WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical hydrogen storage

  1. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated

  2. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also

  3. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K S; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A; Hembram, K P S S; Waghmare, Umesh V; Rao, C N R

    2011-02-15

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp(3) C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  4. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K.P.S.S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; RAO, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehyd...

  5. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  6. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Linehan, Sue [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lipiecki, Frank [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Christopher, Aardahl L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  7. Some recent efforts in chemical hydrogen storage at Loa Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Benjamin L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nakagawa, Tessui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ott, Kevin C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smythe, Nathan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sutton, Andrew D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henson, Neil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, R. Thomas [U. OTTAWA; Hamilton, Charles W [OD VISION, INC.; Dixon, David A [U. ALABAMA; Garner Ill, Edward B [U. ALABAMA; Vasiliu, Monica [U. ALABAMA

    2010-12-08

    Within the transportation sector, a necessity towards realizing the use of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as an alternative fuel, is its storage for controlled delivery. The U.S. DOE's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in H{sub 2} storage have pursued different methodologies (metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents), for the express purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H{sub 2} storage has been dominated by one material, ammonia borane (H3B-NH3, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H{sub 2} (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1} ). As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any storage system is also dependent on efficient recyclability. Within our CoE we have thus endeavored to find efficient base-metal catalyzed AB dehydrogenation pathways and regeneration schemes for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB. We will present some recent results in these areas in this vein.

  8. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  9. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  10. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  11. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Hydrazine Borane and Hydrazinidoboranes as Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Moury

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrazine borane N2H4BH3 and alkali derivatives (i.e., lithium, sodium and potassium hydrazinidoboranes MN2H3BH3 with M = Li, Na and K have been considered as potential chemical hydrogen storage materials. They belong to the family of boron- and nitrogen-based materials and the present article aims at providing a timely review while focusing on fundamentals so that their effective potential in the field could be appreciated. It stands out that, on the one hand, hydrazine borane, in aqueous solution, would be suitable for full dehydrogenation in hydrolytic conditions; the most attractive feature is the possibility to dehydrogenate, in addition to the BH3 group, the N2H4 moiety in the presence of an active and selective metal-based catalyst but for which further improvements are still necessary. However, the thermolytic dehydrogenation of hydrazine borane should be avoided because of the evolution of significant amounts of hydrazine and the formation of a shock-sensitive solid residue upon heating at >300 °C. On the other hand, the alkali hydrazinidoboranes, obtained by reaction of hydrazine borane with alkali hydrides, would be more suitable to thermolytic dehydrogenation, with improved properties in comparison to the parent borane. All of these aspects are surveyed herein and put into perspective.

  13. Effect of chemical treatments on hydrogen storage behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the hydrogen storage behaviors of chemically treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated. The surface properties of the functionalized MWNTs were confirmed by Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, the Boehm titration method, and zeta-potential measurements. The hydrogen storage capacity of the MWNTs was evaluated at 298 K and 100 bar. In the experimental results, it was found that the chemical treatments introduced functional groups onto the MWNT surfaces. The amount of hydrogen storage was enhanced, by acidic surface treatment, to 0.42 wt.% in the acidic-treated MWNTs compared with 0.26 wt.% in the as-received MWNTs. Meanwhile, the basic surface treatment actually reduced the hydrogen storage capacity, to 0.24 wt.% in the basic-treated MWNTs sample. Consequently, it could be concluded that hydrogen storage is greatly influenced by the acidic characteristics of MWNT surfaces, resulting in enhanced electron acceptor-donor interaction at interfaces.

  14. Effect of chemical potential on the computer simulation of hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hong; WANG Shaoqing; CHENG Huiming

    2004-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo molecular simulations were carried out for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that variations in chemical potential may result in a great change in the hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms of single-walled carbon nanotubes at 298.15 K were calculated using a modified chemical potential, and the result obtained is closer to the experimental results. By comparing the experimental and simulation results, it is proposed that chemical adsorption may exist for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  15. ERDA's Chemical Energy Storage Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, J. H.; Kelley, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Chemical Energy Storage Program is described with emphasis on hydrogen storage. Storage techniques considered include pressurized hydrogen gas storage, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage, storage in hydride compounds, and aromatic-alicyclic hydrogen storage. Some uses of energy storage are suggested. Information on hydrogen production and hydrogen use is also presented. Applications of hydrogen energy systems include storage of hydrogen for utilities load leveling, industrial marketing of hydrogen both as a chemical and as a fuel, natural gas supplementation, vehicular applications, and direct substitution for natural gas.

  16. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  17. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum

  18. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  19. Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, Matthew P.; Chun, Jaehun; Choi, Young Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2016-01-25

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high hydrogen content of 14-16 wt% below 200°C and high volumetric density. In our previous paper, we selected AB in silicone oil as a role model for a slurry hydrogen storage system. Materials engineering properties were optimized by increasing solid loading by using an ultra-sonic process. In this paper, we proceeded to scale up to liter size batches with solid loadings up to 50 wt% (8 wt% H2) with dynamic viscosities less than 1000cP at 25°C. The use of a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-15, shows significant promise in controlling the level of foaming produced during the thermal dehydrogenation of the AB. Through the development of new and efficient processing techniques and the ability to adequately control the foaming, stable homogenous slurries of high solid loading have been demonstrated as a viable hydrogen delivery source.

  20. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  1. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  2. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  3. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  4. Interstitial hydrogen storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, H.A.

    1980-09-30

    A metal hydride fuel system is described that incorporates a plurality of storage elements that may be individually replaced to provide a hydrogen fuel system for combustion engines having a capability of partial refueling is presented.

  5. Supercritical fluid chemical deposition of Pd nanoparticles on magnesium–scandium alloy for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillaud, Samuel; Kirikova, Marina [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zaïdi, Warda; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Marre, Samuel; Aymonier, Cyril [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zhang, Junxian; Cuevas, Fermin; Latroche, Michel [ICMPE, CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320-Thiais (France); Aymard, Luc [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Bobet, Jean-Louis, E-mail: bobet@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Nanoparticles of Pd were deposed on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method. •Numerous parameters were tested and optimized in order to obtain a homogeneous deposition. •At the first step, Pd@Mg0.65Sc0.35 decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} under hydrogen pressure (1 MPa) at 330 °C. •The mixture, after decomposition absorbs hydrogen reversibly on Mg/MgH{sub 2} couple with good kinetics. -- Abstract: The deposition of Pd nanoparticles on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method was performed. There, the SFCD operating parameters (co-solvent, temperature, CO{sub 2} and hydrogen pressure, reaction time) have been optimized to obtain homogeneous deposition of Pd nanoparticles (around 10 nm). The hydrogenation properties of the optimized Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} material were determined and compared to those of Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35}Pd{sub 0.024}. The latter compound forms at 300 °C and 1 MPa of H{sub 2} a hydride that crystallizes in the fluorite structure, absorbs reversibly 1.5 wt.% hydrogen and exhibits fast kinetics. In contrast, Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} compound decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} during hydrogen absorption under the same conditions. However, reversible sorption reaches 3.3 wt.% of hydrogen while keeping good kinetics. The possible roles of Pd on the hydrogen-induced alloy decomposition are discussed.

  6. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-02-28

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storage applications, but later on it was found to be unable to store enough amounts of hydrogen under ambient conditions. New arrangements of carbon nanotubes were constructed and hydrogen sorption properties were investigated using state-of-the-art simulation methods. The simulations indicate outstanding total hydrogen uptake (up to 19.0 wt.% at 77 K and 5.52wt.% at 300 K), which makes these materials excellent candidates for storage applications. This reopens the carbon route to superior materials for a hydrogen-based economy. Zeolite imidazolate frameworks are subclass of MOFs with an exceptional chemical and thermal stability. The hydrogen adsorption in ZIFs was investigated as a function of network geometry and organic linker exchange. Ab initio calculations performed at the MP2 level to obtain correct interaction energies between hydrogen molecules and the ZIF framework. Subsequently, GCMC simulations are carried out to obtain the hydrogen uptake of ZIFs at different thermodynamic conditions. The best of these materials (ZIF-8) is found to be able to store up to 5 wt.% at 77 K and high pressure. We expected possible improvement of hydrogen capacity of ZIFs by substituting the metal atom (Zn{sup 2+}) in the structure by lighter elements such as B or Li. Therefore, we investigated the energy landscape of LiB(IM)4 polymorphs in detail and analyzed their hydrogen storage capacities. The structure with the fau topology was shown to be one of the best materials for hydrogen storage. Its

  7. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  8. Effects of chemical coating with Ni on electrochemical properties of Mg2Ni hydrogen storage alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effects of nickel coating on the electrochemical properties of Mg2Ni hydrogen storage alloys are presented in this paper. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques were employed to examine the crystal structure and surface morphologies of the bare and Ni-coated Mg2Ni alloys. The electrochemical properties of alloys were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that Ni coating not only decreased the charge transfer resistance, but also decreased the H atom diflusion resistance for Mg2Ni alloys. It was also found that Ni coating effectively improved the discharge capacity, but decreased the cycling performance of the as-synthesized Ni-coated Mg2Ni alloys. The discharge current has a great impact on the cycling performance of the as-synthesized Ni-coated Mg2Ni alloys.

  9. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.;

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast at tempe......A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  10. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  11. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  12. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  13. Chemical, mineralogical and molecular biological characterization of the rocks and fluids from a natural gas storage deep reservoir as a baseline for the effects of geological hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Daria; Kasina, Monika; Weigt, Jennifer; Merten, Dirk; Pudlo, Dieter; Würdemann, Hilke

    2014-05-01

    Planned transition to renewable energy production from nuclear and CO2-emitting power generation brings the necessity for large scale energy storage capacities. One possibility to store excessive energy produced is to transfer it to chemical forms like hydrogen which can be subsequently injected and stored in subsurface porous rock formations like depleted gas reservoirs and presently used gas storage sites. In order to investigate the feasibility of the hydrogen storage in the subsurface, the collaborative project H2STORE ("hydrogen to store") was initiated. In the scope of this project, potential reactions between microorganism, fluids and rocks induced by hydrogen injection are studied. For the long-term experiments, fluids of natural gas storage are incubated together with rock cores in the high pressure vessels under 40 bar pressure and 40° C temperature with an atmosphere containing 5.8% He as a tracer gas, 3.9% H2 and 90.3% N2. The reservoir is located at a depth of about 2 000 m, and is characterized by a salinity of 88.9 g l-1 NaCl and a temperature of 80° C and therefore represents an extreme environment for microbial life. First geochemical analyses showed a relatively high TOC content of the fluids (about 120 mg l-1) that were also rich in sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron. Remarkable amounts of heavy metals like zinc and strontium were also detected. XRD analyses of the reservoir sandstones revealed the major components: quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, anhydrite and analcime. The sandstones were intercalated by mudstones, consisting of quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, analcime, chlorite, mica and carbonates. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes was applied to characterize the microbial community composition by PCR-SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results indicate the presence of microorganisms belonging to the phylotypes alfa-, beta- and gamma

  14. Neutron scattering and hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Ramirez-Cuesta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen has been identified as a fuel of choice for providing clean energy for transport and other applications across the world and the development of materials to store hydrogen efficiently and safely is crucial to this endeavour. Hydrogen has the largest scattering interaction with neutrons of all the elements in the periodic table making neutron scattering ideal for studying hydrogen storage materials. Simultaneous characterisation of the structure and dynamics of these materials during hydrogen uptake is straightforward using neutron scattering techniques. These studies will help us to understand the fundamental properties of hydrogen storage in realistic conditions and hence design new hydrogen storage materials.

  15. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwel; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  16. Hydrogen Storage In Nanostructured Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storag...

  17. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  18. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, James A.; Wang, Tao; Ebner, Armin D.; Holland, Charles E.

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  19. Proceedings of the DOE Chemical Energy Storage and Hydrogen Energy Systems Contracts Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The background and objectives of thirty-nine hydrogen-related tasks were discussed, the status of the studies or technical effort is shown, and state projected solutions for resolving the identified problems are projected.

  20. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  1. Lithium borohydride–melamine complex as a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lin; Hu, Daqiang; He, Teng; Zhang, Yao; Wu, Guotao; Chu, Hailiang; Wang, Peikun [Dalian National Laboratory for Clear Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Xiong, Zhitao, E-mail: xzt@dicp.ac.cn [Dalian National Laboratory for Clear Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Chen, Ping [Dalian National Laboratory for Clear Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}H{sub 6}N{sub 6} was synthesized by ball milling of LiBH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}N{sub 6}. ► 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} starts to evolve hydrogen at ca. 100 °C. ► 7.83 wt.% of Hydrogen can be evolved in the temperature range of 100–340 °C. ► Combination reaction between NH and BH can improve dehydrogenation properties. -- Abstract: A complex hydride, 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}, crystallizing in monoclinic structure with lattice parameters of a = 17.4701 Å, b = 17.6332 Å, c = 4.1749 Å, β = 99.7453° and V = 1267.54 Å{sup 3}, was synthesized by solid reaction between LiBH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}. 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} starts to evolve hydrogen at 100 °C, which is 190 °C lower than that of pristine LiBH{sub 4}. Combination of protic hydrogen of [BH{sub 4}]{sup −} and hydridic hydrogen of NH in 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} may greatly improve the dehydrogenation properties, and totally 7.83 wt.% H{sub 2} can be released from 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} in the temperature range of 100–340 °C.

  2. Hydrogen storage in nanotubes & nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Froudakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last several years, a significant share of the scientific community has focused its attention on the hydrogen storage problem. Since 1997, when carbon nanotubes appeared to be a promising storage material, many theoretical and experimental groups have investigated the hydrogen storage capacity of these carbon nanostructures. These efforts were not always successful and consequently, the results obtained were often controversial. In the current review we attempt to summarize some the ...

  3. LIGHT-WEIGHT NANOCRYSTALLINE HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; B. Zande; R.T. Obermyer; S. Simizu

    2005-11-21

    During Phase I of this SBIR Program, Advanced Materials Corporation has addressed two key issues concerning hydrogen storage: 1. We have conducted preliminary studies on the effect of certain catalysts in modifying the hydrogen absorption characteristics of nanocrystalline magnesium. 2. We have also conducted proof-of-concept design and construction of a prototype instrument that would rapidly screen materials for hydrogen storage employing chemical combinatorial technique in combination with a Pressure-Composition Isotherm Measurement (PCI) instrument. 3. Preliminary results obtained in this study approach are described in this report.

  4. Hydrogen storage in nanotubes & nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Froudakis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, a significant share of the scientific community has focused its attention on the hydrogen storage problem. Since 1997, when carbon nanotubes appeared to be a promising storage material, many theoretical and experimental groups have investigated the hydrogen storage capacity of these carbon nanostructures. These efforts were not always successful and consequently, the results obtained were often controversial. In the current review we attempt to summarize some the highlights of the work on hydrogen storage in various types of nanotube and nanostructure, in a critical way. The nature of the interaction between hydrogen and the host nanomaterials, as revealed through theoretical modeling, helps us understand the basic mechanisms of hydrogen storage. Analysis of the results reveals why high hydrogen storage capacity at ambient conditions, which meets the DOE targets, cannot occur in bare carbon nanotubes. Through our analysis we also propose guidelines to enhance the hydrogen storage capacity of already synthesized materials and recommend advanced materials for this application.

  5. Measurements of Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P.

    2004-03-01

    The many sensational claims of vast quantities of hydrogen (H) stored in carbon materials reported since 1996 have resulted in the H storage and carbon scientific literature now being cluttered with misinformation and some genuinely bad science. H storage experiments are not trivial, and they are prone to error and misinterpretation. For example, volumetric experiments use equilibrium gas pressures (P) and temperatures (T) measured in calibrated volumes to determine the number of moles of gas, and changes in P without changes in T (or leakage) are then interpreted as sorption. A typical mistake is measuring P vs. time after pressurizing a sample chamber and interpreting a drop in P as sorption. This is difficult to interpret as real absorption because all confounding effects (leaks, T drifts, thermal inhomogeneities, etc.) are nearly impossible to eliminate. Moreover, the basic thermodynamic properties of gas flow systems tell us that high-P gases filling evacuated chambers experience non-negligible rises in T. Another example of misinterpretation arises in gravimetric experiments that use weight (W) measurements corrected for large T-dependent buoyancy effects to determine gas sorption. Here a typical mistake is interpreting the actual sorption of heavy residual impurity gases as H sorption. These and other techniques for measuring H sorption must be performed and interpreted with great care due to difficulties associated with small sample sizes, high gas pressures, very reactive materials, contamination, low signal-to-noise, poor experimental design, and, in some cases, bad science. Good science respects the difference between measurement precision (the number of significant digits of P or W measurements) and experimental accuracy (the degree of certainty that P or W changes really represent H sorption). At General Motors, we endeavor to understand, conduct, and promote reliable H storage measurements on new materials and routinely use both volumetric

  6. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  7. Carbon material for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourlinos, Athanasios; Steriotis, Theodore; Stubos, Athanasios; Miller, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to carbon based materials that are employed for hydrogen storage applications. The material may be described as the pyrolysis product of a molecular precursor such as a cyclic quinone compound. The pyrolysis product may then be combined with selected transition metal atoms which may be in nanoparticulate form, where the metals may be dispersed on the material surface. Such product may then provide for the reversible storage of hydrogen. The metallic nanoparticles may also be combined with a second metal as an alloy to further improve hydrogen storage performance.

  8. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  9. Hydrogen storage in graphitic nanofibres

    OpenAIRE

    McCaldin, Simon Roger

    2007-01-01

    There is huge need to develop an alternative to hydrocarbons fuel, which does not produce CO2 or contribute to global warming - 'the hydrogen economy' is such an alternative, however the storage of hydrogen is the key technical barrier that must be overcome. The potential of graphitic nanofibres (GNFs) to be used as materials to allow the solid-state storage of hydrogen has thus been investigated. This has been conducted with a view to further developing the understanding of the mechanism(s) ...

  10. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  11. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinska, Kris [PI; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    The primary goal of this project is to fabricate and investigate different glass systems and glass-derived nanocrystalline composite materials. These glass-based, two-phased materials will contain nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen and be of potential interest as hydrogen storage media. The glass materials with intrinsic void spaces that are able to precipitate functional nanocrystals capable to attract hydrogen are of particular interest. Proposed previously, but never practically implemented, one of promising concepts for storing hydrogen are micro-containers built of glass and shaped into hollow microspheres. The project expanded this concept to the exploration of glass-derived nanocrystalline composites as potential hydrogen storage media. It is known that the most desirable materials for hydrogen storage do not interact chemically with hydrogen and possess a high surface area to host substantial amounts of hydrogen. Glasses are built of disordered networks with ample void spaces that make them permeable to hydrogen even at room temperature. Glass-derived nanocrystalline composites (two-phased materials), combination of glasses (networks with ample voids) and functional nanocrystals (capable to attract hydrogen), appear to be promising candidates for hydrogen storage media. Key advantages of glass materials include simplicity of preparation, flexibility of composition, chemical durability, non-toxicity and mechanical strength, as well as low production costs and environmental friendliness. This project encompasses a fundamental research into physics and chemistry of glasses and nanocrystalline composite materials, derived from glass. Studies are aimed to answer questions essential for considering glass-based materials and composites as potential hydrogen storage media. Of particular interest are two-phased materials that combine glasses with intrinsic voids spaces for physisorption of hydrogen and nanocrystals capable of chemisorption. This project does not

  12. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  13. Hydrogen storage development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  14. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application to hydrogen storage. Complexes have been found which catalyze the reversible hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons. This catalytic reaction could be the basis for a low temperature, hydrogen storage system with a available hydrogen density greater than 7 weight percent. The P-C-P pincer complexes, RhH{sub 2}(C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}) and IrH{sub 2}(C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}) have unprecedented, long term stability at elevated temperatures. The novel iridium complex catalyzes the transfer dehydrogenation of cycloctane to cyclooctene at the rate of 716 turnovers/h which is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that found for previously reported catalytic systems which do not require the sacrificial hydrogenation of a large excess of hydrogen acceptor.

  15. Chemical energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloegl, Robert (ed.) [Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2013-02-01

    The use of regenerative energy in many primary forms leads to the necessity to store grid dimensions for maintaining continuous supply and enabling the replacement of fossil fuel systems. Chemical energy storage is one of the possibilities besides mechano-thermal and biological systems. This work starts with the more general aspects of chemical energy storage in the context of the geosphere and evolves to dealing with aspects of electrochemistry, catalysis, synthesis of catalysts, functional analysis of catalytic processes and with the interface between electrochemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. Top-notch experts provide a sound, practical, hands-on insight into the present status of energy conversion aimed primarily at the young emerging research front.

  16. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  17. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibres : new developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shutz, W. [Vodafone Pilotentwicklung GmbH, Munich (Germany); Maneck, E. [Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung, Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Carbon materials show high potential as candidates for hydrogen storage for automotive applications, but the price of hydrogen-driven vehicles is too high and customer acceptance is low. In this study, carbon nanofibers were synthesized through the reaction of carbon containing gases over a suitable catalyst. Essentially, carbon nanofibres were created by chemical catalytic vapour deposition of carbon containing gases using a horizontal quartz tube reactor at 500 to 1000 degrees C. The size and shape of the product was found to be dependent on the catalyst used and by the reaction temperature and time. The presentation illustrates gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity measurements, pressure dependent X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy measurements. It was shown that the intercalated hydrogen in carbon nanofibers can be released during heating. Future studies will focus on examining the effects of the interaction between carbon nanofibers and hydrogen with focus on the potential of these materials for technical use in hydrogen storage systems. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U. Niemann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS2/MoS2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc. and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.

  19. Trends of Chinese RE Hydrogen Storage Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ . Status of Chinese RE Hydrogen Storage Alloys 1. R εt D of RE Hydrogen Storage Alloys in China AB5 hydrogen storage materials, taking rare earth mischmetals as raw materials, developed rapidly in China in recent years. Today, different countries attach importance to the development and application of the new environmental protection reproducible power sources.

  20. Hydrogen storage in nickel doped MCM-41

    OpenAIRE

    Dündar Tekkaya, Ezgi; Dundar Tekkaya, Ezgi; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen as an energy carrier is one of the best environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuel sources. The potential use of hydrogen results with increasing demand to hydrogen production and storage. Recent studies show that materials having high surface area, large pore size and high affinity to hydrogen have high hydrogen storage capacity. MCM-41 is silica based material having such properties and its hydrogen sorption properties can be improved by doping transition metals to the st...

  1. Applying Study of Hydrogen Storage Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xin-ming; JIANG Hai; YIN Shao-hui; TIAN Zhi-gang

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen is an important source of energy. The natural resouces of hydrogen is plenty and it gives us lots of heat, and it is clean. One of difficulties of developing hydrogen sources of energy is hydrogen storage. Hydrogen storage tank is either dangous or a little of capacity. Liquid hydrogen occupys small space. Liquefaction temprature of hydrogen is - 253℃and need better heat insulation protection, the volumn and weight of heat insulation layer are equal to hydrogen storage tank. Hydrogen storage utillizing hydrogen storage material is a very safety、 economical and effective method. Hydrogen storage material is either a medium of solid hydrogen storage or is negative pole active material of Ni-H battery,and is the one of key technoloy of fuel and Ni-H battery, it is an important material of new sources of energy too. Nanotechnology is introduced Mg-matrix hydrogen storage alloy and is achieved progress gteatly,but hydrogen storage alloy need be mede further improvment on applying investigation.

  2. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, A. S. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mazumder, M. K. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Karabacak, T. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kannarpady, Ganesh [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Sharma, R. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  3. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  4. Hydrogen storage with titanium-functionalized graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Mashoff, Torge; Tanabe, Shinichi; Hibino, Hiroki; Beltram, Fabio; Heun, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We report on hydrogen adsorption and desorption on titanium-covered graphene in order to test theoretical proposals to use of graphene functionalized with metal atoms for hydrogen storage. At room temperature titanium islands grow with an average diameter of about 10 nm. Samples were then loaded with hydrogen, and its desorption kinetics was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy. We observe the desorption of hydrogen in the temperature range between 400K and 700 K. Our results demonstrate the stability of hydrogen binding at room temperature and show that hydrogen desorbs at moderate temperatures in line with what required for practical hydrogen-storage applications.

  5. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  6. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Availability of a safe, low-pressure, lightweight, compact hydrogen storage system is an enabling technology for hydrogen electric fuel cell usage for space...

  7. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  8. Effective hydrogen storage: a strategic chemistry challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, William I F

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the current status and future potential of hydrogen storage from a chemistry perspective and is based on the concluding presentation of the Faraday Discussion 151--Hydrogen Storage Materials. The safe, effective and economical storage of hydrogen is one of the main scientific and technological challenges in the move towards a low-carbon economy. One key sector is transportation where future vehicles will most likely be developed around a balance of battery-electric and hydrogen fuel-cell electric technologies. Although there has been a very significant research effort in solid-state hydrogen storage, high-pressure gas storage combined with conventional metal hydrides is still seen as the current intermediate-term candidate for car manufacturers. Significant issues have arisen in the search for improved solid-state hydrogen storage materials; for example, facile reversibility has been a major challenge for many recently studied complex hydrides while physisorption in porous structures is still restricted to cryogenic temperatures. However, many systems fulfil the majority of necessary criteria for improved hydrogen storage--indeed, the discovery of reversibility in multicomponent hydride systems along with recent chemistry breakthroughs in off-board and solvent-assisted regeneration suggest that the goal of both improved on-board reversible and off-board regenerated hydrogen storage systems can be achieved. PMID:22455082

  9. Study on Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Complex hydrides have been heavily investigated as a hydrogen storage material, particularly for future vehicular applications. The present major problem of such complex hydrides is their relatively high hydrogen desorption temperature (Td). In order to find a predominant parameter for determining Td, we have investigated internal nuclear magnetic fields in several complex hydrides, such as, lithium and sodium alanates, borohydrides, and magnesium hydrides, with a muon spin rotation and relaxation (μ+SR) technique. At low temperatures, the μ+SR spectrum obtained in a zero external field (ZF) exhibits a clear oscillation due to the formation of a three spin 1/2 system, HμH, besides Mg(BH4)2 and Sc(BH4)2. Such oscillatory signal becomes weaker and weaker with increasing temperature, and finally disappears above around room temperature. However, the volume fraction of the HμH signal to the whole asymmetry at 5 K is found to be a good indicator for Td in borohydrides. At high temperatures, on the contrary, the ZF-spectrum for MgH2 shows a Kubo-Toyabe like relaxation due to a random nuclear magnetic field of 1H. Such nuclear magnetic field becomes dynamic well below Td in the milled MgH2, indicating a significant role on H-diffusion in solids for determining Td.

  10. Handheld hydrogen - a new concept for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink

    2005-01-01

    A method of hydrogen storage using metal ammine complexes in combination with an ammonia decomposition catalyst is presented. This dense hydrogen storage material has high degree of safety compared to all the other available alternatives. This technology reduces the safety hazards of using liquid...... ammonia and benefits from the properties of ammonia as a fuel. The system can be used as a safe, reversible, low-cost hydrogen carrier....

  11. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pez, Guido Peter; Cooper, Alan Charles; Scott, Aaron Raymond

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  12. Metal ammine complexes for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Johannessen, Tue;

    2005-01-01

    The hopes of using hydrogen as an energy carrier are severely dampened by the fact that there is still no safe, high-density method available for storing hydrogen. We investigate the possibility of using metal ammine complexes as a solid form of hydrogen storage. Using Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2 as the example...

  13. Boron-Based Hydrogen Storage: Ternary Borides and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    DOE continues to seek reversible solid-state hydrogen materials with hydrogen densities of ≥11 wt% and ≥80 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at moderate temperatures (≤100 °C) and pressures (≤100 bar) enabling incorporation into hydrogen storage systems suitable for transportation applications. Boron-based hydrogen storage materials have the potential to meet the density requirements given boron’s low atomic weight, high chemical valance, and versatile chemistry. However, the rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based compounds are thus far much too slow for practical applications. Although contributing to the high hydrogen densities, the high valance of boron also leads to slow rates of hydrogen exchange due to extensive boron-boron atom rearrangements during hydrogen cycling. This rearrangement often leads to multiple solid phases occurring over hydrogen release and recharge cycles. These phases must nucleate and react with each other across solid-solid phase boundaries leading to energy barriers that slow the rates of hydrogen exchange. This project sought to overcome the slow rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based hydrogen storage materials by minimizing the number of solid phases and the boron atom rearrangement over a hydrogen release and recharge cycle. Two novel approaches were explored: 1) developing matched pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides that could exchange hydrogen with only one hydrogenated phase (the mixed-metal borohydride) and only one dehydrogenated phase (the ternary boride); and 2) developing boranes that could release hydrogen by being lithiated using lithium hydride with no boron-boron atom rearrangement.

  14. Pretreatment of bottom sludge of crude oil storage tanks using chemical oxidation process with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Nabizadeh

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: Mere application of chemical oxidation is not capable of complete treatment of the sludge but it is an effective process as a pre-treatment step for decreasing toxicity and increasing its biodegradability.

  15. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  16. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  17. Hydrogen storage technology materials and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klebanoff, Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Zero-carbon, hydrogen-based power technology offers the most promising long-term solution for a secure and sustainable energy infrastructure. With contributions from the world's leading technical experts in the field, Hydrogen Storage Technology: Materials and Applications presents a broad yet unified account of the various materials science, physics, and engineering aspects involved in storing hydrogen gas so that it can be used to provide power. The book helps you understand advanced hydrogen storage materials and how to build systems around them. Accessible to nonscientists, the first chapt

  18. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrock, J.L.; Malinowski, M.E.; Wally, K. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a newly developed fuel cell vehicle hydride storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. An experimental test facility, the Hydride Bed Testing Laboratory (HBTL) has been designed and fabricated. The development of this facility and its use in storage system development will be reviewed. These two capabilities (analytical and experimental) form the basis of an integrated approach to storage system design and development. The initial focus of these activities has been on hydride utilization for vehicular applications.

  19. Recent progress in hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing demand for energy coupled with dwindling fossil fuel resources make the establishment of a clean and sustainable energy system a compelling need. Hydrogen-based energy systems offer potential solutions. Although, in the long-term, the ultimate technological challenge is large-scale hydrogen production from renewable sources, the pressing issue is how to store hydrogen efficiently on board hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles1,2.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a bottom-up costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with ® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target

  1. Hydrogen transport and storage in engineered microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambach, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hendricks, C. [W.J. Schafer Associates, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This project is a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and W.J. Schafer Associates (WJSA). The authors plan to experimentally verify the performance characteristics of engineered glass microspheres that are relevant to the storage and transport of hydrogen for energy applications. They will identify the specific advantages of hydrogen transport by microspheres, analyze the infrastructure implications and requirements, and experimentally measure their performance characteristics in realistic, bulk storage situations.

  2. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  3. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  4. Ammonia for hydrogen storage: challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet;

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier is discussed. Compared to other hydrogen storage materials, ammonia has the advantages of a high hydrogen density, a well-developed technology for synthesis and distribution, and easy catalytic decomposition. Compared to hydrocarbons...... and alcohols, it has the advantage that there is no CO2 emission at the end user. The drawbacks are mainly the toxicity of liquid ammonia and the problems related to trace amounts of ammonia in the hydrogen after decomposition. Storage of ammonia in metal ammine salts is discussed, and it is shown...... that this maintains the high volumetric hydrogen density while alleviating the problems of handling the ammonia. Some of the remaining challenges for research in ammonia as a hydrogen carrier are outlined....

  5. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrock, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

  6. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  7. Hydrogen storage systems from waste Mg alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistidda, C.; Bergemann, N.; Wurr, J.; Rzeszutek, A.; Møller, K. T.; Hansen, B. R. S.; Garroni, S.; Horstmann, C.; Milanese, C.; Girella, A.; Metz, O.; Taube, K.; Jensen, T. R.; Thomas, D.; Liermann, H. P.; Klassen, T.; Dornheim, M.

    2014-12-01

    The production cost of materials for hydrogen storage is one of the major issues to be addressed in order to consider them suitable for large scale applications. In the last decades several authors reported on the hydrogen sorption properties of Mg and Mg-based systems. In this work magnesium industrial wastes of AZ91 alloy and Mg-10 wt.% Gd alloy are used for the production of hydrogen storage materials. The hydrogen sorption properties of the alloys were investigated by means of volumetric technique, in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) and calorimetric methods. The measured reversible hydrogen storage capacity for the alloys AZ91 and Mg-10 wt.% Gd are 4.2 and 5.8 wt.%, respectively. For the Mg-10 wt.% Gd alloy, the hydrogenated product was also successfully used as starting reactant for the synthesis of Mg(NH2)2 and as MgH2 substitute in the Reactive Hydride Composite (RHC) 2LiBH4 + MgH2. The results of this work demonstrate the concrete possibility to use Mg alloy wastes for hydrogen storage purposes.

  8. Hydrogen storage: hydrogen as a hydride. 1974-May, 1980 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1974-May 80. [135 abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography covers hydrogen storage as a hydride. Topics include the chemical and physical properties of the hydride, and how useful it may be for hydrogen storage. Also considered is the conversion of hydrogen to a hydride and the conversion back to hydrogen. (This updated bibliography contains 135 abstracts, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. GTI's hydrogen programs: hydrogen production, storage, and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范钦柏

    2006-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier could help address our concerns about energy security, global climate change,and air quality. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Future and have the potential to revolutionize theway we power our nation, offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels.For over 45 years, GTI has been active in hydrogen energy research, development and demonstration. The Institute has extensive experience and on-going work in all aspects of the hydrogen energy economy including production, delivery, infrastructure,use, safety and public policy. This paper discusses the recent GTI programs in hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC).

  10. HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS DURING STORAGE OF 3013 OXIDE SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensel, S.; Askew, N.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-03-14

    As part of a surveillance program intended to ensure the safe storage of plutonium bearing nuclear materials in the Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS), samples of these materials are shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. These samples are in the form of solids or powders which will have absorbed moisture. Potentially flammable hydrogen gas is generated due to radiolysis of the moisture. The samples are shipped for processing after chemical analysis. To preclude the possibility of a hydrogen deflagration or detonation inside the shipping containers, the shipping times are limited to ensure that hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of every layer of confinement is below the lower flammability limit of 4 volume percent (vol%). This study presents an analysis of the rate of hydrogen accumulation due to radiolysis and calculation of allowable shipping times for typical KAMS materials.

  11. Review of Solid State Hydrogen Storage Methods Adopting Different Kinds of Novel Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Renju Zacharia; Sami ullah Rather

    2015-01-01

    Overview of advances in the technology of solid state hydrogen storage methods applying different kinds of novel materials is provided. Metallic and intermetallic hydrides, complex chemical hydride, nanostructured carbon materials, metal-doped carbon nanotubes, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), metal-doped metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and clathrates solid state hydrogen storage techniques are discussed. The studies on their hydrogen storage properties are in pr...

  12. Simultaneous purification and storage of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Weber, R.; Carlson, E. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Specially coated magnesium particles have been shown to selectively absorb hydrogen from a hydrogen-rich gas stream such as reformate. These coated magnesium particles can store the absorbed hydrogen as required and subsequently deliver pure hydrogen, just as uncoated magnesium particles can. These coated magnesium particles could be used in a device that accepts a steady stream of reformate, as from a methane reformer, stores the selectively absorbed hydrogen indefinitely, and delivers purified hydrogen on demand. Unfortunately, this coating (magnesium nitride) has been shown to degrade over a period of several weeks, so that the magnesium within evidences progressively lower storage capacity. The authors are investigating two other coatings, one of which might be applicable to hydridable metals other than magnesium, to replace magnesium nitride.

  13. Sodium Alanate Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Baldé, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Preparation and characterization of sodium alanate (NaAlH4) based hydrogen storage materials are described in this book. The effect of the NaAlH4 particle size, particularly in the nanometer size range deposited on carbon materials, will be linked to the hydrogen storage characteristics. Moreover, role and structure of the effect of adding a Ti-based-catalyst to the nano-NaAlH4 will be described. The structural changes that lead to a catalyst deactivation will be described for TiCl3 and Ti(OB...

  14. Multi-component hydrogen storage material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Syed A.; Lewis, Gregory J.; Sachtler, J.W. Adriaan; Low, John J.; Lesch, David A.; Dosek, Paul M.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Siegel, Donald J.; Sudik, Andrea C.; Yang, Jun

    2010-09-07

    A reversible hydrogen storage composition having an empirical formula of: Li.sub.(x+z)N.sub.xMg.sub.yB.sub.zH.sub.w where 0.4.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8; 0.2.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.6; 0hydrogen storage compared to binary systems such as MgH.sub.2--LiNH.sub.2.

  15. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  16. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  17. Thermodynamically Tuned Nanophase Materials for reversible Hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping Liu; John J. Vajo

    2010-02-28

    This program was devoted to significantly extending the limits of hydrogen storage technology for practical transportation applications. To meet the hydrogen capacity goals set forth by the DOE, solid-state materials consisting of light elements were developed. Many light element compounds are known that have high capacities. However, most of these materials are thermodynamically too stable, and they release and store hydrogen much too slowly for practical use. In this project we developed new light element chemical systems that have high hydrogen capacities while also having suitable thermodynamic properties. In addition, we developed methods for increasing the rates of hydrogen exchange in these new materials. The program has significantly advanced (1) the application of combined hydride systems for tuning thermodynamic properties and (2) the use of nanoengineering for improving hydrogen exchange. For example, we found that our strategy for thermodynamic tuning allows both entropy and enthalpy to be favorably adjusted. In addition, we demonstrated that using porous supports as scaffolds to confine hydride materials to nanoscale dimensions could improve rates of hydrogen exchange by > 50x. Although a hydrogen storage material meeting the requirements for commercial development was not achieved, this program has provided foundation and direction for future efforts. More broadly, nanoconfinment using scaffolds has application in other energy storage technologies including batteries and supercapacitors. The overall goal of this program was to develop a safe and cost-effective nanostructured light-element hydride material that overcomes the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers to hydrogen reaction and diffusion in current materials and thereby achieve > 6 weight percent hydrogen capacity at temperatures and equilibrium pressures consistent with DOE target values.

  18. Solar hydrogen hybrid system with carbon storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete solar hydrogen hybrid system has been developed to convert, store and use energy from renewable energy sources. The theoretical model has been implemented in a dynamic model-based software environment and applied to real data to simulate its functioning over a one-year period. Results are used to study system design and performance. A photovoltaic sub-system directly drives a residential load and, if a surplus of energy is available, an electrolyzer to produce hydrogen which is stored in a cluster of nitrogen-cooled tanks filled with AX-21 activated carbons. When the power converted from the sun is not sufficient to cover load needs, hydrogen is desorbed from activated carbon tanks and sent to the fuel-cell sub-system so to obtain electrical energy. A set of sub-systems (bus-bar, buck- and boost-converters, inverter, control circuits), handle the electrical power according to a Programmable Logic Control unit so that the load can be driven with adequate Quality of Service. Hydrogen storage is achieved through physisorption (weak van der Waals interactions) between carbon atoms and hydrogen molecules occurring at low temperature (77 K) in carbon porous solids at relatively low pressures. Storage modeling has been developed using a Langmuir-Freundlich 1st type isotherm and experimental data available in literature. Physisorption storage provides safer operations along with good gravimetric (10.8% at 6 MPa) and volumetric (32.5 g/l at 6 MPa) storage capacities at costs that can be comparable to, or smaller than, ordinary storage techniques (compression or liquefaction). Several test runs have been performed on residential user data-sets: the system is capable of providing grid independence and can be designed to yield a surplus production of hydrogen which can be used to recharge electric car batteries or fill tanks for non-stationary uses. (author)

  19. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M.; Zidan, R.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH{sub 4} is catalyzed in toluene slurries of the NaAlH{sub 4} containing the pincer complex, IrH{sub 4} {l_brace}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}{r_brace}. The rates of the pincer complex catalyzed dehydrogenation are about five times greater those previously found for NaAlH{sub 4} that was doped with titanium through a wet chemistry method. Homogenization of NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mole % Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} under an atmosphere of argon produces a novel titanium containing material. TPD measurements show that the dehydrogenation of this material occurs about 30 C lower than that previously found for wet titanium doped NaAlH{sub 4}. In further contrast to wet doped NaAlH{sub 4}, the dehydrogenation kinetics and hydrogen capacity of the novel material are undiminished over several dehydriding/hydriding cycles. Rehydrogenation of the titanium doped material occurs readily at 170 C under 150 atm of hydrogen. TPD measurements show that about 80% of the original hydrogen content (4.2 wt%) can be restored under these conditions.

  20. Hydrogen Storage Properties of Ti1.2Fe+xCa Hydrogen Storage Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of Ti1.2Fe+xCa (x=1%, 3% and 5% in mass fraction) alloys was investigated. Results show that the modified alloys can be activated without any thermal treatment at room temperature due to the addition of Ca and excess Ti in the alloys. Hydrogen storage properties of these modified alloys vary with Ca amount and reaction temperature. In addition, the influence mechanism of the addition of Ca and excessive Ti on the activation behavior and hydrogen storage capacity of the alloys was discussed.

  1. Nuclear power reactors and hydrogen storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among conclusions and results come by, a nuclear-electric-hydrogen integrated power system was suggested as a way to prevent the energy crisis. It was shown that the hydrogen power system using nuclear power as a leading energy resource would hold an advantage in the current international situation as well as for the long-term future. Results reported provide designers of integrated nuclear-electric-hydrogen systems with computation models and routines which will allow them to explore the optimal solution in coupling power reactors to hydrogen producing systems, taking into account the specific characters of hydrogen storage systems. The models were meant for average computers of a type easily available in developing countries. (author)

  2. Seasonal energy storage - PV-hydrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaenen, J. [Neste Oy/NAPS (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    PV systems are widely used in remote areas e.g. in telecommunication systems. Typically lead acid batteries are used as energy storage. In northern locations seasonal storage is needed, which however is too expensive and difficult to realise with batteries. Therefore, a PV- battery system with a diesel backup is sometimes used. The disadvantages of this kind of system for very remote applications are the need of maintenance and the need to supply the fuel. To overcome these problems, it has been suggested to use hydrogen technologies to make a closed loop autonomous energy storage system

  3. Use of hydrogen within a chemical Verbund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankertz, H.J.; Gall, M. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Hydrogen is an essential building block within the value chains of chemical Verbund sites, even though it is not a product targeted within the sales portfolio of a chemical company. At most sites not only Hydrogen, but also the other products of a Synthesisgas plant - Carbonmonoxide and Oxogas (mixture of Hydrogen and Carbonmonoxide) - are needed as well. A predominant portion of the plants within a Verbund depends on its supply. So within a chemical Verbund the challenge is to supply these gases in varying load situations, utilize respective co-produced gases from other plants and do so with highest availability and flexibility. As storage of substantial gas quantities is not economically feasible, buffer capacity is very limited. This makes these gas supply networks very stiff, which means that every change within the system causes immediate effect. Transportation of gases in large volumes via road or rail is economically not feasible, therefore the gases supply of a Verbund site is a customized local set-up. For newly developed demand it has to be evaluated whether an own investment or purchase of respective gas quantities (dedicated plant or supply via pipeline operated by gas companies) is the most economic concept. Future challenges will be limited availability of conventional liquid and gaseous fossil feedstocks, still increasing demand especially in Asia and effects caused by regulations and consumer behaviour related to sustainability and environmental aspects. We will need new, improved and proven technologies to manage these challenges. (Published in summary form only) (orig.)

