WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical hydrogen cyanamide

  1. A rapid transcriptional activation is induced by the dormancy-breaking chemical hydrogen cyanamide in kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Eric F.; Wu, Rong-Mei; Richardson, Annette C.; Davy, Marcus; Hellens, Roger P.; Thodey, Kate; Janssen, Bart J.; Gleave, Andrew P.; Rae, Georgina M.; Wood, Marion; Schaffer, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Budbreak in kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) can be poor in locations that have warm winters with insufficient winter chilling. Kiwifruit vines are often treated with the dormancy-breaking chemical hydrogen cyanamide (HC) to increase and synchronize budbreak. This treatment also offers a tool to understand the processes involved in budbreak. A genomics approach is presented here to increase our understanding of budbreak in kiwifruit. Most genes identified following HC application appear to be associated with responses to stress, but a number of genes appear to be associated with the reactivation of growth. Three patterns of gene expression were identified: Profile 1, an HC-induced transient activation; Profile 2, an HC-induced transient activation followed by a growth-related activation; and Profile 3, HC- and growth-repressed. One group of genes that was rapidly up-regulated in response to HC was the glutathione S-transferase (GST) class of genes, which have been associated with stress and signalling. Previous budbreak studies, in three other species, also report up-regulated GST expression. Phylogenetic analysis of these GSTs showed that they clustered into two sub-clades, suggesting a strong correlation between their expression and budbreak across species. PMID:19651683

  2. Effects of Hydrogen Cyanamide Application Rates and Timing on Fruit and Foliage of 'Climax' Rabbiteye Blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the effects of flower bud pruning or utilizing differing rates of hydrogen cyanamide, on development of vegetative and floral buds, as well as on leaf area, vegetative coverage, fruit damage and development, and yield. In this study, hydrogen cyanamide applica...

  3. Fabrication of nanocomposites composed of silver cyanamide and titania for improved photocatalytic hydrogen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hao; Li, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Xia; Liu, Yufeng; Xu, Yan; Han, Yide; Xu, Junli

    2015-12-14

    Highly efficient composite photocatalysts composed of silver cyanamide (Ag2NCN) and anatase titania (TiO2) were fabricated through a chemical precipitation process of silver nitrate and cyanamide in TiO2 suspensions. The TiO2 nanoparticles around 15 nm were immobilized on the surface of rectangular Ag2NCN particles to form a hetero-structure, and the contents of TiO2 were varied to tune the structure and the photocatalytic performances. In comparison with single TiO2 or Ag2NCN, the TiO2/Ag2NCN nanocomposites exhibited a prominent improved photocatalytic activity in the hydrogen generation, and the hydrogen evolution rate (1494.0 μmol (g h)(-1)) was higher than most of the reported TiO2-composite photocatalysts. Based on the structure investigation, the photocatalytic mechanism of these TiO2/Ag2NCN nanocomposites was proposed. The enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to three points: the matched energy level between TiO2 and Ag2NCN promoted the electron-hole transfer and thus inhibited the recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes; the great electron storage capacity of metallic silver produced in the photocatalytic process also facilitated the charge separation; in addition, the expanded absorption spectrum because of the composite structure enhanced the UV and visible light response ability. These TiO2/Ag2NCN nanocomposites also presented good photocatalytic stability in the typical cycle tests. This work provided new insights into fabricating highly efficient composite photocatalysts containing silver and TiO2 for hydrogen generation. PMID:26515664

  4. CYANAMIDE: A POSSIBLE KEY COMPOUND IN CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, Gary; Lemmon, Richard M.; Calvin, Melvin

    1964-05-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of phosphorus-containing compounds--such as nucleotides and polynucleotides--would require both a geologically plausible source of the element and pathways for its incorporation into chemical systems on the primitive Earth. The mineral apatite, which is the only significant source of phosphate on Earth, has long been thought to be problematical in this respect due to its low solubility and reactivity. However, in the last decade or so, at least two pathways have been demonstrated which would circumvent these perceived problems. In addition, recent results would seem to suggest an additional, extraterrestrial source of reactive phosphorus. It appears that the 'phosphorus problem' is no longer the stumbling block which it was once thought to be.

  5. Estimation of chilling requirement and effect of hydrogen cyanamide on budbreak and fruit characteristics of 'superior seedless' table grape cultivated in a mild winter climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chilling requirement and optimum time for hydrogen cyanamide (HC) application were determined for Superior Seedless table grape grown in southern Tunisia, an arid mild winter region. The reliability of five models to predict chilling accumulation for this cultivar was also investigated. In mid-November, current season shoots were excised and subjected to artificial chilling at 7 deg. C for different lengths of time. Each time, half the shoots were treated with a 2% (v/v) aqueous solution of HC, the others were sprayed with distilled water. Thereafter, these shoots were forced to budburst. Rest intensity gradually declined due to chilling accumulation. We estimated that the cultivar needed approx. 440 hours (h) of chilling, or chilling requirement (CR), to overcome endodormancy. During two dormant seasons, estimation of chilling accumulation showed that the Positive Chill Unit model was the most suitable to predict rest completion for Superior Seedless grown under our climatic conditions. Using this model, we found that the variety's CR was not always met by mid-February. In both laboratory and field trials, HC was most effective in enhancing and advancing budbreak if applied when approx. 2/3 of the cultivar's CR were met. Moreover, by this application berry weight and diameter were increased and fruit maturity was advanced. Our study indicated that HC (2%) was effective in advancing budbreak and fruit maturity of Superior Seedless table grape although its effectiveness depended on application date. (author)

  6. Quantification of cyanamide contents in herbaceous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Sato, Masae; Kato, Kenji; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Nakajima, Eri; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Hirota, Mitsuru

    2006-09-01

    Cyanamide (NH2CN) is found in nature, although it has long been recognized as an industrial product. Distribution of cyanamide in the plant kingdom was investigated using a direct quantitative determination method to detect and measure cyanamide by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (the SID-GC-MS method). The SID-GC-MS method proved to be a robust way to quantify cyanamide contents in the extracts of 101 species of herbaceous plants. The average recovery of cyanamide from all plants tested was 55.6+/-20.3%. Vicia villosa and V. cracca contained cyanamide at 369-498 microg/gFW and 3,460-3,579 microg/gFW respectively, while the other 99 species contained no detectable cyanamide (<1 microg/gFW). This result suggests that distribution of cyanamide in the plant kingdom is limited and uneven. PMID:16960361

  7. Cyanamide mode of action during inhibition of onion (Allium cepa L.) root growth involves disturbances in cell division and cytoskeleton formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata

    2011-09-01

    Cyanamide is an allelochemical produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.). Its phyotoxic effect on plant growth was examined on roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Water solution of cyanamide (2-10 mM) restricted growth of onion roots in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of onion roots with cyanamide resulted in a decrease in root growth rate accompanied by a decrease in accumulation of fresh and dry weight. The inhibitory effect of cyanamide was reversed by its removal from the environment, but full recovery was observed only for tissue treated with this chemical at low concentration (2-6 mM). Cytological observations of root tip cells suggest that disturbances in cell division may explain the strong cyanamide allelopathic activity. Moreover, in cyanamide-treated onion the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells and cell cycle, and modifications of cytoskeleton arrangement. PMID:21573814

  8. Fenologia, brotação de gemas e produção de frutos de macieira em resposta à aplicação de cianamida hidrogenada e óleo mineral Phenology, budbreak and apple fruit production by hydrogen cyanamide and mineral oil application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando José Hawerroth

    2009-01-01

    , detecting this effects along of productive season became important. Thus, this study was carried out during 2007/2008 season, in Caçador, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, aiming to evaluate different hydrogen cyanamide and mineral oil combinations on phenology, budbreak and apple fruit production. The experimental design was a randomized block, with six replications, in factorial arrangement (5x2, with five budbreak promoter treatments (1. control; 2. mineral oil 3.2%; 3. mineral oil 3.2% + hydrogen cyanamide 0.20%; 4. mineral oil 3.2% + hydrogen cyanamide 0.39%; 5. mineral oil 3.2% + hydrogen cyanamide 0.59% and two cultivars (Imperial Gala and Suprema's Fuji. The budbreak promoters application anticipated and reduced the blooming period, increasing the blooming overlap between Imperial Gala and Suprema's Fuji cultivars. The budbreak promoters equalized and increased the budbreak in axillary and terminal buds, with the major budbreak level observed in Imperial Gala cultivar with 0.44% of hydrogen cyanamide and 3.2% of mineral oil treatment. The increase of hydrogen cyanamide concentration showed the tendency to decrease the fruit set. It was observed different treatment responses on production and mean fruit weight, probably to be related to fruit production predominance in different frutification structures.

  9. Evidence of cyanamide production in hairy vetch Vicia villosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Kato, Kenji; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Nakajima, Eri; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Hirota, Mitsuru

    2006-05-10

    Cyanamide (NH(2)CN) has recently been isolated as a plant growth inhibitor from Vicia villosa, which is the first discovery of cyanamide from natural sources. To reveal the presence of the biosynthesized cyanamide in plants, 3.4 mM potassium ((15)N)nitrate was administered to 15- to 35-day-old plants of V. villosa, from which the cyanamide was purified and subjected to GC/MS analysis. The isotopic ratio (15)N/((14)N + (15)N) of the cyanamide was calculated to be 0.143, while that of the cyanamide extracted from V. villosa grown in the presence of a natural N source was 0.0065. The (15)N-enrichment proved de novo biosynthesis of cyanamide. PMID:16644540

  10. Effects of Hydrogen Cyanamide on the Floral Morphogenesis of Kiwifruit Buds Efectos de la Cianamida de Hidrógeno sobre la Morfogénesis Floral de Kiwi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Engin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hydrogen cyanamide (HC on the flower bud development of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa (A. Chev. C.F. Liang & A.R. Ferguson. ‘Hayward’ was studied. The bud samples were taken every 5-10 d starting from dormant season (March and fixed in FAA (10% formalin, 50% ethanol, 5% glacial acetic acid. Flower bud development was compared in three HC concentrations and the control. 1%, 2%, and 3% of HC was applied 35 d before the expected natural bud break. During the onset of bud break, only 57.6% of control buds had sepal primordia developed. On the other hand, HC treated buds had almost completed their stamen formation and started stigma primordia. When the control vines were in advanced bud break, gynoecial plateau already began to form in the vines treated with 2 and 3% HC. Vines treated with 1% HC lagged a little behind and had not started developing the gynoecial plateau. As the bud developed from the open cluster to the tight bud stage, the differences between the control and HC treated plants were more distinct. However, there were no differences between HC treatments as the ovule initiation took place in the buds.El presente estudio evalúa la influencia de la aplicación de cianamida de hidrogeno (HC sobre el desarrollo de las yemas florales de kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa (A. Chev. C.F. Liang & A.R. Ferguson cv. Hayward. Las muestras de yemas se tomaron cada 5-10 días comenzando en la época de dormancia en marzo y se fijaron en FAA (10% formaldehido, 50% etanol, 5% ácido acético glacial. Se comparó el desarrollo de las yemas florales en tres concentraciones de HC y el control. Se aplicó HC al 1%, 2% y 3% 35 días antes del brote natural de las yemas. En el momento de la apertura de las yemas, sólo el 57,6% de las yemas de control habían desarrollado los primordios de los sépalos. Por el contrario, las yemas tratadas con HC casi habían completado la formación de estambres y habían empezado el desarrollo de primordios

  11. Chemical and physical solutions for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Ulrich; Felderhoff, Michael; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier in future energy systems. However, storage of hydrogen is a substantial challenge, especially for applications in vehicles with fuel cells that use proton-exchange membranes (PEMs). Different methods for hydrogen storage are discussed, including high-pressure and cryogenic-liquid storage, adsorptive storage on high-surface-area adsorbents, chemical storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides, and storage in boranes. For the latter chemical solutions, reversible options and hydrolytic release of hydrogen with off-board regeneration are both possible. Reforming of liquid hydrogen-containing compounds is also a possible means of hydrogen generation. The advantages and disadvantages of the different systems are compared. PMID:19598190

  12. Cyanamide is biosynthesized from L-canavanine in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Sakurai, Sakae; Yamanashi, Tatsuya; Todoroki, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Cyanamide had long been recognized as a synthetic compound but more recently has been found as a natural product from several leguminous plants. This compound's biosynthetic pathway, as yet unelaborated, has attracted attention because of its utility in many domains, such as agriculture, chemistry, and medicine. We noticed that the distribution of L-canavanine in the plant kingdom appeared to include that of cyanamide and that the guanidino group structure in L-canavanine contained the cyanamide skeleton. Here, quantification of these compounds in Vicia species suggested that cyanamide was biosynthesized from L-canavanine. Subsequent experiments involving L-[guanidineimino-(15)N2]canavanine addition to young Vicia villosa seedlings resulted in significant incorporation of (15)N-label into cyanamide, verifying its presumed biosynthetic pathway. PMID:26013398

  13. Cyanamide is biosynthesized from l-canavanine in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Tsunashi Kamo; Sakae Sakurai; Tatsuya Yamanashi; Yasushi Todoroki

    2015-01-01

    Cyanamide had long been recognized as a synthetic compound but more recently has been found as a natural product from several leguminous plants. This compound’s biosynthetic pathway, as yet unelaborated, has attracted attention because of its utility in many domains, such as agriculture, chemistry, and medicine. We noticed that the distribution of L-canavanine in the plant kingdom appeared to include that of cyanamide and that the guanidino group structure in L-canavanine contained the cyanam...

  14. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated

  15. Thermochemical and radiation chemical hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In search of closed-cycle hydrogen production processes by nuclear energy, thermochemical and radiation chemical reactions have been studied which are related to candidate processes. In a hopeful thermochemical process, nickel, iodine and sulfur are used (NIS process). This process is an improved iodine-sulfur process, and is characterized by the separation of nickel iodide and sulfate by solvent extraction and the high temperature decomposition of sulfur trioxide in the absence of water. Experimental results of main unit operations are described. Another feasible process with carbon dioxide was also studied using ferrous iodide. For radiation chemical hydrogen production, radiolysis of carbon dioxide was studied by gamma-rays and reactor radiations containing fission fragments, and with nitrogen dioxide and propane as additives. The mechanism of reoxidation of carbon monoxide, the back reaction, is discussed, because the back reaction determines the carbon monoxide yield. (author)

  16. Low energy electron attachment to cyanamide (NH2CN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyanamide (NH2CN) is a molecule relevant for interstellar chemistry and the chemical evolution of life. In the present investigation, dissociative electron attachment to NH2CN has been studied in a crossed electron–molecular beams experiment in the electron energy range from about 0 eV to 14 eV. The following anionic species were detected: NHCN−, NCN−, CN−, NH2−, NH−, and CH2−. The anion formation proceeds within two broad electron energy regions, one between about 0.5 and 4.5 eV and a second between 4.5 and 12 eV. A discussion of possible reaction channels for all measured negative ions is provided. The experimental results are compared with calculations of the thermochemical thresholds of the anions observed. For the dehydrogenated parent anion, we explain the deviation between the experimental appearance energy of the anion with the calculated corresponding reaction threshold by electron attachment to the isomeric form of NH2CN—carbodiimide

  17. Direct quantitative determination of cyanamide by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Kamo, Tsunashi; Nakajima, Eri; Kato, Kenji; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2005-12-01

    Cyanamide is a multifunctional agrochemical used, for example, as a pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer. Recent research has revealed that cyanamide is a natural product biosynthesized in a leguminous plant, hairy vetch (Vicia villosa). In the present study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with a capillary column for amines was used for direct quantitative determination of cyanamide. Quantitative signals for ((14)N(2))cyanamide, ((15)N(2))cyanamide (internal standard for stable isotope dilution method), and m-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (internal standard for correcting errors in GC-MS analysis) were recorded as peak areas on mass chromatograms at m/z 42 (A(42)), 44 (A(44)), and 171 (A(IS)), respectively. Total cyanamide content, ((14)N(2))cyanamide plus ((15)N(2))cyanamide, was determined as a function of (A(42)+A(44))/A(IS). Contents of ((14)N(2))cyanamide and ((15)N(2))cyanamide were then calculated by multiplying the total cyanamide content by A(42)/(A(42)+A(44)) and A(44)/(A(42)+A(44)), respectively. The limit of detection for the total cyanamide content by the GC-MS analysis was around 1ng. The molar ratio of ((14)N(2))cyanamide to ((15)N(2))cyanamide in the injected sample was equal to the observed A(42)/A(44) value in the range from 0.1 to 5. It was, therefore, possible to use the stable isotope dilution method to quantify the natural cyanamide content in samples; i.e., the natural cyanamide content was derived by subtracting the A(42)/A(44) ratio of the internal standard from the A(42)/A(44) ratio of sample spiked with internal standard, and then multiplying the resulting difference by the amount of added ((15)N(2))cyanamide (SID-GC-MS method). This method successfully gave a reasonable value for the natural cyanamide content in hairy vetch, concurring with the value obtained by a conventional method in which cyanamide was derivatized to a photometrically active compound 4-cyanimido-1,2-naphthoquinone and analyzed with reversed

  18. Carbon sources of natural cyanamide in Vicia villosa subsp. varia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Kasahara, Ryohei; Abe, Shun; Hirota, Mitsuru; Sugano, Mami; Yamaya, Hiroko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2010-10-01

    The ¹³C labels of [¹³C]carbon dioxide and D-[¹³C₆]glucose were incorporated into cyanamide (NH₂CN) when they were administered to Vicia villosa subsp. varia shoots. In contrast, the administration of sodium [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate did not affect the relative area of the [M + 1]+ ion of cyanamide in the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate was incorporated into organic acids that are part of the citric acid cycle, such as succinate and fumarate, confirming that the shoots absorbed and metabolised it. These observations demonstrated that the carbon atom of cyanamide is derived from any of the carbohydrates that are present upstream of pyruvate in the metabolic pathway. PMID:20954091

  19. Chemical equilibrium analysis of dry hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is based on a thermo-chemical equilibrium model for studying the effect of combustion of hydrogen during postulated accident scenarios in nuclear reactor containments. This model is based on the method of element potentials which seeks to minimize the free energy of the system. The condition on internal energy balance is imposed as a constraint during the minimization process. Another simplified model purely based on the internal energy balance has also been implemented to investigate the isolated impact of free energy and the conditions under which it becomes dominant. The two models have been used to extract final pressures for a wide range of initial conditions and mixture compositions that are typically found during accident scenarios. In the absence of hydrogen combustion experimental data, such models will become important for laying down a first estimate on the possible outcomes. (author)

  20. Amélioration de la croissance végétative et de la constitution des réserves en amidon des pêchers par les traitements avec la cyanamide d'hydrogène

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dbara, S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetative Growth and Starch Reserve Improvement in Peach Trees Using Hydrogen Cyanamid Treatments. Hydrogen cyanamid use was investigated as a means of improving vegetative growth and starch content in peach trees. Results given that the treatments 40 days before natural bud break was increased the vegetative growth, starch content and shoot extension especially in the earliest cultivar (Queen Crest. For the latest cultivar May Crest all treatments (45 and 32 days before natural bud break was ameliorated only the starch content.

  1. Chemical foundations of hydrogen sulfide biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R

    2013-11-30

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  2. Galactic chemical evolution hydrogen through zinc

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Timmes, F X; Woosley, S E

    1994-01-01

    Using the output from a grid of 60 Type II supernova models (Woosley \\& Weaver 1994) of varying mass (11 \\ltaprx M/M\\sun \\ltaprx 40) and metallicity (0, 10^{-4}, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 Z\\sol), the chemical evolution of 76 stable isotopes, from hydrogen to zinc, is calculated. The chemical evolution calculation employs a simple dynamical model for the Galaxy (infall with a 4 billion year e-folding time scale onto a exponential disk and 1/r^2 bulge), and standard evolution parameters, such as a Salpeter initial mass function and a quadratic Schmidt star formation rate. The theoretical results are compared in detail with observed stellar abundances in stars with metallicities in the range -3.0 \\ltaprx [Fe/H] \\ltaprx 0.0 dex. While our discussion focuses on the solar neighborhood where there are the most observations, the supernovae rates, an intrinsically Galactic quantity, are also discussed.

  3. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K S; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A; Hembram, K P S S; Waghmare, Umesh V; Rao, C N R

    2011-02-15

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp(3) C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  4. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K.P.S.S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; RAO, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehyd...

