flow.The porous media was formed by packed bed of glass beads.Flow measurement was carried out by a modified spin echo sequence.The results show that the velocity distribution in pipe is annular and the linear relation between MRI velocity and actual velocity is found in pipe flow measurement.The flow distribution in porous media is rather heterogeneous,and it is consistent with heterogeneous pore structure.The flow through pores with the high volume flow rate is determined largely by geometrical effects such as pore size and cross-sectional area.

  5. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenkel, Martin; Töpperwien, Mareike; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  6. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Krenkel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  7. Grooved Terrain on Ganymede: First Results from Galileo High-Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R.T.; Head, J.W.; Collins, G.C.; Kirk, R.L.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Giese, B.; Greeley, R.; Chapman, C.R.; Helfenstein, P.; Moore, Johnnie N.; McEwen, A.; Tufts, B.R.; Senske, D.A.; Herbert, Breneman H.; Klaasen, K.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution Galileo imaging has provided important insight into the origin and evolution of grooved terrain on Ganymede. The Uruk Sulcus target site was the first imaged at high resolution, and considerations of resolution, viewing geometry, low image compression, and complementary stereo imaging make this region extremely informative. Contrast variations in these low-incidence angle images are extreme and give the visual impression of topographic shading. However, photometric analysis shows that the scene must owe its character to albedo variations. A close correlation of albedo variations to topography is demonstrated by limited stereo coverage, allowing extrapolation of the observed brightness and topographic relationships to the rest of the imaged area. Distinct geological units are apparent across the region, and ridges and grooves are ubiquitous within these units. The stratigraphically lowest and most heavily cratered units ("lineated grooved terrain") generally show morphologies indicative of horst-and-graben-style normal faulting. The stratigraphically highest groove lanes ("parallel ridged terrain") exhibit ridges of roughly triangular cross section, suggesting that tilt-block-style normal faulting has shaped them. These extensional-tectonic models are supported by crosscutting relationships at the margins of groove lanes. Thus, a change in tectonic style with time is suggested in the Uruk Sulcus region, varying from horst and graben faulting for the oldest grooved terrain units to tilt block normal faulting for the latest units. The morphologies and geometries of some stratigraphically high units indicate that a strike-slip component of deformation has played an important role in shaping this region of grooved terrain. The most recent tectonic episode is interpreted as right-lateral transtension, with its tectonic pattern of two contemporaneous structural orientations superimposed on older units of grooved terrain. There is little direct evidence for

  8. Using High Resolution Vegetation Images to study Ecogeomorphologic Thresholds in Semiarid Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Samira; Saco, Patricia; Moreno-de las Heras, Mariano; Willgoose, Garry

    2016-04-01

    Arid and Semiarid sites are very sensitive to climatic or anthropogenic pressures. Several previous studies argue that ecosystem function in these areas tends to display critical degradation thresholds which make rehabilitation efforts considerably difficult. This threshold behaviour is linked to coevolving eco-geomorphic processes triggered by climatic or anthropogenic disturbances. A common trigger is the removal of vegetation (by grazing or harvesting activities) which increases landscape hydrological connectivity and can induce a substantial loss of water and soil affecting ecosystem function (e.g. decreasing the rainfall-use efficiency of the landscape). Here we present results exploring the impact of degradation processes induced by grazing pressure on rainfall-use efficiency along a precipitation gradient (250 mm to 490 mm annual average rainfall). The sites were carefully selected in the mulga lands bioregion (New South Wales, Queensland) and in sites of the Northern Territory in Australia, and display similar vegetation characteristics and good quality rainfall information. Vegetation patterns and percentage cover are derived from high resolution remote sensing images (IKONOS, QuickBird and complement this information with high resolution images obtained from Google Earth). We compute rainfall use efficiency and precipitation marginal response using local precipitation data and MODIS vegetation indices. The analysis of the NDVI MODIS data shows the presence of a clear critical degradation threshold, associated with loss of vegetation cover in the drier sites. Below this threshold we found what we call "functional landscapes" with high vegetation cover that display high rainfall use efficiency. Above this threshold, we found "dysfunctional landscapes" with much lower rainfall use efficiency. We compare the different behaviours for several sites along the precipitation gradient, and find that the wetter sites do not tend to display this threshold behaviour

  9. HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGING OF EPITHELIAL INJURY IN THE SHEEP CERVICOVAGINAL TRACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kathleen L.; Bourne, Nigel; Bell, Brent A.; Vargas, Gracie; Tan, Alai; Cowan, Daniel; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2009-01-01

    Background Access to readily available large animal models and sensitive non-invasive techniques that can be used for the evaluation of microbicide-induced changes in tissue could significantly facilitate pre-clinical evaluations of microbicide safety. The sheep cervicovaginal tract, with stratified squamous epithelium similar to humans, holds promise as a large animal model used prior to non-human primates. In addition, optical coherence tomography (OCT) could enable high resolution visualization of tissue morphology and non-invasive assessment of microbicide-induced epithelial injury. Methods We evaluated the dose response of sheep cervicovaginal tract to benzalkonium chloride (BZK). Twenty sheep received treatment with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or BZK solution (2%, 0.2%, or 0.02%). Pre- and post-treatment colposcopy and OCT images were collected and graded based on WHO criteria and a previously reported scoring system, respectively. Biopsies were collected and the degree of epithelial injury and its thickness was assessed based on histology and OCT. Results The sheep cervicovagina exhibited anatomical and microscopic features similar to the human. Extensive loss of the epithelium was noted on colposcopy and OCT following application of 2% BZK. Colposcopy detected findings in half of sheep and OCT in all sheep treated with 0.2% BZK. OCT detected differences in the 0.02% BZK-treated group compared to controls whereas colposcopy failed to detect any changes. Conclusions The sheep cervicovagina is similar to humans, and exhibits dose dependent epithelial changes following BZK treatment. These findings suggest that the sheep model and OCT may become valuable tools for the safety evaluation of candidate microbicides, and warrant continued development. Short summary Optical coherence tomography, a high resolution imaging method, used with colposcopy in the sheep cervicovaginal tract detected a dose-dependent response to benzalkonium chloride, demonstrating

  10. Imaging of aortopulmonary collateral arteries with high-resolution multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, Gerald F.; Hofbeck, Michael; Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Hans-Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, Heidelberg (Germany); Kuettner, Axel; Schaefer, Juergen F.; Dammann, Florian; Claussen, Claus D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Precise visualization of the pulmonary vasculature is mandatory for adequate treatment of patients with pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect (PA-VSD). Aortopulmonary collateral arteries (APCs) can be visualized by selective injections of contrast agent in the catheterization laboratory. To evaluate multidetector CT (MDCT) and different image postprocessing methods for analysis of complex pulmonary blood supply in patients with PA-VSD. Eight patients (6 weeks to 27.8 years of age) with PA-VSD and APCs underwent MDCT and cardiac catheterization. Using multiplanar reformatting, volume rendering and semiautomatic segmentation algorithms, the aorta, pulmonary arteries and APCs were displayed. MDCT and cardiac catheterization were analyzed by two independent observers. MDCT accurately imaged central pulmonary arteries (n=8), aortopulmonary shunts (n=2), right ventricular to pulmonary artery conduits (n=2) and origin, course and intrapulmonary connections of APCs (n=25), compared to X-ray angiography. A high correlation was found between the MDCT vessel diameter measurements by two independent observers (n=70, r=0.96, P<0.01) and between MDCT and angiographic vessel diameter measurements (n=68, r=0.96, P<0.01). Using three-dimensional imaging software, a complex pulmonary blood supply can be non-invasively and accurately imaged with high-resolution MDCT. This technique may help to reduce the number of cardiac catheterizations or guide interventional or surgical therapy. (orig.)

  11. High resolution confocal imaging of vaginal epithelial microstructure as a means of detecting microbicide toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Gracie; Shilagard, Tuya; Johnston, Rebecca; Bell, Brent; Stegal, Rachael; Vincent, Kathleen; Stanberry, Lawrence; Motamedi, Massoud; Bourne, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    High resolution optical imaging by confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) was investigated for revealing epithelial microstructure and alterations which may occur from vaginal microbicides. The vaginal tracts of Swiss Webster mice treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate were exposed in vivo to a 4% nonoxynyl-9 containing gel or saline for 4, 16, or 48 hours. The vaginal tract was removed and imaged by CRM without staining and imaged regions were then biopsied and processed for histology. In control mice, CRM revealed columnar epithelium and lamina propria with features resembling that of histology. CRM revealed exfoliated epithelium following 4 and 16 hour N-9 treatments and quantitative measurement of epithelial thickness revealed a decrease from approximately 41.7 ± 1.7 (SEM) in controls to 14.9 ± 4.5 and 24.4 ± 2.1 after 4 and 16 hours, respectively. Indication of inflammation at 4 hours was given through the presence of inflammatory infiltrates. After 48 hours the epithelium was regenerating. The timecourse of change in structure and epithelial thickness detected by CRM closely resembled that observed and measured by histology. This study demonstrates CRM can reveal epithelial structure and indicators of inflammation following treatment with N-9 and may be a useful imaging tool for evaluating effects of microbicides. PMID:19355817

  12. High Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Cancers Using Lanthanide Ion-Doped Upconverting Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naccache, Rafik; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Bogdan, Nicoleta [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Concordia University, Montreal H4B 1R6 (Canada); Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco [Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Cruz, Maria del Carmen Iglesias de la [Departamento de Fisiología. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28029 (Spain); Fuente, Ángeles Juarranz de la [Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Vetrone, Fiorenzo [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, Université du Québec, Varennes J3X 1S2 (Canada); Jaque, Daniel; Solé, José García, E-mail: jose.garcia_sole@uam.es [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Capobianco, John A., E-mail: jose.garcia_sole@uam.es [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Concordia University, Montreal H4B 1R6 (Canada)

    2012-10-22

    During the last decade inorganic luminescent nanoparticles that emit visible light under near infrared (NIR) excitation (in the biological window) have played a relevant role for high resolution imaging of cancer. Indeed, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoparticles, mostly gold nanorods (GNRs), are already commercially available for this purpose. In this work we review the role which is being played by a relatively new class of nanoparticles, based on lanthanide ion doped nanocrystals, to target and image cancer cells using upconversion fluorescence microscopy. These nanoparticles are insulating nanocrystals that are usually doped with small percentages of two different rare earth (lanthanide) ions: The excited donor ions (usually Yb{sup 3+} ion) that absorb the NIR excitation and the acceptor ions (usually Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+}), that are responsible for the emitted visible (or also near infrared) radiation. The higher conversion efficiency of these nanoparticles in respect to those based on QDs and GNRs, as well as the almost independent excitation/emission properties from the particle size, make them particularly promising for fluorescence imaging. The different approaches of these novel nanoparticles devoted to “in vitro” and “in vivo” cancer imaging, selective targeting and treatment are examined in this review.

  13. High Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Cancers Using Lanthanide Ion-Doped Upconverting Nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade inorganic luminescent nanoparticles that emit visible light under near infrared (NIR) excitation (in the biological window) have played a relevant role for high resolution imaging of cancer. Indeed, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoparticles, mostly gold nanorods (GNRs), are already commercially available for this purpose. In this work we review the role which is being played by a relatively new class of nanoparticles, based on lanthanide ion doped nanocrystals, to target and image cancer cells using upconversion fluorescence microscopy. These nanoparticles are insulating nanocrystals that are usually doped with small percentages of two different rare earth (lanthanide) ions: The excited donor ions (usually Yb3+ ion) that absorb the NIR excitation and the acceptor ions (usually Er3+, Ho3+ or Tm3+), that are responsible for the emitted visible (or also near infrared) radiation. The higher conversion efficiency of these nanoparticles in respect to those based on QDs and GNRs, as well as the almost independent excitation/emission properties from the particle size, make them particularly promising for fluorescence imaging. The different approaches of these novel nanoparticles devoted to “in vitro” and “in vivo” cancer imaging, selective targeting and treatment are examined in this review

  14. A New Approach to Urban Road Extraction Using High-Resolution Aerial Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Road information is fundamental not only in the military field but also common daily living. Automatic road extraction from a remote sensing images can provide references for city planning as well as transportation database and map updating. However, owing to the spectral similarity between roads and impervious structures, the current methods solely using spectral characteristics are often ineffective. By contrast, the detailed information discernible from the high-resolution aerial images enables road extraction with spatial texture features. In this study, a knowledge-based method is established and proposed; this method incorporates the spatial texture feature into urban road extraction. The spatial texture feature is initially extracted by the local Moran’s I, and the derived texture is added to the spectral bands of image for image segmentation. Subsequently, features like brightness, standard deviation, rectangularity, aspect ratio, and area are selected to form the hypothesis and verification model based on road knowledge. Finally, roads are extracted by applying the hypothesis and verification model and are post-processed based on the mathematical morphology. The newly proposed method is evaluated by conducting two experiments. Results show that the completeness, correctness, and quality of the results could reach approximately 94%, 90% and 86% respectively, indicating that the proposed method is effective for urban road extraction.

  15. DSP accelerator for the wavelet compression/decompression of high- resolution images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, M.A.; Gleason, S.S.; Jatko, W.B.

    1993-07-23

    A Texas Instruments (TI) TMS320C30-based S-Bus digital signal processing (DSP) module was used to accelerate a wavelet-based compression and decompression algorithm applied to high-resolution fingerprint images. The law enforcement community, together with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NISI), is adopting a standard based on the wavelet transform for the compression, transmission, and decompression of scanned fingerprint images. A two-dimensional wavelet transform of the input image is computed. Then spatial/frequency regions are automatically analyzed for information content and quantized for subsequent Huffman encoding. Compression ratios range from 10:1 to 30:1 while maintaining the level of image quality necessary for identification. Several prototype systems were developed using SUN SPARCstation 2 with a 1280 {times} 1024 8-bit display, 64-Mbyte random access memory (RAM), Tiber distributed data interface (FDDI), and Spirit-30 S-Bus DSP-accelerators from Sonitech. The final implementation of the DSP-accelerated algorithm performed the compression or decompression operation in 3.5 s per print. Further increases in system throughput were obtained by adding several DSP accelerators operating in parallel.

  16. High-resolution dynamic pressure sensor array based on piezo-phototronic effect tuned photoluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingzeng; Li, Zhou; Liu, Caihong; Zheng, Qiang; Shi, Xieqing; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Du, Shiyu; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    A high-resolution dynamic tactile/pressure display is indispensable to the comprehensive perception of force/mechanical stimulations such as electronic skin, biomechanical imaging/analysis, or personalized signatures. Here, we present a dynamic pressure sensor array based on pressure/strain tuned photoluminescence imaging without the need for electricity. Each sensor is a nanopillar that consists of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Its photoluminescence intensity can be modulated dramatically and linearly by small strain (0-0.15%) owing to the piezo-phototronic effect. The sensor array has a high pixel density of 6350 dpi and exceptional small standard deviation of photoluminescence. High-quality tactile/pressure sensing distribution can be real-time recorded by parallel photoluminescence imaging without any cross-talk. The sensor array can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by semiconductor product lines. The proposed dynamic all-optical pressure imaging with excellent resolution, high sensitivity, good uniformity, and ultrafast response time offers a suitable way for smart sensing, micro/nano-opto-electromechanical systems.

  17. Ultra-fast high-resolution hybrid and monolithic CMOS imagers in multi-frame radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Kris; Douence, Vincent; Bai, Yibin; Nedrow, Paul; Mariam, Fesseha; Merrill, Frank; Morris, Christopher L.; Saunders, Andy

    2014-09-01

    A new burst-mode, 10-frame, hybrid Si-sensor/CMOS-ROIC FPA chip has been recently fabricated at Teledyne Imaging Sensors. The intended primary use of the sensor is in the multi-frame 800 MeV proton radiography at LANL. The basic part of the hybrid is a large (48×49 mm2) stitched CMOS chip of 1100×1100 pixel count, with a minimum shutter speed of 50 ns. The performance parameters of this chip are compared to the first generation 3-frame 0.5-Mpixel custom hybrid imager. The 3-frame cameras have been in continuous use for many years, in a variety of static and dynamic experiments at LANSCE. The cameras can operate with a per-frame adjustable integration time of ~ 120ns-to- 1s, and inter-frame time of 250ns to 2s. Given the 80 ms total readout time, the original and the new imagers can be externally synchronized to 0.1-to-5 Hz, 50-ns wide proton beam pulses, and record up to ~1000-frame radiographic movies typ. of 3-to-30 minute duration. The performance of the global electronic shutter is discussed and compared to that of a high-resolution commercial front-illuminated monolithic CMOS imager.

  18. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF OIL DEPOTS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES: A NEW PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an original approach to identify oil depots from single high resolution aerial/satellite images in an automated manner. The new approach considers the symmetric nature of circular oil depots, and it computes the radial symmetry in a unique way. An automated thresholding method to focus on circular regions and a new measure to verify circles are proposed. Experiments are performed on six GeoEye-1 test images. Besides, we perform tests on 16 Google Earth images of an industrial test site acquired in a time series manner (between the years 1995 and 2012. The results reveal that our approach is capable of detecting circle objects in very different/difficult images. We computed an overall performance of 95.8% for the GeoEye-1 dataset. The time series investigation reveals that our approach is robust enough to locate oil depots in industrial environments under varying illumination and environmental conditions. The overall performance is computed as 89.4% for the Google Earth dataset, and this result secures the success of our approach compared to a state-of-the-art approach.

  19. Objects Grouping for Segmentation of Roads Network in High Resolution Images of Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maboudi, M.; Amini, J.; Hahn, M.

    2016-06-01

    Updated road databases are required for many purposes such as urban planning, disaster management, car navigation, route planning, traffic management and emergency handling. In the last decade, the improvement in spatial resolution of VHR civilian satellite sensors - as the main source of large scale mapping applications - was so considerable that GSD has become finer than size of common urban objects of interest such as building, trees and road parts. This technological advancement pushed the development of "Object-based Image Analysis (OBIA)" as an alternative to pixel-based image analysis methods. Segmentation as one of the main stages of OBIA provides the image objects on which most of the following processes will be applied. Therefore, the success of an OBIA approach is strongly affected by the segmentation quality. In this paper, we propose a purpose-dependent refinement strategy in order to group road segments in urban areas using maximal similarity based region merging. For investigations with the proposed method, we use high resolution images of some urban sites. The promising results suggest that the proposed approach is applicable in grouping of road segments in urban areas.

  20. Computationally-optimized bone mechanical modeling from high-resolution structural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy F Magland

    Full Text Available Image-based mechanical modeling of the complex micro-structure of human bone has shown promise as a non-invasive method for characterizing bone strength and fracture risk in vivo. In particular, elastic moduli obtained from image-derived micro-finite element (μFE simulations have been shown to correlate well with results obtained by mechanical testing of cadaveric bone. However, most existing large-scale finite-element simulation programs require significant computing resources, which hamper their use in common laboratory and clinical environments. In this work, we theoretically derive and computationally evaluate the resources needed to perform such simulations (in terms of computer memory and computation time, which are dependent on the number of finite elements in the image-derived bone model. A detailed description of our approach is provided, which is specifically optimized for μFE modeling of the complex three-dimensional architecture of trabecular bone. Our implementation includes domain decomposition for parallel computing, a novel stopping criterion, and a system for speeding up convergence by pre-iterating on coarser grids. The performance of the system is demonstrated on a dual quad-core Xeon 3.16 GHz CPUs equipped with 40 GB of RAM. Models of distal tibia derived from 3D in-vivo MR images in a patient comprising 200,000 elements required less than 30 seconds to converge (and 40 MB RAM. To illustrate the system's potential for large-scale μFE simulations, axial stiffness was estimated from high-resolution micro-CT images of a voxel array of 90 million elements comprising the human proximal femur in seven hours CPU time. In conclusion, the system described should enable image-based finite-element bone simulations in practical computation times on high-end desktop computers with applications to laboratory studies and clinical imaging.

  1. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  2. Shadow detection improvement using spectral indices and morphological operators in high resolution images from urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, S. C.; Silva, E. A.; Pedrosa, M. M.

    2015-04-01

    While high-resolution remote sensing images have increased application possibilities for urban studies, the large number of shadow areas has created challenges to processing and extracting information from these images. Furthermore, shadows can reduce or omit information from the surface as well as degrading the visual quality of images. The pixels of shadows tend to have lower radiance response within the spectrum and are often confused with low reflectance targets. In this work, a shadow detection method was proposed using a morphological operator for dark pattern identification combined with spectral indices. The aims are to avoid misclassification in shadow identification through properties provided by them on color models and, therefore, to improve shadow detection accuracy. Experimental results were tested applying the panchromatic and multispectral band of WorldView-2 image from Sao Paulo city in Brazil, which is a complex urban environment composed by high objects like tall buildings causing large shadow areas. Black top-hat with area injunction was applied in PAN image and shadow identification performance has improved with index as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Saturation-Value Difference Index (NSDVI) ratio from HSV color space obtained from pansharpened multispectral WV-2 image. An increase in distinction between shadows and others objects was observed, which was tested for the completeness, correctness and quality measures computed, using a created manual shadow mask as reference. Therefore, this method can contribute to overcoming difficulties faced by other techniques that need shadow detection as a first necessary preprocessing step, like object recognition, image matching, 3D reconstruction, etc.

  3. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajedi, Salar; Zeraatkar, Navid [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moji, Vahideh; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, Saeed [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabi, Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Teymoorian, Behnoosh [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafarian, Pardis [Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, NRITLD, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); PET/CT and Cyclotron Center, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Reza Ay, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@sina.tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-21

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2–1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/µCi and 1.25 cps/µCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/µCi and 1.02 cps/µCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT.

  4. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2–1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/µCi and 1.25 cps/µCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/µCi and 1.02 cps/µCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT

  5. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) functionalized carbon nano-onions for high resolution cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelmess, Juergen; de Luca, Elisa; Signorelli, Angelo; Baldrighi, Michele; Becce, Michele; Brescia, Rosaria; Nardone, Valentina; Parisini, Emilio; Echegoyen, Luis; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Giordani, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical studies due to their low toxicity, efficient cellular uptake and low fluorescence quenching of attached probes.Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical

  6. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru-Shan Wu; Xiao-Bi Xie

    2008-06-08

    Our proposed work on high resolution/high fidelity seismic imaging focused on three general areas: (1) development of new, more efficient, wave-equation-based propagators and imaging conditions, (2) developments towards amplitude-preserving imaging in the local angle domain, in particular, imaging methods that allow us to estimate the reflection as a function of angle at a layer boundary, and (3) studies of wave inversion for local parameter estimation. In this report we summarize the results and progress we made during the project period. The report is divided into three parts, totaling 10 chapters. The first part is on resolution analysis and its relation to directional illumination analysis. The second part, which is composed of 6 chapters, is on the main theme of our work, the true-reflection imaging. True-reflection imaging is an advanced imaging technology which aims at keeping the image amplitude proportional to the reflection strength of the local reflectors or to obtain the reflection coefficient as function of reflection-angle. There are many factors which may influence the image amplitude, such as geometrical spreading, transmission loss, path absorption, acquisition aperture effect, etc. However, we can group these into two categories: one is the propagator effect (geometric spreading, path losses); the other is the acquisition-aperture effect. We have made significant progress in both categories. We studied the effects of different terms in the true-amplitude one-way propagators, especially the terms including lateral velocity variation of the medium. We also demonstrate the improvements by optimizing the expansion coefficients in different terms. Our research also includes directional illumination analysis for both the one-way propagators and full-wave propagators. We developed the fast acquisition-aperture correction method in the local angle-domain, which is an important element in the true-reflection imaging. Other developments include the super

  7. A new method of inshore ship detection in high-resolution optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qifeng; Du, Yaling; Jiang, Yunqiu; Ming, Delie

    2015-10-01

    Ship as an important military target and water transportation, of which the detection has great significance. In the military field, the automatic detection of ships can be used to monitor ship dynamic in the harbor and maritime of enemy, and then analyze the enemy naval power. In civilian field, the automatic detection of ships can be used in monitoring transportation of harbor and illegal behaviors such as illegal fishing, smuggling and pirates, etc. In recent years, research of ship detection is mainly concentrated in three categories: forward-looking infrared images, downward-looking SAR image, and optical remote sensing images with sea background. Little research has been done into ship detection of optical remote sensing images with harbor background, as the gray-scale and texture features of ships are similar to the coast in high-resolution optical remote sensing images. In this paper, we put forward an effective harbor ship target detection method. First of all, in order to overcome the shortage of the traditional difference method in obtaining histogram valley as the segmentation threshold, we propose an iterative histogram valley segmentation method which separates the harbor and ships from the water quite well. Secondly, as landing ships in optical remote sensing images usually lead to discontinuous harbor edges, we use Hough Transform method to extract harbor edges. First, lines are detected by Hough Transform. Then, lines that have similar slope are connected into a new line, thus we access continuous harbor edges. Secondary segmentation on the result of the land-and-sea separation, we eventually get the ships. At last, we calculate the aspect ratio of the ROIs, thereby remove those targets which are not ship. The experiment results show that our method has good robustness and can tolerate a certain degree of noise and occlusion.

  8. High-resolution near-infrared imaging of the Orion 114-426 silhouette disk

    CERN Document Server

    McCaughrean, M J; Bally, J; Erickson, E; Thompson, R; Rieke, M J; Schneider, G; Stolovy, S; Young, E; Caughrean, Mark J. Mc; Chen, Hua; Bally, John; Erickson, Ed; Thompson, Rodger; Rieke, Marcia; Schneider, Glenn; Stolovy, Susan; Young, Erick

    1997-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution near-infrared images of the edge-on silhouette circumstellar disk, Orion 114-426, made using NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Images taken against the bright nebular background of the ionized hydrogen Pa$\\alpha$ line at 1.87 micron show the major axis of the disk to be approximately 20% smaller than at 0.6 micron, from which we deduce the structure of the edge of the disk. Continuum images of diffuse polar lobes above and below the plane of the disk show a morphology and evolution with wavelength consistent with predictions for reflection nebulae in a diffuse envelope with large polar cavities, surrounding a thin, massless, Keplerian disk, centered on an otherwise hidden central star. We make use of our observations and reasonable assumptions about the underlying disk structure to show that the disk mass is at least 10 earth masses and plausibly $\\geq 5\\times 10^{-4}$ solar masses.

  9. In vivo high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Jiadi; McMahon, Michael T; van Zijl, Peter C M; Mori, Susumu; Northington, Frances J; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2013-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the laboratory mouse brain provides important macroscopic information for anatomical characterization of mouse models in basic research. Currently, in vivo DTI of the mouse brain is often limited by the available resolution. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo high-resolution DTI of the mouse brain using a cryogenic probe and a modified diffusion-weighted gradient and spin echo (GRASE) imaging sequence at 11.7 T. Three-dimensional (3D) DTI of the entire mouse brain at 0.125 mm isotropic resolution could be obtained in approximately 2 h. The high spatial resolution, which was previously only available with ex vivo imaging, enabled non-invasive examination of small structures in the adult and neonatal mouse brains. Based on data acquired from eight adult mice, a group-averaged DTI atlas of the in vivo adult mouse brain with 60 structure segmentations was developed. Comparisons between in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain DTI data showed significant differences in brain morphology and tissue contrasts, which indicate the importance of the in vivo DTI-based mouse brain atlas.

  10. S-Cnn Ship Detection from High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqian; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Kao; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Jiadong

    2016-06-01

    Reliable ship detection plays an important role in both military and civil fields. However, it makes the task difficult with high-resolution remote sensing images with complex background and various types of ships with different poses, shapes and scales. Related works mostly used gray and shape features to detect ships, which obtain results with poor robustness and efficiency. To detect ships more automatically and robustly, we propose a novel ship detection method based on the convolutional neural networks (CNNs), called SCNN, fed with specifically designed proposals extracted from the ship model combined with an improved saliency detection method. Firstly we creatively propose two ship models, the "V" ship head model and the "||" ship body one, to localize the ship proposals from the line segments extracted from a test image. Next, for offshore ships with relatively small sizes, which cannot be efficiently picked out by the ship models due to the lack of reliable line segments, we propose an improved saliency detection method to find these proposals. Therefore, these two kinds of ship proposals are fed to the trained CNN for robust and efficient detection. Experimental results on a large amount of representative remote sensing images with different kinds of ships with varied poses, shapes and scales demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our proposed S-CNN-Based ship detector.