  4. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  5. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage - New perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Morten B.; Jepsen, Lars H.; Lee, Young-Su;

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, hydrogen has been considered as a possible energy carrier for the storage of renewable energy. The main focus has been on addressing the ultimate challenge: developing an environmentally friendly successor for gasoline. This very ambitious goal has not yet been fully reached, as...

  6. Modified borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au, Ming

    2005-08-29

    In attempt to develop lithium borohydrides as the reversible hydrogen storage materials with the high capacity, the feasibility to reduce dehydrogenation temperature of the lithium borohydride and moderate rehydrogenation condition has been explored. The commercial available lithium borohydride has been modified by ball milling with metal oxides and metal chlorides as the additives. The modified lithium borohydrides release 9 wt% hydrogen starting from 473K. The dehydrided modified lithium borohydrides absorb 7-9 wt% hydrogen at 873K and 7 MPa. The additive modification reduces dehydriding temperature from 673K to 473K and moderates rehydrogenation conditions to 923K and 15 MPa. XRD and SEM analysis discovered the formation of the intermediate compound TiB{sub 2} that may plays the key role in change the reaction path resulting the lower dehydriding temperature and reversibility. The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of the oxide modified lithium borohydrides decreases gradually during hydriding-dehydriding cycling due to the lost of the boron during dehydrogenation. But, it can be prevented by selecting the suitable additive, forming intermediate boron compounds and changing the reaction path. The additives reduce dehydriding temperature and improve the reversibility, it also reduces the hydrogen storage capacity. The best compromise can be reached by optimization of the additive loading and introducing new process other than ball milling.

  7. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  8. Boron-Based Hydrogen Storage: Ternary Borides and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John

    2016-09-22

    DOE continues to seek reversible solid-state hydrogen materials with hydrogen densities of ³11 wt% and ³80 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at moderate temperatures (£100 °C) and pressures (£100 bar) enabling incorporation into hydrogen storage systems suitable for transportation applications. Boron-based hydrogen storage materials have the potential to meet the density requirements given boron’s low atomic weight, high chemical valance, and versatile chemistry. However, the rates of hydrogen exchange in boron based compounds are thus far much too slow for practical applications. Although contributing to the high hydrogen densities, the high valance of boron also leads to slow rates of hydrogen exchange due to extensive boron-boron atom rearrangements during hydrogen cycling. This rearrangement often leads to multiple solid phases occurring over hydrogen release and recharge cycles. These phases must nucleate and react with each other across solid-solid phase boundaries leading to energy barriers that slow the rates of hydrogen exchange. This project sought to overcome the slow rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based hydrogen storage materials by minimizing the number of solid phases and the boron atom rearrangement over a hydrogen release and recharge cycle. Two novel approaches were explored: 1) developing matched pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides that could exchange hydrogen with only one hydrogenated phase (the mixed-metal borohydride) and only one dehydrogenated phase (the ternary boride); and 2) developing boranes that could release hydrogen by being lithiated using lithium hydride with no boron-boron atom rearrangement. For the first approach, possible pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides based on Mg with various first row transition metals were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. In particular, the Mg/Mn ternary boride and mixed-metal borohydride were found to be a suitable pair and

  9. Evolution of Hydrogen Storage Alloys Prepared by Special Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong; Zhang Ximin; Jing Hai; Li Chengdong; Xu Jun

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure characteristics and electrochemical properties of hydrogen storage alloys prepared by gas atomization, melt spinning and strip casting respectively were outlined.The advantages, disadvantages and research development of the above methods for preparing hydrogen storage alloys were explained.The strip casting is a new special means for preparing AB5 rare earth hydrogen storage alloys of high performance and low cost, and the study of the strip casting for preparing hydrogen storage alloys is presented specially.

  10. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Heldebrant, David J [Richland, WA; Linehan, John C [Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Zheng, Feng [Richland, WA

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  11. Hydrogen storage in carbon derived from solid endosperm of coconut

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Viney; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Shahi, R. R.; Yadav, T. P.; O.N. Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Carbons are being widely investigated as hydrogen storage material owing to their light weight, fast hydrogen adsorption kinetics and cost effectiveness. However, these materials suffer from low hydrogen storage capacity, particularly at room temperature. The aim of the present study is to develop carbon-based material from natural bio-precursor which shows at least moderate hydrogen storage at room temperature. For this purpose, hydrogenation characteristics of carbon derived from solid endo...

  12. Scale-up activation of carbon fibres for hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Kunowsky, Mirko; Marco Lozar, Juan Pablo; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Linares Solano, Ángel

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, we investigated, at a laboratory scale, the chemical activation of two different carbon fibres (CF), their porosity characterization, and their optimization for hydrogen storage [1]. In the present work, this study is extended to: (i) a larger range of KOH activated carbon fibres, (ii) a larger range of hydrogen adsorption measurements at different temperatures and pressures (i.e. at room temperature, up to 20 MPa, and at 77 K, up to 4 MPa), and (iii) a scaling-up activat...

  13. Vehicular hydrogen storage using lightweight tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Weisberg, A H; Myers, B

    2000-07-22

    Lightweight hydrogen storage for vehicles is enabled by adopting and adapting aerospace tankage technology. The weight, volume, and cost are already acceptable and improving. Prototype tankage was demonstrated with 11.3% hydrogen by weight, 1.74 million inch (44.3 km) burst performance factor (P{sub b}V/W), and 3.77 kWh/kg specific energy for the tank and hydrogen (LHV). DOE cannot afford full scale aerospace development costs. For example, it costs many tens of $M to develop a rocket motor casing with a safety factor (SF) of 1.25. Large teams of experts are required to design, develop, and test new processes. Car companies are buying existing technology with only modest investments in research and development (R&D). The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) team is maximizing the leverage from DOE funding by joining with industry to solve technical risks at the component level. LLNL is developing fabrication processes with IMPCO Technologies, Thiokol Propulsion, and Aero Tec Laboratories (ATL). LLNL is creating commercial products that are close to adoption under DOE solicitation. LLNL is breaking ground to achieve greater than 10% hydrogen by weight tankage with safety that exceeds the requirements of NGV2 standards modified for hydrogen. Risk reduction is proceeding along three axes: (1) Commercializable products will be available next year with {approx}90% confidence; (2) R&D progress is pushing the envelope in lightweight tankage for vehicles; and (3) Integration challenges are being met with partners in industry and DOE demo programs. This project is a key part of LLNL's effort to develop high cycle life energy storage systems with >600 Wh/kg specific energy for various applications, including: high altitude long endurance solar rechargeable aircraft, zero emission vehicles, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems for spacecraft, energy storage for premium power, remote power sources, and peak shaving.

  14. Coupling of exothermic and endothermic hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Bowden, Mark E.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Houghton, Adrian Y.; Autrey, S. Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage (CHS) materials are a high-storage-density alternative to the gaseous compressed hydrogen currently used to provide hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. One of the challenges of CHS materials is addressing the energy barriers required to break the chemical bonds and release the hydrogen. Coupling CHS reactions that are endothermic and exothermic during dehydrogenation can improve onboard energy efficiency and thermal control for the system, making such materials viable. Acceptable coupling between reactions requires both thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. In this work, models were developed to predict the reaction enthalpy and rate required to achieve high conversions for both reactions based on experimental measurements. Modeling results show that the coupling efficiency of exothermic and endothermic reactions is more sensitive to the ratio of the exothermic and endothermic enthalpies than to the ratio of the rates of the two steps. Modeling results also show that a slower endothermic step rate is desirable to permit sufficient heating of the reactor by the exothermic step. We look at two examples of a sequential and parallel reaction scheme and provide some of the first published insight into the required temperature range to maximize the hydrogen release from 1,2-BN cyclohexane and indoline.

  15. Progress on first-principles-based materials design for hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Noejung; Choi, Keunsu; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Ok; Ihm, Jisoon

    2012-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes the research activities in the field of hydrogen storage in sorbent materials and reports our recent works and future directions for the design of such materials. Distinct features of sorption-based hydrogen storage methods are described compared with metal hydrides and complex chemical hydrides. We classify the studies of hydrogen sorbent materials in terms of two key technical issues: (i) constructing stable framework structures with high porosity, and (ii) i...

  16. Method and system for hydrogen evolution and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2012-12-11

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen (H.sub.2) employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  17. Palladium based nanomaterials for enhanced hydrogen spillover and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Konda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage remains one of the most challenging prerequisites to overcome toward the realization of a hydrogen based economy. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier for fuel cell applications has been limited by the lack of safe and effective hydrogen storage materials. Palladium has high affinity for hydrogen sorption and has been extensively studied, both in the gas phase and under electrochemical conditions. In this review, recent advancements are highlighted and discussed in regard to palladium based nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, as well as the effects of hydrogen spillover on various adsorbents including carbons, metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks, and other nanomaterials.

  18. Coupling of Exothermic and Endothermic Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Bowden, Mark E.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Houghton, Adrian Y.; Autrey, Thomas

    2016-08-30

    Chemical hydrogen storage (CHS) materials are a high-storage-density alternative to the gaseous compressed hydrogen currently used to provide hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. One of the challenges of CHS materials is addressing the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers required to break the chemical bonds and release the hydrogen. Coupling CHS reactions that are endothermic and exothermic during the dehydrogenation can improve the system on-board energy efficiency and thermal control, making such materials viable. Acceptable coupling between reactions requires both thermodynamic and kinetics considerations. Models were developed to predict the reaction enthalpy and rate required to achieve high conversions for both reactions based on experimental measurements. These modeling results show that the efficiency of coupling of an exothermic and endothermic reaction is more sensitive the magnitude of the ratio of the exothermic and endothermic enthalpies than the ratio of the rates of the two steps. The modeling shows further that a slower rate of the endothermic step is desirable to permit sufficient heating of the reactor by the exothermic step. We look at two examples of a sequential and parallel reaction scheme and provide some of the first insight into the required temperature range to maximize the H2 release from 1,2-BN cyclohexane and indoline.

  19. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenstra, Mike [Ford Scientific Research Lab., Dearborn, MI (United States); Purewal, Justin [Ford Scientific Research Lab., Dearborn, MI (United States); Xu, Chunchuan [Ford Scientific Research Lab., Dearborn, MI (United States); Yang, Jun [Ford Scientific Research Lab., Dearborn, MI (United States); Blaser, Rachel [Ford Scientific Research Lab., Dearborn, MI (United States); Sudik, Andrea [Ford Motor Company; Siegel, Don [University of Michigan; Ming, Yang [University of Michigan; Liu, Dong' an [University of Michigan; Chi, Hang [University of Michigan; Gaab, Manuela [BASF; Arnold, Lena [BASF; Muller, Ulrich [BASF

    2016-08-17

    Widespread adoption of hydrogen as a vehicular fuel depends critically on the development of low-cost, on-board hydrogen storage technologies capable of achieving high energy densities and fast kinetics for hydrogen uptake and release. As present-day technologies -- which rely on physical storage methods such as compressed hydrogen -- are incapable of attaining established Department of Energy (DOE) targets, development of materials-based approaches for storing hydrogen have garnered increasing attention. Material-based storage technologies have potential to store hydrogen beyond twice the density of liquid hydrogen. To hasten development of these ‘hydride’ materials, the DOE previously established three centers of excellence for materials storage R&D associated with the key classes of materials: metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen, and adsorbents. While these centers made progress in identifying new storage materials, the challenges associated with the engineering of the system around a candidate storage material are in need of further advancement. In 2009 the DOE established the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence with the objective of developing innovative engineering concepts for materials-based hydrogen storage systems. As a partner in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence, the Ford-UM-BASF team conducted a multi-faceted research program that addresses key engineering challenges associated with the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. First, we developed a novel framework that allowed for a material-based hydrogen storage system to be modeled and operated within a virtual fuel cell vehicle. This effort resulted in the ability to assess dynamic operating parameters and interactions between the storage system and fuel cell power plant, including the evaluation of performance throughout various drive cycles. Second, we engaged in cost modeling of various incarnations of the storage systems. This analysis

  20. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenstra, Mike [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Purewal, Justin [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Xu, Chunchuan [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Yang, Jun [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Blaser, Rachel [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Sudik, Andrea [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Siegel, Don [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ming, Yang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Liu, Dong' an [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chi, Hang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gaab, Manuela [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Arnold, Lena [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Muller, Ulrich [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2015-06-30

    Widespread adoption of hydrogen as a vehicular fuel depends critically on the development of low-cost, on-board hydrogen storage technologies capable of achieving high energy densities and fast kinetics for hydrogen uptake and release. As present-day technologies -- which rely on physical storage methods such as compressed hydrogen -- are incapable of attaining established Department of Energy (DOE) targets, development of materials-based approaches for storing hydrogen have garnered increasing attention. Material-based storage technologies have potential to store hydrogen beyond twice the density of liquid hydrogen. To hasten development of these ‘hydride’ materials, the DOE previously established three centers of excellence for materials storage R&D associated with the key classes of materials: metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen, and adsorbents. While these centers made progress in identifying new storage materials, the challenges associated with the engineering of the system around a candidate storage material are in need of further advancement. In 2009 the DOE established the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence with the objective of developing innovative engineering concepts for materials-based hydrogen storage systems. As a partner in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence, the Ford-UM-BASF team conducted a multi-faceted research program that addresses key engineering challenges associated with the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. First, we developed a novel framework that allowed for a material-based hydrogen storage system to be modeled and operated within a virtual fuel cell vehicle. This effort resulted in the ability to assess dynamic operating parameters and interactions between the storage system and fuel cell power plant, including the evaluation of performance throughout various drive cycles. Second, we engaged in cost modeling of various incarnations of the storage systems. This analysis

  1. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    OpenAIRE

    Ogden, Joan M.; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The development of a hydrogen infrastructure has been identified as a key barrier to implementing hydrogen as for a future transportation fuel. Several recent studies of hydrogen infrastructure have assessed near-term and long-term alternatives for hydrogen supply [1-2]. In this paper, we discuss how advances in material science related to hydrogen storage could change how a future hydrogen infrastructure is designed. Using a simplified engineering/economic model for hydrogen infrastructure d...

  2. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  3. Palladium based nanomaterials for enhanced hydrogen spillover and storage

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh K. Konda; Aicheng Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen storage remains one of the most challenging prerequisites to overcome toward the realization of a hydrogen based economy. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier for fuel cell applications has been limited by the lack of safe and effective hydrogen storage materials. Palladium has high affinity for hydrogen sorption and has been extensively studied, both in the gas phase and under electrochemical conditions. In this review, recent advancements are highlighted and discussed in regard...

  4. Material demands for storage technologies in a hydrogen economy

    OpenAIRE

    Kunowsky, M.; Marco-Lózar, J. P.; Linares-Solano, A.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogen economy is needed, in order to resolve current environmental and energy-related problems. For the introduction of hydrogen as an important energy vector, sophisticated materials are required. This paper provides a brief overview of the subject, with a focus on hydrogen storage technologies for mobile applications. The unique properties of hydrogen are addressed, from which its advantages and challenges can be derived. Different hydrogen storage technologies are described and evalua...

  5. Performance of hydrogen storage of carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    木士春; 唐浩林; 钱胜浩; 潘牧; 袁润章

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes(CNTs) decorated with palladium were synthesized and applied to hydrogen storage of gas phase. The results show that the amount of hydrogen storage of the decorated CNTs is up to 3.9 % (mass fraction), of which, almost 85% H2 can be desorbed at ambient temperature and pressure, while the non-decorated CNTs has a poor performance of hydrogen storage(only about 0.5% H2, mass fraction). These indicate that it is feasible to enhance the performance of hydrogen storage of CNTs by further decoration with hydrogen-storing metals or alloys.

  6. Hydrogen Fire in a Storage Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Zena M.

    2010-01-01

    On October 23, 2007, the operations team began a procedure to sample the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage vessels ("tanks"), and associated transfer system. This procedure was being performed to determine the conditions within the system, and if necessary, to purge the system of any excess Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) in preparation for reactivation of the system. The system had not been used since 2003. The LH2 storage system contains two (2) spherical pressure vessels of 225,000 gallons in volume, with a maximum working pressure (MAWP) of 50 psig. Eight inch transfer piping connects them to the usage point. Operations began with activation of the burnstack for the LH2 storage area. Pneumatic (GN2) systems in the storage area were then activated and checked. Pressurization of storage tank number 1 with gaseous nitrogen (GN2) was initiated, with a target pressure of 10 psig, at which point samples were planned to be taken. At 5 psig, a loud noise was heard in the upper area of tank number 2. Smoke was seen exiting the burnstack and from the insulation on vent lines for both tanks. At this time tank number 1 was vented and the pressurization system was secured. The mishap resulted in physical damage to both storage tanks, as well as to some of the piping for both tanks. Corrective action included repair of the damaged hardware by a qualified contractor. Preventive action included documented organizational policy and procedures for establishing standby and mothball conditions for facilities and equipment, including provisions as detailed in the investigation report recommendations: Recommendation 1: The using organization should define necessary activities in order to place hydrogen systems in long term periods of inactivity. The defined activities should address requirements for rendering inert, isolation (i.e., physical disconnect, double block and bleed, etc.) and periodic monitoring. Recommendation 2: The using organization should develop a process to periodically monitor

  7. Surface analysis, hydrogen adsorption and electrochemical performance of alkali-reduce treated hydrogen storage alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫祥; 徐铸德; 涂江平; 李海洋; 陈石; 袁俊; 鲍世宁

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogen storage alloy powders (MlNi4.0Co0.6Al0.4, Ml=rich-La mischmetal) were treated in a hot 6mol/L KOH+0.02mol/L KBH4 solution, the surface compositions and chemical states of the treated and untreated alloys were analyzed by XPS and EDX, the hydrogen adsorption on the surface of these alloys was evaluated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), the effects of the surface treatment on the electrochemical performances of the alloy electrodes were investigated. The results show that the hydrogen adsorption is greatly strengthened by the surface modification, and hence leads to marked improvement in the electrocatalytic activity, the treated alloy exhibits higher exchange current density and lower apparent activation energy for the hydrogen electrode reaction than the untreated alloy.

  8. Hydrogen Storage using Physisorption : Modified Carbon Nanofibers and Related Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Marije Gessien

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes our research on adsorbent systems for hydrogen storage for small scale, mobile application. Hydrogen storage is a key element in the change-over from the less efficient and polluting internal combustion engine to the pollution-free operating hydrogen fuel cell. In general, hydr

  9. Optimization of a solar hydrogen storage system: safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen has been extensively used in many industrial applications for more than 100 years, including production, storage, transport, delivery and final use. Nevertheless, the goal of the hydrogen energy system implies the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier in a more wide scale and for a public not familiarized with hydrogen technologies and properties. The road to the hydrogen economy pass by the development of safe practices in the production, storage, distribution, and use of hydrogen. These issues are essential for hydrogen insurability. We have to bear in mind that a catastrophic failure in any hydrogen project could damage the insurance public perception of hydrogen technologies at this early step of development of hydrogen infrastructures. Safety is a key issue for the development of hydrogen economy, and a great international effort is being done by different stakeholders for the development of suitable codes and standards concerning safety for hydrogen technologies. Additionally to codes and standards, different studies have been done regarding safety aspects of particular hydrogen energy projects during the last years. Most of them have been focused on hydrogen production and storage in large facilities, transport, delivery in hydrogen refuelling stations, and utilization, mainly on fuel cells for mobile and stationary applications. In comparison, safety considerations for hydrogen storage in small or medium scale facilities, as usual in hydrogen production plants from renewable energies, have received relatively less attention. After a brief introduction to risk assessment for hydrogen facilities, this paper reports an example of risk assessment of a small solar hydrogen storage system, applied to the INTA Solar Hydrogen Production and Storage facility as particular case, and considers a top level Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for the identification of hazard associated to the specific characteristics of the facility. (authors)

  10. Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

  11. Hydrogen isotope storage in zircaloy scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. S.; Kuk, I. H.; Chung, H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S

    1999-08-01

    8 MCi of tritium a year will be produced after wolsong TRF is in operation. The metal hydride form is one of useful tritium storage. The metals in use for metal hydride are uranium, titanium, etc., however uranium is limited to use by regulation, and titanium is relatively costly. Both metals are not produced in country but whole amount is imported. On the other hand 2,000kg of zircaloy scrap is produced by CANDU nuclear fuel fabrication process, which is also useful for hydrogen storage. The purpose of this study is to evaluation of hydrogen absorption capacity for zircaloy scrap that is produced as waste by CANDU nuclear fuel fabrication process. The sample evacuated for an hour at 1000 deg C. The strip showed higher capacity : 0.7 at 25 deg C, 2.0 at 200 deg C, 2.0 at 200 deg C, 2.0 at 400 deg C, respectively. The H/M values for commercial zircaloy sponge were 2.0 at 25 deg C and 2.0 at 400 deg C.

  12. Compressorless Gas Storage and Regenerative Hydrogen Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microwave regenerative sorption media gas storage/delivery techniques are proposed to address both compressed gas management and hydrogen purification requirements...

  13. A nanostructured composite material for hydrogen storage: design & analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hajjaj, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has long been considered an ideal energy carrier for a sustainable energy economy, for both direct combustion and as a fuel for polymer-electrolyte fuel cells. One of the main challenges associated with the use of hydrogen is to find efficient methods of storage. Any method must be safe, reversible, cost-effective and practical. In this thesis, a general introduction to hydrogen energy and the hydrogen economy is provided, together with descriptions of incumbent and emerging storage ...

  14. Electrospun nanostructured composite fibres for hydrogen storage applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kurban, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The urgent realisation of the low carbon economy requires the development of cheap, safe and lightweight hydrogen storage, both for commercialisation of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, and for the use of hydrogen as a reservoir of energy from intermittent renewable energy sources. The primary motivation of this PhD project was to investigate (co)electrospinning, a cheap and scalable fibre production technique, for nanostructuring potential solid state hydrogen storage materials. Solid state stor...

  15. Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-13

    Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

  16. Review of Solid State Hydrogen Storage Methods Adopting Different Kinds of Novel Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renju Zacharia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overview of advances in the technology of solid state hydrogen storage methods applying different kinds of novel materials is provided. Metallic and intermetallic hydrides, complex chemical hydride, nanostructured carbon materials, metal-doped carbon nanotubes, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, metal-doped metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks (COFs, and clathrates solid state hydrogen storage techniques are discussed. The studies on their hydrogen storage properties are in progress towards positive direction. Nevertheless, it is believed that these novel materials will offer far-reaching solutions to the onboard hydrogen storage problems in near future. The review begins with the deficiencies of current energy economy and discusses the various aspects of implementation of hydrogen energy based economy.

  17. Hydrogen transmission/storage with a metal hydride/organic slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.; McClaine, A. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has developed a new approach for the production, transmission, and storage of hydrogen. In this approach, a chemical hydride slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. The slurry protects the hydride from unanticipated contact with moisture in the air and makes the hydride pumpable. At the point of storage and use, a chemical hydride/water reaction is used to produce high-purity hydrogen. An essential feature of this approach is the recovery and recycle of the spent hydride at centralized processing plants, resulting in an overall low cost for hydrogen. This approach has two clear benefits: it greatly improves energy transmission and storage characteristics of hydrogen as a fuel, and it produces the hydrogen carrier efficiently and economically from a low cost carbon source. The preliminary economic analysis of the process indicates that hydrogen can be produced for $3.85 per million Btu based on a carbon cost of $1.42 per million Btu and a plant sized to serve a million cars per day. This compares to current costs of approximately $9.00 per million Btu to produce hydrogen from $3.00 per million Btu natural gas, and $25 per million Btu to produce hydrogen by electrolysis from $0.05 per Kwh electricity. The present standard for production of hydrogen from renewable energy is photovoltaic-electrolysis at $100 to $150 per million Btu.

  18. BIMETALLIC LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDES TOWARD REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au, M.

    2010-10-21

    Borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4} have been studied as candidates for hydrogen storage because of their high hydrogen contents (18.4 wt% for LiBH{sub 4}). Limited success has been made in reducing the dehydrogenation temperature by adding reactants such as metals, metal oxides and metal halides. However, full rehydrogenation has not been realized because of multi-step decomposition processes and the stable intermediate species produced. It is suggested that adding second cation in LiBH{sub 4} may reduce the binding energy of B-H. The second cation may also provide the pathway for full rehydrogenation. In this work, several bimetallic borohydrides were synthesized using wet chemistry, high pressure reactive ball milling and sintering processes. The investigation found that the thermodynamic stability was reduced, but the full rehydrogenation is still a challenge. Although our experiments show the partial reversibility of the bimetallic borohydrides, it was not sustainable during dehydriding-rehydriding cycles because of the accumulation of hydrogen inert species.

  19. Developing business opportunities for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quick review of the history of Dynetek Industries Limited was provided. During the period 1991-1995, it began research and development efforts in the field of advanced lightweight fuel storage systems and the DyneCellR Fuel Storage Systems was introduced on the market. In 1997, it began supplying Ballard Power Systems with hydrogen fuel tanks. Trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange started in September 2000, and in 2001 Dynetek incorporated a 100 per cent European subsidiary, Dynetek Europe GmbH. The advantages of the product are numerous: lightest cylinder on the market with a metallic liner, highest storage capacity of all lightweight designs, non-permeable, one piece, seamless aluminium liner, and true fast-fill capabilities to name but a few. Dynetek's vision of market development was introduced. It involves a California demonstration project for the period 2001-2003 which should lead to transit vehicles in 2005-2008. Fleet vehicles are expected to follow suit during the same period, and the consumer market should be ripe in 2010-2015. Some of the challenges facing the industry were discussed and Dynetek's role in meeting them was examined. figs

  20. Chemical energy storage by means of methanol. Silicon fire-technology converts electrolysis hydrogen and carbon dioxide into methanol; Chemische Energiespeicherung mittels Methanol. Silicon-Fire-Technologie wandelt Elektrolysewasserstoff und Kohlendioxid in Methanol um

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Pittroff, Roland [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Weihenstephan (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The electric network system will reach its limits due to the further extensive installation of wind and solar power plants. To preserve its operability the generated fluctuating electric energy must be in part transferred into storable energy forms preferably locally. These storable energy carriers can be used economically and ecologically worthwhile mainly outside of the electric network system in other energy consumption sectors like vehicle movement. Accordant the state of technology only the chemical storage can be considered for the needed capacities. During the last years the Silicon Fire-Methanol-Technology has been developed for the synthesis of methanol from electrolysis hydrogen and carbon dioxide coming from concentrated industrial sources. The methanol can be used profitable e.g. as renewable substitute for gasoline or as admixture to gasoline comparable to bio-ethanol - but without competition with foods. (orig.)

  1. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  2. Effects of structure and surface properties on carbon nanotubes' hydrogen storage characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption experiments were carried out in special stainless steel vessels at room temperature (298K) and under 10 MPa using self-synthesized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In the experiments, carbon nanotubes synthesized by the seeded catalyst method were pretreated by being soaked in chemical reagents or annealed at high temperature before they were used to adsorb hydrogen, but their capacity for hydrogen storage was still poor. Carbon nanotubes synthesized by the floating catalyst method were found to be able to adsorb more hydrogen. They have a hydrogen storage capacity of over 4% after they were annealed at high temperatures, which suggested that they could be used as a promising material for hydrogen storage.``

  3. Hydrogen storage in Chabazite zeolite frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regli, Laura; Zecchina, Adriano; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Spoto, Giuseppe; Lamberti, Carlo; Lillerud, Karl P; Olsbye, Unni; Bordiga, Silvia

    2005-09-01

    We have recently highlighted that H-SSZ-13, a highly siliceous zeolite (Si/Al = 11.6) with a chabazitic framework, is the most efficient zeolitic material for hydrogen storage [A. Zecchina, S. Bordiga, J. G. Vitillo, G. Ricchiardi, C. Lamberti, G. Spoto, M. Bjørgen and K. P. Lillerud, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2005, 127, 6361]. The aim of this new study is thus to clarify both the role played by the acidic strength and by the density of the polarizing centers hosted in the same framework topology in the increase of the adsorptive capabilities of the chabazitic materials towards H2. To achieve this goal, the volumetric experiments of H2 uptake (performed at 77 K) and the transmission IR experiment of H2 adsorption at 15 K have been performed on H-SSZ-13, H-SAPO-34 (the isostructural silico-aluminophosphate material with the same Brønsted site density) and H-CHA (the standard chabazite zeolite: Si/Al = 2.1) materials. We have found that a H2 uptake improvement has been obtained by increasing the acidic strength of the Brønsted sites (moving from H-SAPO-34 to H-SSZ-13). Conversely, the important increase of the Brønsted sites density (moving from H-SSZ-13 to H-CHA) has played a negative role. This unexpected behavior has been explained as follows. The additional Brønsted sites are in mutual interaction via H-bonds inside the small cages of the chabazitic framework and for most of them the energetic cost needed to displace the adjacent OH ligand is higher than the adsorption enthalpy of the OH...H2 adduct. From our work it can be concluded that proton exchanged chabazitic frameworks represent, among zeolites, the most efficient materials for hydrogen storage. We have shown that a proper balance between available space (volume accessible to hydrogen), high contact surface, and specific interaction with strong and isolated polarizing centers are the necessary characteristics requested to design better materials for molecular H2 storage. PMID:16240032

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  5. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH4), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH4 from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H2) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH4 as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH4 is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH4 in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project utilized an engineering-guided R

  6. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

    2010-12-31

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This

  7. Chemical Expansion: Implications for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bishop, S.R.; Marrocchelli, D.; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos;

    2014-01-01

    Many energy-related materials rely on the uptake and release of large quantities of ions, for example, Li+ in batteries, H+ in hydrogen storage materials, and O2− in solid-oxide fuel cell and related materials. These compositional changes often result in large volumetric dilation of the material...... modeling and an overview of factors impacting chemical expansion. We discuss the implications of chemical expansion for mechanical stability and functionality in the energy applications above, as well as in other oxide-based systems. The use of chemical expansion as a new means to probe other materials...

  8. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  9. Nanoporous metal organic framework materials for hydrogen storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Xiao; Qingchun Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen is expected to play an important role in future transportation as a promising alternative clean energy source to carbon-based fuels.One of the key challenges to commercialize hydrogen energy is to develop appropriate onboard hydrogen storage systems,capable of charging and discharging large quantities of hydrogen with fast enough kinetics to meet commercial requirements.Metal organic framework (MOF) is a new type of inorganic and organic hybrid nanoporous particulate materials.Its diverse networks can enhance hydrogen storage through tuning the structure and property of MOFs.The MOF materials so far developed adsorb hydrogen through weak disperston interactions,which allow significant quantity of hydrogen to be stored at cryogenic temperatures with fast kinetics.Novel MOFs are being developed to strengthen the interactions between hydrogen and MOFs in order to store hydrogen under ambient conditions.This review surveys the development of such candidate materials,their performance and future research needs.

  10. Spark Discharge Generated Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vons, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest obstacles to the large scale application of hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles is the absence of hydrogen storage methods suitable for application on-board of these vehicles. Metal hydrides are materials in which hydrogen is reversibly absorbed by one or more metals or combinatio

  11. Simulation and Modelling of MOFs for Hydrogen Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Başdoğan, Yasemin; Keskin Avcı, Seda

    2015-01-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have received significant attention in recent years both from academia and industry since this new class of nanoporous materials has many potential advantages over traditional nanoporous materials in gas storage and separation applications. Hydrogen storage has been one of the most widely investigated applications of MOFs and recent experimental studies have shown that several MOFs are promising for hydrogen storage at low temperatures and moderate pressures. I...

  12. Electron Charged Graphite-based Hydrogen Storage Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Chinbay Q. Fan; D Manager

    2012-03-14

    The electron-charge effects have been demonstrated to enhance hydrogen storage capacity using materials which have inherent hydrogen storage capacities. A charge control agent (CCA) or a charge transfer agent (CTA) was applied to the hydrogen storage material to reduce internal discharge between particles in a Sievert volumetric test device. GTI has tested the device under (1) electrostatic charge mode; (2) ultra-capacitor mode; and (3) metal-hydride mode. GTI has also analyzed the charge distribution on storage materials. The charge control agent and charge transfer agent are needed to prevent internal charge leaks so that the hydrogen atoms can stay on the storage material. GTI has analyzed the hydrogen fueling tank structure, which contains an air or liquid heat exchange framework. The cooling structure is needed for hydrogen fueling/releasing. We found that the cooling structure could be used as electron-charged electrodes, which will exhibit a very uniform charge distribution (because the cooling system needs to remove heat uniformly). Therefore, the electron-charge concept does not have any burden of cost and weight for the hydrogen storage tank system. The energy consumption for the electron-charge enhancement method is quite low or omitted for electrostatic mode and ultra-capacitor mode in comparison of other hydrogen storage methods; however, it could be high for the battery mode.

  13. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  14. Tailoring of Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hui [ORNL; Zhao, Bin [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Styers-Barnett, David J [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Brown, Craig M. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN; Liu, Yun [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN; Zhou, Wei [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kabbour, Houria [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Neumann, Dan [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2007-01-01

    We report the post-processing chemical treatments of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as a medium with tunable porosity to optimize hydrogen adsorption. Laser synthesized SWNHs are oxidized in air to achieve surface areas up to 1900 m2/g. Chemistry methods are described for the decoration of SWNHs with 1-3 nm Pt nanoparticles to probe spillover and metal-assisted hydrogen storage mechanisms. Hydrogen storage of opened SWNHs is 2.6 wt% at 77K, which is 3 times as that of as-prepared SWNHs.

  15. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  16. Activated carbons from African oil palm waste shells and fibre for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We prepared a series of activated carbons by chemical activation with two strong bases in-group that few use, and I with waste from shell and fibers and oil-palm African. Activated carbons are obtained with relatively high surface areas (1605 m2/g. We study the textural and chemical properties and its effect on hydrogen storage. The activated carbons obtained from fibrous wastes exhibit a high hydrogen storage capacity of 6.0 wt % at 77 K and 12 bar.

  17. Novel progress in the development of hydrogen storage materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A new dehydrogenation mechanism for LiBH4, a new hydrogen storage material, has recently been developed by CAS scientists and their coworkersfrom the University of Nottingham, showing a promising future for its onboard applications.

  18. Low Pressure Adsorbent for Recovery & Storage Vented Hydrogen Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance fullerene-based adsorbent is proposed for recovery and storage hydrogen and separating helium via pressure-swing-adsorption (PSA) process....

  19. Radiation Shielding and Hydrogen Storage with Multifunctional Carbon Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  20. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and pressur

  1. The Energy Efficiency of Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Li, Qingfeng;

    2007-01-01

    A number of the most common ways of storing hydrogen are reviewed in terms of energy efficiency. Distinction is made between energy losses during regeneration and during hydrogen liberation. In the latter case, the energy might have to be provided by part of the released hydrogen, and the true...

  2. Recent progress in metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.-W.; Yan, Y.; Orimo, S.-I. [Tohoku University, Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Sendai (Japan); Zuettel, A. [Department of the Environment, Energy and Mobility (EMPA), Abt. 138 ' Hydrogen and Energy' , Duebendorf (Switzerland); Jensen, C. M. [University of Hawaii, Department of Chemistry, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The prerequisite for widespread use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is the development of new materials that can safely store it at high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal borohydrides M(BH{sub 4}){sub n} (n is the valence of metal M), in particular, have high hydrogen density, and are therefore regarded as one such potential hydrogen storage material. For fuel cell vehicles, the goal for on-board storage systems is to achieve reversible store at high density but moderate temperature and hydrogen pressure. To this end, a large amount of effort has been devoted to improvements in their thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. This review provides an overview of recent research activity on various M(BH{sub 4}){sub n}, with a focus on the fundamental dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation properties and on providing guidance for material design in terms of tailoring thermodynamics and promoting kinetics for hydrogen storage. (authors)

  3. Development of hydrogen storage systems using Sodium alanate

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Martinez, Gustavo Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen storage systems based on sodium alanate are studied, modelled, and optimised, on the basis of both experimental and theoretical approaches. The experimental hydrogen sorption behaviour (kinetics, heat transfer and cycling) of small cells up to kg-scale storage tanks is compared and analysed. In particular the effect of the size of the system, powder compaction, and addition of expanded graphite on the sorption behaviour is investigated and characterized. In order to implement simulat...

  4. Hydrogen storage materials and metal hydride-Ni batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen storage alloy is the key active material in metal hydride-Ni (MH-Ni) batteries. A brief review of hydrogen storage negative electrode materials including misch-nickel-based alloys, Laves phase alloys, magnesium-based alloys, vanadium-based solid solutions and nanotubes is presented. Current problems that need to be solved are mentioned. In addition, recent developments of MH/Ni-batteries with high power and energy are introduced

  5. Fatigue test of carbon epoxy composite high pressure hydrogen storage vessel under hydrogen environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-xiang ZHENG; Liang WANG; Rong LI; Zong-xin WEI; Wei-wei ZHOU

    2013-01-01

    A significant temperature raise within hydrogen vehicle cylinder during the fast filling process will be observed,while the strength and fatigue life of the cylinder will dramatically decrease at high temperature.In order to evaluate the strength and fatigue of composite hydrogen storage vessel,a 70-MPa fatigue test system using hydrogen medium was set up.Experimental study on the fatigue of composite hydrogen storage vessels under real hydrogen environment was performed.The experimental results show that the ultimate strength and fatigue life both decreased obviously compared with the values under hydraulic fatigue test.Furthermore,fatigue property,failure behavior,and safe hydrogen charging/discharging working mode of onboard hydrogen storage vessels were obtained through the fatigue tests.

  6. The Influence of Graphene Curvature on Hydrogen Adsorption: Towards Hydrogen Storage Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Goler, Sarah; Tozzini, Valentina; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mashoff, Torge; Beltram, Fabio; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Heun, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ability of atomic hydrogen to chemisorb on graphene makes the latter a promising material for hydrogen storage. Based on scanning tunneling microscopy techniques, we report on site-selective adsorption of atomic hydrogen on convexly curved regions of monolayer graphene grown on SiC(0001). This system exhibits an intrinsic curvature owing to the interaction with the substrate. We show that at low coverage hydrogen is found on convex areas of the graphene lattice. No hydrogen is detected on concave regions. These findings are in agreement with theoretical models which suggest that both binding energy and adsorption barrier can be tuned by controlling the local curvature of the graphene lattice. This curvature-dependence combined with the known graphene flexibility may be exploited for storage and controlled release of hydrogen at room temperature making it a valuable candidate for the implementation of hydrogen-storage devices.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela D.; Li, Qixiu; Badding, John V.; Fonseca, Dania; Gutierrez, Humerto; Sakti, Apurba; Adu, Kofi; Schimmel, Michael

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  8. Thermal management technology for hydrogen storage: Fullerene option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.C.; Chen, F.C.; Murphy, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Fullerenes are selected as the first option for investigating advanced thermal management technologies for hydrogen storage because of their potentially high volumetric and gravimetric densities. Experimental results indicate that about 6 wt% of hydrogen (corresponding to C{sub 60}H{sub 48}) can be added to and taken out of fullerenes. A model assuming thermally activated hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes was developed to explain the experimental findings. The activation energies were estimated to be 100 and 160 kJ/mole (1.0 and 1.6 eV/H{sub 2}) for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes, respectively. The difference is interpreted as the heat released during hydrogenation. There are indications that the activation energies and the heat of hydrogenation can be modified by the use of catalysts. Preliminary hydrogen storage simulations for a conceptually simple device were performed. A 1-m long hollow metal cylinder with an inner diameter of 0.02 m was assumed to be filled with fullerene powders. The results indicate that the thermal diffusivity of the fullerenes controls the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation rates. The rates can be significantly modified by changing the thermal diffusivity of the material inside the cylinder, e.g., by incorporating a metal mesh. Results from the simulation suggest that thermal management is essential for efficient hydrogen storage devices using fullerenes. While the preliminary models developed in this study explain some of the observation, more controlled experiments, rigorous model development, and physical property determinations are needed for the development of practical hydrogen storage devices. The use of catalysts to optimize the hydrogen storage characteristics of fullerenes also needs to be pursued. Future cooperative work between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Material & Electrochemical Research Corporation (MER) is planned to address these needs.

  9. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-07-01

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 246922. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30940h

  10. Nanoconfined Alkali-metal borohydrides for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has been identified as a promising energy carrier. Its combustion is not associated with pollution when generated from renewable energy sources like solar and wind. The large-scale use of hydrogen for intermittent energy storage and as a fuel for cars can contribute to the realization of a

  11. Hydrogen Storage in Porous Materials and Magnesium Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzech, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis representatives of two different types of materials for potential hydrogen storage application are presented. Usage of either nanoporous materials or metal hydrides has both operational advantages and disadvantages. A main objective of this thesis is to characterize the hydrogen stora

  12. Characteristics of depleted uranium for the storage of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics for the hydrogen storage was investigated using depleted uranium that was the waste of nuclear fuel manufacturing. Activation process was conducted to heat the experimental vessel to 450 .deg. C under vacuum and the reaction temperature was room temperature. The absorption reaction between hydrogen and depleted uranium was very fast with rapid increasing of temperature and reached to the saturated state within 10 minutes. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium was 2.95 and the amounts of absorbed hydrogen were 3.5 liter after one hour of reaction. The experimental results of reproducibility showed the similar tendencies after third reaction. The reaction of hydrogen and deuterium showed similar tendencies and the initial reaction rate of deuterium was slower than that of hydrogen. The desorption of absorbed hydrogen started around 250 .deg. C. It was confirmed that the almost absorbed hydrogen was desorbed by heating to 450 .deg. C

  13. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  14. A study of hydro-graphene for energy storage (2) Hydrogen absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokio Yamabe; Mitsuhiro Fujii [Nagasaki Institute ofApplied Science, 536 Aba-machi, Nagasaki 851-0193, (Japan); Yoshio Furuya [Department of Technology, Faculty of Education, Nagasaki University, 1-14 bunkyo-cho, Nagasaki 852-8521, (Japan); Shiro Mori; Shizukuni Yata [Energy Conversion Research Laboratory, KRI Inc., Kyoto Research Park, 134 Chudoji Minami-machi, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813, (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The technology of hydrogen storage is one of the most important challenges in hydrogen energy system for clean environment. Some carbon materials are expected to have such advantage for hydrogen storage. We have studied about PAS and PAHs, which are marginal members of the carbon allotropes containing a significant amount of hydrogen atoms, and which show a variety of interesting properties lacking pure carbon materials. They constituted by graphite sheets terminated by hydrogen atoms, and so it may be called 'hydro-graphene'. In this work, we prepared two kinds of hydro-graphene, such as PAS and PAHs, by the pyrolysis at 550 C. The [H]/[C] molar ratio of PAS was 0.45, and that of PAHs was 0.33. The interlayer distance of PAS was broad, and that of PAH was 3.68 A. We examined their ability of hydrogen storage by two methods. It was measured the amount of equilibrium pressure change of sample room, on the first method of increasing hydrogen pressure at 77 K, and on the second method of temperature increasing to R.T. in vacuum after reducing pressure. On the former method, the hydrogen storage amount of PAS was 0.5 wt-%, and that of PAHs was 0.4 wt-%. On the latter, that of PAS was 0.4 wt-%, and that of PAHs was 0.3 wt-%. Those results indicate that each total capacity of hydrogen storage was estimated 0.5-6 wt-%. We will discuss the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption to hydro-graphene based on the quantum chemical viewpoint. (authors)

  15. A Cassette Based System for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Wayne E.

    2006-11-29

    A hydrogen storage system is described and evaluated. This is based upon a cassette, that is a container for managing hydrogen storage materials. The container is designed to be safe, modular, adaptable to different chemistries, inexpensive, and transportable. A second module receives the cassette and provides the necessary infrastructure to deliver hydrogen from the cassette according to enduser requirements. The modular concept has a number of advantages over approaches that are all in one stand alone systems. The advantages of a cassette based system are discussed, along with results from model and laboratory testing.