  5. Chemical reaction between single hydrogen atom and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study chemical reaction between a single hydrogen atom and a graphene, which is the elemental reaction between hydrogen and graphitic carbon materials. In the present work, classical molecular dynamics simulation is used with modified Brenner's empirical bond order potential. The three reactions, that is, absorption reaction, reflection reaction and penetration reaction, are observed in our simulation. Reaction rates depend on the incident energy of the hydrogen atom and the graphene temperature. The dependence can be explained by the following mechanisms: (1) The hydrogen atom receives repulsive force by π-electrons in addition to nuclear repulsion. (2) Absorbing the hydrogen atom, the graphene transforms its structure to the 'overhand' configuration such as sp3 state. (3) The hexagonal hole of the graphene is expanded during the penetration of the hydrogen atom. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  7. Inhibitory efficacy of calcium cyanamide on the pathogens of replant diseases in strawberry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lijing; HU Tongle; JI Lijing; CAO Keqiang

    2007-01-01

    Replant diseases in strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia solani,Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae are serious problems for its sustainable production under continuous cropping.This research studied the inhibitory effect of calcium cyanamide on pathogenic fungi in Petri dishes and on sterilized soil.Results indicated that calcium cyanamide had an obvious inhibitory effect on three pathogens on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates.Among them,the inhibitory effect on Rhizoctonia solani was the highest.As the concentrations of calcium cyanamide was increased from 0.1 to 10 mg/mL,the inhibition rate on mycelial growth increased from -1.43% to 100%.Inhibitory effects on Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae also existed on Petri dishes but to a lesser extent.Similar results were also observed in sterilized soil.When the concentration of calcium cyanamide in sterilized soil was 0.1%,the inhibitory effect on Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae was 68.46% and 54.46%,respectively.The inhibitive effect of calcium cyanamide on Fusariurn oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae increased quickly as the soil moisture changed from 10% to 40% for Verticillium dahliae and from 10% to 60% forFusarium oxysporum.This indicated that the inhibitive effect of calcium cyanamide could be influenced greatly by the moisture content in the soil.

  8. Non-precious metal catalysts prepared from precursor comprising cyanamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-10-27

    Catalyst comprising graphitic carbon and methods of making thereof; said graphitic carbon comprising a metal species, a nitrogen-containing species and a sulfur containing species. A catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction for an alkaline fuel cell was prepared by heating a mixture of cyanamide, carbon black, and a salt selected from an iron sulfate salt and an iron acetate salt at a temperature of from about 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. under an inert atmosphere. Afterward, the mixture was treated with sulfuric acid at elevated temperature to remove acid soluble components, and the resultant mixture was heated again under an inert atmosphere at the same temperature as the first heat treatment step.

  9. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Linehan, Sue [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lipiecki, Frank [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Christopher, Aardahl L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  10. Quantification of cyanamide in young seedlings of Vicia species, Lens culinaris, and Robinia pseudo-acacia by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Takemura, Tomoko; Wasano, Naoya; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Hiradate, Syuntaro

    2012-01-01

    We quantified the cyanamide content of young leaves of nine Vicia species, Lens culinaris, and Robinia pseudo-acacia using a modified analytical procedure that made it possible to measure the cyanamide content of a single leaf. Recent molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that cyanamide is present in V. benghalensis, which is placed in a monophyletic group with cyanamide-biosynthesizing plants, V. villosa and V. cracca; this suggestion was verified. PMID:22785492

  11. Synthesis of heterocycles from disubstituted cyanamides; Fukugokan kagobutsu no atarashii goseigenryo toshiteno jiokikaeshianamido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, I [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-12-22

    Authors have studied on the reactivity of disubstituted cyanamides as comparison with nitriles, and researched the possibility as starting materials for synthesizing heterocycles containing nitrogen for the last decade. As the result, many new reactions, not observed in nitriles, have been developed as shown in the below, and it was found that the disubstituted cyanamides are usefull materials for synthesizing heterocycles. At first, in compressed liquid phase (500{approx}800MPa), the reaction with amidoximes or N-substituted formamides afforded 1,2,4-oxadiazoles (2,3) or 2-substituted amino-4, 6-bis (di-substituted amino)-1,3,5-triazines with liberation of secondary amines. respectively. In the reaction with carbon disulfide, 4-thiocarbamoyl amino-1,3,5-thiadiazines, (6) were obtained in one-pot. In the initial stage of the reaction, thiocarbamoyl isothiocyanates, an adduct of carbon disulfide and a disubstituted cyanamide, seem to have been formed. On the other hand, the reaction with aryl isothiocyanates gave 2-disubstituted amino-quinazolines (13), and the reaction mechanism was also discussed. Next, the reaction with the organic cations was examined. Disubstituted cyanamides react with (dichlormethylene) dimethylammonium chloride to give 1-(disubstituted amino)-3- dimethylamino-1,3-dichloro-2-azapropenium chlorides, and these products were applied to the synthesis of heterocyclic cations containing S or Se (14,15,16, and 17). Thiocarbamoyl anilides were desulfurized by using a silver salt in the presence of a disubstituted cyanamide to give 4-disubstituted aminoquinazolines (18) in good yields. (author)

  12. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  13. Radiation Chemical and Plasma Chemical Processes for Hydrogen Production from Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is considered to be the fuel of the future. The simplest way to produce hydrogen is by water decomposition. The usual, non-electrical method of producing this reaction is either by direct thermal water splitting or by making use of some catalytic process in a batch or flow reactor. The aim of the present work, which is part of the DEMO studies, is to investigate two further, little used methods for hydrogen production. I. Radiation Chemical Process Both fission and fusion reactors produce radioactive material, the radiation energy of which is wasted. By examining the water decomposition yields observed under different conditions we conclude that the radiolysis of high temperature water vapour in contact with oxide catalysts can produce sizable amounts of hydrogen. II. Plasma Chemical Process One of the most serious problems with thermal water decomposition lies with the high reaction temperature which, apart from other associated problems, demands highly corrosion resistant materials. Plasma chemical splitting removes this obstacle, but a mixture of O2 and H2 is formed and the separation of these products is quite difficult. Having investigated a number of high temperature processes where product separation might be easier, we conclude that the thermodynamic conditions of the reaction N2 + H2O = N2O + H2 appear attractive, additionally, N2O is easy to separate from H2. More detailed thermodynamic studies and relating kinetic investigations of this and analogous processes must follow in order to assess the practical use of plasma chemical methods. Energy carriers other than hydrogen, e.g. methane, methanol, formic acid, will also be considered, as these can also be synthesised in chemical plasmas by making use of fusion energy. The paper will report the results of the studies on both these processes for the production of hydrogen from fusion energy. (author)

  14. Performance analysis of Isopropanol–Acetone–Hydrogen chemical heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The increase of temperature of endothermic reaction reduces performance of heat pump. ► The better the performance is, the larger the number of trays. ► COP focuses on the quantity of recovered heat. ► Exergy efficiency focuses on the quantity and quality of recovered heat. - Abstract: The performance of an Isopropanol–Acetone–Hydrogen (IAH) chemical heat pump system is investigated in terms of enthalpy efficiency (COP) and exergy efficiency, in which the exothermic and endothermic reactions take place in the gas phase. The increase of reflux ratio, temperature of endothermic reaction and temperature of exothermic reaction reduces the performance of the heat pump when the other operating parameters remain unchanged. However, the performance of the IAH chemical heat pump improves with the increase of the ratio of molar quantity of hydrogen to that of acetone in the entry of exothermic reactor and the number of heat transfer units of regenerator. Generally, a better performance of the chemical heat pump corresponds to a larger number of trays in the distillation column. The performance of the system can be improved significantly after multi-parameter optimization design. The coefficient of performance (COP) pays more attention to the heat released from the exothermic reactor, while the exergy efficiency takes into consideration of both heat released from the exothermic reactor and temperature of exothermic reaction.

  15. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  16. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle

  17. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  18. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  19. Some recent efforts in chemical hydrogen storage at Loa Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Benjamin L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nakagawa, Tessui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ott, Kevin C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smythe, Nathan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sutton, Andrew D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henson, Neil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, R. Thomas [U. OTTAWA; Hamilton, Charles W [OD VISION, INC.; Dixon, David A [U. ALABAMA; Garner Ill, Edward B [U. ALABAMA; Vasiliu, Monica [U. ALABAMA

    2010-12-08

    Within the transportation sector, a necessity towards realizing the use of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as an alternative fuel, is its storage for controlled delivery. The U.S. DOE's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in H{sub 2} storage have pursued different methodologies (metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents), for the express purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H{sub 2} storage has been dominated by one material, ammonia borane (H3B-NH3, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H{sub 2} (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1} ). As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any storage system is also dependent on efficient recyclability. Within our CoE we have thus endeavored to find efficient base-metal catalyzed AB dehydrogenation pathways and regeneration schemes for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB. We will present some recent results in these areas in this vein.

  20. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... rule (December 1, 1993, 58 FR 63500). Hydrogen sulfide was listed under the criteria of EPCRA section... EPCRA section 313(d)(2)(B) (see 59 FR 61432, 61433, 61440-61442). Hydrogen sulfide has also been... adding hydrogen sulfide to the EPCRA section 313 list of toxic chemicals (58 FR 63500) (effective...

  1. Effect of chemical potential on the computer simulation of hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Hong; WANG; Shaoqing; CHENG; Huiming

    2004-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo molecular simulations were carried out for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that variations in chemical potential may result in a great change in the hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms of single-walled carbon nanotubes at 298.15 K were calculated using a modified chemical potential, and the result obtained is closer to the experimental results. By comparing the experimental and simulation results, it is proposed that chemical adsorption may exist for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  2. Catalytic hydrogenation reactors for the fine chemicals industries. Their design and operation.

    OpenAIRE

    Westerterp, K.R.; Molga, E.J.; Gelder, van, M.

    1997-01-01

    The design and operation of reactors for catalytic, hydrogenation in the fine chemical industries are discussed. The requirements for a good multiproduct catalytic hydrogenation unit as well as the choice of the reactor type are considered. Packed bed bubble column reactors operated without hydrogen recycle are recommended as the best choice to obtain a flexible reactor with good selectivities. The results of an experimental study of the catalytic hydrogenation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene in a mini...

  3. Limited distribution of natural cyanamide in higher plants: occurrence in Vicia villosa subsp. varia, V. cracca, and Robinia pseudo-acacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Endo, Mai; Sato, Masae; Kasahara, Ryohei; Yamaya, Hiroko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Hirai, Nobuhiro; Hirota, Mitsuru

    2008-03-01

    Cyanamide (NH2CN) has recently been proven to be a natural product, although it has been synthesized for over 100 years for agricultural and industrial purposes. The distribution of natural cyanamide appears to be limited, as indicated by our previous investigation of 101 weed species. In the present study, to investigate the distribution of natural cyanamide in Vicia species, we monitored the cyanamide contents in V. villosa subsp. varia, V. cracca, and V. amoena during their pre-flowering and flowering seasons. It was confirmed that V. cracca was superior to V. villosa subsp. varia in accumulating natural cyanamide, and that V. amoena was unable to biosynthesize this compound under laboratory condition examined. The localization of cyanamide in the leaves of V. villosa subsp. varia seedlings was also clarified. In a screening study to find cyanamide-biosynthesizing plants, only Robinia pseudo-acacia was found to contain cyanamide among 452 species of higher plants. We have investigated 553 species to date, but have so far found the ability to biosynthesize cyanamide in only three species, V. villosa subsp. varia, V. cracca and R. pseudo-acacia. PMID:18160082

  4. Cyanamide mode of action during inhibition of onion (Allium cepa L.) root growth involves disturbances in cell division and cytoskeleton formation

    OpenAIRE

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata

    2011-01-01

    Cyanamide is an allelochemical produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.). Its phyotoxic effect on plant growth was examined on roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Water solution of cyanamide (2–10 mM) restricted growth of onion roots in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of onion roots with cyanamide resulted in a decrease in root growth rate accompanied by a decrease in accumulation of fresh and dry weight. The inhibitory effect of cyanamide was reversed by its removal from the enviro...

  5. Analysis of hydrogen mobility in Nb-based alloy membranes in view of new description of hydrogen permeability based on hydrogen chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yukawa, H., E-mail: hiroshi@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Nambu, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-Cho, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oita National College of Technology, Maki, Oita 870-0152 (Japan); Murata, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The alloying effects on the mobility of hydrogen atom, B, in Nb have been investigated. • The analysis based on the new description of hydrogen permeation has been performed. • The mobility of hydrogen atom is expressed in a format of the Arrhenius equation. • The logarithm of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy decrease linearly by alloying. • Ru, W and Mo in Nb enhance the hydrogen diffusivity at low temperature below T{sub int}. - Abstract: Hydrogen permeability of Nb-based alloy membranes have been analyzed in view of the new description of hydrogen permeation based on hydrogen chemical potential in order to investigate the alloying effects on the mobility of hydrogen atom, B. There is a liner relationship between the normalized hydrogen flux, J⋅L, and the PCT factor, f{sub PCT}. The mobility of hydrogen atom is expressed in a format of the Arrhenius equation. Then, the alloying effects on the activation energy, E, and the pre-exponential factor, B{sub 0}, have been investigated. It is found that logarithm of the pre-exponential factor, ln B{sub 0}, is proportional to the activation energy, E. In other words, when one factor decreases by alloying, the other factor also decreases linearly. As a result, the addition of ruthenium, tungsten and molybdenum into niobium enhances the hydrogen diffusivity at low temperature below the intersection temperature, T{sub int}.

  6. Hydrazine Borane and Hydrazinidoboranes as Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Moury

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrazine borane N2H4BH3 and alkali derivatives (i.e., lithium, sodium and potassium hydrazinidoboranes MN2H3BH3 with M = Li, Na and K have been considered as potential chemical hydrogen storage materials. They belong to the family of boron- and nitrogen-based materials and the present article aims at providing a timely review while focusing on fundamentals so that their effective potential in the field could be appreciated. It stands out that, on the one hand, hydrazine borane, in aqueous solution, would be suitable for full dehydrogenation in hydrolytic conditions; the most attractive feature is the possibility to dehydrogenate, in addition to the BH3 group, the N2H4 moiety in the presence of an active and selective metal-based catalyst but for which further improvements are still necessary. However, the thermolytic dehydrogenation of hydrazine borane should be avoided because of the evolution of significant amounts of hydrazine and the formation of a shock-sensitive solid residue upon heating at >300 °C. On the other hand, the alkali hydrazinidoboranes, obtained by reaction of hydrazine borane with alkali hydrides, would be more suitable to thermolytic dehydrogenation, with improved properties in comparison to the parent borane. All of these aspects are surveyed herein and put into perspective.

  7. The effect of imidazole, cyanamide, and polyornithine on the condensation of nucleotides in aqueous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, J.; Kimball, A. P.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Development of two models for the condensation of nucleotides under possibly prebiotic conditions. In the first of these models this type of reaction is promoted by the presence of imidazole and substituted imidazole compounds. The second model involves the condensation of mononucleotides with cyanamide in the presence and absence of a prototemplate such as polyornithine. A tentative mechanism for the role of imidazole catalysis in phosphodiester bond formation between adjacent TMP molecules is suggested.

  8. AMPHOTERIC COLLOIDS : I. CHEMICAL INFLUENCE OF THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, J

    1918-09-20

    1. It has been shown in this paper that while non-ionized gelatin may exist in gelatin solutions on both sides of the isoelectric point (which lies for gelatin at a hydrogen ion concentration of C(H) = 2.10(-5) or pH = 4.7), gelatin, when it ionizes, can only exist as an anion on the less acid side of its isoelectric point (pH > 4.7), as a cation only on the more acid side of its isoelectric point (pH writer's previous papers. 4. The reason for this influence of the hydrogen ion concentration on the stability of the two forms of ionization possible for an amphoteric electrolyte is at present unknown. We might think of the possibility of changes in the configuration or constitution of the gelatin molecule whereby ionized gelatin can exist only as an anion on the alkaline side and as a cation on the acid side of its isoelectric point. 5. The literature of colloid chemistry contains numerous statements which if true would mean that the anions of neutral salts act on gelatin on the alkaline side of the isoelectric point, e.g. the alleged effect of the Hofmeister series of anions on the swelling and osmotic pressure of common gelatin in neutral solutions, and the statement that both ions of a neutral salt influence a protein simultaneously. The writer has shown in previous publications that these statements are contrary to fact and based on erroneous methods of work. Our present paper shows that these claims of colloid chemists are also theoretically impossible. 6. In addition to other physical properties the conductivity of gelatin previously treated with acids has been investigated and plotted, and it was found that this conductivity is a minimum in the region of the isoelectric point, thus confirming the conclusion that gelatin can apparently not exist in ionized condition at that point. The conductivity rises on either side of the isoelectric point, but not symmetrically for reasons given in the paper. It is shown that the curves for osmotic pressure, viscosity

  9. Light metal chemical hydrides slurry for hydrogen production and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen has immense potential as an efficient and environmentally friendly energy carrier of the future. It can be used directly by fuel cells to produce electricity with>50% efficiency and with zero emissions. Ultra-low emissions are also achievable when hydrogen is combusted with air to power an engine (especially in the new hybrid systems) or to provide process heat, since the only pollutant produced, NOx, is then easily controlled. To realize this potential, however, cost effective methods for producing, transporting, and storing hydrogen must be developed. (author)

  10. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Study of chemical thermodynamic equilibrium of liquid sodium-hydrogen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the thermodynamic equilibrium of the liquid sodium-hydrogen system is carried out on the basis of chemical engineering thermodynamics. The relationship between the hydrogen partial pressure above the surface of liquid sodium and hydrogen concentration in liquid sodium is presented. The quantitative dependence of the Sieverts constant on the temperature is obtained from above. And the experimental data of the Sieverts constant from some references are analyzed. Moreover, the temperature dependence of hydrogen solubility in sodium is given, and the comparison with the experimental data is made

  12. Quantum-chemical basis of adsorption mechanism of hydrogen and carbon oxide on cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of quantum-chemical calculations of the cluster model of H2 and CO adsorption on CdTe surface enabled to support the basic conclusions concerning the nature of adsorption centers and adsorption mechanism, made on the basis of experimental investigation of the system: 1) hydrogen can be adsorbed in two forms - molecular and dissociative ones versus carbon monoxide which doesn't dissociate during adsorption: 2) predominant centers of molecular hydrogen adsorption are presented by surface VTe vacancies and F-centers; 3) formed hydrogen atoms can advantageously bind with surface coordination-ionsaturated Te atoms: 4) hydrogen adsorption result in the positive charging of the surface

  13. Photoluminescence of amorphous carbon films fabricated by layer-by-layer hydrogen plasma chemical annealing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐骏; 黄晓辉; 李伟; 王立; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    A method in which nanometre-thick film deposition was alternated with hydrogen plasma annealing (layer-by-layermethod) was applied to fabricate hydrogenated amorphous carbon films in a conventional plasma-enhanced chemicalvapour deposition system. It was found that the hydrogen plasma treatment could decrease the hydrogen concentrationin the films and change the sp2/sp3 ratio to some extent by chemical etching. Blue photoluminescence was observed atroom temperature, as a result of the reduction of sp2 clusters in the films.

  14. Effect of chemical treatments on hydrogen storage behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the hydrogen storage behaviors of chemically treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated. The surface properties of the functionalized MWNTs were confirmed by Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, the Boehm titration method, and zeta-potential measurements. The hydrogen storage capacity of the MWNTs was evaluated at 298 K and 100 bar. In the experimental results, it was found that the chemical treatments introduced functional groups onto the MWNT surfaces. The amount of hydrogen storage was enhanced, by acidic surface treatment, to 0.42 wt.% in the acidic-treated MWNTs compared with 0.26 wt.% in the as-received MWNTs. Meanwhile, the basic surface treatment actually reduced the hydrogen storage capacity, to 0.24 wt.% in the basic-treated MWNTs sample. Consequently, it could be concluded that hydrogen storage is greatly influenced by the acidic characteristics of MWNT surfaces, resulting in enhanced electron acceptor-donor interaction at interfaces.