  11. Dynamic high-resolution US of ankle and midfoot ligaments: normal anatomic structure and imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The ankle is the most frequently injured major joint in the body, and ankle sprains are frequently encountered in individuals playing football, basketball, and other team sports, in addition to occurring in the general population. Imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to provide excellent evaluation of ligaments around the ankle, with the ability to show associated intraarticular abnormalities, joint effusion, and bone marrow edema. Ultrasonography (US) performed with high-resolution broadband linear-array probes has become increasingly important in the assessment of ligaments around the ankle because it is low cost, fast, readily available, and free of ionizing radiation. US can provide a detailed depiction of normal anatomic structures and is effective for evaluating ligament integrity. In addition, US allows the performance of dynamic maneuvers, which may contribute to increased visibility of normal ligaments and improved detection of tears. In this article, the authors describe the US techniques for evaluation of the ankle and midfoot ligaments and include a brief review of the literature related to their basic anatomic structures and US of these structures. Short video clips showing dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US of ankle and midfoot structures and their principal pathologic patterns are included as supplemental material. Use of a standardized imaging technique may help reduce the intrinsic operator dependence of US. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. High Resolution Airborne Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Imaging with a Small Uav Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallay, Michal; Eck, Christoph; Zgraggen, Carlo; Kaňuk, Ján; Dvorný, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS) have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology) in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  13. Localization of buildings with a gable roof in very high-resolution aerial images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelhoff, Lykele; de With, Peter H. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at the robust automatic detection of buildings with a gable roof in varying rural areas from very-high-resolution aerial images. The originality of our approach resides in a custom-made design extracting key features close to modeling, such as e.g. roof ridges and gutters. In this way, we allow a large freedom in roof appearances. The proposed method is based on a combination of two hypotheses. First, it exploits the physical properties of gable roofs and detects straight line-segments within non-vegetated and non-farmland areas, as possibilities of occurring roof-ridges. Second, for each of these candidate roof-ridges, the likely roof-gutter positions are estimated for both sides of the line segment, resulting in a set of possible roof configurations. These hypotheses are validated based on the analysis of size, shadow, color and edge information, where for each roof-ridge candidate the optimal configuration is selected. Roof configurations with unlikely properties are rejected and afterwards ridges with overlapping configurations are fused. Experiments conducted on a set of 200 images covering various rural regions, with a large variation in both building appearance and surroundings, show that the algorithm is able to detect 75% of the buildings with a precision of 69.4%. We consider this as a reasonably good result, since the computing is fully unconstrained, numerous buildings were occluded by trees and because there is a significant appearance difference between the considered test images.

  14. HIGH RESOLUTION AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING AND HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING WITH A SMALL UAV PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gallay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  15. High-resolution glacier imaging and characterization by means of GPR attribute analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenke; Forte, Emanuele; Colucci, Renato R.; Pipan, Michele

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the applicability and the effectiveness of GPR attribute analysis for high-resolution glacier imaging and characterization, testing this approach on 4-D GPR multifrequency data collected in a small glacier in the Eastern Alps, by repeating the acquisition along the same profiles in four different periods of the year 2013. The main objectives are to image and characterize the glacier's inner structure and to quantitatively monitor the seasonal thawing of near-surface frozen materials (snow/firn). A multiattribute approach is used to characterize the subsurface through different attribute categories, including instantaneous and textural attributes considering not only amplitude-, phase- and frequency-related attributes, but also other more complex and integrated parameters. We combine information from more than one attribute into a single image with composite displays, using overlays or mixed displays. The results demonstrate that the developed GPR attribute analysis can provide significant improvements in the discrimination of GPR signals, and obtain enhanced and more constrained data interpretations.

  16. Is your system calibrated? MRI gradient system calibration for pre-clinical, high-resolution imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O'Callaghan

    Full Text Available High-field, pre-clinical MRI systems are widely used to characterise tissue structure and volume in small animals, using high resolution imaging. Both applications rely heavily on the consistent, accurate calibration of imaging gradients, yet such calibrations are typically only performed during maintenance sessions by equipment manufacturers, and potentially with acceptance limits that are inadequate for phenotyping. To overcome this difficulty, we present a protocol for gradient calibration quality assurance testing, based on a 3D-printed, open source, structural phantom that can be customised to the dimensions of individual scanners and RF coils. In trials on a 9.4 T system, the gradient scaling errors were reduced by an order of magnitude, and displacements of greater than 100 µm, caused by gradient non-linearity, were corrected using a post-processing technique. The step-by-step protocol can be integrated into routine pre-clinical MRI quality assurance to measure and correct for these errors. We suggest that this type of quality assurance is essential for robust pre-clinical MRI experiments that rely on accurate imaging gradients, including small animal phenotyping and diffusion MR.

  17. Image tiling for a high-resolution helmet-mounted display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Russell M.; Pradhan, Ranjit D.; Aye, Tin M.; Chua, Kang-Bin; Tengara, Indra; Tun, Nay; Win, Tin; Holmstedt, Jason; Schindler, Axel; Hergert, Steffen

    2005-05-01

    Head-mounted or helmet-mounted displays (HMDs) have long proven invaluable for many military applications. Integrated with head position, orientation, and/or eye-tracking sensors, HMDs can be powerful tools for training. For such training applications as flight simulation, HMDs need to be lightweight and compact with good center-of-gravity characteristics, and must display realistic full-color imagery with eye-limited resolution and large field-of-view (FOV) so that the pilot sees a truly realistic out-the-window scene. Under bright illumination, the resolution of the eye is ~300 μr (1 arc-min), setting the minimum HMD resolution. There are several methods of achieving this resolution, including increasing the number of individual pixels on a CRT or LCD display, thereby increasing the size, weight, and complexity of the HMD; dithering the image to provide an apparent resolution increase at the cost of reduced frame rate; and tiling normal resolution subimages into a single, larger high-resolution image. Physical Optics Corporation (POC) is developing a 5120 × 4096 pixel HMD covering 1500 × 1200 mr with resolution of 300 μr by tiling 20 subimages, each of which has a resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels, in a 5 × 4 array. We present theory and results of our preliminary development of this HMD, resulting in a 4k × 1k image tiled from 16 subimages, each with resolution 512 × 512, in an 8 × 2 array.

  18. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9/Jupiter collision observed with a high resolution speckle imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    During the week of July 16, 1994, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, broken into 20 plus pieces by tidal forces on its last orbit, smashed into the planet Jupiter, releasing the explosive energy of 500 thousand megatons. A team of observers from LLNL used the LLNL Speckle Imaging Camera mounted on the University of California`s Lick Observatory 3 Meter Telescope to capture continuous sequences of planet images during the comet encounter. Post processing with the bispectral phase reconstruction algorithm improves the resolution by removing much of the blurring due to atmospheric turbulence. High resolution images of the planet surface showing the aftermath of the impact are probably the best that were obtained from any ground-based telescope. We have been looking at the regions of the fragment impacts to try to discern any dynamic behavior of the spots left on Jupiter`s cloud tops. Such information can lead to conclusions about the nature of the comet and of Jupiter`s atmosphere. So far, the Hubble Space Telescope has observed expanding waves from the G impact whose mechanism is enigmatic since they appear to be too slow to be sound waves and too fast to be gravity waves, given the present knowledge of Jupiter`s atmosphere. Some of our data on the G and L impact region complements the Hubble observations but, so far, is inconclusive about spot dynamics.

  19. In situ, high-resolution imaging of labile phosphorus in sediments of a large eutrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shiming; Han, Chao; Wang, Yanping; Yao, Lei; Wang, Yan; Xu, Di; Sun, Qin; Williams, Paul N; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the labile status of phosphorus (P) in sediments is crucial for managing a eutrophic lake, but it is hindered by lacking in situ data particularly on a catchment scale. In this study, we for the first time characterized in situ labile P in sediments with the Zr-oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (Zr-oxide DGT) technique at a two-dimensional (2D), submillimeter resolution in a large eutrophic lake (Lake Taihu, China, with an area of 2338 km(2)). The concentration of DGT-labile P in the sediment profiles showed strong variation mostly ranging from 0.01 to 0.35 mg L(-1) with a considerable number of hotspots. The horizontal heterogeneity index of labile P varied from 0.04 to 4.5. High values appeared at the depths of 0-30 mm, likely reflecting an active layer of labile P under the sediment-water interface (SWI). Concentration gradients of labile P were observed from the high-resolution 1D DGT profiles in both the sediment and overlying water layers close to the SWI. The apparent diffusion flux of P across the SWI was calculated between -21 and 65 ng cm(-2) d(-1), which showed that the sediments tended to be a source and sink of overlying water P in the algal- and macrophyte-dominated regions, respectively. The DGT-labile P in the 0-30 mm active layer showed a better correlation with overlying water P than the labile P measured by ex situ chemical extraction methods. It implies that in situ, high-resolution profiling of labile P with DGT is a more reliable approach and will significantly extend our ability in in situ monitoring of the labile status of P in sediments in the field. PMID:25720671

  20. The observation of Martian dune migration using very high resolution image analysis and photogrammetric data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungrack; Yun, Hyewon; Kim, Younghwi; Baik, Hyunseob

    2016-04-01

    Although the origins and processes of Martian aeolian features, especially dunes, have not been fully identified yet, it has been better understood by the orbital observation method which has led to the identification of Martian dune migration such as a case in Nili Patera (Bridges, 2012), and the numerical model employing advanced computational fluid dynamics (Jackson et al., 2015). Specifically, the recent introduction of very high-resolution image products, such as 25 cm-resolution HiRISE imagery and its precise photogrammetric processor, allows us to trace the estimated, although tiny, dune migration over the Martian surface. In this study, we attempted to improve the accuracy of active dune migration measurements by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on the hierarchical geodetic control (Kim and Muller, 2009) for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout polynomial image control; and 3) the improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Consequently, this scheme not only measured Martian dune migration more precisely, but it will further achieve the extension of 3D observations combining stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using the HiRISE time series images over several dune fields, such as the Kaiser, Procter, and Wirtz craters, which were reported by the Mars Global Digital Dune Database (Hayward et al., 2013). The detected dune migrations were significantly larger than previously reported values and slightly correlated with the wind directions estimated by Martian Climate Database (Bingham et al., 2003). The outcomes in our study will be demonstrated with the quantified values in 2D and volumetric direction. In the future, the method will be further applied to the dune fields in the Mars Global dune database comprehensively and

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE ATLBS REGIONS: THE RADIO SOURCE COUNTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australia Telescope Low-brightness Survey (ATLBS) regions have been mosaic imaged at a radio frequency of 1.4 GHz with 6'' angular resolution and 72 μJy beam–1 rms noise. The images (centered at R.A. 00h35m00s, decl. –67°00'00'' and R.A. 00h59m17s, decl. –67°00'00'', J2000 epoch) cover 8.42 deg2 sky area and have no artifacts or imaging errors above the image thermal noise. Multi-resolution radio and optical r-band images (made using the 4 m CTIO Blanco telescope) were used to recognize multi-component sources and prepare a source list; the detection threshold was 0.38 mJy in a low-resolution radio image made with beam FWHM of 50''. Radio source counts in the flux density range 0.4-8.7 mJy are estimated, with corrections applied for noise bias, effective area correction, and resolution bias. The resolution bias is mitigated using low-resolution radio images, while effects of source confusion are removed by using high-resolution images for identifying blended sources. Below 1 mJy the ATLBS counts are systematically lower than the previous estimates. Showing no evidence for an upturn down to 0.4 mJy, they do not require any changes in the radio source population down to the limit of the survey. The work suggests that automated image analysis for counts may be dependent on the ability of the imaging to reproduce connecting emission with low surface brightness and on the ability of the algorithm to recognize sources, which may require that source finding algorithms effectively work with multi-resolution and multi-wavelength data. The work underscores the importance of using source lists—as opposed to component lists—and correcting for the noise bias in order to precisely estimate counts close to the image noise and determine the upturn at sub-mJy flux density.

  2. Estimation of Trees Outside Forests using IRS High Resolution data by Object Based Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujar, G. S.; Reddy, P. M.; Reddy, C. S.; Jha, C. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of Trees outside forests (TOF) is widely being recognized as a pivotal theme, in sustainable natural resource management, due to their role in offering variety of goods, such as timber, fruits and fodder as well as services like water, carbon, biodiversity. Forest Conservation efforts involving reduction of deforestation and degradation may have to increasingly rely on alternatives provided by TOF in catering to economic demands in forest edges. Spatial information systems involving imaging, analysis and monitoring to achieve objectives under protocols like REDD+, require incorporation of information content from areas under forest as well as trees outside forests, to aid holistic decisions. In this perspective, automation in retrieving information on area under trees, growing outside forests, using high resolution imaging is essential so that measuring and verification of extant carbon pools, are strengthened. Retrieval of this tree cover is demonstrated herewith, using object based image analysis in a forest edge of dry deciduous forests of Eastern Ghats, in Khammam district of Telangana state of India. IRS high resolution panchromatic 2.5 m data (Cartosat-1 Orthorectified) used in tandem with 5.8 m multispectral LISS IV data, discerns tree crowns and clusters at a detailed scale and hence semi-automated approach is attempted to classify TOF from a pair of image from relatively crop and cloud free season. Object based image analysis(OBIA) approach as implemented in commercial suite of e-Cognition (Ver 8.9) consists of segmentation at user defined scale followed by application of wide range of spectral, textural and object geometry based parameters for classification. Software offers innovative blend of raster and vector features that can be juxtaposed flexibly, across scales horizontally or vertically. Segmentation was carried out at multiple scales to discern first the major land covers, such as forest, water, agriculture followed by that at a finer

  3. Topography improvements in MEMS DMs for high-contrast, high-resolution imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop and demonstrate an innovative microfabrication process to substantially improve the surface quality achievable in high-resolution...

  4. Detection of flooded urban areas in high resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images using double scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, D. C.; Giustarini, L.; Garcia-Pintado, J.; Cloke, H. L.

    2014-05-01

    Flooding is a particular hazard in urban areas worldwide due to the increased risks to life and property in these regions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors are often used to image flooding because of their all-weather day-night capability, and now possess sufficient resolution to image urban flooding. The flood extents extracted from the images may be used for flood relief management and improved urban flood inundation modelling. A difficulty with using SAR for urban flood detection is that, due to its side-looking nature, substantial areas of urban ground surface may not be visible to the SAR due to radar layover and shadow caused by buildings and taller vegetation. This paper investigates whether urban flooding can be detected in layover regions (where flooding may not normally be apparent) using double scattering between the (possibly flooded) ground surface and the walls of adjacent buildings. The method estimates double scattering strengths using a SAR image in conjunction with a high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) height map of the urban area. A SAR simulator is applied to the LiDAR data to generate maps of layover and shadow, and estimate the positions of double scattering curves in the SAR image. Observations of double scattering strengths were compared to the predictions from an electromagnetic scattering model, for both the case of a single image containing flooding, and a change detection case in which the flooded image was compared to an un-flooded image of the same area acquired with the same radar parameters. The method proved successful in detecting double scattering due to flooding in the single-image case, for which flooded double scattering curves were detected with 100% classification accuracy (albeit using a small sample set) and un-flooded curves with 91% classification accuracy. The same measures of success were achieved using change detection between flooded and un-flooded images. Depending on the particular flooding

  5. The application of very high resolution satellite image in urban vegetation cover investigation: a case study of Xiamen City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGChengqi; LiBin; MATing

    2003-01-01

    With the technological improvements of satellite sensors, we will acquire more information about the earth so that we have reached a new application epoch of observation on earth environmental change and cartography. But with the enhancement of spatial resolution, some questions have arisen in the application of using traditional image processing and classification methods. Aiming for such questions, we studied the application of IKONOS very high resolution image (1 m) in Xiamen City on Urban Vegetation Cover Investigation and discussed the difference between the very high resolution image and traditional low spatial resolution image at classification,information abstraction etc. It is an advantageous test for the large-scale application of very high resolution data in the future.

  6. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) during MRO's Primary Science Phase (PSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Banks, M.E.; Baugh, N.; Becker, K.; Boyd, A.; Bergstrom, J.W.; Beyer, R.A.; Bortolini, E.; Bridges, N.T.; Byrne, S.; Castalia, B.; Chuang, F.C.; Crumpler, L.S.; Daubar, I.; Davatzes, A.K.; Deardorff, D.G.; DeJong, A.; Alan, Delamere W.; Dobrea, E.N.; Dundas, C.M.; Eliason, E.M.; Espinoza, Y.; Fennema, A.; Fishbaugh, K.E.; Forrester, T.; Geissler, P.E.; Grant, J. A.; Griffes, J.L.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Gulick, V.C.; Hansen, C.J.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Heyd, R.; Jaeger, W.L.; Jones, D.; Kanefsky, B.; Keszthelyi, L.; King, R.; Kirk, R.L.; Kolb, K.J.; Lasco, J.; Lefort, A.; Leis, R.; Lewis, K.W.; Martinez-Alonso, S.; Mattson, S.; McArthur, G.; Mellon, M.T.; Metz, J.M.; Milazzo, M.P.; Milliken, R.E.; Motazedian, T.; Okubo, C.H.; Ortiz, A.; Philippoff, A.J.; Plassmann, J.; Polit, A.; Russell, P.S.; Schaller, C.; Searls, M.L.; Spriggs, T.; Squyres, S. W.; Tarr, S.; Thomas, N.; Thomson, B.J.; Tornabene, L.L.; Van Houten, C.; Verba, C.; Weitz, C.M.; Wray, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) acquired 8 terapixels of data in 9137 images of Mars between October 2006 and December 2008, covering ???0.55% of the surface. Images are typically 5-6 km wide with 3-color coverage over the central 20% of the swath, and their scales usually range from 25 to 60 cm/pixel. Nine hundred and sixty stereo pairs were acquired and more than 50 digital terrain models (DTMs) completed; these data have led to some of the most significant science results. New methods to measure and correct distortions due to pointing jitter facilitate topographic and change-detection studies at sub-meter scales. Recent results address Noachian bedrock stratigraphy, fluvially deposited fans in craters and in or near Valles Marineris, groundwater flow in fractures and porous media, quasi-periodic layering in polar and non-polar deposits, tectonic history of west Candor Chasma, geometry of clay-rich deposits near and within Mawrth Vallis, dynamics of flood lavas in the Cerberus Palus region, evidence for pyroclastic deposits, columnar jointing in lava flows, recent collapse pits, evidence for water in well-preserved impact craters, newly discovered large rayed craters, and glacial and periglacial processes. Of particular interest are ongoing processes such as those driven by the wind, impact cratering, avalanches of dust and/or frost, relatively bright deposits on steep gullied slopes, and the dynamic seasonal processes over polar regions. HiRISE has acquired hundreds of large images of past, present and potential future landing sites and has contributed to scientific and engineering studies of those sites. Warming the focal-plane electronics prior to imaging has mitigated an instrument anomaly that produces bad data under cold operating conditions. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Vázquez, Roberto; Zavala, Saúl A.; Guillén, Pedro F.; Ayala, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a high-resolution imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy study of the complex morphological and kinematical structure of the planetary nebula NGC 3242. We analyze narrowband Hα, [O III] and [N II] images, addressing important morphological features: in the [O III] image we found one knot oriented to PA=-4°, in the [N II] image, three knots oriented at PA1=155°, PA2=+157°, and PA3=-45.5°, and in the Hα image, two bubbles in the internal region, one of them oriented toward SE and the other toward NW. Additionally we used the unsharp-masking technique and found faint structures in the halo that have not been studied before. These structures are presented in two pairs of arcs, one pair oriented toward PA=-35° and the other toward PA=140°. NGC 3242 is a morphologically rich PN with bubbles, asymmetrical outflows, and some knots in a double-shell nebular structure. Ground-based long-slit echelle spectra were obtained crossing NGC 3242 at twelve different positions to precisely determine kinematical features in the structure of the nebula. We obtain a systemic velocity of VLSR=-6.6 km/s. We have used the software SHAPE (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to reconstruct a 3D model of NGC 3242 which fits all our observational data. Preliminary results (deprojected velocities and kinematical ages) of all these structures will be presented.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  8. Automatic cortical surface reconstruction of high-resolution T1 echo planar imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvall, Ville; Witzel, Thomas; Wald, Lawrence L; Polimeni, Jonathan R

    2016-07-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) is the method of choice for the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), yet EPI is prone to geometric distortions and thus misaligns with conventional anatomical reference data. The poor geometric correspondence between functional and anatomical data can lead to severe misplacements and corruption of detected activation patterns. However, recent advances in imaging technology have provided EPI data with increasing quality and resolution. Here we present a framework for deriving cortical surface reconstructions directly from high-resolution EPI-based reference images that provide anatomical models exactly geometric distortion-matched to the functional data. Anatomical EPI data with 1mm isotropic voxel size were acquired using a fast multiple inversion recovery time EPI sequence (MI-EPI) at 7T, from which quantitative T1 maps were calculated. Using these T1 maps, volumetric data mimicking the tissue contrast of standard anatomical data were synthesized using the Bloch equations, and these T1-weighted data were automatically processed using FreeSurfer. The spatial alignment between T2(⁎)-weighted EPI data and the synthetic T1-weighted anatomical MI-EPI-based images was improved compared to the conventional anatomical reference. In particular, the alignment near the regions vulnerable to distortion due to magnetic susceptibility differences was improved, and sampling of the adjacent tissue classes outside of the cortex was reduced when using cortical surface reconstructions derived directly from the MI-EPI reference. The MI-EPI method therefore produces high-quality anatomical data that can be automatically segmented with standard software, providing cortical surface reconstructions that are geometrically matched to the BOLD fMRI data. PMID:27079529

  9. Resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction for a high-resolution animal SPECT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Sajedi, Salar; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Arabi, Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    The small-animal High-Resolution SPECT (HiReSPECT) is a dedicated dual-head gamma camera recently designed and developed in our laboratory for imaging of murine models. Each detector is composed of an array of 1.2 × 1.2 mm(2) (pitch) pixelated CsI(Na) crystals. Two position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) are coupled to each head's crystal. In this paper, we report on a resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction code applicable to the system and present the experimental results achieved using different phantoms and mouse scans. Collimator-detector response functions (CDRFs) were measured via a pixel-driven method using capillary sources at finite distances from the head within the field of view (FOV). CDRFs were then fitted by independent Gaussian functions. Thereafter, linear interpolations were applied to the standard deviation (σ) values of the fitted Gaussians, yielding a continuous map of CDRF at varying distances from the head. A rotation-based maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was used for reconstruction. A fast rotation algorithm was developed to rotate the image matrix according to the desired angle by means of pre-generated rotation maps. The experiments demonstrated improved resolution utilizing our resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction. While the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) radial and tangential resolution measurements of the system were over 2 mm in nearly all positions within the FOV without resolution recovery, reaching around 2.5 mm in some locations, they fell below 1.8 mm everywhere within the FOV using the resolution-recovery algorithm. The noise performance of the system was also acceptable; the standard deviation of the average counts per voxel in the reconstructed images was 6.6% and 8.3% without and with resolution recovery, respectively.

  10. Automatic extraction of road seeds from high-resolution aerial images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluir P. Dal-Poz

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an automatic methodology for extraction of road seeds from high-resolution aerial images. The method is based on a set of four road objects and another set of connection rules among road objects. Each road object is a local representation of an approximately straight road fragment and its construction is based on a combination of polygons describing all relevant image edges, according to some rules embodying road knowledge. Each one of the road seeds is composed by a sequence of connected road objects, in which each sequence of this type can be geometrically structured as a chain of contiguous quadrilaterals. Experiments carried out with high-resolution aerial images showed that the proposed methodology is very promising in extracting road seeds. This article presents the fundamentals of the method and the experimental results, as well.Este artigo apresenta uma metodologia automática para extração de sementes de rodovia a partir de imagens aéreas de alta resolução. O método se baseia em um conjunto de quatro objetos de rodovia e em um conjunto de regras de conexão entre tais objetos. Cada objeto de rodovia é uma representação local de um fragmento de rodovia aproximadamente reto e sua construção é baseada na combinação de polígonos que descrevem todas as bordas relevantes da imagem, de acordo com algumas regras que incorporam conhecimento sobre a feição rodovia. Cada uma das sementes de rodovia é composta por uma sucessão de objetos de rodovia conectados, sendo que cada sucessão deste tipo pode ser geometricamente estruturada como uma cadeia de quadriláteros contíguos. Os experimentos realizados com imagens aéreas de alta resolução mostraram que a metodologia proposta é muito promissora na extração de sementes de rodovia. Este artigo apresenta os fundamentos do método, bem como os resultados experimentais.

  11. High-Resolution CT Imaging of Single Breast Cancer Microcalcifications In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazumasa; Liu, Fangbing; Hoppin, Jack; Lunsford, Elaine P.; Lackas, Christian; Hesterman, Jacob; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Fujii, Hirofumi; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Microcalcification is a hallmark of breast cancer and a key diagnostic feature for mammography. We recently described the first robust animal model of breast cancer microcalcification. In this study, we hypothesized that high-resolution computed tomography (CT) could potentially detect the genesis of a single microcalcification in vivo and quantify its growth over time. Using a commercial CT scanner, we systematically optimized acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Two ray-tracing image reconstruction algorithms were tested, a voxel-driven “fast” cone beam algorithm (FCBA) and a detector-driven “exact” cone beam algorithm (ECBA). By optimizing acquisition and reconstruction parameters, we were able to achieve a resolution of 104 µm full-width at half maximum (FWHM). At an optimal detector sampling frequency, ECBA provided a 28 µm (21%) FWHM improvement in resolution over FCBA. In vitro, we were able to image a single 300 µm by 100 µm hydroxyapatite crystal. In a syngeneic rat model of breast cancer, we were able to detect the genesis of a single microcalcification in vivo and follow its growth longitudinally over weeks. Taken together, this study provides an in vivo “gold standard” for the development of calcification-specific contrast agents and a model system for studying the mechanism of breast cancer microcalcification. PMID:21504703

  12. Fluorescent-protein stabilization and high-resolution imaging of cleared, intact mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Schwarz

    Full Text Available In order to observe and quantify long-range neuronal connections in intact mouse brain by light microscopy, it is first necessary to clear the brain, thus suppressing refractive-index variations. Here we describe a method that clears the brain and preserves the signal from proteinaceous fluorophores using a pH-adjusted non-aqueous index-matching medium. Successful clearing is enabled through the use of either 1-propanol or tert-butanol during dehydration whilst maintaining a basic pH. We show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging of entire, structurally intact juvenile and adult mouse brains is possible at subcellular resolution, even following many months in clearing solution. We also show that axonal long-range projections that are EGFP-labelled by modified Rabies virus can be imaged throughout the brain using a purpose-built light-sheet fluorescence microscope. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, we determined a detailed map of the monosynaptic projections onto a target cell population in the lateral entorhinal cortex. This example demonstrates that our method permits the quantification of whole-brain connectivity patterns at the subcellular level in the uncut brain.

  13. High Resolution Imaging of Defect Structures in Polymer and Organic Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David

    2003-03-01

    We have been developing techniques for the low dose High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) imaging of defect structures in polymer and organic molecular crystals. We have examined a variety of technologically important materials systems including rigid-rod polymers, poly(imides), poly(diacetylenes), poly(bisthiazoles), poly(bisoxazoles), and aromatic polyamides such as poly(paraphenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA or Kevlar(R)) and poly(metaphenylene diisophthalamide) (MPDI or Nomex(R)). These studies have made it possible for us to image the molecular reorganization in the vicinity of dislocations, surfaces, and grain boundaries. We have also learned about the micromechanisms of lattice bending and twisting. Most recently we have been examining the microstructure of pentacene, a highly-crystalline conjugated organic small molecule that is of interest for making flexible electronic devices such as thin-film transistors. We have also been examing the utility of low voltage techniques using a table-top sized electron microscope that operates near 5 kV.

  14. CARMENES input catalogue of M dwarfs II. High-resolution imaging with FastCam

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes-Contreras, M; Caballero, J A; Gauza, B; Montes, D; Alonso-Floriano, F J; Jeffers, S V; Morales, J C; Reiners, A; Ribas, I; Schoefer, P; Quirrenbach, A; Amado, P J; Mundt, R; Seifert, W

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We search for low-mass companions of M dwarfs and characterize their multiplicity fraction with the purpose of helping in the selection of the most appropriate targets for the CARMENES exoplanet survey. Methods: We obtained high-resolution images in the I band with the lucky imaging instrument FastCam at the 1.5 m Telescopio Carlos Sanchez for 490 mid- to late-M dwarfs. For all the detected binaries, we measured angular separations, position angles, and magnitude differences in the I band. We also calculated the masses of each individual component and estimated orbital periods, using the available magnitude and colour relations for M dwarfs and our own MJ-spectral type and mass-MI relations. To avoid biases in our sample selection, we built a volume-limited sample of M0.0-M5.0 dwarfs that is complete up to 86% within 14 pc. Results: From the 490 observed stars, we detected 80 companions in 76 systems, of which 30 are new discoveries. The multiplicity fraction in our observed sample is 16.7+-2.0% . In ou...

  15. Hubble space telescope high-resolution imaging of Kepler small and cool exoplanet host stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Cartier, Kimberly M. S.; Wright, Jason T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Adams, Elisabeth R. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kalas, Paul, E-mail: gillil@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution imaging is an important tool for follow-up study of exoplanet candidates found via transit detection with the Kepler mission. We discuss here Hubble Space Telescope imaging with the WFC3 of 23 stars that host particularly interesting Kepler planet candidates based on their small size and cool equilibrium temperature estimates. Results include detections, exclusion of background stars that could be a source of false positives for the transits, and detection of physically associated companions in a number of cases providing dilution measures necessary for planet parameter refinement. For six Kepler objects of interest, we find that there is ambiguity regarding which star hosts the transiting planet(s), with potentially strong implications for planetary characteristics. Our sample is evenly distributed in G, K, and M spectral types. Albeit with a small sample size, we find that physically associated binaries are more common than expected at each spectral type, reaching a factor of 10 frequency excess in M. We document the program detection sensitivities, detections, and deliverables to the Kepler follow-up program archive.