  16. Improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, K.; Ming, L.; Ramachandran, S. [Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., Troy, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Low cost, high density storage of hydrogen will remove the most serious barrier to large-scale utilization of hydrogen as a non-polluting, zero-emission fuel. An important challenge for the practical use of Mg-based, high capacity hydrogen storage alloys has been the development of a low-cost, bulk production technique. Two difficulties in preparation of Mg-based alloys are the immiscibility of Mg with many transition metals and the relatively high volatility of Mg compared to many transition metals. These factors preclude the use of conventional induction melting techniques for the Mg-based alloy preparation. A mechanical alloying technique, in which Mg immiscibility and volatility do not present a problem, was developed and shows great promise for production of Mg-based alloys. A number of Mg-based alloys were prepared via modified induction melting and mechanical alloying methods. The alloys were tested for gas phase hydrogen storage properties, composition, structure and morphology. The mechanically alloyed samples are multi-component, multi-phase, highly disordered materials in their as-prepared state. These unoptimized alloys have shown reversible H-storage capacity of more than 5 wt.% hydrogen. After 2000 absorption/desorption cycles, the alloys show no decline in storage capacity or desorption kinetics. The alloys have also demonstrated resistance to CH{sub 4} and CO poisoning in preliminary testing. Upon annealing, with an increase in crystallinity, the H-storage capacity decreases, indicating the importance of disorder.

  17. Enhanced hydrogen storage by using lithium decoration on phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Wan, Neng; Lei, Shuangying; Yu, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen storage characteristics of Li decorated phosphorene were systematically investigated based on first-principle density functional theory. It is revealed that the adsorption of H2 on pristine phosphorene is relatively weak with an adsorption energy of 0.06 eV. While this value can be dramatically enhanced to ˜0.2 eV after the phosphorene was decorated by Li, and each Li atom can adsorb up to three H2 molecules. The detailed mechanism of the enhanced hydrogen storage was discussed based on our density functional theory calculations. Our studies give a conservative prediction of hydrogen storage capacity to be 4.4 wt. % through Li decoration on pristine phosphorene. By comparing our calculations to the present molecular dynamic simulation results, we expect our adsorption system is stable under room temperature and hydrogen can be released after moderate heating.

  18. Hydrogen storage by functionalised Poly(ether ether ketone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, R.; Giacoppo, G.; Carbone, A.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, Messina (Italy). Inst. for Advanced Energy Technologies

    2010-07-01

    In this work a functionalised polymer was studied as potential material for hydrogen storage in solid state. A Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) matrix was modified by a manganese oxide in situ formation. Here we report the functionalisation process and the preliminary results on hydrogen storage capability of the synthesised polymer. The polymer was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Gravimetric Hydrogen Adsorption measurements. In the functionalised PEEK, morphological changes occur as a function of oxide precursor concentration and reaction time. Promising results by gravimetric measurements were obtained with a hydrogen sorption of 0.24%wt/wt at 50 C and 60 bar, moreover, reversibility hydrogen adsorption and desorption in a wide range of both temperature and pressure was confirmed. (orig.)

  19. Ballmilling of metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    . Specifically, the research undertaken targets CaB6 whose boron is in a octahedral network, or AlB2 whose boron is layered. These compounds were then reactive ball milled with alkali and alkaline earth metal under hydrogen pressure, with the intention of forming metal borohydrides. For CaB6, no clear sign...... is to hydrogenate simple compounds such as metalborides and hydrides with the intention of forming a new and more hydrogen rich borohydride. In contrast to mainstream research, the method of synthesis has been based on reactants that are expected to be found in the metal borohydride’s dehydrogenated state...

  20. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage – new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. Ley

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, hydrogen has been considered as a possible energy carrier for the storage of renewable energy. The main focus has been on addressing the ultimate challenge: developing an environmentally friendly successor for gasoline. This very ambitious goal has not yet been fully reached, as discussed in this review, but a range of new lightweight hydrogen-containing materials has been discovered with fascinating properties. State-of-the-art and future perspectives for hydrogen-containing solids will be discussed, with a focus on metal borohydrides, which reveal significant structural flexibility and may have a range of new interesting properties combined with very high hydrogen densities.

  1. Comparative analysis of the efficiencies of hydrogen storage systems utilising solid state H storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Yartys, V.A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, Kjeller NO-2027 (Norway); Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO-7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Performance evaluation of H stores with various solid H storage materials was done. • Volumetric and gravimetric H storage densities and energy consumption were evaluated. • Effects of H storage containment and heat exchanger were estimated. • Pressure–temperature conditions of H storage strongly affect the overall performance. • Material’s packing density influences safety of operation and efficiency of H stores. - Abstract: Evaluation of the performances of hydrogen storage systems accommodating solid H storage materials should include characteristics on their reversible hydrogen storage capacity, operating pressures and temperatures, packing densities, and heat effects of hydrogen uptake and release. We have conducted a performance evaluation of the systems accumulating 5 kg of hydrogen in a containment of cylindrical geometry filled with a solid H storage material including such hydrides and reactive hydride composites as AlH{sub 3}, MgH{sub 2}, “low-temperature” (inter)metallic hydrides, NaAlH{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6}, LiBH{sub 4} + MgH{sub 2}, and MOFs. The analysis yielded gravimetric and volumetric H storage capacities, and energy efficiencies of hydrogen stores. We conclude that the weight efficiency of hydrogen stores, apart from the gravimetric H storage capacity of the material, is greatly affected by its packing density, and by the pressure–temperature conditions which determine type and dimensions of the containment. The materials with low heat effects of H exchange, operating close to the ambient conditions, should be targeted in the course of the development of new hydrogen stores as offering the best energy efficiency of their operation.

  2. Advancement of Systems Designs and Key Engineering Technologies for Materials Based Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hassel, Bart A. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2015-09-18

    UTRC lead the development of the Simulink Framework model that enables a comparison of different hydrogen storage systems on a common basis. The Simulink Framework model was disseminated on the www.HSECoE.org website that is hosted by NREL. UTRC contributed to a better understanding of the safety aspects of the proposed hydrogen storage systems. UTRC also participated in the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of both the chemical- and the adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system during Phase 2 of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. UTRC designed a hydrogen storage system with a reversible metal hydride material in a compacted form for light-duty vehicles with a 5.6 kg H2 storage capacity, giving it a 300 miles range. It contains a heat exchanger that enables efficient cooling of the metal hydride material during hydrogen absorption in order to meet the 3.3 minute refueling time target. It has been shown through computation that the kinetics of hydrogen absorption of Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4 was ultimately limiting the rate of hydrogen absorption to 85% of the material capacity in 3.3 minutes. An inverse analysis was performed in order to determine the material property requirements in order for a metal hydride based hydrogen storage system to meet the DOE targets. Work on metal hydride storage systems was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review due to the lack of metal hydride materials with the required material properties. UTRC contributed to the design of a chemical hydrogen storage system by developing an adsorbent for removing the impurity ammonia from the hydrogen gas, by developing a system to meter the transport of Ammonia Borane (AB) powder to a thermolysis reactor, and by developing a gas-liquid-separator (GLS) for the separation of hydrogen gas from AB slurry in silicone oil. Stripping impurities from hydrogen gas is essential for a long life of the fuel cell system on board of a vehicle. Work on solid transport of AB was halted after the

  3. Hydrogen storage in insulated pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S.M.; Garcia-Villazana, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current analysis and experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

  4. Predicting New Materials for Hydrogen Storage Application

    OpenAIRE

    Helmer Fjellvåg; Ponniah Vajeeston; Ponniah Ravindran

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge about the ground-state crystal structure is a prerequisite for the rational understanding of solid-state properties of new materials. To act as an efficient energy carrier, hydrogen should be absorbed and desorbed in materials easily and in high quantities. Owing to the complexity in structural arrangements and difficulties involved in establishing hydrogen positions by x-ray diffraction methods, the structural information of hydrides are very limited compared to other classes of ma...

  5. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    This is a reference guide to common methodologies and protocols for measuring critical performance properties of advanced hydrogen storage materials. It helps users to communicate clearly the relevant performance properties of new materials as they are discovered and tested.

  6. Hydrogen production and storage: R & D priorities and gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    This review of priorities and gaps in hydrogen production and storage R & D has been prepared by the IEA Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in the context of the activities of the IEA Hydrogen Co-ordination Group. It includes two papers. The first is by Trygve Riis, Elisabet F. Hagen, Preben J.S. Vie and Oeystein Ulleberg. This offers an overview of the technologies for hydrogen production. The technologies discussed are reforming of natural gas; gasification of coal and biomass; and the splitting of water by water-electrolysis, photo-electrolysis, photo-biological production and high-temperature decomposition. The second paper is by Trygve Riis, Gary Sandrock, Oeystein Ulleberg and Preben J.S. Vie. The objective of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the possible hydrogen storage options available today and in the foreseeable future. Hydrogen storage can be considered for onboard vehicular, portable, stationary, bulk, and transport applications, but the main focus of this paper is on vehicular storage, namely fuel cell or ICE/electric hybrid vehicles. 7 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Alloying effect on the electronic structures of hydrogen storage compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, H.; Moringa, M.; Takahashi, Y. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mater. Sci. and Eng.

    1997-05-20

    The electronic structures of hydrogenated LaNi{sub 5} containing various 3d transition elements were investigated by the DV-X{alpha} molecular orbital method. The hydrogen atom was found to form a strong chemical bond with the Ni rather than the La atoms. The alloying modified the chemical bond strengths between atoms in a small metal octahedron containing a hydrogen atom at the center, resulting in the change in the hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of LaNi{sub 5} with alloying. (orig.) 7 refs.

  8. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. F. [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  9. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. (John) F [UTRC

    2015-01-05

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  10. Lunar-derived titanium alloys for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, S.; Hertzberg, A.; Woodcock, G.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen gas, which plays an important role in many projected lunar power systems and industrial processes, can be stored in metallic titanium and in certain titanium alloys as an interstitial hydride compound. Storing and retrieving hydrogen with titanium-iron alloy requires substantially less energy investment than storage by liquefaction. Metal hydride storage systems can be designed to operate at a wide range of temperatures and pressures. A few such systems have been developed for terrestrial applications. A drawback of metal hydride storage for lunar applications is the system's large mass per mole of hydrogen stored, which rules out transporting it from earth. The transportation problem can be solved by using native lunar materials, which are rich in titanium and iron.

  11. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  12. Synthesis and Hydrogen Storage in Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by a hydrogen arc discharge method. A high yield of gram quantity of SWNTs per hour was achieved. Tow kinds of SWNT products: web-like substance and thin films in large slices were obtained. Results of resonant Raman scattering measurements indicate that the SWNTs prepared have a wider diameter distribution and a larger mean diameter. Hydrogen uptake measurements of the two kinds of SWNT samples (both as prepared and pretreated) were carried out using a high pressure volumetric method,respectively. And a hydrogen storage capacity of 4 wt pct could be repeatedly achieved for the suitably pretreated SWNTs, which indicates that SWNTs may be a promising hydrogen storage material.

  13. Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage in a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eLiu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A highly order mesoporous carbon has been synthesized through a strongly acidic, aqueous cooperative assembly route. The structure and morphology of the carbon material were investigated using TEM, SEM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The carbon was proven to be meso-structural and consisted of graphitic micro-domain with larger interlayer space. AC impedance and electrochemical measurements reveal that the synthesized highly ordered mesoporous carbon exhibits a promoted electrochemical hydrogen insertion process and improved capacitance and hydrogen storage stability. The meso-structure and enlarged interlayer distance within the highly ordered mesoporous carbon are suggested as possible causes for the enhancement in hydrogen storage. Both hydrogen capacity in the carbon and mass diffusion within the matrix were improved.

  14. Development of hydrogen storage systems using sodium alanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano Martinez, Gustavo Adolfo

    2010-12-06

    In this work, hydrogen storage systems based on sodium alanate were studied, modelled and optimised, using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The experimental approach covered investigations of the material from mg scale up to kg scale in demonstration test tanks, while the theoretical approach discussed modelling and simulation of the hydrogen sorption process in a hydride bed. Both approaches demonstrated the strong effect of heat transfer on the sorption behaviour of the hydride bed and led to feasible methods to improve and optimise the volumetric and gravimetric capacities of hydrogen storage systems. The applied approaches aimed at an optimal integration of sodium alanate material in practical hydrogen storage systems. First, it was experimentally shown that the size of the hydride bed influences the hydrogen sorption behaviour of the material. This is explained by the different temperature profiles that are developed inside the hydride bed during the sorptions. In addition, in a self-constructed cell it was possible to follow the hydrogen sorptions and the developed temperature profiles within the bed. Moreover, the effective thermal conductivity of the material was estimated in-situ in this cell, given very good agreement with reported values of ex-situ measurements. It was demonstrated that the effective thermal conductivity of the hydride bed can be enhanced by the addition of expanded graphite. This enhancement promotes lower temperature peaks during the sorptions due to faster heat conduction through the bed, which in addition allows faster heat transfer during sorption. Looking towards simulations and further evaluations, empirical kinetic models for both hydrogen absorption and desorption of doped sodium alanate were developed. Based on the results of the model, the optimal theoretical pressure-temperature conditions for hydrogen sorptions were determined. A new approach is proposed for the mass balance of the reactions when implementing

  15. Hydrogen storage for vehicular applications: Technology status and key development areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.L.; Handrock, J.L.

    1994-04-01

    The state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage technology is reviewed, including gaseous, liquid, hydride, surface adsorbed media, glass microsphere, chemical reaction, and liquid chemical technologies. The review of each technology includes a discussion of advantages, disadvantages, likelihood of success, and key research and development activities. A preferred technological path for the development of effective near-term hydrogen storage includes both cur-rent DOT qualified and advanced compressed storage for down-sized highly efficient but moderate range vehicles, and liquid storage for fleet vehicle applications. Adsorbate media are also suitable for fleet applications but not for intermittent uses. Volume-optimized transition metal hydride beds are also viable for short range applications. Long-term development of coated nanoparticulate or metal matrix high conductivity magnesium alloy, is recommended. In addition, a room temperature adsorbate medium should be developed to avoid cryogenic storage requirements. Chemical storage and oxidative schemes present serious obstacles which must be addressed for these technologies to have a future role.

  16. Hydrogen based energy storage for solar energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.P.; Hagstroem, M.T.; Lund, P.H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics; Leppaenen, J.R.; Nieminen, J.P. [Neste Oy (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen based energy storage options for solar energy systems was studied in order to improve their overall performance. A 1 kW photovoltaic hydrogen (PV-H2) pilot-plant and commercial prototype were constructed and a numerical simulation program H2PHOTO for system design and optimisation was developed. Furthermore, a comprehensive understanding of conversion (electrolysers and fuel cells) and storage (metal hydrides) technologies was acquired by the project partners. The PV-H{sub 2} power system provides a self-sufficient solution for applications in remote locations far from electric grids and maintenance services. (orig.)

  17. Development of Mg-based Hydrogen Storage Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mg-based hydrogen storage alloys are considered as a promising candidate for hydrogen system because of its lightweight, high storage capacity, low price and rich mineral resources. In detail,we reviewed the preparation and properties of Mg-Ni-based hydrogen storage alloys. All kinds of attempts have been done to improve the hydriding and dehydriding behaviors. It is found that the partial substitution of foreign elements can decrease the hydrogen absorption temperature,especially the substitution of a more electronegative element, such as Al and Mn. Mechanical alloying (MA) and mechanical grinding (MG) are the most effective methods to improve the hydriding/dehydriding kinetics and electrochemical capacity, and decrease the desorption temperature, but the corrosion resistance is so poor that the 80% of maximum capacity is lost within ten cycles. Microencapsulation is a useful measurement for improving the corrosion resistance and electrocatalytic activity. In order to improve the properties of the alloys for practical application, the alloys should have a large number of defects, which give activated sites, subsequently,MA, MG and electroless plating should be used to improve the hydriding/dehydriding kinetics and protect the surface of alloys, respectively. The new composite Mg-based alloys give a new way for the hydrogen storage material to practical application. Furthermore we put forward several problems which will be discussed in future.

  18. Hydrogen Storage in Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Oku

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanomaterials were synthesized from LaB6 and Pd/boron powder, and the hydrogen storage was investigated by differential thermogravimetric analysis, which showed possibility of hydrogen storage of 1–3 wt%. The hydrogen gas storage in BN and carbon (C clusters was also investigated by molecular orbital calculations, which indicated possible hydrogen storage of 6.5 and 4.9 wt%, respectively. Chemisorption calculation was also carried out for B24N24 cluster with changing endohedral elements in BN cluster to compare the bonding energy at nitrogen and boron, which showed that Li is a suitable element for hydrogenation to the BN cluster. The BN cluster materials would store H2 molecule easier than carbon fullerene materials, and its stability for high temperature would be good. Molecular dynamics calculations showed that a H2 molecule remains stable in a C60 cage at 298 K and 0.1 MPa, and that pressures over 5 MPa are needed to store H2 molecules in the C60 cage.

  19. Pressure resistance of glass capillaries for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtappels, Kai; Beckmann-Kluge, Martin; Gebauer, Marek [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Eliezer, Dan

    2011-07-01

    A crucial problem in the development of new hydrogen technologies is the need for lightweight and safe storage of acceptable amounts of hydrogen, in particular for portable or mobile applications. A new and innovative technology based on capillary arrays has been developed. These systems ensure the safe infusion, storage, and controlled release of hydrogen gas, even when storage pressures of up to 1200 bar are applied. This technology enables the storage of a significantly higher amount of hydrogen than other approaches. It has already surpassed the US Department of Energy's 2010 target, and is expected to meet the DOE's 2015 target in the near future. The main determinant in this storage technology is the pressure resistance of glass capillaries. It is well known that quartz, for example, is three times stronger than steel. At the same time, the density is about three times lower which means that much less material is necessary to reach the same pressure resistance. The pressure resistance of single capillaries has been determined in relation to various capillary materials and dimensions, wall thicknesses etc. in order to find out optimal parameters for the 'final' capillaries. (orig.)

  20. Hydrogen storage capacity of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The hydrogen adsorption of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons has been studied. • Lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity. • Lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. • Lithium reagent can alter the pore structure, depending on the raw material. • Optimizing the pore size and functional group is needed for better hydrogen uptake. - Abstract: The authors have studied the hydrogen adsorption performance of several types of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons. In the case of activated cokes, lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity from 5.02 kg/m3 to 5.86 kg/m3 at 303 K. Hydrogen adsorption density increases by around 17% after lithium doping, likely due to the fact that lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. The effects of lithium on hydrogen storage capacity vary depending on the raw material, because the lithium reagent can react with the material and alter the pore structure, indicating that lithium doping has the effect of plugging or filling the micropores and changing the structures of functional groups, resulting in the formation of mesopores. Despite an observed decrease in hydrogen uptake, lithium doping was found to improve hydrogen adsorption affinity. Lithium doping increases hydrogen uptake by optimizing the pore size and functional group composition

  1. An overview—Functional nanomaterials for lithium rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hua Kun, E-mail: hua@uow.edu.au

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanomaterials play important role in lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials play important role for lithium rechargeable batteries. • Nanostructured materials increase the capacitance of supercapacitors. • Nanostructure improves the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. • Nanomaterials enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts in fuel cells. - Abstract: There is tremendous worldwide interest in functional nanostructured materials, which are the advanced nanotechnology materials with internal or external dimensions on the order of nanometers. Their extremely small dimensions make these materials unique and promising for clean energy applications such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and other applications. This paper will highlight the development of new approaches to study the relationships between the structure and the physical, chemical, and electrochemical properties of functional nanostructured materials. The Energy Materials Research Programme at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, the University of Wollongong, has been focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of functional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanoporous materials, and nanocomposites. The emphases are placed on advanced nanotechnology, design, and control of the composition, morphology, nanostructure, and functionality of the nanomaterials, and on the subsequent applications of these materials to areas including lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells.

  2. Research of heat treatment of low-Co AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys for MH-Ni batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jinghong; CHEN Demin; LIU Guozhong; YANG Ke; MA Jun

    2003-01-01

    The effects of low-Co AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys prepared by quenching and annealing on the performances of MH-Ni batteries were investigated, and the characteristics of the low-Co AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys were compared with those of the high-Co AB5 type hydrogen storage alloy as well. The results showed that the faster the cooling of the low-Co hydrogen storage alloy is, the better homogeneity of the chemical composition for the alloy and the longer cycle life of the battery are, but the electrochemical discharge capacity and high-rate discharge ability are reduced. The high-rate discharge ability and charge retention of MH-Ni batteries for the conventional as-cast annealed low-Co hydrogen storage alloy were superior to those for the rapidly quenched low-Co hydrogen storage alloy and the high-Co hydrogen storage alloy, but a little inferior in the cycle life.

  3. Predicting New Materials for Hydrogen Storage Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmer Fjellvåg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the ground-state crystal structure is a prerequisite for the rational understanding of solid-state properties of new materials. To act as an efficient energy carrier, hydrogen should be absorbed and desorbed in materials easily and in high quantities. Owing to the complexity in structural arrangements and difficulties involved in establishing hydrogen positions by x-ray diffraction methods, the structural information of hydrides are very limited compared to other classes of materials (like oxides, intermetallics, etc.. This can be overcome by conducting computational simulations combined with selected experimental study which can save environment, money, and man power. The predicting capability of first-principles density functional theory (DFT is already well recognized and in many cases structural and thermodynamic properties of single/multi component system are predicted. This review will focus on possible new classes of materials those have high hydrogen content, demonstrate the ability of DFT to predict crystal structure, and search for potential meta-stable phases. Stabilization of such meta-stable phases is also discussed.

  4. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150°C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  5. Chemical equilibrium analysis of dry hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is based on a thermo-chemical equilibrium model for studying the effect of combustion of hydrogen during postulated accident scenarios in nuclear reactor containments. This model is based on the method of element potentials which seeks to minimize the free energy of the system. The condition on internal energy balance is imposed as a constraint during the minimization process. Another simplified model purely based on the internal energy balance has also been implemented to investigate the isolated impact of free energy and the conditions under which it becomes dominant. The two models have been used to extract final pressures for a wide range of initial conditions and mixture compositions that are typically found during accident scenarios. In the absence of hydrogen combustion experimental data, such models will become important for laying down a first estimate on the possible outcomes. (author)

  6. Hydrogen logistics: Assessment of production, conditioning, distribution, storage and refuelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohlein, B.; Reijerkerk, J.

    2005-07-01

    Providing energy on a clean, safe and reliable basis, on reasonable price conditions and on acceptable economic terms, is one of the major challenges for the future. The overall path leading to a hydrogen oriented energy economy will require the solution of two complex problems, i.e. hydrogen production and hydrogen supply. In this context, it is important to analyse energy demand, emissions and the cost of supplying new energy carriers - including hydrogen as a long-term option - in terms of distribution strategies subject to global, regional as well as local requirements. Hydrogen logistics involves high cost and energy expenditure considering not only the production, conditioning, distribution and storage of hydrogen but also hydrogen management at service stations (for automobile applications) or at refuelling stations (for refuelling cartridges) - see figure. Our conference contribution offers systems analyses for various hydrogen paths up to the end consumer, evaluating the alternative options in terms of energy demand, greenhouse-gas emissions and hydrogen costs at the service stations. The assessment is based on research studies from Forschungszentrum Juelich (2003/04), Linde Gas (2002/04), National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering (2004) and E4Tech (2005). (Author)

  7. Technoeconomic analysis of renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.; Kadam, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Technical and economic feasibility studies of different degrees of completeness and detail have been performed on several projects being funded by the Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Work this year focused on projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, although analyses of projects at other institutions are underway or planned. Highly detailed analyses were completed on a fiber optic hydrogen leak detector and a process to produce hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis followed by steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil. Less detailed economic assessments of solar and biologically-based hydrogen production processes have been performed and focused on the steps that need to be taken to improve the competitive position of these technologies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on all analyses to reveal the degree to which the cost results are affected by market changes and technological advances. For hydrogen storage by carbon nanotubes, a survey of the competing storage technologies was made in order to set a baseline for cost goals. A determination of the likelihood of commercialization was made for nearly all systems examined. Hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis and steam reforming was found to have significant economic potential if a coproduct option could be co-commercialized. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production may have economic potential, but only if low-cost cells can be modified to split water and to avoid surface oxidation. The use of bacteria to convert the carbon monoxide in biomass syngas to hydrogen was found to be slightly more expensive than the high end of currently commercial hydrogen, although there are significant opportunities to reduce costs. Finally, the cost of installing a fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detection system in passenger vehicles was found to be very low and competitive with alternative sensor systems.

  8. Computational investigation and design of coordination compounds for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo

    Two classes of high capacity hydrogen storage materials, the metal tetrahydroborates and the metal ammines, were investigated at the atomic scale using density functional theory simulations. It was shown that simple model structures could be used to asses the stabilities of complex systems. Trends...

  9. A hydrogen storage nanotank: lithium-organic pillared graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Soo; Jang, Seung Soon

    2009-09-28

    From first-principle based grand canonical Monte-Carlo simulations, we propose a new hydrogen storage material, lithium-organic pillared graphite, showing high H2 uptake of 4.0 wt% and 41.9 kg m(-3) at 300 K and 100 bar.

  10. Parameter study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale prototype hydrogen storage system as part of a Work For Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed using the complex metal hydride sodium alanate. For the current work, we have continued our evaluation of the GM Demonstration System to provide learning to DOE's hydrogen storage programs, specifically the new Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. Baseline refueling data during testing for GM was taken over a narrow range of optimized parameter values. Further testing was conducted over a broader range. Parameters considered included hydrogen pressure and coolant flow rate. This data confirmed the choice of design pressure of the Demonstration System, but indicated that the system was over-designed for cooling. Baseline hydrogen delivery data was insufficient to map out delivery rate as a function of temperature and capacity for the full-scale system. A more rigorous matrix of tests was performed to better define delivery capabilities. These studies were compared with 1-D and 2-D coupled multi-physics modeling results. The relative merits of these models are discussed along with opportunities for improved efficiency or reduced mass and volume.

  11. Integrated Refrigeration and Storage for Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has used liquefied hydrogen (LH2) on a large scale since the beginning of the space program as fuel for the Centaur and Apollo upper stages, and more recently to feed the three space shuttle main engines. The LH2 systems currently in place at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch pads are aging and inefficient compared to the state-of-the-art. Therefore, the need exists to explore advanced technologies and operations that can drive commodity costs down, and provide increased capabilities. The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) was developed at KSC to pursue these goals by demonstrating active thermal control of the propellant state by direct removal of heat using a cryocooler. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The key technology challenge was efficiently integrating the cryogenic refrigerator into the LH2 storage tank. A Linde LR1620 Brayton cycle refrigerator is used to produce up to 900W cooling at 20K, circulating approximately 22 g/s gaseous helium through the hydrogen via approximately 300 m of heat exchanger tubing. The GODU-LH2 system is fully operational, and is currently under test. This paper will discuss the design features of the refrigerator and storage system, as well as the current test results.

  12. A study of hydro-graphene for energy storage (2) hydrogen absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokio, Yamabe; Mitsuhiro, Fujii [Nagasaki Institute of Applied Science, Nagasaki (Japan); Yoshio, Furuya [Faculty of Education, Dept. of Technology, Nagasaki (Japan); Shiro, Mori; Shizukuni, Yata [Energy Conversion Research Lab., KRI Inc., Kyoto (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The technology of hydrogen storage is one of the most important challenges in hydrogen energy system for clean environment [1]. Some carbon materials are expected to have such advantage for hydrogen storage. We have studied about PAS and PAHs, which are marginal members of the carbon allotropes containing a significant amount of hydrogen atoms, and which show a variety of interesting properties lacking pure carbon materials [2-9]. They constituted by graphite sheets terminated by hydrogen atoms, and so it may be called 'hydro-graphene' [10]. In this work, we prepared two kinds of hydro-graphene, such as PAS [8,9] and PAHs [7], by the pyrolysis at 550 C. The [H]/[C] molar ratio of PAS was 0.45, and that of PAHs was 0.33. The interlayer distance of PAS was broad, and that of PAH was 3.68 A. We examined their ability of hydrogen storage by two methods. It was measured the amount of equilibrium pressure change of sample room, on the first method of increasing hydrogen pressure at 77 K, and on the second method of temperature increasing to R.T. in vacuum after reducing pressure. On the former method, the hydrogen storage amount of PAS was 0.5 wt-%, and that of PAHs was about 0.4 wt-%. On the latter, that of PAS was 0.4 wt-%, d that of PAHs was 0.3 wt-%. Those results indicate that each total capacity of hydrogen storage was estimated 0.5-0.6 wt%. We will discuss the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption to hydro-graphene based on the quantum chemical viewpoint. [1] DOE Hydrogen Program: www.hydrogen.energy.gov. [2] P. Novac, K. Muller, K. S. V. Santhanam, O. Haas: Chem. Rev., 97, 270, 1997; [3] T. Yamabe, K. Tanaka, K. Ohzeki, S. Yata: Solid State Commun., 44, 823, 1982; [4] S. Yata, Y. Hato, K. Sakurai, H. Satake, K. Mukai, K. Tanaka, T. Yamabe: Synth. Met., 38, 169, 1990; [5] S. Yata, H. Kinoshita, M. Komori, N. Ando, T. Kashiwamura, T. Harada, K Tanaka, T. Yamabe: Synth. Met., 62, 153, 1994; [6] J. R. Dahn, T. Zheng, Y. Liu, J. S. Xue: Science, 270, 590, 1995

  13. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Wicks, George G.

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Benzene Moiety Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bing-Yun; LIANG Qi-Min; SONG Chen; XIA Yue-Yuan; ZHAO Ming-wen; LIU Xiang-Dong; ZHANG Hong-Yu

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen storage capacity of(5,5)single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs)decorated chemically with benzene moieties is studied by using molecular dynamics simulations(MDSs)and density functional theory(DFT) calculations.It is found that benzene molecules colliding on (5,5) SWNTs at incident energy of 50 eV form very stable configurations of benzene moiety adsorption on the wall of SWNTs.The MDSs indicate that when the benzene moiety decorated(5,5)SWNTs and a pristine(5,5)SWNT are put in a box in which hydrogen molecules are filled to a pressure of~26 atm,the hydrogen storage capacity of the benzene moiety decorated(5,5)SWNT is about 4.7wt.% and that of the pristine (5,5) SwNT is nearly 3.9 wt.%.

  15. Combined hydrogen production and storage with subsequent carbon crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueking, Angela D; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Fonseca, Dania A; Narayanan, Deepa L; Van Essendelft, Dirk; Jain, Puja; Clifford, Caroline E B

    2006-06-21

    We provide evidence of low-temperature hydrogen evolution and possible hydrogen trapping in an anthracite coal derivative, formed via reactive ball milling with cyclohexene. No molecular hydrogen is added to the process. Raman-active molecular hydrogen vibrations are apparent in samples at atmospheric conditions (300 K, 1 bar) for samples prepared 1 year previously and stored in ambient air. Hydrogen evolves slowly at room temperature and is accelerated upon sample heating, with a first increase in hydrogen evolution occurring at approximately 60 degrees C. Subsequent chemical modification leads to the observation of crystalline carbons, including nanocrystalline diamond surrounded by graphene ribbons, other sp2-sp3 transition regions, purely graphitic regions, and a previously unidentified crystalline carbon form surrounded by amorphous carbon. The combined evidence for hydrogen trapping and carbon crystallization suggests hydrogen-induced crystallization of the amorphous carbon materials, as metastable hydrogenated carbons formed via the high-energy milling process rearrange into more thermodynamically stable carbon forms and molecular hydrogen.

  16. Galactic chemical evolution hydrogen through zinc

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Timmes, F X; Woosley, S E

    1994-01-01

    Using the output from a grid of 60 Type II supernova models (Woosley \\& Weaver 1994) of varying mass (11 \\ltaprx M/M\\sun \\ltaprx 40) and metallicity (0, 10^{-4}, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 Z\\sol), the chemical evolution of 76 stable isotopes, from hydrogen to zinc, is calculated. The chemical evolution calculation employs a simple dynamical model for the Galaxy (infall with a 4 billion year e-folding time scale onto a exponential disk and 1/r^2 bulge), and standard evolution parameters, such as a Salpeter initial mass function and a quadratic Schmidt star formation rate. The theoretical results are compared in detail with observed stellar abundances in stars with metallicities in the range -3.0 \\ltaprx [Fe/H] \\ltaprx 0.0 dex. While our discussion focuses on the solar neighborhood where there are the most observations, the supernovae rates, an intrinsically Galactic quantity, are also discussed.

  17. 76 FR 4338 - Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo- Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops AGENCY.... Discussion will focus on determining research strategies and technical pathways to lower costs while..., (202) 586-9995. More information on DOE's hydrogen storage program, targets and current...

  18. Hydrogen storage for mixed wind-nuclear power plants in the context of a hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel methodology for the economic evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new aspects such as residual heat and oxygen utilization is applied in this work. This analysis is completed in the context of a hydrogen economy and competitive electricity markets. The simulation of the operation of a combined nuclear-wind-hydrogen system is discussed first, where the selling and buying of electricity, the selling of excess hydrogen and oxygen, and the selling of heat are optimized to maximize profit to the energy producer. The simulation is performed in two phases: in a pre-dispatch phase, the system model is optimized to obtain optimal hydrogen charge levels for the given operational horizons. In the second phase, a real-time dispatch is carried out on an hourly basis to optimize the operation of the system as to maximize profits, following the hydrogen storage levels of the pre-dispatch phase. Based on the operation planning and dispatch results, an economic evaluation is performed to determine the feasibility of the proposed scheme for investment purposes; this evaluation is based on calculations of modified internal rates of return and net present values for a realistic scenario. The results of the present studies demonstrate the feasibility of a hydrogen storage and production system with oxygen and heat utilization for existent nuclear and wind power generation facilities. (author)

  19. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  20. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F.; Nakamura, Kenji; Au, Ming; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  1. Remarkable Hydrogen Storage on Beryllium Oxide Clusters: First Principles Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Since the current transportation sector is the largest consumer of oil, and subsequently responsible for major air pollutants, it is inevitable to use alternative renewable sources of energies for vehicular applications. The hydrogen energy seems to be a promising candidate. To explore the possibility of achieving a solid-state high-capacity storage of hydrogen for onboard applications, we have performed first principles density functional theoretical calculations of hydrogen storage properties of beryllium oxide clusters (BeO)$_{n}$ (n=2 -- 8). We observed that polar BeO bond is responsible for H$_{2}$ adsorption. The problem of cohesion of beryllium atoms does not arise, as they are an integral part of BeO clusters. The (BeO)$_{n}$ (n=2 -- 8) adsorbs 8--12 H$_{2}$ molecules with an adsorption energy in the desirable range of reversible hydrogen storage. The gravimetric density of H$_{2}$ adsorbed on BeO clusters meets the ultimate 7.5 wt% limit, recommended for onboard practical applications. In conclusion,...

  2. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  3. Simple and Efficient System for Combined Solar Energy Harvesting and Reversible Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Mu, Xiaoyue; Liu, Wenbo; Mi, Zetian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-06-24

    Solar energy harvesting and hydrogen economy are the two most important green energy endeavors for the future. However, a critical hurdle to the latter is how to safely and densely store and transfer hydrogen. Herein, we developed a reversible hydrogen storage system based on low-cost liquid organic cyclic hydrocarbons at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. A facile switch of hydrogen addition (>97% conversion) and release (>99% conversion) with superior capacity of 7.1 H2 wt % can be quickly achieved over a rationally optimized platinum catalyst with high electron density, simply regulated by dark/light conditions. Furthermore, the photodriven dehydrogenation of cyclic alkanes gave an excellent apparent quantum efficiency of 6.0% under visible light illumination (420-600 nm) without any other energy input, which provides an alternative route to artificial photosynthesis for directly harvesting and storing solar energy in the form of chemical fuel.

  4. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  5. Hydrogen storage alternatives - a technological and economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Joakim; Hjortsberg, Ove [Volvo Teknisk Utveckling AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    This study reviews state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage alternatives for vehicles. We will also discuss the prospects and estimated cost for industrial production. The study is based on published literature and interviews with active researchers. Among the alternatives commercially available today, we suggest using a moderate-pressure chamber for seasonal stationary energy storage; metal hydride vessels for small stationary units; a roof of high-pressure cylinders for buses, trucks and ferries; cryogenic high-pressure vessels or methanol reformers for cars and tractors; and cryogenic moderate-pressure vessels for aeroplanes. Initial fuel dispensing systems should be designed to offer hydrogen in pressurised form for good fuel economy, but also as cryogenic liquid for occasional needs of extended driving range and as methanol for reformer-equipped vehicles. It is probable that hydrogen can be stored efficiently in adsorbents for use in recyclable hydrogen fuel containers or rechargeable hydrogen vessels operating at ambient temperature and possibly ambient pressure by year 2004, and at reasonable or even low cost by 2010. The most promising alternatives involve various forms of activated graphite nanostructures. Recommendations for further research and standardisation activities are given.

  6. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  7. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

  8. CREATION OF AUTORECIPIENTS FOR STORAGE, TRANSPORTATIONS AND DELIVERIES OF THE COMPRESSED HYDROGEN

    OpenAIRE

    Павлов, Н. В.

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of hydrogen in various industries and predictable in the near future a change to hydrogen economy make actual the creation of automobile recipients for transportation and storages of the hydrogen compressed up to high pressures. For substantiation of development of automobile hydrogen recipient the comparison of some parameters (specific consumption of energy, specific volume) three possible systems of storage: compressed hydrogen; hydrogen in liquid kind at cryogenic temperatures...

  9. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ramsden, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

  10. Hydrogen Energy Storage and Power-to-Gas: Establishing Criteria for Successful Business Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Joshua; Melaina, Marc

    2015-10-27

    As the electric sector evolves and increasing amounts of variable generation are installed on the system, there are greater needs for system flexibility, sufficient capacity and greater concern for overgeneration. As a result there is growing interest in exploring the role of energy storage and demand response technologies to support grid needs. Hydrogen is a versatile feedstock that can be used in a variety of applications including chemical and industrial processes, as well as a transportation fuel and heating fuel. Traditionally, hydrogen technologies focus on providing services to a single sector; however, participating in multiple sectors has the potential to provide benefits to each sector and increase the revenue for hydrogen technologies. The goal of this work is to explore promising system configurations for hydrogen systems and the conditions that will make for successful business cases in a renewable, low-carbon future. Current electricity market data, electric and gas infrastructure data and credit and incentive information are used to perform a techno-economic analysis to identify promising criteria and locations for successful hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas projects. Infrastructure data will be assessed using geographic information system applications. An operation optimization model is used to co-optimizes participation in energy and ancillary service markets as well as the sale of hydrogen. From previous work we recognize the great opportunity that energy storage and power-to-gas but there is a lack of information about the economic favorability of such systems. This work explores criteria for selecting locations and compares the system cost and potential revenue to establish competitiveness for a variety of equipment configurations. Hydrogen technologies offer unique system flexibility that can enable interactions between multiple energy sectors including electric, transport, heating fuel and industrial. Previous research established that

  11. Electronic Structure of Hydrogen Storage Compounds, LaNi5 and Its Micro-Hydrogenated Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Yufang; Zhao Dongliang; Wang Xinlin; Zhang Yanghuan

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structures of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloys and its micro-hydrogenated compounds with two hydrogen atoms in the center of two octahedral interstices and two tetrahedral interstices, were investigated by the first principles discrete variational method(DVM). The results of density of states and the difference of charge distribution clearly show that the s electrons of H mainly interact with the s electrons of hydride-non-forming element Ni, despite there being a larger affinity of La for hydrogen than that of Ni in pure metal-hydrogen system. From the cohesive energy of systems, we also found two systems have almost same stability with occupation of H atoms.

  12. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to the closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC), recently constructed at NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. Illustrated with explanatory graphics and figures, this report outlines the engineering motivations for the RFC as a solar energy storage device, the system requirements, layout and hardware detail of the RFC unit at NASA Glenn, the construction history, and test experience accumulated to date with this unit.

  13. Innovative Materials and Systems for Solid State Hydrogen Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Capurso, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The research presented in this doctoral thesis concerns with the development of novel materials and systems for solid state hydrogen storage. The first group of works presented is on alkaline and alkaline-earth borohydrides. The possibility to enhance their properties with the help of nanosupports has been widely explored. An attempt to improve the dehydrogenation kinetics of lithium borohydride has been made dispersing this material on the surface of modified nanotubes and gra...

  14. Vehicular hydrogen storage using lightweight tanks (regenerative fuel cell systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

    1999-06-01

    Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight tankage to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will leverage work for aerospace applications supported by other sponsors (including BMDO, NASA, and USAF) to develop URFC systems for transportation and utility applications. Lightweight tankage is important for primary fuel cell powered vehicles that use on-board storage of hydrogen. Lightweight pressure vessels with state-of-the-art performance factors were designed, and prototypes are being fabricated to meet the DOE 2000 goals (4000 Wh/kg, 12% hydrogen by weight, 700 Wh/liter, and $20/kWh in high volume production). These pressure vessels use technologies that are easily adopted by industrial partners. Advanced liners provide permeation barriers for gas storage and are mandrels for composite overwrap. URFCs are important to the efficient use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and enabler of renewable energy. H{sub 2}/halogen URFCs may be advantageous for stationary applications whereas H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/air URFCs are advantageous for vehicular applications. URFC research and development is required to improve performance (efficiency), reduce catalyst loading, understand engineering operation, and integrate systems. LLNL has the experimental equipment and advanced URFC membrane electrode assemblies (some with reduced catalyst loading) for evaluating commercial hardware (not funded by DOE in FY1999).