  15. Hydrogen production employing Spirulina maxima 2342: A chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juantorena, A.U.; Santoyo, E.; Gamboa, S.A.; Lastres, O.D. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Temixco 62580, Morelos (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Temixco 62580, Morelos (Mexico); Cuerpo Academico de Energia, UP Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Sanchez-Escamilla, D. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Bustos, A. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, UNAM, Ave. Universidad, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Eapen, D. [Investigacion y Desarrollo en Agroindustria, UP Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    The biomass of the cyanobacteria, Spirulina maxima 2342, was autotrophically obtained in a 20 l bioreactor under illumination and air bubbling and analyzed for its photobiological hydrogen production capability. A volume of 250 ml of Spirulina sp. taken from the reactor was used as culture sample for performing the experiments. An illumination-agitation process was employed to induce the hydrogen photoproduction reaction. The hydrogen produced in this process was quantified by gas chromatography technique using Molesieve 5 A(16ft x (1)/(8)in) column and a thermal conductivity detector (with a detector temperature of 110{sup o}C and a column temperature of 60{sup o}C). The culture samples were finally observed in an electron microscope to evaluate the effect of vacuum on the Spirulina sp. cells. (author)

  16. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary...... and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  17. Note: Dissolved hydrogen detection in power transformer oil based on chemically etched fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Ma, Guo-ming; Song, Hong-tu; Zhou, Hong-yang; Li, Cheng-rong; Luo, Ying-ting; Wang, Hong-bin

    2015-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on chemically etched cladding to detect dissolved hydrogen is proposed and studied in this paper. Low hydrogen concentration tests have been carried out in mixed gases and transformer oil to investigate the repeatability and sensitivity. Moreover, to estimate the influence of etched cladding thickness, a physical model of FBG-based hydrogen sensor is analyzed. Experimental results prove that thin cladding chemically etched by HF acid solution improves the response to hydrogen detection in oil effectively. At last, the sensitivity of FBG sensor chemically etched 16 μm could be as high as 0.060 pm/(μl/l), increased by more than 30% in comparison to un-etched FBG. PMID:26521000

  18. Hydrogenation of rapeseed oil for production of liquid bio-chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Production of renewable liquid hydrocarbons through rapeseed oil hydrogenation. ► Hydrogenation at lower temperature and lower hydrogen pressures. ► Test of a catalyst commonly employed in petrochemical industry. ► Improve of hydrogenation process viability by decreasing operational costs. ► Analysis of hydrogenated product applications as bio-chemicals. -- Abstract: The main objective of rapeseed oil hydrogenation tests was the production of liquid bio-chemicals to be used as renewable raw material for the production of several chemicals and in chemical synthesis to substitute petroleum derived stuff. As, hydrogenation of vegetable oils is already applied for the production of biofuels, the work done focused in producing aromatic compounds, due to their economic value. The effect of experimental conditions on rapeseed oil hydrogenation was studied, namely, reaction temperature and time with the aim of selecting the most favourable conditions to convert rapeseed oil into liquid valuable bio-chemicals. Rapeseed oil was hydrogenated at a hydrogen initial pressure of 1.10 MPa. Reaction temperature varied in the range from 200 °C to 400 °C, while reaction times between 6 and 180 min were tested. The performance of a commercial cobalt and molybdenum catalyst was also studied. The highest hydrocarbons yields were obtained at the highest temperature and reaction times tested. At a temperature of 400 °C and at the reaction time of 120 min hydrocarbons yield was about 92% in catalyst presence, while in the absence of the catalyst this value decreased to 85%. Hydrocarbons yield was even higher when the reaction time of 180 min was used in the presence of catalyst, as the yield of 97% was observed. At these conditions hydrocarbons formed had a high content of aromatic compounds, around 50%. For this reason, the viscosity values of hydrogenated oils were lower than that established by EN590, which together with hydrogenated liquids composition

  19. Thermodynamic Feasibility of Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production Supported by Iron Based Chemical Looping Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Słowiński

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuously increasing oil prices as well as stronger environmental regulations regarding greenhouse emissions made the greatest economic powers search a new, price competitive, and environment friendly energy carrier, such as hydrogen. The world research activities in these terms focus on the development of integrated hydrogen and power generating technologies, particularly technologies of hydrogen production from various carbonaceous resources, like methane, coal, biomass, or waste, often combined with carbon dioxide capture. In the paper the thermodynamic analysis of the enhancement of hydrogen production in iron based chemical looping process is presented. In this method, iron oxide is first reduced to iron with a reducing agent, such as carbon oxide, hydrogen, or mixture of both gases (synthesis gas, and then, in the inverse reaction with steam, it is regenerated to iron oxide, and pure stream of hydrogen is produced.

  20. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Wiesmann, Harold

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  1. Chemical-clathrate hybrid hydrogen storage: storage in both guest and host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Timothy A; Kim, Yongkwan; Andrews, Gary S; Ferrell, Jack R; Koh, Carolyn A; Herring, Andrew M; Sloan, E Dendy

    2008-11-12

    Hydrogen storage from two independent sources of the same material represents a novel approach to the hydrogen storage problem, yielding storage capacities greater than either of the individual constituents. Here we report a novel hydrogen storage scheme in which recoverable hydrogen is stored molecularly within clathrate cavities as well as chemically in the clathrate host material. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm the formation of beta-hydroquinone (beta-HQ) clathrate with molecular hydrogen. Hydrogen within the beta-HQ clathrate vibrates at considerably lower frequency than hydrogen in the free gaseous phase and rotates nondegenerately with splitting comparable to the rotational constant. Compared with water-based clathrate hydrate phases, the beta-HQ+H2 clathrate shows remarkable stability over a range of p-T conditions. Subsequent to clathrate decomposition, the host HQ was used to directly power a PEM fuel cell. With one H2 molecule per cavity, 0.61 wt % hydrogen may be stored in the beta-HQ clathrate cavities. When this amount is combined with complete dehydrogenation of the host hydroxyl hydrogens, the maximum hydrogen storage capacity increases nearly 300% to 2.43 wt %. PMID:18928261

  2. Hydrogen plasma and atomic oxygen treatments of diamond: Chemical versus morphological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical bonding and morphology of chemical vapor deposited diamond films were studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, following hydrogen plasma and atomic oxygen exposures. The hydrogen plasma exposure resulted in preferential etching of nondiamond carbon phases, selective etching of diamond facets, and termination of the diamond surfaces by sp3-C-H species. Exposure to atomic oxygen, on the other hand, produced significant chemical changes resulting in oxidized hydrocarbon ill defined top layer, while the morphology of the surface remained almost unchanged

  3. Hydrogen Storage in High Surface Area Carbon Nanotubes Produced by Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Bacsa, Revathi; Laurent, Christophe; Morishima, Ryuta; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Le Lay, Mikako

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, mostly single- and double-walled, are prepared by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method using H2-CH4 atmospheres with different CH4 contents. The maximum hydrogen storage at room temperatures and 10 MPa is 0.5 wt %. Contrary to expectations, purification of the carbon nanotube specimens by oxidative acid treatments or by heating in inert gas decreases the hydrogen storage. Decreasing the residual catalyst content does not necessarily lead to an increase in ASH. Moreov...

  4. Chemical Reactions and Kinetics of the Carbon Monoxide Coupling in the Presence of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fandong Meng; Genhui Xu; Zhenhua Li; Pa Du

    2002-01-01

    The chemical reactions and kinetics of the catalytic coupling reaction of carbon monoxide to diethyl oxalate were studied in the presence of hydrogen over a supported palladium catalyst in the gaseous phase at the typical coupling reaction conditions. The experiments were performed in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that hydrogen only reacts with ethyl nitrite to form ethanol, and kinetic studies revealed that the rate-determining step is the surface reaction of adsorbed hydrogen and the ethoxy radical (EtO-). A kinetic model is proposed and a comparison of the observed and calculated conversions showed that the rate expressions are of rather high confidence.

  5. Catalyst for Gas Phase Hydrogenation of Aldehydes Successfully Developed by Daqing Chemical Research Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ A national invention patent has been granted to the method for preparation of the Cu-Zn-Al system catalyst for gas phase hydrogenation of aldehydes developed by the Daqing Chemi-cal Research Center (DCRC) under the PetroChina Petro-chemical Research Institute. This technology is mainly ap-plied to the gas phase process for hydrogenation of butanal/crotonaldehyde to manufacture butanol/octanol and has brought about hundreds of million RMB of economic ben-efits since its application.

  6. Hydrogen and chemicals production by plasma reforming methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low temperature plasmas have excellent potential as on board transportation reformers for fuel cells. Because of their low temperature operation, they start up and shut down rapidly, and little energy is lost in waste heat that cannot easily be recovered from high temperature processes. Their use of electricity to drive reactions certainly requires good efficiency, but may simplify on-board systems. Partial oxidation has been shown to operate effectively as has steam reforming under these conditions. Hydrogen, COx, and C2s are the primary products of plasma reforming of methane. In this paper, the major reaction pathways and the results of the partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane will be discussed. (author)

  7. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R. K.; Shukla, S.; Saxena, S.; Lee, G.-H.; Sahajwalla, V.; Alwarappan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  8. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, R. K., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in; Sahajwalla, V. [Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Shukla, S.; Saxena, S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Lee, G.-H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Alwarappan, S., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS{sub 2}, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS{sub 2} film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS{sub 2} is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS{sub 2} shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS{sub 2} is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  9. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  10. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer

  11. Chemical bonding in hydrogen and lithium under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2015-08-01

    Though hydrogen and lithium have been assigned a common column of the periodic table, their crystalline states under common conditions are drastically different: the former at temperatures where it is crystalline is a molecular insulator, whereas the latter is a metal that takes on simple structures. On compression, however, the two come to share some structural and other similarities associated with the insulator-to-metal and metal-to-insulator transitions, respectively. To gain a deeper understanding of differences and parallels in the behaviors of compressed hydrogen and lithium, we performed an ab initio comparative study of these systems in selected identical structures. Both elements undergo a continuous pressure-induced s-p electronic transition, though this is at a much earlier stage of development for H. The valence charge density accumulates in interstitial regions in Li but not in H in structures examined over the same range of compression. Moreover, the valence charge density distributions or electron localization functions for the same arrangement of atoms mirror each other as one proceeds from one element to the other. Application of the virial theorem shows that the kinetic and potential energies jump across the first-order phase transitions in H and Li are opposite in sign because of non-local effects in the Li pseudopotential. Finally, the common tendency of compressed H and Li to adopt three-fold coordinated structures as found is explained by the fact that such structures are capable of yielding a profound pseudogap in the electronic densities of states at the Fermi level, thereby reducing the kinetic energy. These results have implications for the phase diagrams of these elements and also for the search for new structures with novel properties.

  12. Chemical bonding in hydrogen and lithium under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2015-08-14

    Though hydrogen and lithium have been assigned a common column of the periodic table, their crystalline states under common conditions are drastically different: the former at temperatures where it is crystalline is a molecular insulator, whereas the latter is a metal that takes on simple structures. On compression, however, the two come to share some structural and other similarities associated with the insulator-to-metal and metal-to-insulator transitions, respectively. To gain a deeper understanding of differences and parallels in the behaviors of compressed hydrogen and lithium, we performed an ab initio comparative study of these systems in selected identical structures. Both elements undergo a continuous pressure-induced s-p electronic transition, though this is at a much earlier stage of development for H. The valence charge density accumulates in interstitial regions in Li but not in H in structures examined over the same range of compression. Moreover, the valence charge density distributions or electron localization functions for the same arrangement of atoms mirror each other as one proceeds from one element to the other. Application of the virial theorem shows that the kinetic and potential energies jump across the first-order phase transitions in H and Li are opposite in sign because of non-local effects in the Li pseudopotential. Finally, the common tendency of compressed H and Li to adopt three-fold coordinated structures as found is explained by the fact that such structures are capable of yielding a profound pseudogap in the electronic densities of states at the Fermi level, thereby reducing the kinetic energy. These results have implications for the phase diagrams of these elements and also for the search for new structures with novel properties. PMID:26277151

  13. Chemical bonding in hydrogen and lithium under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Hoffmann, Roald [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ashcroft, N. W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics and Cornell Center for Materials Research, Cornell University, Clark Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Though hydrogen and lithium have been assigned a common column of the periodic table, their crystalline states under common conditions are drastically different: the former at temperatures where it is crystalline is a molecular insulator, whereas the latter is a metal that takes on simple structures. On compression, however, the two come to share some structural and other similarities associated with the insulator-to-metal and metal-to-insulator transitions, respectively. To gain a deeper understanding of differences and parallels in the behaviors of compressed hydrogen and lithium, we performed an ab initio comparative study of these systems in selected identical structures. Both elements undergo a continuous pressure-induced s-p electronic transition, though this is at a much earlier stage of development for H. The valence charge density accumulates in interstitial regions in Li but not in H in structures examined over the same range of compression. Moreover, the valence charge density distributions or electron localization functions for the same arrangement of atoms mirror each other as one proceeds from one element to the other. Application of the virial theorem shows that the kinetic and potential energies jump across the first-order phase transitions in H and Li are opposite in sign because of non-local effects in the Li pseudopotential. Finally, the common tendency of compressed H and Li to adopt three-fold coordinated structures as found is explained by the fact that such structures are capable of yielding a profound pseudogap in the electronic densities of states at the Fermi level, thereby reducing the kinetic energy. These results have implications for the phase diagrams of these elements and also for the search for new structures with novel properties.

  14. Chemical bonding in hydrogen and lithium under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though hydrogen and lithium have been assigned a common column of the periodic table, their crystalline states under common conditions are drastically different: the former at temperatures where it is crystalline is a molecular insulator, whereas the latter is a metal that takes on simple structures. On compression, however, the two come to share some structural and other similarities associated with the insulator-to-metal and metal-to-insulator transitions, respectively. To gain a deeper understanding of differences and parallels in the behaviors of compressed hydrogen and lithium, we performed an ab initio comparative study of these systems in selected identical structures. Both elements undergo a continuous pressure-induced s-p electronic transition, though this is at a much earlier stage of development for H. The valence charge density accumulates in interstitial regions in Li but not in H in structures examined over the same range of compression. Moreover, the valence charge density distributions or electron localization functions for the same arrangement of atoms mirror each other as one proceeds from one element to the other. Application of the virial theorem shows that the kinetic and potential energies jump across the first-order phase transitions in H and Li are opposite in sign because of non-local effects in the Li pseudopotential. Finally, the common tendency of compressed H and Li to adopt three-fold coordinated structures as found is explained by the fact that such structures are capable of yielding a profound pseudogap in the electronic densities of states at the Fermi level, thereby reducing the kinetic energy. These results have implications for the phase diagrams of these elements and also for the search for new structures with novel properties

  15. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  16. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  17. Analysis of solar chemical processes for hydrogen production from water splitting thermochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a process analysis of ZnO/Zn, Fe3O4/FeO and Fe2O3/Fe3O4 thermochemical cycles as potential high efficiency, large scale and environmentally attractive routes to produce hydrogen by concentrated solar energy. Mass and energy balances allowed estimation of the efficiency of solar thermal energy to hydrogen conversion for current process data, accounting for chemical conversion limitations. Then, the process was optimized by taking into account possible improvements in chemical conversion and heat recoveries. Coupling of the thermochemical process with a solar tower plant providing concentrated solar energy was considered to scale up the system. An economic assessment gave a hydrogen production cost of 7.98$ kg-1 and 14.75$ kg-1 of H2 for, respectively a 55 MWth and 11 MWth solar tower plant operating 40 years

  18. Quantum chemical simulation of hydrogen like states in silicon and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantum-chemical methods of the complete neglect of differential overlap (CNDO) and intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) are used to calculate the electronic structure of atomic hydrogen (muonium) located at different interstital sites of the silicon and diamond crystal lattices. The electronic g- and hyperfine interaction tensors of the impure atom are determined.The results obtained are compared with the experimental data on the 'normal' (Mu') and 'anomalous' (Mu*) muonium centers as well as on the hydrogen-bearing Si-AA9 EPR center which is a hydrogen-bearing analogue of (Mu*). The most likely localization sites for hydrogen (muonium) atoms in silicon and diamond crystals are established. 22 refs

  19. Lignin solubilization and aqueous phase reforming for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    The solubilization and aqueous phase reforming of lignin, including kraft, soda, and alcell lignin along with sugarcane bagasse, at low temperatures (T≤498 K) and pressures (P≤29 bar) is reported for the first time for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen. Analysis of lignin model compo

  20. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  1. Chemical evolution of spiral galaxies: models with star formation proportional to molecular hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi, M.; Angeles I. Díaz

    1990-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Tosi, M., Díaz, A.I. Chemical evolution of spiral galaxies: models with star formation proportional to molecular hydrogen. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 246 (1990): 616-623

  2. 75 FR 8889 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... toxic chemicals as part of a 1993 final rule (December 1, 1993, 58 FR 63500). Hydrogen sulfide was... Federal Register of February 4, 1987 (52 FR 3479) to provide guidance regarding the recommended content... Federal Register of May 23, 1991 (56 FR 23703) regarding the recommended content of petitions to...

  3. Chemical Bonding States of TiC Films before and after Hydrogen Ion Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    TiC films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering followed by Ar+ ion bombardment were irradiated with a hydrogen ion beam. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used for characterization of the chemical bonding states of C and Ti elements of the TiC films before and after hydrogen ion irradiation, in order to understand the effect of hydrogen ion irradiation on the films and to study the mechanism of hydrogen resistance of TiC films. Conclusions can be drawn that ion bombardment at moderate energy can cause preferential physical sputtering of carbon atoms from the surface of low atomic number (Z) material. This means that ion beam bombardment leads to the formation of a non-stoichiometric composition of TiC on the surface.TiC films prepared by ion beam mixing have the more excellent characteristic of hydrogen resistance. One important cause, in addition to TiC itself, is that there are many vacant sites in TiC created by ion beam mixing.These defects can easily trap hydrogen and effectively enhance the effect of hydrogen resistance.

  4. Supercritical fluid chemical deposition of Pd nanoparticles on magnesium–scandium alloy for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Nanoparticles of Pd were deposed on the binary compound Mg0.65Sc0.35 using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method. •Numerous parameters were tested and optimized in order to obtain a homogeneous deposition. •At the first step, Pd@Mg0.65Sc0.35 decomposes into ScH2 and MgH2 under hydrogen pressure (1 MPa) at 330 °C. •The mixture, after decomposition absorbs hydrogen reversibly on Mg/MgH2 couple with good kinetics. -- Abstract: The deposition of Pd nanoparticles on the binary compound Mg0.65Sc0.35 using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method was performed. There, the SFCD operating parameters (co-solvent, temperature, CO2 and hydrogen pressure, reaction time) have been optimized to obtain homogeneous deposition of Pd nanoparticles (around 10 nm). The hydrogenation properties of the optimized Pd@Mg0.65Sc0.35 material were determined and compared to those of Mg0.65Sc0.35Pd0.024. The latter compound forms at 300 °C and 1 MPa of H2 a hydride that crystallizes in the fluorite structure, absorbs reversibly 1.5 wt.% hydrogen and exhibits fast kinetics. In contrast, Pd@Mg0.65Sc0.35 compound decomposes into ScH2 and MgH2 during hydrogen absorption under the same conditions. However, reversible sorption reaches 3.3 wt.% of hydrogen while keeping good kinetics. The possible roles of Pd on the hydrogen-induced alloy decomposition are discussed

  5. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  6. Radiation induced chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies of radiation induced chemical reactions of CO-H2 mixture have revealed that the yields of oxygen containing products were larger than those of hydrocarbons. In the present study, methane was added to CO-H2 mixture in order to increase further the yields of the oxygen containing products. The yields of most products except a few products such as formaldehyde increased with the addition of small amount of methane. Especially, the yields of trioxane and tetraoxane gave the maximum values when CO-H2 mixture containing 1 mol% methane was irradiated. When large amounts of methane were added to the mixture, the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids having more than two carbon atoms increased, whereas those of trioxane and tetraoxane decreased. From the study at reaction temperature over the range of 200 to 473 K, it was found that the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids showed maxima at 323 K. The studies on the effects of addition of cationic scavenger (NH3) and radical scavenger (O2) on the products yields were also carried out on the CO-H2-CH4 mixture. (author)

  7. Ozonation of refractory chemicals in leachate with hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nearly 97% of organic chemicals in Hong Kong leachatecould be effectively removed by the UASB(upflow anaerobic sludgeblanket) process followed by the Fenton coagulation. The COD ofleachate was lowered from an average of 12900 mg/L to 1440 mg/hafter the UASB treatment, and was further lowered to 394 mg/L afterthe Fenton coagulation. The remaining refractory residues could befurther removed by ozonation with the addition of H2O2. Theozonation for the supernatant of the Fenton coagulation was mosteffective at pH 7-8, with the addition of 300 mg/L of H2O2, and 30min of reaction. The final effluent contained only 85 mg/L of CODand l0 mg/L of BOD5. On the other hand, direct ozonation of UASBeffluent lowered the COD to 905 mg/L and BOD5 to l03 mg/L.Ozonation improved the biodegradability of the organic residues,and also converted part of organic-N in the leachate into NH3-N andNO3--N.