  16. High-resolution multi-band imaging for validation and characterization of small Kepler planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based optical speckle and near-infrared adaptive optics images are taken to search for stars in close angular proximity to host stars of candidate planets identified by the NASA Kepler Mission. Neighboring stars are a potential source of false positive signals. These stars also blend into Kepler light curves, affecting estimated planet properties, and are important for an understanding of planets in multiple star systems. Deep images with high angular resolution help to validate candidate planets by excluding potential background eclipsing binaries as the source of the transit signals. A study of 18 Kepler Object of Interest stars hosting a total of 28 candidate and validated planets is presented. Validation levels are determined for 18 planets against the likelihood of a false positive from a background eclipsing binary. Most of these are validated at the 99% level or higher, including five newly validated planets in two systems: Kepler-430 and Kepler-431. The stellar properties of the candidate host stars are determined by supplementing existing literature values with new spectroscopic characterizations. Close neighbors of seven of these stars are examined using multi-wavelength photometry to determine their nature and influence on the candidate planet properties. Most of the close neighbors appear to be gravitationally bound secondaries, while a few are best explained as closely co-aligned field stars. Revised planet properties are derived for each candidate and validated planet, including cases where the close neighbors are the potential host stars.

  17. New Approach for Unambiguous High-Resolution Wide-Swath SAR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueguan Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-resolution wide-swath (HRWS SAR system uses a small antenna for transmitting waveform and multiple antennas both in elevation and azimuth for receiving echoes. It has the potential to achieve wide spatial coverage and fine azimuth resolution, while it suffers from elevation pattern loss caused by the presence of topographic height and impaired azimuth resolution caused by nonuniform sampling. A new approach for HRWS SAR imaging based on compressed sensing (CS is introduced. The data after range compression of multiple elevation apertures are used to estimate direction of arrival (DOA of targets via CS, and the adaptive digital beamforming in elevation is achieved accordingly, which avoids the pattern loss of scan-on-receive (SCORE algorithm when topographic height exists. The effective phase centers of the system are nonuniformly distributed when displaced phase center antenna (DPCA technology is adopted, which causes Doppler ambiguities under traditional SAR imaging algorithms. Azimuth reconstruction based on CS can resolve this problem via precisely modeling the nonuniform sampling. Validation with simulations and experiment in an anechoic chamber are presented.

  18. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusanno, F., E-mail: francesco.cusanno@iss.infn.i [I.N.F.N., Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Argentieri, A. [I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); De Vincentis, G. [Universita La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Fratoni, R. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Garibaldi, F. [I.N.F.N., Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Magliozzi, M.L. [I.N.F.N., Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Majewski, S. [West Virginia University, Morgantown WV (United States); Marano, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Musico, P. [I.N.F.N., Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Tsui, B.M.W. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD (United States); Vitelli, L. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  19. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging of urethral anatomy in continent nulliparous pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To quantify the distribution of morphologic appearances of urethral anatomy and measure variables of urethral sphincter anatomy in continent, nulliparous, pregnant women by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: We studied fifteen women during their first pregnancy. We defined and quantified bladder neck and urethral morphology on axial and sagittal MR images from healthy, continent women. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) total transverse urethral diameter, anterior–posterior diameter, unilateral striated sphincter muscle thickness, and striated sphincter length were 15 ± 2 mm (range: 12–19 mm), 15 ± 2 mm (range: 11–20 mm), 2 ± 1 mm (range: 1–4 mm), and 13 ± 3 mm (range: 9–18 mm) respectively. The mean (±standard deviation) total urethral length on sagittal scans was 22 ± 3 mm (range: 17.6–26.4 mm). Discussion: Advances in MR technique combined with anatomical and histological findings will provide an insight to understand how changes in urethral anatomy might affect the continence mechanisms in pregnant and non-pregnant, continent or incontinent individuals.

  20. New Generation of High Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging Technique for Advanced Material Characterization: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, R. Gr.

    The role of non-destructive material characterization and NDT is changing at a rapid rate, continuing to evolve alongside the dramatic development of novel techniques based on the principles of high-resolution imaging. The modern use of advanced optical, thermal, ultrasonic, laser-ultrasound, acoustic emission, vibration, electro-magnetic, and X-ray techniques, etc., as well as refined measurement and signal/data processing devices, allows for continuous generation of on-line information. As a result real-time process monitoring can be achieved, leading to the more effective and efficient control of numerous processes, greatly improving manufacturing as a whole. Indeed, concurrent quality inspection has become an attainable reality. With the advent of new materials for use in various structures, joints, and parts, however, innovative applications of modern NDT imaging techniques are necessary to monitor as many stages of manufacturing as possible. Simply put, intelligent advance manufacturing is impossible without actively integrating modern non-destructive evaluation into the production system.

  1. High-resolution imaging and computational analysis of haematopoietic cell dynamics in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechlein, Claire S; Harris, Jeffrey R; Lee, Timothy K; Weeks, Joi; Fox, Raymond G; Zimdahl, Bryan; Ito, Takahiro; Blevins, Allen; Jung, Seung-Hye; Chute, John P; Chourasia, Amit; Covert, Markus W; Reya, Tannishtha

    2016-01-01

    Although we know a great deal about the phenotype and function of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, a major challenge has been mapping their dynamic behaviour within living systems. Here we describe a strategy to image cells in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution, and quantify their interactions using a high-throughput computational approach. Using these tools, and a new Msi2 reporter model, we show that haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells display preferential spatial affinity for contacting the vascular niche, and a temporal affinity for making stable associations with these cells. These preferences are markedly diminished as cells mature, suggesting that programs that control differentiation state are key determinants of spatiotemporal behaviour, and thus dictate the signals a cell receives from specific microenvironmental domains. These collectively demonstrate that high-resolution imaging coupled with computational analysis can provide new biological insight, and may in the long term enable creation of a dynamic atlas of cells within their native microenvironment. PMID:27425143

  2. High-resolution electroluminescent imaging of pressure distribution using a piezoelectric nanowire LED array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Caofeng; Dong, Lin; Zhu, Guang; Niu, Simiao; Yu, Ruomeng; Yang, Qing; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-09-01

    Emulation of the sensation of touch through high-resolution electronic means could become important in future generations of robotics and human-machine interfaces. Here, we demonstrate that a nanowire light-emitting diode-based pressure sensor array can map two-dimensional distributions of strain with an unprecedented spatial resolution of 2.7 µm, corresponding to a pixel density of 6,350 dpi. Each pixel is composed of a single n-ZnO nanowire/p-GaN light-emitting diode, the emission intensity of which depends on the local strain owing to the piezo-phototronic effect. A pressure map can be created by reading out, in parallel, the electroluminescent signal from all of the pixels with a time resolution of 90 ms. The device may represent a major step towards the digital imaging of mechanical signals by optical means, with potential applications in artificial skin, touchpad technology, personalized signatures, bio-imaging and optical microelectromechanical systems.

  3. Feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging for the diagnosis of intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Miran; Rim, Nae-Jung; Kim, Sun Yong; Choi, Jin Wook [Ajou University School of Medicine, Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Soo [Ajou University School of Medicine, Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of high-resolution MRI (HR-MRI) for diagnosing intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection (VBD) and to identify the most useful imaging findings suggesting dissection. We retrospectively reviewed 50 patients with suspected intracranial VBDs who underwent HR-MRI. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed the HR-MR images. The diagnosis based on HR-MRI was compared with the final diagnosis by consensus among the neuroradiologists, neurointerventionist, and neurologist. Two neuroradiologists also sought signs of dissection (mural hematoma, dissection flap, outer-diameter enlargement on T2WI of steno-occlusive lesions). Inter- and intraobserver agreements were analysed. HR-MRI corroborated the final diagnosis in 47 (94 %; 31 VBD and 16 non-VBD) patients. A mural haematoma was best detected on T1WI and contrast-enhanced (CE)-T1WI (54.3 %). Dissection flaps were observed in almost all cases on CE-T1WI (91.4 %), and then were detected on T2WI (68.6 %). Outer-diameter enlargement of the steno-occlusive lesions on angiography was detected in more than half of the cases (62.9 %). The two reviewers showed almost perfect agreement for the diagnosis of VBD and detecting dissection signs on every sequence. HR-MRI can be a useful and non-invasive diagnostic tool for intracranial VBD, and dissection flaps on CE-T1WI are the signs with the greatest diagnostic value. (orig.)

  4. Monitoring of HTS compound library quality via a high-resolution image acquisition and processing instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Pierre; Scampavia, Louis; Einsteder, Ross; Hodder, Peter

    2011-06-01

    This report presents the high-resolution image acquisition and processing instrument for compound management applications (HIAPI-CM). The HIAPI-CM combines imaging spectroscopy and machine-vision analysis to perform rapid assessment of high-throughput screening (HTS) compound library quality. It has been customized to detect and classify typical artifacts found in HTS compound library microtiter plates (MTPs). These artifacts include (1) insufficient volume of liquid compound sample, (2) compound precipitation, and (3) colored compounds that interfere with HTS assay detection format readout. The HIAPI-CM is also configured to automatically query and compare its analysis results to data stored in a LIMS or corporate database, aiding in the detection of compound registration errors. To demonstrate its capabilities, several compound plates (n=5760 wells total) containing different artifacts were measured via automated HIAPI-CM analysis, and results compared with those obtained by manual (visual) inspection. In all cases, the instrument demonstrated high fidelity (99.8% empty wells; 100.1% filled wells; 94.4% for partially filled wells; 94.0% for wells containing colored compounds), and in the case of precipitate detection, the HIAPI-CM results significantly exceeded the fidelity of visual observations (220.0%). As described, the HIAPI-CM allows for noninvasive, nondestructive MTP assessment with a diagnostic throughput of about 1min per plate, reducing analytical expenses and improving the quality and stewardship of HTS compound libraries.

  5. A True Multi-modality Approach for High Resolution Optical Imaging: Photo-Magnetic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Luk, Alex T.; Ha, Seunghoon; Nouizi, Farouk; Thayer, David; Lin, Yuting; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging leverages the competitive advantage of different imaging systems to improve the overall resolution and quantitative accuracy. Our new technique, Photo-Magnetic Imaging (PMI) is one of these true multi-modality imaging approaches, which can provide quantitative optical absorption map at MRI spatial resolution. PMI uses laser light to illuminate tissue and elevate its temperature while utilizing MR thermometry to measure the laser-induced temperature variation with high s...

  6. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennetiere D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  7. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennetiere, D.; Troussel, Ph.; Courtois, C.; Wrobel, R.; Audebert, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  8. Content-Based High-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Retrieval via Unsupervised Feature Learning and Collaborative Affinity Metric Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansheng Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the urgent demand for automatic management of large numbers of high-resolution remote sensing images, content-based high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval (CB-HRRS-IR has attracted much research interest. Accordingly, this paper proposes a novel high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval approach via multiple feature representation and collaborative affinity metric fusion (IRMFRCAMF. In IRMFRCAMF, we design four unsupervised convolutional neural networks with different layers to generate four types of unsupervised features from the fine level to the coarse level. In addition to these four types of unsupervised features, we also implement four traditional feature descriptors, including local binary pattern (LBP, gray level co-occurrence (GLCM, maximal response 8 (MR8, and scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT. In order to fully incorporate the complementary information among multiple features of one image and the mutual information across auxiliary images in the image dataset, this paper advocates collaborative affinity metric fusion to measure the similarity between images. The performance evaluation of high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval is implemented on two public datasets, the UC Merced (UCM dataset and the Wuhan University (WH dataset. Large numbers of experiments show that our proposed IRMFRCAMF can significantly outperform the state-of-the-art approaches.

  9. High-resolution polarization sensitive OCT for ocular imaging in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialová, Stanislava; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Baumann, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    A new high-resolution polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography system was developed for imaging rodent retina. Various light-tissue interactions such as birefringence and depolarization can change the polarization state of light. In the eye, there are several tissues that have these properties, for example retinal pigment epithelium (depolarization) and sclera (birefringence). These layers play key roles in diseases like age-related macular degeneration or glaucoma. Animal models are an important component for understanding disease pathogenesis. The gold standard for the evaluation of preclinical experiments is histology, which is an invasive and terminal procedure. Since OCT is non-invasive, it has the potential to be an alternative to histology with the benefit of long-term study of the disease progression in the same animal. In this study, a superluminescent diode with spectrum width 100 nm and mean wavelength 840 nm is used as a light source in order to enable high axial resolution. Spectrometers are custom built to enable high imaging speed that allows acquiring 3D data sets with 1024x200x1536 voxels in 3.44 s. From the acquired data, images displaying phase retardation induced by birefringence and orientation of birefringent axis were calculated. In first measurements, we were able to identify the RPE-choroid complex (depolarization effect) and the sclera (strong birefringence) in the retina of Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley rats. Our preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of the system for high speed/resolution imaging of the rodent retina. This is useful for longitudinal studies of disease models of retinal disease in rats and mice

  10. Cadastral Resurvey using High Resolution Satellite Ortho Image - challenges: A case study in Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, P. K.; Sanabada, M. K.; Tripathi, S.

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in satellite sensor technology enabling capturing of geometrically accurate images of earth's surface coupled with DGPS/ETS and GIS technology holds the capability of large scale mapping of land resources at cadastral level. High Resolution Satellite Images depict field bunds distinctly. Thus plot parcels are to be delineated from cloud free ortho-images and obscured/difficult areas are to be surveyed using DGPS and ETS. The vector datasets thus derived through RS/DGPS/ETS survey are to be integrated in GIS environment to generate the base cadastral vector datasets for further settlement/title confirmation activities. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the efficacy of a hybrid methodology employed in Pitambarpur Sasana village under Digapahandi Tahasil of Ganjam district, as a pilot project, particularly in Odisha scenario where the land parcel size is very small. One of the significant observations of the study is matching of Cadastral map area i.e. 315.454 Acres, the image map area i.e. 314.887 Acres and RoR area i.e. 313.815 Acre. It was revealed that 79 % of plots derived by high-tech survey method show acceptable level of accuracy despite the fact that the mode of area measurement by ground and automated method has significant variability. The variations are more in case of Government lands, Temple/Trust lands, Common Property Resources and plots near to river/nalas etc. The study indicates that the adopted technology can be extended to other districts and cadastral resurvey and updating work can be done for larger areas of the country using this methodology.

  11. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) for high-resolution conductivity imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-sectional imaging of an electrical conductivity distribution inside the human body has been an active research goal in impedance imaging. By injecting current into an electrically conducting object through surface electrodes, we induce current density and voltage distributions. Based on the fact that these are determined by the conductivity distribution as well as the geometry of the object and the adopted electrode configuration, electrical impedance tomography (EIT) reconstructs cross-sectional conductivity images using measured current–voltage data on the surface. Unfortunately, there exist inherent technical difficulties in EIT. First, the relationship between the boundary current–voltage data and the internal conductivity distribution bears a nonlinearity and low sensitivity, and hence the inverse problem of recovering the conductivity distribution is ill posed. Second, it is difficult to obtain accurate information on the boundary geometry and electrode positions in practice, and the inverse problem is sensitive to these modeling errors as well as measurement artifacts and noise. These result in EIT images with a poor spatial resolution. In order to produce high-resolution conductivity images, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been lately developed. Noting that injection current produces a magnetic as well as electric field inside the imaging object, we can measure the induced internal magnetic flux density data using an MRI scanner. Utilization of the internal magnetic flux density is the key idea of MREIT to overcome the technical difficulties in EIT. Following original ideas on MREIT in early 1990s, there has been a rapid progress in its theory, algorithm and experimental techniques. The technique has now advanced to the stage of human experiments. Though it is still a few steps away from routine clinical use, its potential is high as a new impedance imaging modality providing conductivity images with a spatial

  12. High-Resolution 3-D Imaging and Tissue Differentiation with Transmission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarelis, V. Z.; Jeong, J.; Shin, D. C.; Do, S.

    A three-dimensional High-resolution Ultrasonic Transmission Tomography (HUTT) system has been developed recently under the sponsorship of the Alfred Mann Institute at the University of Southern California that holds the promise of early detection of breast cancer (mm-size lesions) with greater sensitivity (true positives) and specificity (true negatives) than current x-ray mammograghy. In addition to sub-mm resolution in 3-D, the HUTT system has the unique capability of reliable tissue classification by means of the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics of individual voxels that are extracted from the tomographic data through novel signal processing methods. These methods yield "multi-band signatures" of the various tissue types that are utilized to achieve reliable tissue differentiation via novel segmentation and classification algorithms. The unparalleled high-resolution and tissue differentiation capabilities of the HUTT system have been demonstrated so far with man-made and animal-tissue phantoms. Illustrative results are presented that corroborate these claims, although several challenges remain to make HUTT a clinically acceptable technology. The next critical step is to collect and analyze data from human subjects (female breasts) in order to demonstrate the key capability of the HUTT system to detect breast lesions early (at the mm-size stage) and to differentiate between malignant and benign lesions in a manner that is far superior (in terms of sensitivity and specificity) to the current x-ray mammography. The key initial application of the HUTT imaging technology is envisioned to be the early (at the mm-size) detection of breast cancer, which represents a major threat to the well-being of women around the world. The potential impact is estimated in hundreds of thousands lives saved, millions of unnecessary biopsies avoided, and billions of dollars saved in national health-care costs every year - to say nothing of the tens of thousands of

  13. Shoreline Tracing Using Medium to High-Resolution Satellite Images for Storm Surge Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladiero, C.; Lagmay, A. M. A.; Santiago, J. T.; Suarez, J. K. B.; Puno, J. V.; Bahala, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    In a developing country like Philippines, which ranks fourth in the longest coastline in the world at 36 289 kilometers, acquiring an updated and finer shoreline at the municipal level is mostly scarce. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of accurately delineating shoreline in coastal management, engineering design, sea-level rise research, coastal hazard map development, boundary definition, coastal change research and monitoring and numerical models. In the context of storm surge modelling, shoreline boundary serves as basis for tidal conditions and requires to be well-defined to generate an accurate simulation result. This paper presents the cost-effective way of shoreline tracing employed by the Storm Surge component under the Department of Science and Technology-Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (DOST-Project NOAH) for use in modelling storm surge hazards in the country, particularly in San Pedro Bay during the Typhoon Haiyan. Project NOAH was tasked to conduct disaster science research and development and recommend innovative information services in government's disaster prevention and mitigation efforts through cutting edge technologies. The Storm Surge component commenced in September 2013 and was mandated by the Philippine government to identify storm surge vulnerable areas and provide high-resolution maps of storm surge inundation in the localities. In the absence of LIDAR data at the time, the Project utilized the freely available medium to high resolution satellite images of Google Earth and digitized the shoreline. To minimize subjectivity, set of digitizing standards were developed for classifying common shoreline features in the country, differentiating image textures and colors and tabulating identified shoreline features. After which, the digitized shoreline were quality checked and corrected for topology using ArcGIS Desktop 10 software. The final output is a vector data that served as boundary for topo-bathy extraction

  14. Quantizing and analyzing the feature information of coastal zone based on high-resolution remote sensing image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaomei; LAN Rongqin; LUO Jiancheng

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of realization of beach information and its differentiating of high-resolution remote sensing image on coastal zone, extracting objects are carried through RS multi-scale diagnostic analysis, and fast information extraction methods and key technologies are put forward . Meanwhile image segmentation methods are set forth for objects of coastal zone. And through the application of Otsu2D to the segmentation of water area and dock and the applying of Gabor filter to the separation and extraction of construction, some typical applications of high-resolution RS image are presented in the field of coastal zone surface objects' recognition. Quantizing high-resolution RS information on the coastal zone proved to be of great scientific and practical significance for coastal development and management.

  15. Step-by-step chemical purification of carbon nanotubes analyzed by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosolen, Jose Mauricio; Montoro, Luciano Andrey; Matsubara, Elaine Yoshiko; Marchesin, Marcel Silva; Nascimento, Leandro Fontanetti do; Tronto, Simone [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Quimica

    2006-07-01

    Nanotechnology can be defined as the science of nanoscale materials. One of the most important nanotechnological materials is the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a nanomaterial that, to the naked eye, looks like black powder, but which is visible microscopically as shown in Figure 1. Using high resolution transmission electron microscopes, CNTs can be seen as single-walled (SWNTs), multi-walled (MWNTs), and cup-stacked nanotube (CSNTs) structures. (author)

  16. High Resolution Depth-Resolved Imaging From Multi-Focal Images for Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.;

    2015-01-01

    in-focus images. The technique is derived from biological microscopy and is validated here with simulated ultrasound data. A linear array probe is used to scan a point scatterer phantom that moves in depth with a controlled step. From the beamformed responses of each scatterer position the image......An ultrasound imaging technique providing subdiffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values for...... sharpness is assessed. Values from all positions plotted together form a curve that peaks at the receive focus, which is set during the beamforming. Selection of three different receive foci for each acquired dataset will result in the generation of three overlapping sharpness curves. A set of three...

  17. A data model and database for high-resolution pathology analytical image informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The systematic analysis of imaged pathology specimens often results in a vast amount of morphological information at both the cellular and sub-cellular scales. While microscopy scanners and computerized analysis are capable of capturing and analyzing data rapidly, microscopy image data remain underutilized in research and clinical settings. One major obstacle which tends to reduce wider adoption of these new technologies throughout the clinical and scientific communities is the challenge of managing, querying, and integrating the vast amounts of data resulting from the analysis of large digital pathology datasets. This paper presents a data model, which addresses these challenges, and demonstrates its implementation in a relational database system. Context: This paper describes a data model, referred to as Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS, and a database implementation, which are designed to support the data management and query requirements of detailed characterization of micro-anatomic morphology through many interrelated analysis pipelines on whole-slide images and tissue microarrays (TMAs. Aims: (1 Development of a data model capable of efficiently representing and storing virtual slide related image, annotation, markup, and feature information. (2 Development of a database, based on the data model, capable of supporting queries for data retrieval based on analysis and image metadata, queries for comparison of results from different analyses, and spatial queries on segmented regions, features, and classified objects. Settings and Design: The work described in this paper is motivated by the challenges associated with characterization of micro-scale features for comparative and correlative analyses involving whole-slides tissue images and TMAs. Technologies for digitizing tissues have advanced significantly in the past decade. Slide scanners are capable of producing high-magnification, high-resolution images from whole

  18. Prediction of the origin of intracanalicular neoplasms with high-resolution MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, S. [Sendai Shakaihoken Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sendai (Japan); Takahashi, S.; Higano, S. [Tohoku University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hashimoto, S. [Tohoku University, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2005-09-01

    Correct diagnosis of intracanalicular neoplasms is important to avoid unnecessary operations or an unsuitable surgical approach. We investigated the capability of high-resolution three-dimensional MR imaging in predicting the origin of intracanalicular neoplasms. Twenty cases underwent three-dimensional Fourier-transformation (3DFT) constructive interference in steady state and contrast-enhanced 3DFT-fast low angled shot MR imaging and surgery. Seventeen cases underwent caloric test. MR diagnosis on the origin of intracanalicular neoplasms was compared with surgical results. For MR diagnosis, the origin of intracanalicular neoplasms was predicted according to the location of the tumor in the internal auditory canal (IAC) in two ways, i.e., determining (1) a single specific nerve of origin and (2) whether the tumor originated from the superior or inferior aspect of the IAC. Surgery could determine the nerve of origin in 16 cases (14 inferior and 2 superior vestibular schwannomas), but it was indeterminate in 4. Comparison between MR prediction and surgical results on a single nerve origin revealed exact agreement in five, but inconsistent in three. Regarding whether the tumor was derived from superior or inferior aspect of the IAC, agreement was found in 10 of the 16 cases (62.5%). Caloric test was abnormal in all patients examined but one with superior vestibular schwannoma. 3DFT-MR imaging was not particularly useful in predicting a precise nerve of origin of intracanalicular neoplasms. The prediction on whether the tumor originated in the superior or inferior aspect of the IAC was superior to caloric test, which might have clinical significance in treatment planning especially for hearing preservation surgery. (orig.)

  19. Near-Field Imaging Based on High Resolution Focal Spot Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillers, G.; Campillo, M.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Roux, P.; Lecointre, A.; Vernon, F.

    2015-12-01

    The dense spatial wavefield sampling provided by modern seismological acquisitions allows the resolution of the near-field focal spot. The large-amplitude focal spot emerges from the superposition of a collapsing, time reversed wavefront. We discuss an imaging method that is based on high resolution reconstructions of the focal spot that is obtained from cross correlation. This approach exploits the dependence of the spot's shape on local properties of the propagation medium, i.e., the distance of the first zero crossing is proportional to the wave length. We construct noise correlation functions from data collected by a highly-dense Nodal array centered on the San Jacinto fault zone south of Anza. The focal spot can be obtained from the amplitude distributions at zero lag time. We repeat this analysis using each geophone location as the collapsing point to which the wave length estimate is related. The anisotropic intensity of the converging wavefields leads to distorted focal spots. In addition, strong body and fault zone waves that are associated with the complex fault zone structure prohibit the straightforward analysis of the spatially variable zero-lag time distributions. We discuss strategies to mute the influence of the wavefield anisotropy and the removal of the body and fault zone wave components for improved reconstructions of the symmetric surface wave focal spot. The overall consistency of the local wave speed estimates from the zero crossing and images obtained with more traditional far-field travel time inversions validates the near-field approach. We discuss causes for the remaining inconsistencies and compare limits of the resolution in both cases. At higher frequencies (>3 Hz) both methods reveal a heterogeneous velocity structure that exhibits pronounced low-velocity zones. In addition, near-field based images obtained at wave lengths that are too large for the application of far-field methods suggest a strong velocity contrast across the fault.

  20. High-resolution imaging of hypervelocity metal jets using advanced high-speed photographic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.

    1995-08-29

    It is now possible to obtain high resolution sequential photographs of the initial formation and evolution of hypervelocity metal jets formed by shaped charge devices fired in air. Researchers have been frustrated by the high velocity of the jet material and the luminous sheath of hot gases cloaking the jet that made detailed observation of the jet body extremely difficult. The camera system that provides the photographs is a large format multi-frame electro-optic camera, referred to as an IC camera (IC stands for image converter), that utilizes electro-optic shuttering, monochromatic pulsed laser illumination and bandpass filtering to provide sequential pictures (in 3D if desired) with minimal degradation due to luminous air shocks or motion blur. The large format (75mm image plane), short exposure (15 ns minimum), ruby laser illumination and bandpass filtering (monochromatic illumination while excluding extraneous light) produces clear, sharp, images of the detailed surface structure of a metal shaped charge jet during early jet formation, elongation of the jet body, jet tip evolution and subsequent particulation (breakup) of the jet body. By utilizing the new camera system in conjunction with the more traditional rotating mirror high speed cameras, pulsed radiography, and electrical sensors, a maximum amount of, often unique, data can be extracted from a single experiment. This paper was intended primarily as an oral presentation. For purposes of continuity and simplicity in these proceedings, the authors have chosen to concentrate on the development of the IC camera system and its impact on the photography of high speed shaped chargejets.

  1. Image-based motion compensation for high-resolution extremities cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods: Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1-4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results: Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10-15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2-4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion: The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  2. A perception-inspired building index for automatic built-up area detection in high-resolution satellite images

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Gang; Xia, Gui-Song; Huang, Xin; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Liangpei

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatic extraction of built-up areas from high-resolution remote sensing images. We propose a new building presence index from the point view of perception. We argue that built-up areas usually result in significant corners and junctions in high-resolution satellite images, due to the man-made structures and occlusion, and thus can be measured by the geometrical structures they contained. More precisely, we first detect corners and junctions by relying on...

  3. Compact magnet array for portable high-resolution NMR and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Perlo, Juan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico [ITMC, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Portable NMR probes built from permanent magnets offer several advantages over conventional NMR systems. However, the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field generated by these sensors precludes their use in high resolution NMR spectroscopy and MRI. Recently we have demonstrated that the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field can be removed by providing the sensor with movable permanent magnets which allows generating and controlling harmonic field corrections by a mechanical shimming approach. In this work we present a high-performance magnet design based on this concept, which enables us to reduce the size of the magnet keeping the field strength and the sample volume constant. In particular, it was used to build a palm size magnet working in a volume large enough to fit conventional 5 mm NMR tubes where the high field homogeneity allowed us to measure proton NMR spectra of different solvents with a resolution better than 0.16 ppm at 30 MHz. By scaling the dimensions of the magnet the same geometry was optimized to build a portable MRI scanner for imaging samples of 4 cm DSV 1.

  4. Compact magnet array for portable high-resolution NMR and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portable NMR probes built from permanent magnets offer several advantages over conventional NMR systems. However, the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field generated by these sensors precludes their use in high resolution NMR spectroscopy and MRI. Recently we have demonstrated that the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field can be removed by providing the sensor with movable permanent magnets which allows generating and controlling harmonic field corrections by a mechanical shimming approach. In this work we present a high-performance magnet design based on this concept, which enables us to reduce the size of the magnet keeping the field strength and the sample volume constant. In particular, it was used to build a palm size magnet working in a volume large enough to fit conventional 5 mm NMR tubes where the high field homogeneity allowed us to measure proton NMR spectra of different solvents with a resolution better than 0.16 ppm at 30 MHz. By scaling the dimensions of the magnet the same geometry was optimized to build a portable MRI scanner for imaging samples of 4 cm DSV 1.