  15. Hydrogen Storage Enhancement Attained by Fixation of Ti on MWNTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Pérez-Bueno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, hydrogen has a preponderant position among the potentially sustainable energy sources. Due to its power density, its storage is of main concern when considering a broad use in practical applications. Carbon nanotubes constitute promising candidates for the design and construction of hydrogen storage devices. This work explores the use of some procedures involving electrochemistry, aimed to bond atomic Ti on the outer surface of MWNTs. Each titanium atom has the potential of hosting two hydrogen molecules and relinquishing them by heating. Nevertheless, nanotubes are difficult to handle due to electrostatic charge and agglomeration, and in this context, two routes were tested as procedures to spread and stick nanotubes on an electrode: (1 a functionalization capable of attaching gold was tested in two forms, as either using 4 nm particles or a flat gold electrode. The fixation of Au particles was confirmed by HRTEM. (2 A simpler route that consisted on drying a CH2Cl2/nanotubes solution previously spread on a glassy carbon flat electrode. CH2Cl2 was selected as the medium and TiCl4 as the precursor for attaching atomic Ti to the nanotubes. The results revealed that hydrogen adsorption, estimated from voltamperometry, was five times higher on Ti-MWNTs than on bare nanotubes.

  16. Design and integration of a hydrogen storage on metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a hydrogen storage system using metal hydrides for a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. Hydride storage technology has been chosen due to project specifications: high volumetric capacity, low pressures (≤ 3.5 bar) and low temperatures (≤ 75 C: fuel cell temperature). During absorption, heat from hydride generation is dissipated by fluid circulation. An integrated plate-fin type heat exchanger has been designed to obtain good compactness and to reach high absorption/desorption rates. At first, the storage system has been tested in accordance with project specifications (absorption 3.5 bar, desorption 1.5 bar). Then, the hydrogen charge/discharge times have been decreased to reach system limits. System design has been used to simulate thermal and mass comportment of the storage tank. The model is based on the software Fluent. We take in consideration heat and mass transfers in the porous media during absorption/desorption. The hydride thermal and mass behaviour has been integrated in the software. The heat and mass transfers experimentally obtained have been compared to results calculated by the model. The influence of experimental and numerical parameters on the model behaviour has also been explored. (author)

  17. Study of Supported Nickel Catalysts Prepared by Aqueous Hydrazine Method. Hydrogenating Properties and Hydrogen Storage: Support Effect. Silver Additive Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied Ni or NiAg nano-particles obtained by the reduction of nickel salts (acetate or nitrate) by hydrazine and deposited by simple or EDTA-double impregnation on various supports (γ-Al2O3, amorphous or crystallized SiO2, Nb2O5, CeO2 and carbon). Prepared catalysts were characterized by different methods (XRD, XPS, low temperature adsorption and desorption of N2, FTIR and FTIR-Pyridine, TEM, STEM, EDS, H2-TPR, H2-adsorption, H2-TPD, isopropanol decomposition) and tested in the gas phase hydrogenation of benzene or as carbon materials in the hydrogen storage at room temperature and high pressure. The catalysts prepared exhibited better dispersion and activity than classical catalysts. TOF's of NiAg/SiO2 or Ni/carbon catalysts were similar to Pt catalysts in benzene hydrogenation. Differences in support acidity or preparation method and presence of Ag as metal additive play a crucial role in the chemical reduction of Ni by hydrazine and in the final properties of the materials. Ni/carbon catalysts could store significant amounts of hydrogen at room temperature and high pressure (0.53%/30 bars), probably through the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  18. Metallic Hydrides I: Hydrogen Storage and Other Gas-Phase Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Robert C., Jr.; Fultz, Brent

    2002-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the various classes of metal alloys and compounds that are suitable for hydrogen-storage and energy-conversion applications. Comparisons are made of relevant properties including hydrogen absorption and desorption pressures, total and reversible hydrogen-storage capacity, reaction-rate kinetics, initial activation requirements, susceptibility to contamination, and durability during long-term thermal cycling. Selected applications are hydrogen storage as a fuel, gas ...

  19. Northeastern Center for Chemical Energy Storage (NECCES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittingham, M. Stanley [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The chemical reactions that occur in batteries are complex, spanning a wide range of time and length scales from atomic jumps to the entire battery structure. The NECCES team of experimentalists and theorists made use of, and developed new methodologies to determine how model compound electrodes function in real time, as batteries are cycled. The team determined that kinetic control of intercalation reactions (reactions in which the crystalline structure is maintained) can be achieved by control of the materials morphology and explains and allows for the high rates of many intercalation reactions where the fundamental properties might indicate poor behavior in a battery application. The small overvoltage required for kinetic control is technically effective and economically feasible. A wide range of state-of-the-art operando techniques was developed to study materials under realistic battery conditions, which are now available to the scientific community. The team also investigated the key reaction steps in conversion electrodes, where the crystal structure is destroyed on reaction with lithium and rebuilt on lithium removal. These so-called conversion reactions have in principle much higher capacities, but were found to form very reactive discharge products that reduce the overall energy efficiency on cycling. It was found that by mixing either the anion, as in FeOF, or the cation, as in Cu1-yFeyF2, the capacity on cycling could be improved. The fundamental understanding of the reactions occurring in electrode materials gained in this study will allow for the development of much improved battery systems for energy storage. This will benefit the public in longer lived electronics, higher electric vehicle ranges at lower costs, and improved grid storage that also enables renewable energy supplies such as wind and solar.

  20. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies. PMID:27441240

  1. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  2. Hydrogen storage alloys prepared by high-energy milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Staszewski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate an efficiency of high-energy milling, as a method to obtain hydrogen storage alloys with good properties.Design/methodology/approach: Two classes of the alloys were studied: AB2 type with atomic composition of (Ti0.5Zr0.5(V0.68Mn0.68Cr0.34Ni0.7 and AB5 type with atomic composition of (Ce0.63La0.37(Ni3.55Al0.3Mn0.4 Co0.75.The materials were prepared by arc melting and initially pulverized and afterwards subjected to wet milling process in a planetary mill.Findings: Both initially obtained alloys had proper, single phase structure of hexagonal symmetry. However their elemental composition was greatly inhomogeneous. High-energy milling causes both homogenization of the composition and severe fragmentation of the powder particles, which after milling have mean diameter of about 3 µm (AB2 alloy and below 2 µm (AB5 alloy. The morphology of obtained powders reveals that they tend to form agglomerates consisting of large number of crystallites. Mean crystallite sizes after milling are of about 4.5 nm and of 20 nm, respectively. The specific surface of the powders, measured using BET method, equals 8.74 m2/g and 2.70 m2/g, respectively.Research limitations/implications: The results provide the information on the possibility of obtaining hydrogen storage alloys by high-energy milling and on the transformations taking place as a result of this process.Practical implications: The obtained powders can be used to produce the elements of hydrogen-nickel batteries and fuel cells, providing improved properties; especially extreme rise of the specific surface of the hydrogen storage material, in compare to the standard methods.Originality/value: New method for preparation of hydrogen storage alloys by means of high-energy milling technique has been successfully tested.

  3. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Peter [University of Missouri; Wexler, Carlos [University of Missouri; Hawthorne, M. Frederick [University of Missouri; Lee, Mark W. [University of Missouri; Jalistegi, Satish S. [University of Missouri

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have

  4. On the hydrogen-graphene layers interactions, relevance to the onboard storage problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, Y S; Ochsner, A

    2012-10-01

    Empirical evaluations of fundamental characteristics of the physical and chemical interaction of hydrogen with graphene layers in different kinds of graphite and novel carbonaceous nanomaterials of graphene layer structure have been carried out. This was done by using the approaches of the thermodynamics of reversible and irreversible processes for analysis of the adsorption, absorption, diffusion, the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and other experimental data and comparing such analytical results with first-principles calculations. Such an analysis of a number of the known experimental and theoretical data has shown a real possibility of the multilayer specific adsorption (intercalation) of hydrogen between graphene layers in novel carbonaceous nanomaterials. This is of relevance for solving the bottle-neck problem of the hydrogen on-board storage in fuel-cell-powered vehicles, and other technical applications. PMID:23421196

  5. On the hydrogen-graphene layers interactions, relevance to the onboard storage problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, Y S; Ochsner, A

    2012-10-01

    Empirical evaluations of fundamental characteristics of the physical and chemical interaction of hydrogen with graphene layers in different kinds of graphite and novel carbonaceous nanomaterials of graphene layer structure have been carried out. This was done by using the approaches of the thermodynamics of reversible and irreversible processes for analysis of the adsorption, absorption, diffusion, the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and other experimental data and comparing such analytical results with first-principles calculations. Such an analysis of a number of the known experimental and theoretical data has shown a real possibility of the multilayer specific adsorption (intercalation) of hydrogen between graphene layers in novel carbonaceous nanomaterials. This is of relevance for solving the bottle-neck problem of the hydrogen on-board storage in fuel-cell-powered vehicles, and other technical applications.

  6. Preparation and research on poisoning resistant Zr-Co based hydrogen storage alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hualing; WANG Shumao; JIANG Lijun; ZHANG Lidong; LIU Xiaopeng; LI Zhinian

    2008-01-01

    At present,all hydrogen storage alloys are poisoned by hydrogen mixed with CO,CO2,etc,which decreases the hydrogen storage property sharply.Zr-Co based hydrogen storage alloys with good poisoning resistance were prepared by alloying,fluorinating,and electroless plating.The experiment results show that the poisoning resistance of the Zr-Co based alloy was improved remarkably after the treatments.The poisoning resistance mechanism of the Zr-Co based hydrogen storage alloys was analyzed.

  7. Highly efficient hydrogen storage system based on ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over palladium nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji; Yang, Lisha; Lu, Mi; Lin, Hongfei

    2015-03-01

    A highly efficient, reversible hydrogen storage-evolution process has been developed based on the ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over the same carbon-supported palladium nanocatalyst. This heterogeneously catalyzed hydrogen storage system is comparable to the counterpart homogeneous systems and has shown fast reaction kinetics of both the hydrogenation of ammonium bicarbonate and the dehydrogenation of ammonium formate under mild operating conditions. By adjusting temperature and pressure, the extent of hydrogen storage and evolution can be well controlled in the same catalytic system. Moreover, the hydrogen storage system based on aqueous-phase ammonium formate is advantageous owing to its high volumetric energy density.

  8. Multi-criteria evaluation of on-board hydrogen storage technologies using the MACBETH approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montignac, F.; Noirot, I.; Chaudourne, S. [CEA, LITEN, Departement des Technologies de l' Hydrogene, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-05-15

    This paper provides some results obtained from the implementation of the MACBETH multi-criteria evaluation approach for the evaluation and comparison of the technical performance of three hydrogen storage technologies: a type IV 70 MPa hydrogen storage system, a cylindrical steel made liquid hydrogen storage system and a solid storage system. The evaluation is carried out considering a 6 kg hydrogen fuel cell vehicle application. Five technical evaluation criteria are taken into account in the analysis: system volume, system mass, refuelling time, hydrogen loss rate and conformability. The outcomes and added-value of this multi-criteria approach are finally discussed. (author)

  9. Hydrogen underground storage in siliciclastic reservoirs - intention and topics of the H2STORE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudlo, Dieter; Ganzer, Leonhard; Henkel, Steven; Liebscher, Axel; Kühn, Michael; De Lucia, Marco; Panfilov, Michel; Pilz, Peter; Reitenbach, Viktor; Albrecht, Daniel; Würdemann, Hilke; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    The transfer of energy supply from nuclear and CO2-emitting power generation to renewable energy production sources is strongly reliant to the potential of storing high capacities of energy in a safe and reliable way in time spans of several months. One conceivable option can be the storage of hydrogen and (related) synthetic natural gas (SNG) production in appropriate underground structures, like salt caverns and pore space reservoirs. Successful storage of hydrogen in the form of town gas in salt caverns has been proven in several demonstration projects and can be considered as state of the art technology. However, salt structures have only limited importance for hydrogen storage due to only small cavern volumes and the limited occurrence of salt deposits suitable for flushing of cavern constructions. Thus, regarding potential high-volume storage sites, siliciclastic deposits like saline aquifers and depleted gas reservoirs are of increasing interest. Motivated by a project call and sponsored by the German government the H2STORE ("Hydrogen to Store") collaborative project will investigate the feasibility and the requirements for pore space storage of hydrogen. Thereby depleted gas reservoirs are a major concern of this study. This type of geological structure is chosen because of their well investigated geological settings and proved sealing capacities, which already enable a present (and future) use as natural (and synthetic) reservoir gas storages. Nonetheless hydrogen and hydrocarbon in porous media exhibit major differences in physico-chemical behaviour, essentially due to the high diffusivity and reactivity of hydrogen. The biotic and abiotic reactions of hydrogen with rocks and fluids will be necessary observed in siliciclastic sediments which consist of numerous inorganic and organic compounds and comprise original formation fluids. These features strongly control petrophysical behaviour (e.g. porosity, permeability) and therefore fluid (hydrogen

  10. Methyllithium-Doped Naphthyl-Containing Conjugated Microporous Polymer with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Sun, Lei; Li, Gang; Shang, Jin; Yang, Rui-Xia; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen storage is a primary challenge for using hydrogen as a fuel. With ideal hydrogen storage kinetics, the weak binding strength of hydrogen to sorbents is the key barrier to obtain decent hydrogen storage performance. Here, we reported the rational synthesis of a methyllithium-doped naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer with exceptional binding strength of hydrogen to the polymer guided by theoretical simulations. Meanwhile, the experimental results showed that isosteric heat can reach up to 8.4 kJ mol(-1) and the methyllithium-doped naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer exhibited an enhanced hydrogen storage performance with 150 % enhancement compared with its counterpart naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer. These results indicate that this strategy provides a direction for design and synthesis of new materials that meet the US Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen storage target. PMID:27106536

  11. Technical and economic assessment of methods for the storage of large quantities of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. B.; Alderson, J. E. A.; Kalyanam, K. M.; Phillips, L. A.; Lyle, A. B.

    Attention is given to five scenarios for the storage of large quantities of hydrogen, involving storage above ground as a cryogenic liquid as well as high pressure storage both above and below ground in either natural or man-made cavities. The incremental cost of storage is calculated, and sensitivity is determined for variations of throughput, capital cost and electricity cost. These data also include the costs of electrolytic hydrogen and of hydrogen liquefaction. It is established that the cost of storage can add between 30 and 300 percent to the cost of hydrogen; it is accordingly essential that large offsetting benefits exist, in order to achieve economic variablity.

  12. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  13. Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang , Ralph T.

    2011-02-04

    The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on

  14. Rapid Solidification of AB{sub 5} Hydrogen Storage Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulbrandsen-Dahl, Sverre

    2002-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is concerned with rapid solidification of AB{sub 5} materials suitable for electrochemical hydrogen storage. The primary objective of the work has been to characterise the microstructure and crystal structure of the produced AB{sub 5} materials as a function of the process parameters, e.g. the cooling rate during rapid solidification, the determination of which has been paid special attention to. The thesis is divided into 6 parts, of which Part I is a literature review, starting with a short presentation of energy storage alternatives. Then a general review of metal hydrides and their utilisation as energy carriers is presented. This part also includes more detailed descriptions of the crystal structure, the chemical composition and the hydrogen storage properties of AB{sub 5} materials. Furthermore, a description of the chill-block melt spinning process and the gas atomisation process is given. In Part II of the thesis a digital photo calorimetric technique has been developed and applied for obtaining in situ temperature measurements during chill-block melt spinning of a Mm(NiCoMnA1){sub 5} hydride forming alloy (Mm = Mischmetal of rare earths). Compared with conventional colour transmission temperature measurements, this technique offers a special advantage in terms of a high temperature resolutional and positional accuracy, which under the prevailing experimental conditions were found to be {+-}29 K and {+-} 0.1 mm, respectively. Moreover, it is shown that the cooling rate in solid state is approximately 2.5 times higher than that observed during solidification, indicating that the solid ribbon stayed in intimate contact with the wheel surface down to very low metal temperatures before the bond was broken. During this contact period the cooling regime shifted from near ideal in the melt puddle to near Newtonian towards the end, when the heat transfer from the solid ribbon to the wheel became the rate controlling step. In Part III of the

  15. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G.; Marin, A.; Wyss, C.; Mueller, S.; Newson, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  16. Wind energy-hydrogen storage hybrid power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenjei Yang; Orhan Aydin [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

    2001-07-01

    In this theoretical investigation, a hybrid power generation system utilizing wind energy and hydrogen storage is presented. Firstly, the available wind energy is determined, which is followed by evaluating the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system. A revised model of windmill is proposed from which wind power density and electric power output are determined. When the load demand is less than the output of the generation, the excess electric power is relayed to the electrolytic cell where it is used to electrolyse the de-ionized water. Hydrogen thus produced can be stored as hydrogen compressed gas or liquid. Once the hydrogen is stored in an appropriate high-pressure vessel, it can be used in a combustion engine, fuel cell, or burned in a water-cooled burner to produce a very high-quality steam for space heating, or to drive a turbine to generate electric power. It can also be combined with organic materials to produce synthetic fuels. The conclusion is that the system produces no harmful waste and depletes no resources. Note that this system also works well with a solar collector instead of a windmill. (author)

  17. Atomistic Modelling of Materials for Clean Energy Applications : hydrogen generation, hydrogen storage, and Li-ion battery

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a number of clean-energy materials for hydrogen generation, hydrogen storage, and Li-ion battery energy storage applications have been investigated through state-of-the-art density functional theory. As an alternative fuel, hydrogen has been regarded as one of the promising clean energies with the advantage of abundance (generated through water splitting) and pollution-free emission if used in fuel cell systems. However, some key problems such as finding efficient ways to prod...

  18. Hydrogen Storage in Iron/Carbon Nano powder Composite Materials: Effect of Varying Spiked Iron Content on Hydrogen Adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the effects of varying the spiked iron content of iron/carbon nano powder (Fe/CNP) composite materials on hydrogen storage capacity. Among four such samples, a maximum hydrogen uptake of approximately 0.48 wt % was obtained with 14 wt % of spiked iron under 37 atm and 300 K. This higher hydrogen uptake capacity was believed to be closely related to the physisorption mechanism rather than chemisorption. In this case, the formation of maghemite catalyzed the attraction of hydrogen molecules and the CNP skeleton was the principal absorbent material for hydrogen storage. However, as the iron content exceeded 14 wt %, the formation of larger and poorly dispersed maghemite grains reduced the available surface areas of CNP for the storage of hydrogen molecules, leading to decreased uptake. Our study shows that hydrogen uptake capacities can be improved by appropriately adjusting the surface polarities of the CNP with well dispersed iron oxides crystals.

  19. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This

  20. Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This

  1. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. PMID:26638824

  2. Studies on hydrogen storage of titanium powder by temperature programmed reduction/desorption techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regeneration of cold trap (CT) in fast reactors releases large quantity of hydrogen and needs to be mitigated/ contained. Regeneration of PFBR cold trap is planned to be carried out by thermal decomposition of trapped sodium hydride under vacuum. Hydrogen released during regeneration will be mitigated to a great extent using fuel cell by electrochemical oxidation. The residual hydrogen at the exit of fuel cell is planned to be contained using hydrogen storage materials.. Hence, there is need to find suitable hydrogen storage material for trapping the hydrogen released from such processes. Light metal like titanium is suitable for hydrogen storage as it possesses high storage capacity and also undergoes hydrogen uptake/release cycling at optimised temperatures

  3. Rapid Solidification of AB{sub 5} Hydrogen Storage Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulbrandsen-Dahl, Sverre

    2002-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is concerned with rapid solidification of AB{sub 5} materials suitable for electrochemical hydrogen storage. The primary objective of the work has been to characterise the microstructure and crystal structure of the produced AB{sub 5} materials as a function of the process parameters, e.g. the cooling rate during rapid solidification, the determination of which has been paid special attention to. The thesis is divided into 6 parts, of which Part I is a literature review, starting with a short presentation of energy storage alternatives. Then a general review of metal hydrides and their utilisation as energy carriers is presented. This part also includes more detailed descriptions of the crystal structure, the chemical composition and the hydrogen storage properties of AB{sub 5} materials. Furthermore, a description of the chill-block melt spinning process and the gas atomisation process is given. In Part II of the thesis a digital photo calorimetric technique has been developed and applied for obtaining in situ temperature measurements during chill-block melt spinning of a Mm(NiCoMnA1){sub 5} hydride forming alloy (Mm = Mischmetal of rare earths). Compared with conventional colour transmission temperature measurements, this technique offers a special advantage in terms of a high temperature resolutional and positional accuracy, which under the prevailing experimental conditions were found to be {+-}29 K and {+-} 0.1 mm, respectively. Moreover, it is shown that the cooling rate in solid state is approximately 2.5 times higher than that observed during solidification, indicating that the solid ribbon stayed in intimate contact with the wheel surface down to very low metal temperatures before the bond was broken. During this contact period the cooling regime shifted from near ideal in the melt puddle to near Newtonian towards the end, when the heat transfer from the solid ribbon to the wheel became the rate controlling step. In Part III of the

  4. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Ian M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Lab., Iowa

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  5. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  6. Storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Rita

    The increased utilization of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as an alternative to internal combustion engines is expected to increase the demand for hydrogen, which is used as the energy source in these systems. The objective of this work is to develop and test new methods for the storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cells. Six ligand-stabilized hydrides were synthesized and tested as hydrogen storage media for use in portable fuel cells. These novel compounds are more stable than classical hydrides (e.g., NaBH4, LiAlH4) and react to release hydrogen less exothermically upon hydrolysis with water. Three of the compounds produced hydrogen in high yield (88 to 100 percent of the theoretical) and at significantly lower temperatures than those required for the hydrolysis of NaBH4 and LiAlH4. However, a large excess of water and acid were required to completely wet the hydride and keep the pH of the reaction medium neutral. The hydrolysis of the classical hydrides with steam can overcome these limitations. This reaction was studied in a flow reactor and the results indicate that classical hydrides can be hydrolyzed with steam in high yields at low temperatures (110 to 123°C) and in the absence of acid. Although excess steam was required, the pH of the condensed steam was neutral. Consequently, steam could be recycled back to the reactor. Production of hydrogen for large-scale transportation fuel cells is primarily achieved via the steam reforming, partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of natural gas or the steam reforming of methanol. However, in all of these processes CO is a by-product that must be subsequently removed because the Pt-based electrocatalyst used in the fuel cells is poisoned by its presence. The direct cracking of methane over a Ni/SiO2 catalyst can produce CO-free hydrogen. In addition to hydrogen, filamentous carbon is also produced. This material accumulates on the catalyst and eventually deactivates it. The Ni/SiO2 catalyst

  7. Thermal energy storage. [by means of chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The principles involved in thermal energy storage by sensible heat, chemical potential energy, and latent heat of fusion are examined for the purpose of evolving selection criteria for material candidates in the low ( 0 C) and high ( 100 C) temperature ranges. The examination identifies some unresolved theoretical considerations and permits a preliminary formulation of an energy storage theory. A number of candidates in the low and high temperature ranges are presented along with a rating of candidates or potential candidates. A few interesting candidates in the 0 to 100 C region are also included. It is concluded that storage by means of reactions whose reversibility can be controlled either by product removal or by catalytic means appear to offer appreciable advantages over storage with reactions whose reversability cannot be controlled. Among such advantages are listed higher heat storage capacities and more favorable options regarding temperatures of collection, storage, and delivery. Among the disadvantages are lower storage efficiencies.

  8. Impact of hydrogen onboard storage technologies on the performance of hydrogen fuelled vehicles: A techno-economic well-to-wheel assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen onboard storage technologies form an important factor in the overall performance of hydrogen fuelled transportation, both energetically and economically. Particularly, advanced storage options such as metal hydrides and carbon nanotubes are often hinted favourable to conventional, liquid an

  9. Value assessment of hydrogen-based electrical energy storage in view of electricity spot market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Hu, Junjie; Lin, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen as an energy carrier represents one of the most promising carbon-free energy solutions. The ongoing development of power-to-gas (PtG) technologies that supports large-scale utilization of hydrogen is therefore expected to support hydrogen economy with a final breakthrough. In this paper......, the economic performance of a MW-sized hydrogen system, i.e. a composition of water electrolysis, hydrogen storage, and fuel cell combined heat and power plant (FCCHP), is assessed as an example of hydrogen-based bidirectional electrical energy storage (EES). The analysis is conducted in view of the Danish...

  10. Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliermans; , Carl B.

    2012-08-07

    Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

  11. Applied hydrogen storage research and development: A perspective from the U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Malley, Kathleen [SRA International, Inc., Fairfax, VA 22033 (United States); Ordaz, Grace; Adams, Jesse; Randolph, Katie [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Ahn, Channing C. [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stetson, Ned T., E-mail: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Overview of U.S. DOE-supported hydrogen storage technology development efforts. • Physical and materials-based strategy for developing hydrogen storage systems. • Materials requirements for automotive storage systems. • Key R&D developments. - Abstract: To enable the wide-spread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Fuel Cell Technology Office, maintains a comprehensive portfolio of R&D activities to develop advanced hydrogen storage technologies. The primary focus of the Hydrogen Storage Program is development of technologies to meet the challenging onboard storage requirements for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) to meet vehicle performance that consumers have come to expect. Performance targets have also been established for materials handling equipment (e.g., forklifts) and low-power, portable fuel cell applications. With the imminent release of commercial FCEVs by automobile manufacturers in regional markets, a dual strategy is being pursued to (a) lower the cost and improve performance of high-pressure compressed hydrogen storage systems while (b) continuing efforts on advanced storage technologies that have potential to surpass the performance of ambient compressed hydrogen storage.

  12. Moderate Temperature Dense Phase Hydrogen Storage Materials within the US Department of Energy (DOE H2 Storage Program: Trends toward Future Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott McWhorter

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen has many positive attributes that make it a viable choice to augment the current portfolio of combustion-based fuels, especially when considering reducing pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. However, conventional methods of storing H2 via high-pressure or liquid H2 do not provide long-term economic solutions for many applications, especially emerging applications such as man-portable or stationary power. Hydrogen storage in materials has the potential to meet the performance and cost demands, however, further developments are needed to address the thermodynamics and kinetics of H2 uptake and release. Therefore, the US Department of Energy (DOE initiated three Centers of Excellence focused on developing H2 storage materials that could meet the stringent performance requirements for on-board vehicular applications. In this review, we have summarized the developments that occurred as a result of the efforts of the Metal Hydride and Chemical Hydrogen Storage Centers of Excellence on materials that bind hydrogen through ionic and covalent linkages and thus could provide moderate temperature, dense phase H2 storage options for a wide range of emerging Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM FC applications.

  13. Synthesis and Evaluation on Performance of Hydrogen Storage of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Platinum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Shi-chung; TANG Hao-lin; PAN Mu; YUAN Run-zhang

    2003-01-01

    By means of chemical reduction,nanoparticles of platinum were deposited on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).The performance of hydrogen storage of as-prepared MWCNTs decorated with platinum was investigated.The results indicate that:(1) Hydrogen uptake is more quick and intense for decorated MWCNTs than that for not decorated ones at 10.931MPa and room temperature.The saturation of hydrogen uptake of the former only lasts about 30min,while the latter needs about 150 min;(2) The amount of hydrogen uptake of decorated MWCNTs is about 1.13wt%, which is larger than that of not decorated ones(about 0.54wt%);(3) However,more than 37% hydrogen absorbed by decorated MWCNTs is chemisorbed.

  14. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 1013 to 1014 atoms/cm2 by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings

  15. The challenge of storage in the hydrogen energy cycle: nanostructured hydrides as a potential solution

    OpenAIRE

    Hanlon, James M.; Reardon, Hazel; Tapia-Ruiz, Nuria; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has the capacity to provide society with the means to carry ‘green’ energy between the point of generation and the point of use. A sustainable energy society in which a hydrogen economy predominates will require renewable generation provided, for example, by artificial photosynthesis and clean, efficient energy conversion effected, for example, by hydrogen fuel cells. Vital in the hydrogen cycle is the ability to store hydrogen safely and effectively. Solid-state storage in hydrides ...

  16. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  17. Hydrogen storage alloys prepared by high-energy milling

    OpenAIRE

    M. Staszewski; A. Sierczyńska; M. Kamińska; M. Osadnik; M. Czepelak; Swoboda, P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate an efficiency of high-energy milling, as a method to obtain hydrogen storage alloys with good properties.Design/methodology/approach: Two classes of the alloys were studied: AB2 type with atomic composition of (Ti0.5Zr0.5)(V0.68Mn0.68Cr0.34Ni0.7) and AB5 type with atomic composition of (Ce0.63La0.37)(Ni3.55Al0.3Mn0.4 Co0.75).The materials were prepared by arc melting and initially pulverized and afterwards subjected to wet milling process in a ...

  18. Effect of Annealing on Rare Earth Based Hydrogen Storage Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jinhua

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth-based hydrogen storage alloy used as negative electrode materials for nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries are used commercially.The effect of annealing treatment with different annealing temperature and time on the MLNi3.68 Co0.78 Mn0.35 Al0.27 and MMNi3.55 Co0.75 Mn0.40 Al0.30 alloys were investigated.The crystal microstructure,pressure-composition-isotherms (p-C-T) and electrochemical properties of alloys were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), automatic PCI monitoring system and electrical performance testing instruments.The optimum annealing treatment conditions of two kinds of alloys were determined.

  19. Electrochemical properties of TiV-based hydrogen storage alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱云峰; 李锐; 高明霞; 刘永锋; 潘洪革; 王启东

    2003-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of the super-stoichiometric TiV-based hydrogen storage electrode alloys(Ti0.8Zr0.2)(V0.533Mn0.107Cr0.16Ni0.2)x(x=2, 3, 4, 5, 6) were studied. It is found by XRD analysis that all the al-loys mainly consist of a C14 Laves phase with hexagonal structure and a V-based solid solution phase with BCCstructure. The lattice parameters and the unit cell volumes of the two phases decrease with increasing x. The cyclelife, the linear polarization, the anode polarization and the electrochemical impedance spectra of the alloy electrodeswere investigated systematically. The overall electrochemical properties of the alloy electrode are found improvedgreatly as the result of super-stoichiometry and get to the best when x= 5.

  20. Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhouse, Norman L. [Hexagon Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-04-29

    Hexagon Lincoln started this DOE project as part of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) contract on 1 February 2009. The purpose of the HSECoE was the research and development of viable material based hydrogen storage systems for on-board vehicular applications to meet DOE performance and cost targets. A baseline design was established in Phase 1. Studies were then conducted to evaluate potential improvements, such as alternate fiber, resin, and boss materials. The most promising concepts were selected such that potential improvements, compared with the baseline Hexagon Lincoln tank, resulted in a projected weight reduction of 11 percent, volume increase of 4 percent, and cost reduction of 10 percent. The baseline design was updated in Phase 2 to reflect design improvements and changes in operating conditions specified by HSECoE Partners. Evaluation of potential improvements continued during Phase 2. Subscale prototype cylinders were designed and fabricated for HSECoE Partners’ use in demonstrating their components and systems. Risk mitigation studies were conducted in Phase 3 that focused on damage tolerance of the composite reinforcement. Updated subscale prototype cylinders were designed and manufactured to better address the HSECoE Partners’ requirements for system demonstration. Subscale Type 1, Type 3, and Type 4 tanks were designed, fabricated and tested. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate vacuum insulated systems for cooling the tanks during fill, and maintaining low temperatures during service. Full scale designs were prepared based on results from the studies of this program. The operating conditions that developed during the program addressed adsorbent systems operating at cold temperatures. A Type 4 tank would provide the lowest cost and lightest weight, particularly at higher pressures, as long as issues with liner compatibility and damage tolerance could be resolved. A Type 1 tank might be the choice if the

  1. The impact of carbon materials on the hydrogen storage properties of light metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelhelm, P.A.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    The safe and efficient storage of hydrogen is still one of the remaining challenges towards fuel cell powered cars. Metal hydrides are a promising class of materials as they allow the storage of large amounts of hydrogen in a small volume at room temperature and low pressures. However, usually the k

  2. Templated synthesis of nickel nanoparticles: Toward heterostructured nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Nicholas Cole [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The world is currently facing an energy and environmental crisis for which new technologies are needed. Development of cost-competitive materials for catalysis and hydrogen storage on-board motor vehicles is crucial to lead subsequent generations into a more sustainable and energy independent future. This thesis presents work toward the scalable synthesis of bimetallic heterostructures that can enable hydrogen to compete with carbonaceous fuels by meeting the necessary gravimetric and volumetric energy densities and by enhancing hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics near ambient temperatures and pressures. Utilizing the well-known phenomenon of hydrogen spillover, these bimetallic heterostructures could work by lowering the activation energy for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of metals. Herein, we report a novel method for the scalable synthesis of silica templated zero-valent nickel particles (Ni⊂SiO2) that hold promise for the synthesis of nickel nanorods for use in bimetallic heterostructures for hydrogen storage. Our synthesis proceeds by chemical reduction of a nickel-hydrazine complex with sodium borohydride followed by calcination under hydrogen gas to yield silica encapsulated nickel particles. Transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the general morphology of the resultant nanocapsules as well as the crystalline phases of the incorporated Ni0 nanocrystals. The structures display strong magnetic behavior at room temperature and preliminary data suggests nickel particle size can be controlled by varying the amount of nickel precursor used in the synthesis. Calcination under different environments and TEM analysis provides evidence for an atomic migration mechanism of particle formation. Ni⊂SiO2 nanocapsules were used as seeds to induce heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth within the nanocapsule via electroless nickel plating. Nickel nanoparticle growth occurs

  3. The potential of organic polymer-based hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Peter M; Butler, Anna; Selbie, James; Mahmood, Khalid; McKeown, Neil B; Ghanem, Bader; Msayib, Kadhum; Book, David; Walton, Allan

    2007-04-21

    The challenge of storing hydrogen at high volumetric and gravimetric density for automotive applications has prompted investigations into the potential of cryo-adsorption on the internal surface area of microporous organic polymers. A range of Polymers of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIMs) has been studied, the best PIM to date (a network-PIM incorporating a triptycene subunit) taking up 2.7% H(2) by mass at 10 bar/77 K. HyperCrosslinked Polymers (HCPs) also show promising performance as H(2) storage materials, particularly at pressures >10 bar. The N(2) and H(2) adsorption behaviour at 77 K of six PIMs and a HCP are compared. Surface areas based on Langmuir plots of H(2) adsorption at high pressure are shown to provide a useful guide to hydrogen capacity, but Langmuir plots based on low pressure data underestimate the potential H(2) uptake. The micropore distribution influences the form of the H(2) isotherm, a higher concentration of ultramicropores (pore size <0.7 nm) being associated with enhanced low pressure adsorption. PMID:17415491

  4. Nanoporous materials for hydrogen storage and H2/D2 isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents a study of hydrogen adsorption properties at RT with noble metal doped porous materials and an efficient separation of hydrogen isotopes with nanoporous materials. Most analysis is performed via thermal desorption spectra (TDS) and Sieverts-type apparatus. The result and discussion is presented in two parts; Chapter 4 focuses on metal doped nanoporous materials for hydrogen storage. Cryogenic hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials has the advantage of high reversibility and fast refuelling times with low heat evolution at modest pressures. At room temperature, however, the physisorption mechanism is not abEle to achieve enough capacity for practical application due to the weak van der Waals interaction, i.e., low isosteric heats for hydrogen sorption. Recently, the ''spillover'' effect has been proposed by R. Yang et al. to enhance the room temperature hydrogen storage capacity. However, the mechanism of this storage enhancement by decoration of noble metal particles inside high surface area supports is not yet fully understood and still under debate. In this chapter, noble metal (Pt / Pd) doped nanoporous materials (i.e. porous carbon, COFs) have been investigated for room temperature hydrogen storage. Their textural properties and hydrogen storage capacity are characterized by various analytic techniques (e.g. SEM, HRTEM, XRD, BET, ICP-OES, Thermal desorption spectra, Sievert's apparatus and Raman spectroscopy). Firstly, Pt-doped and un-doped templated carbons possessing almost identical textural properties were successfully synthesized via a single step wet impregnation method. This enables the study of Pt catalytic activities and hydrogen adsorption kinetics on porous carbons at ambient temperature by TDS after H2/D2 gas exposure and PCT measurement, respectively. While the H2 adsorption kinetics in the microporous structure is enhanced by Pt catalytic activities (spillover), only a small enhancement of the hydrogen uptake in

  5. Storage of hydrogen at 303 K in graphite slitlike pores from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Tanaka, Hideki; Hołyst, Robert; Kaneko, Katsumi; Ohmori, Takumi; Miyamoto, Junichi

    2005-09-15

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used for the modeling of the hydrogen adsorption in idealized graphite slitlike pores. In all simulations, quantum effects were included through the Feynman and Hibbs second-order effective potential. The simulated surface excess isotherms of hydrogen were used for the determination of the total hydrogen storage, density of hydrogen in graphite slitlike pores, distribution of pore sizes and volumes, enthalpy of adsorption per mole, total surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of pitch-based activated carbon fibers. Combining experimental results with simulations reveals that the density of hydrogen in graphite slitlike pores at 303 K does not exceed 0.014 g/cm(3), that is, 21% of the liquid-hydrogen density at the triple point. The optimal pore size for the storage of hydrogen at 303 K in the considered pore geometry depends on the pressure of storage. For lower storage pressures, p graphite slitlike pores in the whole range of the hydrogen pressure as well as in wider ones at high pressures of bulk hydrogen. The enthalpies of adsorption per mole for the considered carbonaceous materials are practically constant with hydrogen loading and vary within the narrow range q(st) congruent with 7.28-7.85 kJ/mol. Our systematic study of hydrogen adsorption at 303 K in graphite slitlike pores gives deep insight into the timely problem of hydrogen storage as the most promising source of clean energy. The calculated maximum storage of hydrogen is equal to approximately 1.4 wt %, which is far from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) target (i.e., 6.5 wt %), thus concluding that the total storage amount of hydrogen obtained at 303 K in graphite slitlike pores of carbon fibers is not sufficient yet.

  6. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Thanh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, Matt [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, Stephen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, Karen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, Jayanti [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  7. Hydrogen storage via physisorption: the combined role of adsorption enthalpy and entropy

    OpenAIRE

    AREAN, Carlos Otero; BONELLI, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Materials capable of cost-effective on-board hydrogen storage and delivery are currently being sought worldwide as a means to facilitate a hydrogen-based energy transition in the transportation sector. Among the solutions proposed, hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous solids constitutes a main avenue of research, and for intelligent design of such materials a detailed knowledge of gas adsorption thermodynamics is of the utmost importance. Analysis of the available data for hyd...

  8. Estimating the revenues of a hydrogen-based high-capacity storage device: methodology and results

    OpenAIRE

    François-Lavet, Vincent; Fonteneau, Raphaël; Ernst, Damien

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to estimate the maximum revenue that can be generated by a company that operates a high-capacity storage device to buy or sell electricity on the day-ahead electricity market. The methodology exploits the Dynamic Programming (DP) principle and is specified for hydrogen-based storage devices that use electrolysis to produce hydrogen and fuel cells to generate electricity from hydrogen. Experimental results are generated using historical data of energy prices o...

  9. Systems of solar hydrogen storage; Sistemas de almacenamiento de hidrogeno solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E.; Isorna, F.; Rosa, F.

    2004-07-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to play a major role in a future energy system. Hydrogen production from renewable energy can solve some of the associated problems to such energies. From production to end-users, it is essential the development of suitable hydrogen delivery and storage systems, taking into consideration the particular characteristics of each project. This article describes, in a general way, main choices for hydrogen storage when produced from renewable energy, and shows the particular case of the INTA's Hydrogen Production Plant. (Author)

  10. Reversible hydrogen storage in Mg(BH4)2/carbon nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Y.; Au, Y.S.; Rentsch, D.; Remhof, A.; de Jongh, P.E.; Züttel, A.

    2013-01-01

    Mg(BH4)2 exhibits a high hydrogen content of 14.9 wt% and thermodynamic stability in the overall decomposition reaction that corresponds to hydrogen desorption at around room temperature. However, the potential applications in hydrogen storage are restricted by high kinetic barriers. In this study,

  11. Thermodynamic Properties of Organometallic Dihydrogen Complexes for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David Gregory

    appropriate ranges for hydrogen storage applications. Simulated thermodynamic values for Fe complexes were found to significantly underestimate experimental behavior, demonstrating the importance of the magnetic spin state of the molecule to hydrogen binding properties.

  12. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) and Power-to-Gas Economic Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Joshua

    2015-07-30

    This presentation summarizes opportunities for hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas and presents the results of a market analysis performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to quantify the value of energy storage. Hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas systems have the ability to integrate multiple energy sectors including electricity, transportation, and industrial. On account of the flexibility of hydrogen systems, there are a variety of potential system configurations. Each configuration will provide different value to the owner, customers and grid system operator. This presentation provides an economic comparison of hydrogen storage, power-to-gas and conventional storage systems. The total cost is compared to the revenue with participation in a variety of markets to assess the economic competitiveness. It is found that the sale of hydrogen for transportation or industrial use greatly increases competitiveness. Electrolyzers operating as demand response devices (i.e., selling hydrogen and grid services) are economically competitive, while hydrogen storage that inputs electricity and outputs only electricity have an unfavorable business case. Additionally, tighter integration with the grid provides greater revenue (e.g., energy, ancillary service and capacity markets are explored). Lastly, additional hours of storage capacity is not necessarily more competitive in current energy and ancillary service markets and electricity markets will require new mechanisms to appropriately compensate long duration storage devices.

  13. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  14. GAT 4 production and storage of hydrogen. Report July 2004; GAT 4 procduction et stockage de l'hydrogene. Rapport juillet 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns two aspects of the hydrogen: the production and the storage. For both parts the challenges and a state of the art are presented. It discusses also the hydrogen production by renewable energies, by solar energy, the hydrogen of hydrocarbons reforming purification, active phases development, thermal transfer simulation. Concerning the hydrogen storage the hydrogen adsorption by large surface solid, the storage by metallic hydrides, the alanates and light hydrides, the adsorption on carbon nano-tubes, the storage in nano-structures, the thermal and mechanical simulation of the hydrogen are presented. (A.L.B.)

  15. Si-decorated graphene: A promising media for molecular hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M. Darvish, E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.com; Emami, S.N.; Khosravi, A.; Abbasi, M.

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • The adsorption of H{sub 2} on Si-decorated graphene was studied by DFT-LDA method. • Chemisorbed Si atom exhibits as a potential positive center for H{sub 2} adsorption. • BSSE correction and spin polarization affect slightly on the binding energies estimation. • Si atom can absorb up to eight H{sub 2}molecules with the gravimetric density of 15 wt%. • The binding properties for the adsorbed H{sub 2}molecules are typical for the physisorption. - Abstract: The adsorption of hydrogen molecules (H{sub 2}) on Si-decorated graphene was studied by using density functional theory calculations based on local density approximation (LDA). The accuracy of our method was validated by high level quantum chemical calculation result at MP2 level of theory for similar system. Our calculations show that Si-decorated graphene has high adsorption energy, high net charge transfer values and small connecting distances to graphene surface due to chemisorption. This makes adsorbed Si on the surface as a positive center which can adsorb considerably H{sub 2} molecules. We find that up to 16 H{sub 2} molecules can stably bind to two Si atoms on both side of the graphene sheet with slightly desirable adsorption energy which indicates that the resultant system facilitates the hydrogen desorption at near ambient conditions for practical applications. This newly developed Si decorated graphene with its hydrogen storage capacity of about 15 wt% would be an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage mediums.