  8. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Purohit, Sudhaunshu S.; Li, Han; King, Sean W.; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David; Lanford, William A.; Paquette, Michelle M.

    2015-07-01

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-BxC:Hy) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (EU), and Tauc parameter (B1/2)], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-BxC:Hy thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm3, Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 1010 to 1015 Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ˜1.3 g/cm3 (or below ˜35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters EU and B1/2, with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in structural disorder. All of these correlations in a-BxC:Hy are found to be very similar to those

  9. Adsorption and dissociation of molecular hydrogen on Pt/CeO2 catalyst in the hydrogen spillover process: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamics method (UA-QCMD) was used to study the dynamics of the hydrogen spillover process on Pt/CeO2 catalyst surface for the first time. The direct observation of dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on Pt/CeO2 catalyst surface as well as the diffusion of dissociative hydrogen from the Pt/CeO2 catalyst surface was simulated. The diffusion of the hydrogen atom in the gas phase explains the high reactivity observed in the hydrogen spillover process. Chemical changes, change of adsorption states and structural changes were investigated. It was observed that parallel adsorption of hydrogen facilitates the dissociative adsorption leading to hydrogen desorption. Impact with perpendicular adsorption of hydrogen causes the molecular adsorption on the surface, which decelerates the hydrogen spillover. The present study also indicates that the CeO2 support has strong interaction with Pt catalyst, which may cause an increase in Pt activity as well as enhancement of the metal catalyst dispersions and hence increasing the rate of hydrogen spillover reaction.

  10. Hydrogen dilution effect on microstructure of Si thin film grown by catalyzer enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hydrogen dilution on microstructure of in situ polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) films grown by catalyzer-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CECVD) has been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) analysis. It was shown that the increase of the hydrogen dilution ratio resulted in transition of microstructure of Si thin film from amorphous to polycrystalline in CECVD at low substrate temperature (∼80 deg. C). These results indicate that the CECVD technique is a promising candidate to grow high-quality in situ polycrystalline Si films on glass or a flexible substrate for low-temperature poly-Si (LTPS) and flexible displays

  11. Hydrogen dilution effect on microstructure of Si thin film grown by catalyzer enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han-Ki [School of Advanced Materials and Systems Engineering, Kumoh National Institute of Technology (KIT), 1 Yangho-dong, Gumi, Gyeongbuk, 730-701 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hkkim@kumoh.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    The effect of hydrogen dilution on microstructure of in situ polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) films grown by catalyzer-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CECVD) has been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) analysis. It was shown that the increase of the hydrogen dilution ratio resulted in transition of microstructure of Si thin film from amorphous to polycrystalline in CECVD at low substrate temperature ({approx}80 deg. C). These results indicate that the CECVD technique is a promising candidate to grow high-quality in situ polycrystalline Si films on glass or a flexible substrate for low-temperature poly-Si (LTPS) and flexible displays.

  12. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum

  13. Study on the retention behavior of hydrogen isotopes and the change of chemical states of boron film exposed to hydrogen plasma in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Akiko, E-mail: r0032021@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Kobayashi, Makoto; Matsuoka, Katsushi; Suzuki, Masato; Osuo, Junya [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Hatano, Yuji [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    The behavior of hydrogen retention and the change of chemical states of boron film exposed to hydrogen plasma in LHD were investigated. The sample was prepared in LHD, and atomic concentrations for the boron film after hydrogen plasma exposure were changed from 75% for boron, 15% for carbon and 8% for oxygen to 53%, 18% and 22%, respectively. B-C bond was a major chemical state of the boron film after hydrogen plasma exposure, although abundance of B-B bond was the highest before the plasma exposure. Total hydrogen retention measured by TDS was evaluated to be 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} H m{sup -2}, and the retentions of hydrogen as B-H-B, B-H and B-C-H bonds were, respectively, 4.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}, 7.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} and 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} H m{sup -2}. It was concluded that the hydrogen retention could be estimated by taking account not only of chemical states of impurities, but also of hydrogen depth profile.

  14. Corrosion test of structural materials for thermo-chemical and electrolytic hybrid hydrogen production cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion behavior of structural materials for thermo-chemical and electrolytic hydrogen production cycle was investigated in liquid and gaseous sulfuric acid in the temperature range of 200-500degC. The cycle is one of the hydrogen production methods using sulfuric acid and the maximum temperature through the processes is about 500degC. In this study, corrosion tests of candidate structural materials for equipment of the hydrogen production plant were performed at the conditions each equipment will be used. The concentration of sulfuric acid was 95 mass% in all experiments and maximum test duration was 500 h. Only high Si cast iron had good corrosion resistance in the boiling sulfuric acid, whereas high Si cast iron and Hastelloy C276 had good corrosion resistance in the sulfurous acid gas atmosphere (vaporized sulfuric acid or mixture of sulfur dioxide and water vapor). Furthermore, post test analysis by optical microscope and SEM-EDX were performed. (author)

  15. Effect of calcium cyanamide, ammonium bicarbonate and lime mixture, and ammonia water on survival of Ralstonia solanacearum and microbial community

    OpenAIRE

    Lijuan Liu; Chengliang Sun; Xingxing Liu; Xiaolin He; Miao Liu; Hao Wu; Caixian Tang; Chongwei Jin; Yongsong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The inorganic nitrogenous amendments calcium cyanamide (CC), ammonia water (AW), and a mixture of ammonium bicarbonate with lime (A+L) are popularly used as fumigants to control soil-borne disease in China. However, it is unclear which of these fumigants is more effective in controlling R. solanacearum. This present study compared the efficiencies of the three nitrogenous amendments listed above at four nitrogen levels in suppressing the survival of R. solanacearum in soil. The CC showed the ...

  16. Synthesis and enhanced hydrogen desorption kinetics of magnesium hydride using hydriding chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Ho [Icheon Branch, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology (KICET), Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Goan [Korea Energy Materials Co.Ltd., 409, Daegu Technopark, 1-11, Hosan-Dong, Dalse-Gu 704-230 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yong-Mook, E-mail: dake@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Dongguk University-Seoul, 100715 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized pure MgH{sub 2} by a hydriding chemical vapor synthesis process in a hydrogen atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particle size HCVS-MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} desorbed hydrogen up to about 7.2 wt% and 7.1 wt%. - Abstract: This paper describes the hydriding chemical vapor synthesis (HCVS) of the hydrogen storage alloy MgH{sub 2} in a hydrogen atmosphere and the product's hydrogenation properties. Mg powder was used as a starting material to produce submicron MgH{sub 2} and uniformly heated to a temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C for Mg vaporization. The effects of deposited positions in HCVS reactor on the morphology and the composition of the obtained products were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. It is clearly seen that after the HCVS process, the particle size of synthesized MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale and these showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. The hydrogen desorption temperatures of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). It was found that after the HCVS process, the desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} decreased from 430 to 385 Degree-Sign C and, simultaneously, the smallest particle size and the highest specific surface area were obtained. These observations indicate that the minimum hydrogen desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} powder with needle-like form can be obtained, and that this temperature is dependent on the particle size and the specific surface area of the products. The thermogravimetric

  17. Problems of application of porous silicon to chemical and photocatalytic production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advantages of the use of silicon and porous silicon (PS) for the chemical production of hydrogen have been analyzed and compared with other fuels. An analytic expression is derived for the dependence of the volume of hydrogen produced at the PS interaction with water on the material porosity, as well as for the corresponding energy yield, when the produced gas is used in the power sources of electronic systems. It is found that the silicon porosity growth results in a reduction of the total volume of hydrogen released in the reaction with water, as compared with the amount of H2 obtained from the initial quantity of raw silicon. This effect is explained by significant losses of a material at PS formation. The ratio between the accumulation of hydrogen in the PS material and silicon losses in the etchant is determined to be optimal for the silicon porosity in the interval of 60-70%. When applying the produced hydrogen in fuel cells, the etching of silicon provides a growth of the output power, but reduces the total amount of the produced energy. Those mechanisms are analyzed to demonstrate the inexpedience of using the composites on the basis of pure nano-PS for the photocatalytic water dissociation

  18. Computer simulation of chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, J H; Roth, J; Eckstein, W

    2003-01-01

    Chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment has been investigated theoretically by applying a model of chemical erosion to the TRIDYN code. The model involves the formation of methane at the end of the ion track as well as the kinetic emission of hydrocarbons from the target surface. Model calculations were performed for ion energies ranging from 10 to 1000 eV and at target temperatures ranging from 300 to 900 K. Good agreement between calculated and measured erosion yields is obtained.

  19. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Paquette, Michelle M., E-mail: paquettem@umkc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Purohit, Sudhaunshu S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Li, Han; King, Sean W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Lanford, William A. [Department of Physics, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y}) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (E{sub U}), and Tauc parameter (B{sup 1/2})], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y} thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm{sup 3}, Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 15} Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ∼1.3 g/cm{sup 3} (or below ∼35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters E{sub U} and B{sup 1/2}, with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in

  20. 75 FR 19319 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... requirements for hydrogen sulfide (75 FR 8889). B. Why and for How Long Is EPA Extending the Comment Period... Number (CAS No.) 7783-06-4) (75 FR 8889). The purpose of today's action is to inform interested parties... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical...

  1. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  2. Surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates pretreated by alkali hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xueping; Jiang, Yan; Rong, Xianjian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Shuangfei; Nie, Shuangxi

    2016-09-01

    The surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates by alkali hydrogen peroxide pretreatment (AHPP) were investigated in this study. The results tended to manifest that AHPP prior to enzymatic and chemical treatment was potential for improving accessibility and reactivity of bamboo substrates. The inorganic components, organic solvent extractives and acid-soluble lignin were effectively removed by AHPP. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the surface of bamboo chips had less lignin but more carbohydrate after pre-treatment. Fiber surfaces became etched and collapsed, and more pores and debris on the substrate surface were observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Brenauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) results showed that both of pore volume and surface area were increased after AHPP. Although XRD analysis showed that AHPP led to relatively higher crystallinity, pre-extraction could overall enhance the accessibility of enzymes and chemicals into the bamboo structure. PMID:27311789

  3. Chemical and Phase Evolution of Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide Catalysts for Electrochemical Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Benck, Jesse D; Tsai, Charlie; Park, Joonsuk; Koh, Ai Leen; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Sinclair, Robert

    2016-01-26

    Amorphous MoSx is a highly active, earth-abundant catalyst for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction. Previous studies have revealed that this material initially has a composition of MoS3, but after electrochemical activation, the surface is reduced to form an active phase resembling MoS2 in composition and chemical state. However, structural changes in the MoSx catalyst and the mechanism of the activation process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image amorphous MoSx catalysts activated under two hydrogen-rich conditions: ex situ in an electrochemical cell and in situ in an environmental TEM. For the first time, we directly observe the formation of crystalline domains in the MoSx catalyst after both activation procedures as well as spatially localized changes in the chemical state detected via electron energy loss spectroscopy. Using density functional theory calculations, we investigate the mechanisms for this phase transformation and find that the presence of hydrogen is critical for enabling the restructuring process. Our results suggest that the surface of the amorphous MoSx catalyst is dynamic: while the initial catalyst activation forms the primary active surface of amorphous MoS2, continued transformation to the crystalline phase during electrochemical operation could contribute to catalyst deactivation. These results have important implications for the application of this highly active electrocatalyst for sustainable H2 generation. PMID:26624225

  4. Extent of hydrogen coverage of Si(001) under chemical vapor deposition conditions from ab initio approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Phil; Tonner, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The extent of hydrogen coverage of the Si(001) c(4 × 2) surface in the presence of hydrogen gas has been studied with dispersion corrected density functional theory. Electronic energy contributions are well described using a hybrid functional. The temperature dependence of the coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium was studied computing the phonon spectrum in a supercell approach. As an approximation to these demanding computations, an interpolated phonon approach was found to give comparable accuracy. The simpler ab initio thermodynamic approach is not accurate enough for the system studied, even if corrections by the Einstein model for surface vibrations are considered. The on-set of H2 desorption from the fully hydrogenated surface is predicted to occur at temperatures around 750 K. Strong changes in hydrogen coverage are found between 1000 and 1200 K in good agreement with previous reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy experiments. These findings allow a rational choice for the surface state in the computational treatment of chemical reactions under typical metal organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions on Si(001).

  5. Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, Matthew P.; Chun, Jaehun; Choi, Young Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2016-01-25

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high hydrogen content of 14-16 wt% below 200°C and high volumetric density. In our previous paper, we selected AB in silicone oil as a role model for a slurry hydrogen storage system. Materials engineering properties were optimized by increasing solid loading by using an ultra-sonic process. In this paper, we proceeded to scale up to liter size batches with solid loadings up to 50 wt% (8 wt% H2) with dynamic viscosities less than 1000cP at 25°C. The use of a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-15, shows significant promise in controlling the level of foaming produced during the thermal dehydrogenation of the AB. Through the development of new and efficient processing techniques and the ability to adequately control the foaming, stable homogenous slurries of high solid loading have been demonstrated as a viable hydrogen delivery source.

  6. Middle atmosphere heating by exothermic chemical reactions involving odd-hydrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Solomon, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The rate of heating which occurs in the middle atmosphere due to four exothermic reactions involving members of the odd-hydrogen family is calculated. The following reactions are considered: O + OH yields O2 + H; H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M; H + O3 yields OH + O2; and O + HO2 yields OH + O2. It is shown that the heating rates due to these reactions rival the oxygen-related heating rates conventionally considered in middle-atmosphere models. The conversion of chemical potential energy into molecular translational energy (heat) by these odd-hydrogen reactions is shown to be a significant energy source in the middle atmosphere that has not been previously considered.

  7. Recombinant human diamine oxidase activity is not inhibited by ethanol, acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate or cyanamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartko, Johann; Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Petroczi, Karin; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO, EC 1.4.3.22) is the key enzyme in the degradation of extracellular histamine. Consumption of alcohol is a known trigger of mast cell degranulation in patients with mast cell activation syndrome. Ethanol may also interfere with enzymatic histamine degradation, but reports on the effects on DAO activity are controversial. There are also conflicting reports whether disulfiram, an FDA-approved agent in the treatment of alcohol dependence, inhibits DAO. We therefore investigated the inhibitory potential of ethanol and disulfiram and their metabolites on recombinant human DAO (rhDAO) in three different assay systems. Relevant concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate did not inhibit rhDAO activity in an in vitro assay system using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) -mediated luminol oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; EC 1.2.1.3) inhibitors cyanamide and its dimer dicyanamide also had no effect on DAO activity. In one assay system, the irreversible ALDH inhibitor disulfiram and its main metabolite diethyldithiocarbamate seemed to inhibit DAO activity. However, the decreased product formation was not due to a direct block of DAO activity but resulted from inhibition of peroxidase employed in the coupled system. Our in vitro data do not support a direct blocking effect of ethanol, disulfiram, and their metabolites on DAO activity in vivo. PMID:27401969

  8. Acute toxic effect of calcium cyanamide on golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata).%石灰氮对福寿螺的急性毒性效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵本良; 章家恩; 代魏; 罗明珠; 宋春秀

    2011-01-01

    福寿螺(Pomacea canaliculata)是世界自然保护联盟认定的世界100种恶性外来入侵物种之一,在华南地区已对水稻生产造成严重危害.本研究将福寿螺按照壳高(H)分为小螺(5 mm≤H<15 mm)、中螺(15 mm≤H<25 mm)、大螺(25 mm≤H<35 mm)和超大螺(35 mm≤H<45 mm),通过室内毒性试验,探讨了化学肥料石灰氮(氰氨化钙)对不同体型福寿螺的毒性效应.结果表明:石灰氮对不同大小福寿螺毒性效应显著,尤其是对中小福寿螺具有很强的抑制和杀灭作用;石灰氮处理7 d后,最低浓度0.2 g·L-1处理造成71%死亡率,其他处理死亡率均在95%以上,其中3.0和5.0 g·L-1处理中福寿螺全部死亡;石灰氮对不同大小福寿螺的半抑制浓度(24 h)和半致死浓度(96 h)大小顺序均为小螺<中螺<大螺<超大螺;石灰氮对福寿螺的抑制效应显著,其对福寿螺的平均半抑制浓度为0.08~0.39 g·L-1;1.0和5.0 g·L-1浓度的石灰氮处理24 h后,福寿螺鳃组织SOD酶活性呈极显著下降,分别为对照的41%和60%.本研究表明,石灰氮在入侵生物福寿螺的防治方面有一定应用潜力,有望成为一种新型的"杀螺肥料".%Golden apple snail ( Pomacea canaliculata) is one of the 100 worst invasive alien species cognized by World Conservation Union, and has been resulting in a mass loss of rice production in South China. In this study, the snails according to their shell height ( H) were divided in to four groups, i. e. , small size (5 mm ≤ H<15 mm), medium size (15 mm ≤ H<25 mm), large size (25 mm≤H<35 mm) , and extra large size (35 mm≤ H<45 mm) , and a laboratory toxicity test was conducted to evaluate the molluscicidal activity of chemical fertilizer calcium cyanamide ( CaCN2) in controlling different sizes P. canaliculata. Calcium cyanamide had signifi cant molluscicidal effect on different sizes, especially small and medium sizes P. canaliculata. After treated one week, 0. 2 g

  9. Reasoned opinion on the review of the existing maximum residue levels (MRLs for cyanamide according to Article 12 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to Article 12 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA has reviewed the Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs currently established at European level for the pesticide active substance cyanamide. Considering that this active substance is no longer authorised within the European Union, that no MRLs are established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission, and that no import tolerances were notified to EFSA, residues of cyanamide are not expected to occur in any plant or animal commodity. Available data were also not sufficient to derive a residue definition or an LOQ for enforcement against potential illegal uses.

  10. An Integrated Photoelectrochemical-Chemical Loop for Solar-Driven Overall Splitting of Hydrogen Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Han, Jingfeng; Seger, Brian;

    2014-01-01

    Abundant and toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from industry and nature has been traditionally considered a liability. However, it represents a potential resource if valuable H-2 and elemental sulfur can be simultaneously extracted through a H2S splitting reaction. Herein a photochemical-chemical loop...... linked by redox couples such as Fe2+/Fe3+ and I-/I-3(-) for photoelectrochemical H-2 production and H2S chemical absorption redox reactions are reported. Using functionalized Si as photoelectrodes, H2S was successfully split into elemental sulfur and H-2 with high stability and selectivity under...... simulated solar light. This new conceptual design will not only provide a possible route for using solar energy to convert H2S into valuable resources, but also sheds light on some challenging photochemical reactions such as CH4 activation and CO2 reduction....

  11. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH3OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH3OOH with CF3O- clustering chemistry. CH3OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H2O is ±80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H2O is estimated to be better than ±40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

  12. Excitation of the aromatic infrared emission bands: Chemical energy in hydrogenated amorphous carbon particles?

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, Walter W

    2011-01-01

    We outline a model for the heating of hydrogenated amorphous (HAC) dust via the release of stored chemical energy and show that this energy (~12 kJ/mole) is sufficient to heat dust grains of classical size (50-1000 {\\AA}) to temperatures at which they can emit at 3.3 {\\mu}m and other "UIR" wavelengths. Using laboratory data, we show that this heating process is consistent with a concentration of a few percent of dangling bonds in HAC and may be initiated by the recombination of trapped H atoms. We suggest that the release of chemical energy from dust represents an additional source of excitation for the UIR bands relaxing the previous requirement that only stochastically heated molecules having fewer than ~ 50 atoms can produce emission at 3.3 {\\mu}m.

  13. Characterization of chemical vapour deposited diamond films: correlation between hydrogen incorporation and film morphology and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to tailor diamond synthesized through chemical vapour deposition (CVD) for different applications, many diamond films of different colours and variable quality were deposited by a 5 kW microwave plasma CVD reactor under different growth conditions. The morphology, quality and hydrogen incorporation of these films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively. From this study, a general trend between hydrogen incorporation and film colour, morphology and quality was found. That is, as the films sorted by colour gradually become darker, ranging from white through grey to black, high magnification SEM images illustrate that the smoothness of the well defined crystalline facet gradually decreases and second nucleation starts to appear on it, indicating gradual degradation of the crystalline quality. Correspondingly, Raman spectra evidence that the diamond Raman peak at 1332 cm-1 becomes broader and the non-diamond carbon band around 1500 cm-1 starts to appear and becomes stronger, confirming increase of the non-diamond component and decrease of the phase purity of the film, while FTIR spectra show that the CH stretching band and the two CVD diamond specific peaks around 2830 cm-1 rise rapidly, and this indicates that the total amount of hydrogen incorporated into the film increases significantly

  14. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  15. Facile Gold-Catalyzed Heterocyclization of Terminal Alkynes and Cyanamides Leading to Substituted 2-Amino-1,3-Oxazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassadin, Valentin A; Boyarskiy, Vadim P; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2015-07-17

    Facile gold-catalyzed heterocyclization based upon intermolecular trapping of the generated α-oxo gold carbenes with various cyanamides R(2)R(3)NCN (R(2)/R(3) = Alk/Alk, -(CH2)2O(CH2)2-, Ar/Ar, Ar/H) has been developed. In most cases, 2-amino-1,3-oxazoles functionalized at the nitrogen atom as well as at the fifth position of the heterocyclic ring (12 examples) were isolated in good to moderate yields. PMID:26135038

  16. Thermodynamic Possibilities of Pure Hydrogen Production by a Nickel or Cobalt-based Redox Chemical Looping Process at Lower Temperatures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael; Wieczorek, K.; Baxter, D.; Schosger, J.P.