  5. A novel sparse boosting method for crater detection in the high resolution planetary image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Impact craters distributed on planetary surface become one of the main barriers during the soft landing of planetary probes. In order to accelerate the crater detection, in this paper, we present a new sparse boosting (SparseBoost) method for automatic detection of sub-kilometer craters. The SparseBoost method integrates an improved sparse kernel density estimator (RSDE-WL1) into the Boost algorithm and the RSDE-WL1 estimator is achieved by introducing weighted l1 penalty term into the reduced set density estimator. An iterative algorithm is proposed to implement the RSDE-WL1. The SparseBoost algorithm has the advantage of fewer selected features and simpler representation of the weak classifiers compared with the Boost algorithm. Our SparseBoost based crater detection method is evaluated on a large and high resolution image of Martian surface. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve less computational complexity in comparison with other crater detection methods in terms of selected features.

  6. The High-Resolution Doppler Imager: status update 12 years after launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Wilbert R.; Marshall, Alan R.; Gell, David A.; Raines, Jim

    2003-11-01

    The High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) has been measuring winds in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere since November, 1991. The winds are determined by measuring the Doppler shift of emission and absorption lines in the O2 Atmospheric Band that are located between 630 and 762 nm. HRDI is a triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer that has a resolution of ~0.05 cm-1 and very good white light rejection. A multi-channel detector with 31 channels is used to examine a spectral region 0.5 cm-1 wide and an adjustable filter wheel permits the selection of any one of 13 spectral bands. The long life of this instrument has presented many challenges in keeping the calibrations current and in compensating for inevitable degradations in instrument and spacecraft performance. Some of the problems with the UARS spacecraft the affect HRDI operations are: limited power due to the solar array drive failure; loss of data resulting from a failure of the tape recorders, and loss of attitude knowledge caused by the failure of the star trackers. HRDI has shown little loss in capability over the years with only a decrease in the azimuth rate of the telescope motor a significant sign of aging. This paper will discuss some of these challenges and how they have been met.

  7. High-resolution mechanical imaging of glioblastoma by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To generate high-resolution maps of the viscoelastic properties of human brain parenchyma for presurgical quantitative assessment in glioblastoma (GB. METHODS: Twenty-two GB patients underwent routine presurgical work-up supplemented by additional multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography. Two three-dimensional viscoelastic parameter maps, magnitude |G*|, and phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus were reconstructed by inversion of full wave field data in 2-mm isotropic resolution at seven harmonic drive frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 Hz. RESULTS: Mechanical brain maps confirmed that GB are composed of stiff and soft compartments, resulting in high intratumor heterogeneity. GB could be easily differentiated from healthy reference tissue by their reduced viscous behavior quantified by φ (0.37±0.08 vs. 0.58±0.07. |G*|, which in solids more relates to the material's stiffness, was significantly reduced in GB with a mean value of 1.32±0.26 kPa compared to 1.54±0.27 kPa in healthy tissue (P = 0.001. However, some GB (5 of 22 showed increased stiffness. CONCLUSION: GB are generally less viscous and softer than healthy brain parenchyma. Unrelated to the morphology-based contrast of standard magnetic resonance imaging, elastography provides an entirely new neuroradiological marker and contrast related to the biomechanical properties of tumors.

  8. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Davis, D S; Perlman, E S; Wise, M; Canizares, C R; Harris, D E

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton mo...

  9. Direct imaging of CdTe(001) surface reconstructions by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Smith, David J.

    1991-08-01

    Novel reconstructions of the CdTe(001) surface have been directly observed using high-resolution electron microscopy in the profile-imaging geometry. The CdTe(001) surface, obtained by in situ annealing under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, is found to have a (2 × 1) structure at temperatures of less than about 200° C, but it transforms reversibly into a (3 × 1) structure at temperatures above 200 °C. Structural models for the reconstructions have been proposed and confirmed by extensive computer simulations. The (2 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Cd atoms, consists of a {1}/{2} monolayer of Cd vacancies and a large inward relaxation of the remaining surface Cd atoms, similar to the (2 × 1) reconstruction previously proposed for the GaAs(001) surface. The (3 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Te atoms, involves formation of surface dimers and the presence of vacancies. In both reconstructions, atomic displacements are observed that extend a few layers into the bulk and serve to reduce the strain energy.

  10. Expressway deformation mapping using high-resolution TerraSAR-X images

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xuguo

    2014-01-27

    Monitoring deformation of linear infrastructures such as expressway and railway caused by natural processes or anthropogenic activities is a vital task to ensure the safety of human lives and properties. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has been widely recognized as an effective technology to carry out large-area surface deformation mapping. However, its application in linear infrastructure deformation monitoring has not been intensively studied till now. In this article, a modified Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) method is proposed to retrieve the deformation patterns of the expressway. In our method, only the point-like targets identified on the expressway were kept in our analysis, and two complementary subsets of interferograms were formed to better separate the signals of height error and deformation from inteferometric phase observations. We successfully applied this method with multitemporal high-resolution TerraSAR-X images to retrieve the spatialoral pattern of surface deformation along the Beian-Heihe expressway that is located in island-permafrost areas and threatened by geohazards. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  11. High-Resolution Chandra X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sigma Orionis Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Cohen, D H; Gagné, M; Owocki, S P; Townsend, R D

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the primary CCD (ACIS-S3). All but five have near-IR or optical counterparts and about one-fourth are variable. Notable high-mass stellar detections are sigma Ori AB, the magnetic B star sigma Ori E, and the B5V binary HD 37525. Most of the other detections have properties consistent with lower mass K or M-type stars. We present the first X-ray spectrum of the unusual infrared source IRS1 located 3.3 arc-sec north of sigma Ori AB, which is likely an embedded T Tauri star whose disk/envelope is being photoevaporated by sigma Or...

  12. Quantitative accuracy of serotonergic neurotransmission imaging with high-resolution 123I SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging can be used to study the role of regional abnormalities of neurotransmitter release in various mental disorders and to study the mechanism of action of therapeutic drugs or drugs' abuse. We examine the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility that can be achieved with high-resolution SPECT of serotonergic neurotransmission. Method: Binding potential (BP) of 123I labeled tracer specific for midbrain SERT was assessed in 20 healthy persons. The effects of scatter, attenuation, partial volume, misregistration and statistical noise were estimated using phantom and human studies. Results: Without any correction, BP was underestimated by 73%. The partial volume error was the major component in this underestimation whereas the most critical error for the reproducibility was misplacement of region of interest (ROI). Conclusion: The proper ROI registration, the use of the multiple head gamma camera with transmission based scatter correction introduce more relevant results. However, due to the small dimensions of the midbrain SERT structures and poor spatial resolution of SPECT, the improvement without the partial volume correction is not great enough to restore the estimate of BP to that of the true one. (orig.)

  13. Miniaturization high-resolution NUV-VIS-NIR imaging spectrometer array for FAST SAT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torr, D.G. [Science and Engineering Associates Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Zukic, M.; Feng, C.; Ahmad, A.; Swift, W. [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors report here the design of an instrument needed to study processes relevant to the natural destruction of ozone in the upper atmosphere. They report the design of a miniature Imaging Spectrometer Array (ISA) for observations of the daytime and nighttime mesosphere, capable of operating in a spectral range extending from the near-ultraviolet (NUV) to the near-infrared (NIR). The instrument comprises an array of f/2 all-reflective imaging spectrometers with a 6{degree} field of view. The design comprises an offset single aspheric toroidal telescope mirror, a slit, an offset aspheric toroidal collimator, a plane reflective grating and a camera with three offset decentered aspheric mirrors. The optical system has a 75 mm effective focal length and ca. 7.5 {micro}m spot size. The slit image curvature distortion for the system is <7.5 {micro}m. Sampling of the image plane is provided by a 1317x1035 spatial x spectral pixel CCD array with 6.8 {micro}m x 6.8 {micro}m pixel size. Three modules of the array cover the wavelength range 260 to 400 and 550 to 870 nm at 0.3 nm spectral resolution. One high resolution module covers the range 306 to 310 at 0.05 nm resolution. The readout electronics software allows the 1317 spatial pixels to be summed into any number of selectable bin sizes incurring a single read per bin. Since much of the full slit sensitivity is attributable to the large (6{degree}) field of view, the slit could be slanted with respect to the vertical, in order to enhance the sensitivity per vertical spatial bin, at the cost of some horizontal smearing. The instrument offers a powerful means for conducting comprehensive spectroscopy studies of the lower thermosphere and mesosphere, since the overall performance is better than that of the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) flown on the ATLAS 1 shuttle mission in 1992. The weight and size reduction from the ISO to the ISA are approximately 270 kg to <15 kg, and 20 cu ft to 1 cu ft respectively.

  14. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  15. High resolution image reconstruction method for a double-plane PET system with changeable spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Zhou, Wei; Li, Lin; Wei, Long; Yin, Peng-Fei; Shang, Lei-Min; Yun, Ming-Kai; Lu, Zhen-Rui; Huang, Xian-Chao

    2016-05-01

    Breast-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques have been developed in recent years. Their capacities to detect millimeter-sized breast tumors have been the subject of many studies. Some of them have been confirmed with good results in clinical applications. With regard to biopsy application, a double-plane detector arrangement is practicable, as it offers the convenience of breast immobilization. However, the serious blurring effect of the double-plane PET, with changeable spacing for different breast sizes, should be studied. We investigated a high resolution reconstruction method applicable for a double-plane PET. The distance between the detector planes is changeable. Geometric and blurring components were calculated in real-time for different detector distances, and accurate geometric sensitivity was obtained with a new tube area model. Resolution recovery was achieved by estimating blurring effects derived from simulated single gamma response information. The results showed that the new geometric modeling gave a more finite and smooth sensitivity weight in the double-plane PET. The blurring component yielded contrast recovery levels that could not be reached without blurring modeling, and improved visual recovery of the smallest spheres and better delineation of the structures in the reconstructed images were achieved with the blurring component. Statistical noise had lower variance at the voxel level with blurring modeling at matched resolution, compared to without blurring modeling. In distance-changeable double-plane PET, finite resolution modeling during reconstruction achieved resolution recovery, without noise amplification. Supported by Knowledge Innovation Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-EW-N06)

  16. Miscellaneous High-Resolution Seismic Imaging Investigations in Salt Lake and Utah Valleys for Earthquake Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Worley, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies by researchers at the Utah Geological Survey, University of Utah, Utah State University, Brigham Young University, and San Diego State University, the U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Hazards Team Intermountain West Project conducted three high-resolution seismic imaging investigations along the Wasatch Front between September 2003 and September 2005. These three investigations include: (1) a proof-of-concept P-wave minivib reflection imaging profile in south-central Salt Lake Valley, (2) a series of seven deep (as deep as 400 m) S-wave reflection/refraction soundings using an S-wave minivib in both Salt Lake and Utah Valleys, and (3) an S-wave (and P-wave) investigation to 30 m at four sites in Utah Valley and at two previously investigated S-wave (Vs) minivib sites. In addition, we present results from a previously unpublished downhole S-wave investigation conducted at four sites in Utah Valley. The locations for each of these investigations are shown in figure 1. Coordinates for the investigation sites are listed in Table 1. With the exception of the P-wave common mid-point (CMP) reflection profile, whose end points are listed, these coordinates are for the midpoint of each velocity sounding. Vs30 and Vs100, also shown in Table 1, are defined as the average shear-wave velocities to depths of 30 and 100 m, respectively, and details of their calculation can be found in Stephenson and others (2005). The information from these studies will be incorporated into components of the urban hazards maps along the Wasatch Front being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, Utah Geological Survey, and numerous collaborating research institutions.

  17. Ultra-compact, High Resolution, LADAR system for 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop an innovative, ultra-compact, high resolution, long range LADAR system to produce a 3D map of the exterior of any object in space such as...

  18. Improving high resolution retinal image quality using speckle illumination HiLo imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Retinal image quality from flood illumination adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopes is adversely affected by out-of-focus light scatter due to the lack of confocality. This effect is more pronounced in small eyes, such as that of rodents, because the requisite high optical power confers a large dioptric thickness to the retina. A recently-developed structured illumination microscopy (SIM) technique called HiLo imaging has been shown to reduce the effect of out-of-focus light scatter in flood i...

  19. High-Resolution Imaging of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    To date, seismic experiments have been key in our understanding of the internal structure of volcanic systems. However, most experiments, especially subaerial-based, are often restricted to refraction geometries with limited numbers of sources and receivers, and employ smoothing constraints required by tomographic inversions that produce smoothed and blurry images with spatial resolutions well below the length scale of important features that define these magmatic systems. Taking advantage of the high density of sources and receivers from multichannel seismic (MCS) data should, in principle, allow detailed images of velocity and reflectivity to be recovered. Unfortunately, the depth of mid-ocean ridges has the detrimental effect of concealing critical velocity information behind the seafloor reflection, preventing first arrival travel-time tomographic approaches from imaging the shallowest and most heterogeneous part of the crust. To overcome the limitations of the acquisition geometry, here we are using an innovative multistep approach. We combine a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 3-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and a reverse time migration (RTM) formalism, and present one of the most detailed imagery to date of a massive and complex magmatic system beneath Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano that lies at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. We present high-resolution images along 12 seismic lines that span the volcano. We refine the extent/volume of the main crustal magma reservoir that lies beneath the central caldera. We investigate the extent, volume and physical state of a secondary magma body present to the southwest and study its connections with the main magma reservoir. Additionally, we present a 3D tomographic model of the entire volcano that reveals a subsiding caldera floor that provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows, supporting a "trapdoor

  20. Determination of Destructed and Infracted Forest Areas with Multi-temporal High Resolution Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, D. Z.; Unal, A.; Kaya, S.; Alganci, U.

    2015-12-01

    Migration from rural areas to city centers and their surroundings is an important problem of not only our country but also the countries that under development stage. This uncontrolled and huge amount of migration brings out urbanization and socio - economic problems. The demand on settling the industrial areas and commercial activities nearby the city centers results with a negative change in natural land cover on cities. Negative impacts of human induced activities on natural resources and land cover has been continuously increasing for decades. The main human activities that resulted with destruction and infraction of forest areas can be defined as mining activities, agricultural activities, industrial / commercial activities and urbanization. Temporal monitoring of the changes in spatial distribution of forest areas is significantly important for effective management and planning progress. Changes can occur as spatially large destructions or small infractions. Therefore there is a need for reliable, fast and accurate data sources. At this point, satellite images proved to be a good data source for determination of the land use /cover changes with their capability of monitoring large areas with reasonable temporal resolutions. Spectral information derived from images provides discrimination of land use/cover types from each other. Developments in remote sensing technology in the last decade improved the spatial resolution of satellites and high resolution images were started to be used to detect even small changes in the land surface. As being the megacity of Turkey, Istanbul has been facing a huge migration for the last 20 years and effects of urbanization and other human based activities over forest areas are significant. Main focus of this study is to determine the destructions and infractions in forest areas of Istanbul, Turkey with 2.5m resolution SPOT 5 multi-temporal satellite imagery. Analysis was mainly constructed on threshold based classification of

  1. Ultra-Wideband Vivaldi Antenna Array for High Resolution Subsurface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Cresp, A.; Pichot, C.; Aliferis, I.; Dauvignac, J.; Fortino, N.; Gaffet, S.

    2008-05-01

    Use of ultra-wideband electromagnetic waves to image the subsurface yields enhanced resolution, provided sources, antennas and recording equipment can be developed and calibrated over the complete bandwidth of interest. We present a demonstration of the latest microwave transmission and recording technology to obtain high-resolution images. Our transmitter and receiver electronics are embodied in the vector network analyzer (PNA series) from Agilent, an eight-port vector network analyzer that records amplitude and phase. The analyzer is connected through a microwave multiplexer and microwave switch to an 8 element, balanced, antipodal Vivaldi antenna array, which can transmit or receive data over a bandwidth from 1.3 to 20 GHz. The bandwidth of the integrated system is determined by the bandwidth of the microwave switch, from DC to 18GHz, which interfaces the multiplexer to the PNA. The capabilities of a microwave multiplexer are employed to collect multi-channel data, by using one channel for transmission and reception on all 8 channels. The demonstration of this integrated system will be focussed on scattering from a single conducting cylinder as well as two cylinders, a dielectric and conducting cylinder, spaced at different intervals. The increased bandwidth, over that obtained in conventional GPR recording will result in pulses that have little ringing, allowing the detection of deeper reflections and eliminating any post-processing distortions that arise from deconvolving the traditional oscillatory waveform. Although the demonstration will be presented in the GHz bandwidth, suitable for imaging over a length scale to 1m, this integrated system will scale to lower bandwidths and can operate from 100 MHz to 3 GHz, with a resultant penetration depth of 10 to 20 m depending on the subsurface properties. Given the electronic constraints of the switch and the PNA, this scaling is simply achieved by enlarging the Vivaldi antenna dimensions. The advantage of using

  2. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  3. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and rangeland science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C. A.; Perini, N. A.; Saripalli, S.; Laliberte, A.

    2012-12-01

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low flight altitudes and velocities, UAVs are able to produce high resolution (5 cm) images as well as stereo coverage (with 75% forward overlap and 40% sidelap) to extract digital elevation models (DEM). Another advantage of flying at low altitude is that the potential problems of atmospheric haze obscuration are eliminated. Both small fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft have been used in our experiments over two rangeland areas in the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico and the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. The fixed-wing UAV has a digital camera in the wing and six-band multispectral camera in the nose, while the rotary-wing UAV carries a digital camera as payload. Because we have been acquiring imagery for several years, there are now > 31,000 photos at one of the study sites, and 177 mosaics over rangeland areas have been constructed. Using the DEM obtained from the imagery we have determined the actual catchment areas of three watersheds and compared these to previous estimates. At one site, the UAV-derived watershed area is 4.67 ha which is 22% smaller compared to a manual survey using a GPS unit obtained several years ago. This difference can be significant in constructing a watershed model of the site. From a vegetation species classification, we also determined that two of the shrub types in this small watershed(mesquite and creosote with 6.47 % and 5.82% cover, respectively) grow in similar locations(flat upland areas with deep soils), whereas the most predominant shrub(mariola with 11.9% cover) inhabits hillslopes near stream channels(with steep shallow soils). The positioning of these individual shrubs throughout the catchment using

  4. Efficacy of High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Preoperative Local Staging of Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysun Uçar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI for preoperative local staging in patients with rectal cancer who did not receive preoperative radiochemotherapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, 30 patients with biopsy proved primary rectal cancer were evaluated by HRMRI. Two observers independently scored the tumour and lymph node stages, and circumferential resection margin (CRM involvement. The sensitivity, specificity, the negative predictive value and the positive predictive value of HRMRI findings were calculated within the 95% confidence interval. The area under the curve was measured for each result. Agreement between two observers was assessed by means of the Kappa test. Results: In T staging the accuracy rate of HRMRI was 47-67%, overstaging was 10-21%, and understaging was 13-43%. In the prediction of extramural invasion with HRMRI, the sensitivity was 79-89%, the specificity was 72-100%, the PPV was 85-100%, the NPV was 73-86%, and the area under the curve was 0.81-0.89. In the prediction of lymph node metastasis, the sensitivity was 58-58%, the specificity was 50-55%, the PPV was 43-46%, and the NPV was 64-66%. The area under the curve was 0.54-0.57. When the cut off value was selected as 1 mm, the sensitivity of HRMRI was 38-42%, the specificity was 73-82%, the PPV was 33-42%, and NPV was 79-81% in the prediction of the CRM involvement. The correlation between the two observers was moderate for tumour staging, substantial for lymph node staging and predicting of CRM involvement. Conclusion: Preoperative HRMRI provides good predictive data for extramural invasion but poor prediction of lymph node status and CRM involvement.

  5. DISENTANGLING THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR ENVIRONS OF CENTAURUS A. I. HIGH-RESOLUTION MOLECULAR GAS IMAGING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present high-resolution images of the 12CO(2-1) emission in the central 1' (1 kpc) of NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), observed using the Submillimeter Array. We elucidate for the first time the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in this region with a resolution of 6.''0 x 2.''4 (100 pc x 40 pc). We spatially resolve the circumnuclear molecular gas in the inner 24''x 12'' (400 pc x 200 pc), which is elongated along a position angle of P.A. ≅155 deg. and perpendicular to the radio/X-ray jet. The southeast (SE) and northwest (NW) components of the circumnuclear gas are connected to molecular gas found at larger radii. This gas appears as two parallel filaments at P.A. = 120 deg., which are coextensive with the long sides of the 3 kpc parallelogram shape of the previously observed dust continuum, as well as ionized and pure rotational H2 lines. Spatial and kinematical asymmetries are apparent in both the circumnuclear and outer gas, suggesting noncoplanar and/or noncircular motions. We extend to inner radii (r12CO(2 - 1) observations show relevant deviations from this model: namely, the physical connection between the circumnuclear gas and that at larger radii, brighter SE and NW sides on the parallelogram-shaped feature, and an outer curvature of its long sides. Overall, it resembles more closely an S-shaped morphology, a trend that is also found in other molecular species. Hence, we qualitatively explore the possible contribution of a weak bi-symmetric potential which would naturally explain these peculiarities.

  6. A three-axis high-resolution capacitive tactile imager system based on floating comb electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, R.; Guo, Q.; Xie, Y.; Young, D. J.; Mastrangelo, C. H.

    2013-07-01

    We present the design, fabrication and testing of a high-resolution 169-sensing cell capacitive flexible tactile imager (FTI) for normal and shear stress measurement as an auxiliary sensor for robotic grippers and gait analysis. The FTI consists of a flexible high-density array of normal stress and two-dimensional shear stress sensors fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) techniques. The drive/sense lines of the FTI are realized using FPCB whereas the floating electrodes (Au) are patterned on a compressible PDMS layer spin coated on the FPCB layer. The use of unconnected floating electrodes significantly improves the reliability of traditional quad-electrode contact sensing devices by eliminating the need for patterning electrical wiring on PDMS. When placed at the heel of a boot, this FTI senses the position and motion of the line of contact with the ground. Normal stress readouts are obtained from the net capacitance of the cell and the shear-sense direction is determined by the amount of asymmetric overlap of the floating combs with respect to the bottom electrodes. The FTI is characterized using a high-speed switched-capacitor circuit with a 12-bit resolution at full frame rates of 100 Hz (˜0.8 Mb s-1) capable of resolving a displacement as low as 60 µm. The FTI and the readout circuitry contribute to a noise/interference level of 5 mV and the sensitivity of normal and shear stress for the FTI is 0.38 MPa-1 and 79.5 GPa-1 respectively.

  7. A three-axis high-resolution capacitive tactile imager system based on floating comb electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, fabrication and testing of a high-resolution 169-sensing cell capacitive flexible tactile imager (FTI) for normal and shear stress measurement as an auxiliary sensor for robotic grippers and gait analysis. The FTI consists of a flexible high-density array of normal stress and two-dimensional shear stress sensors fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) techniques. The drive/sense lines of the FTI are realized using FPCB whereas the floating electrodes (Au) are patterned on a compressible PDMS layer spin coated on the FPCB layer. The use of unconnected floating electrodes significantly improves the reliability of traditional quad-electrode contact sensing devices by eliminating the need for patterning electrical wiring on PDMS. When placed at the heel of a boot, this FTI senses the position and motion of the line of contact with the ground. Normal stress readouts are obtained from the net capacitance of the cell and the shear-sense direction is determined by the amount of asymmetric overlap of the floating combs with respect to the bottom electrodes. The FTI is characterized using a high-speed switched-capacitor circuit with a 12-bit resolution at full frame rates of 100 Hz (∼0.8 Mb s−1) capable of resolving a displacement as low as 60 µm. The FTI and the readout circuitry contribute to a noise/interference level of 5 mV and the sensitivity of normal and shear stress for the FTI is 0.38 MPa−1 and 79.5 GPa−1 respectively. (paper)

  8. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation—relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target—it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  9. High-resolution MR imaging of periarterial edema associated with biological inflammation in spontaneous carotid dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naggara, Olivier; Marsico, Rodolpho; Meder, Jean-Francois; Oppenheim, Catherine [Paris-Descartes University, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Touze, Emmanuel; Mas, Jean-Louis [Paris-Descartes University, Department of Neurology, Paris (France); Leclerc, Xavier; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre [University Hospital Roger Salengro, Department of Neuroradiology, Lille (France); Nguyen, Thanh [Boston University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    It has been suggested that spontaneous cervical carotid artery dissection (sCAD) may result from arterial inflammation. Periarterial edema (PAE), occasionally described in the vicinity of the mural hematoma in patients with sCAD, may support this hypothesis. Using cervical high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, three readers, blinded to the mechanism of carotid artery dissection, searched for PAE, defined as periarterial T2-hyperintensity and T1-hypointensity, in 29 consecutive CAD patients categorized as spontaneous CAD (sCAD, n = 18) or traumatic CAD (tCAD, n = 11; i.e., major head or neck trauma within 2 weeks before the clinical onset). The relationships between PAE, inflammatory biological markers, history of infection and CAD mechanism were explored. Multiple CADs (n = 8) were found only in sCAD patients. Compared with tCAD, patients with sCAD were more likely to have a recent history of infection (OR = 12.5 [{sub 95%}CI = 1.3-119], p = 0.03), PAE (83% vs. 27%; OR = 13.3 [{sub 95%}CI = 2.2-82.0], p = 0.005) and to have elevated CRP (OR = 6.1 [{sub 95%}CI = 1.2-32.1], p = 0.0002) or ESR (OR = 8.8 [{sub 95%}CI = 1.5-50.1], p = 0.002) values. Interobserver agreement was 0.84 or higher for PAE identification. sCAD was associated with PAE and biological inflammation. Our results support the hypothesis of an underlying arterial inflammation in sCAD. (orig.)

  10. Radioisotope guided surgery with imaging probe, a hand-held high-resolution gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1997, our group of Physics together with Nuclear Physicians studies imaging probes (IP), hand-held, high-resolution gamma cameras for radio-guided surgery (RGS). Present work is aimed to verify the usefulness of two updated IP in different surgical operations. Forty patients scheduled for breast cancer sentinel node (SN) biopsy, five patients with nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer, seven patients with parathyroid adenomas, five patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET), were operated under the guide of IP. We used two different IP with field of view of 1 and 4 in.2, respectively and intrinsic spatial resolution of about 2 mm. Radioisotopes were 99mTc, 123I and 111In. The 1 in.2 IP detected SN in all the 40 patients and more than one node in 24, whereas anger camera (AC) failed locating SN in four patients and detected true positive second nodes in only nine patients. The 4 in.2 IP was used for RGS of thyroid, parathyroid and NETs. It detected eight latero-cervical nodes. In the same patients, AC detected five invaded nodes. Parathyroid adenomas detected by IP were 10 in 7 patients, NET five in five patients. One and 4 in.2 IPs showed usefulness in all operations. Initial studies on SN biopsy were carried out on small series of patients to validate IP and to demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of IP alone or against conventional probes. We propose the use of the IP as control method for legal documentation and surgeon strategy guide before and after lesion(s) removal

  11. Assessing coastline exploitation from multitemporal medium-high resolution images: Jintang Island, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Pan, Delu; Chen, Jianyu; Chen, Qi; Jia, Shifeng

    2015-10-01

    Jintang Island, located in Zhoushan archipelago New Area, China, covers an area of ~76.4 km2. As the closest island to connecting the continental shore of Zhejiang and the eastern Zhoushan Island after the project of Zhoushan Tran-Oceanic Bridges, it has experienced great change during the past 40 years, and however little attention was paid to evaluate the coastline exploitation of Jintang Island. In this paper the coastline position was firstly extracted by combining histogram thresholding and band ratio techniques with visual interpretation supplemented, based on multitemporal medium-high resolution imagery from 1970 to 2011. And then the coastline exploitation degree for different periods was quantified from three index, coastline complexity, coastline artificial intensity and coastal use. The uncertainty for coastline extraction was controlled in one-pixel for each image. The results show that the position of coastline accreted seaward since 1970. As the natural coastline was straightened, the proportion of artificial coastline has surpassed the natural coastline after 1992. Until 2011, the dominant coastline type has been changed as artificial coastline, mainly covering urban/industrial and port coast. The calculated coastline exploitation degree of Jintang Island in 1970, 1992, 2003 and 2011 is 0.637, 0.719, 0.734 and 0.929 respectively, showing an uptrend. Part 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8 of the total coastline are relatively higher than other parts, and this generally coincides with the distribution of deep ports. It indicates that natural conditions and human policies may contribute to increasing coastline exploitation from 1970 to 2011. And Jintang Island is facing great human intervention for reclaiming more coastal land to develop the marine economy.

  12. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  13. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  14. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew D. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto d' Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer A., E-mail: vsmith@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  15. High-Resolution Imaging System of Small Satellite%小卫星高分辨率成像系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林来兴

    2011-01-01

    对小卫星对地观测高分辨率成像系统进行了综述。介绍了国内外有极高分辨率(0.5~1.0m)、高分辨率(1.8~2.5m)和中高分辨率(4-10m)小卫星光学成像系统的性能,并与合成孔径雷达(SAR)成像系统进行了比较。给出了小卫星光学成像系统、SAR高分辨率成像系统和卫星平台的关键技术。讨论了未来小卫星及其高分辨率成像系统技术的发展趋势。%The high resolution imaging system of small satellite for earth observation was reviewed in this paper. The performances of the optical imaging system of the small satellite with very high resolution 0.5-1.0 m, highresolution 1.8-2.5 m and medial-high resolution 4-10 m were introduced and compared with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system. The key technologies of the optical imaging system, SAR high-resolution imaging system and platform in the small satellite were given out, The technology development trends of the small satellite and its high resolution imaging system were discussed.