  16. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  17. Modeling of an Integrated Renewable Energy System (IRES) with hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Navin Kodange

    2010-12-01

    Scope and Method of Study. The purpose of the study was to consider the integration of hydrogen storage technology as means of energy storage with renewable sources of energy. Hydrogen storage technology consists of an alkaline electrolyzer, gas storage tank and a fuel cell. The Integrated Renewable Energy System (IRES) under consideration includes wind energy, solar energy from photovoltaics, solar thermal energy and biomass energy in the form of biogas. Energy needs are categorized depending on the type and quality of the energy requirements. After meeting all the energy needs, any excess energy available from wind and PVs is converted into hydrogen using an electrolyzer for later use in a fuel cell. Similarly, when renewable energy generation is not able to supply the actual load demand, the stored hydrogen is utilized through fuel cell to fulfill load demand. Analysis of how IRES operates in order to satisfy different types of energy needs is discussed. Findings and Conclusions. All simulations are performed using MATLAB software. Hydrogen storage technology consisting of an electrolyzer, gas storage tank and a fuel cell is incorporated in the IRES design process for a hypothetical remote community. Results show that whenever renewable energy generated is greater than the electrical demand, excess energy is stored in the form of hydrogen and in case of energy shortfall, the stored hydrogen is utilized through the fuel cell to supply to excess power demand. The overall operation of IRES is enhanced as a result of energy storage in the form of hydrogen. Hydrogen has immense potential to be the energy carrier of the future because of its clean character and the model of hydrogen storage discussed here can form an integral part of IRES for remote area applications.

  18. Superhalogens as Building Blocks of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Superhalogens are species whose electron affinity (EA) or vertical detachment energy (VDE) exceed to those of halogen. These species typically consist of a central electropositive atom with electronegative ligands. The EA or VDE of species can be further increased by using superhalogen as ligands, which are termed as hyperhalogen. Having established BH4- as a superhalogen, we have studied BH4-x(BH4)x- (x = 1 to 4) hyperhalogen anions and their Li-complexes, LiBH4-x(BH4)x using density functional theory. The VDE of these anions is larger than that of BH4-, which increases with the increase in the number of peripheral BH4 moieties (x). The hydrogen storage capacity of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes is higher but binding energy is smaller than that of LiBH4, a typical complex hydride. The linear correlation between dehydrogenation energy of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes and VDE of BH4-x(BH4)x- anions is established. These complexes are found to be thermodynamically stable against dissociation into LiBH4 and borane. This stud...

  19. Technical analysis of photovoltaic/wind systems with hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Vukman V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical analysis of a hybrid wind-photovoltaic energy system with hydrogen gas storage was studied. The market for the distributed power generation based on renewable energy is increasing, particularly for the standalone mini-grid applications. The main design components of PV/Wind hybrid system are the PV panels, the wind turbine and an alkaline electrolyzer with tank. The technical analysis is based on the transient system simulation program TRNSYS 16. The study is realized using the meteorological data for a Typical Metrological Year (TMY for region of Novi Sad, Belgrade cities and Kopaonik national park in Serbia. The purpose of the study is to design a realistic energy system that maximizes the use of renewable energy and minimizes the use of fossil fuels. The reduction in the CO2 emissions is also analyzed in the paper. [Acknowledgment. This paper is the result of the investigations carried out within the scientific project TR33036 supported by the Ministry of Science of the Republic of Serbia.

  20. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO(2)/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H(2) generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and 287 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) are obtained with TiO(2)/Ni(OH)(2) nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application.

  1. Fabrication of Nickel Nanotube Using Anodic Oxidation and Electrochemical Deposition Technologies and Its Hydrogen Storage Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical deposition technique was utilized to fabricate nickel nanotubes with the assistance of AAO templates. The topography and element component of the nickel nanotubes were characterized by TEM and EDS. Furthermore, the nickel nanotube was made into microelectrode and its electrochemical hydrogen storage property was studied using cyclic voltammetry. The results showed that the diameter of nickel nanotubes fabricated was around 20–100 mm, and the length of the nanotube could reach micron grade. The nickel nanotubes had hydrogen storage property, and the hydrogen storage performance was higher than that of nickel powder.

  2. Tank designs for combined high pressure gas and solid state hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea

    for each storage solution investigated in this work. Attention is given to solutions that involve high-pressure solid-state and gas hydrogen storage with an integrated passive cooling system. A set of libraries is implemented in the modeling platform to select among different material compositions, kinetic......Many challenges have still to be overcome in order to establish a solid ground for significant market penetration of fuel cell hydrogen vehicles. The development of an effective solution for on-board hydrogen storage is one of the main technical tasks that need to be tackled. The present thesis...

  3. Metal-Assisted Hydrogen Storage on Pt-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Brown, Craig [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Neumann, Dan [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Hu, Hui [ORNL; Styers-Barnett, David J [ORNL; Krasnov, Pavel O. [Rice University; Yakobson, Boris I. [Rice University

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic dissociation of hydrogen molecules by metal nanoparticles and spillover of atomic hydrogen onto various supports is a well-established phenomenon in catalysis. However, the mechanisms by which metal catalyst nanoparticles can assist in enhanced hydrogen storage on high-surface area supports are still under debate. Experimental measurements of metal-assisted hydrogen storage have been hampered by inaccurate estimation of atomically stored hydrogen deduced from comparative measurements between metal-decorated and undecorated samples. Here we report a temperature cycling technique combined with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of quantum rotational transitions of molecular H2 to more accurately quantify adsorbed hydrogen aided by catalytic particles using single samples. Temperature cycling measurements on single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs) decorated with 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles showed 0.17 % mass fraction of metal-assisted hydrogen storage (at 0.5 MPa) at room temperature. Temperature cycling of Pt-decorated SWCNHs using a Sievert s apparatus also indicated metal-assisted hydrogen adsorption of 0.08 % mass fraction at 5 MPa at room temperature. No additional metal-assisted hydrogen storage was observed in SWCNH samples without Pt nanoparticles cycled to room temperature, or in Pt-SWCNHs when the temperature was cycled to less than 150K. The possible formation of C-H bonds due to spilled-over atomic hydrogen was also investigated using both INS and density functional theory calculations.

  4. Hydrogen as a fuel for today and tomorrow: expectations for advanced hydrogen storage materials/systems research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    History shows that the evolution of vehicles is promoted by several environmental restraints very similar to the evolution of life. The latest environmental strain is sustainability. Transport vehicles are now facing again the need to advance to use sustainable fuels such as hydrogen. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are being prepared for commercialization in 2015. Despite intensive research by the world's scientists and engineers and recent advances in our understanding of hydrogen behavior in materials, the only engineering phase technology which will be available for 2015 is high pressure storage. Thus industry has decided to implement the high pressure tank storage system. However the necessity of smart hydrogen storage is not decreasing but rather increasing because high market penetration of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is expected from around 2025 onward. In order to bring more vehicles onto the market, cheaper and more compact hydrogen storage is inevitable. The year 2025 seems a long way away but considering the field tests and large scale preparation required, there is little time available for research. Finding smart materials within the next 5 years is very important to the success of fuel cells towards a low carbon sustainable world.

  5. Study on Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption by Metal Hydride Slurries Ⅰ. Absorption of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Storage Alloy MlNi5 Suspended in Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安越; 陈长聘; 徐国华; 蔡官明; 王启东

    2002-01-01

    The absorption of hydrogen was studied in metal hydride slurry, which is formed by benzene and hydrogen storage alloy powder. The influence of temperature on the rate of absorption was discussed using three-phase mass transfer model. It is also concluded that the suitable absorption temperature is 313 K.

  6. The Quest for Greater Chemical Energy Storage: A Deceiving Game of Nanometer Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, C. Michael

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that modern energetic materials based on organic chemistry have nearly reached a plateau in performance with only ~ 40% improvement realized over the past half century. This fact has stimulated research on alternative chemical energy storage schema in various US government funded ``High Energy Density Materials'' (HEDM) programs since the 1950's. These efforts have examined a wide range of phenomena such as free radical stabilization, metallic hydrogen, metastable helium, polynitrogens, extended molecular solids, nanothermites, and others. In spite of the substantial research investments, significant improvements in energetic material performance have not been forthcoming. In this talk we will survey various fundamental modes of chemical energy storage, lesson's learned in the various HEDM programs, and areas that are being explored currently. A recurring theme in all of this work is the challenge to successfully manipulate and stabilize matter at the ~ 1 nm scale.

  7. Hydrogen Storage in Iron/Carbon Nanopowder Composite Materials: Effect of Varying Spiked Iron Content on Hydrogen Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lin Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of varying the spiked iron content of iron/carbon nanopowder (Fe/CNP composite materials on hydrogen storage capacity. Among four such samples, a maximum hydrogen uptake of approximately 0.48 wt% was obtained with 14 wt% of spiked iron under 37 atm and 300 K. This higher hydrogen uptake capacity was believed to be closely related to the physisorption mechanism rather than chemisorption. In this case, the formation of maghemite catalyzed the attraction of hydrogen molecules and the CNP skeleton was the principal absorbent material for hydrogen storage. However, as the iron content exceeded 14 wt%, the formation of larger and poorly dispersed maghemite grains reduced the available surface areas of CNP for the storage of hydrogen molecules, leading to decreased uptake. Our study shows that hydrogen uptake capacities can be improved by appropriately adjusting the surface polarities of the CNP with well dispersed iron oxides crystals.

  8. Carbon Materials for Chemical Capacitive Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y.; Dou, Y.; Zhao, D.; Fulvio, P. F.; Mayes, R. T.; Dai, S.

    2011-09-26

    Carbon materials have attracted intense interests as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost. Activated carbons produced by different activation processes from various precursors are the most widely used electrodes. Recently, with the rapid growth of nanotechnology, nanostructured electrode materials, such as carbon nanotubes and template-synthesized porous carbons have been developed. Their unique electrical properties and well controlled pore sizes and structures facilitate fast ion and electron transportation. In order to further improve the power and energy densities of the capacitors, carbon-based composites combining electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC)-capacitance and pseudo-capacitance have been explored. They show not only enhanced capacitance, but as well good cyclability. In this review, recent progresses on carbon-based electrode materials are summarized, including activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, and template-synthesized porous carbons, in particular mesoporous carbons. Their advantages and disadvantages as electrochemical capacitors are discussed. At the end of this review, the future trends of electrochemical capacitors with high energy and power are proposed.

  9. Carbon materials for chemical capacitive energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yunpu; Zhao, Dongyuan [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers of the Chinese, Ministry of Education, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Dou, Yuqian [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Shenyang (China); Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-11-09

    Carbon materials have attracted intense interests as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost. Activated carbons produced by different activation processes from various precursors are the most widely used electrodes. Recently, with the rapid growth of nanotechnology, nanostructured electrode materials, such as carbon nanotubes and template-synthesized porous carbons have been developed. Their unique electrical properties and well controlled pore sizes and structures facilitate fast ion and electron transportation. In order to further improve the power and energy densities of the capacitors, carbon-based composites combining electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC)-capacitance and pseudo-capacitance have been explored. They show not only enhanced capacitance, but as well good cyclability. In this review, recent progresses on carbon-based electrode materials are summarized, including activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, and template-synthesized porous carbons, in particular mesoporous carbons. Their advantages and disadvantages as electrochemical capacitors are discussed. At the end of this review, the future trends of electrochemical capacitors with high energy and power are proposed. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Li修饰的C24团簇的储氢性能∗%Hydrogen storage prop erties of Li-decorated C24 clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁鹏堂; 陈宏善

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a potentially ideal substitution for fossil fuels in the future sustainable energy system because it is an abundant, clean and renewable energy carrier. A safe, efficient and economic storage method is the crucial prerequistite and the biggest challenge for the wide scale use of hydrogen. The nanomaterial is one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials because of its high surface to volume ratio, unique electronic structure and novel chemical and physical properties. It has been demonstrated that pristine nanostructures are not suitable for hydrogen storage, since they interact weakly with hydrogen molecule and their hydrogen storage density is very low. However, the hydrogen storage capacity of the nanostructures can be significantly enhanced through substitutional doping or decoration by metal atoms. Using density functional theory, we investigate the properties of hydrogen adsorption on Li-decorated C24clusters. Results show that the preferred binding site for Li atom is the pentagonal rings. The interaction of Li atoms with the clusters is stronger than that among Li atoms, thus hindering effectively aggregation of Li atoms on the surface of the cluster. The decorated Li atoms are positively charged due to electron transfer from Li to C atoms. When H2 molecules approach Li atoms, they are moderately polarized under the electric field, and adsorbed around the Li atoms in molecular form. Each Li atom in the Li-decorated C24 complexes can adsorb two to three H2 molecules. The H–H bond lengths of the adsorbed H2 molecules are slightly stretched. The average adsorption energies are in the range of 0.08 to 0.13 eV/H2, which are intermediate between physisorption and chemisorption. C24Li6 can hold up to 12 H2 molecules, corresponding to a hydrogen uptake density of 6.8 wt%. This value exceeds the 2020 hydrogen storage target of 5.5 wt%proposed by the U. S. Department of Energy.

  11. A Novel Sandwich-type Dinuclear Complex for High-capacity Hydrogen Storage%A Novel Sandwich-type Dinuclear Complex for High-capacity Hydrogen Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱海燕; 陈元振; 李赛; 曹秀贞; 柳永宁

    2012-01-01

    From density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we predicted that the sandwich-type dinuclear organometallic compounds Cpffi2 and Cp2Sc2 can adsorb up to eight hydrogen molecules respectively, corresponding to a high gravimetric storage capacity of 6.7% and 6.8% (w), respectively. These sandwich-type organometallocenes proposed in this work are favorable for reversible adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at ambient conditions.

  12. Improved synthesis and hydrogen storage of a microporous metal-organic framework material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shaojuan; Liu, Shaobing [Department of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang, Henan 471023 (China); Zhao, Qiang; Li, Jinping [Research Institute of Special Chemicals, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China)

    2009-05-15

    A microporous metal-organic framework MOF-5 [Zn{sub 4}O(BDC){sub 3}, BDC 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic] was synthesized with and without H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by improved methods based on the previous studies. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption, and their hydrogen storage capacities were measured. The synthesis experiments showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} favored the growth of high quality sample, large pore volume and high specific surface area. The measurements of hydrogen storage indicated that the sample with higher specific surface area and large pore volume showed better hydrogen storage behavior than other samples. It was suggested that specific surface area and pore volume influenced the capacity of hydrogen storage for MOF-5 material. (author)

  13. Synthesis and hydrogen-storage behavior of metal-organic framework MOF-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jinping; Zhao, Qiang; Long, Peipei; Dong, Jinxiang [Research Institute of Special Chemicals, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Cheng, Shaojuan [Department of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang, Henan 471023 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Metal-organic framework MOF-5 (Zn{sub 4}O(BDC){sub 3}), a microporous material with a high surface area and large pore volume, was synthesized by three approaches: direct mixing of triethylamine (TEA), slow diffusion of TEA, and solvothermal synthesis. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and nitrogen adsorption, and their hydrogen-storage capacities were measured. The different synthesis methods influenced the pore-structure parameters, morphologies and hydrogen-storage behavior of the obtained MOF-5. MOF-5 synthesized by the solvothermal approach showed a higher surface area and larger pore volume than the samples prepared by the other two approaches. Measurements of the hydrogen-storage behavior showed that the hydrogen-storage capacity was correlated with the specific surface area and pore volume of MOF-5. (author)

  14. Improved synthesis and hydrogen storage of a microporous metal-organic framework material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Shaojuan [Department of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang, Henan 471023 (China)], E-mail: shaojuanchengwork@hotmail.com; Liu Shaobing [Department of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang, Henan 471023 (China); Zhao Qiang; Li Jinping [Research Institute of Special Chemicals, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China)

    2009-05-15

    A microporous metal-organic framework MOF-5 [Zn{sub 4}O(BDC){sub 3}, BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic] was synthesized with and without H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by improved methods based on the previous studies. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption, and their hydrogen storage capacities were measured. The synthesis experiments showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} favored the growth of high quality sample, large pore volume and high specific surface area. The measurements of hydrogen storage indicated that the sample with higher specific surface area and large pore volume showed better hydrogen storage behavior than other samples. It was suggested that specific surface area and pore volume influenced the capacity of hydrogen storage for MOF-5 material.

  15. Modeling, Testing and Deploying a Multifunctional Radiation Shielding / Hydrogen Storage Unit Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  16. 纳米限域的储氢材料%Nanoconfined Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹勇进; 向翠丽; 邱树君; 褚海亮; 孙立贤; 徐芬

    2013-01-01

    As a clean and ideal energy source, hydrogen energy has received extensive attention in recent years. However, the technology for hydrogen storage is still the key technology restricting the application of hydrogen commercialization. Hydrogen storage materials are considered to be safe, efficient way for solid-state hydrogen storage. Therefore, the development of new high-capacity hydrogen storage materials and hydrogen storage technology is one of the hot topics nowadays. Nanoconfinement is to fill the materials in the nanopores. By using the interaction between the filled materials and nanopore, the reaction is promoted. In recent years, nanoconfinement has become an effective way to enhance the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydrogen storage materials. In this paper, the development of nanoconfined hydrogen storage materials has been reviewed. The preparation, hydrogen storage properties, reaction mechanism and existing problems for nanoconfined hydrogen storage materials are discussed. In addition, the future prospect of nanoconfined hydrogen storage materials is addressed.%氢能作为洁净、理想的二次能源,已受到世界各国的广泛关注.然而,氢的储存技术仍然是制约氢能商业化应用的关键技术.利用储氢材料进行储氢被认为是一种安全、高效的固态储氢方式.因此,开发新型高容量的储氢材料与储氢技术成为氢能领域研究的热点之一.纳米限域是将材料填充到纳米孔道里,利用材料和纳米孔道的相互作用促进反应的进行,为化学反应提供一个独特的微环境.近年来,纳米限域逐渐发展成为改善储氢材料热力学和动力学的新方法.本文综述了纳米限域的储氢材料的研究进展,从纳米限域的储氢材料制备、储氢性能、反应机理和存在的问题等方面进行讨论,并指出了纳米限域储氢材料的发展趋势.

  17. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-doped graphene: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desnavi, Sameerah, E-mail: sameerah-desnavi@zhcet.ac.in [Department of Electronic Engineering, ZHCET, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped grapheme has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 1.40 eV. Doping by Y makes the system metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 2.11 μ{sub B}. Y decorated graphene can adsorb up to four hydrogen molecules with an average binding energy of 0.415 eV. All the hydrogen atoms are physisorbed with an average desorption temperature of 530.44 K. The Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, which imply a wt% of 6.17, close to the DoE criterion for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system is potential hydrogen storage medium with 100% recycling capability.

  18. Nanostructured Boron Nitride: From Molecular Design to Hydrogen Storage Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Moussa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The spray-pyrolysis of borazine at 1400 °C under nitrogen generates boron nitride (BN nanoparticles (NPs. The as-prepared samples form elementary blocks containing slightly agglomerated NPs with sizes ranging from 55 to 120 nm, a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET-specific surface area of 34.6 m2 g−1 and a helium density of 1.95 g cm−3. They are relatively stable in air below 850 °C in which only oxidation of the NP surface proceeds, whereas under nitrogen, their lower size affects their high temperature thermal behavior in the temperature range of 1450–2000 °C. Nitrogen heat-treated nanostructures have been carefully analyzed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The high temperature treatment (2000 °C gives hollow-cored BN-NPs that are strongly facetted, and after ball-milling, hollow core-mesoporous shell NPs displaying a BET-specific surface area of 200.5 m2·g−1 and a total pore volume of 0.287 cm3·g−1 were produced. They have been used as host material to confine, then destabilize ammonia borane (AB, thus improving its dehydrogenation properties. The as-formed AB@BN nanocomposites liberated H2 at 40 °C, and H2 is pure in the temperature range 40–80 °C, leading to a safe and practical hydrogen storage composite material.

  19. Chemical storage of renewable electricity in hydrocarbon fuels via H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eilers, H.; Iglesias Gonzalez, M.; Schaub, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Institute I

    2012-07-01

    The increased generation of renewable electricity leads to an increasing demand for storage due to its fluctuating production. Electrical energy can be stored as chemical energy carriers e.g. in form of H{sub 2} that can be further processed to hydrocarbons. Storage in form of hydrocarbons is advantageous compared to H{sub 2} storage since (i) a higher volumetric energy density in the product can be achieved and (ii) the infrastructure for hydrocarbon distribution, storage and utilization already exists. The present contribution introduces the potential of H{sub 2} integration in upgrading/production processes to hydrocarbon fuels, based on stoichiometry and kind of carbon feedstock. Processes include petroleum refining, vegetable oil hydrogenation, production of synfuel from lignocellulosic biomass and substitute natural gas from H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}. In the case of fossil raw materials, yields per feedstock can be increased and fossil CO{sub 2} emissions decreased since fossil resources for H{sub 2} production can be avoided. In the case of biomass conversion to synfuels, product yields per biomass/hectare can be increased. If CO{sub 2} is hydrogenated to fuels, no gasification step is needed, however lower hydrocarbon product yields per H{sub 2} are achieved since CO{sub 2} has the highest oxygen content. (orig.)

  20. Advanced materials for solid state hydrogen storage: “Thermal engineering issues”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen has been widely recognized as the “Energy Carrier” of the future. Efficient, reliable, economical and safe storage and delivery of hydrogen form important aspects in achieving success of the “Hydrogen Economy”. Gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities become important when one considers portable and mobile applications of hydrogen. In the case of solid state hydrogen storage, the gas is reversibly embedded (by physisorption and/or chemisorption) in a solid matrix. A wide variety of materials such as intermetallics, physisorbents, complex hydrides/alanates, metal organic frameworks, etc. have been investigated as possible storage media. This paper discusses the feasibility of lithium– and sodium–aluminum hydrides with emphasis on their thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties. Drawbacks such as poor heat transfer characteristics and poor kinetics demand special attention to the thermal design of solid state storage devices. - Highlights: • Advanced materials suitable for solid state hydrogen storage are discussed. • Issues related to thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of hydriding materials are brought out. • Hydriding and dehydriding behavior including sorption kinetics of complex hydrides with emphasis on alanates are explained

  1. Underground hydrogen storage. Final report. [Salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers and depleted fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foh, S.; Novil, M.; Rockar, E.; Randolph, P.

    1979-12-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of storing hydrogen in underground storage reservoirs is evaluated. The past and present technology of storing gases, primarily natural gas is reviewed. Four types of reservoirs are examined: salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields. A technical investigation of hydrogen properties reveals that only hydrogen embrittlement places a limit on the underground storage by hydrogen. This constraint will limit reservoir pressures to 1200 psi or less. A model was developed to determine economic feasibility. After making reasonable assumptions that a utility might make in determining whether to proceed with a new storage operation, the model was tested and verified on natural gas storage. A parameteric analysis was made on some of the input parameters of the model to determine the sensitivity of the cost of service to them. Once the model was verified it was used to compute the cost of service of storing hydrogen in the four reservoir types. The costs of service for hydrogen storage ranged from 26 to 150% of the cost of the gas stored. The study concludes that it is now both safe and economic to store hydrogen in underground reservoirs.

  2. Synthesis and enhanced hydrogen desorption kinetics of magnesium hydride using hydriding chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Ho [Icheon Branch, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology (KICET), Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Goan [Korea Energy Materials Co.Ltd., 409, Daegu Technopark, 1-11, Hosan-Dong, Dalse-Gu 704-230 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yong-Mook, E-mail: dake@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Dongguk University-Seoul, 100715 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized pure MgH{sub 2} by a hydriding chemical vapor synthesis process in a hydrogen atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particle size HCVS-MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} desorbed hydrogen up to about 7.2 wt% and 7.1 wt%. - Abstract: This paper describes the hydriding chemical vapor synthesis (HCVS) of the hydrogen storage alloy MgH{sub 2} in a hydrogen atmosphere and the product's hydrogenation properties. Mg powder was used as a starting material to produce submicron MgH{sub 2} and uniformly heated to a temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C for Mg vaporization. The effects of deposited positions in HCVS reactor on the morphology and the composition of the obtained products were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. It is clearly seen that after the HCVS process, the particle size of synthesized MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale and these showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. The hydrogen desorption temperatures of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). It was found that after the HCVS process, the desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} decreased from 430 to 385 Degree-Sign C and, simultaneously, the smallest particle size and the highest specific surface area were obtained. These observations indicate that the minimum hydrogen desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} powder with needle-like form can be obtained, and that this temperature is dependent on the particle size and the specific surface area of the products. The thermogravimetric

  3. Hydrogen patent portfolios in the automotive industry - the search for promising storage methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, S.

    2010-01-01

    In the development of hydrogen vehicle technologies, the automotive industry adopts a portfolio approach; a multitude of technological options is developed for hydrogen storage and conversion. Patent portfolios of car manufacturers are used as indicators of the variation and selection dynamics of di

  4. Hydrogen storage on Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite for fuel application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomaterials are now emerging as an alternative to the conventional bulk materials due to their unprecedented physical and chemical properties. A material is said to be nano if the particle size is less than 100 nm in at least one dimension. From the great many advantages of nanomaterials one is the opportunity to control the microstructure (composition, structure, shape and size) at nano-meter level scale. The properties of nanomaterials change as a function of size of the particles. The smaller size allows large specific surface area which enables them excellent candidates for adsorption applications. This presentation highlights the synthesis of Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite and its application for hydrogen adsorption (storage), one of the burning topics of the present times. A dynamic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique was used for the synthesis of Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite. The material was achieved by reducing Ni+2 to Ni0 under the steady stream of hydride-modified aluminum alkoxides ((H2Al(OtBu)2). The CVD reactor has the advantage of dynamic vacuum removing the byproduct as soon as produced and thus hindering the contamination of the resulting Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite. The physical (analytical) characterization techniques revealed the formation of metallic nickel dispersed in alumina (Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) matrix. The material has sufficient porosity which is revealed by the scanning electron microscopic photographs. The material was tested for possible hydrogen storage using homemade Sievert's type apparatus and it was found that approximately 2.9 wt.% (w/w %) hydrogen can be stored upon the Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite. Although the amount of hydrogen stored is below of the required amount for onboard applications. However, the study will open new dimension in terms of hydrogen storage materials. (author)

  5. Economic analysis of large-scale hydrogen storage for renewable utility applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenung, Susan M.

    2011-08-01

    The work reported here supports the efforts of the Market Transformation element of the DOE Fuel Cell Technology Program. The portfolio includes hydrogen technologies, as well as fuel cell technologies. The objective of this work is to model the use of bulk hydrogen storage, integrated with intermittent renewable energy production of hydrogen via electrolysis, used to generate grid-quality electricity. In addition the work determines cost-effective scale and design characteristics and explores potential attractive business models.

  6. Hydrogen Storage Materials Based on Single-Layer Aluminum Nitride Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Sheng; YUAN Peng-Fei; LI Meng; SUN Qiang; JIA Yu

    2011-01-01

    Using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, we study the hydrogen storage properties of Li-doped single-layer aluminum nitride nanostructures (A1N). For the pristine A1N sheet, each Al atom adsorbs one H2 with an average binding energy of 0.14eV/H2. The hydrogen binding energies and storage capacities can be markedly increased by doping Li atoms onto the A1N sheet. The charge analysis shows that there are charges transferring from the Li atoms to the A1N sheet, thus the charged Li atoms can polarize hydrogen molecules and enhance the interaction between hydrogen molecules and the A1N sheet. In the fully loaded cases, the Li-doped A1N sheet can contain up to 8.25wt% of molecular hydrogen with an average binding energy of 0.20eV/H2.%Using the first-principles method based on density functional theory,we study the hydrogen storage properties of Li-doped single-layer aluminum nitride nanostructures (AlN).For the pristine AlN sheet,each Al atom adsorbs one H2 with an average binding energy of 0.14 eV/H2.The hydrogen binding energies and storage capacities can be markedly increased by doping Li atoms onto the AlN sheet.The charge analysis shows that there are charges transferring from the Li atoms to the AlN sheet,thus the charged Li atoms can polarize hydrogen molecules and enhance the interaction between hydrogen molecules and the AlN sheet.In the fully loaded cases,the Li-doped AlN sheet can contain up to 8.25wt% of molecular hydrogen with an average binding energy of 0.20eV/H2.Hydrogen has long been considered as a carbondioxide-free energy carrier of the future.[1-3] One of the primary barriers preventing the large-scale use of hydrogen is the lack of an economic,effective and safe hydrogen storage medium.To achieve eventual economic feasibility,the materials should store hydrogen with large gravimetric and volumetric densities and operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions.[4]To meet these criteria,hydrogen storage media should only

  7. Boron-nitrogen based hydrides and reactive composites for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Lars H.; Ley, Morten B.; Lee, Young-Su;

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen forms chemical compounds with most other elements and forms a variety of different chemical bonds. This fascinating chemistry of hydrogen has continuously provided new materials and composites with new prospects for rational design and the tailoring of properties. This review highlights...

  8. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  9. Magnesium-based materials for hydrogen storage: Recent advances and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO XiangDong; LU GaoQing

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen storage is a real challenge for realizing "hydrogen economy" that will solve the critical is-sues of humanity such as energy depletion,air pollution,greenhouse emission and climate change.Recently,tremendous efforts have been devoted to this internationally focused area.Magnesium (Mg) is among the most promising candidates for this purpose and attracts numerous research interests.This paper is aiming at reviewing recent literatures on approaches and progress,the necessity of fur-ther research,and future direction to the research of Mg for hydrogen storage.

  10. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ≥6 wt% and ≥50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the

  11. Hydrogen storage alloy electrode and its manufacturing method; Suiso kyuzo gokin denkyoku oyobi sono seizo hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, I.; Kuribayashi, Y.

    1996-04-02

    A metal-hydrogen alkaline battery with a negative electrode of a hydrogen storage alloy has a defect that the hydrogen storage alloy of the negative electrode is crushed after the repeated charge and discharge and drops out of the electrode so to induce a decrease of the capacity. This invention relates to an electrode with hydrogen storage alloy powder supported on the surface of a conductive carrier by a binder in which xanthane gum is used as a main component of the binder. Xanthane gum is a water-soluble polysaccharide manufactured by fermentation with Xanthomonas campestris. A xanthane gum solution has a high thixotropic character so that hydrogen storage alloy powder can be dispersed uniformly in an aqueous xanthane gum solution and the paste prepared by a dipping method can be applied on a current collector with little dangling at the application on the current collector and causes little shape change. The total amount of the binder should be in a range of 0.1 to 2.0 wt% of the hydrogen storage alloy. 1 fig.

  12. Thermodynamic Tuning of Mg-Based Hydrogen Storage Alloys: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mg-based hydrides are one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials because of their relatively high storage capacity, abundance, and low cost. However, slow kinetics and stable thermodynamics hinder their practical application. In contrast to the substantial progress in the enhancement of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics, thermodynamic tuning is still a great challenge for Mg-based alloys. At present, the main strategies to alter the thermodynamics of Mg/MgH2 are alloying, nanostructuring, and changing the reaction pathway. Using these approaches, thermodynamic tuning has been achieved to some extent, but it is still far from that required for practical application. In this article, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of these strategies. Based on the current progress, finding reversible systems with high hydrogen capacity and effectively tailored reaction enthalpy offers a promising route for tuning the thermodynamics of Mg-based hydrogen storage alloys.

  13. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  14. Competing expectations: the case of hydrogen storage technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lente, H. van; Bakker, S.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a wide range of hydrogen technologies is linked to the promise of hydrogen as a sustainable energy carrier and the beginning of the end of the fossil fuel era. These promising technologies, however, have to compete among each other in terms of visibility and credibility. The paper

  15. Hydrogen isotope storage behavior of Zr1-xTixCo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium storage properties similar to uranium make ZrCo as a suitable candidate material for storage, supply and recovery of hydrogen isotopes in various tritium facilities. Beside non-radioactive, nonpyrophoric at room temperature and higher storage capacity (H/f.u. up to 3, f.u. = ZrCo), it has been reported that upon repeated hydriding-dehydriding cycles, ZrCo undergoes dis-proportionation as per the reaction; ZrCo + H2 ↔ ZrH2 + ZrCo2. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of Ti content on the hydrogen storage behavior of Zr1-xTixCo alloys and the hydrogen isotope effect

  16. Analysis and Design of Cryogenic Pressure Vessels for Automotive Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Loza, Francisco Javier

    Cryogenic pressure vessels maximize hydrogen storage density by combining the high pressure (350-700 bar) typical of today's composite pressure vessels with the cryogenic temperature (as low as 25 K) typical of low pressure liquid hydrogen vessels. Cryogenic pressure vessels comprise a high-pressure inner vessel made of carbon fiber-coated metal (similar to those used for storage of compressed gas), a vacuum space filled with numerous sheets of highly reflective metalized plastic (for high performance thermal insulation), and a metallic outer jacket. High density of hydrogen storage is key to practical hydrogen-fueled transportation by enabling (1) long-range (500+ km) transportation with high capacity vessels that fit within available spaces in the vehicle, and (2) reduced cost per kilogram of hydrogen stored through reduced need for expensive structural material (carbon fiber composite) necessary to make the vessel. Low temperature of storage also leads to reduced expansion energy (by an order of magnitude or more vs. ambient temperature compressed gas storage), potentially providing important safety advantages. All this is accomplished while simultaneously avoiding fuel venting typical of cryogenic vessels for all practical use scenarios. This dissertation describes the work necessary for developing and demonstrating successive generations of cryogenic pressure vessels demonstrated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The work included (1) conceptual design, (2) detailed system design (3) structural analysis of cryogenic pressure vessels, (4) thermal analysis of heat transfer through cryogenic supports and vacuum multilayer insulation, and (5) experimental demonstration. Aside from succeeding in demonstrating a hydrogen storage approach that has established all the world records for hydrogen storage on vehicles (longest driving range, maximum hydrogen storage density, and maximum containment of cryogenic hydrogen without venting), the work also

  17. First-principles study of hydrogen storage in non-stoichiometric TiCx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The absorption of hydrogen in non-stoichiometric TiCx is thermally favorable. ► As many as four hydrogen atoms can be trapped by a carbon vacancy. ► The diffusion of hydrogen in TiCx is difficult, especially in TiCx with high x. - Abstract: In this work, the first principles calculation has been performed to study the hydrogen storage in non-stoichiometric TiCx. It is found that hydrogen absorption in stoichiometric TiC is energetically unfavorable, while it is favorable in non-stoichiometric TiCx. This indicates that the existence of carbon vacancies is essential for hydrogenation storage in TiCx. At the same time, multiple hydrogen occupancy of the vacancy has been confirmed and it is calculated that as many as four hydrogen atoms can be trapped by a carbon vacancy. These absorbed hydrogen atoms tend to uniformly distribute around the vacancy. However, it is also found that the diffusion of hydrogen atoms in TiCx is difficult, especially in TiCx with high x.

  18. A comparative analysis of the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitpas, G [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benard, P [Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (Canada); Klebanoff, L E [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Xiao, J [Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (Canada); Aceves, S M [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    While conventional low-pressure LH₂ dewars have existed for decades, advanced methods of cryogenic hydrogen storage have recently been developed. These advanced methods are cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage, which operate best in the temperature range 30–100 K. We present a comparative analysis of both approaches for cryogenic hydrogen storage, examining how pressure and/or sorbent materials are used to effectively increase onboard H₂ density and dormancy. We start by reviewing some basic aspects of LH₂ properties and conventional means of storing it. From there we describe the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods, and then explore the relationship between them, clarifying the materials science and physics of the two approaches in trying to solve the same hydrogen storage task (~5–8 kg H₂, typical of light duty vehicles). Assuming that the balance of plant and the available volume for the storage system in the vehicle are identical for both approaches, the comparison focuses on how the respective storage capacities, vessel weight and dormancy vary as a function of temperature, pressure and type of cryo-adsorption material (especially, powder MOF-5 and MIL-101). By performing a comparative analysis, we clarify the science of each approach individually, identify the regimes where the attributes of each can be maximized, elucidate the properties of these systems during refueling, and probe the possible benefits of a combined “hybrid” system with both cryo-adsorption and cryo-compression phenomena operating at the same time. In addition the relationships found between onboard H₂ capacity, pressure vessel and/or sorbent mass and dormancy as a function of rated pressure, type of sorbent material and fueling conditions are useful as general designing guidelines in future engineering efforts using these two hydrogen storage approaches.

  19. FUNDAMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIAL 2LIBH4 MGH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, C.; Anton, D.; Cortes-Concepcion, J.; Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2012-01-10

    While the storage of hydrogen for portable and stationary applications is regarded as critical in bringing PEM fuel cells to commercial acceptance, little is known of the environmental exposure risks posed in utilizing condensed phase chemical storage options as in complex hydrides. It is thus important to understand the effect of environmental exposure of metal hydrides in the case of accident scenarios. Simulated tests were performed following the United Nations standards to test for flammability and water reactivity in air for a destabilized lithium borohydride and magnesium hydride system in a 2 to 1 molar ratio respectively. It was determined that the mixture acted similarly to the parent, lithium borohydride, but at slower rate of reaction seen in magnesium hydride. To quantify environmental exposure kinetics, isothermal calorimetry was utilized to measure the enthalpy of reaction as a function of exposure time to dry and humid air, and liquid water. The reaction with liquid water was found to increase the heat flow significantly during exposure compared to exposure in dry or humid air environments. Calorimetric results showed the maximum normalized heat flow the fully charged material was 6 mW/mg under liquid phase hydrolysis; and 14 mW/mg for the fully discharged material also occurring under liquid phase hydrolysis conditions.

  20. Electric field improved hydrogen storage of Ca-decorated monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Nahong [College of Computer and Information Engineering, Henan University of Economics and Law, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Yusheng [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Gao, Haiyan; Jiang, Weifen; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Bin [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Sun, Qiang [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2015-04-17

    Hydrogen storage property of Ca-decorated MoS{sub 2} is carried out using first-principles calculations. Our calculations demonstrate that the preferential binding of Ca atoms on MoS{sub 2} effectively prevent the Ca clustering. Six H{sub 2} molecules per Ca atom can be adsorbed with a desirable adsorption energy of 0.14 eV/H{sub 2}. Both hybridization of the Ca-3d and S-2s with the H-1s orbital and the polarization of the H{sub 2} molecules contribute to the hydrogen adsorption. Our results show that the external electric field can effectively tune the hydrogen adsorption energy, therefore making hydrogen storage and release reversible. - Highlights: • Ca binds with MoS{sub 2} stalely without clustering. • It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions. • External electric field can effectively tune the hydrogen adsorption energy.

  1. Hydrogen storage properties of Mg[BH₄]₂

    OpenAIRE

    Matsunaga, Tomoya; Buchter, Florian; Mauron, Phillipe; Bielmann, Michael; Nakamori, Y.; Orimo, S; Ohba, N; Miwa, K; Towata, S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Among the large variety of possible complex hydrides only few exhibit a large gravimetric hydrogen density and stability around 40 kJ mol⁻¹H₂. Mg[BH₄]₂ is based on theoretical approaches a complex hydride with an equilibrium hydrogen pressure of approximately 1 bar at room temperature and a hydrogen content of 14.9 mass%. The reaction of Li[BH₄] with MgCl₂ at elevated temperatures was investigated as a possible route to synthesize Mg[BH₄]₂. Li[BH₄] reacts with MgCl₂ at a temperature >523 K at...