    Bratislava: Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering, 2007 - (Markoš, J.; Štefuca, V.), s. 241 ISBN 978-80-227-2640-5. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /34./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 21.05.2007-25.05.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrogen * nickel * cobalt Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  17. Hydrogenation of CO-bearing species on grains: unexpected chemical desorption of CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, M.; Moudens, A.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-05-01

    The amount of methanol in the gas phase and the CO depletion from the gas phase are still open problems in astrophysics. In this work, we investigate solid-state hydrogenation of CO-bearing species via H-exposure of carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methanol-thin films deposited on cold surfaces, paying attention to the possibility of a return to the gas phase. The products are probed via infrared spectroscopy (reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy), and two types of mass spectroscopy protocols: temperature-programmed desorption, and during-exposure desorption techniques. In the case of the [CO+H] reactive system, we have found that chemical desorption of CO is more efficient than H-addition reactions and HCO and H2CO formation; the studies of the [H2CO +H] reactive system show a strong competition between all surface processes, chemical desorption of H2CO, H-addition (CH3OH formation) and H-abstraction (CO formation); finally, [CH3OH + H] seems to be a non-reactive system and chemical desorption of methanol is not efficient. CO-bearing species present a see-saw mechanism between CO and H2CO balanced by the competition of H-addition and H2-abstraction that enhances the CO chemical desorption. The chemical network leading to methanol has to be reconsidered. The methanol formation on the surface of interstellar dust grain is still possible through CO+H reaction; nevertheless, its consumption of adsorbed H atoms should be higher than previously expected.

  18. Advanced construction materials for thermo-chemical hydrogen production from VHTR process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (very) high temperature reactor concept ((V)HTR) is characterized by its potential for process heat applications. The production of hydrogen by means of thermo-chemical cycles is an appealing example, since it is more efficient than electrolysis due to the direct use of process heat. The sulfur-iodine cycle is one of the best studied processes for the production of hydrogen, and solar or nuclear energy can be used as a heating source for the high temperature reaction of this process. The chemical reactions involved in the cycle are: I2 (l) + SO2 (g) +2 H2O (l) → 2HI (l) + H2SO4 (l) (70-120 deg. C); H2SO4 (l) → H2O (l) + SO2 (g) + 1/2 O2 (g) (800-900 deg. C); 2HI (l) → I2 (g) + H2 (g) (300-450 deg. C) The high temperature decomposition of sulphuric acid, which is the most endothermic reaction, results in a very aggressive chemical environment which is why suitable materials for the decomposer heat exchanger have to be identified. The class of candidate materials for the decomposer is based on SiC. In the current study, SiC based materials were tested in order to determine the residual mechanical properties (flexural strength and bending modulus, interfacial strength of brazed joints), after exposure to an SO2 rich environment, simulating the conditions in the hydrogen production plant. Brazed SiC specimens were tested after 20, 100, 500 and 1000 hrs exposure to SO2 rich environment at 850oC under atmospheric pressure. The gas composition in the corrosion rig was: 9.9 H2O, 12.25 SO2, 6.13 O2, balance N2 (% mol). The characterization involved: weight change monitoring, SEM microstructural analysis and four-point bending tests after exposure. Most of the specimens gained weight due to the formation of a corrosion layer as observed in the SEM. The corrosion treatment also showed an effect on the mechanical properties. In the four-point bending tests performed at room temperature and at 850 deg. C, a decrease in bending modulus with exposure time was observed

  19. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Robers [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Dryer, Frederick [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ju, Yiguang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  20. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  1. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H2 Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  2. A hydrogen and oxygen combined cycle with chemical-looping combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new system integrating CLC and the H2 and O2 combined cycle was proposed. • The new system has been investigated with the aid of the exergy principle. • The net efficiency of new system is 59.8% with CO2 capture when TIT is 1300 °C. • Efficiency are 8–12% higher than combined cycle with CO2 capture. - Abstract: In the current paper, new systems integrating chemical-looping hydrogen (CLH) generation and the hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) combined cycle have been proposed. The new methane-fueled cycle using CLH has been investigated with the aid of the exergy principle (energy utilization diagram methodology). First, H2 is produced in the CLH, in which FeO and Fe3O4 are used as the looping material. The H2 and O2 combined cycle then uses H2 as fuel. Two types of these combined cycles have been analyzed. Waste heat from the H2–O2 combined cycle is utilized in the CLH to produce H2. The advantages of CLH and the H2 and O2 combined cycle have resulted in a breakthrough in performance. The new system can achieve 59.8% net efficiency with CO2 separation when the turbine inlet temperature is 1300 °C. Meanwhile, the cycle is environmentally superior because of the recovery of CO2 without an energy penalty

  3. Hydrogen-free spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition method for the carbon nanotube growth: Parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the absence of hydrogen at low carrier gas flow rates has been used for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A parametric study of the carbon nanotube growth has been conducted by optimizing various parameters such as temperature, injection speed, precursor volume, and catalyst concentration. Experimental observations and characterizations reveal that the growth rate, size and quality of the carbon nanotubes are significantly dependent on the reaction parameters. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the morphology, structure and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes. The synthesis process can be applied to both semiconducting silicon wafer and conducting substrates such as carbon microfibers and stainless steel plates. This approach promises great potential in building various nanodevices with different electron conducting requirements. In addition, the absence of hydrogen as a carrier gas and the relatively low synthesis temperature (typically 750 deg. C) qualify the spray pyrolysis CVD method as a safe and easy way to scale up the CNT growth, which is applicable in industrial production.

  4. Characterization of doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin-Liang; Wu Er-Xing

    2007-01-01

    The B-and P-doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films (nc-Si:H) are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) .The microstructures of doped nc-Si:H films are carefully and systematically char acterized by using high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) ,Raman scattering,x-ray diffraction (XRD) ,Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) ,and resonant nucleus reaction (RNR) .The results show that as the doping concentration of PH3 increases,the average grain size (d) tends to decrease and the crystalline volume percentage (Xc) increases simultaneously.For the B-doped samples,as the doping concentration of B2H6 increases,no obvious change in the value of d is observed,but the value of Xc is found to decrease.This is especially apparent in the case of heavy B2H6 doped samples,where the films change from nanocrystalline to amorphous.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  6. Design of an isopropanol–acetone–hydrogen chemical heat pump with exothermic reactors in series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isopropanol–acetone–hydrogen chemical heat pump system with a series of exothermic reactors in which the reaction temperatures decrease successively is proposed. This system shows the better energy performances as compared with the traditional system with a single exothermic reactor, especially when the higher upgraded temperature is need. At the same amounts of the heat released, the work input of the compressor and the heater are both reduced notably. The results indicate that the advantages of the IAH-CHP system with exothermic reactors in series are obvious. - Highlights: • We propose the IAH-CHP system with exothermic reactors in series. • The COP and exergy efficiency of the system increase by 7.6% and 10.3% respectively. • The work input of the system is reduced notably at the same quantity of heat released

  7. Organic chemical hydrides as storage medium of hydrogen on the basis of superheated liquid-film concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A catalysis pair of tetralin dehydrogenation / naphthalene hydrogenation has been proposed in the present paper as an organic chemical hydride for operating stationary fuel cells. Catalytic naphthalene hydrogenation, having been commercialized since the 1940's, proceeds to generate decalin via tetralin as an intermediate. The storage capacities of tetralin (3.0 wt%, 28.2 kg-H2 / m3) are lower than decalin (7.3 wt%, 64.8 kg-H2 / m3) but both tetralin dehydrogenation and naphthalene hydrogenation are much faster than the decalin / naphthalene pair. Moreover, existing infrastructures, e.g., gas station and tank lorry, are available for storage, transportation and supply of hydrogen. As for the stationary fuel cells with large space for hydrogen storage, tetralin as a hydrogen carrier is superior to decalin in terms of fast hydrogen supply. Rapid hydrogen supply from tetralin under mild conditions was only accomplished with the carbon supported metal catalysts in the 'superheated liquid-film states' under reactive distillation conditions. In contrast to the ordinary suspended states, the catalyst layer superheated in the liquid-film state gave high catalytic performances at around 250 C. As a result, serious coke formation over the catalyst surface and excessive exergy consumption were prevented simultaneously. (authors)

  8. Study on HIx cycling techniques for thermo chemical hydrogen production process. R and D on refractory and corrosion resistant pressure sensor for hydrogen iodide cycling test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High refractory and corrosion resistant pressure sensor with tantalum/SUS 316 welding type diaphragm has been developed for hydrogen iodide cycling test in thermo chemical hydrogen production process and tested its fatigue and corrosion properties. With these results, the following conclusions were derived. (1) New type of high refractory and corrosion resistant alloy was found in Ta/SUS 316 welding region and its elemental composition was identified as 83Ta-11Fe-2Ni-2Cr-2Mo [wt.%]. (2) This pressure sensor achieved a new record of the longest fatigue life over 107 cycles within 0.44%F.S./degC and (3) No degradation of its mechanical and sensitivity properties was found after 20000 hours hydrogen iodide cycling test. (author)

  9. Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the...

  10. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  11. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  12. Chemical kinetic analysis of hydrogen-air ignition and reaction times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, R. C.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An anaytical study of hydrogen air kinetics was performed. Calculations were made over a range of pressure from 0.2 to 4.0 atm, temperatures from 850 to 2000 K, and mixture equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 2.0. The finite rate chemistry model included 60 reactions in 20 species of the H2-O2-N2 system. The calculations also included an assessment of how small amounts of the chemicals H2O, NOx, H2O2, and O3 in the initial mixture affect ignition and reaction times, and how the variation of the third body efficiency of H2O relative of N2 in certain key reactions may affect reaction time. The results indicate that for mixture equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7, ignition times are nearly constant; however, the presence of H2O and NO can have significant effects on ignition times, depending on the mixture temperature. Reaction time is dominantly influenced by pressure but is nearly independent of initial temperature, equivalence ratio, and the addition of chemicals. Effects of kinetics on reaction at supersonic combustor conditions are discussed.

  13. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. Chemical aspects of hydrogen ingress in zirconium and zircaloy pressure tubes: ageing management of Indian PHWR coolant channels - determination of hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) use zirconium and zirconium based alloys as clad and coolant tubes since its beginning. The first ever zircaloy-2 pressure tube failure occurred in 1983 at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Unit 2 in Canada which necessitated a thorough examination of causes of such failure. The failure was attributed to massive hydriding at the failed spot of pressure tube. Continuous usage of zirconium alloys could result in their hydrogen and deuterium pick-up leading to hydrogen/ deuterium embrittlement. The life of the zircaloy coolant channels is dictated by hydrogen/deuterium content and hence ageing management of the pressure tubes is essential for ensuring their trouble-free usage. It is desirable to have a sound knowledge on the chemical aspects of zirconium and zirconium based alloys metallurgy, the mechanistic principles of hydrogen ingress into the pressure tubes during in reactor service, and identifying suitable analytical methodologies for precise and accurate determination of hydrogen in wafer thin sliver samples carved out from insides of pressure tubes without causing any structural damage so that it can continue to remain in service. This is desirable so that the ageing management does not result in cost-escalation. This report is divided in to three main parts. The first part deals with the chemical aspects of zirconium and zirconium based alloy metallurgy, the mechanism of hydrogen pick-up and hydride formation in zirconium matrix. The second part describes various methodologies and their limitations, available for hydrogen/deuterium determination. The third part deals in detail, about the extensive investigations carried out at Radioanalytical Chemistry Division (RACD) in Radiochemistry and Isotope Group for establishing an indigenously developed hot vacuum extraction system in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry for precise determination of hydrogen and deuterium in wafer thin sliver sample of zircaloy. The

  15. Thermodynamic Possibilities and Constraints for Pure Hydrogen Production by Iron Based Chemical Looping Process at Lower Temperatures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Slowinski, G.; Rogut, J.; Baxter, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, 12 (2007) , s. 3063-3073. ISSN 0196-8904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : iron * hydrogen production * magnetite Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.180, year: 2007

  16. The application of entransy theory in optimization design of Isopropanol–Acetone–Hydrogen chemical heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, a multi-parameter optimization approach of Isopropanol–Acetone–Hydrogen (IAH) chemical heat pump is developed based on the entransy theory. In the optimization process, the total low-temperature heat consumed by the heat pump system generally decreases while the high-temperature heat recovered by the heat pump increases remarkably. When the temperatures of the reboiler and endothermic reaction are fixed, the temperature of exothermic reaction in the optimal design scheme is larger than that in the initial design scheme, and the high-temperature heat released from the exothermic reactor increases significantly in the optimal design scheme. The enthalpy efficiency (COP) and exergy efficiency monotonously increase as the entransy efficiency increases in the optimization process. The entransy efficiency has a definite physical meaning and pays more attention to the quality of the high-temperature heat recovered by the heat pump than enthalpy efficiency; it does not introduce an additional parameter and has more succinct expression than exergy efficiency. The multi-parameter optimization approach taking entransy efficiency as the objective function is very effective in the optimization design of IAH chemical heat pump. -- Highlights: ► A multi-parameter optimization approach of chemical heat pump is developed. ► The multi-parameter optimization approach is very effective in first and second law. ► Entransy efficiency is defined based on the entransy theory. ► Entransy efficiency is superior to enthalpy efficiency in quality. ► Entransy efficiency has more succinct expression than exergy efficiency.

  17. Micropower chemical fuel-to-electric conversion : a "regenerative flip" hydrogen concentration cell promising near carnot efficiency.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wally, Karl

    2006-05-01

    Although battery technology is relatively mature, power sources continue to impose serious limitations for small, portable, mobile, or remote applications. A potentially attractive alternative to batteries is chemical fuel-to-electric conversion. Chemical fuels have volumetric energy densities 4 to 10 times those of batteries. However, realizing this advantage requires efficient chemical fuel-to-electric conversion. Direct electrochemical conversion would be the ideal, but, for most fuels, is generally not within the state-of-the-science. Next best, chemical-to-thermal-to-electric conversion can be attractive if efficiencies can be kept high. This small investigative project was an exploration into the feasibility of a novel hybrid (i.e., thermal-electrochemical) micropower converter of high theoretical performance whose demonstration was thought to be within near-term reach. The system is comprised of a hydrogen concentration electrochemical cell with physically identical hydrogen electrodes as anode and cathode, with each electrode connected to physically identical hydride beds each containing the same low-enthalpy-of-formation metal hydride. In operation, electrical power is generated by a hydrogen concentration differential across the electrochemical cell. This differential is established via coordinated heating and passive cooling of the corresponding hydride source and sink. Heating is provided by the exothermic combustion (i.e., either flame combustion or catalytic combustion) of a chemical fuel. Upon hydride source depletion, the role of source and sink are reversed, heating and cooling reversed, electrodes commutatively reversed, cell operation reversed, while power delivery continues unchanged. This 'regenerative flip' of source and sink hydride beds can be cycled continuously until all available heating fuel is consumed. Electricity is efficiently generated electrochemically, but hydrogen is not consumed, rather the hydrogen is regeneratively

  18. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  19. Development of Bi-phase sodium-oxygen-hydrogen chemical equilibrium calculation program (BISHOP) using Gibbs free energy minimization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Yasushi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-08-01

    In order to analyze the reaction heat and compounds due to sodium combustion, the multiphase chemical equilibrium calculation program for chemical reaction among sodium, oxygen and hydrogen is developed in this study. The developed numerical program is named BISHOP; which denotes Bi-Phase, Sodium - Oxygen - Hydrogen, Chemical Equilibrium Calculation Program'. Gibbs free energy minimization method is used because of the special merits that easily add and change chemical species, and generally deal many thermochemical reaction systems in addition to constant temperature and pressure one. Three new methods are developed for solving multi-phase sodium reaction system in this study. One is to construct equation system by simplifying phase, and the other is to expand the Gibbs free energy minimization method into multi-phase system, and the last is to establish the effective searching method for the minimum value. Chemical compounds by the combustion of sodium in the air are calculated using BISHOP. The Calculated temperature and moisture conditions where sodium-oxide and hydroxide are formed qualitatively agree with the experiments. Deformation of sodium hydride is calculated by the program. The estimated result of the relationship between the deformation temperature and pressure closely agree with the well known experimental equation of Roy and Rodgers. It is concluded that BISHOP can be used for evaluated the combustion and deformation behaviors of sodium and its compounds. Hydrogen formation condition of the dump-tank room at the sodium leak event of FBR is quantitatively evaluated by BISHOP. It can be concluded that to keep the temperature of dump-tank room lower is effective method to suppress the formation of hydrogen. In case of choosing the lower inflammability limit of 4.1 mol% as the hydrogen concentration criterion, formation reaction of sodium hydride from sodium and hydrogen is facilitated below the room temperature of 800 K, and concentration of

  20. Development of Bi-phase sodium-oxygen-hydrogen chemical equilibrium calculation program (BISHOP) using Gibbs free energy minimization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to analyze the reaction heat and compounds due to sodium combustion, the multiphase chemical equilibrium calculation program for chemical reaction among sodium, oxygen and hydrogen is developed in this study. The developed numerical program is named BISHOP; which denotes Bi-Phase, Sodium - Oxygen - Hydrogen, Chemical Equilibrium Calculation Program'. Gibbs free energy minimization method is used because of the special merits that easily add and change chemical species, and generally deal many thermochemical reaction systems in addition to constant temperature and pressure one. Three new methods are developed for solving multi-phase sodium reaction system in this study. One is to construct equation system by simplifying phase, and the other is to expand the Gibbs free energy minimization method into multi-phase system, and the last is to establish the effective searching method for the minimum value. Chemical compounds by the combustion of sodium in the air are calculated using BISHOP. The Calculated temperature and moisture conditions where sodium-oxide and hydroxide are formed qualitatively agree with the experiments. Deformation of sodium hydride is calculated by the program. The estimated result of the relationship between the deformation temperature and pressure closely agree with the well known experimental equation of Roy and Rodgers. It is concluded that BISHOP can be used for evaluated the combustion and deformation behaviors of sodium and its compounds. Hydrogen formation condition of the dump-tank room at the sodium leak event of FBR is quantitatively evaluated by BISHOP. It can be concluded that to keep the temperature of dump-tank room lower is effective method to suppress the formation of hydrogen. In case of choosing the lower inflammability limit of 4.1 mol% as the hydrogen concentration criterion, formation reaction of sodium hydride from sodium and hydrogen is facilitated below the room temperature of 800 K, and concentration of hydrogen

  1. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  2. Characterizing the chemical pathways for water formation -- A deep search for hydrogen peroxide

    CERN Document Server

    Parise, B; Menten, K

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, hydrogen peroxide (HOOH) was observed for the first time outside the solar system (Bergman et al., A&A, 2011, 531, L8). This detection appeared a posteriori quite natural, as HOOH is an intermediate product in the formation of water on the surface of dust grains. Following up on this detection, we present a search for HOOH in a diverse sample of sources in different environments, including low-mass protostars and regions with very high column densities, such as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs). We do not detect the molecule in any other source than Oph A, and derive 3$\\sigma$ upper limits for the abundance of HOOH relative to H$_2$ lower than in Oph A for most sources. This result sheds a different light on our understanding of the detection of HOOH in Oph A, and shifts the puzzle to why this source seems to be special. Therefore we rediscuss the detection of HOOH in Oph A, as well as the implications of the low abundance of HOOH, and its similarity with the case of O$_2$. Our chemical models show th...