  16. Developing a platform for high-resolution phase contrast imaging of high pressure shock waves in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schropp, Andreas; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Arnold, Brice; Galtier, Eric C.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2012-10-01

    Current and upcoming X-ray sources, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC, USA), the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser (SACLA, Japan), or the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, Germany) will provide X-ray beams with outstanding properties.1, 2 Short and intense X-ray pulses of about 50 fs time duration and even shorter will push X-ray science to new frontiers such as, e. g., in high-resolution X-ray imaging, high-energy-density physics or in dynamical studies based on pump-probe techniques. Fast processes in matter often require high-resolution imaging capabilities either by magnified imaging in direct space or diffractive imaging in reciprocal space. In both cases highest resolutions require focusing the X-ray beam.3, 4 In order to further develop high-resolution imaging at free-electron laser sources we are planning a platform to carry out high-resolution phase contrast imaging experiments based on Beryllium compound refractive X-ray lenses (Be-CRLs) at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the LCLS. The instrument provides all necessary equipment to induce high pressure shock waves by optical lasers. The propagation of a shock wave is then monitored with an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) pulse by magnified phase contrast imaging. With the CRL optics, X-ray beam sizes in the sub-100nm range are expected, leading to a similar spatial resolution in the direct coherent projection image. The experiment combines different state-of-the art scientific techniques that are currently available at the LCLS. In this proceedings paper we describe the technical developments carried out at the LCLS in order to implement magnified X-ray phase contrast imaging at the MEC endstation.

  17. Image Fusion-Based Change Detection for Flood Extent Extraction Using Bi-Temporal Very High-Resolution Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younggi Byun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Change detection based on satellite images acquired from an area at different dates is of widespread interest, according to the increasing number of flood-related disasters. The images help to generate products that support emergency response and flood management at a global scale. In this paper, a novel unsupervised change detection approach based on image fusion is introduced. The approach aims to extract the reliable flood extent from very high-resolution (VHR bi-temporal images. The method takes an advantage of the spectral distortion that occurs during image fusion process to detect the change areas by flood. To this end, a change candidate image is extracted from the fused image generated with bi-temporal images by considering a local spectral distortion. This can be done by employing a universal image quality index (UIQI, which is a measure for local evaluation of spectral distortion. The decision threshold for the determination of changed pixels is set by applying a probability mixture model to the change candidate image based on expectation maximization (EM algorithm. We used bi-temporal KOMPSAT-2 satellite images to detect the flooded area in the city of N′djamena in Chad. The performance of the proposed method was visually and quantitatively compared with existing change detection methods. The results showed that the proposed method achieved an overall accuracy (OA = 75.04 close to that of the support vector machine (SVM-based supervised change detection method. Moreover, the proposed method showed a better performance in differentiating the flooded area and the permanent water body compared to the existing change detection methods.

  18. High-resolution seismic imaging, Mono Lake fault zone, eastern Sierra region, Walker Lane, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A. S.; Childs, J. R.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Multiple strands of the Mono Lake fault zone (MLfz), a segment of the Sierra Nevada frontal fault zone, have been imaged on several high-resolution seismic reflection profiles collected during 2009 and 2011 at Mono Lake. The profiles show coherent reflectors to about 30-40 ms depth below the lake bottom (~30 m thick section) in nearshore areas north of the Lee Vining delta. The MLfz is well imaged on 8 lines including 4 lines ~normal to the trend of the fault zone. The fault zone is ~ 0.75 km wide. Deep reflection horizons appear gently tilted and rotated into the fault zone with a prominent clastic wedge overlying the west-tilted horizons. Shallow reflectors above the clastic wedge are generally east-sloping, but noticeably less inclined above the fault zone. At least two ruptures offset Holocene deposits, with ~0.5-1.8 m dip-slip offset around 2.5 ka and ~3.6-6.13 m dip-slip offset around 4.7 to 6.25 ka. The ages of reflection horizons are estimated using published Holocene and late Pleistocene sedimentation rates, as well as correlation with a published nearby shallow core. The short term fault slip rate based on the timing of the most recent event and multiple events in the profile lines suggests fault slip rates of about 0.26 to 0.55 m/ka using ages based only on sedimentation rate and of about 0.31 to 0.34 m/ka using correlation ages from nearby shallow core. This offshore dip-slip rate is significantly lower than previous published 1.0-2.0 m/ka dip-slip rates estimated using cosmogenic dating of Tioga glacial moraines in Lundy Canyon and offset older moraines. The offset on the large scarp in Lundy Canyon (~20 m) decreases both north and south of the canyon and flanking lateral moraines where the scarp is on the order of only ~4-7 m high. A possible explanation for the apparent difference in MLfz slip rates onshore and offshore in this part of Mono Basin may be soft sediment deformation of saturated glacial-deltaic sediment within Lundy Canyon that causes

  19. A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Stephey, L. A.; Biedermann, C.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Dunn, J. P.; Gamradt, M.

    2016-11-01

    A high-resolution imaging system, consisting of megapixel mid-IR and visible cameras along the same line of sight, has been prepared for the new W7-X stellarator and was operated during Operational Period 1.1 to view one of the five inboard graphite limiters. The radial line of sight, through a large diameter (184 mm clear aperture) uncoated sapphire window, couples a direct viewing 1344 × 784 pixel FLIR SC8303HD camera. A germanium beam-splitter sends visible light to a 1024 × 1024 pixel Allied Vision Technologies Prosilica GX1050 color camera. Both achieve sub-millimeter resolution on the 161 mm wide, inertially cooled, segmented graphite tiles. The IR and visible cameras are controlled via optical fibers over full Camera Link and dual GigE Ethernet (2 Gbit/s data rates) interfaces, respectively. While they are mounted outside the cryostat at a distance of 3.2 m from the limiter, they are close to a large magnetic trim coil and require soft iron shielding. We have taken IR data at 125 Hz to 1.25 kHz frame rates and seen that surface temperature increases in excess of 350 °C, especially on leading edges or defect hot spots. The IR camera sees heat-load stripe patterns on the limiter and has been used to infer limiter power fluxes (˜1-4.5 MW/m2), during the ECRH heating phase. IR images have also been used calorimetrically between shots to measure equilibrated bulk tile temperature, and hence tile energy inputs (in the range of 30 kJ/tile with 0.6 MW, 6 s heating pulses). Small UFO's can be seen and tracked by the FLIR camera in some discharges. The calibrated visible color camera (100 Hz frame rate) has also been equipped with narrow band C-III and H-alpha filters, to compare with other diagnostics, and is used for absolute particle flux determination from the limiter surface. Sometimes, but not always, hot-spots in the IR are also seen to be bright in C-III light.

  20. Framland parcels extraction from high-resolution remote sensing images based on the two-stage image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoying; Song, Xu; Lv, Jing

    2015-12-01

    It is difficult and boring for people to artificially extract farmland parcels from high resolution remote sensing images. Therefore, automatic methods are in the urgent need to release image interpreters from such a work as well as achieve accurate results. In the past years, although many researchers have made attempts to solve this problem by using different techniques and also produced some good results, they still cannot meet the demand of practical applications. In this paper, a farmland extraction method is proposed based on a new technique of two-stage image classification. The first stage aims at producing a map of farmland area by using the supervised iterative conditional mode (ICM), where a novel mixture posterior is proposed based on the tree-structured interpretation of certain complex landscapes, e.g., farmland and building area, and the Markov random field model (MRF) is also used to make use of spatial information between neighboring pixels. The second stage extracts the farmland parcels by using the Meanshift algorithm (MS) based on the hybrid of the original image and the texture image produced by the local binary pattern (LBP) method. We applied our method to a piece of aerial image in the urban area of Taizhou, China. The results show that the proposed method has an ability to produce more accurate results than the MS method.

  1. Masterpieces unmasked: New high-resolution infrared cameras produce rich, detailed images of artwork, and create new controversies

    CERN Multimedia

    Marshall, J

    2002-01-01

    Luca Pezzati is a physicist who heads a group called Art Diagnostics, which is a part of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, an institute devoted to the research and conservation of artworks in Italy. Pezzati and his group use high-resolution infrared scanning device to produce colour images of what lies below the surface of paintings. Their scanner is able to produce the best-known quality of images without harming the painting under examination (1 page).

  2. Gemini Planet Imager Observational Calibrations III: Empirical Measurement Methods and Applications of High-Resolution Microlens PSFs

    OpenAIRE

    Ingraham, Patrick; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Perrin, Marshall D.; Wolff, Schuyler G.; Draper, Zachary H.; Maire, Jerome; Marchis, Franck; Fesquet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The newly commissioned Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) combines extreme adaptive optics, an advanced coronagraph, precision wavefront control and a lenslet-based integral field spectrograph (IFS) to measure the spectra of young extrasolar giant planets between 0.9-2.5 um. Each GPI detector image, when in spectral model, consists of ~37,000 microspectra which are under or critically sampled in the spatial direction. This paper demonstrates how to obtain high-resolution microlens PSFs and discusses ...

  3. Chemical Abundances in Field Red Giants from High-Resolution H-Band Spectra using the APOGEE Spectral Linelist

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Verne V; Shetrone, Matthew D; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Perez, Ana Garcia; Majewski, Steven R; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the SDSS III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes 12C, 13C, 14N, and 16O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to ~0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is, thus, well-suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as inter...

  4. Color imaging of Mars by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamere, W.A.; Tornabene, L.L.; McEwen, A.S.; Becker, K.; Bergstrom, J.W.; Bridges, N.T.; Eliason, E.M.; Gallagher, D.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L.; Mattson, S.; McArthur, G.K.; Mellon, M.T.; Milazzo, M.; Russell, P.S.; Thomas, N.

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE has been producing a large number of scientifically useful color products of Mars and other planetary objects. The three broad spectral bands, coupled with the highly sensitive 14 bit detectors and time delay integration, enable detection of subtle color differences. The very high spatial resolution of HiRISE can augment the mineralogic interpretations based on multispectral (THEMIS) and hyperspectral datasets (TES, OMEGA and CRISM) and thereby enable detailed geologic and stratigraphic interpretations at meter scales. In addition to providing some examples of color images and their interpretation, we describe the processing techniques used to produce them and note some of the minor artifacts in the output. We also provide an example of how HiRISE color products can be effectively used to expand mineral and lithologic mapping provided by CRISM data products that are backed by other spectral datasets. The utility of high quality color data for understanding geologic processes on Mars has been one of the major successes of HiRISE. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to

  6. High-resolution imaging of interfacial water by noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinbo; Guo, Jing; Hapala, Prokop; Cao, Duanyun; Jelínek, Pavel; Xu, Limei; Wang, Enge; Jiang, Ying; Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter Collaboration

    Resolving the hydrogen-bonding configuration of water on the solid surfaces with atomic-scale precision is crucial in water science yet it remains challenging. Recently we have shown the possibility of attacking this problem by STM based on the submolecular orbital imaging of water. However, STM mainly probes the spatial distribution of the density of states near the Fermi level, thus is not sensitive to the chemical structure of molecules. Here we report the ultrahigh resolution imaging of water molecules on a NaCl film by NC-AFM, which enables us to determine the topology of hydrogen-bonding network in unprecedented details. Comparison with the theoretical simulations reveals that the sharp features in the AFM images result from the relaxation of the tip apex mainly due to the electrostatic force between the tip and the water molecules. Our results shed new light on the underlying mechanism of the ultrahigh imaging with NC-AFM and highlight the importance of electrostatics in the imaging of polar molecules such as water. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Programs of China.

  7. Toroid cavity detectors for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and rotating frame imaging: capabilities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momot, K I; Binesh, N; Kohlmann, O; Johnson, C S

    2000-02-01

    The capabilities of toroid cavity detectors for simultaneous rotating frame imaging and NMR spectroscopy have been investigated by means of experiments and computer simulations. The following problems are described: (a) magnetic field inhomogeneity and subsequent loss of chemical shift resolution resulting from bulk magnetic susceptibility effects, (b) image distortions resulting from off-resonance excitation and saturation effects, and (c) distortion of lineshapes and images resulting from radiation damping. Also, special features of signal analysis including truncation effects and the propagation of noise are discussed. B(0) inhomogeneity resulting from susceptibility mismatch is a serious problem for applications requiring high spectral resolution. Image distortions resulting from off-resonance excitation are not serious within the rather narrow spectral range permitted by the RF pulse lengths required to read out the image. Incomplete relaxation effects are easily recognized and can be avoided. Also, radiation damping produces unexpectedly small effects because of self-cancellation of magnetization and short free induction decay times. The results are encouraging, but with present designs only modest spectral resolution can be achieved. PMID:10648153

  8. High Resolution 2-D Fluoresd3nce Imaging of the Mass Boundary Layer Thickness at Free Water Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräuter, C.; Trofimova, D.; Kiefhaber, D.; Krah, N.; Jähne, B.

    2014-03-01

    A novel 2-D fluorescence imaging technique has been developed to visualize the thickness of the aqueous mass boundary layer at a free water surface. Fluorescence is stimulated by high-power LEDs and is observed from above with a low noise, high resolution and high-speed camera. The invasion of ammonia into water leads to an increase in pH (from a starting value of 4), which is visualized with the fluorescent dye pyranine. The flux of ammonia can be controlled by controlling its air side concentration. A higher flux leads to basic pH values (pH > 7) in a thicker layer at the water surface from which fluorescent light is emitted. This allows the investigation of processes affecting the transport of gases in different depths in the aqueous mass boundary layer. In this paper, the chemical system and optical components of the measurement method are presented and its applicability to a wind-wave tank experiment is demonstrated.

  9. High-resolution 3D ultrasound jawbone surface imaging for diagnosis of periodontal bony defects: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2010-11-01

    Although medical specialties have recognized the importance of using ultrasonic imaging, dentistry is only beginning to discover its benefit. This has particularly been important in the field of periodontics which studies infections in the gum and bone tissues that surround the teeth. This study investigates the feasibility of using a custom-designed high-frequency ultrasound imaging system to reconstruct high-resolution (3D) surface images of periodontal defects in human jawbone. The system employs single-element focused ultrasound transducers with center frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 MHz. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high-precision two-dimensional (2D) positioning system of ±1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate measurements of the mandible, in vitro. Signal and image processing algorithms are applied to reconstruct high-resolution ultrasound images and extract the jawbone surface in each frame. Then, all edges are combined and smoothed in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the system performance using mandibles with teeth (dentate) or without (nondentate). The system was able to reconstruct 3D images for the mandible's outer surface with superior spatial resolution down to 24 μm, and to perform the whole scanning in images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles. All the anatomical landmarks were detected and fully described as 3D images using this novel ultrasound imaging technique, whereas the 2D X-ray radiographic images suffered from poor contrast. These results indicate the great potential of utilizing high-resolution ultrasound as a noninvasive, nonionizing imaging technique for the early diagnosis of the more severe form of periodontal disease.

  10. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  11. High resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla using PROPELLER-EPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Martin; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group

    2014-09-01

    We report the application of PROPELLER-EPI for high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter in-plane resolution on a clinical 3 Tesla scanner. Periodically rotated blades of a long-axis PROPELLER-EPI sequence were acquired with fast gradient echo readout and acquisition matrix of 320 x 50 per blade. Images were reconstructed by using 2D-gridding, phase and geometric distortion correction and compensation of resonance frequency drifts that occurred during extended measurements. To characterize these resonance frequency offsets, short FID calibration measurements were added to the PROPELLER-EPI sequence. Functional PROPELLER-EPI was performed with volunteers using a simple block design of right handed finger tapping. Results indicate that PROPELLER-EPI can be employed for fast, high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging provided geometric distortions and possible resonance frequency drifts are properly corrected. Even small resonance frequency drifts below 10 Hz as well as non-corrected geometric distortions degraded image quality substantially. In the initial fMRI experiment image quality and signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient for obtaining high resolution functional activation maps. (orig.)

  12. MSCT versus CBCT: evaluation of high-resolution acquisition modes for dento-maxillary and skull-base imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillenseger, Jean-Philippe; Goetz, Christian [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Matern, Jean-Francois [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Gros, Catherine-Isabelle; Bornert, Fabien [Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire, Strasbourg (France); Le Minor, Jean-Marie [Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Institut d' Anatomie Normale, Strasbourg (France); Constantinesco, Andre [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Choquet, Philippe [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Hopital de Hautepierre, Imagerie Preclinique, Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2014-09-24

    Our aim was to conduct a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of high-resolution skull-bone imaging for dentistry and otolaryngology using different architectures of recent X-ray computed tomography systems. Three multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) systems and one Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system were used in this study. All apparatuses were tested with installed acquisition modes and proprietary reconstruction software enabling high-resolution bone imaging. Quantitative analyses were performed with small fields of view with the preclinical vmCT phantom, which permits to measure spatial resolution, geometrical accuracy, linearity and homogeneity. Ten operators performed visual qualitative analyses on the vmCT phantom images, and on dry human skull images. Quantitative analysis showed no significant differences between protocols in terms of linearity and geometric accuracy. All MSCT systems present a better homogeneity than the CBCT. Both quantitative and visual analyses demonstrate that CBCT acquisitions are not better than the collimated helical MSCT mode. Our results demonstrate that current high-resolution MSCT protocols could exceed the performance of a previous generation CBCT system for spatial resolution and image homogeneity. (orig.)

  13. Use of High resolution 3D Diffusion tensor imaging to study brain white matter development in live neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu eCai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available High resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI can provide important information on brain development, yet it is challenging in live neonatal rats due to the small size of neonatal brain and motion-sensitive nature of DTI. Imaging in live neonatal rats has clear advantages over fixed brain scans, as longitudinal and functional studies would be feasible to understand neuro-developmental abnormalities. In this study, we developed imaging strategies that can be used to obtain high resolution 3D DTI images in live neonatal rats at postnatal day 5 (PND5 and postnatal day 14 (PND14, using only 3 hours of imaging acquisition time. An optimized 3D DTI pulse sequence and appropriate animal setup to minimize physiological motion artifacts are the keys to successful high resolution 3D DTI imaging. Thus, a 3D RARE DTI sequence with twin navigator echoes was implemented to accelerate imaging acquisition time and minimize motion artifacts. It has been suggested that neonatal mammals possess a unique ability to tolerate mild to moderate hypothermia and hypoxia without long term impact. Thus, we additionally utilized this ability to minimize motion artifacts in MR images by carefully suppressing the respiratory rate to around 15/min for PND5 and 30/min for PND14 using mild to moderate hypothermia. These imaging strategies have been successfully implemented to study how the effect of cocaine exposure in dams might affect brain development in their rat pups. Image quality resulting from this in vivo DTI study was comparable to ex vivo scans. FA values were also similar between the live and fixed brain scans. The capability of acquiring high quality in vivo DTI imaging offers a valuable opportunity to study many neurological disorders in brain development in an authentic living environment.

  14. High resolution susceptibility weighted MR-imaging of brain tumors during the application of a gaseous agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, A. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-Magnetresonanz, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria); Sedlacik, J.; Fitzek, C.; Kaiser, W.A.; Reichenbach, J.R. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Walter, B.; Hochstetter, A.; Kalff, R. [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: to employ a high resolution blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) method called susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) together with the breathing of carbogen to investigate the response of cerebral tumors to this breathing gas and to assess tumor anatomy at high resolution. Methods: five patients with cerebral tumors (four glioblastoma multiforme, one astrocytoma [WHO grade II]) were studied using a susceptibility weighted 3D gradient echo, first order velocity compensated sequence (TE = 45 ms, TR = 67 ms, {alpha} = 25 , FOV = 256 x 192 x 64 mm{sup 3}, typical matrix = 512 x 192 x 64), on a 1.5 T MR scanner while they were breathing air and carbogen. Signal changes between the two breathing conditions were investigated. Results: the glioblastomas showed strong but heterogeneous signal changes between carbogen and air breathing, with changes between + 22.4 {+-} 4.9% at the perimeter of the tumors and -5.0 {+-} 0.4% in peritumoral areas that appeared hyperintense on T{sub 2}-weighted images. The astrocytoma displayed a signal decrease during carbogen breathing (-4.1 {+-} 0.1% to -6.8 {+-} 0.3% in peritumoral areas that correspond to hyperintense regions on T{sub 2}-weighted images, and -3.1 {+-} 0.1% in the tumor-center). Conclusions: SWI provides high resolution images of cerebral anatomy and venous vascularization. Combined with hypercapnia it allows for regional assessment of tumor activity. (orig.)

  15. Damage Mapping of Powdery Mildew in Winter Wheat with High-Resolution Satellite Image

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Yuan; Jingcheng Zhang; Yeyin Shi; Chenwei Nie; Liguang Wei; Jihua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by the fungus Blumeria graminis, is a major winter wheat disease in China. Accurate delineation of powdery mildew infestations is necessary for site-specific disease management. In this study, high-resolution multispectral imagery of a 25 km2 typical outbreak site in Shaanxi, China, taken by a newly-launched satellite, SPOT-6, was analyzed for mapping powdery mildew disease. Two regions with high representation were selected for conducting a field survey of powdery mild...

  16. Diagnosis of intraductal spread of breast cancer by high-resolution MR imaging. Correlation between MR imaging and pathohistological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate pathohistological factors that affect the MR findings of intraductal spread (IDS) of breast cancer. The subjects of the present study were 42 breast cancer patients who were examined by MR imaging. Fat-suppressed high-resolution T1-weighted spin-echo images (350/13/1 (TR/TE/excitations), 16-cm FOV, 5-mm section thickness, and 512 x 256 matrix) were obtained one minute after the intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. In this protocol, contrast determination time was 1 min 48 sec. Of the 42 cases, IDS was found to be located more than 1 cm from the primary focus in 22 cases (52%). Rates of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR imaging for the detection of IDS were 82%, 80%, and 81%, respectively. The probable cause of misdiagnosis was parenchymal enhancement due to severe fibrocystic disease and normal menstrual cycle. In 21 of 42 cases, the MR findings were precisely correlated with the pathohistologic findings of almost the same cross-section. The MR findings of IDS varied greatly with observation of linear, band-like, branch-like, plate-like and minute ring enhancements. These findings closely reflected the size, aggregation pattern, and distribution of intraductal lesions. In particular, minute ring enhancement was only observed in 4 comedo-type lesions. This pattern of enhancement is considered to reflect elevated intraductal cellular density with necrosis in the central region. (author)

  17. Forest and fuel variables estimation and digital terrain modelling with airborne laser scanning and high resolution multi-spectral images

    OpenAIRE

    Tomé, Margarida; Pereira, Luísa; Gonçalves, Gil; Soares, Paula

    2009-01-01

    The research Project PTDC/AGR-CFL/72380/2006, entitled "Forest and Fuel Variables Estimation and Digital Terrain Modelling with Airborne Laser Scanning and High Resolution Multi-Spectral Images", financed by the Portuguese foundation Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia (FCT), has as partners the University of Aveiro, the Faculty of Sciences and Technology of the University of Coimbra and the Institute of Agronomy of the Technical University of Lisbon. The project main objectiv...

  18. One-dimensional mean computed tomography value evaluation of ground-glass opacity on high-resolution images

    OpenAIRE

    Kitami, Akihiko; Kamio, Yoshito; Hayashi, Shoko; Suzuki, Kosuke; Uematsu, Shugo; Gen, Ryozo; Suzuki, Takashi; Kadokura, Mitsutaka

    2012-01-01

    Objective Differentiation of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), and invasive carcinoma on computed tomography (CT) is useful for determining “follow-up or resection” strategies for lesions displaying ground-glass opacity (GGO). The purpose of this study is to evaluate one-dimensional quantitative CT values of GGO on high-resolution CT (HRCT) images using computer-aided diagnosis. Methods Between April 2001 and March 2010, a total of 44 nodules in 42 pa...

  19. Global mesospheric tidal winds observed by the high resolution Doppler imager on board the upper atmosphere research satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Y.T.; Lieberman, R.S.; Hays, P.B.; Ortland, D.A.; Marshall, A.R.; Wu, D.; Skinner, W.R.; Burrage, M.D.; Gell, D.A.; Yee, J.H.

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents results of mesospheric and lower thermospheric wind tides. The observations come from the high resolution doppler imager (HRDI) on board the upper atmosphere research satellite. From these observations, the authors report the observation of tidal effects on top of the meridonal winds observed in this region. Previous measurements have been mainly limited to radar measurements from fixed ground stations, which do not give consistent results, and do not provide a global picture of the wave structure.

  20. High-resolution imaging of the large non-human primate brain using microPET: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neuroanatomy and physiology of the baboon brain closely resembles that of the human brain and is well suited for evaluating promising new radioligands in non-human primates by PET and SPECT prior to their use in humans. These studies are commonly performed on clinical scanners with 5 mm spatial resolution at best, resulting in sub-optimal images for quantitative analysis. This study assessed the feasibility of using a microPET animal scanner to image the brains of large non-human primates, i.e. papio hamadryas (baboon) at high resolution. Factors affecting image accuracy, including scatter, attenuation and spatial resolution, were measured under conditions approximating a baboon brain and using different reconstruction strategies. Scatter fraction measured 32% at the centre of a 10 cm diameter phantom. Scatter correction increased image contrast by up to 21% but reduced the signal-to-noise ratio. Volume resolution was superior and more uniform using maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstructed images (3.2-3.6 mm3 FWHM from centre to 4 cm offset) compared to both 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) (5.6-8.3 mm3) and 3D reprojection (3DRP) (5.9-9.1 mm3). A pilot 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([18F]FDG) scan was performed on a healthy female adult baboon. The pilot study demonstrated the ability to adequately resolve cortical and sub-cortical grey matter structures in the baboon brain and improved contrast when images were corrected for attenuation and scatter and reconstructed by MAP. We conclude that high resolution imaging of the baboon brain with microPET is feasible with appropriate choices of reconstruction strategy and corrections for degrading physical effects. Further work to develop suitable correction algorithms for high-resolution large primate imaging is warranted

  1. New Potentiometric Wireless Chloride Sensors Provide High Resolution Information on Chemical Transport Processes in Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smettem, Keith; Harris, Nick; Cranny, Andy; Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the travel times, pathways and dispersion of solutes moving through stream environments is critical for understanding the biogeochemical cycling processes that control ecosystem functioning. Validation of stream solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from in-stream measurement of chemical concentration changes through time. This can be expensive and time consuming, leading to a need for cheap distributed sensor arrays that respond instantly and record chemical transport at points of interest on timescales of seconds. To meet this need we apply new, low-cost (in the order of a euro per sensor) potentiometric chloride sensors used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The application here is to monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical, in this case NaCl. We present data obtained from the distributed sensor array under baseflow conditions for three stream reaches in Luxembourg. Sensor results are comparable to data obtained from more expensive electrical conductivity meters and allow spatial resolution of hydrodynamic mixing processes and identification of chemical 'dead zones' in the study reaches.

  2. Clustering, methodology, and mechanistic insights into acetate chemical ionization using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Patrick; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of cluster control and transmission through the Tofwerk atmospheric pressure interface installed on various chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometers using authentic standards. This characterization of the atmospheric pressure interface allows for a detailed investigation of the acetate chemical ionization mechanisms and the impact of controlling these mechanisms on sensitivity, selectivity, and mass spectral ambiguity with the aim of non-targeted analysis. Chemical ionization with acetate reagent ions is controlled by a distribution of reagent ion-neutral clusters that vary with relative humidity and the concentration of the acetic anhydride precursor. Deprotonated carboxylic acids are primarily detected only if sufficient declustering is employed inside the atmospheric pressure interface. The configuration of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) using an acetate chemical ionization source for non-targeted analysis is discussed. Recent approaches and studies characterizing acetate chemical ionization as it applies to the HR-TOF-CIMS are evaluated in light of the work presented herein.

  3. High resolution SEM imaging of gold nanoparticles in cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, A; Soroka, Y; Frušić-Zlotkin, M; Popov, I; Kohen, R

    2014-12-01

    The growing demand of gold nanoparticles in medical applications increases the need for simple and efficient characterization methods of the interaction between the nanoparticles and biological systems. Due to its nanometre resolution, modern scanning electron microscopy (SEM) offers straightforward visualization of metallic nanoparticles down to a few nanometre size, almost without any special preparation step. However, visualization of biological materials in SEM requires complicated preparation procedure, which is typically finished by metal coating needed to decrease charging artefacts and quick radiation damage of biomaterials in the course of SEM imaging. The finest conductive metal coating available is usually composed of a few nanometre size clusters, which are almost identical to the metal nanoparticles employed in medical applications. Therefore, SEM monitoring of metal nanoparticles within cells and tissues is incompatible with the conventional preparation methods. In this work, we show that charging artefacts related to non-conductive biological specimen can be successfully eliminated by placing the uncoated biological sample on a conductive substrate. By growing the cells on glass pre-coated with a chromium layer, we were able to observe the uptake of 10 nm gold nanoparticles inside uncoated and unstained macrophages and keratinocytes cells. Imaging in back scattered electrons allowed observation of gold nanoparticles located inside the cells, while imaging in secondary electron gave information on gold nanoparticles located on the surface of the cells. By mounting a skin cross-section on an improved conductive holder, consisting of a silicon substrate coated with copper, we were able to observe penetration of gold nanoparticles of only 5 nm size through the skin barrier in an uncoated skin tissue. The described method offers a convenient modification in preparation procedure for biological samples to be analyzed in SEM. The method provides high

  4. Optimal non-circular fiber geometries for image scrambling in high-resolution spectrographs

    CERN Document Server

    Stürmer, Julian; Grimm, Stephan; Kalide, Andre; Sutherland, Adam P; Seifahrt, Andreas; Schuster, Kay; Bean, Jacob L; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibers are a key component for high-resolution spectrographs to attain high precision in radial velocity measurements. We present a custom fiber with a novel core geometry - a 'D'-shape. From a theoretical standpoint, such a fiber should provide superior scrambling and modal noise mitigation, since unlike the commonly used circular and polygonal fiber cross sections, it shows chaotic scrambling. We report on the fabrication process of a test fiber and compare the optical properties, scrambling performance, and modal noise behavior of the D-fiber with those of common polygonal fibers.