  2. Prototype reflectivity analyses of hydrogen storage levels in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nick E; Lambrakos, S G; Moore, P G; Ashraf Imam, M; Dulcey, C S

    2004-06-01

    A prototype case study is presented that examines the level of hydrogen content in H-SWNTs using the Surface Plasmon Resonance technique. The damping effect and the angular shift in the resonance minimum of an SWNT-gold interface due to the presence of hydrogen is analyzed using a parametric model, which is based on the concept of an effective permittivity. The new approach provides for a non-invasive analysis of the level of hydrogen content in H-SWNTs and is potentially extendable to other carbon-based hydrogen storage materials. PMID:15268050

  3. Design and building of a new experimental setup for testing hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2005-09-01

    For hydrogen to become the future energy carrier a suitable way of storing hydrogen is needed, especially if hydrogen is to be used in mobile applications such as cars. To test potential hydrogen storage materials with respect to capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics the Materials Research Department has a high pressure balance. However, the drawback of this equipment is, that in order to load samples, exposure towards air is inevitable. This has prompted the design and building of a new experimental setup with a detachable reactor allowing samples to be loaded under protective atmosphere. The purpose of this report is to serve as documentation of the new setup. (au)

  4. Possibilities of Production and Storage of Hydrogen in the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black Sea, a highly-isolated inland sea, is the largest anoxic zone in the world. Since the hydrogen sulphide zone was discovered in early 19. century in the Black Sea, it has been adopted that there is no life in the depths of the Black Sea and there are only bacteria live in the hydrogen sulphide layer. High content of organic matter, with maximum processes of bacterial sulfate reduction is the major source of this hydrogen sulphide zone. Hydrogen sulphide is one of the most poisonous gases in the world but it has great economic value to obtain hydrogen via dissociated into hydrogen and sulphur. Thus the Black Sea is not only has a serious environmental contamination but also has potential source of hydrogen energy, if a decomposition process can be developed. In this study, the sources of hydrogen sulphide, environmental impact of hydrogen sulphide in the Black Sea, the available techniques of hydrogen production from hydrogen sulphide and the possibilities of hydrogen storage by the natural sources in the Black Sea have been investigated. (authors)

  5. A Biomimetic Approach to New Adsorptive Hydrogen Storage Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hongcai J [Texas A& M University

    2015-08-12

    In the past decades, there has been an escalation of interest in the study of MOFs due to their fascinating structures and intriguing application potentials. Their exceptionally high surface areas, uniform yet tunable pore sizes, and well-defined adsorbate-MOF interaction sites make them suitable for hydrogen storage. Various strategies to increase the hydrogen capacity of MOFs, such as constructing pore sizes comparable to hydrogen molecules, increasing surface area and pore volume, utilizing catenation, and introducing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers (UMCs) have been widely explored to increase the hydrogen uptake of the MOFs. MOFs with hydrogen uptake approaching the DOE gravimetric storage goal under reasonable pressure but cryo- temperature (typically 77 K) were achieved. However, the weak interaction between hydrogen molecules and MOFs has been the major hurdle limiting the hydrogen uptake of MOFs at ambient temperature. Along the road, we have realized both high surface area and strong interaction between framework and hydrogen are equally essential for porous materials to be practically applicable in Hydrogen storage. Increasing the isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen through the introduction of active centers into the framework could have great potential on rendering the framework with strong interaction toward hydrogen. Approaches on increasing the surface areas and improving hydrogen affinity by optimizing size and structure of the pores and the alignment of active centers around the pores in frameworks have been pursued, for example: (a) the introduction of coordinatively UMC (represents a metal center missing multiple ligands) with potential capability of multiple dihydrogen-binding (Kubas type, non-dissociative) per UMC, (b) the design and synthesis of proton-rich MOFs in which a + H3 binds dihydrogen just like a metal ion does, and (c) the preparation of MOFs and PPNs with well aligned internal electric fields. We believe the

  6. Hydrogen based energy storage for solar energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.; Hagstroem, M.; Lund, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

    1998-10-01

    The main technical constraint in solar energy systems which operate around the year is the lack of suitable long-term energy storage. Conventional solutions to overcome the problem of seasonal storage in PV power systems are to use oversized batteries as a seasonal energy storage, or to use a diesel back-up generator. However, affordable lead-acid batteries are not very suitable for seasonal energy storage because of a high self-discharge rate and enhanced deterioration and divergence of the single cells during prolonged periods of low state of charge in times of low irradiation. These disadvantages can be avoided by a back-up system, e.g. a diesel generator, which car supply energy to the loads and charge the battery to the full state of charge to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. Unfortunately, diesel generators have several disadvantages, e.g. poor starting reliability, frequent need for maintenance and noise

  7. Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Pork Sausage during Refrigerated Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wilfred Ruban

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A study to compare the effectiveness of Tapioca Starch (TS and Potato Flour (PF for preparation of pork sausage with 50 per cent lean and 30 per cent low value meat (Head, Heart and Tongue in the ratio of 70:15:15 was carried out. Sausages were prepared with 5 per cent level of PF and 7 per cent of TS and were subjected to physico-chemical characteristics viz., pH, shear force, TBARS and TV to study the keeping quality at refrigerated storage (4±10C for 30 days. Inclusion of 30 per cent low value meat had not much effect compared to full meat sausages. The results revealed that during storage there was a highly significant (P<0.01 decrease in pH, hear force, and increase in TBARS and TV with the increase in storage days in both the treatments. Sausages prepared with 5 per cent PF and 7 per cent TS were acceptable upto 25 days of refrigerated storage (4±10C. Sausages with potato flour had lower values of TBARS and hence considered more acceptable compared to TS incorporated sausages. [Vet. World 2009; 2(3.000: 95-97

  8. 储氢技术综述及在氢储能中的应用展望%Overview of Hydrogen Storage Technologies and Their Application Prospects in Hydrogen-based Energy Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐丽; 马光; 盛鹏; 李瑞文; 刘志伟; 李平

    2016-01-01

    氢储能技术是解决大规模风电储存的一种新途径,高效储氢技术是氢储能系统得以应用的关键环节之一。综述储氢技术的国内外研究进展,对适于商业应用的高压气态储氢技术、低温液态储氢技术、金属氢化物储氢技术,以及低温高压、高压金属氢化物复合储氢技术展开比较和分析。通过对氢储能系统应用过程的分析,认为氢储能系统对储氢技术的要求,更侧重于安全性、成本和体积密度。综合考虑各种储氢方式在氢储能应用上的优缺点,认为金属氢化物储氢技术和高压金属氢化物储氢技术具有显著的优势。%Hydrogen storage technology is a new way to solve large-scale wind power storage, and high efficient hydrogen storage technology is one of the key links in the application of hydrogen energy storage system. This paper reviews its domestic and foreign research progresses of hydrogen storage technology. Comparative analysis of high pressure gaseous hydrogen storage technology, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage technology, metal hydride hydrogen storage technology, cryogenic high pressure and high-pressure metal hydride composite hydrogen storage technology for commercial application is carried out. According to the analysis of hydrogen energy storage system’s application process, it could be deemed that the requirements of hydrogen energy storage system for hydrogen storage technology are more focused on safety, cost and volume density. The advantages and disadvantages of various hydrogen storage ways in hydrogen energy storage applications are synthetically considered. It can draw the conclusion that metal hydride hydrogen storage technology and high-pressure metal hydride hydrogen storage technology have remarkable advantages.

  9. Hydrogen storage materials with focus on main group I-II elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2005-07-01

    A future hydrogen based society, viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier, is viewed by many as a solution to many of the energy related problems of the world {integral} the ultimate problem being the eventual depletion of fossil fuels. Although, for the hydrogen based society to become realizable, several technical difficulties must be dealt with. Especially, the transport sector relies on a cheap, safe and reliable way of storing hydrogen with high storage capacity, fast kinetics and favourable thermodynamics. No potential hydrogen storage candidate has been found yet, which meets all the criteria just summarized. The hydrogen storage solution showing the greatest potential in fulfilling the hydrogen storage criteria with respect to storage capacity, is solid state storage in light metal hydrides e.g. alkali metals and alkali earth metals. The remaining issues to be dealt with mainly concerns the kinetics of hydrogen uptake/release and the thermal stability of the formed hydride. In this thesis the hydrogen storage properties of some magnesium based hydrides and alkali metal tetrahydridoaluminates, a subclass of the so called complex hydrides, are explored in relation to hydrogen storage. After briefly reviewing the major energy related problems of the world, including some basic concepts of solid state hydrogen storage the dehydrogenation kinetics of various magnesium based hydrides are investigated. By means of time resolved in situ X-ray powder diffraction, quantitative phase analysis is performed for air exposed samples of magnesium, magnesium-copper, and magnesium-aluminum based hydrides. From kinetic analysis of the different samples it is generally found that the dehydrogenation kinetics of magnesium hydride is severely hampered by the presence of oxide impurities whereas alloying with both Cu and Al creates compounds significantly less sensitive towards contamination. This leads to a phenomenological explanation of the large

  10. From Fundamental Understanding To Predicting New Nanomaterials For High Capacity Hydrogen/Methane Storage and Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, Taner [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-03

    On-board hydrogen/methane storage in fuel cell-powered vehicles is a major component of the national need to achieve energy independence and protect the environment. The main obstacles in hydrogen storage are slow kinetics, poor reversibility and high dehydrogenation temperatures for the chemical hydrides; and very low desorption temperatures/energies for the physisorption materials (MOF’s, porous carbons). Similarly, the current methane storage technologies are mainly based on physisorption in porous materials but the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are below the target values. Finally, carbon capture, a critical component of the mitigation of CO2 emissions from industrial plants, also suffers from similar problems. The solid-absorbers such as MOFs are either not stable against real flue-gas conditions and/or do not have large enough CO2 capture capacity to be practical and cost effective. In this project, we addressed these challenges using a unique combination of computational, synthetic and experimental methods. The main scope of our research was to achieve fundamental understanding of the chemical and structural interactions governing the storage and release of hydrogen/methane and carbon capture in a wide spectrum of candidate materials. We studied the effect of scaffolding and doping of the candidate materials on their storage and dynamics properties. We reviewed current progress, challenges and prospect in closely related fields of hydrogen/methane storage and carbon capture.[1-5] For example, for physisorption based storage materials, we show that tap-densities or simply pressing MOFs into pellet forms reduce the uptake capacities by half and therefore packing MOFs is one of the most important challenges going forward. For room temperature hydrogen storage application of MOFs, we argue that MOFs are the most promising scaffold materials for Ammonia-Borane (AB) because of their unique interior active metal-centers for AB binding and well

  11. Hydrogen storage properties of carbon nanomaterials and carbon containing metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehlen, Jan Petter

    2003-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is structural investigations of carbon containing materials in respect to their hydrogen storage properties. This work was initially triggered by reports of extremely high hydrogen storage capacities of specific carbon nanostructures. It was decided to try to verify and understand the mechanisms in play in case of the existence of such high hydrogen densities in carbon. Two different routes towards the goal were employed; by studying selected hydrides with carbon as one of its constituents (mainly employing powder diffraction techniques in combination with hydrogen absorption and desorption measurements) and by carefully conducting hydrogen sorption experiments on what was believed to be the most ''promising'' carbon nanomaterial sample. In the latter case, a lot of effort was attributed to characterisations of different carbon nanomaterial containing samples with the aid of electron microscopy. Three different carbon-containing metal hydride systems, Y2C-H, YCoC-H and Y5SiC0.2-H, were examined. A relation between hydrogen occupation and the local arrangement of metal and carbon atoms surrounding the hydrogen sites was established. Several characteristic features of the compounds were noted in addition to solving the structure of the former unknown deuterideY5Si3C0.2D2.0 by the use of direct methods. Several carbon-nanomaterial containing samples were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction, thus gaining knowledge concerning the structural aspects of nanomaterials. Based on these investigations, a specific sample containing a large amount of open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes was chosen for subsequent hydrogen storage experiments. The latter experiments revealed moderate hydrogen storage capacities of the nanotubes not exceeding the values obtained for more conventional forms of carbon. These two different routes in investigating the hydrogen storage properties of carbon and

  12. Effects of alloying side B on Ti-based AB2 hydrogen storage alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王家淳; 于荣海; 刘庆

    2004-01-01

    Ti-based AB2-type hydrogen storage alloys are a group of promising materials, which will probably replace the prevalent rare earth-based AB5-type alloys and be adopted as the main cathode materials of nickelmetal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries in the near future. Alloying in side B is a major way to improve the performance of Ti-based AB2-type alloys. Based on recent studies, the effects of alloying elements in side B upon the performance of Ti-based AB2 -type hydrogen storage alloys are systematically reviewed here. These performances are divided into two categories, namely PCI characteristics, including hydrogen storage capacity (HSC), plateau pressure (PP), pressure hysteresis (PH) and pressure plateau sloping (PPS) , and electrochemical properties, including discharge capacity (DC), activation property (AP), cycling stability (CS) and high-rate dischargeability (HRD). Furthermore, the existing problems in these investigations and some suggestions for future research are proposed.

  13. Hydrogen storage properties of Na-Li-Mg-Al-H complex hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Xia [United Technologies Research Center, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States)], E-mail: tangx@utrc.utc.com; Opalka, Susanne M.; Laube, Bruce L. [United Technologies Research Center, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Wu Fengjung; Strickler, Jamie R. [Albemarle Corporation, Gulf States Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70805 (United States); Anton, Donald L. [Savannah River National Laboratory, 227 Gateway Dr., Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2007-10-31

    Lightweight complex hydrides have attracted attention for their high storage hydrogen capacity. NaAlH{sub 4} has been widely studied as a hydrogen storage material for its favorable reversible operating temperature and pressure range for automotive fuel cell applications. The increased understanding of NaAlH{sub 4} has led to an expanded search for high capacity materials in mixed alkali and akali/alkaline earth alanates. In this study, promising candidates in the Na-Li-Mg-Al-H system were evaluated using a combination of experimental chemistry, atomic modeling, and thermodynamic modeling. New materials were synthesized using solid state and solution based processing methods. Their hydrogen storage properties were measured experimentally, and the test results were compared with theoretical modeling assessments.

  14. Manufacturing Method of a hydrogen storage electrode. Suiso kyuzo denkyoku no seizo hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, T. (, Hyogo (Japan)); Ishikawa, H.; Miyamura, H.; Kuriyama, N. (, Osaka (Japan)); Takagi, J. (Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, Ltd., Aichi (Japan))

    1990-11-14

    This invention provides a manufacturing method of a hydrogen storage electrode with excellent high discharging ability. In other words, a surface of hydrogen storage alloy powder is porous coated consisting of copper or nickel which is made into a microcapsule; group of this capsule is mix/kneaded with a PTFE powder and the mass is filled in a porous metal or placing between a metal mesh and is then molded under heat and pressure. Amount of coating of copper or nickel is 5-30 weight% of the microcapsule. Amount of PTFE powder is 5-7 weight% of said mixture. Temperature is 300-340 {degrees}C and the pressure is 200-400 kg/cm {sup 2}. According to this invention, the rapid dischargeability of a large square cell consisting of a nickel-hydrogen storage alloy secondary cell is significantly improved. 2 figs.

  15. Hydrogen storage: storage as a gas or liquid. 1974-May, 1980 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1974-May 80. [144 abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography relates to storing hydrogen as a liquid or a gas. Topics include fuel storage, energy storage, and the construction of tanks used to store the material. Any type of storage that is related to batteries, fuel cells, or solar cells are excluded, unless the abstract states that its purpose is to store hydrogen. (This updated bibliography contains 144 abstracts, 18 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  16. Preparation and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Mg-Rich Mg-Ni Ultrafine Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Mg-rich Mg-Ni ultrafine powders were prepared through an arc plasma method. The phase components, microstructure, and hydrogen storage properties of the powders were carefully investigated. It is found that Mg2Ni and MgNi2 could be obtained directly from the vapor state reactions between Mg and Ni, depending on the local vapor content in the reaction chamber. A nanostructured MgH2 + Mg2NiH4 hydrogen storage composite could be generated after hydrogenation of the Mg-Ni ultrafine powders. After dehydrogenation, MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 decomposed into nanograined Mg and Mg2Ni, respectively. Thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC analyses showed that Mg2NiH4 phase may play a catalytic role in the dehydriding process of the hydrogenated Mg ultrafine particles.

  17. [Ca(BH4)2] n clusters as hydrogen storage material: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cuiling; Dong, Yanyun; Wang, Bingqiang; Zhang, Caiyun

    2016-10-01

    Calcium borohydride is widely studied as a hydrogen storage material. However, investigations on calcium borohydride from a cluster perspective are seldom found. The geometric structures and binding energies of [Ca(BH4)2] n ( n = 1-4) clusters are determined using density function theory (DFT). For the most stable structures, vibration frequency, natural bond orbital (NBO) are calculated and discussed. The charge transfer from (BH4) to Ca was observed. Meanwhile, we also study the LUMO-HOMO gap ( E g) and the B-H bond dissociation energies (BDEs). [Ca(BH4)2]3 owns higher E g, revealing that trimer is more stable than the other forms. Structures don't change during optimization after hydrogen radical removal, showing that calcium borohydride could possibly be used as a reversible hydrogen storage material. [Ca(BH4)2]4 has the smallest dissociation energy suggesting it releases hydrogen more easily than others.

  18. Fabrication of a three-electrode battery using hydrogen-storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Chi-Woo; Seo, Jung-Yong; Moon, Hyung-Seok; Park, Hyun-Young; Nam, Na-Yun; Cho, Sung Min; Yoo, Pil J.; Chung, Chan-Hwa

    2015-04-01

    In this study, an energy storage device using a three-electrode battery is fabricated. The charging process takes place during electrolysis of the alkaline electrolyte where hydrogen is stored at the palladium bifunctional electrode. Upon discharging, power is generated by operating the alkaline fuel cell using hydrogen which is accumulated in the palladium hydride bifunctional electrode during the charging process. The bifunctional palladium electrode is prepared by electrodeposition using a hydrogen bubble template followed by a galvanic displacement reaction of platinum in order to functionalize the electrode to work not only as a hydrogen storage material but also as an anode in a fuel cell. This bifunctional electrode has a sufficiently high surface area and the platinum catalyst populates at the surface of electrode to operate the fuel cell. The charging and discharging performance of the three-electrode battery are characterized. In addition, the cycle stability is investigated.

  19. Numerical analysis of accidental hydrogen releases from high pressure storage at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Melideo, Daniele; Baraldi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    . The vessel dynamics are modeled using a simplified engineering and a CFD model to evaluate the performance of various EOS to predict vessel pressures, temperatures mass flow rates and jet flame lengths. It is shown that the chosen EOS and the chosen specific heat capacity correlation are important to model......Evaluations of the performance of simplified engineering and CFD models are important to improve risk assessment tools e.g. to predict accurately releases from various types of hydrogen storages. These tools have to predict releases from a wide range of storage pressures (up to 80 MPa......) and temperatures (down to 20 K), e.g. cryogenic compressed gas storage covers pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures between 33 K and 338 K. Accurate calculations of high pressure releases require real gas EOS. This paper compares a number of EOS to predict hydrogen properties typical in different storage types...

  20. Uncertainties in risk assessment of hydrogen discharges from pressurized storage vessels at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Melideo, D.; Baraldi, D.

    2013-01-01

    20K) e.g. the cryogenic compressed gas storage covers pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures between 33K and 338 K. Accurate calculations of high pressure releases require real gas EOS. This paper compares a number of EOS to predict hydrogen properties typical in different storage types. The vessel......Evaluations of the uncertainties resulting from risk assessment tools to predict releases from the various hydrogen storage types are important to support risk informed safety management. The tools have to predict releases from a wide range of storage pressures (up to 80 MPa) and temperatures (at...... dynamics are modeled to evaluate the performance of various EOS to predict exit pressures and temperatures. The results are compared to experimental data and results from CFD calculations....

  1. Investigation of cryogenic hydrogen storage on high surface area activated carbon. Equilibrium and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, Ricardo Gaspar

    2008-11-29

    This thesis investigates cryo-adsorptive systems for hydrogen storage for mobile applications. By means of macroscopic and microscopic balance models, an extensive analysis is carried out, including among others the investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure system filling, venting losses during normal operation and inactivity, time-course of system pressure and temperature and gas delivery under various operating conditions. Model results were compared with experimental data, good agreement was obtained. The analysis also includes a comparison to other storage technologies such as cryo-compressed gas and liquefaction storage. The results show that cryo-adsorptive systems have storage characteristics comparable to compressed gas systems, but at a much lower pressure. They are also energetically more efficient than liquid hydrogen systems. However, the necessity of cryotemperatures and thermal management during operation and filling might limit their application. (orig.)

  2. Preparation of Isolated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艾飞; 刘吉平; 吕广庶; 刘华

    2006-01-01

    Isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes with high proportion of opening tips were synthesized by using alcohol as carbon source. The mechanism of cutting action of oxygen was proposed to explain its growth. Compared with carbon nanotubes synthesized with benzene as carbon source, their specific surface area was heightened by approximately 2.2 times (from 200.5 to 648 m2/g) and the hydrogen storage capacity was increased by approximately 6.5 times (from 0.95 to 7.17%, ω)which had exceeded DOE energy standard of vehicular hydrogen storage.

  3. Design of Zr-based AB2 type hydrogen storage alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文明芬; 王秋萍; 王兴海; 翟玉春; 陈廉

    2003-01-01

    The influences of the ratio of the radius of atom A(rA)to radius of atom B(rB),electronegativity and electron number were discussed on the Laves phase formation and the characteristics of Zr-based AB2 type hydrogen storage alloy.An enthalpy model of Zr-based AB2 alloy was obtained from known data and twelve Zr-based alloys were designed to test the model.The results show that the predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental values.The model can be used for predicting enthalpy values of Zr-based hydrogen storage alloys and settles a foundation for experiments.

  4. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, M. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  5. Theoretical prediction of hydrogen storage on Li decorated planar boron sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Li decorated boron sheets as hydrogen storage media. ► The gravimetric density of H2 is 9.22 wt%. ► The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is 0.35 eV/H2. ► It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions. - Abstract: First-principles calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to study the effect of Li decorated boron sheets (BST) on hydrogen storage. The results show that physisorption of H2 molecules on a pristine BST gives a binding energy of ∼0.10 eV/H2, which is too lower for hydrogen storage application. With Li atoms decorated on the both sides of each hexagonal ring, the average binding energy of H2 can reach ∼0.35 eV/H2, acceptable for reversible H2 adsorption/desorption near the room temperature. The maximal hydrogen storage capacity is 9.22 wt%. The enhanced binding energy of H2 molecules on the Li decorated BST can be attributed to the orbital hybridizations and polarization mechanisms.

  6. Theoretical prediction of hydrogen storage on Li decorated planar boron sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu Sheng, E-mail: wangyusheng@ncwu.edu.cn [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450001 (China); College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Wang, Fei; Li, Meng [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450001 (China); Xu, Bin [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Sun, Qiang [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450001 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450001 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li decorated boron sheets as hydrogen storage media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gravimetric density of H{sub 2} is 9.22 wt%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is 0.35 eV/H{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions. - Abstract: First-principles calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to study the effect of Li decorated boron sheets (BST) on hydrogen storage. The results show that physisorption of H{sub 2} molecules on a pristine BST gives a binding energy of {approx}0.10 eV/H{sub 2}, which is too lower for hydrogen storage application. With Li atoms decorated on the both sides of each hexagonal ring, the average binding energy of H{sub 2} can reach {approx}0.35 eV/H{sub 2}, acceptable for reversible H{sub 2} adsorption/desorption near the room temperature. The maximal hydrogen storage capacity is 9.22 wt%. The enhanced binding energy of H{sub 2} molecules on the Li decorated BST can be attributed to the orbital hybridizations and polarization mechanisms.

  7. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  8. Experimental design and simulation of a metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadre, Sarang Ajit

    Metal hydrides, as a hydrogen storage medium, have been under consideration for many years because they have the ability to store hydrogen reversibly in the solid state at relatively low pressures and ambient temperatures. The utility of metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage medium was demonstrated recently by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in an on-board hydrogen storage system for a hybrid electric bus project. The complex geometry and the intricate design of the SRTC bed presents quite a challenge to the development of a mathematical model that can be used for design and optimization. In a new approach introduced here, the reversible reaction kinetics and the empirical Van't Hoff relationship used in a typical reactor model are replaced by a solid phase diffusion equation and one of the two semi-empirical equilibrium P-C-T relationships based on modified virial and composite Langmuir isotherm expressions. Starting with the simplest mathematical formulation, which resulted in an analytical expression, various models were developed and successively improved by relaxing certain assumptions, eventually resulting in the most rigorous model yet developed for this system. All of these models were calibrated using experimental pressure and temperature histories obtained from a bench scale hydrogen storage test facility. The heat and mass transfer coefficients or the thermal conductivity were the only adjustable parameters in these models. A design of experiments approach was also used for studying the effect of various factors on the performance of this bench scale hydrogen storage unit. Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that even a fairly simple numerical model could do a reasonable job in predicting the discharge behavior of a fairly complicated, metal hydride hydrogen storage bed over a wide range of operating conditions. The more rigorous 2-D model gave considerable insight into the dynamics of the hydrogen discharge process from an

  9. Hydrogen storage materials : a first-principles study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, Süleyman

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable provision of energy is one of the greatest challenges to mankind. Energy generated from sustainable sources has to be transported and stored in an efficient and ecologically friendly way. Hydrogen is an important energy carrier in current sustainable energy scenarios. Such scenarios ar

  10. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  11. Charge Modulation in Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Switchable Approach to High-Capacity Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-11-01

    Electrical charging of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C4 N3 and g-C3 N4 ) is proposed as a strategy for high-capacity and electrocatalytically switchable hydrogen storage. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of H2 molecules on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets is dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At full hydrogen coverage, the negatively charged graphitic carbon nitride achieves storage capacities up to 6-7 wt %. In contrast to other hydrogen storage approaches, the storage/release occurs spontaneously once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charging voltage. Therefore, this approach promises both facile reversibility and tunable kinetics without the need of specific catalysts. Importantly, g-C4 N3 has good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility, which can be a very good candidate for electron injection/release. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of high-capacity hydrogen storage materials.

  12. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Metal Hydride/Carbon Aerogel Composites for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two materials currently of interest for onboard lightweight hydrogen storage applications are sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH4, a complex metal hydride, and carbon aerogels (CAs, a light porous material connected by several spherical nanoparticles. The objectives of the present work have been to investigate the synthesis, characterization, and hydrogenation behavior of Pd-, Ti- or Fe-doped CAs, NaAlH4, and MgH2 nanocomposites. The diameters of Pd nanoparticles onto CA’s surface and BET surface area of CAs were 3–10 nm and 700–900 m2g−1, respectively. The H2 storage capacity of metal hydrides has been studied using high-pressure TGA microbalance and they were 4.0, 2.7, 2.1, and 1.2 wt% for MgH2-FeTi-CAs, MgH2-FeTi, CAs-Pd, and 8 mol% Ti-doped NaAlH4, respectively, at room temperature. Carbon aerogels with higher surface area and mesoporous structures facilitated hydrogen diffusion and adsorption, which accounted for its extraordinary hydrogen storage phenomenon. The hydrogen adsorption abilities of CAs notably increased after inclusion of metal hydrides by the “hydrogen spillover” mechanisms.

  14. Strategies for Hydrogen Storage in Nanoporous Metal-Organic Framework Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snurr, Randall

    2011-03-01

    Storing hydrogen by physisorption in porous materials is a challenging problem of great interest for future vehicle technology. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a new class of nanoporous materials that have demonstrated exciting potential for solving this problem. MOFs are synthesized by the self-assembly of metal nodes and connecting organic linker molecules to create stable, porous frameworks. The synthetic chemistry opens the possibility to create an almost unlimited number of MOFs and to tailor them for particular applications, such as hydrogen storage. The diversity of MOFs also creates an opportunity to learn more about the fundamentals of hydrogen adsorption in porous materials. We have used a combination of classical Monte Carlo simulations and quantum mechanical approaches to investigate fundamental questions about hydrogen storage in MOFs and to design new materials with improved storage capabilities. Relationships have been elucidated between hydrogen uptake and properties such as the MOF surface area, void volume, degree of catenation, enthalpy of adsorption, and cation content. Introduction of cations is a promising strategy to improve hydrogen uptake at room temperature, and different metal cations and different strategies for introducing them into MOFs have been screened computationally.

  15. A Combined Fuzzy-AHP and Fuzzy-GRA Methodology for Hydrogen Energy Storage Method Selection in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytac Yildiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to select the most appropriate Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES method for Turkey from among the alternatives of tank, metal hydride and chemical storage, which are determined based on expert opinions and literature review. Thus, we propose a Buckley extension based fuzzy Analytical Hierarchical Process (Fuzzy-AHP and linear normalization based fuzzy Grey Relational Analysis (Fuzzy-GRA combined Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM methodology. This combined approach can be applied to a complex decision process, which often makes sense with subjective data or vague information; and used to solve to solve HES selection problem with different defuzzification methods. The proposed approach is unique both in the HES literature and the MCDM literature.

  16. Hydrogen storage by boron-nitrogen heterocycles: a simple route for spent fuel regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patrick G; Zakharov, Lev N; Grant, Daniel J; Dixon, David A; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2010-03-17

    We describe a new hydrogen storage platform based on well-defined BN heterocyle materials. Specifically, we demonstrate that regeneration of the spent fuel back to the charged fuel can be accomplished using molecular H(2) and H(-)/H(+) sources. Crystallographic characterization of intermediates along the regeneration pathway confirms our structural assignments and reveals unique bonding changes associated with increasing hydrogen content on boron and nitrogen. Synthetic access to the fully charged BN cyclohexane fuels will now enable investigations of these materials in hydrogen desorption studies. PMID:20214402

  17. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs; Hidruros solidos como acumuladores de hidrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.; Sanchez, C.; Friedrichs, O.; Ares, J. R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2010-07-01

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH{sub 2} as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH{sub 2} are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  18. Hydrogen-Enhanced Lunar Oxygen Extraction and Storage Using Only Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, rodney; King, Darren

    2013-01-01

    The innovation consists of a thermodynamic system for extracting in situ oxygen vapor from lunar regolith using a solar photovoltaic power source in a reactor, a method for thermally insulating the reactor, a method for protecting the reactor internal components from oxidation by the extracted oxygen, a method for removing unwanted chemical species produced in the reactor from the oxygen vapor, a method for passively storing the oxygen, and a method for releasing high-purity oxygen from storage for lunar use. Lunar oxygen exists in various types of minerals, mostly silicates. The energy required to extract the oxygen from the minerals is 30 to 60 MJ/kg O. Using simple heating, the extraction rate depends on temperature. The minimum temperature is approximately 2,500 K, which is at the upper end of available oven temperatures. The oxygen is released from storage in a purified state, as needed, especially if for human consumption. This method extracts oxygen from regolith by treating the problem as a closed batch cycle system. The innovation works equally well in Earth or Lunar gravity fields, at low partial pressure of oxygen, and makes use of in situ regolith for system insulation. The innovation extracts oxygen from lunar regolith using a method similar to vacuum pyrolysis, but with hydrogen cover gas added stoichiometrically to react with the oxygen as it is produced by radiatively heating regolith to 2,500 K. The hydrogen flows over and through the heating element (HE), protecting it from released oxygen. The H2 O2 heat of reaction is regeneratively recovered to assist the heating process. Lunar regolith is loaded into a large-diameter, low-height pancake reactor powered by photovoltaic cells. The reactor lid contains a 2,500 K HE that radiates downward onto the regolith to heat it and extract oxygen, and is shielded above by a multi-layer tungsten radiation shield. Hydrogen cover gas percolates through the perforated tungsten shielding and HE, preventing

  19. Combined chemical looping for energy storage and conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvita, Vladimir V.; Poelman, Hilde; Marin, Guy B.

    2015-07-01

    Combined chemical looping was demonstrated as novel concept of energy storage in a laboratory scale test. The proposed technology is able to store and release energy from redox chemical looping reactions combined with calcium looping. This process uses Fe3O4 and CaO, two low cost and environmentally friendly materials, while CH4 + CO2 serve as feed. During the reduction of Fe3O4 by CH4, both formation of carbon and metallic iron occur. CO2 acts as mediation gas to facilitate the metal/metal oxide redox reaction and carbon gasification into CO. CaO, on the other hand, is used for storage of CO2. Upon temperature rise, CaCO3 releases CO2, which re-oxidizes the carbon deposits and reduced Fe, thus producing carbon monoxide. The amount of produced CO is higher than the theoretical amount for Fe3O4, because carbon deposits from CH4 equally contribute to the CO yield. After each redox cycle, the material is regenerated, so that it can be used repeatedly, providing a stable process.

  20. High Pressure Hydrogen Storage on Carbon Materials for Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Blackman, James Michael

    2005-01-01

    Recognising the difficulties encountered in measuring the adsorption of hydrogen at high pressure, a reliable volumetric differential pressure method of high accuracy and good repeatability has been developed for measurement up to ca 100 bar. The apparatus used has two identical limbs, a sample and a blank limb, between which a high accuracy differential pressure cell measures changes in pressure. By simultaneously expanding the two limbs and closely controlling the temperature of the entir...

  1. Hydrogen storage for wind parks: A real options evaluation for an optimal investment in more flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Economic analysis of investing in H2 storage for excess wind power production. • Use of real options analysis to account for uncertainty and managerial flexibility. • Hourly profits are simulated for profit-maximizing operation of the storage device. • Revenues by load factor increase, offering minute reserve, temporal arbitrage, H2 sale. • Power-to-power is unprofitable under current techno-political conditions in Germany. - Abstract: In this paper, we investigate the economic viability of hydrogen storage for excess electricity produced in wind power plants. For the analysis, we define two scenarios (50 MW system with and without re-electrification unit) and apply Monte Carlo simulation and real options analysis (ROA) to compute hourly profits under uncertainty regarding wind speed, spot market electricity prices, and call of minute reserve capacity. Hydrogen as a storage medium helps to either (1) increase capacity utilization of the wind park in case of grid disconnection; (2) to offer minute reserve; or (3) to exploit temporal price arbitrage at the electricity spot market; additionally, hydrogen can also be directly sold as a commodity. We find that power-to-power operation is highly uneconomical under current framework conditions in Germany, irrespective of potential energy efficiency gains. Interestingly, due to counterbalancing effects, offshore wind parks are found to have only a modest economic advantage compared to onshore ones. The power-to-fuel plant can be operated profitably (at hydrogen prices of more than 0.36 € m−3 and a 100% utilization of the electrolyzer) if hydrogen is directly marketed instead of used to store and re-generate electrical energy. The ROA recommends investment in a storage device without re-electrification unit beyond an expected project value that is about twice the investment cost of the storage device, a figure which is reduced markedly as conversion efficiency rises, assuming technical change to

  2. Hydrogen Car Cartridges: A New Strategy for Hydrogen Storage, Delivering and Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to introduce a sustainable model in the automotive field, guarantying the Kyoto agreements. The aim of the project is to develop an innovative hydrogen tank able to power an hydrogen fuel cell car with the same performance of liquid fuelled cars. Most of the system performance are expected to satisfy the Department of Energy (DOE) goals for 2015. The hydrogen releasing system is based on solid NaBH4 which is hydrolyzed with water or steam to obtain hydrogen. Sodium borate is obtained as by-product and it has to be recycled. Pure and humidified hydrogen, ready to be utilized in a fuel cell, is obtained by a simple and sure way. Hydrogen is produced only when it is requested and therefore there is never pressurized hydrogen or hydrogen overproduction The system works at atmospheric pressure avoiding the problems related to handling and storing pressurized gas. The car fuelling could be performed in area like the present service stations. The used cartridges can be removed and substituted by new cartridges. Contemporarily a water tank should be refilled. To improve the total energetic yield it was also proposed a NaBH4 regeneration process directly starting from the products of hydrolysis. (auth)

  3. Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-01-07

    On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include • Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (< 1.5 nm) are much more effective in storing hydrogen than larger ones, such that many materials with large total surface areas are sub-par performers. • Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

  4. Optimal generation scheduling for renewable microgrids using hydrogen storage systems

    OpenAIRE

    Petrollese, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the development of a tool for an optimal energy management strategy (EMS) of the generators and energy storage systems constituent microgrids, both grid-connected or isolated (stand-alone power system) powered by Renewable Energy Sources (RES). In particular, a novel control system is designed based on the resolution of the unit commitment problem. For each time step, the proposed control system compares the expected power produced by the renewabl...

  5. Analysis of Cost-Effective Off-Board Hydrogen Storage and Refueling Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ted Barnes; William Liss

    2008-11-14

    This report highlights design and component selection considerations for compressed gas hydrogen fueling stations operating at 5000 psig or 350 bar. The primary focus is on options for compression and storage – in terms of practical equipment options as well as various system configurations and how they influence delivery performance and station economics.

  6. Hybrid functional calculations of potential hydrogen storage material: Complex dimagnesium iron hydride

    KAUST Repository

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar

    2014-06-01

    By employing the state of art first principles approaches, comprehensive investigations of a very promising hydrogen storage material, Mg 2FeH6 hydride, is presented. To expose its hydrogen storage capabilities, detailed structural, elastic, electronic, optical and dielectric aspects have been deeply analysed. The electronic band structure calculations demonstrate that Mg2FeH6 is semiconducting material. The obtained results of the optical bandgap (4.19 eV) also indicate that it is a transparent material for ultraviolet light, thus demonstrating its potential for optoelectronics application. The calculated elastic properties reveal that Mg2FeH6 is highly stiff and stable hydride. Finally, the calculated hydrogen (H2) storage capacity (5.47 wt.%) within a reasonable formation energy of -78 kJ mol-1, at room temperature, can be easily achievable, thus making Mg2FeH6 as potential material for practical H2 storage applications. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  8. Metalized T graphene: A reversible hydrogen storage material at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zhong, Wei, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn; Du, You-Wei [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Chun-Sheng, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency and Micro-Nano Electronics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zeng, Zhi [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-09-21

    Lithium (Li)-decorated graphene is a promising hydrogen storage medium due to its high capacity. However, homogeneous mono-layer coating graphene with lithium atoms is metastable and the lithium atoms would cluster on the surface, resulting in the poor reversibility. Using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory, we demonstrated that lithium atoms can be homogeneously dispersed on T graphene due to a nonuniform charge distribution in T graphene and strong hybridizations between the C-2p and Li-2p orbitals. Thus, Li atoms are not likely to form clusters, indicating a good reversible hydrogen storage. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of hydrogen molecules (storage capacity of 7.7 wt. %) with an optimal adsorption energy of 0.19 eV/H₂. The adsorption/desorption of H₂ at ambient temperature and pressure is also discussed. Our results can serve as a guide in the design of new hydrogen storage materials based on non-hexagonal graphenes.

  9. Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (TIAX, LLC)

    2011-02-09

    The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

  10. Recommended volumetric capacity definitions and protocols for accurate, standardized and unambiguous metrics for hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parilla, Philip A.; Gross, Karl; Hurst, Katherine; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The ultimate goal of the hydrogen economy is the development of hydrogen storage systems that meet or exceed the US DOE's goals for onboard storage in hydrogen-powered vehicles. In order to develop new materials to meet these goals, it is extremely critical to accurately, uniformly and precisely measure materials' properties relevant to the specific goals. Without this assurance, such measurements are not reliable and, therefore, do not provide a benefit toward the work at hand. In particular, capacity measurements for hydrogen storage materials must be based on valid and accurate results to ensure proper identification of promising materials for further development. Volumetric capacity determinations are becoming increasingly important for identifying promising materials, yet there exists controversy on how such determinations are made and whether such determinations are valid due to differing methodologies to count the hydrogen content. These issues are discussed herein, and we show mathematically that capacity determinations can be made rigorously and unambiguously if the constituent volumes are well defined and measurable in practice. It is widely accepted that this occurs for excess capacity determinations and we show here that this can happen for the total capacity determination. Because the adsorption volume is undefined, the absolute capacity determination remains imprecise. Furthermore, we show that there is a direct relationship between determining the respective capacities and the calibration constants used for the manometric and gravimetric techniques. Several suggested volumetric capacity figure-of-merits are defined, discussed and reporting requirements recommended. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate these protocols and concepts.

  11. Catalyzed light hydride nanomaterials embedded in a micro-channels hydrogen storage container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehouche, Zahir; Peretti, Hernán A; Yoo, Yeong; Belkacemi, Khaled; Goyette, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Activated alloys synthesized by arc-melting were examined as catalysts for improving the hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured magnesium hydride, proposed as a reversible hydrogen storage material. The MgH(2)-catalyst absorbing materials were prepared by ball milling of pure MgH(2) with hydrided Zr(47)Ni(53), Zr(9)Ni(11), and other alloys investigated. The nanostructured MgH(2)-intermetallic systems were tested at 250 degrees C and catalyst addition of eutectoid Zr(47)Ni(53) resulted in the fastest desorption time and highest initial desorption rate. The catalyzed Mg-hydride with activated Zr(9)Ni(11) and Zr(7)Ni(10) phases showed fast desorption kinetics. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the composition of dispersed Zr(x)Ni(y)catalysts has a strong influence on the amount of accumulated hydrogen and desorption rate of Mg-nanocomposite. Part two covers advanced micro-channels hydrogen storage module design based on the results of semi-empirical computer simulations of heat and mass transfers in the container. The micro-channels reservoir concept offers many advantages over the conventional metal hydride hydrogen storage system. It is a micro-structured system that can pack a lot of power into a small space and dissipate effectively the heat of the sorption reactions. This review summarizes recent patents related to CNTS.

  12. Li and Na Co-decorated carbon nitride nanotubes as promising new hydrogen storage media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu Sheng [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450052 (China); College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450011 (China); Li, Meng; Wang, Fei; Sun, Qiang [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450052 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450052 (China)

    2012-01-09

    The capacity of Li and Na co-decorated carbon nitride nanotube (CNNT) for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory. The results show that with two H{sub 2} molecules attached to per Li and four H{sub 2} molecules per Na the Li and Na co-decorated CNNT gains a gravimetric density of H{sub 2} as high as 9.09 wt% via electrostatic interaction without the clustering of the deposited metal atoms (at T=0 K). The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is in the range of 0.09–0.22 eV/H{sub 2}, which is suitable for practical hydrogen storage at ambient temperatures. -- Highlights: ► Li and Na co-decorated carbon nitride nanotubes as hydrogen storage media. ► The gravimetric density of H{sub 2} is 9.09 wt%. ► The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is 0.09–0.22 eV/H{sub 2}. ► It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions.

  13. Li{sub 2}O clusters for high-capacity hydrogen storage: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yusheng [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China); Li, Xingfu [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Wang, Fei [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China); Xu, Bin; Zhang, Jing [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Sun, Qiang [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Li{sub 2}O clusters as hydrogen storage media. ► The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is 0.19–0.22 eV/H{sub 2}. ► It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions. - Abstract: First-principles calculations based on density functional theory were carried out to study the geometries, electronic structures, and hydrogen storage properties of (Li{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters. The results show that for a given n its ground-state structure usually has the maximum Li–O bond. Due to transferring of charges from Li to O, the Li–O bond is polar. The orbital hybridization and the polarization are two main reasons for the adsorption of H{sub 2}. The (Li{sub 2}O){sub n} (n = 1–6) clusters each can bind 12–24 hydrogen molecules with average adsorption energy of 0.19–0.22 eV/H{sub 2}, desirable for reversible hydrogen storage.

  14. Hydrogen storage in pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaojun; Gao, Yi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio density-functional theory study suggests that pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen with a mass density higher than 6.0 weight% and a volumetric density higher than 45 g/L. The boron substitution in carbon nanotube greatly enhances the binding energy of Li atom to the nanotube, and this binding energy (~ 2.7 eV) is greater than the cohesive energy of lithium metal (~1.7 eV), preventing lithium from aggregation (or segregation) at high lithium d...

  15. Recent progress on Kubas-type hydrogen-storage nanomaterials: from theories to experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, ChiHye; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2015-06-01

    Transition-metal (TM) atoms are known to form TM-H2 complexes, which are collectively called Kubas dihydrogen complexes. The TM-H2 complexes are formed through the hybridization of the TM d orbitals with the H2 σ and σ* orbitals. The adsorption energy of H2 molecules in the TM-H2 complexes is usually within the range of energy required for reversible H2 storage at room temperature and ambient pressure (-0.4 ~ -0.2 eV/H2). Thus, TM-H2 complexes have been investigated as potential Kubas-type hydrogen-storage materials. Recently, TM-decorated nanomaterials have attracted much attention because of their promising high capacity and reversibility as Kubas-type hydrogen-storage materials. The hydrogen storage capacity of TM-decorated nanomaterials is expected to be as large as ~9 wt%, which is suitable for certain vehicular applications. However, in the TM-decorated nanostructures, the TM atoms prefer to form clusters because of the large cohesive energy (approximately 4 eV), which leads to a significant reduction in the hydrogen-storage capacity. On the other hand, Ca atoms can form complexes with H2 molecules via Kubas-like interactions. Ca atoms attached to nanomaterials have been reported to be able to adsorb as many H2 molecules as TM atoms. Ca atoms tend to cluster less because of the small cohesive energy of bulk Ca (1.83 eV), which is much smaller than those of bulk TMs. These observations suggest thatKubas interactions can occur in d orbital-free elements, thereby making Ca a more suitable element for attracting H2 in hydrogen-storage materials. Recently, Kubas-type TM-based, hydrogen- stor ge materials were experimentally synthesized, and the Kubas-type interactions were measured to be stronger than the van der Waals interactions. In this review, the recent progress of Kubas-type hydrogen- storage materials will be discussed from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints.