  3. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation from disposed gypsum drywall using chemical inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Bitton, Gabriel

    2011-07-15

    Disposal of gypsum drywall in landfills has been demonstrated to elevate hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentrations in landfill gas, a problem with respect to odor, worker safety, and deleterious effect on gas-to-energy systems. Since H(2)S production in landfills results from biological activity, the concept of inhibiting H(2)S production through the application of chemical agents to drywall during disposal was studied. Three possible inhibition agents - sodium molybdate (Na(2)MoO(4)), ferric chloride (FeCl(3)), and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) - were evaluated using flask and column experiments. All three agents inhibited H(2)S generation, with Na(2)MoO(4) reducing H(2)S generation by interrupting the biological sulfate reduction process and Ca(OH)(2) providing an unfavorable pH for biological growth. Although FeCl(3) was intended to provide an electron acceptor for a competing group of bacteria, the mechanism found responsible for inhibiting H(2)S production in the column experiment was a reduction in pH. Application of both Na(2)MoO(4) and FeCl(3) inhibited H(2)S generation over a long period (over 180 days), but the impact of Ca(OH)(2) decreased with time as the alkalinity it contributed was neutralized by the generated H(2)S. Practical application and potential environmental implications need additional exploration. PMID:21592650

  4. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation from disposed gypsum drywall using chemical inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal of gypsum drywall in landfills has been demonstrated to elevate hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentrations in landfill gas, a problem with respect to odor, worker safety, and deleterious effect on gas-to-energy systems. Since H2S production in landfills results from biological activity, the concept of inhibiting H2S production through the application of chemical agents to drywall during disposal was studied. Three possible inhibition agents - sodium molybdate (Na2MoO4), ferric chloride (FeCl3), and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) - were evaluated using flask and column experiments. All three agents inhibited H2S generation, with Na2MoO4 reducing H2S generation by interrupting the biological sulfate reduction process and Ca(OH)2 providing an unfavorable pH for biological growth. Although FeCl3 was intended to provide an electron acceptor for a competing group of bacteria, the mechanism found responsible for inhibiting H2S production in the column experiment was a reduction in pH. Application of both Na2MoO4 and FeCl3 inhibited H2S generation over a long period (over 180 days), but the impact of Ca(OH)2 decreased with time as the alkalinity it contributed was neutralized by the generated H2S. Practical application and potential environmental implications need additional exploration.

  5. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  6. Immobilization of redox mediators on functionalized carbon nanotube: A material for chemical sensor fabrication and amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D R Shobha Jeykumari; S Senthil Kumar; S Sriman Narayanan

    2005-10-01

    Chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with redox mediators, namely, toluidine blue and thionin have been carried out and the performance of graphite electrode modified with functionalized carbon nanotubes is described. Mechanical immobilization of functionalized single-walled nanotube (SWNT) on graphite electrode was achieved by gently rubbing the electrode surface on carbon nanotubes supported on a glass slide. The electrochemical behaviour of the modified electrodes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The SWNT-modified electrodes showed excellent electrocatalytic effect for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. A decrease in overvoltage was observed as well as an enhanced peak current compared to a bare graphite electrode for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic current was found to be directly proportional to the amount of hydrogen peroxide taken.

  7. Thermodynamic Feasibility of Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production Supported by Iron Based Chemical Looping Process

    OpenAIRE

    Słowiński, Grzegorz; Smoliński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The continuously increasing oil prices as well as stronger environmental regulations regarding greenhouse emissions made the greatest economic powers search a new, price competitive, and environment friendly energy carrier, such as hydrogen. The world research activities in these terms focus on the development of integrated hydrogen and power generating technologies, particularly technologies of hydrogen production from various carbonaceous resources, like methane, coal, biomass, or waste, of...

  8. Enhanced thermophilic fermentative hydrogen production from cassava stillage by chemical pretreatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Luo, Gang; Xie, Li;

    2013-01-01

    Acid and alkaline pretreatments for enhanced hydrogen production from cassava stillage were investigated in the present study. The result showed that acid pretreatment was suitable for enhancement of soluble carbohydrate while alkaline pretreatment stimulated more soluble total organic carbon...... production from cassava stillage. Acid pretreatment thereby has higher capacity to promote hydrogen production compared with alkaline pretreatment. Effects of pretreatment temperature, time and acid concentration on hydrogen production were also revealed by response surface methodology. The results showed...... highest hydrogen production of 434 mL, 67% higher than raw cassava stillage....

  9. Hot bubbles of planetary nebulae with hydrogen-deficient winds I. Heat conduction in a chemically stratified plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Sandin, Christer; Schönberner, Detlef; Rühling, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Heat conduction has been found a plausible solution to explain discrepancies between expected and measured temperatures in hot bubbles of planetary nebulae (PNe). While the heat conduction process depends on the chemical composition, to date it has been exclusively studied for pure hydrogen plasmas in PNe. A smaller population of PNe show hydrogen-deficient and helium- and carbon-enriched surfaces surrounded by bubbles of the same composition; considerable differences are expected in physical properties of these objects in comparison to the pure hydrogen case. The aim of this study is to explore how a chemistry-dependent formulation of the heat conduction affects physical properties and how it affects the X-ray emission from PN bubbles of hydrogen-deficient stars. We extend the description of heat conduction in our radiation hydrodynamics code to work with any chemical composition. We then compare the bubble-formation process with a representative PN model using both the new and the old descriptions. We also ...

  10. Application of Ozone and Oxygen to Reduce Chemical Oxygen Demand and Hydrogen Sulfide from a Recovered Paper Processing Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    A pilot study was performed at the Fox River Fiber recovered paper processing company in DePere, Wisconsin, to determine the extent to which injection of oxygen and ozone could reduce the high chemical oxygen demand, COD, in the effluent and the effectiveness of the ozone/oxygen stream in suppressing production of hydrogen sulfide gas in downstream sewage lines. Adaptive Ozone Solutions, LLC, supplied the oxygen/ozone generation and injection system. Samples were analyzed both befo...

  11. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  12. Influence of chemical activation of a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel on its penetration and efficacy--in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, C R G; Wiegand, A.; Sener, B.; Attin, T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemical activation of hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel on colour changes and penetration through the tooth structure. METHODS: One hundred and four bovine incisors were used. One dentine (CD) disc and one enamel-dentine (ED) disc were prepared from each tooth. They were positioned over artificial pulpal chambers and the bleaching was performed with an experimental 35% HP gel. Two control and six experimental groups were prepared. In ...

  13. Purification of hydrogen under a free or combined form in a gaseous mixture, by chemical reactions with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the european fusion program, we are dealing with the purification of hydrogen (tritium) under a free or combined form, from a H2, N2, NH3, CH4, O2, gaseous mixture. The process consists in cracking the hydrogenated molecules and absorbing the impurities by chemical reactions with uranium, without holding back hydrogen. In the temperature range: 950 K < T < 1200 K hydrides are indeed fully decomposed for hydrogen partial pressures lower than ten atmospheres while uranium oxides, nitrides and carbides formation reactions are promoted. The experiments are carried out with massive uranium heated at 973 K in a closed reactor. They confirm that such a process may satisfy our goals, but they point out the importance of interactions occurring between the gaseous and solids systems and interfere with the conversion rates. Gaseous pressure decreases with time according to two successive phases: the first one is governed by a surface kinetic law, while after a short transition time, gas diffusion in the solid products arises and becomes the limiting step of the reactions. Experimental results with pure gases and mixtures, prove that solid products have different structures. An illustrative example is given by nitrogen and methane reactions with uranium: the solid layers are compactely formed with each pure gas and they slow down the chemical kinetic rates; on the contrary the chemical kinetic rates of the mixed gases reactions are clearly increased and the diffusional rates are postponed. Then, the compacity of the solid products merely depends on the operating conditions and the influence of the reactional surface state on the chemical kinetic rates is here pointed out

  14. The behaviour of chemically altered coals in ZnCl{sub 2}-catalysed reaction with hydrogen and methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Bimer, J.; Salbut, P.D.; Gruber, R.; Djega-Mariadassou, G.; Brodzki, D.; Korniyets, E.; Kuznetsova, L.; Krzton, A. [Institute of Chemistry and Chemico-Metallurgical Processes, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01

    A series of chemically altered coals was investigated in the reaction with methanol and hydrogen in the presence of ZnCl{sub 2} as a catalyst. Significant beneficial effects were observed when high-rank coals were altered by reductive and radioactively methylating pretreatments. The behaviour of altered low-rank brown and subbituminous coals was affected by both the mode of chemical pretreatment and the reaction conditions. The benefit can be explained by partial depolymerization of the coal matter through the disruption of cross-links and the passivation of hydroxyl groups by methylation. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (III): Accurate evaluation of proton hydration energy and standard hydrogen electrode potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-04-01

    Gibbs free energy of hydration of a proton and standard hydrogen electrode potential were evaluated using high-level quantum chemical calculations. The solvent effect was included using the cluster-continuum model, which treated short-range effects by quantum chemical calculations of proton-water complexes, and the long-range effects by a conductor-like polarizable continuum model. The harmonic solvation model (HSM) was employed to estimate enthalpy and entropy contributions due to nuclear motions of the clusters by including the cavity-cluster interactions. Compared to the commonly used ideal gas model, HSM treatment significantly improved the contribution of entropy, showing a systematic convergence toward the experimental data.

  16. Synergistic hydrogen desorption behavior of magnesium aluminum hydride synthesized by mechano-chemical activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mg(AlH4)2 could release 3.1 wt% H2 at initial temperature as low as 100 °C. ► The synergistic and mutual catalytic effects of NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 were noticed. ► In situ synchrotron XRD confirmed the two-step dehydrogenation process of Mg(AlH4)2. - Abstract: A mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS) is employed to fabricate Mg(AlH4)2 via milling the precursors, specifically NaAlH4 and MgCl2. The corresponding dehydrogenation behavior of the synthesized powders is investigated. The experimental results showed that incomplete synthesis or premature dehydrogenation may occur if the milling process was not properly controlled. The hydrogen content of each synthesized powder is determined by using a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The dehydrogenation reactions of the synthesized powders are investigated by employing ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ synchrotron XRD and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results showed that the incompletely synthesized powder consisted of residual NaAlH4 in the synthesized Mg(AlH4)2, which demonstrated an initial dehydrogenation temperature as low as 100 °C and accompanied with a maximum amount (3.1 wt%) of H2 released below 350 °C. The mutual catalytic effect of both NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 on lowering their initial dehydrogenation temperature is confirmed.

  17. The impact of soil uptake on the global distribution of molecular hydrogen: chemical transport model simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yashiro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The global tropospheric distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2 and its uptake by the soil are simulated using a model called CHemical AGCM (atmospheric general circulation model for the Study of the Environment and Radiative forcing (CHASER, which incorporates a two-layered soil diffusion/uptake process component. The simulated distribution of deposition velocity over land is influenced by regional climate, and has a global average of 3.3×10−2 cm s−1. In the region north of 30° N, the amount of soil uptake shows a large seasonal variation corresponding to change in biological activity due to soil temperature and change in diffusion suppression by snow cover. In the temperate and humid regions in the mid- to low- latitudes, the uptake is mostly influenced by the soil air ratio, which controls the gas diffusivity in the soil. In the semi-arid regions, water stress and high temperatures contribute to the reduction of biological activity, as well as to the seasonal variation in the deposition velocity. A comparison with the observations shows that the model reproduces both the distribution and seasonal variation of H2 relatively well. The global burden and tropospheric lifetime of H2 are 150 Tg and 2.0 yr, respectively. The seasonal variation in H2 mixing ratios at the northern high latitudes is mainly controlled by a large seasonal change in the soil uptake. In the Southern Hemisphere, seasonal change in net chemical production and inter-hemispheric transport are the dominant causes of the seasonal cycle, while large biomass burning contributes significantly to the seasonal variation in the tropics and subtropics. Both observations and the model show large inter-annual variations, especially for the period 1997–1998, associated with large biomass burning in the tropics and at Northern Hemisphere high latitudes. The soil uptake shows relatively small inter-annual variability

  18. The impact of soil uptake on the global distribution of molecular hydrogen: chemical transport model simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yashiro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular hydrogen (H2 in the troposphere is highly influenced by the strength of H2 uptake by the terrestrial soil surface. The global distribution of H2 and its uptake by the soil are simulated by using a model called CHemical AGCM for Study of Environment and Radiative forcing (CHASER, which incorporates a 2-layered soil diffusion/uptake process component. The simulated distribution of deposition velocity over land reflects regional climate and has a global average of 3.3 × 10−2 cm s−1. In the region north of 30° N, the amount of soil uptake increases, particularly in the summer. However, the increase in the uptake becomes smaller in the winter season due to snow cover and a reduction in the biological activity at low temperatures. In the temperate and humid regions in the mid- and low-latitudes, the uptake is mostly influenced by the soil air ratio, which controls the gas diffusivity in the soil. In the semi-arid region, water stress and high temperature contribute to the reduction of biological activity, as well as to the seasonal variation in the deposition velocity. The comparison with the observations shows that the model reproduces both the distribution and seasonal variation of H2 relatively well. The global burden and tropospheric lifetime are 150 Tg and 2.0 yr, respectively. The seasonal variation of H2 in the northern high latitude is mainly controlled by the large seasonal change in soil uptake. In the Southern Hemisphere, the seasonal change in the net chemical production and inter-hemispheric transport are the dominant cause of the seasonal cycle. Large biomass burning impacts the magnitude of seasonal variation mainly in the tropics and subtropics. Both observation and model show large inter-annual variation, especially for the period 1997–1998, associated with the large biomass burning in tropics and northern high-latitudes. The soil uptake

  19. Hot bubbles of planetary nebulae with hydrogen-deficient winds. I. Heat conduction in a chemically stratified plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, C.; Steffen, M.; Schönberner, D.; Rühling, U.

    2016-02-01

    Heat conduction has been found a plausible solution to explain discrepancies between expected and measured temperatures in hot bubbles of planetary nebulae (PNe). While the heat conduction process depends on the chemical composition, to date it has been exclusively studied for pure hydrogen plasmas in PNe. A smaller population of PNe show hydrogen-deficient and helium- and carbon-enriched surfaces surrounded by bubbles of the same composition; considerable differences are expected in physical properties of these objects in comparison to the pure hydrogen case. The aim of this study is to explore how a chemistry-dependent formulation of the heat conduction affects physical properties and how it affects the X-ray emission from PN bubbles of hydrogen-deficient stars. We extend the description of heat conduction in our radiation hydrodynamics code to work with any chemical composition. We then compare the bubble-formation process with a representative PN model using both the new and the old descriptions. We also compare differences in the resulting X-ray temperature and luminosity observables of the two descriptions. The improved equations show that the heat conduction in our representative model of a hydrogen-deficient PN is nearly as efficient with the chemistry-dependent description; a lower value on the diffusion coefficient is compensated by a slightly steeper temperature gradient. The bubble becomes somewhat hotter with the improved equations, but differences are otherwise minute. The observable properties of the bubble in terms of the X-ray temperature and luminosity are seemingly unaffected.

  20. Comparison of the chemical structure of coal hydrogenation products, Athabasca tar sand bitumen and Green River shale oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, R.; Yoshida, T.; Nakata, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hino, M.; Ikawa, Y.; Makabe, M.; Bodily, D.M.

    1983-03-01

    Coal hydrogenation products, Athabasca tar sand bitumen, and Green River shale oil produced by retorting were analyzed by the Brown-Ladner method and the Takeya et al. method on the basis of elemental analysis and /sup 1/H-NMR data, by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy and by FT-IR spectroscopy. Structural characteristics were compared. The results show that the chemical structure of oils from Green River shale oil and Athabasca tar sand bitumen, and the oils produced in the initial stage of hydrogenation of Taiheiyo coal and Clear Creek, Utah, coal is characterized as monomers consisting of units of one aromatic ring substituted highly with C/sub 5//sub -//sub 6/ aliphatic chains and heteroatom-containing functional groups. The chemical structure of asphaltenes from Green River shale oil and Athabasca tar sand bitumen is characterized by oligomers consisting of units of 1-2 aromatic rings substituted highly with C/sub 3//sub -//sub 5/ aliphatic chains and heteroatom-containing functional groups. The chemical structure of asphaltenes from coal hydrogenation is characterized by dimers and/or trimers of unit structures of 2 to 5 condensed aromatic rings, substituted moderately with C/sub 2//sub -//sub 5/ aliphatic chains and heteroatom-containing functional groups. The close agreement between f/SUB/a(/sup 1/H-NMR) and f/SUB/a(/sup 13/C-NMR) for Green River shale oil derivatives indicates that the assumption of 2 for the atomic H/C ratio of aliphatic structures is reasonable. For coal hydrogenation products, a value of 1.6-1.7 for the H/C ratio of aliphatic structures would be more reasonable. (25 refs).

  1. Determination of trapping parameters and the chemical diffusion coefficient from hydrogen permeation experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří; Mori, G.; Prethaler, A.; Fischer, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 82, MAY (2014), s. 93-100. ISSN 0010-938X Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Steel * Electrochemical calculation * Modeling studies * Hydrogen permeation * Kinetic parameters Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 4.422, year: 2014

  2. Extend of hydrogen coverage of Si(001) under chemical vapor deposition conditions from ab initio approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenow, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen coverage of the Si(001)c(4x2) surface in the presence of hydrogen gas has been studied with dispersion corrected density functional theory. Electronic energy contributions are well described using a hybrid functional. The temperature dependence of the coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium was studied computing the phonon spectrum in a supercell approach. As an approximation to these demanding computations, an interpolated phonon approach was found to give comparable accuracy. The simpler ab initio thermodynamic approach is not accurate enough for the system studied, even if corrections by the Einstein model for surface vibrations are considered. The on-set of H2 desorption from the fully hydrogenated surface is predicted to occur at temperatures around 750 K. Strong changes in hydrogen coverage are found between 1000 and 1200 K in good agreement with previous reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy experiments. These findings allow a rational choice for the surface state in the computationa...

  3. Nuclear-Driven Copper-Based Hybrid Thermo/Electro Chemical Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a worldwide need for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, hydrogen gas has become a primary focus of energy researchers as a promising substitute of nonrenewable energy sources. For instance, use of hydrogen gas in fuel cells has received special technological interest particularly from the transportation sector, which is presently dominated by fuel oil. It is not only gaseous hydrogen that is in demand, but the need for liquid hydrogen is growing as well. For example, the aerospace industry uses liquid hydrogen as fuel for space shuttles. The use of liquid hydrogen during a single space shuttle launch requires about 15,000 gallons per minute, which is equivalent to about forty-five hydrogen trailers, each with 13,000 gallons capacity. The hydrogen required to support a single Mars mission would be at least ten times that required for one space shuttle launch. In this work, we provide mass and energy balances, major equipment sizing, and costing of a hybrid CuO-CuSO4 plant with 1000 MW (30,240 kg/hr) H2 production capacity. With a 90% annual availability factor, the estimated hydrogen production rate is about 238,412 tons annually, the predicted plant efficiency is about 36%, and the estimated hydrogen production cost is about $4.0/kg (not including storage and transportation costs). In addition to hydrogen production, the proposed plant generates oxygen gas as a byproduct with an estimated flowrate of about 241,920 kg/hr (equivalent to 1,907,297 tons annually). We also propose a novel technology for separating SO2 and SO3 from O2 using a battery of redundant fixed-bed reactors containing CuO impregnated in porous alumina (Al2O3). This technology accommodates online regeneration of the CuO. Other practical approaches for gaseous separation are also examined including use of ceramic membranes, liquefaction, and regenerable wet scrubbing with slurried magnesium oxide or solutions of sodium salts such as sodium sulfite and sodium hydroxide. Finally, we discuss

  4. Modelling a DR shaft operated with pure hydrogen using a physical-chemical and CFD approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ranzani Da Costa, Andrea; Wagner, D.; Patisson, F.; Ablitzer, D.

    2009-01-01

    International audience The hydrogen-based route could be a valuable way to produce steel considering its low carbon dioxide emissions. In ULCOS, it is regarded as a long-term option, largely dependent on the emergence of a hydrogen economy. To anticipate its possible development, it was decided to check the feasibility of using 100% H2 in a Direct Reduction shaft furnace and to determine the best operating conditions, through appropriate experimental and modelling work. We developed from s...

  5. HR-EELS study of hydrogen bonding configuration, chemical and thermal stability of detonation nanodiamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-diamond films composed of 3–10 nm grains prepared by the detonation method and deposited onto silicon substrates by drop-casting were examined by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The impact of (i) ex-situ ambient annealing at 400 °C and (ii) ex-situ hydrogenation on hydrogen bonding and its thermal stability were examined. In order to clarify the changes in hydrogen bonding configuration detected on the different surfaces as a function of thermal annealing, in-situ hydrogenation by thermally activated atomic hydrogen was performed and examined. This study provides direct evidence that the exposure to ambient conditions and medium temperature ambient annealing have a pronounced effect on the hydrogen-carbon bonding configuration onto the nano-diamond surfaces. In-situ 1000 °C annealing results in irreversible changes of the film surface and partial nano-diamond silicidation.