  5. Combining UAV and high-resolution image-based particle image velocimetry to monitor flow in lakes and rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.; Kennedy, A. B.; Donahue, A. S.; Hovakimyan, N.; Cichella, V.; Pakrasi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are increasingly being applied by the geophysical community for large-scale surveys of environments that are challenging to reach (e.g. volcanoes, glaciers). Some of these natural systems include large bodies of water such as oceans, lakes and rivers. These environments are highly dynamic and, even in normal conditions, their characterization requires long surveys involving the deployment of expensive equipment and large crews. Technical challenges, and thus costs, become prohibitive especially during extreme natural events that may pose a threat not only to the monitoring facilities but, more importantly, to the surrounding residential areas (e.g. river flooding, extreme waves). Traditional measurement techniques have difficulty or are unable to monitor some flow quantities (i.e. flow discharge and wave energy content) associated with these natural systems, especially during emergencies. Extreme hydrodynamic loads due to high flow discharges and/or highly energetic waves may tamper with traditional monitoring systems that are typically submerged or fixed in the vicinity of the water body. Here, we propose to employ specially developed UAV systems to remotely and safely gain high-resolution images of the water surface. Such images are processed using robust large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) algorithms that are able to accurately resolve the complex two-dimensional flow field of the water surface over extensive areas. These systems can theoretically be deployed in a cost-effective way for long periods of time for continuous monitoring. Such monitoring is key to inform and calibrate predictive tools that can reconstruct potential emergency scenarios. In addition, during extreme natural events, data can be collected with no risk to human operators. Here, we discuss the concept and technology employed to render these measurement systems effective, and provide examples of applications that show the depth of the data that can

  6. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Extremely Metal-Poor Stars from SDSS/SEGUE: I. Atmospheric Parameters and Chemical Compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Wako; Lee, Young Sun; Honda, Satoshi; Ito, Hiroko; Takada-Hidai, Masahide; Frebel, Anna; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masatuki Y; Carollo, Daniela; Sivarani, Thirupathi

    2012-01-01

    Chemical compositions are determined based on high-resolution spectroscopy for 137 candidate extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first stellar extension, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). High-resolution spectra with moderate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios were obtained with the High Dispersion Spectrograph of the Subaru Telescope. Most of the sample (approximately 80%) are main-sequence turn-off stars, including dwarfs and subgiants. Four cool main-sequence stars, the most metal-deficient such stars known, are included in the remaining sample. Good agreement is found between effective temperatures estimated by the SEGUE stellar parameter pipeline, based on the SDSS/SEGUE medium-resolution spectra, and those estimated from the broadband $(V-K)_0$ and $(g-r)_0$ colors. Our abundance measurements reveal that 70 stars in our sample have [Fe/H] $ +0.7$) among the 25 giants in our sample is as high as 36%, while only a lowe...

  7. Classification and Extraction of Urban Land-Use Information from High-Resolution Image Based on Object Multi-features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kong Chunfang; Xu Kai; Wu Chonglong

    2006-01-01

    Urban land provides a suitable location for various economic activities which affect the development of surrounding areas. With rapid industrialization and urbanization, the contradictions in land-use become more noticeable. Urban administrators and decision-makers seek modern methods and technology to provide information support for urban growth. Recently, with the fast development of high-resolution sensor technology, more relevant data can be obtained, which is an advantage in studying the sustainable development of urban land-use. However, these data are only information sources and are a mixture of "information" and "noise". Processing, analysis and information extraction from remote sensing data is necessary to provide useful information. This paper extracts urban land-use information from a high-resolution image by using the multi-feature information of the image objects, and adopts an object-oriented image analysis approach and multi-scale image segmentation technology. A classification and extraction model is set up based on the multi-features of the image objects, in order to contribute to information for reasonable planning and effective management. This new image analysis approach offers a satisfactory solution for extracting information quickly and efficiently.

  8. A high-resolution imaging technique using a whole-body, research photon counting detector CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, S.; Yu, Z.; Halaweish, A.; Kappler, S.; Hahn, K.; Henning, A.; Li, Z.; Lane, J.; Levin, D. L.; Jorgensen, S.; Ritman, E.; McCollough, C.

    2016-03-01

    A high-resolution (HR) data collection mode has been introduced to a whole-body, research photon-counting-detector CT system installed in our laboratory. In this mode, 64 rows of 0.45 mm x 0.45 mm detector pixels were used, which corresponded to a pixel size of 0.25 mm x 0.25 mm at the iso-center. Spatial resolution of this HR mode was quantified by measuring the MTF from a scan of a 50 micron wire phantom. An anthropomorphic lung phantom, cadaveric swine lung, temporal bone and heart specimens were scanned using the HR mode, and image quality was subjectively assessed by two experienced radiologists. High spatial resolution of the HR mode was evidenced by the MTF measurement, with 15 lp/cm and 20 lp/cm at 10% and 2% modulation. Images from anthropomorphic phantom and cadaveric specimens showed clear delineation of small structures, such as lung vessels, lung nodules, temporal bone structures, and coronary arteries. Temporal bone images showed critical anatomy (i.e. stapes superstructure) that was clearly visible in the PCD system. These results demonstrated the potential application of this imaging mode in lung, temporal bone, and vascular imaging. Other clinical applications that require high spatial resolution, such as musculoskeletal imaging, may also benefit from this high resolution mode.

  9. Imaging of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction—Comparison of high-resolution ultrasound and 3 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 18 MHz high-resolution ultrasound appears to be slightly more accurate than 3 T MRI in the diagnosis of PTTD. • High-resolution ultrasound is recommended as an initial diagnostic tool. • Long-lasting PTT discomfort may require MRI. • Other pathologies can mimic PTTD. - Abstract: Purpose: Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of acquired asymmetric flatfoot deformity. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the diagnostic value of MRI and high-resolution ultrasound (HR-US) in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), and assess their correlation with intraoperative findings. Materials and methods: We reviewed 23 posterior tibial tendons in 23 patients with clinical findings of PTTD (13 females, 10 males; mean age, 50 years) with 18 MHz HR-US and 3 T MRI. Surgical intervention was performed in nine patients. Results: HR-US findings included 2 complete tears, 6 partial tears, 10 tendons with tendinosis, and 5 unremarkable tendons. MRI demonstrated 2 complete tears, 7 partial tears, 10 tendons with tendinosis, and 4 unremarkable tendons. HR-US and MRI were concordant in 20/23 cases (87%). Image findings for HR-US were confirmed in six of nine patients (66.7%) by intraoperative inspection, whereas imaging findings for MRI were concordant with five of nine cases (55.6%). Conclusion: Our results indicate that HR-US can be considered slightly more accurate than MRI in the detection of PTTD

  10. Imaging of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction—Comparison of high-resolution ultrasound and 3 T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoldner, Michael A., E-mail: michael.arnoldner@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Gruber, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Syré, Stefanie [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Trauma-Surgery, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kristen, Karl-Heinz [Foot & Ankle Centre Vienna, Alser Straße 43/8, 1080 Vienna (Austria); Trnka, Hans-Jörg [Foot & Ankle Centre Vienna, Alser Straße 43/8, 1080 Vienna (Austria); Orthopaedic Hospital Vienna, Speisinger Straße 109, 1130 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz; Bodner, Gerd [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • 18 MHz high-resolution ultrasound appears to be slightly more accurate than 3 T MRI in the diagnosis of PTTD. • High-resolution ultrasound is recommended as an initial diagnostic tool. • Long-lasting PTT discomfort may require MRI. • Other pathologies can mimic PTTD. - Abstract: Purpose: Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of acquired asymmetric flatfoot deformity. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the diagnostic value of MRI and high-resolution ultrasound (HR-US) in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), and assess their correlation with intraoperative findings. Materials and methods: We reviewed 23 posterior tibial tendons in 23 patients with clinical findings of PTTD (13 females, 10 males; mean age, 50 years) with 18 MHz HR-US and 3 T MRI. Surgical intervention was performed in nine patients. Results: HR-US findings included 2 complete tears, 6 partial tears, 10 tendons with tendinosis, and 5 unremarkable tendons. MRI demonstrated 2 complete tears, 7 partial tears, 10 tendons with tendinosis, and 4 unremarkable tendons. HR-US and MRI were concordant in 20/23 cases (87%). Image findings for HR-US were confirmed in six of nine patients (66.7%) by intraoperative inspection, whereas imaging findings for MRI were concordant with five of nine cases (55.6%). Conclusion: Our results indicate that HR-US can be considered slightly more accurate than MRI in the detection of PTTD.

  11. High resolution imaging of molecular line emission from high redshift QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Carilli, C L; Kawabe, R; Ohta, K; Henkel, C; Menten, K M; Yun, M; Petric, A; Tutui, Y

    2002-01-01

    We present moderate (1'') and high resolution (0.2'') observations of the CO(2-1) emission at 43 GHz, and radio continuum emission at 1.47 GHz, from the z=4.7 QSO BRI 1202-0725 and the z=4.4 QSO BRI 1335--0417 using the Very Large Array. The moderate resolution observations show that in both cases the CO emission is spatially resolved into two components separated by 1'' for 1335-0417 and 4'' for 1202-0725. The high resolution observations show that each component has sub-structure on scales of 0.2'' to 0.5'', with intrinsic brightness temperatures > 20K. The CO ladder from (2-1) up to (7-6) suggests a high kinetic temperature for the gas (70 K), and a high column density (10^{24} cm^{-2}). In both sources the continuum-to-line ratio: L_{FIR}/L'_{CO(1-0)} = 335. All these characteristics (brightness temperature, excitation temperature, column density, and continuum-to-line ratio) are comparable to conditions found in low redshift, ultra-luminous nuclear starburst galaxies. We find that the CO emitting regions...

  12. High Resolution Infrared Imaging & Spectroscopy of the Z Canis Majoris System During Quiescence & Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkley, Sasha; Oppenheimer, Ben R; Rice, Emily; Pueyo, Laurent; Vasisht, Gautam; Zimmerman, Neil; Kraus, Adam L; Ireland, Michael J; Brenner, Douglas; Beichman, Charles A; Dekany, Richard; Roberts, Jennifer E; Parry, Ian R; Roberts, Lewis C; Crepp, Justin R; Burruss, Rick; Wallace, J Kent; Cady, Eric; Zhai, Chengxing; Shao, Michael; Lockhart, Thomas; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We present adaptive optics photometry and spectra in the JHKL-bands along with high spectral resolution K-band spectroscopy for each component of the Z Canis Majoris system. Our high angular resolution photometry of this very young (<1 Myr) binary, comprised of an FU Ori object and a Herbig Ae/Be star, were gathered shortly after the 2008 outburst while our high resolution spectroscopy was gathered during a quiescent phase. Our photometry conclusively determine that the outburst was due solely to the embedded Herbig Ae/Be member, supporting results from earlier works, and that the optically visible FU Ori component decreased slightly (~30%) in luminosity during the same period, consistent with previous works on the variability of FU Ori type systems. Further, our high-resolution K-band spectra definitively demonstrate that the 2.294 micron CO absorption feature seen in composite spectra of the system is due solely to the FU Ori component, while a prominent CO emission feature at the same wavelength, long s...

  13. High-resolution Surface Relative Humidity Computation Using MODIS Image in Peninsular Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Guangxiong; LI Jing; CHEN Yunhao; Abdul Patah NORIZAN; Liphong TAY

    2006-01-01

    Forest fire is a serious disaster all over the world. The Fire Weather Index (FWI) System can be used in applied forestry as a tool to investigate and manage all types of fire. Relative humidity (RH) is a very important parameter to calculate FWI. However, RH interpolated from meteorological data may not be able to provide precise and confident values for areas between far separated stations. The principal objective of this study is to provide high-resolution RH for FWI using MODIS data. The precipitable water vapor (PW) can be retrieved from MODIS using split window techniques. Four-year-time-series (2000-2003) of 8-day mean PW and specific humidity (Q) of Peninsular Malaysia were analyzed and the statistic expression between PW and Q was developed. The root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of Q estimated by PW is generally less than 0.0004 and the correlation coefficient is 0.90. Based on the experiential formula between PW and Q, surface RH can be computed with combination of auxiliary data such as DEM and air temperature (Ta). The mean absolute errors of the estimated RH in Peninsular Malaysia are less than 5% compared to the measured RH and the correlation coefficient is 0.8219. It is proven to be a simple and feasible model to compute high-resolution RH using remote sensing data.

  14. Damage Mapping of Powdery Mildew in Winter Wheat with High-Resolution Satellite Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew, caused by the fungus Blumeria graminis, is a major winter wheat disease in China. Accurate delineation of powdery mildew infestations is necessary for site-specific disease management. In this study, high-resolution multispectral imagery of a 25 km2 typical outbreak site in Shaanxi, China, taken by a newly-launched satellite, SPOT-6, was analyzed for mapping powdery mildew disease. Two regions with high representation were selected for conducting a field survey of powdery mildew. Three supervised classification methods—artificial neural network, mahalanobis distance, and maximum likelihood classifier—were implemented and compared for their performance on disease detection. The accuracy assessment showed that the ANN has the highest overall accuracy of 89%, following by MD and MLC with overall accuracies of 84% and 79%, respectively. These results indicated that the high-resolution multispectral imagery with proper classification techniques incorporated with the field investigation can be a useful tool for mapping powdery mildew in winter wheat.

  15. High-resolution magnetic field imaging with a nitrogen-vacancy diamond sensor integrated with a photonic-crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, I V; Blakley, S M; Serebryannikov, E E; Hemmer, P; Scully, M O; Zheltikov, A M

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution magnetic field imaging with a scanning fiber-optic probe which couples nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to a high-numerical-aperture photonic-crystal fiber integrated with a two-wire microwave transmission line. Magnetic resonance excitation of NV centers driven by the microwave field is read out through optical interrogation through the photonic-crystal fiber to enable high-speed, high-sensitivity magnetic field imaging with sub 30 μm spatial resolution. PMID:26907400

  16. Fat suppression techniques for obtaining high resolution dynamic contrast enhanced bilateral breast MR images at 7 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Velden, Tijl A; Schmitz, Alexander M Th; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A;

    2016-01-01

    was scored qualitatively on overall image quality, sharpness of anatomical details, presence of artefacts, inhomogeneous fat suppression and the presence of water-fat shift. A quantitative scoring was obtained from the signal to noise ratio and contrast to noise ratio. RESULTS: WSE scored significantly...... better in terms of overall image quality and the absence of artefacts. No significant difference in contrast to noise ratio was found between the two fat suppression methods. CONCLUSION: When maximizing temporal and spatial resolution of high resolution DCE MRI of the breast, water selective excitation...

  17. Three-dimensional building roof boundary extraction using high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Poz, A. P.; Fazan, Antonio J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a semiautomatic method for rectilinear building roof boundary extraction, based on the integration of high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data. The proposed method is formulated as an optimization problem, in which a snakes-based objective function is developed to represent the building roof boundaries in an object-space coordinate system. Three-dimensional polylines representing building roof boundaries are obtained by optimizing the objective function using the dynamic programming optimization technique. The results of our experiments showed that the proposed method satisfactorily performed the task of extracting different building roof boundaries from aerial image and LiDAR data.

  18. INTEGRATION OF POINT CLOUDS FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING AND IMAGE-BASED MATCHING FOR GENERATING HIGH-RESOLUTION ORTHOIMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salach

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An orthoimage is one of the basic photogrammetric products used for architectural documentation of historical objects; recently, it has become a standard in such work. Considering the increasing popularity of photogrammetric techniques applied in the cultural heritage domain, this research examines the two most popular measuring technologies: terrestrial laser scanning, and automatic processing of digital photographs. The basic objective of the performed works presented in this paper was to optimize the quality of generated high-resolution orthoimages using integration of data acquired by a Z+F 5006 terrestrial laser scanner and a Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera. The subject was one of the walls of the “Blue Chamber” of the Museum of King Jan III’s Palace at Wilanów (Warsaw, Poland. The high-resolution images resulting from integration of the point clouds acquired by the different methods were analysed in detail with respect to geometric and radiometric correctness.

  19. Integration of Point Clouds from Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Image-Based Matching for Generating High-Resolution Orthoimages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salach, A.; Markiewicza, J. S.; Zawieska, D.

    2016-06-01

    An orthoimage is one of the basic photogrammetric products used for architectural documentation of historical objects; recently, it has become a standard in such work. Considering the increasing popularity of photogrammetric techniques applied in the cultural heritage domain, this research examines the two most popular measuring technologies: terrestrial laser scanning, and automatic processing of digital photographs. The basic objective of the performed works presented in this paper was to optimize the quality of generated high-resolution orthoimages using integration of data acquired by a Z+F 5006 terrestrial laser scanner and a Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera. The subject was one of the walls of the "Blue Chamber" of the Museum of King Jan III's Palace at Wilanów (Warsaw, Poland). The high-resolution images resulting from integration of the point clouds acquired by the different methods were analysed in detail with respect to geometric and radiometric correctness.

  20. Quantitative chemical state analysis of supported vanadium oxide catalysts by high resolution vanadium Kα spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Nanbu, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Tsunehiro; Kawai, Jun

    2011-03-01

    Oxidation states of vanadium species on Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), and TiO(2) were quantitatively analyzed by least-squares fitting of V Kα spectra recorded with a two-crystal X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Uncertainties of analytical results by the normalization procedure, and coefficient of validation and the reduction behavior of vanadium species by X-ray irradiation were discussed. The V(5+)/V(4+)/V(3+) ratios on Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), and TiO(2) calcined at 773 K in air were determined to be ca. 6/3/1, 3/6/1, and 5/4/1, respectively. The possible chemical states of vanadium species on supports were proposed. PMID:21302919

  1. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  2. High-resolution imaging with a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Simonetti, Francesco; Williamson, Michael; Rosenberg, Robert; Heintz, Philip; Sandoval, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult for ultrasound to image small targets such as breast microcalcifications. Synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging has recently developed as a promising tool to improve the capabilities of medical ultrasound. We use two different tissueequivalent phantoms to study the imaging capabilities of a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system for imaging small targets. The InnerVision ultrasound system DAS009 is an investigational system for real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. We use the system to image the two phantoms, and compare the images with those obtained from clinical scanners Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. Our results show that synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging produces images with higher resolution and less image artifacts than Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. In addition, we study the effects of sound speed on synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and demonstrate that an accurate sound speed is very important for imaging small targets.

  3. An ex vivo rat eye model to aid development of high-resolution retina imaging devices for rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oterendorp, Christian; Martin, Keith R.; Zhong, Jiang Jian; Diaz-Santana, Luis

    2010-09-01

    High resolution in vivo retinal imaging in rodents is becoming increasingly important in eye research. Development of suitable imaging devices currently requires many lengthy animal procedures. We present an ex vivo rat model eye with fluorescently labelled retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and nerve fibre bundles that reduces the need for animal procedures while preserving key properties of the living rat eye. Optical aberrations and scattering of four model eyes and eight live rat eyes were quantified using a Shack-Hartmann sensor. Fluorescent images from RGCs were obtained using a prototype scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The wavefront aberration root mean square value without defocus did not significantly differ between model and living eyes. Higher order aberrations were slightly higher but RGC image quality was comparable to published in vivo work. Overall, the model allows a large reduction in number and duration of animal procedures required to develop new in vivo retinal imaging devices.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution computed tomography in tumors of the lung and the mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamassima, F; Villari, N; Fargnoli, R; Di Lollo, S; Cellerini, A; Ruggiero, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and high resolution computed tomography (CT) have been compared in 37 patients who had expansive processes of the lung and the mediastinum. MR imaging and CT scanning gave identical results in 32 patients; in 5 patients, CT scanning has proved more useful in evaluating the stag e of primary lung tumors. MR imaging often gives more information about the actual size of the tumor, and the involvement of close structures, although it does not modify staging of the tumor. MR imaging has the advantage to differentiate hilar adenopathy from blood vessel structures. Evaluation of T2 relaxing time (that we have performed in the same location of thin-needle biopsy aspiration), however, did not prove to be of diagnostic significance; this indicates that MR imaging at the moment is not suitable for tissue typification. PMID:3344352

  5. Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers for Chemical State Analysis of Dilute Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryogenic X-ray spectrometers operating at temperatures below 1 K combine high energy resolution with broadband efficiency for X-ray energies up to 10 keV. They offer advantages for chemical state analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional Ge or Si(Li) detectors lack energy resolution and grating spectrometers lack detection efficiency. We are developing soft X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction (STJ) technology. X-rays absorbed in one of the superconducting electrodes generate excess charge carriers in proportion to their energy, thereby producing a measurable temporary increase in tunneling current. For STJ operation at the synchrotron, we have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) with a cold finger that holds a 3 x 3 array of STJs inside the UHV sample chamber at a temperature of ∼0.1 K within ∼15 mm of a room temperature sample. Our STJ spectrometer can have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies up to 1 keV, and has total count rate capabilities above 100,000 counts/s. We will describe detector performance in synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence experiments and demonstrate its use for XAS on a dilute metal site in a metalloprotein

  6. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [123I]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [123I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [123I]β-CIT and [123I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [123I]β-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [123I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  7. High resolution simulations of aerosol microphysics in a global and regionally nested chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.; Marks, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol indirect effect is the largest source of forcing uncertainty in current climate models. This effect arises from the influence of aerosols on the reflective properties and lifetimes of clouds, and its magnitude depends on how many particles can serve as cloud droplet formation sites. Assessing levels of this subset of particles (cloud condensation nuclei, or CCN) requires knowledge of aerosol levels and their global distribution, size distributions, and composition. A key tool necessary to advance our understanding of CCN is the use of global aerosol microphysical models, which simulate the processes that control aerosol size distributions: nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation. Previous studies have found important differences in CO (Chen, D. et al., 2009) and ozone (Jang, J., 1995) modeled at different spatial resolutions, and it is reasonable to believe that short-lived, spatially-variable aerosol species will be similarly - or more - susceptible to model resolution effects. The goal of this study is to determine how CCN levels and spatial distributions change as simulations are run at higher spatial resolution - specifically, to evaluate how sensitive the model is to grid size, and how this affects comparisons against observations. Higher resolution simulations are necessary supports for model/measurement synergy. Simulations were performed using the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem (v9-02). The years 2008 and 2009 were simulated at 4ox5o and 2ox2.5o globally and at 0.5ox0.667o over Europe and North America. Results were evaluated against surface-based particle size distribution measurements from the European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research project. The fine-resolution model simulates more spatial and temporal variability in ultrafine levels, and better resolves topography. Results suggest that the coarse model predicts systematically lower ultrafine levels than does the fine-resolution model. Significant

  8. High-resolution airborne gravity imaging over James Ross Island (West Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T.A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jones, P.C.; Smellie, J.L.; Ghidella, M.; Corr, H. F. J.; Zakrajsek, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    James Ross Island (JRI) exposes a Miocene-Recent alkaline basaltic volcanic complex that developed in a back-arc, east of the northern Antarctic Peninsula. JRI has been the focus of several geological studies because it provides a window on Neogene magmatic processes and paleoenvironments. However, little is known about its internal structure. New airborne gravity data were collected as part of the first high-resolution aerogeophysical survey flown over the island and reveal a prominent negative Bouguer gravity anomaly over Mt Haddington. This is intriguing as basaltic volcanoes are typically associated with positive Bouguer anomalies, linked to underlying mafic intrusions. The negative Bouguer anomaly may be associated with a hitherto unrecognised low-density sub-surface body, such as a breccia-filled caldera, or a partially molten magma chamber.

  9. Generation and Assessment of Urban Land Cover Maps Using High-Resolution Multispectral Aerial Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim; Höhle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    to a tree structured classifier, which automatically derives land cover maps in 2D or 3D. We investigate the thematic accuracy of the produced land cover map by a class-wise stratified design and provide a method for deriving necessary sample sizes. Corresponding survey adjusted accuracy measures......New aerial cameras and new advanced geo-processing tools improve the generation of urban land cover maps. Elevations can be derived from stereo pairs with high density, positional accuracy, and efficiency. The combination of multispectral high-resolution imagery and high-density elevations enable...... a unique method for the automatic generation of urban land cover maps. In the present paper, imagery of a new medium-format aerial camera and advanced geoprocessing software are applied to derive normalized digital surface models and vegetation maps. These two intermediate products then become input...

  10. Coring and High-Resolution Imaging of the Permian-Triassic Boundary in Deltadalen, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    The Permian-Triassic extinction was likely triggered by the voluminous igneous activity of the Siberian Traps. There are, however, limited information available about the effects of the Siberian Traps volcanism in Permian to Triassic sedimentary successions outside Siberia. We drilled two boreholes across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) in Deltadalen, Svalbard, in August 2014, to better document the extinction event and environmental changes in the sedimentary succession in this region. Even though the PTB event is studied in several outcrops to varying degree if scrutiny on Svalbard, a scientific core is important for understanding the details of the PTB event, as outcrops may not permit studies at the appropriate levels of resolution, exposure or confidence. The Deltadalen site was chosen as an optimal drilling location after field work in the Isfjorden area in 2013 and early 2014. The almost 100 m deep holes were fully cored and penetrated the Triassic Vikinghøgda Formation (about 85 m recovered) and the Permian Kapp Starostin Formation (about 15 m). The main lithologies include Permian chert-rich green glauconitic sandstones and Triassic mudstones. A 10 m thick sedimentary reference outcrop section across the PTB was further logged and sampled in a nearby river valley. A comprehensive core analysis program is now underway. High-resolution XRF, MST and hyperspectral core scanning has been completed along the entire core surface, while high-resolution CT scanning has been carried out for whole core sections. The DD-1 core has subsequently been split, photographed, described, and sampled for geochemical, micropaleontological, petrological and magnetic analyses. Almost 10 bentonite layers have furthermore been sampled for volcanological and geochronological studies. Our goal is that the cores will become an important future reference section of the PTB in Svalbard and the high-Arctic, and help constrain the extent of the regional effects of explosive volcanism

  11. High resolution MR angiography with rephasing and dephasing sequences for selective vascular imaging of arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With rephasing and dephasing sequences the vascular system is imaged with high or low signal intensity whereas stationary tissue is imaged with identical signal intensity. With images recorded in systole and diastole followed by image subtraction separate imaging of arteries or veins without background superposition is possible. 13 patients with vascular lesions of the lower extremities and 7 volunteers were examined. Vascular stenosis, aneurysm, dilatation, occlusion and collateral vessels could be imaged similar to digital subtraction angiography. Vessels with a diameter down to 1 mm could be imaged. The large slice thickness up to 80 mm results in projection type images where the vascular tree is imaged over the whole field of view and without partial volume effects. (orig.)

  12. High resolution MR angiography with rephasing and dephasing sequences for selective vascular imaging of arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiderer, M.; Laub, G.; Staebler, A.; Yousry, P.; Lauterjung, L.

    1988-03-01

    With rephasing and dephasing sequences the vascular system is imaged with high or low signal intensity whereas stationary tissue is imaged with identical signal intensity. With images recorded in systole and diastole followed by image subtraction separate imaging of arteries or veins without background superposition is possible. 13 patients with vascular lesions of the lower extremities and 7 volunteers were examined. Vascular stenosis, aneurysm, dilatation, occlusion and collateral vessels could be imaged similar to digital subtraction angiography. Vessels with a diameter down to 1 mm could be imaged. The large slice thickness up to 80 mm results in projection type images where the vascular tree is imaged over the whole field of view and without partial volume effects.

  13. ASTC-MIMO-TOPS Mode with Digital Beam-Forming in Elevation for High-Resolution Wide-Swath Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Huang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Future spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR missions require complete and frequent coverage of the earth with a high resolution. Terrain Observation by Progressive Scans (TOPS is a novel wide swath mode but has impaired azimuth resolution. In this paper, an innovative extended TOPS mode named Alamouti Space-time Coding multiple-input multiple-output TOPS (ASTC-MIMO-TOPS mode combined with digital beam-forming (DBF in elevation and multi-aperture SAR signal reconstruction in azimuth is proposed. This innovative mode achieves wide-swath coverage with a high geometric resolution and also overcomes major drawbacks in conventional MIMO SAR systems. The data processing scheme of this imaging scheme is presented in detail. The designed system example of the proposed ASTC-MIMO-TOPS mode, which has the imaging capacity of a 400 km wide swath with an azimuth resolution of 3 m, is given. Its system performance analysis results and simulated imaging results on point targets demonstrate the potential of the proposed novel spaceborne SAR mode for high-resolution wide-swath (HRWS imaging.