  16. General Motors: Final Report for Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Mei [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Chakraborty, Amlan [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Hou, Peter [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Kaisare, Niklet [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Jorgensen, Scott [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Kumar, Sudarshan [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Li, Changpeng [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Ortmann, Jerome [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Raju, M. [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Vadivelu, S. Kumar [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    As part of the HSECoE team, the GM team built system models and detailed transport models for on-board hydrogen storage systems using metal hydrides and adsorbent materials. Detailed transport models have been developed for both the metal hydride and adsorbent systems with a focus on optimization of heat exchanger designs with the objective of minimizing the heat exchanger mass. We also performed work in collaboration with our partners on storage media structuring and enhancement studies for the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Since the hydrogen storage materials are generally characterized by low density and low thermal conductivity, we conducted experiments to form pellets and add thermal conductivity enhancers to the storage material, and to improve cycling stability and durability of the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Refueling of a MOF-5 pellet with cryogenic hydrogen was studied by developing a detailed two-dimensional axisymmetric COMSOL® model of the process. The effects of pellet permeability, thermal conductivity, and thermal conductivity enhancers were investigated. Our key area of focus has been on designing and building a cryo-adsorption vessel for validation of cryo-adsorption models. The 3-L cryogenic tank was used to study the fast fill and discharge dynamics of a cryo-adsorbent storage system, both experimentally and numerically.

  17. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

  18. Synthesis of Nanostructured Mg-Ni Alloy and Its Hydrogen Storage Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A. Niaz; I. Ahmad; Waheed S. Khan; S. Tajammul Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured Mg–Ni alloy with the particle size in the range of 40–50 nm was synthesized by the thermal decomposition of bipyridyl complexes of Mg and Ni metals at 773 K for 24 h under dry argon gas ambient. The as-prepared nano-alloy was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for compositional and structural analysis. The alloy exhibited superior hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior with 3.2 wt% absorption within 1 min at 573 K and about 3 wt% desorption within 5–10 min at 573 K. This favorable behavior of Mg–Ni compound for the hydrogen storage is due to the specific nanostructure of the material. The low activation energy values and favorable thermodynamics indicate that the prepared Mg–Ni alloy is an attracting material for hydrogen storage applications.

  19. Ternary Amides Containing Transition Metals for Hydrogen Storage: A Case Study with Alkali Metal Amidozincates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Richter, Theresia M M; Pistidda, Claudio; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Santoru, Antonio; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The alkali metal amidozincates Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2 and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time as hydrogen storage media. Compared with the LiNH2-2 LiH system, both Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2-12 LiH and K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH systems showed improved rehydrogenation performance, especially K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH, which can be fully hydrogenated within 30 s at approximately 230 °C. The absorption properties are stable upon cycling. This work shows that ternary amides containing transition metals have great potential as hydrogen storage materials.

  20. Enhanced dehydrogenation of hydrazine bisborane for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Leigang [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Tan, Yingbin; Tang, Ziwei; Xia, Guanglin; Yuan, Feng [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li, Qian, E-mail: shuliqian@shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Yu, Xuebin, E-mail: yuxuebin@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-02-14

    NiCl{sub 2} and CoCl{sub 2} were adopted to enhance the dehydrogenation of hydrazine bisborane (HBB), respectively, of which NiCl{sub 2} showed better performance. By adding 2.0 mol. % NiCl{sub 2}, the dehydrogenation property of HBB was significantly improved, for example, the impurity of NH{sub 3} during the dehydrogenation of HBB was totally suppressed with more than 13.0 wt. % of pure hydrogen evolved. By Kissinger method, the apparent activation energies of the first step for HBB and Ni-doped HBB were calculated to be 143.2 and 60.7 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. DSC result showed that the addition of NiCl{sub 2} did not change the enthalpy change of HBB dehydrogenation. Based on theoretical analysis and literature review, the improved dehydrogenation property of HBB was potentially ascribed to the solid state interaction of Ni{sup 2+} with the electronegative N in the NH{sub 2} group of HBB. - Highlights: • NiCl{sub 2} enhanced dehydrogenation of hydrazine bisborane (HBB) was reported. • By adding NiCl{sub 2}, the desorption rate and the hydrogen purity were improved. • A possible explanation was proposed to understand NiCl{sub 2} enhanced desorption of HBB.

  1. Thermal energy storage using thermo-chemical heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Understanding of the performance of thermo chemical heat pump. ► Tool for storing thermal energy. ► Parameters that affect the amount of thermal stored energy. ► Lithium chloride has better effect on storing thermal energy. - Abstract: A theoretical study was performed to investigate the potential of storing thermal energy using a heat pump which is a thermo-chemical storage system consisting of water as sorbet, and sodium chloride as the sorbent. The effect of different parameters namely; the amount of vaporized water from the evaporator, the system initial temperature and the type of salt on the increase in temperature of the salt was investigated and hence on the performance of the thermo chemical heat pump. It was found that the performance of the heat pump improves with the initial system temperature, with the amount of water vaporized and with the water remaining in the system. Finally it was also found that lithium chloride salt has higher effect on the performance of the heat pump that of sodium chloride.

  2. Using approximate dynamic programming for estimating the revenues of a hydrogen-based high-capacity storage device

    OpenAIRE

    François-Lavet, Vincent; Fonteneau, Raphaël; Ernst, Damien

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to estimate the maximum revenue that can be generated by a company that operates a high-capacity storage device to buy or sell electricity on the day-ahead electricity market. The methodology exploits the Dynamic Programming (DP) principle and is specified for hydrogen-based storage devices that use electrolysis to produce hydrogen and fuel cells to generate electricity from hydrogen. Experimental results are generated using historical data of energy prices o...

  3. Mechanism of activation of TiFe intermetallics for hydrogen storage by severe plastic deformation using high-pressure torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edalati, Kaveh; Matsuda, Junko; Arita, Makoto; Daio, Takeshi; Akiba, Etsuo; Horita, Zenji

    2013-09-01

    TiFe, a potential candidate for solid-state hydrogen storage, does not absorb hydrogen without a sophisticated activation process because of severe oxidation. This study shows that nanostructured TiFe becomes active by high-pressure torsion (HPT) and is not deactivated even after storage for several hundred days in the air. Surface segregation and formation of Fe-rich islands and cracks occur after HPT. The Fe-rich islands are suggested to act as catalysts for hydrogen dissociation and cracks and nanograin boundaries act as pathways to transport hydrogen through the oxide layer. Rapid atomic diffusion by HPT is responsible for enhanced surface segregation and hydrogen transportation.

  4. Hydrogen storage in Li-doped fullerene-intercalated hexagonal boron nitrogen layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Han; Zhang, Chuan-Yu; Ren, Juan; Tong, Kai-Yu

    2016-10-01

    New materials for hydrogen storage of Li-doped fullerene (C20, C28, C36, C50, C60, C70)-intercalated hexagonal boron nitrogen ( h-BN) frameworks were designed by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. First-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that the structures of the C n -BN ( n = 20, 28, 36, 50, 60, and 70) frameworks were stable at room temperature. The interlayer distance of the h-BN layers was expanded to 9.96-13.59 Å by the intercalated fullerenes. The hydrogen storage capacities of these three-dimensional (3D) frameworks were studied using grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. The GCMC results revealed that at 77 K and 100 bar (10 MPa), the C50-BN framework exhibited the highest gravimetric hydrogen uptake of 6.86 wt% and volumetric hydrogen uptake of 58.01 g/L. Thus, the hydrogen uptake of the Li-doped C n -intercalated h-BN frameworks was nearly double that of the non-doped framework at room temperature. Furthermore, the isosteric heats of adsorption were in the range of 10-21 kJ/mol, values that are suitable for adsorbing/desorbing the hydrogen molecules at room temperature. At 193 K (-80 °C) and 100 bar for the Li-doped C50-BN framework, the gravimetric and volumetric uptakes of H2 reached 3.72 wt% and 30.08 g/L, respectively.

  5. Potassium silanide (KSiH3): a reversible hydrogen storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotard, Jean-Noël; Tang, Wan Si; Raybaud, Pascal; Janot, Raphaël

    2011-10-24

    KSi silicide can absorb hydrogen to directly form the ternary KSiH(3) hydride. The full structure of α-KSiD(3), which has been solved by using neutron powder diffraction (NPD), shows an unusually short Si-D lengths of 1.47 Å. Through a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experimental methods, the thermodynamic and structural properties of the KSi/α-KSiH(3) system are determined. This system is able to store 4.3 wt% of hydrogen reversibly within a good P-T window; a 0.1 MPa hydrogen equilibrium pressure can be obtained at around 414 K. The DFT calculations and the measurements of hydrogen equilibrium pressures at different temperatures give similar values for the dehydrogenation enthalpy (≈23 kJ mol(-1) H(2)) and entropy (≈54 J K(-1) mol(-1) H(2)). Owing to its relatively high hydrogen storage capacity and its good thermodynamic values, this KSi/α-KSiH(3) system is a promising candidate for reversible hydrogen storage.

  6. Ti-decorated graphitic-C3N4 monolayer: A promising material for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weibin; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Fuchun; Yang, Woochul

    2016-11-01

    Ti-decorated graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) monolayer as a promising material system for high-capacity hydrogen storage is proposed through density functional theory calculations. The stability and hydrogen adsorption of Ti-decorated g-C3N4 is analyzed by computing the adsorption energy, the charge population, and electronic density of states. The most stable decoration site of Ti atom is the triangular N hole in g-C3N4 with an adsorption energy of -7.58 eV. The large diffusion energy barrier of the adsorbed Ti atom of ∼6.00 eV prohibits the cluster formation of Ti atoms. The electric field induced by electron redistribution of Ti-adsorbed porous g-C3N4 significantly enhanced hydrogen adsorption up to five H2 molecules at each Ti atom with an average adsorption energy of -0.30 eV/H2. The corresponding hydrogen capacity reaches up to 9.70 wt% at 0 K. In addition, the hydrogen capacity is predicted to be 6.30 wt% at 233 K and all adsorbed H2 are released at 393 K according to molecular dynamics simulation. Thus, the Ti-decorated g-C3N4 monolayer is suggested to be a promising material for hydrogen storage suggested by the DOE for commercial applications.

  7. Improved Mg-based alloys for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, K.; Ming, L.; Stetson, N.T.; Evans, J. [Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., Troy, MI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The overall objective of this on-going work is to develop low temperature alloys capable of reversibly storing at least 3 wt.% hydrogen, allowing greater than for 2 wt.% at the system level which is required by most applications. Surface modification of Mg can be used to improve its H-sorption kinetics. The authors show here that the same Mg-transition metal-based multi-component alloy when prepared by melt-spinning results in a more homogeneous materials with a higher plateau pressure as compared to preparing the material by mechanical grinding. They have also shown that mechanically alloyed Mg{sub 50}Al{sub 45}Zn{sub 5} results in a sample having a higher plateau pressure.

  8. Hydrogen storage in LiH: A first principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banger, Suman, E-mail: sumanphy28@gmail.com; Nayak, Vikas, E-mail: sumanphy28@gmail.com; Verma, U. P., E-mail: sumanphy28@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics, Jiwaji University, Gwalior-474011 (India)

    2014-04-24

    First principles calculations have been performed on the Lithium hydride (LiH) using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the framework of density functional theory. We have extended our calculations for LiH+2H and LiH+6H in NaCl structure. The structural stability of three compounds have been studied. It is found that LiH with 6 added Hydrogen atoms is most stable. The obtained results for LiH are in good agreement with reported experimental data. Electronic structures of three compounds are also studied. Out of three the energy band gap in LiH is ∼3.0 eV and LiH+2H and LiH+6H are metallic.

  9. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

    2010-03-03

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  10. High-density automotive hydrogen storage with cryogenic capable pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias; Ross, Timothy O.; Weisberg, Andrew H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-792, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Brunner, Tobias C.; Kircher, Oliver [BMW Group, Knorrstr. 147, 80788 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    LLNL is developing cryogenic capable pressure vessels with thermal endurance 5-10 times greater than conventional liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) tanks that can eliminate evaporative losses in routine usage of (L)H{sub 2} automobiles. In a joint effort BMW is working on a proof of concept for a first automotive cryo-compressed hydrogen storage system that can fulfill automotive requirements on system performance, life cycle, safety and cost. Cryogenic pressure vessels can be fueled with ambient temperature compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH{sub 2}), LH{sub 2} or cryogenic hydrogen at elevated supercritical pressure (cryo-compressed hydrogen, CcH{sub 2}). When filled with LH{sub 2} or CcH{sub 2}, these vessels contain 2-3 times more fuel than conventional ambient temperature compressed H{sub 2} vessels. LLNL has demonstrated fueling with LH{sub 2} onboard two vehicles. The generation 2 vessel, installed onboard an H{sub 2}-powered Toyota Prius and fueled with LH{sub 2} demonstrated the longest unrefueled driving distance and the longest cryogenic H{sub 2} hold time without evaporative losses. A third generation vessel will be installed, reducing weight and volume by minimizing insulation thickness while still providing acceptable thermal endurance. Based on its long experience with cryogenic hydrogen storage, BMW has developed its cryo-compressed hydrogen storage concept, which is now undergoing a thorough system and component validation to prove compliance with automotive requirements before it can be demonstrated in a BMW test vehicle. (author)

  11. Tool for optimal design and operation of hydrogen storage based autonomous energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberschachtsiek, B.; Lemken, D. [ZBT - Duisburg (Germany); Stark, M.; Krost, G. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Decentralized small scale electricity generation based on renewable energy sources usually necessitates decoupling of volatile power generation and consumption by means of energy storage. Hydrogen has proven as an eligible storage medium for mid- and long-term range, which - when indicated - can be reasonably complemented by accumulator short term storage. The selection of appropriate system components - sources, storage devices and the appertaining peripherals - is a demanding task which affords a high degree of freedom but, on the other hand, has to account for various operational dependencies and restrictions of system components, as well as for conduct of load and generation. An innovative tool facilitates the configuration and dimensioning of renewable energy based power supply systems with hydrogen storage paths, and allows for applying appropriate operation strategies. This tool accounts for the characteristics and performances of relevant power sources, loads, and types of energy storage, and also regards safety rules the energy system has to comply with. In particular, the tool is addressing small, detached and autonomous supply systems. (orig.)

  12. Pillared Graphene: A New 3-D Innovative Network Nanostructure Augments Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgios, Dimitrakakis K.; Emmanuel, Tylianakis; George, Froudakis E.

    2009-08-01

    Nowadays, people have turned into finding an alternative power source for everyday applications. One of the most promising energy fuels is hydrogen. It can be used as an energy carrier at small portable devices (e.g. laptops and/or cell phones) up to larger, like cars. Hydrogen is considered as the perfect fuel. It can be burnt in combustion engines and the only by-product is water. For hydrogen-powered vehicles a big liming factor is the gas tank and is the reason for not using widely hydrogen in automobile applications. According to United States' Department of Energy (D.O.E.) the target for reversible hydrogen storage in mobile applications is 6% wt. and 45 gr. H2/L and these should be met by 2010. After their synthesis Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) were considered as ideal candidates for hydrogen storage especially after some initially incorrect but invitingly results. As it was proven later, pristine carbon nanotubes cannot achieve D.O.E.'s targets in ambient conditions of pressure and temperature. Therefore, a way to increase their hydrogen storage capacity should be found. An attempt was done by doping CNTs with alkali metal atoms. Although the results were promising, even that increment was not enough. Consequently, new architectures were suggested as materials that could potentially enhance hydrogen storage. In this work a novel three dimensional (3-D) nanoporous carbon structure called Pillared Graphene (Figure 1) is proposed for augmented hydrogen storage in ambient conditions. Pillared Graphene consists of parallel graphene sheets and CNTs that act like pillars and support the graphene sheets. The entire structure (Figure 1) can be resembled like a building in its early stages of construction, where the floors are represented by graphene sheets and the pillars are the CNTs. As shown in Figure 1, CNTs do not penetrate the structure from top to bottom. Instead, they alternately go up and down, so that on the same plane do not exist two neighboring CNTs with the

  13. Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

    2014-05-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

  14. Enhanced hydrogen storage in graphene oxide-MWCNTs composite at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboutalebi, Seyed Hamed; Aminorroaya-Yamini, Sima; Nevirkovets, Ivan; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Liu, Hua Kun [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM), Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, NSW 2519 (Australia)

    2012-12-15

    High hydrogen capacity (up to 2.6 wt%) is reported for highly aligned structures of Graphene oxide-Multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite at room temperature. It is demonstrated that the scalable liquid crystal route can be employed as a new method to prepare unique 3-D framework of graphene oxide layers with proper interlayer spacing as building blocks for cost-effective high-capacity hydrogen storage media. The strong synergistic effect of the intercalation of MWCNTs as 1-D spacers within graphene oxide frameworks resulted in unrivalled high hydrogen capacity at ambient temperature. The mechanisms involved in the intercalation procedure are fully discussed. The main concept behind intercalating one-dimensional spacers in between giant GO sheets represents a versatile and highly scalable route to fabricate devices with superior hydrogen uptake. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Thermal Performance Comparison of Glass Microsphere and Perlite Insulation Systems for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; Fesmire, J. E.; Nagy, Z. F.; Sojourner, S. J.; Morris, D. L.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2008-03-01

    A technology demonstration test project was conducted by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide comparative thermal performance data for glass microspheres, referred to as bubbles, and perlite insulation for liquid hydrogen tank applications. Two identical 1/15th scale versions of the 3,200,000 liter spherical liquid hydrogen tanks at Launch Complex 39 at KSC were custom designed and built to serve as test articles for this test project. Evaporative (boil-off) calorimeter test protocols, including liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, were established to provide tank test conditions characteristic of the large storage tanks that support the Space Shuttle launch operations. This paper provides comparative thermal performance test results for bubbles and perlite for a wide range of conditions. Thermal performance as a function of cryogenic commodity (nitrogen and hydrogen), vacuum pressure, insulation fill level, tank liquid level, and thermal cycles will be presented.

  16. New nitrogen-containing materials for hydrogen storage and their characterization by high-pressure microbalance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbø, Andreas Peter

    or liquid form, technologies that are well developed and usable, but not energy efficient. Certain metals and alloys are able to contain hydrogen within practical pressure and temperature ranges very efficient volume-wise, but they are too heavy for use in cars. Recently, attention has turned to the so......-called complex hydrides, which contain hydrogen bound covalently often in very light materials involving elements such as lithium, sodium, nitrogen and aluminum. While these materials typically have high decomposition temperatures, the combination with other compounds helps to destabilize the material resulting...... in lowered effective dehydrogenation temperatures. From the discovery in 1996 by Borislav Bogdanović and his group that catalyzed sodium alanate, NaAlH4, can release hydrogen reversibly below 200 °C relatively fast, hydrogen storage in nitrogen-containing compounds beginning with lithium nitride, Li3N...

  17. Technology Development for Hydrogen Propellant Storage and Transfer at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Krenn, Angela; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a major user of liquid hydrogen. In particular, NASA's John F. Kennedy (KSC) Space Center has operated facilities for handling and storing very large quantities of liquid hydrogen (LH2) since the early 1960s. Safe operations pose unique challenges and as a result NASA has invested in technology development to improve operational efficiency and safety. This paper reviews recent innovations including methods of leak and fire detection and aspects of large storage tank health and integrity. We also discuss the use of liquid hydrogen in space and issues we are addressing to ensure safe and efficient operations should hydrogen be used as a propellant derived from in-situ volatiles.

  18. Energy Dense, Lighweight, Durable, Systems for Storage and Delivery of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacky Pruez; Samir Shoukry; Gergis William; Thomas Evans; Hermann Alcazar

    2008-12-31

    The work presented in this report summarizes the current state-of-the-art in on-board storage on compressed gaseous hydrogen as well as the development of analysis tools, methods, and theoretical data for devising high performance design configurations for hydrogen storage. The state-of-the-art in the area of compressed hydrogen storage reveals that the current configuration of the hydrogen storage tank is a seamless cylindrical part with two end domes. The tank is composed of an aluminum liner overwrapped with carbon fibers. Such a configuration was proved to sustain internal pressures up to 350 bars (5,000 psi). Finite-element stress analyses were performed on filament-wound hydrogen storage cylindrical tanks under the effect of internal pressure of 700 bars (10,000 psi). Tank deformations, stress fields, and intensities induced at the tank wall were examined. The results indicated that the aluminum liner can not sustain such a high pressure and initiate the tank failure. Thus, hydrogen tanks ought to be built entirely out of composite materials based on carbon fibers or other innovative composite materials. A spherical hydrogen storage tank was suggested within the scope of this project. A stress reduction was achieved by this change of the tank geometry, which allows for increasing the amount of the stored hydrogen and storage energy density. The finite element modeling of both cylindrical and spherical tank design configurations indicate that the formation of stress concentration zones in the vicinity of the valve inlet as well as the presence of high shear stresses in this area. Therefore, it is highly recommended to tailor the tank wall design to be thicker in this region and tapered to the required thickness in the rest of the tank shell. Innovative layout configurations of multiple tanks for enhanced conformability in limited space have been proposed and theoretically modeled using 3D finite element analysis. Optimum tailoring of fiber orientations and lay

  19. Neutron scattering studies of hydrogen in potassium-graphite intercalates: Towards tunable graphite intercalates for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-temperature neutron scattering studies on the ternary graphite intercalation compounds KC24(H2)x, x=1,1.5 show low-energy excitations analogous to those seen in CsC24(H2)x and RbC24(H2)x, attributable to the rotational mode of the H2 split due to the crystal field of the graphene sheets. As in the Cs and Rb-doped systems the hydrogen in KC24(H2)x also occupies two sites. But no preferential population of sites was observed, implying that both sites fill at lower H2 concentration than in the Cs and Rb systems. Increasing c-lattice spacing by doping with deuterated ammonia has the effect of hindering the H2 adsorption, underlining the importance of an optimised graphite-charging regime to maximise hydrogen storage capability in these systems

  20. Model for energy conversion in renewable energy system with hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kélouwani, S.; Agbossou, K.; Chahine, R.

    A dynamic model for a stand-alone renewable energy system with hydrogen storage (RESHS) is developed. In this system, surplus energy available from a photovoltaic array and a wind turbine generator is stored in the form of hydrogen, produced via an electrolyzer. When the energy production from the wind turbine and the photovoltaic array is not enough to meet the load demand, the stored hydrogen can then be converted by a fuel cell to produce electricity. In this system, batteries are used as energy buffers or for short time storage. To study the behavior of such a system, a complete model is developed by integrating individual sub-models of the fuel cell, the electrolyzer, the power conditioning units, the hydrogen storage system, and the batteries (used as an energy buffer). The sub-models are valid for transient and steady state analysis as a function of voltage, current, and temperature. A comparison between experimental measurements and simulation results is given. The model is useful for building effective algorithms for the management, control and optimization of stand-alone RESHSs.

  1. Size-dependent mechanical properties of Mg nanoparticles used for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qian, E-mail: qyuzju@gmail.com [Center of Electron Microscopy and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Qi, Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Mishra, Raja K. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan 48090 (United States); Zeng, Xiaoqin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-29

    Magnesium (Mg) hydride is a promising hydrogen storage material, yet its application has been limited by the slow hydrogen sorption kinetics. Recently, Mg nanoparticles have shown significant improvement of hydrogen storage properties in terms of dimensional stability upon cycling with the trend that the smaller the particle, the better the sorption kinetics. Since the volume change during sorption generates stress, leading to plastic deformation, the fundamentals of the mechanical deformation of the Mg particles are a significant issue. By using in situ transmission electron microscope compression tests and atomistic simulations on Mg nanoparticles, it was observed that deformation in the larger particles was dominated by the nucleation of 〈a〉-type dislocations from stress concentrations at the contact surface, while the smaller particles deformed more homogeneously with greater distribution of multiple types of dislocation sources. Importantly, this improvement of plastic deformation with decrease in size is orientation-independent. First-principles calculations suggest that this improved plasticity can be explained by the nearly-isotropic ideal shear strength for Mg, which becomes more important in smaller nanoparticles. As a result, the smaller Mg nanoparticles demonstrated better plastic stability to accommodate volume change upon hydrogen storage cycling.

  2. "Job-Sharing" Storage of Hydrogen in Ru/Li₂O Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lijun; Tang, Kun; Oh, Hyunchul; Manickam, Kandavel; Bräuniger, Thomas; Chandran, C Vinod; Menzel, Alexander; Hirscher, Michael; Samuelis, Dominik; Maier, Joachim

    2015-06-10

    A "job-sharing" hydrogen storage mechanism is proposed and experimentally investigated in Ru/Li2O nanocomposites in which H(+) is accommodated on the Li2O side, while H(-) or e(-) is stored on the side of Ru. Thermal desorption-mass spectroscopy results show that after loading with D2, Ru/Li2O exhibits an extra desorption peak, which is in contrast to Ru nanoparticles or ball-milled Li2O alone, indicating a synergistic hydrogen storage effect due to the presence of both phases. By varying the ratio of the two phases, it is shown that the effect increases monotonically with the area of the heterojunctions, indicating interface related hydrogen storage. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance results show that a weak LiO···D bond is formed after loading in Ru/Li2O nanocomposites with D2. The storage-pressure curve seems to favor H(+)/H(-) over H(+)/e(-) mechanism. PMID:25915434

  3. Reversible phase modulation and hydrogen storage in multivalent VO2 epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyojin; Choi, Minseok; Lim, Tae-Won; Kwon, Hyunah; Ihm, Kyuwook; Kim, Jong Kyu; Choi, Si-Young; Son, Junwoo

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen, the smallest and the lightest atomic element, is reversibly incorporated into interstitial sites in vanadium dioxide (VO2), a correlated oxide with a 3d1 electronic configuration, and induces electronic phase modulation. It is widely reported that low hydrogen concentrations stabilize the metallic phase, but the understanding of hydrogen in the high doping regime is limited. Here, we demonstrate that as many as two hydrogen atoms can be incorporated into each VO2 unit cell, and that hydrogen is reversibly absorbed into, and released from, VO2 without destroying its lattice framework. This hydrogenation process allows us to elucidate electronic phase modulation of vanadium oxyhydride, demonstrating two-step insulator (VO2)-metal (HxVO2)-insulator (HVO2) phase modulation during inter-integer d-band filling. Our finding suggests the possibility of reversible and dynamic control of topotactic phase modulation in VO2 and opens up the potential application in proton-based Mottronics and novel hydrogen storage.

  4. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  5. Hydrogen Storage Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course--Clean Energy: Hydrogen/Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Alla; Andrews, Lisa; Khot, Ameya; Rubin, Lea; Young, Jun; Allston, Thomas D.; Takacs, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    Global interest in both renewable energies and reduction in emission levels has placed increasing attention on hydrogen-based fuel cells that avoid harm to the environment by releasing only water as a byproduct. Therefore, there is a critical need for education and workforce development in clean energy technologies. A new undergraduate laboratory…

  6. Low-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Alloy and Its Application in Ni-MH Battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶明大; 陈云贵; 吴朝玲; 付春艳; 涂铭旌

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth compositions, La, Ce and Pr in Mm(NiCoMnAl)5 hydrogen storage alloy, were arranged by uniform design method. The discharge performances and kinetics parameters including capacity, exchange current density, symmetry factor and hydrogen diffusion coefficient of the alloy at -40 ℃, were tested in standard tri-electrode cell. And linear regression method was used to analyze the effect of rare earth compositions on the performances of hydrogen storage alloys. The results show that the capacities of the alloys are positively correlative to the square of Ce content at -40 ℃ and under both 0.4 and 0.2C rate. The kinetics parameters and hydrogen diffusion coefficient indicate that the low-temperature performances of the alloys are mainly controlled by hydrogen diffusion process, and the surface electrochemical reaction affects the low-temperature performances to a certain extent. The low-temperature discharge capacities of the battery were also tested. The results show excellent low-temperature performances.The battery delivers 69.6% of its room-temperature capacity at -40 ℃ and 0.2C rate, 77.7% at -40 ℃ and 0.4C rate, 59.1% at -45 ℃ and 0.2C rate.

  7. On-board hydrogen storage and production: An application of ammonia electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Bryan K.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    On-board hydrogen storage and production via ammonia electrolysis was evaluated to determine whether the process was feasible using galvanostatic studies between an ammonia electrolytic cell (AEC) and a breathable proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Hydrogen-dense liquid ammonia stored at ambient temperature and pressure is an excellent source for hydrogen storage. This hydrogen is released from ammonia through electrolysis, which theoretically consumes 95% less energy than water electrolysis; 1.55 Wh g -1 H 2 is required for ammonia electrolysis and 33 Wh g -1 H 2 for water electrolysis. An ammonia electrolytic cell (AEC), comprised of carbon fiber paper (CFP) electrodes supported by Ti foil and deposited with Pt-Ir, was designed and constructed for electrolyzing an alkaline ammonia solution. Hydrogen from the cathode compartment of the AEC was fed to a polymer exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In terms of electric energy, input to the AEC was less than the output from the PEMFC yielding net electrical energies as high as 9.7 ± 1.1 Wh g -1 H 2 while maintaining H 2 production equivalent to consumption.

  8. Calcium-decorated graphyne nanotubes as promising hydrogen storage media: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yusheng, E-mail: wangyusheng@ncwu.edu.cn [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Yuan Pengfei; Li Meng [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Jiang Weifen [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Sun Qiang [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Jia Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China)

    2013-01-15

    First principles calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to study the hydrogen storage properties of Ca-decorated graphyne nanotubes. The results show that Ca atoms can be adsorbed stably on the acetylenic ring of the graphyne nanotube (GNT) without Ca atom clustering. Both the polar interactions and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of H{sub 2} molecules. The average adsorption energy is in the range of 0.13-0.33 eV/H{sub 2} which is almost independent of the tube diameter. Each Ca atom can adsorb up to four H{sub 2} molecules due to the steric hindrance of the H{sub 2} molecules. With a hydrogen uptake of 7.44-8.96 wt%, the Ca-decorated GNT is an optimal choice for hydrogen recycling at near ambient conditions. - Graphical abstract: 2D contour of charge density of Ca decorated GNT2 and the side view of Ca decorated GNT2 with full loaded H{sub 2} molecules. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca decorated graphyne nanotubes as hydrogen storage media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gravimetric density of H{sub 2} is 7.44-8.96 wt%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is 0.13-0.33 eV/H{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions.

  9. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  10. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... rule (December 1, 1993, 58 FR 63500). Hydrogen sulfide was listed under the criteria of EPCRA section... EPCRA section 313(d)(2)(B) (see 59 FR 61432, 61433, 61440-61442). Hydrogen sulfide has also been... adding hydrogen sulfide to the EPCRA section 313 list of toxic chemicals (58 FR 63500) (effective...

  11. Energy modeling and analysis for optimal grid integration of large-scale variable renewables using hydrogen storage in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the extensive introduction of VRs (variable renewables) will play an essential role to resolve energy and environmental issues in Japan after the Fukushima nuclear accident, its large-scale integration would pose a technical challenge in the grid management; as one of technical countermeasures, hydrogen storage receives much attention, as well as rechargeable battery, for controlling the intermittency of VR power output. For properly planning renewable energy policies, energy system modeling is important to quantify and qualitatively understand its potential benefits and impacts. This paper analyzes the optimal grid integration of large-scale VRs using hydrogen storage in Japan by developing a high time-resolution optimal power generation mix model. Simulation results suggest that the installation of hydrogen storage is promoted by both its cost reduction and CO2 regulation policy. In addition, hydrogen storage turns out to be suitable for storing VR energy in a long period of time. Finally, through a sensitivity analysis of rechargeable battery cost, hydrogen storage is economically competitive with rechargeable battery; the cost of both technologies should be more elaborately recognized for formulating effective energy policies to integrate massive VRs into the country's power system in an economical manner. - Highlights: • Authors analyze hydrogen storage coupled with VRs (variable renewables). • Simulation analysis is done by developing an optimal power generation mix model. • Hydrogen storage installation is promoted by its cost decline and CO2 regulation. • Hydrogen storage is suitable for storing VR energy in a long period of time. • Hydrogen storage is economically competitive with rechargeable battery

  12. Wax: A benign hydrogen-storage material that rapidly releases H2-rich gases through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cortes, S.; Slocombe, D. R.; Xiao, T.; Aldawsari, A.; Yao, B.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Liberti, E.; Kirkland, A. I.; Alkinani, M. S.; Al-Megren, H. A.; Thomas, J. M.; Edwards, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, especially for application in hydrogen powered fuel-cell vehicles (HFCV’s). However, its widespread implementation in this role has been thwarted by the lack of a lightweight, safe, on-board hydrogen storage material. Here we show that benign, readily-available hydrocarbon wax is capable of rapidly releasing large amounts of hydrogen through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition. This discovery offers a new material and system for safe and efficient hydrogen storage and could facilitate its application in a HFCV. Importantly, hydrogen storage materials made of wax can be manufactured through completely sustainable processes utilizing biomass or other renewable feedstocks. PMID:27759014

  13. Effect of loading bimetallic mixture of Ni and Pd on hydrogen storage capacity of MCM-41

    OpenAIRE

    Dündar Tekkaya, Ezgi; Dundar Tekkaya, Ezgi; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2014-01-01

    MCM-41 was produced by microwave irradiation, which allows high yield, improved product purity, increased reaction rate and crystallization. As transition metals enhance the hydrogen uptake, Pd and Ni were loaded on MCM-41 to increase the hydrogen storage capacity of the structure. The surface area, pore size and adsorption capacity of MCM-41 were measured by N2 adsorption. It was observed that the material had large surface area around 938-1369 m2/g and roughly 2.39-3.09 nm pore size. The sa...

  14. Influence of surface contaminations on the hydrogen storage behaviour of metal hydride alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schülke, Mark; Paulus, Hubert; Lammers, Martin; Kiss, Gábor; Réti, Ferenc; Müller, Karl-Heinz

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides is a promising alternative to common storage methods. The surface of a metal hydride plays an important part in the absorption of hydrogen, since important partial reaction steps take place here. The development of surface contaminations and their influence on hydrogen absorption is examined by means of absorption experiments and surface analysis, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS) and secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), in this work. All investigations were carried out on a modern AB(2) metal hydride alloy, namely Ti(0.96)Zr(0.04)Mn(1.43)V(0.45)Fe(0.08). Surface analysis (SNMS, XPS) shows that long-term air storage (several months) leads to oxide layers about 15 nm thick, with complete oxidation of all main alloy components. By means of in situ oxygen exposure at room temperature and XPS analysis, it can be shown that an oxygen dose of about 100 Langmuirs produces an oxide layer comparable to that after air storage. Manganese enrichment (segregation) is also clearly observed and is theoretically described here. This oxide layer hinders hydrogen absorption, so an activation procedure is necessary in order to use the full capacity of the metal hydride. This procedure consists of heating (T = 120 degrees C) in vacuum and hydrogen flushing at pressures like p = 18 bar. During the activation process the alloy is pulverized to particles of approximately 20 microm through lattice stretches. It is shown that this pulverization of the metal hydride (creating clean surface) during hydrogen flushing is essential for complete activation of the material. Re-activation of powder contaminated by small doses of air (p approximately 0.1 bar) does not lead to full absorption capacity. In ultrahigh vacuum, hydrogen is only taken up by the alloy after sputtering of the surface (which is done in order to remove oxide layers from it), thus creating adsorption sites for the hydrogen. This

  15. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, RD; Krungleviciute, V; Clingerman, DJ; Mondloch, JE; Peng, Y; Wilmer, CE; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK; Mirkin, CA

    2013-09-10

    A Cu-carborane-based metal organic framework (MOF), NU-135, which contains a quasi-spherical para-carborane moiety, has been synthesized and characterized. NU-135 exhibits a pore volume of 1.02 cm(3)/g and a gravimetric BET surface area of ca. 2600 m(2)/g, and thus represents the first highly porous carborane-based MOF. As a consequence of the, unique geometry of the carborane unit, NU-135 has a very high volumetric BET surface area of ca. 1900 m(2)/cm(3). CH4, CO2, and H-2 adsorption isotherms were measured over a broad range of pressures and temperatures and are in good agreement with computational predictions. The methane storage capacity of NU-135 at 35 bar and 298 K is ca. 187 v(STP)/v. At 298 K, the pressure required to achieve a methane storage density comparable to that of a compressed natural gas (CNG) tank pressurized to 212 bar, which is a typical storage pressure, is only 65 bar. The methane working capacity (5-65 bar) is 170 v(STP)/v. The volumetric hydrogen storage capacity at 55 bar and 77 K is 49 g/L. These properties are comparable to those of current record holders in the area of methane and hydrogen storage. This initial example lays the groundwork for carborane-based materials with high surface areas.

  16. Best mix of primary energy resources by renewable energy and fossil fuel with CCS in view of security,stability and sustainability——A vision on hydrogen supply chain by organic chemical hydride method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junichi; SAKAGUCHI

    2010-01-01

    The best mix scenario by renewable energy and fossil fuel with or without CCS(Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage) would be a solution to compromise Greenhouse Gases emission issue caused by carbon dioxide(CO2),and depletion of crude oil and natural gas reserves.As fossil fuel with pre-combustion CCS means hydrogen manufacturing and also hydrogen can be produced via electrolysis with renewable energy,it is desirable to establish transportation and storage systems of hydrogen as a clean energy.In this paper a vision on Hydrogen Supply Chain by Organic Chemical Hydride(OCH) Method as well as comparison of CCS configuration are discussed.

  17. Solid-state structures and properties of scandium hydride; hydrogen storage and switchable mirrors application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodja, Khadidja; Bouhadda, Youcef; Seddik, Larbi; Benyelloul, Kamel

    2016-05-01

    First-principles calculation has been performed on the rare earth hydride ScH2 for hydrogen storage and switchable mirror applications, using the pseudo-potentials and plane waves based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The electronic and structural properties are studied within both local-density and generalized gradient approximations for exchange energy. The formation energy and the optical properties have been investigated and discussed. Our calculated results are generally in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  18. Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the...

  19. Catalytic hydrogenation reactors for the fine chemicals industries. Their design and operation.

    OpenAIRE

    Westerterp, K.R.; Molga, E.J.; Gelder, van, M.

    1997-01-01

    The design and operation of reactors for catalytic, hydrogenation in the fine chemical industries are discussed. The requirements for a good multiproduct catalytic hydrogenation unit as well as the choice of the reactor type are considered. Packed bed bubble column reactors operated without hydrogen recycle are recommended as the best choice to obtain a flexible reactor with good selectivities. The results of an experimental study of the catalytic hydrogenation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene in a mini...

  20. Effect of hydrogen storage alloy on combustion properties of ammonium perchlorate /glycidylazide polymer -based propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. P.; Dou, Y. M.; Chai, C. P.; Luo, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen storage alloys can serve as good potential fuels for propellant design, by improving the energy and combustion properties. The influence of hydrogen storage alloy (A30) on the combustion properties of ammonium perchlorate/glycidylazide polymer (AP/GAP)-based on propellant were studied. The results showed that A30 could increase the burning rate of propellants by 29.75% and 74.78%, compared with B30 and Al. The combustion model of AP/GAP-based propellant containing different fuel was built. Firstly, A30 reduced the high decomposition temperature and promote condensed phase reaction heat of AP. Secondly, A30 deduced the burning surface temperature. Thirdly, A30 might prove the explosive heat of propellant. Therefore, A30 could greatly improve combustion properties of AP/GAP-based propellant.

  1. Ab initio study of beryllium-decorated fullerenes for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonkyung; Huang, Bing; Duan, Wenhui; Ihm, Jisoon

    2010-04-01

    We have found that a beryllium (Be) atom on nanostructured materials with H2 molecules generates a Kubas-like dihydrogen complex [Lee, Huang, Duan, and Ihm, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 143120 (2010)]. Here, we investigate the feasibility of Be-decorated fullerenes for hydrogen storage using ab initio calculations. We find that the aggregation of Be atoms on pristine fullerenes is energetically preferred, resulting in the dissociation of the dihydrogen. In contrast, for boron (B)-doped fullerenes, Be atoms prefer to be individually attached to B sites of the fullerenes, and a maximum of one H2 molecule binds to each Be atom in a form of dihydrogen with a binding energy of ˜0.3 eV. Our results show that individual dispersed Be-decorated B-doped fullerenes can serve as a room-temperature hydrogen storage medium.

  2. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  3. Research and application of RE hydrogen storage materials (continued)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2. Characters of NiMH power battery and requirements on negative electrode hydrogen storage materials In contrast with ordinary small NiMH battery, NiMH power battery for autos works in the more harsh conditions. Hence, requirements on the comprehensive performances of NiMH power battery are strict. Main differences between NiMH power battery and ordinary NiMH battery include:

  4. Electrochemical impedance studies of AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepski, Pawel; Darowicki, Kazimierz; Andrearczyk, Karolina [Department of Electrochemistry Corrosion and Materials Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza Street, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Kopczyk, Maciej; Sierczynska, Agnieszka [Institute of Non-ferrous Metals, Department in Poznan, Central Laboratory of Batteries and Cells, 12 Forteczna Street, 61-362 Poznan (Poland)

    2010-05-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique was used to describe behavior of AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloy. Impedance investigations were performed during cyclic voltammetry measurement and charge/discharge cycles. The comprehensive interpretation of instantaneous impedance spectra obtained in potentiostatic mode allowed further to interpret impedance results in galvanostatic mode. Proposed methodology enabled to trace electrical parameters as a function of state of charge (SOC) and depth of discharge (DOD). (author)

  5. Closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission (chemical heat pipe). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakil, H.B.; Flock, J.W.

    1978-02-01

    The work documents the anlaysis of closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission, commonly referred to as the Chemical Heat Pipe (CHP). Among the various chemical reaction systems and sources investigated, the two best systems were determined to be the high temperature methane/steam reforming reaction (HTCHP) coupled to a Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) and the lower temperature, cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction (LTCHP) coupled to existing sources such as coal or light water reactors. Solar and other developing technologies can best be coupled to the LTCHP. The preliminary economic and technical analyses show that both systems could transport heat at an incremental cost of approximately $1.50/GJ/160 km (in excess of the primary heat cost of $2.50/GJ), at system efficiencies above 80%. Solar heat can be transported at an incremental cost of $3/GJ/160 km. The use of the mixed feed evaporator concept developed in this work contributes significantly to reducing the transportation cost and increasing the efficiency of the system. The LTCHP shows the most promise of the two systems if the technical feasibility of the cyclic closed loop chemical reaction system can be established. An experimental program for establishing this feasibility is recommended. Since the VHTR is several years away from commercial demonstration and the HTCHP chemical technology is well developed, future HTCHP programs should be aimed at VHTR and interface problems.