  6. High precision quantum-chemical treatment of adsorption: Benchmarking physisorption of molecular hydrogen on graphane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multilevel hierarchical ab initio protocol for calculating adsorption on non-conducting surfaces is presented. It employs fully periodic treatment, which reaches local Møller-Plesset perturbation theory of second order (MP2) with correction for the basis set incompleteness via the local F12 technique. Post-MP2 corrections are calculated using finite clusters. That includes the coupled cluster treatment in the local and canonical frameworks (up to perturbative quadruples) and correlated core (with MP2). Using this protocol, the potential surface of hydrogen molecules adsorbed on graphane was computed. According to the calculations, hydrogen molecules are adsorbed on graphane in a perpendicular to the surface orientation with the minimum of the potential surface of around −3.6 kJ/mol located at the distance of 3.85 Å between the bond center of the hydrogen molecule and the mid-plane of graphane. The adsorption sites along the path from the downward-pointing carbon to the ring center of the graphane are energetically virtually equally preferable, which can enable nearly free translations of hydrogen molecules along these paths. Consequently, the hydrogen molecules on graphane most likely form a non-commensurate monolayer. The analysis of the remaining errors reveals a very high accuracy of the computed potential surface with an error bar of a few tenths of a kJ/mol. The obtained results are a high-precision benchmark for further theoretical and experimental studies of hydrogen molecules interacting with graphane

  7. Selective deposition of a crystalline Si film by a chemical sputtering process in a high pressure hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selective deposition of Si films was demonstrated using a chemical sputtering process induced by a high pressure hydrogen plasma at 52.6 kPa (400 Torr). In this chemical sputtering process, the initial deposition rate (Rd) is dependent upon the substrate type. At the initial stage of Si film formation, Rd on glass substrates increased with elapsed time and reached to a constant value. In contrast, Rd on Si substrates remained constant during the deposition. The selective deposition of Si films can be achieved by adjusting the substrate temperature (Tsub) and hydrogen concentration (CH2) in the process atmosphere. For any given deposition time, it was found that an optimum CH2 exists for a given Tsub to realize the selective deposition of a Si film, and the optimum Tsub value tends to increase with decreasing CH2. According to electron diffraction patterns obtained from the samples, the selectively prepared Si films showed epitaxial-like growth, although the Si films contained many defects. It was revealed by Raman scattering spectroscopy that some of the defects in the Si films were platelet defects induced by excess hydrogen incorporated during Si film formation. Raman spectrum also suggested that Si related radicals (SiH2, SiH, Si) with high reactivity contribute to the Si film formation. Simple model was derived as the guideline for achieving the selective growth

  8. Thermodynamic possibilities and constraints for pure hydrogen production by iron based chemical looping process at lower temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron offers the possibility of transformation of a syngas or gaseous hydrocarbons into hydrogen by a cycling process of iron oxide reduction (e.g. by hydrocarbons) and release of hydrogen by steam oxidation. From the thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium point of view, the reduction of magnetite by hydrogen, CO, CH4 and a model syngas (mixtures CO + H2 or H2 + CO + CO2) and oxidation of iron by steam has been studied. Attention was concentrated not only on convenient conditions for reduction of Fe3O4 to iron at temperatures 400-800 K but also on the possible formation of undesired soot, Fe3C and iron carbonate as precursors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide formation in the steam oxidation step. Reduction of magnetite at low temperatures requires a relatively high H2/H2O ratio, increasing with decreasing temperature. Reduction of iron oxide by CO is complicated by soot and Fe3C formation. At lower temperatures and higher CO2 concentrations in the reducing gas, the possibility of FeCO3 formation must be taken into account. The purity of the hydrogen produced depends on the amount of soot, Fe3C and FeCO3 in the iron after the reduction step. Magnetite reduction is the more difficult stage in the looping process. Pressurized conditions during the reduction step will enhance formation of soot and carbon containing iron compounds

  9. Influence of hydrogen on chemical vapour synthesis of different carbon nanostructures using propane as precursor and nickel as catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Sahoo; H Mamgain; C Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The role of hydrogen in the catalytic chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes using sputtered nickel thin film as a catalyst is explained in this work. The growth of different carbon nanostructures with the variation in the precursor gas content was studied by keeping all other process parameters constant and using sputtered Ni thin film as a catalyst. The catalyst granule size, its external morphology and the resulting products were analysed. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and carbon nanoribbons (CNRs) were observed under different growth conditions. The different conditions of growth leading to form tubes, fibres or ribbons were analysed by varying the flow ratio of propane and hydrogen gas during the high temperature growth. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies confirmed the above structures under different growth conditions. The role of hydrogen on the surface passivation behaviour of the Ni catalyst and its correlative effect on the growth of carbon nanostructures is analysed. This direct approach can, in principle, be used to synthesize different types of carbon nanostructures by tailoring the hydrogen concentration.

  10. Analysis of the number of hydrogen bond groups of a multiwalled carbon nanotube probe tip for chemical force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we describe a statistical method of quantification of the number of functional groups at the contact area of a probe tip for atomic force microscopy from the result of repetitive pull-off force measurements. We have investigated laboratory-made carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips to apply them for chemical force microscopy because limited number of functional groups at the tip-end is expected. Using a CNT tip, we conducted repetitive pull-off force measurements against a self-assembled monolayer terminated with carboxyl group and analyzed them in terms of the number of hydrogen bond groups at the CNT tip. The elementary hydrogen bond rupture force quantum in n-decane medium was estimated to be 84.2 ± 0.5 pN in the present system. Thus it was revealed that only a couple of hydrogen bond groups of the CNT tip were participating in hydrogen bonding with the sample on an average in this experimental system.

  11. Effect of calcium cyanamide, ammonium bicarbonate and lime mixture, and ammonia water on survival of Ralstonia solanacearum and microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijuan; Sun, Chengliang; Liu, Xingxing; He, Xiaolin; Liu, Miao; Wu, Hao; Tang, Caixian; Jin, Chongwei; Zhang, Yongsong

    2016-01-01

    The inorganic nitrogenous amendments calcium cyanamide (CC), ammonia water (AW), and a mixture of ammonium bicarbonate with lime (A+L) are popularly used as fumigants to control soil-borne disease in China. However, it is unclear which of these fumigants is more effective in controlling R. solanacearum. This present study compared the efficiencies of the three nitrogenous amendments listed above at four nitrogen levels in suppressing the survival of R. solanacearum in soil. The CC showed the best ability to suppress R. solanacearum due to its highest capacity to increase soil and NO2(-) contents and pH. However, AW was more suitable to controlling bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum because it had a lower cost and its application rate of 0.25 g N kg(-1) soil could effectively suppress the survival of R. solanacearum. Additionally, soil microbial activity and community populations were restored to their initial state four weeks after the application of each fumigant, indicating that the three fumigants had few detrimental impacts on soil microbial activity and community structure with an exception of the suppression of R. solanacearum. The present study provides guidance for the selection of a suitable alkaline nitrogenous amendment and its application rate in controlling bacterial wilt. PMID:26738601

  12. Mobility and chemical bond of hydrogen in titanium and palladium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probabilities for π- meson capture by hydrogen are measured at 25, 155 and 200 deg C in TiHsub(1.65) hydride and at 25, -120 and -196 deg C in PdHsub(0.67) hydride. An analysis of the results obtained shows that within the accuracy of the measurements (approximately 10%) a sharp (up to 1012) change in the mobility of hydrogen in the hydrides induced by temperature changes within the ranges indicated does not noticeably affect the probabilities for π- meson capture by bound hydrogen, i.e. does not lead to appreciable changes in the Me-H bond. A comparison of the capture probabilities for palladium hydride and hydrides of neighboring transition metals shows that there are no pronounced anomalies in the Pd-H bond

  13. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  14. Hydrogen transfer hydrocracking of C. procera latex under ambient pressure conditions to get value added chemicals and fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, D.K.; Behera, B.K.; Arora, M. (Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India). Fuels and Biofuels Engineering Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    Biomass is renewable source of energy while the reserves of petroleum are being depleted. The latex of a potential petrocrop, Calotropis procera, a laticifer, arid-plant which is rich in hydrocarbon type triterpene compounds etc. was found to be a better feed stock for thermal hydrocracking as compared to whole plant biomass in terms of liquid product yield. Studies of chemical reaction dynamics of the thermal cracking of latex at 200-400[degree]C showed that the process should be termed as hydrogen-transfer (H-T) hydrocracking of latex under ambient pressure conditions. The hydrogen rich cracked triterpenoids act as the H-donors in this process, where nascent hydrogen atoms and free radicals chemically plug the cracked moieties to stabilise these. Latex was also coagulated and the H-T hydrocracking of the feedstock coagulum gave a higher yield of cracked oil in comparison to that from the dried latex. The temperature for hydrocracking of latex has been optimized to 350[degree]C and molecular sieve was found to catalyse the H-T hydrocracking process to yield more liquid product. The distillation range of cracked latex oil (CLO) obtained from H-T hydrocracking of C. procera latex indicated that it can be used as fuel oil or substitute for diesel fuel. Moreover, CLO resembled diesel fuels and was predominantly paraffinic in nature as characterised by NMR and FTIR spectral analysis. A process has been recommended for getting value added fuels and chemicals from C. procera latex. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Neutral water-chemical regime with hydrogen peroxide dosage at the AMB-200 unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of investigations related to estimation of erosion-corrosion process rates on feed water treatment with hydrogen peroxide at the Beloyarskaya NPP second unit are given. As follows from analysis, values of electric conductivity and iron oxide concentrations reduced two times as compared with correctionless regimes. Metal erosion rate in some feed water loop sections reduced 200-600 times. Hydrogen peroxide metering for feed water provides good condition and reliable operation of feed water loop equipment, reactor circuit and process tubes of the AMB-200 reactor unit

  16. Transformation of biogenic carbohydrates into levulinic acid and further hydrogenation using supported nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by chemical fluid deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis was to synthesize and identify powerful metal catalysts and key factors for the conversion of D-fructose and D-glucose to LA as well as the hydrogenation of LA to GVL. A general overview on the use of biomass for chemicals and potential biofuel production is provided. The catalytic transformation systems developed for the conversion of biomass-derived monomers to LA and GVL are reviewed. Meanwhile, an intensive overview of the preparation of supported nano...

  17. Effect of dissolved hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of chemically vapor deposited SiC in a simulated pressurized water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of CVD SiC was studied under PWR-simulating water conditions. • Dissolved hydrogen significantly reduced the corrosion rate of SiC. • Dissolved hydrogen was likely to retard the formation of surface oxide layer. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of chemically vapor deposited SiC was investigated in relation to its application as fuel cladding in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Corrosion tests were conducted in deoxygenated, pressurized water at 360 °C with control of dissolved hydrogen. The dissolved hydrogen dramatically reduced the corrosion rate of SiC compared with that in water without the dissolved hydrogen. It was revealed that the dissolution of the surface oxide of SiC primarily contributed to the weight loss at the initial stage of corrosion. Further weight loss was minimal for 210 d because dissolved hydrogen effectively retarded the formation of SiO2

  18. Chemically modified glasses for analysis of hydrogen isotopes by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive experimental research has been carried out by gas chromatographic runs in order to identify the most suitable adsorbents and define the best operated conditions for selective separation and analysis of hydrogen isotopes in near real-time (i.e. less than 10 min.). Preparation and operation procedures of chromatographic column for hydrogen isotope separation have been examined. This is one of the main requirements of the tritium separation from heavy water of CANDU reactor and of the tritium fuel cycle in D-T fusion reactors. This paper describes the preparation of absorbent materials utilised as stationary phase in the gas-chromatographic column for hydrogen isotope separation and treatment (activation) of stationary phase. Modified thermoresisting glass with Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2 6H2O and Cr2O3, respectively, have been experimentally investigated at 77 K for H2, HD, and D2 separation and the results of chromatographic runs are also reported and discussed. The hydrogen operating conditions of the adsorbent column Fe (III)/glass and Cr2O3/glass, i.e. granulometry, column length, pressure-drop along the column, carrier gas flow rate, sample volume have been study by means of the analysis of the retention times, separation factors and HETP. (authors)

  19. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... required by 1 CFR 21.1, regarding the lifted stay of hydrogen sulfide reporting requirements. In FR Doc... a document on August 22, 1994 (59 FR 43048) imposing stays on the reporting requirements for... Register of October 17, 2011 (76 FR 64022) should have lifted the Administrative Stay of the...

  20. Lithium borohydride–melamine complex as a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lin; Hu, Daqiang; He, Teng; Zhang, Yao; Wu, Guotao; Chu, Hailiang; Wang, Peikun [Dalian National Laboratory for Clear Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Xiong, Zhitao, E-mail: xzt@dicp.ac.cn [Dalian National Laboratory for Clear Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Chen, Ping [Dalian National Laboratory for Clear Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}H{sub 6}N{sub 6} was synthesized by ball milling of LiBH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}N{sub 6}. ► 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} starts to evolve hydrogen at ca. 100 °C. ► 7.83 wt.% of Hydrogen can be evolved in the temperature range of 100–340 °C. ► Combination reaction between NH and BH can improve dehydrogenation properties. -- Abstract: A complex hydride, 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}, crystallizing in monoclinic structure with lattice parameters of a = 17.4701 Å, b = 17.6332 Å, c = 4.1749 Å, β = 99.7453° and V = 1267.54 Å{sup 3}, was synthesized by solid reaction between LiBH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}. 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} starts to evolve hydrogen at 100 °C, which is 190 °C lower than that of pristine LiBH{sub 4}. Combination of protic hydrogen of [BH{sub 4}]{sup −} and hydridic hydrogen of NH in 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} may greatly improve the dehydrogenation properties, and totally 7.83 wt.% H{sub 2} can be released from 3LiBH{sub 4}·C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6} in the temperature range of 100–340 °C.

  1. Influence of density on radiation-chemical yield of molecular hydrogen formed at radiolysis of aqueous solution of NaOH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : In atom and nuclear energy the specialists knowledge about radiation-chemical yield of the initial products formed under the influence of ionizing rays on water is of great importance from the point of security. The radiation-chemical yields of molecular hydrogen have been defined according to the graph and the obtained results

  2. Electron-electron interactions in the chemical bond: ``1/3” Effect in the bond length of hydrogen molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Ganguly

    2001-10-01

    The prominent ``1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of twodimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron-electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) shows evidence for tunnelling of particles with and /3 charges for a constant band mass. A ``1/3” effect in the hydrogen molecule is seen in as much as its internuclear distance, - = - + +, with |+/-| = 1/3. This is examined in terms of electron-electron interactions involving electron- and hole quasiparticles, (-) and (ℎ+), equivalent to those observed in FQHE shot-noise experiments. The (/) ratio of the (-) and (ℎ+) quasiparticles is kept at 1: -3. Instead of a 2DEG, these particles are treated as being in flat Bohr orbits. A treatment in the language of charge-flux tube composites for the hydrogen atom as well as the hydrogen molecule is attempted. Such treatment gives important insights into changes in chemical potential and bond energy on crossing a phase boundary during the atom-bond transition as well as on models for FQHE itself.

  3. Structural and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films by helicon wave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si1-xCx : H) films with different carbon concentrations have been deposited using the helicon wave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique under the condition of strong hydrogen dilution. The a-Si1-xCx:H films with carbon content x up to 0.64 have been deposited. Their structural and optical properties are investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman scattering, ultraviolet-visible transmittance spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The deposition rate, optical band gap and B factor related to structural disorder are found to monotonically change in the investigated range with methane-silane gas flow ratios. It is found that the deposited films exist with the structure of Si-like clusters and Si-C networks when silicon content is high, while they consist mainly of C-like clusters and Si-C networks for carbon-rich samples. A large optical band gap is obtained in high carbon concentration samples, which is attributed to the high density characteristic of helicon wave plasmas and the strong hydrogen dilution condition

  4. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  5. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  6. ECF BLEACHING WITH A FINAL HYDROGEN PEROXIDE STAGE: IMPACT ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF Eucalyptus globulus KRAFT PULPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro E. G. Loureiro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two industrial elemental chlorine free (ECF bleaching sequences, D0(EOPD1(EPD2 and OQ(PODP, are compared with respect to the bulk content of lignin, carboxyl, hexeneuronic acids (HexA, and reducing groups after each bleaching stage. HexA groups contribute significantly to the total content of carboxyl groups, and their degradation during chlorine dioxide bleaching is reflected by a decrease of the carboxyl content. The higher degradation using an enhanced use of oxygen-based bleaching chemicals is associated with a higher fiber charge reduction, mainly due to xylan depletion. Additionally, the effect of process variables of a laboratory final hydrogen peroxide stage on the chemical composition of the fully bleached pulp (D0(EOPD1P and OQ(PODP is studied. The ability of final peroxide bleaching to raise the content of carboxyl groups is dependent on the operating conditions and pulp bleaching history. A balance between carbohydrate oxidation and dissolution of oxidized groups determines the effect on fiber charge. The effect of hydrogen peroxide stabilizers added into the final stage on the content of carboxyl groups is also reported.

  7. Inhibition of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root growth by cyanamide is due to altered cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska, Anita; Bogatek, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Cyanamide (CA) has been reported as a natural compound produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) and it was shown also to be an allelochemical, responsible for strong allelopathic potential in this species. CA phytotoxicity has been demonstrated on various plant species, but to date little is known about its mode of action at cellular level. Treatment of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots with CA (1.2 mM) resulted in inhibition of growth accompanied by alterations in cell division, an...

  8. Chemical nature of coal hydrogenation oils. I - The effect of catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, J. R.; Barrass, G.; Gray, D.

    1980-05-01

    Hydrogenation of the same coal was carried out with no catalyst and with 1, 5, 10 and 15% stannous, zinc and ferrous chloride catalysts. The oils (hexane soluble portion) were fractionated by silica gel chromatography and by extraction with acid and base. The oils and fractions derived from them were investigated by C-13- and H-1-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, ultraviolet, fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy. Increasing the amount of catalyst used decreased the percentage of polar compounds in the oil while the gross hydrocarbon structure showed little change with catalyst concentration. The decrease in the percentage of polar compounds in the oil results in a reduction in the viscosity of the oil due to decreased hydrogen bonding, which was shown by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

  9. Functional, structural, and chemical changes in myosin associated with hydrogen peroxide treatment of skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Lowe, Dawn A.; Spakowicz, Daniel J; Higgins, LeeAnn; O'Conor, Kate; Thompson, LaDora V.; Deborah A Ferrington; Thomas, David D.

    2007-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of oxidation-induced inhibition of muscle contractility, we have studied the effects of hydrogen peroxide on permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle fibers, focusing on changes in myosin purified from these fibers. Oxidation by 5 mM peroxide decreased fiber contractility (isometric force and shortening velocity) without significant changes in the enzymatic activity of myofibrils and isolated myosin. The inhibitory effects were reversed by treating fibers with d...