  14. Rotation-and-scale-invariant airplane detection in high-resolution satellite images based on deep-Hough-forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongtao; Guan, Haiyan; Zai, Dawei; Ji, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a rotation-and-scale-invariant method for detecting airplanes from high-resolution satellite images. To improve feature representation capability, a multi-layer feature generation model is created to produce high-order feature representations for local image patches through deep learning techniques. To effectively estimate airplane centroids, a Hough forest model is trained to learn mappings from high-order patch features to the probabilities of an airplane being present at specific locations. To handle airplanes with varying orientations, patch orientation is defined and integrated into the Hough forest to augment Hough voting. The scale invariance is achieved by using a set of scale factors embedded in the Hough forest. Quantitative evaluations on the images collected from Google Earth service show that the proposed method achieves a completeness, correctness, quality, and F1-measure of 0.968, 0.972, 0.942, and 0.970, respectively, in detecting airplanes with arbitrary orientations and sizes. Comparative studies also demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the other three existing methods in accurately and completely detecting airplanes in high-resolution remotely sensed images.

  15. Comparison of Different Vegetation Indices for Very High-Resolution Images, Specific Case Ultracam-D Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, M.; Ebadi, H.; Kiani, A.

    2015-12-01

    Today digital aerial images acquired with UltraCam sensor are known to be a valuable resource for producing high resolution information of land covers. In this research, different methods for extracting vegetation from semi-urban and agricultural regions were studied and their results were compared in terms of overall accuracy and Kappa statistic. To do this, several vegetation indices were first tested on three image datasets with different object-based classifications in terms of presence or absence of sample data, defining other features and also more classes. The effects of all these cases were evaluated on final results. After it, pixel-based classification was performed on each dataset and their accuracies were compared to optimum object-based classification. The importance of this research is to test different indices in several cases (about 75 cases) and to find the quantitative and qualitative effects of increasing or decreasing auxiliary data. This way, researchers who intent to work with such high resolution data are given an insight on the whole procedure of detecting vegetation species as one of the outstanding and common features from such images. Results showed that DVI index can better detect vegetation regions in test images. Also, the object-based classification with average 93.6% overall accuracy and 86.5% Kappa was more suitable for extracting vegetation rather than the pixel-based classification with average 81.2% overall accuracy and 59.7% Kappa.

  16. COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION INDICES FOR VERY HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGES, SPECIFIC CASE ULTRACAM-D IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barzegar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Today digital aerial images acquired with UltraCam sensor are known to be a valuable resource for producing high resolution information of land covers. In this research, different methods for extracting vegetation from semi-urban and agricultural regions were studied and their results were compared in terms of overall accuracy and Kappa statistic. To do this, several vegetation indices were first tested on three image datasets with different object-based classifications in terms of presence or absence of sample data, defining other features and also more classes. The effects of all these cases were evaluated on final results. After it, pixel-based classification was performed on each dataset and their accuracies were compared to optimum object-based classification. The importance of this research is to test different indices in several cases (about 75 cases and to find the quantitative and qualitative effects of increasing or decreasing auxiliary data. This way, researchers who intent to work with such high resolution data are given an insight on the whole procedure of detecting vegetation species as one of the outstanding and common features from such images. Results showed that DVI index can better detect vegetation regions in test images. Also, the object-based classification with average 93.6% overall accuracy and 86.5% Kappa was more suitable for extracting vegetation rather than the pixel-based classification with average 81.2% overall accuracy and 59.7% Kappa.

  17. High Resolution Global Topography of Itokawa from Hayabusa Imaging and LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Robert W.; Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Scheeres, D. J.; Mukai, T.; Hirata, N.; Abe, S.; Saito, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Ishiguro, M.; Kubota, T.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the topography of the Itokawa asteroid. It summarizes some of the relevant information about the asteroid, and how using the imaging from Hayabusa and LIDAR data, a topographic image of Itokawa was derived.

  18. Chemical Evolution of the Galactic Bulge as Derived from High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of K and M Red Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, K; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2006-01-01

    We present chemical abundances in K and M red-giant members of the Galactic bulge derived from high-resolution infrared spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini-South. The elements studied are carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium, titanium, and iron. The evolution of C and N abundances in the studied red-giants show that their oxygen abundances represent the original values with which the stars were born. Oxygen is a superior element for probing the timescale of bulge chemical enrichment via [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H]. The [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation in the bulge does not follow the disk relation, with [O/Fe] values falling above those of the disk. Titanium also behaves similarly to oxygen with respect to iron. Based on these elevated values of [O/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] extending to large Fe abundances, it is suggested that the bulge underwent a more rapid chemical enrichment than the halo. In addition, there are declines in both [O/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] in those bulge targets with the largest Fe abundances, signifying a...

  19. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Trabecular Bone in the Wrist at 3 Tesla: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludescher, B.; Martirosian, P.; Lenk, S.; Machann, J.; Dammann, F.; Schick, F.; Claussen, C.; Schlemmer, H. [Univ. Clinic, Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Section on Experimental Radiology

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of trabecular bone of the wrist at 3 Tesla (3T) in vivo and to assess the potential benefit of the increased resolution for clinical assessment of structural changes in spongy bone. Material and Methods: High-resolution MRI of the wrist was performed with a whole-body 3T MR scanner using a dedicated circularly polarized transmit/receive wrist-coil. Two 3D-FISP sequences with a spatial resolution of 300x300x300 {mu}m{sup 3} in a measuring time of TA{approx}7:51 min, and 200x200x200 {mu}m{sup 3} in TA{approx}9:33 min were applied. Seven young healthy volunteers and three elderly subjects with suspected osteoporosis were examined. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the optimized setup at 3T was compared to measurements at 1.5T. Results: The images at 3T allow microscopic analysis of the bone structure at an isotropic spatial resolution of 200 {mu}m in examination times of <10 min. Differences in the structure of the spongy bone between normal and markedly osteoporotic subjects are well depicted. The SNR at 3T was found up to 16 times higher than at 1.5T applying unchanged imaging parameters. Conclusion: The proposed high-resolution MRI technique offers high potential in the diagnosis and follow-up of diseases with impaired bone structure of hand and/or wrist in clinical applications.

  20. High-resolution imaging using a wideband MIMO radar system with two distributed arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dang-wei; Ma, Xiao-yan; Chen, A-Lei; Su, Yi

    2010-05-01

    Imaging a fast maneuvering target has been an active research area in past decades. Usually, an array antenna with multiple elements is implemented to avoid the motion compensations involved in the inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. Nevertheless, there is a price dilemma due to the high level of hardware complexity compared to complex algorithm implemented in the ISAR imaging system with only one antenna. In this paper, a wideband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar system with two distributed arrays is proposed to reduce the hardware complexity of the system. Furthermore, the system model, the equivalent array production method and the imaging procedure are presented. As compared with the classical real aperture radar (RAR) imaging system, there is a very important contribution in our method that the lower hardware complexity can be involved in the imaging system since many additive virtual array elements can be obtained. Numerical simulations are provided for testing our system and imaging method. PMID:20051345

  1. Objectives and Layout of a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Gates, D; Monticello, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H

    2010-07-29

    A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for LHD. This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of < 2 cm and ≥ 10 ms. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD.

  2. High-resolution 3D X-ray imaging of intracranial nitinol stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoeren, Rudolph M.; With, Peter H.N. de [Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), Faculty Electrical Engineering, Signal Processing Systems group (SPS), Eindhoven (Netherlands); Soederman, Michael [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Kroon, Johannes N.; Roijers, Ruben B.; Babic, Drazenko [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To assess an optimized 3D imaging protocol for intracranial nitinol stents in 3D C-arm flat detector imaging. For this purpose, an image quality simulation and an in vitro study was carried out. Nitinol stents of various brands were placed inside an anthropomorphic head phantom, using iodine contrast. Experiments with objects were preceded by image quality and dose simulations. We varied X-ray imaging parameters in a commercially interventional X-ray system to set 3D image quality in the contrast-noise-sharpness space. Beam quality was varied to evaluate contrast of the stents while keeping absorbed dose below recommended values. Two detector formats were used, paired with an appropriate pixel size and X-ray focus size. Zoomed reconstructions were carried out and snapshot images acquired. High contrast spatial resolution was assessed with a CT phantom. We found an optimal protocol for imaging intracranial nitinol stents. Contrast resolution was optimized for nickel-titanium-containing stents. A high spatial resolution larger than 2.1 lp/mm allows struts to be visualized. We obtained images of stents of various brands and a representative set of images is shown. Independent of the make, struts can be imaged with virtually continuous strokes. Measured absorbed doses are shown to be lower than 50 mGy Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). By balancing the modulation transfer of the imaging components and tuning the high-contrast imaging capabilities, we have shown that thin nitinol stent wires can be reconstructed with high contrast-to-noise ratio and good detail, while keeping radiation doses within recommended values. Experimental results compare well with imaging simulations. (orig.)

  3. High resolution imaging of particle interactions in a large bubble chamber using holographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle interactions were recorded holographically in a large volume of the 15-foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab. This cryogenic bubble chamber was filled with a heavy Neon-Hydrogen mixture and was exposed to a wideband neutrino beam with mean energy of 150 GeV. The use of holography in combination with conventional photography provides a powerful tool for direct detection of short-lived particles. Holography gives a high resolution over a large depth of field which can not be achieved with conventional photography. A high-power pulsed ruby laser was used as the holographic light source. Since short pulses of some 50 ns duration at the required energy were found to give rise to boiling during the chamber's expansion, a reduction of the instantaneous power at a given energy was required to suppress this unwanted after-effect. This was achieved by developing a unique technique for stretching the pulses using an electro-optic feedback loop. One hundred thousand holograms were produced during a wide-band neutrino experiment (E-632, 1985) using a dark-field holographic system. Analysis of a sample of holograms shows a resolution of 150 μm was achieved in an ovoidal shape fiducial volume of 0.48 m3 % of the 14 m3 total fiducial volume of the chamber

  4. Diagnostic imaging of gout: comparison of high-resolution US versus conventional X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettenbacher, Thomas; Ennemoser, Sybille; Weirich, Harald [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Ulmer, Hanno [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Hartig, Frank; Klotz, Werner; Herold, Manfred [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2008-03-15

    The aim was to compare X-ray and ultrasound (US) in diagnosing gout. In a prospective study, 105 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of gout underwent conventional X-ray und high-resolution US in order to help in arriving at a definite diagnosis. X-ray findings suggestive of gout included soft-tissue opacifications with densities between soft tissue and bone, articular and periarticular bone erosions, and osteophytes at the margins of opacifications or erosions. US findings suggestive of gout included bright stippled foci and hyperechoic soft-tissue areas. Fifty-five patients had a definite diagnosis of gout (102 involved sites), 31 patients were diagnosed as having another disease (59 involved sites), and 19 patients were excluded from the study because a definite diagnosis could not be established. X-ray suggested gout with a sensitivity of 31% (32/102) and a specificity of 93% (55/59), whereas US suggested gout with a sensitivity of 96% (98/102) and a specificity of 73% (43/59). US was much more sensitive than conventional X-ray but less specific. Our data show that US often provided additional diagnostic information in patients with clinical suspicion of gout when laboratory findings and X-ray results were negative or inconclusive and should therefore be used in these cases. (orig.)

  5. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Satija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases.

  6. High-resolution remote sensing image-based extensive deformation-induced landslide displacement field monitoring method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanjun Liu; Han Wang; Jianwei Huang; Lixin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Landslide is one of the multitudinous serious geological hazards. The key to its control and reduction lies on dynamic monitoring and early warning. The article points out the insufficiency of traditional measuring means applied for large-scale landslide monitoring and proposes the method for extensive landslide displacement field monitoring using high-resolution remote images. Matching of cognominal points is realized by using the invariant features of SIFT algorithm in image translation, rotation, zooming, and affine transformation, and through recognition and comparison of characteristics of high-resolution images in different landsliding periods. Following that, landslide displacement vector field can be made known by measuring the distances and directions between cognominal points. As evidenced by field application of the method for landslide monitoring at West Open Mine in Fushun city of China, the method has the attraction of being able to make areal measurement through satellite observation and capable of obtaining at the same time the information of large-area intensive displacement field, for facilitating automatic delimitation of extent of landslide displacement vector field and sliding mass. This can serve as a basis for making analysis of laws governing occurrence of landslide and adoption of countermeasures.

  7. Post-earthquake road damage assessment using region-based algorithms from high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighattalab, A.; Mohammadzadeh, A.; Valadan Zoej, M. J.; Taleai, M.

    2010-10-01

    Receiving accurate and comprehensive knowledge about the conditions of roads after earthquake strike are crucial in finding optimal paths and coordinating rescue missions. Continuous coverage of the disaster region and rapid access of high-resolution satellite images make this technology as a useful and powerful resource for post-earthquake damage assessment and the evaluation process. Along with this improved technology, object-oriented classification has become a promising alternative for classifying high-resolution remote sensing imagery, such as QuickBird, Ikonos. Thus, in this study, a novel approach is proposed for the automatic detection and assessment of damaged roads in urban areas based on object based classification techniques using post-event satellite image and vector map. The most challenging phase of the proposed region-based algorithm is the segmentation procedure. The extracted regions are then classified using nearest neighbor classifier making use of textural parameters. Then, an appropriate fuzzy inference system (FIS) is proposed for road damage assessment. Finally, the roads are correctly labeled as 'Blocked road' or 'Unblocked road' in the road damage assessment step. The proposed method was tested on QuickBird pan-sharpened image of Bam, Iran, concerning the devastating earthquake that occurred in December 2003. The visual investigation of the obtained results demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  8. High-resolution Linear Polarimetric Imaging for the Event Horizon Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew A.; Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Wardle, John F. C.; Bouman, Katherine L.

    2016-09-01

    Images of the linear polarizations of synchrotron radiation around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) highlight their projected magnetic field lines and provide key data for understanding the physics of accretion and outflow from supermassive black holes. The highest-resolution polarimetric images of AGNs are produced with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Because VLBI incompletely samples the Fourier transform of the source image, any image reconstruction that fills in unmeasured spatial frequencies will not be unique and reconstruction algorithms are required. In this paper, we explore some extensions of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to linear polarimetric VLBI imaging. In contrast to previous work, our polarimetric MEM algorithm combines a Stokes I imager that only uses bispectrum measurements that are immune to atmospheric phase corruption, with a joint Stokes Q and U imager that operates on robust polarimetric ratios. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique on 7 and 3 mm wavelength quasar observations from the VLBA and simulated 1.3 mm Event Horizon Telescope observations of Sgr A* and M87. Consistent with past studies, we find that polarimetric MEM can produce superior resolution compared to the standard CLEAN algorithm, when imaging smooth and compact source distributions. As an imaging framework, MEM is highly adaptable, allowing a range of constraints on polarization structure. Polarimetric MEM is thus an attractive choice for image reconstruction with the EHT.

  9. High-Resolution Longitudinal Screening with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Murine Brain Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Bock

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main limitations of intracranial models of diseases is our present inability to monitor and evaluate the intracranial compartment noninvasively over time. Therefore, there is a growing need for imaging modalities that provide thorough neuropathological evaluations of xenograft and transgenic models of intracranial pathology. In this study, we have established protocols for multiple-mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to follow the growth and behavior of intracranial xenografts of gliomas longitudinally. We successfully obtained weekly images on 16 mice for a total of 5 weeks on a 7-T multiple-mouse MRI. T2- and Ti-weighted imaging with gadolinium enhancement of vascularity was used to detect tumor margins, tumor size, and growth. These experiments, using 3D whole brain images obtained in four mice at once, demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining repeat radiological images in intracranial tumor models and suggest that MRI should be incorporated as a research modality for the investigation of intracranial pathobiology.

  10. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  11. Very-High-Resolution SAR Images and Linked Open Data Analytics Based on Ontologies

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza-Molina, Daniela; Nikolaou, Charalampos; Dumitru, Corneliu; Bereta, Konstantina; Koubarakis, Manolis; Schwarz, Gottfried; Datcu, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the integration of multiple sources of information such as Earth observation (EO) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and their metadata, semantic descriptors of the image content, as well as other publicly available geospatial data sources expressed as linked open data for posing complex queries in order to support geospatial data analytics. Our approach lays the foundations for the development of richer tools and applications that focus on EO image analytics us...

  12. Performance Analysis of High Resolution Images Using Interpolation Techniques in Multimedia Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Sinha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents various types of interpolation techniques to obtain a high quality image The difference between the proposed algorithm and conventional algorithms (in estimation of missing pixel value is that if standard deviation of image is used to calculate pixel value rather than the value of nearmost neighbor, the image gives the better result. The proposed method demonstrated higher performances in terms of PSNR and SSIM when compared to the conventional interpolation algorithms mentioned.

  13. Content-based high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval with local binary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A. P.; Wang, S. G.

    2006-10-01

    Texture is a very important feature in image analysis including content-based image retrieval (CBIR). A common way of retrieving images is to calculate the similarity of features between a sample images and the other images in a database. This paper applies a novel texture analysis approach, local binary patterns (LBP) operator, to 1m Ikonos images retrieval and presents an improved LBP histogram spatially enhanced LBP (SEL) histogram with spatial information by dividing the LBP labeled images into k*k regions. First different neighborhood P and scale factor R were chosen to scan over the whole images, so that their labeled LBP and local variance (VAR) images were calculated, from which we got the LBP, LBP/VAR, and VAR histograms and SEL histograms. The histograms were used as the features for CBIR and a non-parametric statistical test G-statistic was used for similarity measure. The result showed that LBP/VAR based features got a very high retrieval rate with certain values of P and R, and SEL features that are more robust to illumination changes than LBP/VAR also obtained higher retrieval rate than LBP histograms. The comparison to Gabor filter confirmed the effectiveness of the presented approach in CBIR.

  14. New views of the human NK cell immunological synapse: recent advances enabled by super- and high- resolution imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Mace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging technology has undergone rapid growth with the development of super resolution microscopy, which enables resolution below the diffraction barrier of light (~200 nm. In addition, new techniques for single molecule imaging are being added to the cell biologist’s arsenal. Immunologists have exploited these techniques to advance understanding of NK biology, particularly that of the immune synapse. The immune synapse’s relatively small size and complex architecture combined with its exquisitely controlled signaling milieu have made it a challenge to visualize. In this review we highlight and discuss new insights into NK cell immune synapse formation and regulation revealed by cutting edge imaging techniques, including super resolution microscopy and high resolution total internal reflection microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer.

  15. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  16. Non-contact high resolution Bessel beam probe for diagnostic imaging of cornea and trabecular meshwork region in eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murukeshan, V. M.; Jesmond, Hong Xun J.; Shinoj, V. K.; Baskaran, M.; Tin, Aung

    2015-07-01

    Primary angle closure glaucoma is a major form of disease that causes blindness in Asia and worldwide. In glaucoma, irregularities in the ocular aqueous outflow system cause an elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP) with subsequent death of retinal ganglion cells, resulting in loss of vision. High resolution visualization of the iridocorneal angle region has great diagnostic value in understanding the disease condition which enables monitoring of surgical interventions that decrease IOP. None of the current diagnostic techniques such as goniophotography, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) and RetCam™ can image with molecular specificity and required spatial resolution that can delineate the trabecular meshwork structures. This paper in this context proposes new concepts and methodology using Bessel beams based illumination and imaging for such diagnostic ocular imaging applications. The salient features using Bessel beams instead of the conventional Gaussian beam, and the optimization challenges in configuring the probe system will be illustrated with porcine eye samples.

  17. High-resolution CT imaging of the lung for patients with primary Sjoegren's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess pulmonary abnormalities in patients with primary Sjoegren's syndrome (PSS) using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Material and methods: The HRCT scans of 24 patients with the diagnosis PSS were retrospectively reviewed regarding the presence, extension and distribution of 16 pathological findings. Results: Nineteen patients (79.2%) showed pathological findings and in five patients (21.8%) the HRCT scan was judged to be normal. A predominance of abnormalities in the lower lobes and subpleural areas was detected. The following pathologies were found: bronchiectasis, thin-walled cysts and small pulmonary nodules (46.2%), ground-glass attenuation and emphysema (37.8%), interlobular-septal thickening (29.4%), honeycombing (25.2%), bronchial wall thickening, tree-in-bud pattern (21.0%), mosaic perfusion (16.8%), architectural distortion (12.6%). Airspace consolidation, air trapping, large nodules (10-30 mm) and masses (>30 mm), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (>15 mm) and free pleural fluid were seen each in 4.2%. In 7 of the 11 patients with thin-walled cysts areas of ground-glass attenuation were detected. Conclusion: HRCT seems is contributive to the characterization of the wide variety of lung abnormalities in PSS. Airway disease alone or in association with the presence of varying degrees of interstitial disease represents the main findings in accordance with earlier reports. Unexpectedly, almost half of the patients had thin-walled cysts on the HRCT scans, which etiology is unclear but could be associated with areas of ground-glass attenuation indicating LIP

  18. Chemical shift measurements of chlorine K X-ray spectra using a high-resolution PIXE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-efficiency high-resolution wavelength-dispersive spectrograph with a von-Hamos configuration was developed for chemical state identification of elements in environmental samples using PIXE analysis. To evaluate the performance of this system, chlorine K X-ray spectra for NaCl, NH4Cl and polyvinylchloride (PVC) targets were measured and compared. Also, to study the applicability to environmental mixed samples, mixtures of NaCl and NH4Cl with different mixing ratios were measured. Through observation of Cl Kα1 X-ray from NaCl, the energy resolution of the system was determined to be 1.1 eV. For the NaCl sample, a Kβx line was observed at an energy, which is higher than that of the Kβ main peak by 2 eV, whereas no Kβx emission was observed for the NH4Cl sample. The chemical shift of the Kβ main peak for PVC relative to that for NaCl was about 1.2 eV. For NaCl-NH4Cl mixture targets, the relative intensity of Kβx satellite to the Kβ main line provided an indication of mixing ratio. Energies and relative intensity of Cl Kβ X-ray satellites for NaCl and NH4Cl samples calculated by a simple molecular-orbital method agreed only qualitatively with the experimental results

  19. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  20. High Res at High Speed: Automated Delivery of High-Resolution Images from Digital Library Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, R. Niccole; Watkins, Sean

    2012-01-01

    As primary source materials in the library are digitized and made available online, the focus of related library services is shifting to include new and innovative methods of digital delivery via social media, digital storytelling, and community-based and consortial image repositories. Most images on the Web are not of sufficient quality for most…

  1. Automatic Detection of Clouds and Shadows Using High Resolution Satellite Image Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Detecting clouds and their shadows is one of the primaries steps to perform when processing satellite images because they may alter the quality of some products such as large-area orthomosaics. The main goal of this paper is to present the automatic method developed at IGN-France for detecting clouds and shadows in a sequence of satellite images. In our work, surface reflectance orthoimages are used. They were processed from initial satellite images using a dedicated software. The cloud detection step consists of a region-growing algorithm. Seeds are firstly extracted. For that purpose and for each input ortho-image to process, we select the other ortho-images of the sequence that intersect it. The pixels of the input ortho-image are secondly labelled seeds if the difference of reflectance (in the blue channel) with overlapping ortho-images is bigger than a given threshold. Clouds are eventually delineated using a region-growing method based on a radiometric and homogeneity criterion. Regarding the shadow detection, our method is based on the idea that a shadow pixel is darker when comparing to the other images of the time series. The detection is basically composed of three steps. Firstly, we compute a synthetic ortho-image covering the whole study area. Its pixels have a value corresponding to the median value of all input reflectance ortho-images intersecting at that pixel location. Secondly, for each input ortho-image, a pixel is labelled shadows if the difference of reflectance (in the NIR channel) with the synthetic ortho-image is below a given threshold. Eventually, an optional region-growing step may be used to refine the results. Note that pixels labelled clouds during the cloud detection are not used for computing the median value in the first step; additionally, the NIR input data channel is used to perform the shadow detection, because it appeared to better discriminate shadow pixels. The method was tested on times series of Landsat 8 and Pl

  2. Histological Basis of Laminar MRI Patterns in High Resolution Images of Fixed Human Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark N.; Cronin, Matthew J.; Bowtell, Richard W.; Scott, Ian S.; Palmer, Alan R.; Gowland, Penny A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of the auditory region of the temporal lobe would benefit from the availability of image contrast that allowed direct identification of the primary auditory cortex, as this region cannot be accurately located using gyral landmarks alone. Previous work has suggested that the primary area can be identified in magnetic resonance (MR) images because of its relatively high myelin content. However, MR images are also affected by the iron content of the tissue and in this study we sought to confirm that different MR image contrasts did correlate with the myelin content in the gray matter and were not primarily affected by iron content as is the case in the primary visual and somatosensory areas. By imaging blocks of fixed post-mortem cortex in a 7 T scanner and then sectioning them for histological staining we sought to assess the relative contribution of myelin and iron to the gray matter contrast in the auditory region. Evaluating the image contrast in T2*-weighted images and quantitative R2* maps showed a reasonably high correlation between the myelin density of the gray matter and the intensity of the MR images. The correlation with T1-weighted phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images was better than with the previous two image types, and there were clearly differentiated borders between adjacent cortical areas in these images. A significant amount of iron was present in the auditory region, but did not seem to contribute to the laminar pattern of the cortical gray matter in MR images. Similar levels of iron were present in the gray and white matter and although iron was present in fibers within the gray matter, these fibers were fairly uniformly distributed across the cortex. Thus, we conclude that T1- and T2*-weighted imaging sequences do demonstrate the relatively high myelin levels that are characteristic of the deep layers in primary auditory cortex and allow it and some of the surrounding areas to be

  3. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution

  4. High-resolution MR imaging evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed on 165 knees to evaluate tears of the anterior cruciate ligament. Images were obtained in the sagittal and coronal plates using proton density, T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Correlation with arthroscopic findings was obtained in 50 patients, 12 of whom had torn anterior cruciate ligaments. T2-weighted coronal images were 100% sensitive and 97% specific for demonstrating anterior cruciate ligament tears. While no false-negative studies were recorded, the sagittal and proton density images were least specific, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 84%. The authors' results indicate that when the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament is in question, T2-weighted coronal images should be obtained

  5. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated.

  6. Clinical Experience With A High Resolution Digital Imaging System For Gastro-Intestinal Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Rowlands, J. A.; Hynes, D. M.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In our department, it is planned that the gastro-intestinal fluoroscopic area will be equipped entirely with digital imaging systems. The use of the 1024 X 1024 pixel frame store, backed by a hard disc for rapid image transfer, and the production of hard copy on a laser imager has reached the point where clinical efficacy and acceptance are assured. The further addition of facilities for annotation and the application of digital post-processing techniques are being explored both at the clinical site and at the research laboratorieS. The use of laser imaging has produced a further improvement in image quality and some of the practical problems related to this apparatus will be described. The availability of larger capacity laser disc image storage enables the local area network or "mini-PACS" system for fluoroscopy areas to become a concept worthy of investigation. We present our experience over a number of years with these systems, together with our latest investigations into potential applications of laser technology to the practice of radiology in a busy imaging centre.

  7. In vivo high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel at 8.0 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heading AbstractObjective. To determine the feasibility of acquiring in vivo images of the human carpal tunnel at 8 tesla (T).Design. The wrist of an asymptomatic volunteer was imaged with an 8 T /80 cm magnet. The subject was imaged prone with the arm over the head and the wrist placed in neutral position in a custom-built dedicated shielded wrist coil. Axial two-dimensional gradient-echo (GRE) images of the wrist were acquired.Results. Image contrast and resolution at 8 T are excellent. The infrastructure of the median nerve, particularly the interfascicular epineurium and individual fascicles, is better visualized at 8 T than at 1.5 T. The flexor tendons are well delineated from each other and the surrounding soft tissues, and tertiary tendon fiber bundles are resolved. The boundaries of the carpal tunnel are better defined at 8 T.Conclusion. We have obtained the first high-quality in vivo images of the human carpal tunnel at 8 T. The 8 T images demonstrated better contrast and resolution than those obtained at 1.5 T. (orig.)

  8. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1997-01-26

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit.

  9. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report, January 26, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1998-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EIVI) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHZ), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) We tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) We conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) We ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit.

  10. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit

  11. High-resolution morphologic and ultrashort time-to-echo quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B. [Veterans Administration San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Tafur, Monica; Du, Jiang; Healey, Robert [University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Wonchon-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Gyeonggi-do, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To implement high-resolution morphologic and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) techniques in cadavers and volunteers. This study was approved by the institutional review board. TMJs of cadavers and volunteers were imaged on a 3-T MR system. High-resolution morphologic and quantitative sequences using conventional and UTE techniques were performed in cadaveric TMJs. Morphologic and UTE quantitative sequences were performed in asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. Morphologic evaluation demonstrated the TMJ structures in open- and closed-mouth position. UTE techniques facilitated the visualization of the disc and fibrocartilage. Quantitative UTE MRI was successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo, reflecting the degree of degeneration. There was a difference in the mean UTE T2* values between asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. MRI evaluation of the TMJ using UTE techniques allows characterization of the internal structure and quantification of the MR properties of the disc. Quantitative UTE MRI can be performed in vivo with short scan times. (orig.)