  6. Hydrogen storage performance of TiFe after processing by ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation of TiFe for hydrogen storage by severe plastic deformation (SPD) through ball milling technique and the effect of microstructure on this activation have been investigated. TiFe becomes activated after the ball milling and is not deactivated after exposure to air, similar to TiFe activated by high-pressure torsion (HPT). The hydrogenation capacity reaches 1.3–1.5 wt.% at 303 K for the first to third cycles and the hydrogen absorption plateau pressure decreases to ∼1 MPa for any hydrogenation cycles. Observation of the microstructure after ball milling shows that the average grain size and crystallite size are as small as ∼7 and ∼11 nm, respectively (smaller than that after HPT or rolling), but few dislocations are detected within the detection limit of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. This study shows clearly that there is a strong relation between the grain size of TiFe and its activation for hydrogen absorption: the activation is easier and the hydrogen pressure for activation is smaller, when the grain size is smaller

  7. Phase transition and hydrogen storage properties of Mg–Ga alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Daifeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ouyang, Liuzhang, E-mail: meouyang@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Wu, Cong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Wang, Hui; Liu, Jiangwen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Sun, Lixian [Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, Guilin 541004 (China); Zhu, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2015-09-05

    Highlights: • A fully reversible transformation in Mg–Ga–H system with reduced dehydrogenation enthalpy is realized. • The mechanism of phase transformation in the de/hydrogenation of Mg–Ga alloy is revealed. • The de/hydrogenation process of Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} compound is expressed as: Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} + H{sub 2} ↔ 2Mg{sub 2}Ga + MgH{sub 2}. - Abstract: Mg-based alloys are viewed as one of the most promising candidates for hydrogen storage; however, high desorption temperature and the sluggish kinetics of MgH{sub 2} hinder their practical application. Alloying and changing the reaction pathway are effective methods to solve these issues. As the solid solubility of Ga in Mg is 5 wt% at 573 K, the preparation of a Mg(Ga) solid solution at relatively high temperatures was designed in this paper. The phase transition and hydrogen storage properties of the MgH{sub 2} and Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} composite (hereafter referred to as Mg–Ga alloy) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pressure–composition-isotherm (PCI) measurements, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of Mg–Ga alloy is 5.7 wt% H{sub 2}. During the dehydrogenation process of Mg–Ga alloy, Mg{sub 2}Ga reacts with MgH{sub 2}, initially releasing H{sub 2} and forming Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2}; subsequently, MgH{sub 2} decomposes into Mg with further release of H{sub 2}. The phase transition mechanism of the Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} compound during the dehydrogenation process was also investigated by using in situ XRD analysis. In addition, the dehydrogenation enthalpy and entropy changes, and the apparent activation energy were also calculated.

  8. Current Status and Future Prospects of Research on Hydrogen Storage Materials%储氢材料的研究现状与发展趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明; 王圣平; 张运丰; 韩波; 吴金平; 程寒松

    2011-01-01

    氢能可提供稳定、高效、无污染的动力,在电动汽车等领域有广阔的应用前景.但是氢能技术面临氢的规模制备、储存和运输等主要挑战.其关键是能否开发具有足够容量的储氢材料,将氢在温和条件下可控释放.现有储氢方式主要有物理储存和吸附、金属氢化物、化学氢化物等.本文综述了上述主要储氢方式的研究现状,并评价了未来最可能用于氢能规模利用的储氢方式.未来的研究重点将集中于具有高可逆性、高容量、高效催化加氢、常温常压下储存与运输、温和条件下可控催化脱氢等特点的储氢材料.%Hydrogen is capable of providing highly stable, efficient and pollution-free power. Its potential application in onboard automotive industry and stationary power generation is promising. However, there are several challenging issues for contemporary hydrogen technologies, I.e., large-scale hydrogen production, hydrogen storage and delivery at near ambient conditions, etc. Hydrogen infrastructure and storage technologies play key roles in the incipient hydrogen economy. The existing storage technologies are physical storage, physical adsorption, hydrides of light metal alloys, complex chemical hydrides, etc.. The advantages and disadvantages of these technologies were briefly reviewed and the prospects of future research and development in this area were discussed. For hydrogen storage materials, future research efforts would focus on high reversibility, high capacity, efficient hydrogenation at a large scale, storage and delivery under near ambient conditions and controllable dehydrogenation under mild conditions.

  9. Combinatorial search for hydrogen storage alloys: Mg-Ni and Mg-Ni-Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelmez, Rabia; Cakmak, Guelhan; Oeztuerk, Tayfur [Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    A combinatorial study was carried out for hydrogen storage alloys involving processes similar to those normally used in their fabrication. The study utilized a single sample of combined elemental (or compound) powders which were milled and consolidated into a bulk form and subsequently deformed to heavy strains. The mixture was then subjected to a post annealing treatment, which brings about solid state reactions between the powders, yielding equilibrium phases in the respective alloy system. A sample, comprising the equilibrium phases, was then pulverized and screened for hydrogen storage compositions. X-ray diffraction was used as a screening tool, the sample having been examined both in the as processed and the hydrogenated state. The method was successfully applied to Mg-Ni and Mg-Ni-Ti yielding the well known Mg{sub 2}Ni as the storage composition. It is concluded that a partitioning of the alloy system into regions of similar solidus temperature would be required to encompass the full spectrum of equilibrium phases. (author)

  10. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissner, Alexander, E-mail: reissner@fotec.at [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pawelke, Roland H.; Hummel, Stefan; Cabelka, Dusan [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gerger, Joachim [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Farnes, Jarle, E-mail: Jarle.farnes@prototech.no [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Schautz, Max, E-mail: max.schautz@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands); Geneste, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.geneste@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H{sub 2}) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system.

  11. The performance of a grid-tied microgrid with hydrogen storage and a hydrogen fuel cell stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two microgrids with different structure are simulated. • Their performance are comprehensively evaluated and compared. • The one with DES and a FC stack has high environmental and quality indexes. - Abstract: In a heat-power system, the use of distributed energy generation and storage not only improves system’s efficiency and reliability but also reduce the emission. This paper is focused on the comprehensive performance evaluation of a grid-tied microgrid, which consists of a PV system, a hydrogen fuel cell stack, a PEM electrolyzer, and a hydrogen tank. Electricity and heat are generated in this system, to meet the local electric and heat demands. The surplus electricity can be stored as hydrogen, which is supplied to the fuel cell stack to generate heat and power as needed. The performance of the microgrid is comprehensively evaluated and is compared with another microgrid without a fuel cell stack. As a result, the emission and the service quality in the first system are higher than those in the second one. But they both have the same overall performance

  12. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  13. Analysis of hydrogen mobility in Nb-based alloy membranes in view of new description of hydrogen permeability based on hydrogen chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yukawa, H., E-mail: hiroshi@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Nambu, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-Cho, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oita National College of Technology, Maki, Oita 870-0152 (Japan); Murata, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The alloying effects on the mobility of hydrogen atom, B, in Nb have been investigated. • The analysis based on the new description of hydrogen permeation has been performed. • The mobility of hydrogen atom is expressed in a format of the Arrhenius equation. • The logarithm of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy decrease linearly by alloying. • Ru, W and Mo in Nb enhance the hydrogen diffusivity at low temperature below T{sub int}. - Abstract: Hydrogen permeability of Nb-based alloy membranes have been analyzed in view of the new description of hydrogen permeation based on hydrogen chemical potential in order to investigate the alloying effects on the mobility of hydrogen atom, B. There is a liner relationship between the normalized hydrogen flux, J⋅L, and the PCT factor, f{sub PCT}. The mobility of hydrogen atom is expressed in a format of the Arrhenius equation. Then, the alloying effects on the activation energy, E, and the pre-exponential factor, B{sub 0}, have been investigated. It is found that logarithm of the pre-exponential factor, ln B{sub 0}, is proportional to the activation energy, E. In other words, when one factor decreases by alloying, the other factor also decreases linearly. As a result, the addition of ruthenium, tungsten and molybdenum into niobium enhances the hydrogen diffusivity at low temperature below the intersection temperature, T{sub int}.

  14. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons; Etude du stockage d'hydrogene par adsorption dans des carbones nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langohr, D

    2004-10-15

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  15. Aluminum hydride as a hydrogen and energy storage material: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3) and its associated compounds make up a fascinating class of materials that have motivated considerable scientific and technological research over the past 50 years. Due primarily to its high energy density, AlH3 has become a promising hydrogen and energy storage material that has been used (or proposed for use) as a rocket fuel, explosive, reducing agent and as a hydrogen source for portable fuel cells. This review covers the past, present and future research on aluminum hydride and includes the latest research developments on the synthesis of α-AlH3 and the other polymorphs (e.g., microcrystallization reaction, batch and continuous methods), crystallographic structures, thermodynamics and kinetics (e.g., as a function of crystallite size, catalysts and surface coatings), high-pressure hydrogenation experiments and possible regeneration routes.

  16. Influence of Temperature on Electrochemical Performances of Rare Earth Based Hydrogen Storage Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In view of the higher temperature of large- size Ni/ MH battery in electric vehicle, the effect oftemperature on electrochemical performances of hydrogen storage alloy Ml ( NiCoMnTi )5 was investigated systematically.The results show that the electrochemical performances of alloy vary drastically with temperature changing.As temperature rises, the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases, the width of hydrogen desorption plateau decreases and the gradient increases, leading to a decline of capacity.When temperature rises from 20 ℃ to 80 ℃, dischargeability is improved markedly.Higher temperatures also bring about a significant decrease in the cycling stability and self- discharge property.X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the alloy has a single phase withCaCu5-type LaNi5 structure.

  17. Stabilization of Wind Energy Conversion System with Hydrogen Generator by Using EDLC Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Seiji; Takahashi, Rion; Murata, Toshiaki; Tamura, Junji; Sugimasa, Masatoshi; Komura, Akiyoshi; Futami, Motoo; Ichinose, Masaya; Ide, Kazumasa

    The spread of wind power generation is progressed hugely in recent years from a viewpoint of environmental problems including global warming. Though wind power is considered as a very prospective energy source, wind power fluctuation due to the random fluctuation of wind speed has still created some problems. Therefore, research has been performed how to smooth the wind power fluctuation. This paper proposes Energy Capacitor System (ECS) for the smoothing of wind power which consists of Electric Double-Layer Capacitor (EDLC) and power electronics devices and works as an electric power storage system. Moreover, hydrogen has received much attention in recent years from a viewpoint of exhaustion problem of fossil fuel. Therefore it is also proposed that a hydrogen generator is installed at the wind farm to generate hydrogen. In this paper, the effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by the simulation analyses using PSCAD/EMTDC.

  18. Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

  19. Preparation and hydrogen storage properties of an Li-Mg-N-H system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    An Li-Mg-N-H system has been synthesized from Mg(NH2)2 and LiH in the ratio 3:8 by a ball-milling process and its dehydrogenation/rehydrogenation properties at around 190℃ were investigated. XRD, FTIR and TG results showed that the system was composed of an LiH phase and an amorphous Mg(NH2)2 phase with a purity of 90%. A reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 4.7% was observed during the first cycle and more than 90% of the stored hydrogen was desorbed within 100 min for each cycle. However, only 4.2% and 2.9%, respectively, of hydrogen was observed during two subsequent dehydrogenation cycles. In situ GC results showed that no NH3 could be observed during the dehydrogenation process. On the basis of the SEM and XRD results, the loss in hydrogen storage capacity can be mainly attributed to agglomeration, oxidation and crystallization of the materials.

  20. Preparation and hydrogen storage properties of an Li-Mg-N-H system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Chao; YANG HuaBin

    2009-01-01

    An Li-Mg-N-H system has been synthesized from Mg(NH2)2 and LiH in the ratio 3:8 by a ball-milling process and its dehydrogenation/rehydrogenation properties at around 190℃ were investigated.XRD,FTIR and TG results showed that the system was composed of an LiH phase and an amorphous Mg(NH2)2 phase with a purity of 90%.A reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 4.7% was observed during the first cycle and more than 90% of the stored hydrogen was desorbed within 100 min for each cycle.However,only 4.2% and 2.9%,respectively,of hydrogen was observed during two subsequent dehydrogenation cycles.In situ GC results showed that no NH3 could be observed during the dehydrogenation process.On the basis of the SEM and XRD results,the loss in hydrogen storage capacity can be mainly attributed to agglomeration,oxidation and crystallization of the materials.

  1. Comparison of hydrogen storage properties of pure Mg and milled pure Mg

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Myoung Youp Song; Young Jun Kwak; Seong Ho Lee; Hye Ryoung Park

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen storage properties of pure Mg were studied at 593 K under 12 bar H2. In order to increase the hydriding and dehydriding rates, pure Mg was ground under hydrogen atmosphere (reactive mechanical grinding, RMG) and its hydrogen storage properties were subsequently investigated. Pure Mg absorbed hydrogen very slowly. At the number of cycles () of 1, pure Mg absorbed 0.05 wt% H for 5 min, 0.08 wt% H for 10 min and 0.29 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. Activation was completed at the fifth cycle. At = 6, pure Mg absorbed 1.76 wt% H for 5 min, 2.17 wt% H for 10 min and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min. The activation of pure Mg after RMG was completed at the sixth cycle. At = 7, pure Mg after RMG absorbed 2.57 wt% H for 5 min, 3.21 wt% H for 10 min and 4.15 wt% H for 60 min.

  2. Characterization of hydrogen storage materials and systems with photons and neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pranzas, P. Klaus; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Karimi, Fahim; Muenning, Martin; Metz, Oliver; Minella, Christian Bonatto; Schmitz, Heinz-Werner; Beckmann, Felix; Bormann, Ruediger; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (Germany). Centre for Materials and Coastal Research; Vainio, Ulla; Zajac, Dariusz; Welter, Edmund [HASYLAB/DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Jensen, Torben R. [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Cerenius, Yngve [MAX-lab, Lund University (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Complex hydrides are very promising candidates for future light-weight solid state hydrogen storage materials. The present work illustrates detailed characterization of such novel hydride materials on different size scales by the use of synchrotron radiation and neutrons. The comprehensive analysis of such data leads to a deep understanding of the ongoing processes and mechanisms. The reaction pathways during hydrogen desorption and absorption are identified by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Function and size of additive phases are estimated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The structure of the metal hydride matrix is characterized using (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering (SANS/USANS). The hydrogen distribution in tanks filled with metal hydride material is studied with neutron computerized tomography (NCT). The results obtained by the different analysis methods are summarized in a final structural model. The complementary information obtained by these different methods is essential for the understanding of the various sorption processes in light metal hydrides and hydrogen storage tanks. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  4. DFT study of hydrogen storage in Pd-decorated C60 fullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mahdy, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen storage reactions on Pd-doped C60 fullerene are investigated by using the state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations. The Pd atom prefers to bind at the bridge site between two hexagonal rings, and can bind up to four hydrogen molecules with average adsorption energies of 0.61, 0.45, 0.32, and 0.21 eV per hydrogen molecule. With no metal clustering, the system gravimetric capacities are expected to be as large as 5.8 wt%. While the desorption activation barriers of the complexes nH2 + Pd-C60 with n = 1 are outside the department of energy (DOE) domain (-0.2 to -0.6 eV), the desorption activation barriers of the complexes nH2 + Pd-C60 with n = 2-4 are inside this domain. While the interaction of 1H2 with Pd + C60 is irreversible at 459 K, the interaction of 2H2 with Pd + C60 is reversible at 529 K. The hydrogen storage of the irreversible 1H2 + Pd-C60 and reversible 2H2 + Pd-C60 interactions are characterised in terms of densities of states, infrared, Raman, and proton magnetic resonance spectra, electrophilicity, and statistical thermodynamic stability.

  5. Hysteresis in the context of hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang; Guhlke, Clemens; Huth, Robert

    2009-07-21

    The processes of reversible storage of hydrogen in a metal by loading and unloading and of charging and discharging of lithium-ion batteries have many things in common. The both processes are accompanied by a phase transition and loading and unloading run along different paths, so that hysteretic behavior is observed. For hydrogen storage we consider a fine powder of magnesium (Mg) particles and lithium storage is studied for iron phosphate (FePO{sub 4}) particles forming the cathode of a lithium-ion battery. The mathematical models describe phase transitions and hysteresis exclusively in a single particle and on that basis they can predict the observed hysteretic plots with almost horizontal plateaus. Interestingly the models predict that the coexistence of a 2-phase system in an individual particle disappears, if its size is below a critical value. However, measurements reveal that this is qualitatively not reflected by the mentioned hysteretic plots of loading and unloading. In other words: The behavior of a storage system consisting of many particles is qualitatively independent of the fact whether the individual particles itself develop a 2-phase system or if they remain in a single phase state. This apparent paradoxical observation is resolved in this article. It is shown that if each of the individual particles homogeneously distributes the supplied matter, nevertheless the many particle ensemble exhibits phase transition and hysteresis, because one of the two phases is realized in some part of the particles while the remaining part is in the other phase. (orig.)

  6. Study on Degradation and Recovery of AB5-Type Hydrogen Storage Alloy Used in Ni-MH Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王荣; 阎杰; 周震; 周作祥; 邓斌; 高学平

    2002-01-01

    The influences of deeply overdischarge on the negative electrode alloy of Ni/MH battery were studied. After overdischarge, La(OH)3 and Al(OH)3 are found to form in the negative electrode through XRD analysis. The hydrogen storage alloy powder from spent Ni/MH batteries was recovered by chemical and melting method according to degradation mechanism. The structure of recovered alloy was measured by XRD. The experimental results demonstrate that the alloy structure is CaCu5 type. The constant-current charge/discharge test was carried out to the original alloy and the recovered alloy. It is found that their discharge capacities are almost the same, but the discharge potential of the recovered alloy is higher than that of the original alloy. The results of cyclic lifetime test demonstrate that the capacity degradation of the recovered alloy is slower than that of the original one.

  7. Storage of Renewable Energy by Reduction of CO2 with Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas; Mauron, Philippe; Kato, Shunsuke; Callini, Elsa; Holzer, Marco; Huang, Jianmei

    2015-01-01

    The main difference between the past energy economy during the industrialization period which was mainly based on mining of fossil fuels, e.g. coal, oil and methane and the future energy economy based on renewable energy is the requirement for storage of the energy fluxes. Renewable energy, except biomass, appears in time- and location-dependent energy fluxes as heat or electricity upon conversion. Storage and transport of energy requires a high energy density and has to be realized in a closed materials cycle. The hydrogen cycle, i.e. production of hydrogen from water by renewable energy, storage and use of hydrogen in fuel cells, combustion engines or turbines, is a closed cycle. However, the hydrogen density in a storage system is limited to 20 mass% and 150 kg/m(3) which limits the energy density to about half of the energy density in fossil fuels. Introducing CO(2) into the cycle and storing hydrogen by the reduction of CO(2) to hydrocarbons allows renewable energy to be converted into synthetic fuels with the same energy density as fossil fuels. The resulting cycle is a closed cycle (CO(2) neutral) if CO(2) is extracted from the atmosphere. Today's technology allows CO(2) to be reduced either by the Sabatier reaction to methane, by the reversed water gas shift reaction to CO and further reduction of CO by the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to hydrocarbons or over methanol to gasoline. The overall process can only be realized on a very large scale, because the large number of by-products of FTS requires the use of a refinery. Therefore, a well-controlled reaction to a specific product is required for the efficient conversion of renewable energy (electricity) into an easy to store liquid hydrocarbon (fuel). In order to realize a closed hydrocarbon cycle the two major challenges are to extract CO(2) from the atmosphere close to the thermodynamic limit and to reduce CO(2) with hydrogen in a controlled reaction to a specific hydrocarbon. Nanomaterials with

  8. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  9. Hydrogen storage properties for Mg–Zn–Y quasicrystal and ternary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xuanli, E-mail: Xuanli.Luo@nottingham.ac.uk; Grant, David M., E-mail: David.Grant@nottingham.ac.uk; Walker, Gavin S., E-mail: Gavin.Walker@nottingham.ac.uk

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Quasicrystal (QC) and H-phase alloys were detected in the Zn–Mg–Y samples. • Hydrogen storage properties of Zn–Mg–Y samples were investigated. • Zn{sub 50}Mg{sub 42}Y{sub 8} showed a capacity of 0.9 wt.% and decomposition temperature of 445 °C. - Abstract: Three Zn–Mg–Y alloys with nominal compositions of Zn{sub 50}Mg{sub 42}Y{sub 8} and Zn{sub 60}Mg{sub 30}Y{sub 10} were prepared by induction melting or gas atomisation. XRD and SEM analysis shows samples ZMY-1 and ZMY-2 consisted of multiple phases including icosahedral quasicrystal (QC) i-phase, hexagonal H-phase and Mg{sub 7}Zn{sub 3}, whilst ZMY-3 contained QC only. The hydrogen storage properties of the Zn–Mg–Y quasicrystal and ternary alloys were investigated for the first time. The quasicrystal sample ZMY-3 hydrogenated at 300 °C had 0.3 wt.% capacity and the DSC decomposition peak temperature was 503 °C. Amongst the three samples, the highest hydrogen storage capacity (0.9 wt.%) and the lowest decomposition peak temperature (445 °C) was achieved by sample ZMY-1. The pressure–composition–isotherm (PCI) curve of ZMY-1 sample showed a flat plateau gave a plateau pressure of 3.5 bar at 300 °C, which indicates a lower dehydrogenation enthalpy than MgH{sub 2}.

  10. Mexican natural zeolite, material for their possible use in the hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a study is presented on the use of a Mexican natural zeolite as possible alternative to storage hydrogen. This zeolite material comes from the Sonora State (Mexico), to which is diminished the particle size by means of a mill treatment with a mechanical alloyed system during 5 hours. Later on, the zeolite in powder form was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It was also exposed to heating in a micro-reactor at 350 C and at the same time making empty during 2 hours, to eliminate humidity and possible gases that were caught in their structure. Soon after, it was diminished the temperature at 10 C and it was contacted with hydrogen of ultra high purity to a pressure of 10 bars during 10 minutes. The hydrogen analysis caught in the zeolite was realized through gas chromatography. The results by means of the chromatograms indicate that the zeolite adsorbed and liberate to hydrogen under conditions completely different to that reported in the literature, being understood that under our experimental conditions to low pressure and temperature, the hydrogen is adsorbed in this material type. (Author)

  11. Hydrogen storage properties of Zr1-xTixCo intermetallic compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhuo; LIU Xiaopeng; JIANG Lijun; WANG Shumao

    2006-01-01

    The intermetallic compound Zr1-xTixCo was prepared and its suitability for hydrogen storage was investigated.The alloys obtained by magnetic levitation melting with the composition of Zr1-xTixCo (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, at.%) show single cubic phase by X-ray diffraction.A single sloping plateau was observed on each isothermal, and pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) measurement results show that the equilibrium hydrogen desorption pressure of Zr1-xTixCo alloy increases with increasing Ti content.The desorption temperatures for supplying 100 kPa hydrogen are about 665, 642, 621 and 614 K for ZrCo, Zr0.9Ti0.1Co, Zr0.8Ti0.2Co and Zr0.7Ti0.3Co alloy, respectively.Repeated hydrogen absorption and desorption cycles do not generate separated ZrCo, TiCo and ZrH2 phases, indicating that alloys have good thermal and hydrogen stabilization.

  12. First Principles Based Simulation of Reaction-Induced Phase Transition in Hydrogen Storage and Other Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Qingfeng [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2014-08-31

    This major part of this proposal is simulating hydrogen interactions in the complex metal hydrides. Over the period of DOE BES support, key achievements include (i) Predicted TiAl3Hx as a precursor state for forming TiAl3 through analyzing the Ti-doped NaAlH4 and demonstrated its catalytic role for hydrogen release; (ii) Explored the possibility of forming similar complex structures with other 3d transition metals in NaAlH4 as well as the impact of such complex structures on hydrogen release/uptake; (iii) Demonstrated the role of TiAl3 in hydriding process; (iv) Predicted a new phase of NaAlH4 that links to Na3AlH6 using first-principles metadynamics; (v) Examined support effect on hydrogen release from supported/encapsulated NaAlH4; and (vi) Expanded research scope beyond hydrogen storage. The success of our research is documented by the peer-reviewed publications.

  13. Mechanism for formation of NaBH4 proposed as low-pressure process for storing hydrogen in borosilicate glass–sodium solid system: a hydrogen storage material

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aysel Kantürk Figen; Sabriye Pişkin

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism for the formation of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was investigated for its ability to store hydrogen in the borosilicate glass–sodium (BSG–Na) solid system under low hydrogen pressure. BSG, which was prepared by melting borax with silica, was used as the starting material in the BSG–Na system that would be prepared to store hydrogen. It was observed that the mechanism for storing hydrogen in the BSG–Na solid system consisted of six steps and when the BSG–Na system was heated under a pressure of 4 atm, which was created through the use of hydrogen atmosphere, the storage of hydrogen occurred at nearly 480°C for approximate duration of 200 min, with the excellent yield (97%). In addition, the hydrogen storage capacity of the NaBH4 sample was measured using the Au–PS structure, which was designed as a mini-hydrogen cell. It was determined that the minimum amount of NaBH4 to generate the maximum volume of hydrogen gas was 12 mg/ml at 270 mV.

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Graphene-Based Materials: Efforts Towards Enhanced Hydrogen Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The discovery in 2004 that graphene can be produced by micromechanical exfoliation brought forth a plethora of unique electronic, mechanical, thermal and optical properties of this first stable two dimensional (2-D) material ever isolated, which afforded the Nobel Prize to Andrei Geim and Konstantin Novoselov in 2010. One of the peculiarities of graphene is its extremely high specific surface area, which in combination with its low weight, robustness and chemical inertness places it among the...

  15. Sorbent Material Property Requirements for On-Board Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J-K; Hua, T. Q.

    2015-05-25

    Material properties required for on-board hydrogen storage in cryogenic sorbents for use with automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems are discussed. Models are formulated for physical, thermodynamic and transport properties, and for the dynamics of H-2 refueling and discharge from a sorbent bed. A conceptual storage configuration with in-bed heat exchanger tubes, a Type-3 containment vessel, vacuum insulation and requisite balance-of-plant components is developed to determine the peak excess sorption capacity and differential enthalpy of adsorption for 5.5 wt% system gravimetric capacity and 55% well-to-tank (WTT) efficiency. The analysis also determines the bulk density to which the material must be compacted for the storage system to reach 40 g.L-1 volumetric capacity. Thermal transport properties and heat transfer enhancement methods are analyzed to estimate the material thermal conductivity needed to achieve 1.5 kg.min(-1) H-2 refueling rate. Operating temperatures and pressures are determined for 55% WTT efficiency and 95% usable H-2. Needs for further improvements in material properties are analyzed that would allow reduction of storage pressure to 50 bar from 100 bar, elevation of storage temperature to 175-200 K from 150 K, and increase of WTT efficiency to 57.5% or higher.

  16. Optimization of a Brayton cryocooler for ZBO liquid hydrogen storage in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserranno, D.; Zagarola, M.; Li, X.; Mustafi, S.

    2014-11-01

    NASA is evaluating and developing technology for long-term storage of cryogenic propellant in space. A key technology is a cryogenic refrigerator which intercepts heat loads to the storage tank, resulting in a reduced- or zero-boil-off condition. Turbo-Brayton cryocoolers are particularly well suited for cryogen storage applications because the technology scales well to high capacities and low temperatures. In addition, the continuous-flow nature of the cycle allows direct cooling of the cryogen storage tank without mass and power penalties associated with a cryogenic heat transport system. To quantify the benefits and mature the cryocooler technology, Creare Inc. performed a design study and technology demonstration effort for NASA on a 20 W, 20 K cryocooler for liquid hydrogen storage. During the design study, we optimized these key components: three centrifugal compressors, a modular high-capacity plate-fin recuperator, and a single-stage turboalternator. The optimization of the compressors and turboalternator were supported by component testing. The optimized cryocooler has an overall flight mass of 88 kg and a specific power of 61 W/W. The coefficient of performance of the cryocooler is 23% of the Carnot cycle. This is significantly better performance than any 20 K space cryocooler existing or under development.

  17. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev;

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated...

  18. Optimization of super-capacitors and hydrogen storage performance using carbons with a controlled nano-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frackowiak, E.; Jurewicz, K.; Friebe, M. [Poznan University of Technology, ICTE, ul. Piotrowo 3 (Poland); Friebe, M.; Beguin, F. [Institut de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces (ICSI), CNRS, 68 - Mulhouse (France); Vix-Guterl, C. [Centre de Recherche sur la Matiere Divisee (CRMD), CNRS-Universite, 45 - Orleans (France)

    2004-07-01

    It is well accepted that the performance of carbons in super-capacitor electrodes or for hydrogen storage is highly controlled by their porous texture. There is an important ongoing research effort to optimize carbons for these applications, especially attempting to correlate the storage capacity with pore size [1-2]. Unfortunately, with activated carbons, it is impossible to match correctly the pores dimensions, and these materials are often characterized by a broad pore size distribution. nano-structured carbons prepared by a template technique using silica hosts such as MCM-48 and SBA-15 allow such drawbacks to be largely circumvented. The first step of the process is the infiltration of the carbon precursor (sucrose, pitch) in the pores of the host, followed by pyrolysis under neutral atmosphere. An alternative route is the chemical vapor decomposition of propylene. In a second step, the silica matrix is dissolved in HF in order to recover the nano-structured carbon. The carbons are characterized by an interconnected network of micropores and well-tailored meso-pores, the latter being the former walls of the silica host. In the case of the carbons prepared by impregnation with an aqueous sucrose solution, a well-developed ultra-micro-porosity is detected due to auto-activation by gas evolution during the carbonization process. The electrochemical characteristics of the various carbons have been correlated with their structural/micro-textural parameters, checking two applications, e.g. super-capacitor electrodes and electrochemical hydrogen storage. Two-electrode super-capacitors have been built both in aqueous (1 mol.L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 6 mol.L{sup -1} KOH) and organic (1 mol.L{sup -1} TEABF{sub 4} in acetonitrile) solutions. In both media, we have found a perfect linear relationship between capacitance and the ultra-micro-pores ({<=} 0.7 nm) volume measured by CO{sub 2} adsorption. Taking into account the respective size of ultra-micro-pores and

  19. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a ‘pen’ for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the ‘printed’ borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications. PMID:27484735

  20. Percolative metal-organic framework/carbon composites for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuqian; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Sun, Xiang; Shi, Shangzhao; Zhang, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhai, Yuchun

    2014-05-01

    Percolative Metal-organic framework/Carbon (MOFAC) composites are synthesized by IRMOF8 (isoreticular metal-organic frameworks) directly depositing on activated carbon via heterogeneous nucleation. Carbon content is calculated by TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis) tests. XRD (X-ray diffraction) and FESEM (Field emission-scanning electron microscope) are carried out to characterize the structures of the samples. BET surface areas and the pore size distribution are measured. The dielectric constant is measured with impedance analyzer and a specially designed sample holder. The dielectric constants of the MOFAC composites rise with increasing the carbon content, and the composites possess the insulator-conductor transition as the carbon content increases from 17.77 wt% to 22.2 wt%. The composites are further tested for hydrogen storage capability under assist of the PMN-PT (single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) generated electric field. With help from the PMN-PT, the hydrogen uptake capability is increased about 31.5% over the MOFAC3 (MOF-Carbon composite with 22.2 wt% of carbon) without PMN-PT, which is elucidated by the charge distribution mechanisms. The improved storage is due to a stronger electrostatic interaction between IRMOF8 and hydrogen molecule caused by field polarization. Meanwhile, rapid adsorption/desorption kinetics and total reversibility on the samples are observed in the present or absence of external electric field.

  1. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a 'pen' for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the 'printed' borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications. PMID:27484735

  2. Exploring several different routes to produce Mg- based nanomaterials for Hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, D. R.; Chanchetti, L. F.; Floriano, R.; Ishikawa, T. T.; Botta, W. J.

    2014-08-01

    Severe mechanical processing routes based on high-energy ball milling (HEBM) or severe plastic deformation (SPD) can be used to produce Mg nanomaterials for hydrogen storage applications. In the last few years, we have been exploring in our research group different SPD processing routes in Mg systems to achieve good activation (first hydrogenation) and fast H-absorption/desorption kinetics, combined with enhanced air resistance. In this paper, we compare SPD techniques applied to Mg with HEBM applied to MgH2. Both advanced - melt spinning (MS), high-pressure torsion (HPT) - and more conventional - cold rolling (CR), cold forging (CF)- techniques are evaluated as means of production of bulk samples with very refined microstructures and controlled textures. In the best SPD processing conditions, attractive H-absorption/desorption kinetic properties are obtained, which are comparable to the ones of MgH2 milled powders, even if the needed temperatures are higher - 350°C compared to 300°C.CR and CF stand out as the processes with higher potential for industrial application, considering the level of the attained hydrogen storage properties, its simplicity and low cost.

  3. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  4. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. PMID:26763714

  5. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles.

  6. Effect of Ni on Mg based hydrogen storage alloy Mg3Nd

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Yanqing; OUYANG Liuzhang; ZHU Min

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium-neodymium based alloys were prepared by induction melting in an alumina crucible under protection of pure argon atmosphere. XRD patterns show that the as-melted Mg-Nd and Mg3NdNi 0.1 diffraction peaks can be excellently indexed with D03 structure (BiF3 type, space group Fm3m ). The lattice constant of Mg3Nd phase is 0.7390 nm, which is determined by XRD analysis using Cohen's extrapolation method. The reversible hydrogen storage capacity reaches 1.95wt.% for Mg3Nd and 2.68wt.% for Mg3NdNi0.1 . The desorption of hydrogen takes place at 291 ℃ for Mg3Nd and at 250 ℃ for Mg3NdNi 0.1 . The alloys could absorb hydrogen at room temperature with rapid hydriding and dehydriding kinetics after only one cycle. The enthalpy (ΔH ) and entropy (ΔS ) of Mg3Nd-H dehydriding reaction were -68.2 kJ·mol-1 H2 and -0.121 kJ·(K·mol)-1 H2 determined by using van't Hoff plot according to the pressure-composition-isotherms (P-C-I) curve measured at different temperatures. Hydrogen absorption kinetic property of Mg3NdNi 0.1 alloy was also measured at room temperature.

  7. MgAl alloy synthesis, characterization and its use in hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Amelia Sampayo [Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM), Batalla 5 de Mayo s/n, esq. Fuerte de Loreto Col. Ejercito de Oriente, C.P. 09230, Del. Iztapalapa Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Iturbe-Garcia, Jose Luis; Lopez-Munoz, Beatriz Eugenia [Departamento de Quimica (Mexico); Jimenez, Alberto Sandoval [Departamento del Acelerador, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    The synthesis and characterization of intermetallic MgAl in two stoichiometric relations, Mg25Al and Mg50Al, and their possible use in hydrogen storage are presented. The intermetallic was prepared by thermal induction in an argon atmosphere. The obtained ingot was submitted to a thermal homogenization treatment at 573 K for 72 h. The particle size diminished with a high energy mill type spex, for which the milling time was 30 and 60 min. The material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Hydrogenation tests were carried out in a micro-reactor with varying pressure, temperature and reaction time. The material was analyzed with a thermogravimetric system before and after the hydrogenation process. The results indicate that the intermetallic phase range with the mill process did not change with the times used. Because of this, smaller particle sizes of less than a micron were obtained just as scanning electronic microscopy analyses demonstrated. X-ray diffraction showed that phase change does not exist in the intermetallic structure after one hour of milling time. The first results obtained by the thermogravimetric system of the hydrogen quantity absorbed in this material report 3% weight approximately under the experimental conditions of mainly pressure and temperature. (author)

  8. Influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on hydrogen storage properties of sodium alanates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhe; CHEN Lixin; XIAO Xuezhang; FAN Xiulin; LI Shouquan; WANG Qidong

    2013-01-01

    NaAlH4 complex hydrides doped with lanthanon hydrides were prepared by hydrogenation of the ball-milled NaH/Al+xmol.% RE-H composites (RE=La,Ce; x=2,4,6) using NaHl and A1 powder as raw materials.The influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on the hydriding and dehydriding behaviors of the as-synthesized composites were investigated.It was found that the composite doped with 2 mol.% La.H3.01 displayed the highest hydrogen absorption capacity of 4.78 wt.% and desorption capacity of 4.66wt.%,respectively.Moreover,the composite doped with 6 mol% CeH2.51 showed the best hydriding/dehydriding reaction kinetics.The proposed catalytic mechanism for reversible hydrogen storage properties of the composite was attributed to the presence of active LaH3.01 and CeH2.51 particles,which were scattering on the surface of NaH and A1 particles,acting as the catalytic active sites for hydrogen diffusion and playing an important catalytic role in the improved hydriding/dehydriding reaction.

  9. Solid NMR characterization of hydrogen solid storage matrices; Caracterisation par RMN du solide des matrices de stockage solide de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilette, M.A.; Charpentier, T.; Berthault, P. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, Lab. de Structure et Dynamique par Resonance Magnetique Lab. Claude Frejacques - CEA/CNRS URA 331, DSM/DRECAM/SCM, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and validate characterization tools by NMR imagery and spectroscopy of the structure of materials for hydrogen storage, and of their evolution during load/unload cycles. The two main topics of this work are in one hand the analysis of the local structure of the materials and the understanding of their eventual modifications, and in another hand, the in-situ analysis of the distribution and diffusion of hydrogen inside the storage material. (O.M.)

  10. The HERMES Polarized Hydrogen and Deuterium Gas Target in the HERA Electron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V V; Capitani, G P; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Ely, J; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Königsmann, K C; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V A; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Orlandi, G; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Yu I; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R G; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M D; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A V; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ybeles-Smit, G V; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zohrabyan, H G; Zupranski, P

    2004-01-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented.

  11. PHOTOCHARGEABLE BEHAVIOR OF HYDROGEN STORAGE ALLOY ELECTRODE MODIFIED WITH TiO_2 NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王改田; 涂江平; 张博; 张文魁; 吴建波; 黄辉

    2004-01-01

    Photochargeable behavior of hydrogen storage alloy electrode modified with TiO_2 nanoparticles(MH/TiO_2) was investigated by measuring its photocharge-discharge characteristics. The results showed the MH/TiO_2 electrode could store light energy photoelectrochemically when it was illuminated. The potential of the MH/TiO_2 electrode could be charged to 0.843 V.The discharge time of the MH/TiO_2 electrode increased with increasing the illuminating time, The mechanism of photochargeable behavior of the MH/T...

  12. Ab initio study of beryllium-decorated fullerenes for hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hoonkyung; Huang, Bing; Duan, Wenhui; Ihm, Jisoon

    2010-01-01

    We have found that a beryllium (Be) atom on nanostructured materials with H2 molecules generates a Kubas-like dihydrogen complex [H. Lee et al. arXiv:1002.2247v1 (2010)]. Here, we investigate the feasibility of Be-decorated fullerenes for hydrogen storage using ab initio calculations. We find that the aggregation of Be atoms on pristine fullerenes is energetically preferred, resulting in the dissociation of the dihydrogen. In contrast, for boron (B)-doped fullerenes, Be atoms prefer to be ind...

  13. Reversible hydrogen storage properties of Ti-doped lithium aluminium hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper our work on lithium aluminium hydride doping with Ti(OBu)4by mechanical milling was showed. Its thermodynamic and kinetics were enhanced greatly and its reversible hydrogen storage capacity could reach 3. 0% (mass fraction). From the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, we found that a lot of LiAlH4 had been decomposed to Li3AlH6 and Al. The catalyst Ti (OBu)4 couldn't be found after ball-milling, instead TiAl3 appeared. But the locations of Ti atoms are still not determined.

  14. Hydrogen combustion in an MCO during interim storage (fauske and associates report 99-14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-05-12

    Flammable conditions are not expected to develop in an MCO during interim storage. This report considers potential phenomena which, although not expected t o occur, could lead t o flammable conditions. For example, reactions of hydrogen w i t h fuel over decades a r e postulated t o lead t o flammable atmospheric mixtures. For the extreme cases considered in this report, the highest attainable post-combustion pressure is about 13 atmospheres absolute, almost a factor of two and a half below the MCO design pressure of 31 atmospheres.

  15. Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R J; Johnson, Jr, A B; Lund, A L; Gilbert, E R [and others

    1996-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

  16. Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAlx, UAlx-Al and U3O8-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrHx, UErZrH, UO2-stainless steel cermet, and U3O8-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified

  17. Reversible storage of the hydrogen by nano structured magnesium hydride; Stockage reversible de l'hydrogene sous forme d'hydrure de magnesium nano-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rango, P. de; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S. [Institut Neel et CRETA, CNRS - UJF, 38 - Grenoble (France); Marty, P. [LEGI - INPG, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    The magnesium hydride MgH{sub 2} is an excellent hydrogen storage element: low cost, abundant, high mass storage capacity up to 7,6% by weight. Meanwhile it presents slow absorption-desorption kinetics and too high thermodynamical stability. Many studies have been realized to improve these kinetics by co-milling with a transition metal. The author presents the metal transition mechanism of this process and the transfer of the production in the industry. (A.L.B.)

  18. New Carbon-Based Porous Materials with Increased Heats of Adsorption for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

    2014-11-03

    Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are a promising alternative to internal combustion engines that burn gasoline. A significant challenge in developing fuel cell vehicles is to store enough hydrogen on-board to allow the same driving range as current vehicles. One option for storing hydrogen on vehicles is to use tanks filled with porous materials that act as “sponges” to take up large quantities of hydrogen without the need for extremely high pressures. The materials must meet many requirements to make this possible. This project aimed to develop two related classes of porous materials to meet these requirements. All materials were synthesized from molecular constituents in a building-block approach, which allows for the creation of an incredibly wide variety of materials in a tailorable fashion. The materials have extremely high surface areas, to provide many locations for hydrogen to adsorb. In addition, they were designed to contain cations that create large electric fields to bind hydrogen strongly but not too strongly. Molecular modeling played a key role as a guide to experiment throughout the project. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of a material with record hydrogen uptake at cryogenic temperatures. Although the ultimate goal was materials that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen at room temperature, this achievement at cryogenic temperatures is an important step in the right direction. In addition, there is significant interest in applications at these temperatures. The hydrogen uptake, measured independently at NREL was 8.0 wt %. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest validated excess hydrogen uptake reported to date at 77 K. This material was originally sketched on paper based on a hypothesis that extended framework struts would yield materials with excellent hydrogen storage properties. However, before starting the synthesis, we used molecular modeling to assess the performance of the material for hydrogen uptake

  19. Theoretical studies of carbon-based nanostructured materials with applications in hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuc, Agnieszka

    2008-07-01

    The main goal of this work is to search for new stable porous carbon-based materials, which have the ability to accommodate and store hydrogen gas. Theoretical and experimental studies suggest a close relation between the nano-scale structure of the material and its storage capacity. In order to design materials with a high storage capacity, a compromise between the size and the shape of the nanopores must be considered. Therefore, a number of different carbon-based materials have been investigated: carbon foams, dislocated graphite, graphite intercalated by C60 molecules, and metal-organic frameworks. The structures of interest include experimentally well-known as well as hypothetical systems. The studies were focused on the determination of important properties and special features, which may result in high storage capacities. Although the variety of possible pure carbon structures and metal-organic frameworks is almost infinite, the materials described in this work possess the main structural characteristics, which are important for gas storage. (orig.)

  20. Photoluminescence of amorphous carbon films fabricated by layer-by-layer hydrogen plasma chemical annealing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐骏; 黄晓辉; 李伟; 王立; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    A method in which nanometre-thick film deposition was alternated with hydrogen plasma annealing (layer-by-layermethod) was applied to fabricate hydrogenated amorphous carbon films in a conventional plasma-enhanced chemicalvapour deposition system. It was found that the hydrogen plasma treatment could decrease the hydrogen concentrationin the films and change the sp2/sp3 ratio to some extent by chemical etching. Blue photoluminescence was observed atroom temperature, as a result of the reduction of sp2 clusters in the films.