  12. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit

  13. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report, January 26, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EIVI) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHZ), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) We tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) We conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) We ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit

  14. Chemical profile of beans cultivars (Phaseolus vulgaris) by 1H NMR - high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS);Perfil quimico de cultivares de feijao (Phaseolus vulgaris) pela tecnica de high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Luciano Morais; Choze, Rafael; Cavalcante, Pedro Paulo Araujo; Santos, Suzana da Costa; Ferri, Pedro Henrique, E-mail: luciano@quimica.ufg.b [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFScar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The application of one-dimensional proton high-resolution magic angle spinning ({sup 1}H HR-MAS) NMR combined with a typical advantages of solid and liquid-state NMR techniques was used as input variables for the multivariate statistical analysis. In this paper, different cultivars of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed and in development by EMBRAPA - Arroz e Feijao were analyzed by {sup 1}H HR-MAS, which have been demonstrated to be a valuable tool in its differentiation according chemical composition and avoid the manipulation of the samples as used in other techniques. (author)

  15. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, Malgorzata G.; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen;

    2015-01-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible w...

  16. Vehicle detection from high-resolution aerial images based on superpixel and color name features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziyi; Cao, Liujuan; Yu, Zang; Chen, Yiping; Wang, Cheng; Li, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Automatic vehicle detection from aerial images is emerging due to the strong demand of large-area traffic monitoring. In this paper, we present a novel framework for automatic vehicle detection from the aerial images. Through superpixel segmentation, we first segment the aerial images into homogeneous patches, which consist of the basic units during the detection to improve efficiency. By introducing the sparse representation into our method, powerful classification ability is achieved after the dictionary training. To effectively describe a patch, the Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) is used. We further propose to integrate color information to enrich the feature representation by using the color name feature. The final feature consists of both HOG and color name based histogram, by which we get a strong descriptor of a patch. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robust performance of the proposed algorithm for vehicle detection from aerial images.

  17. High resolution isotopic analysis of U- bearing particles via fusion of SIMS and EDS images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Garcia, Ben J.; Fischer, Ashley E.; Willingham, David G.

    2016-05-20

    Image fusion of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) images and X-ray elemental maps from energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed to facilitate the isolation and re-analysis of isotopically unique U-bearing particles where the highest precision SIMS measurements are required. Image registration, image fusion and particle micromanipulation were performed on a subset of SIMS images obtained from a large area pre-screen of a particle distribution from a sample containing several certified reference materials (CRM) U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850, as well as a standard reference material (SRM) 8704 (Buffalo River Sediment) to simulate particles collected on swipes during routine inspections of declared uranium enrichment facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In total, fourteen particles, ranging in size from 5 – 15 µm, were isolated and re-analyzed by SIMS in multi-collector mode identifying nine particles of CRM U129A, one of U150, one of U500 and three of U850. These identifications were made within a few percent errors from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) certified atom percent values for 234U, 235U and 238U for the corresponding CRMs. This work represents the first use of image fusion to enhance the accuracy and precision of isotope ratio measurements for isotopically unique U-bearing particles for nuclear safeguards applications. Implementation of image fusion is essential for the identification of particles of interests that fall below the spatial resolution of the SIMS images.

  18. HIGH RESOLUTION REAL-TIME MEDICAL IMAGING BASED ON PARALLEL BEAMFORMING TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lutao; Jin Gang; Xu Hongbing

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of frame-rate is very important for high quality ultrasound imaging of fast-moving structures.It is also one of the key technologies of Three-Dimension (3-D) real-time medical imaging.In this paper,we have demonstrated a beamforming method which gives imaging frame-rate increment without sacrificing the quality of medical images.By using wider and fewer transmit beams in combination with four narrower parallel receive beams,potentially increasing the imaging frame-rate by a factor four.Through employing full transmit aperture,controlling the mainlobe width,and suppressing sidelobes of angular responses,the inherent gain loss of normal parallel beamfomer can be compensated in the maximal degree.The noise and interference signals also can be suppressed effectively.Finally,we show comparable lateral resolution and contrast of ultrasound images to normal single widow weighting beamformer on simulated phantoms of point targets,cyst and fetus of 12th week.As the computational cost is linear with the number of array elements and the same with Delay And Sum (DAS) beamformers,this method has great advantages of possibility for high frame-rate real-time applications.

  19. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  20. High-resolution 3D-GRE imaging of the abdomen using controlled aliasing acceleration technique - a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Busireddy, Kiran K.R.; Liu, Baodong; Burke, Lauren M.; Altun, Ersan; Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Dale, Brian M. [Siemens Medical Solutions, MR Research and Development, Morrisville, NC (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To assess the feasibility of high-resolution 3D-gradient-recalled echo (GRE) fat-suppressed T1-weighted images using controlled aliasing acceleration technique (CAIPIRINHA-VIBE), and compare image quality and lesion detection to standard-resolution 3D-GRE images using conventional acceleration technique (GRAPPA-VIBE). Eighty-four patients (41 males, 43 females; age range: 14-90 years, 58.8 ± 15.6 years) underwent abdominal MRI at 1.5 T with CAIPIRINHA-VIBE [spatial resolution, 0.76 ± 0.04 mm] and GRAPPA-VIBE [spatial resolution, 1.17 ± 0.14 mm]. Two readers independently reviewed image quality, presence of artefacts, lesion conspicuity, and lesion detection. Kappa statistic was used to assess interobserver agreement. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for image qualitative pairwise comparisons. Logistic regression with post-hoc testing was used to evaluate statistical significance of lesions evaluation. Interobserver agreement ranged between 0.45-0.93. Pre-contrast CAIPIRINHA-VIBE showed significantly (p < 0.001) sharper images and lesion conspicuity with decreased residual aliasing, but more noise enhancement and inferior image quality. Post-contrast CAIPIRINHA-VIBE showed significantly (p < 0.001) sharper images and higher lesion conspicuity, with less respiratory motion and residual aliasing artefacts. Inferior fat-suppression was noticeable on CAIPIRINHA-VIBE sequences (p < 0.001). High in-plane resolution abdominal 3D-GRE fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging using controlled-aliasing acceleration technique is feasible and yields sharper images compared to standard-resolution images using standard acceleration, with higher post-contrast image quality and trend for improved hepatic lesions detection. (orig.)

  1. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru-Shan Wu, Xiao-Bi Xie, Thorne Lay

    2005-06-06

    In this project, we develop new theories and methods for multi-domain one-way wave-equation based propagators, and apply these techniques to seismic modeling, seismic imaging, seismic illumination and model parameter estimation in 3D complex environments. The major progress of this project includes: (1) The development of the dual-domain wave propagators. We continue to improve the one-way wave-equation based propagators. Our target is making propagators capable of handling more realistic velocity models. A wide-angle propagator for transversely isotropic media with vertically symmetric axis (VTI) has been developed for P-wave modeling and imaging. The resulting propagator is accurate for large velocity perturbations and wide propagation angles. The thin-slab propagator for one-way elastic-wave propagation is further improved. With the introduction of complex velocities, the quality factors Qp and Qs have been incorporated into the thin-slab propagator. The resulting viscoelastic thin-slab propagator can handle elastic-wave propagation in models with intrinsic attenuations. We apply this method to complex models for AVO modeling, random media characterization and frequency-dependent reflectivity simulation. (2) Exploring the Information in the Local Angle Domain. Traditionally, the local angle information can only be extracted using the ray-based method. We develop a wave-equation based technique to process the local angle domain information. The approach can avoid the singularity problem usually linked to the high-frequency asymptotic method. We successfully apply this technique to seismic illumination and the resulting method provides a practical tool for three-dimensional full-volume illumination analysis in complex structures. The directional illumination also provides information for angle-domain imaging corrections. (3) Elastic-Wave Imaging. We develop a multicomponent elastic migration method. The application of the multicomponent one-way elastic propagator

  2. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging of plant tissues: towards a plant metabolite atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Wang, Qing; Friedt, Wolfgang; Spengler, Bernhard; Gottwald, Sven; Römpp, Andreas

    2015-11-21

    Mass spectrometry (MS) imaging provides spatial and molecular information for a wide range of compounds. This tool can be used to investigate metabolic changes in plant physiology and environmental interactions. A major challenge in our study was to prepare tissue sections that were compatible with high spatial resolution analysis and therefore dedicated sample preparation protocols were established and optimized for the physicochemical properties of all major plant organs. We combined high spatial resolution (5 μm), in order to detect cellular features, and high mass accuracy (root mean square error), for molecular specificity. Mass spectrometry imaging experiments were performed in positive and negative ion mode. Changes in metabolite patterns during plant development were investigated for germination of oilseed rape. The detailed localization of more than 90 compounds allowed assignment to metabolic processes and indicated possible functions in plant tissues. The 'untargeted' nature of MS imaging allows the detection of marker compounds for the physiological status, as demonstrated for plant-pathogen interactions. Our images show excellent correlation with optical/histological examination. In contrast to previous MS imaging studies of plants, we present a complete workflow that covers multiple species, such as oilseed rape, wheat seed and rice. In addition, different major plant organs and a wide variety of compound classes were analyzed. Thus, our method could be used to develop a plant metabolite atlas as a reference to investigate systemic and local effects of pathogen infection or environmental stress.

  3. MPGD for breast cancer prevention: a high resolution and low dose radiation medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, R. M.; Cerquera, E. A.; Mañana, G.

    2012-07-01

    Early detection of small calcifications in mammograms is considered the best preventive tool of breast cancer. However, existing digital mammography with relatively low radiation skin exposure has limited accessibility and insufficient spatial resolution for small calcification detection. Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD) and associated technologies, increasingly provide new information useful to generate images of microscopic structures and make more accessible cutting edge technology for medical imaging and many other applications. In this work we foresee and develop an application for the new information provided by a MPGD camera in the form of highly controlled images with high dynamical resolution. We present a new Super Detail Image (S-DI) that efficiently profits of this new information provided by the MPGD camera to obtain very high spatial resolution images. Therefore, the method presented in this work shows that the MPGD camera with SD-I, can produce mammograms with the necessary spatial resolution to detect microcalcifications. It would substantially increase efficiency and accessibility of screening mammography to highly improve breast cancer prevention.

  4. High-resolution in vivo Wistar rodent brain atlas based on T1 weighted image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Su; Lu, Zhongkang; Huang, Weimin; Seramani, Sankar; Ramasamy, Boominathan; Sekar, Sakthivel; Guan, Cuntai; Bhakoo, Kishore

    2016-03-01

    Image based atlases for rats brain have a significant impact on pre-clinical research. In this project we acquired T1-weighted images from Wistar rodent brains with fine 59μm isotropical resolution for generation of the atlas template image. By applying post-process procedures using a semi-automatic brain extraction method, we delineated the brain tissues from source data. Furthermore, we applied a symmetric group-wise normalization method to generate an optimized template of T1 image of rodent brain, then aligned our template to the Waxholm Space. In addition, we defined several simple and explicit landmarks to corresponding our template with the well known Paxinos stereotaxic reference system. Anchoring at the origin of the Waxholm Space, we applied piece-wise linear transformation method to map the voxels of the template into the coordinates system in Paxinos' stereotoxic coordinates to facilitate the labelling task. We also cross-referenced our data with both published rodent brain atlas and image atlases available online, methodologically labelling the template to produce a Wistar brain atlas identifying more than 130 structures. Particular attention was paid to the cortex and cerebellum, as these areas encompass the most researched aspects of brain functions. Moreover, we adopted the structure hierarchy and naming nomenclature common to various atlases, so that the names and hierarchy structure presented in the atlas are readily recognised for easy use. It is believed the atlas will present a useful tool in rodent brain functional and pharmaceutical studies.

  5. Toward high-sensitivity and high-resolution submillimeter-wave video imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Erik; May, Torsten; Born, Detlef; Zieger, Gabriel; Thorwirth, Günter; Anders, Solveig; Zakosarenko, Vyacheslav; Krause, Torsten; Krüger, André; Schulz, Marco; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Schubert, Marco; Starkloff, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Against a background of newly emerged security threats, the well-established idea of utilizing submillimeter-wave radiation for personal security screening applications has recently evolved into a promising technology. Possible application scenarios demand sensitive, fast, flexible and high-quality imaging techniques. At present, best results are obtained by passive imaging using cryogenic microbolometers as radiation detectors. Building upon the concept of a passive submillimeter-wave stand-off video camera introduced previously, we present the evolution of this concept into a practical application-ready imaging device. This has been achieved using a variety of measures such as optimizing the detector parameters, improving the scanning mechanism, increasing the sampling speed, and enhancing the image generation software. The camera concept is based on a Cassegrain-type mirror optics, an optomechanical scanner, an array of 20 superconducting transition-edge sensors operated at a temperature of 450 to 650 mK, and a closed-cycle cryogen-free cooling system. The main figures of the system include: a frequency band of 350+/-40 GHz, an object distance of 7 to 10 m, a circular field of view of 1.05 m diameter, and a spatial resolution in the image center of 2 cm at 8.5 m distance, a noise equivalent temperature difference of 0.1 to 0.4 K, and a maximum frame rate of 10 Hz.

  6. Designing sparse sensing matrix for compressive sensing to reconstruct high resolution medical images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha Tiwari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing theory enables faithful reconstruction of signals, sparse in domain $ \\Psi $, at sampling rate lesser than Nyquist criterion, while using sampling or sensing matrix $ \\Phi $ which satisfies restricted isometric property. The role played by sensing matrix $ \\Phi $ and sparsity matrix $ \\Psi $ is vital in faithful reconstruction. If the sensing matrix is dense then it takes large storage space and leads to high computational cost. In this paper, effort is made to design sparse sensing matrix with least incurred computational cost while maintaining quality of reconstructed image. The design approach followed is based on sparse block circulant matrix (SBCM with few modifications. The other used sparse sensing matrix consists of 15 ones in each column. The medical images used are acquired from US, MRI and CT modalities. The image quality measurement parameters are used to compare the performance of reconstructed medical images using various sensing matrices. It is observed that, since Gram matrix of dictionary matrix ($ \\Phi \\Psi \\mathrm{} $ is closed to identity matrix in case of proposed modified SBCM, therefore, it helps to reconstruct the medical images of very good quality.

  7. Classification of poplar stand areas by high-resolution satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grignetti A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns the classification of different crown cover classes of Poplar stands, using high spatial resolution images (Ikonos and Quickbird satellites, in order to provide poplar monitoring. The test sites are two agricultural areas, located in the alluvial plain of northern Italy, close to Alessandria. In order to enhance spectral differences among classes, textural and high-pass filters were applied and vegetation indices (ratio, difference and normalized difference were processed. Images were then classified by means of an object-oriented approach which include a segmentation process followed by the application of a Standard Nearest Neighbor classifier on different data sets of spectral images (mean and standard deviation images and shape indices (shape, compactness. The data sets were defined using the Feature Space Optimization tool available in the Definiens®Developer7 software. From a set of attributes, this tool selects the best combination that produces the largest separability among the classes. The shape of the polygons matched the agricultural plots and the classification results were compared with the reference map defined by means of aerial photo interpretation and ground surveys. New poplar classes were defined in order to improve classification results. The accuracy values obtained were satisfactory (close to 73% for Ikonos and 82% for Quickbird images and they constitute a basis for automated recognition of poplar plantations and for updating poplar stands assessments.

  8. Real-time in vitro Fourier ptychographic microscopy for high resolution wide field of view phase imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Lei; Yeh, Li-Hao; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, microscopes have had to trade field of view (FOV) for resolution. Recently, a new computational imaging technique, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), circumvents this limit in order to capture gigapixel-scale images having both wide FOV and high resolution. FPM has enormous potential for revolutionizing biomedical microscopy; however, it has until now been limited to fixed samples, since acquisition time is on the order of minutes. Live biological samples are continuously evolving on multiple spatial and temporal scales, which can cause motion blur. Here, we present a Fast FPM method to achieve sub-second capture times for FPM results with 0.8 NA resolution across a 4x objective's FOV. We demonstrate the first FPM quantitative phase results for both growing and confluent in vitro cell cultures. Experiments capture real-time videos of HeLa and human mammary epithelial (MCF10A) cell division and migration and subcellular dynamical phenomena in adult rat neural stem cells.

  9. Analysis of Properties of Reflectance Reference Targets for Permanent Radiometric Test Sites of High Resolution Airborne Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Ahokas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and optimal exploitation of rapidly developing airborne imaging methods requires geometric and radiometric quality assurance of production systems in operational conditions. Permanent test sites are the most promising approach for cost-efficient performance assessment. Optimal construction of permanent radiometric test sites for high resolution airborne imaging systems is an unresolved issue. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of commercially available gravels and painted and unpainted concrete targets for permanent, open-air radiometric test sites under sub-optimal climate conditions in Southern Finland. The reflectance spectrum and reflectance anisotropy and their stability were characterized during the summer of 2009. The management of reflectance anisotropy and stability were shown to be the key issues for better than 5% reflectance accuracy.

  10. URBAN LAND COVER/USE CHANGE DETECTION USING HIGH RESOLUTION SPOT 5 AND SPOT 6 IMAGES AND URBAN ATLAS NOMENCLATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Akay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Urban land cover/use changes like urbanization and urban sprawl have been impacting the urban ecosystems significantly therefore determination of urban land cover/use changes is an important task to understand trends and status of urban ecosystems, to support urban planning and to aid decision-making for urban-based projects. High resolution satellite images could be used to accurately, periodically and quickly map urban land cover/use and their changes by time. This paper aims to determine urban land cover/use changes in Gaziantep city centre between 2010 and 2105 using object based images analysis and high resolution SPOT 5 and SPOT 6 images. 2.5 m SPOT 5 image obtained in 5th of June 2010 and 1.5 m SPOT 6 image obtained in 7th of July 2015 were used in this research to precisely determine land changes in five-year period. In addition to satellite images, various ancillary data namely Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Difference Water Index (NDWI maps, cadastral maps, OpenStreetMaps, road maps and Land Cover maps, were integrated into the classification process to produce high accuracy urban land cover/use maps for these two years. Both images were geometrically corrected to fulfil the 1/10,000 scale geometric accuracy. Decision tree based object oriented classification was applied to identify twenty different urban land cover/use classes defined in European Urban Atlas project. Not only satellite images and satellite image-derived indices but also different thematic maps were integrated into decision tree analysis to create rule sets for accurate mapping of each class. Rule sets of each satellite image for the object based classification involves spectral, spatial and geometric parameter to automatically produce urban map of the city centre region. Total area of each class per related year and their changes in five-year period were determined and change trend in terms of class transformation were presented. Classification accuracy

  11. Urban Land Cover/use Change Detection Using High Resolution SPOT 5 and SPOT 6 Images and Urban Atlas Nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, S. S.; Sertel, E.

    2016-06-01

    Urban land cover/use changes like urbanization and urban sprawl have been impacting the urban ecosystems significantly therefore determination of urban land cover/use changes is an important task to understand trends and status of urban ecosystems, to support urban planning and to aid decision-making for urban-based projects. High resolution satellite images could be used to accurately, periodically and quickly map urban land cover/use and their changes by time. This paper aims to determine urban land cover/use changes in Gaziantep city centre between 2010 and 2105 using object based images analysis and high resolution SPOT 5 and SPOT 6 images. 2.5 m SPOT 5 image obtained in 5th of June 2010 and 1.5 m SPOT 6 image obtained in 7th of July 2015 were used in this research to precisely determine land changes in five-year period. In addition to satellite images, various ancillary data namely Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Difference Water Index (NDWI) maps, cadastral maps, OpenStreetMaps, road maps and Land Cover maps, were integrated into the classification process to produce high accuracy urban land cover/use maps for these two years. Both images were geometrically corrected to fulfil the 1/10,000 scale geometric accuracy. Decision tree based object oriented classification was applied to identify twenty different urban land cover/use classes defined in European Urban Atlas project. Not only satellite images and satellite image-derived indices but also different thematic maps were integrated into decision tree analysis to create rule sets for accurate mapping of each class. Rule sets of each satellite image for the object based classification involves spectral, spatial and geometric parameter to automatically produce urban map of the city centre region. Total area of each class per related year and their changes in five-year period were determined and change trend in terms of class transformation were presented. Classification accuracy assessment was

  12. Fibre-optic coupling to high-resolution CCD and CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple method of gluing fibre-optic faceplates to complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel and charge coupled device (CCD) image sensors and report on their performance. Cross-sectional cuts reveal that the bonding layer has a thickness close to the diameter of the individual fibres and is uniform over the whole sensor area. Our method requires no special tools or alignment equipment and gives reproducible and high-quality results. The method maintains a uniform bond layer thickness even if sensor dies are mounted at slight angles with their package. These fibre-coupled sensors are of particular interest to X-ray imaging applications but also provide a solution for compact optical imaging systems.

  13. Simultaneous suppression of scattering and aberration for ultra-high resolution imaging deep within scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Sungsam; Kang, Pilsung; Yang, Taeseok D; Ahn, Joonmo; Song, Kyungdeok; Choi, Wonshik

    2016-01-01

    Thick biological tissues give rise to not only the scattering of incoming light waves, but also aberrations of the remaining unscattered waves. Due to the inability of existing optical imaging methodologies to overcome both of these problems simultaneously, imaging depth at the sub- micron spatial resolution has remained extremely shallow. Here we present an experimental approach for identifying and eliminating aberrations even in the presence of strong multiple light scattering. For time-gated complex-field maps of reflected waves taken over various illumination channels, we identify two sets of aberration correction maps, one for the illumination path and one for the reflection path, that can preferentially accumulate the unscattered signal waves over the multiple-scattered waves. By performing closed-loop optimization for forward and phase- conjugation processes, we demonstrated a spatial resolution of 600 nm up to the unprecedented imaging depth of 7 scattering mean free paths.

  14. High resolution VLBI polarisation imaging of AGN with the Maximum Entropy Method

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlan, Colm P

    2016-01-01

    Radio polarisation images of the jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) can provide a deep insight into the launching and collimation mechanisms of relativistic jets. However, even at VLBI scales, resolution is often a limiting factor in the conclusions that can be drawn from observations. The Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is a deconvolution algorithm that can outperform the more common CLEAN algorithm in many cases, particularly when investigating structures present on scales comparable to or smaller than the nominal beam size with "super-resolution". A new implementation of the MEM suitable for single- or multiple-wavelength VLBI polarisation observations has been developed and is described here. Monte Carlo simulations comparing the performances of CLEAN and MEM at reconstructing the properties of model images are presented; these demonstrate the enhanced reliability of MEM over CLEAN when images of the fractional polarisation and polarisation angle are constructed using convolving beams that are appreciably ...

  15. The Black Sea coastal zone in the high resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurovskaya, Maria; Dulov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Landsat data with spatial resolution of 30-100 m provide the ability of regular monitoring of ocean phenomena with scale of 100-1000 m. Sentinel-1 is equipped with C-band synthetic aperture radar. The images allow recognizing the features that affect either the sea surface roughness, or its color characteristics. The possibilities of using the high spatial resolution satellite data are considered for observation and monitoring of Crimean coastal zone. The analyzed database includes all Landsat-8 (Level 1) multi-channel images from January 2013 to August 2015 and all Sentinel-1 radar images in May-August 2015. The goal of the study is to characterize the descriptiveness of these data for research and monitoring of the Crimean coastal areas. The observed marine effects are reviewed and the physical mechanisms of their signatures in the satellite images are described. The effects associated with the roughness variability are usually manifested in all bands, while the subsurface phenomena are visible only in optical data. Confidently observed structures include internal wave trains, filamentous natural slicks, which reflect the eddy coastal dynamics, traces of moving ships and the oil films referred to anthropogenic pollution of marine environment. The temperature fronts in calm conditions occur due to surfactant accumulation in convergence zone. The features in roughness field can also be manifested in Sentinel-1 data. Subsurface processes observed in Landsat-8 images primarily include transport and distribution of suspended matter as a result of floods and sandy beach erosion. The surfactant always concentrates on the sea surface in contaminated areas, so that these events are also observed in Sentinel-1 images. A search of wastewater discharge manifestations is performed. The investigation provides the basis for further development of approaches to obtain quantitative characteristics of the phenomena themselves. Funding by Russian Science Foundation under grant 15

  16. High-resolution NO2 maps of Rotterdam and Zürich retrieved from the APEX imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Gerrit; Hueni, Andreas; Brunner, Dominik

    2016-04-01

    In urban areas, nitrogen dioxide (NO_2) concentrations have high spatial and temporal variability making high-resolution NO2 maps an important tool for air pollution assessment and epidemiological studies. We retrieved high-resolution NO2 maps from the Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) imaging spectrometer measured over Zürich on 30. August 2013 (11:24--12:05 UTC) and Rotterdam on 17. September 2014 (8:53--10:18 UTC). Our updated retrieval fits NO_2, O_3, O_4, H_2O and the Ring effect between 440 and 510 nm using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). The radiance spectra were spectrally calibrated using a high-resolution solar reference spectrum to correct spectral shifts in across- and along-track direction. Air mass factors were computed using the SCIATRAN radiative transfer model. The retrieved NO2 maps have 50×50m2 resolution and cover an area of 10×26 km2 for Zürich and 10×50 km2 for Rotterdam. The maps show enhanced NO2 values in populated areas and at least three strong plumes from oil refineries in Rotterdam. A comparison with ground measurements in Rotterdam shows only weak correlation, because most of the NO2 is found in elevated plumes. In conclusion, airborne observations allow mapping of the NO2 distribution in urban areas providing a different perspective on urban air quality which cannot be acquired by ground-based observations. The obtained maps will be used for further analysis such as estimating NOX emissions from oil refineries and comparison with urban-scale chemistry transport modelling.

  17. New Mathematical Model Based on Affine Transformation for Remote Sensing Image with High Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper calculates the parameters of image position and orientation,proposes a mathematical model and adopts a new method with three steps of transformations based on parallel ray projection.Every step of the model is strict,and the map function of each transformation is the first order polynomials and other simple function.The final calculation of the parameters is for the linear equations with good status.As a result,the problem of the relativity of image parameter calculation is solved completely.Some experiments are carried out.

  18. High resolution in vitro bioluminescence imaging using a multimodal optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabella, L.; Gigliotti, C. R.; Perani, L.; Crippa, M. P.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence in vitro studies are usually performed with dedicated microscopes. In this work, we developed a novel image recovery algorithm and a multimodal system prototype to perform bioluminescence microscopy. We performed a feasibility study using GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bioluminescent cells acquired at low SNR frames and processed using a Super Resolution Regularization Algorithm (SRRA). The method was also tested using in vitro cell acquisition. The results obtained with MC simulations showed an improvement in the spatial resolution from 90 μ m to 10 μ m and from 110 μ m to 13 μ m for in vitro imaging of mesothelioma cells.

  19. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  20. Internal brain motion pumping of CSF using high-resolution velocity MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MR velocity density (MRVD) technique able to detect velocities as low as 0.4 mm/sec was applied to obtain images of the brain synchronized to the cardiac cycle in 25 healthy subjects and five patients. During systole (100-200 msec after the R wave), MRVD images demonstrated a caudad velocity in the central regions of the brain, most prominent in the brain stem (up to 1.5 mm/sec). This caudad brain motion and the synchronous ejection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the ventricles into the basal cisterns, taken together, strongly suggest a cardiac-driven pumping action of the brain on the CSF

  1. Information Extraction of High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Image Based on Multiresolution Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Shao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The principle of multiresolution segmentation was represented in detail in this study, and the canny algorithm was applied for edge-detection of a remotely sensed image based on this principle. The target image was divided into regions based on object-oriented multiresolution segmentation and edge-detection. Furthermore, object hierarchy was created, and a series of features (water bodies, vegetation, roads, residential areas, bare land and other information were extracted by the spectral and geometrical features. The results indicate that the edge-detection has a positive effect on multiresolution segmentation, and overall accuracy of information extraction reaches to 94.6% by the confusion matrix.

  2. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  3. High resolution in vitro bioluminescence imaging using a multimodal optical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescence in vitro studies are usually performed with dedicated microscopes. In this work, we developed a novel image recovery algorithm and a multimodal system prototype to perform bioluminescence microscopy. We performed a feasibility study using GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bioluminescent cells acquired at low SNR frames and processed using a Super Resolution Regularization Algorithm (SRRA). The method was also tested using in vitro cell acquisition. The results obtained with MC simulations showed an improvement in the spatial resolution from 90 μm to 10 μm and from 110 μm to 13 μm for in vitro imaging of mesothelioma cells

  4. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ''deconvolution'' procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs

  5. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging of plant tissues: towards a plant metabolite atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Wang, Qing; Friedt, Wolfgang; Spengler, Bernhard; Gottwald, Sven; Römpp, Andreas

    2015-11-21

    Mass spectrometry (MS) imaging provides spatial and molecular information for a wide range of compounds. This tool can be used to investigate metabolic changes in plant physiology and environmental interactions. A major challenge in our study was to prepare tissue sections that were compatible with high spatial resolution analysis and therefore dedicated sample preparation protocols were established and optimized for the physicochemical properties of all major plant organs. We combined high spatial resolution (5 μm), in order to detect cellular features, and high mass accuracy (germination of oilseed rape. The detailed localization of more than 90 compounds allowed assignment to metabolic processes and indicated possible functions in plant tissues. The 'untargeted' nature of MS imaging allows the detection of marker compounds for the physiological status, as demonstrated for plant-pathogen interactions. Our images show excellent correlation with optical/histological examination. In contrast to previous MS imaging studies of plants, we present a com