  10. Rapid Hydrogen Peroxide release from the coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding and in response to chemical and physical stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoza-Zvuloni, Rachel; Schneider, Avi; Sher, Daniel; Shaked, Yeala

    2016-01-01

    Corals make use of different chemical compounds during interactions with prey, predators and aggressors. Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is produced and released by a wide range of organisms as part of their defense against grazers or pathogens. In coral reefs, the large fluxes and relatively long half-life of H2O2, make it a potentially important info-chemical or defense molecule. Here we describe a previously unstudied phenomenon of rapid H2O2 release from the reef-building coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding on zooplankton and in response to chemical and physical stimuli. Following stimuli, both symbiotic and bleached corals were found to rapidly release H2O2 to the surrounding water for a short period of time (few minutes). The H2O2 release was restricted to the site of stimulus, and an increase in physical stress and chemical stimuli concentration resulted in elevated H2O2 release. Omission of calcium (a key regulator of exocytotic processes) from the experimental medium inhibited H2O2 release. Hence we suggest that H2O2 is actively released in response to stimuli, rather than leaking passively from the coral tissue. We estimate that at the site of stimulus H2O2 can reach concentrations potentially high enough to deter predators or motile, potentially pathogenic, bacteria. PMID:26875833

  11. Quantum chemical elucidation of the mechanism for hydrogenation of TiO2 anatase crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, P; Huang, W F; Lin, M C

    2013-04-21

    Hydrogenation of TiO2 is relevant to hydrogen storage and water splitting. We have carried out a detailed mechanistic study on TiO2 hydrogenation through H and∕or H2 diffusion from the surface into subsurface layers of anatase TiO2 (101) by periodic density functional theory calculations implementing on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT + U). Both H atoms and H2 molecules can migrate from the crystal surface into TiO2 near subsurface layer with 27.8 and 46.2 kcal∕mol energy barriers, respectively. The controlling step for the former process is the dissociative adsorption of H2 on the surface which requires 47.8 kcal∕mol of energy barrier. Both hydrogen incorporation processes are expected to be equally favorable. The barrier energy for H2 migration from the first layer of the subsurface Osub1 to the 2nd layer of the subsurface oxygen Osub2 requires only 6.6 kcal. The presence of H atoms on the surface and inside the subsurface layer tends to promote both H and H2 penetration into the subsurface layer by reducing their energy barriers, as well as to prevent the escape of the H2 from the cage by increasing its escaping barrier energy. The H2 molecule inside a cage can readily dissociate and form 2HO-species exothermically (ΔH = -31.0 kcal∕mol) with only 26.2 kcal∕mol barrier. The 2HO-species within the cage may further transform into H2O with a 22.0 kcal∕mol barrier and 19.3 kcal∕mol exothermicity relative to the caged H2 molecule. H2O formation following the breaking of Ti-O bonds within the cage may result in the formation of O-vacancies and surface disordering as observed experimentally under a high pressure and moderately high temperature condition. According to density of states analysis, the projected density of states of the interstitial H, H2, and H2O appear prominently within the TiO2 band gap; in addition, the former induces a shift of the band gap position notably towards the conduction band. The thermochemistry for formation of the most stable

  12. Chemisorption of hydrogen and oxygen atoms on a cobalt surface: A quantum chemical cluster model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemisorption of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on a cobalt surface has been studied on a five-atom cluster model using one-electron effective core potential (le- ECP) and all-electron calculations at the ab initio SCF and MCPF levels. Also, density functional calculations have been carried out. The different approaches are evaluated. The le- ECP has been compared to similar ECPS for nickel and copper. Our results indicate that this approach is valid also for cobalt. Different contributions to the cluster-adsorbate bonding energy are discussed. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the 1H NMR and 13C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA 1H and 13C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides

  14. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua D; Summers, Michael F; Johnson, Bruce A

    2015-09-01

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the (1)H NMR and (13)C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides. PMID:26141454

  15. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joshua D.; Summers, Michael F. [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Johnson, Bruce A., E-mail: bruce.johnson@asrc.cuny.edu [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides.

  16. Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathe, Mandar [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Xu, Dikai [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Hsieh, Tien-Lin [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Simpson, James [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Statnick, Robert [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Tong, Andrew [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Fan, Liang-Shih [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This document is the final report for the project titled “Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture” under award number FE0012136 for the performance period 10/01/2013 to 12/31/2014.This project investigates the novel Ohio State chemical looping gasification technology for high efficiency, cost efficiency coal gasification for IGCC and methanol production application. The project developed an optimized oxygen carrier composition, demonstrated the feasibility of the concept and completed cold-flow model studies. WorleyParsons completed a techno-economic analysis which showed that for a coal only feed with carbon capture, the OSU CLG technology reduced the methanol required selling price by 21%, lowered the capital costs by 28%, increased coal consumption efficiency by 14%. Further, using the Ohio State Chemical Looping Gasification technology resulted in a methanol required selling price which was lower than the reference non-capture case.

  17. Efeito da aplicação de cianamida hidrogenada e óleo mineral na quebra de dormência e producão do pessegueiro-'Flamecrest' Effect of the application of hidrogen cyanamid and mineral oil on dormancy breaking and peach production, cv. Flamecrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GILMAR ARDUINO BETTIO MARODIN

    2002-08-01

    August. The Dormancy breaking, flowering, fruit set, yield, and antecipation of harvest were evaluated from plants of the folllowing treatments: 1,22; 2,45; 3,675 or 4,90 g of i.a.L-1 hydrogen cyanamid together with 10 g i.a L-1 of mineral oil or a single application of 10 g i.a L-1 mineral oil. The Control plants were not sprayed with the dormancy breaking treatment. None of the treatments resulted in sprouting antecipation of flowering buds however, plants treated with 1,22 or 4,90 g i.a L-1 hydrogen cyanamid mixed with 10 g i.a L-1 mineral oil, had a higher number of sprouted vegetative buds. There was no significant effect of the period of application on flowering and fruit set. The number of fruits thinned out from each plant was higher for the treatments with 2,45 or 4,90 g i.a L-1 of hydrogen cyanamid mixed with 10 g i.a L-1 of mineral oil. When applied to peaches trees in july, the treatments with 1,22 and 3,675 g i.a. L-1 of hydragen cyanamid and 10 g i.a. L-1 of mineral oil resulted in a higher number of fruits and total yield per plant. All the treatments, in the second apllication period, produced higher yields. The Average fruit weight, total soluble solids and pulp firmness were not influenced by the treatments.

  18. Hydrogen production by enhanced-sorption chemical looping steam reforming of glycerol in moving-bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New approach on continuous high-purity H2 produced auto-thermally with long time. • Low-cost NiO/NiAl2O4 exhibited high redox performance to H2 from glycerol. • Oxidation, steam reforming, WSG and CO2 capture were combined into a reactor. • H2 purity of above 90% was produced without heating at 1.5–3.0 S/C and 500–600 °C. • Sorbent regeneration and catalyst oxidization achieved simultaneously in a reactor. - Abstract: The continuous high-purity hydrogen production by the enhanced-sorption chemical looping steam reforming of glycerol based on redox reactions integrated with in situ CO2 removal has been experimentally studied. The process was carried out by a flow of catalyst and sorbent mixture using two moving-bed reactors. Various unit operations including oxidation, steam reforming, water gas shrift reaction and CO2 removal were combined into a single reactor for hydrogen production in an overall economic and efficient process. The low-cost NiO/NiAl2O4 catalyst efficiently converted glycerol and steam to H2 by redox reactions and the CO2 produced in the process was simultaneously removed by CaO sorbent. The best results with an enriched hydrogen product of above 90% in auto-thermal operation for reforming reactor were achieved at initial temperatures of 500–600 °C and ratios of steam to carbon (S/C) of 1.5–3.0. The results indicated also that not all of NiO in the catalyst can be reduced to Ni by the reaction with glycerol, and the reduced Ni can be oxidized to NiO by air at 900 °C. The catalyst oxidization and sorbent regeneration were achieved under the same conditions in air reactor

  19. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  20. Surface roughening during plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon on crystal silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphology of a series of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. The substrates were atomically flat, oxide-free, single-crystal silicon. Films were grown in a PECVD chamber directly connected to a surface analysis chamber with no air exposure between growth and measurement. The homogeneous roughness of the films increases with film thickness. The quantification of this roughening is achieved by calculation of both rms roughness and lateral correlation lengths of the a-Si:H film surface from the height difference correlation functions of the measured topographs. Homogeneous roughening occurs over the film surface due to the collective behavior of the flux of depositing radical species and their interactions with the growth surface. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. Electroless chemical grafting of nitrophenyl groups on n-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chulki; Oh, Kiwon; Han, Seunghee; Kim, Kyungkon; Kim, Il Won; Kim, Heesuk

    2014-08-01

    The direct spontaneous grafting of 4-nitrophenyl molecules onto n-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) surfaces without external ultraviolet, thermal, or electrochemical energy was invegtigated. Clean n-doped a-Si:H thin films were dipped in a solution of 4-nitrobenzenediazonium salts (PNBD) in acetonitrile. After the modified surfaces were rinsed, they were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). XPS and AFM results show that the reaction of an n-doped a-Si:H thin film with PNBD self-terminates without polymerization, after 5 h, and the surface number density of 4-nitrophenyl molecules is 4.2 x 10(15)/cm2. These results demonstrate that the spontaneous grafting of nitrophenyl layers onto n-doped a-Si:H thin films is an attractive pathway toward forming interfaces between a-Si:H and organic layers under ambient conditions. PMID:25936109

  2. Chemical reactivity of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms at temperatures below 100 k

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, H. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis of unusual compounds by techniques employing cryogenic cooling to retard their very extreme reactivity was investigated. Examples of such species that were studied are diimide (N2H2), cyclobutadiene (C4H4), cyclopropanone (C3H4O), oxirene (C2H2O), and many others. Special purpose cryogenically cooled inlet arrangements were designed such that the analyses incurred no warm-up of the cold, and frequently explosively unstable, compounds. Controlled energy electron impact techniques were used to measure critical potentials and to develop the molecular energetics and thermodynamics of these molecules and to gain some insight into their kinetic characteristics as well. Three and four carbon strained ring molecules were studied. Several reactions of oxygen and hydrogen atoms with simple molecules of H, N, C, and O in hard quench configurations were studied. And the quench stabilization of BH3 was explored as a model system in cryochemistry.

  3. Effects of cyanamide fertilizer on microbial community structure of continuous cropping soil%氰胺类肥料对连作土壤微生物种群结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马军伟; 孙万春; 胡庆发; 俞巧钢; 王强; 符建荣

    2013-01-01

    structure and increasing bio‐diversity , was an effective method to overcome continuous cropping obstacles . Calcium cyanamide and dicyandiamide ( DCD) were cyanamide fertilizers , which had significant inhibition effect on harmful organisms , especially on pathogenic fungi in soil . However , effects of cyanamide fertilizers on microbial community structure and bio‐diversity of continuous cropping soil were unclear . The aim of this research was to study the effects of calcium cyanamide and dicyandiamide application on microbial community structure in continuous vegetable cropping soil . Results of the study might reveal the soil micro‐ecological mechanism of calcium cyanamide and dicyandiamide to control eggplant verticillium wilt , and provide theoretical foundation and technical guidance for cyanamide fertilizers application in agricultural production . The experimental soil was silt paddy soil and was collected from farmland in Quzhou , Zhejiang Province . In the farmland , the planting years of eggplant were more than four years , and verticillium wilt of eggplant was severe and out of control in the last year . Six treatments were designed in experiments: 1) control , 2) dicyandiamide , 3) calcium cyanamide (lime nitrogen) , 4) straw , 5) dicyandiamide + straw , 6) calcium cyanamide + straw . Soils of different treatments were incubated at 25 ℃ . Through conventional artificial culture method , quantities of bacteria , fungi and actinomycetes were recorded . Community structure and bio‐diversity of bacteria and fungi were analyzed by PCR‐DGGE . Results showed that , calcium cyanamide application effectively increased the number of bacteria , decreased the amount of fungi , improved the ratio of bacteria to fungi and actinomycetes to fungi in the continuous cropping soil . But dicyandiamide showed no distinct influence on the number of bacteria . Dicyandiamide and dicyandiamide plus rice straw application increased the ratio of bacteria to fungi with the

  4. Physico-chemical origin of superpermeability - large-scale effects of surface chemistry on 'hot' hydrogen permeation and absorption in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livshits, A.I.; Notkin, M.E.; Samartsev, A.A. (Bonch-Bruyevich Electrotechnical Inst. of Communications, Leningrad (USSR). Surface Physics and Electronics Research Centre)

    1990-01-01

    Superpermeability, the absorption of amounts of hydrogen much exceeding the equilibrium concentration, dependence of premeability upon characteristics of metal surface (for membranes of any thickness), and other particular effects, are exhibited when a metal membrane is acted upon by non-equilibrium 'hot' hydrogen. The reason for this is that the process of thermal evolution of the dissolved, or implanted, hydrogen involves the associative step to form the diatomic molecule on the metal surface. This step may become effectively slow because of the presence of the activation barrier resulting, for transition metals, from non-metal adlayers on the surface. The effects of metal surface chemical composition on hydrogen uptake and permeation are demonstrated experimentally on the membranes of palladium, niobium and austenitic stainless steel interacting with hydrogen molecules, thermal atoms and fast ions. In the case of fast ions, hydrogen permeation and absorption increase, and re-emission decreases, by orders of magnitude, if chemically active gases (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}S or C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) are present in the vacuum system. The effect is accompanied by a deep minimum in the energy dependence of permeation and absorption corresponding to the maximum in the sputtering yield. (orig.).

  5. Studies on the preparation of active oxygen-deficient copper ferrite and its application for hydrogen production through thermal chemical water splitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen generation through thermal chemical water splitting technology has recently received in- creasingly international interest in the nuclear hydrogen production field. Besides the main known sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle developed by the General Atomics Company and the UT3 cycle (iron, calcium, and bromine) developed at the University of Tokyo, the thermal cycle based on metal oxide two-step water splitting methods is also receiving research and development attention worldwide. In this work, copper ferrite was prepared by the co-precipitation method and oxygen-deficient copper ferrite was synthesized through first and second calcination steps for the application of hydrogen production by a two-step water splitting process. The crystal structure, properties, chemical composition and δ were investigated in detail by utilizing X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), ultraviolet spectrophotometry (UV), gas chro- matography (GC), and so on. The experimental two-step thermal chemical cycle reactor for hydrogen generation was designed and developed in this lab. The hydrogen generation process of water splitting through CuFe2O4-δ and the cycle performance of copper ferrite regeneration were firstly studied and discussed.

  6. Studies on the preparation of active oxygen-deficient copper ferrite and its application for hydrogen production through thermal chemical water splitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Bo; ZHANG Ping; ZHANG Lei; CHEN Jing; XU JingMing

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen generation through thermal chemical water splitting technology has recently received in-creasingly international interest in the nuclear hydrogen production field. Besides the main known sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle developed by the General Atomics Company and the UT3 cycle (iron, calcium, and bromine) developed at the University of Tokyo, the thermal cycle based on metal oxide two-step water splitting methods is also receiving research and development attention worldwide. In this work, copper ferrite was prepared by the co-precipitation method and oxygen-deficient copper ferrite was synthesized through first and second calcination steps for the application of hydrogen production by a two-step water splitting process. The crystal structure, properties, chemical composition and δwere investigated in detail by utilizing X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), ultraviolet spectrophotometry (UV), gas chro-matography (GC), and so on. The experimental two-step thermal chemical cycle reactor for hydrogen generation was designed and developed in this lab. The hydrogen generation process of water splitting through CuFe2O4-δ and the cycle performance of copper ferrite regeneration were firstly studied and discussed.

  7. Cyanoacetohydrazide under Pressure: Chemical Changes in a Hydrogen-Bonded Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borstad, Gustav M; Batyrev, Iskander G; Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Cyanoacetohydrazide (CAH, C3H5N3O) has been studied under pressure using diamond anvil cell techniques. CAH was characterized using Raman spectroscopy to 30 GPa and synchrotron X-ray diffraction to 45 GPa. The Raman spectra of CAH show reasonable qualitative agreement with first-principle calculations. The X-ray data reveal that CAH maintains its monoclinic structure to approximately 22 GPa with a density change of 12% over this range. Near 22 GPa, the Raman modes and most of the X-ray diffraction peaks disappear. These pressure-induced changes are irreversible upon the release of pressure, and the transformed sample can be recovered to ambient pressure. The recovered sample is photosensitive and shows reaction even at low laser powers of 10 mW at 532 nm. The paper concludes with observations of the roles of hydrogen bonding, molecular configurations, and the behavior of the cyano group in the pressure-induced changes in CAH. PMID:27104289

  8. Fast synthesis of high-performance graphene films by hydrogen-free rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jaechul; Kim, Youngsoo; Won, Dongkwan; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Jin Sung; Lee, Eun-Kyu; Cho, Donyub; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Shin, Hae-A-Seul; Lee, Zonghoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Cho, Seungmin

    2014-01-28

    The practical use of graphene in consumer electronics has not been demonstrated since the size, uniformity, and reliability problems are yet to be solved to satisfy industrial standards. Here we report mass-produced graphene films synthesized by hydrogen-free rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RT-CVD), roll-to-roll etching, and transfer methods, which enabled faster and larger production of homogeneous graphene films over 400 × 300 mm(2) area with a sheet resistance of 249 ± 17 Ω/sq without additional doping. The properties of RT-CVD graphene have been carefully characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, chemical grain boundary analysis, and various electrical device measurements, showing excellent uniformity and stability. In particular, we found no significant correlation between graphene domain sizes and electrical conductivity, unlike previous theoretical expectations for nanoscale graphene domains. Finally, the actual application of the RT-CVD films to capacitive multitouch devices installed in the most sophisticated mobile phone was demonstrated. PMID:24358985

  9. Well-controlled metal co-catalysts synthesised by chemical vapour impregnation for photocatalytic hydrogen production and water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ren; Forde, Michael M; He, Qian; Shen, Yanbin; Wang, Xueqin; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Wendt, Stefan; Huang, Yudong; Iversen, Bo B; Kiely, Christopher J; Besenbacher, Flemming; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-10-28

    As co-catalyst materials, metal nanoparticles (NPs) play crucial roles in heterogeneous photocatalysis. The photocatalytic performance strongly relies on the physical properties (i.e., composition, microstructure, and surface impurities) of the metal NPs. Here we report a convenient chemical vapour impregnation (CVI) approach for the deposition of monometallic-, alloyed, and core-shell structured metal co-catalysts onto the TiO2 photocatalyst. The as-synthesised metal NPs are highly dispersed on the support and show narrow size distributions, which suit photocatalysis applications. More importantly, the surfaces of the as-synthesised metal NPs are free of protecting ligands, enabling the photocatalysts to be ready to use without further treatment. The effect of the metal identity, the alloy chemical composition, and the microstructure on the photocatalytic performance has been investigated for hydrogen production and phenol decomposition. Whilst the photocatalytic H2 production performance can be greatly enhanced by using the core-shell structured co-catalyst (Pdshell-Aucore and Ptshell-Aucore), the Ptshell-Aucore modified TiO2 yields enhanced quantum efficiency but a reduced effective decomposition of phenol to CO2 compared to that of the monometallic counterparts. We consider the CVI approach provides a feasible and elegant process for the decoration of photocatalyst materials. PMID:24970298

  10. Thermodynamic Possibilities and Constraints of Pure Hydrogen Production by a Chromium, Nickel and Manganese-Based Chemical Looping Process at Lower Temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Siewiorek, A.; Baxter, D.; Rogut, J.; Punčochář, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2007), s. 110-120. ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : chromium * thermodynamics * hydrogen Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.367, year: 2007

  11. Thermodynamic Possibilities and Constraints for Pure Hydrogen Production by a Nickel and Cobalt-Based Chemical Looping Process at Lower Temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Siewiorek, A.; Baxter, D.; Rogut, J.; Pohořelý, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2008), s. 221-231. ISSN 0196-8904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrogen * nickel * cobalt Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.813, year: 2008

  12. A study of the chemical, mechanical, and surface properties of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandentop, G.J.

    1990-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were studied with the objective of elucidating the nucleation and growth mechanisms, and the origin of their unique physical properties. The films were deposited onto Si(100) substrates both on the powered (negatively self-biased) and on the grounded electrodes from methane in an rf plasma (13.56 MHz) at 65 mTorr and 300 to 370 K. The films produced at the powered electrode exhibited superior mechanical properties, such as high hardness. A mass spectrometer was used to identify neutral species and positive ions incident on the electrodes from the plasma, and also to measure ion energies. The effect of varying ion energy flux on the properties of a-C:H films was investigated using a novel pulsed biasing technique. It was demonstrated that ions were not the dominant deposition species as the total ion flux measured was insufficient to account for the observed deposition rate. The interface between thin films of a-C:H and silicon substrates was investigated using angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A silicon carbide layer was detected at the interface of a hard a-C:H film formed at the powered electrode. At the grounded electrode, where the kinetic energy is low, no interfacial carbide layer was observed. Scanning tunneling microscopy and high energy electron energy loss spectroscopy was used to investigate the initial stages of growth of a-C:H films. On graphite substrates, films formed at the powered electrode were observed to nucleate in clusters approximately 50 {Angstrom} in diameter, while at the grounded electrode no cluster formation was observed. 58 figs.

  13. COSMOLOGICAL CONCORDANCE OR CHEMICAL COINCIDENCE? DEUTERATED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ABUNDANCES AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two detections of deuterated molecular hydrogen (HD) in QSO absorption-line systems at z>2. Toward J2123-0500, we find N(HD) =13.84 ± 0.2 for a sub-Damped Lyman Alpha system (DLA) with metallicity ≅0.5Zsun and N(H2) = 17.64 ± 0.15 at z = 2.0594. Toward FJ0812+32, we find N(HD) =15.38 ± 0.3 for a solar-metallicity DLA with N(H2) = 19.88 ± 0.2 at z = 2.6265. These systems have ratios of HD to H2 above that observed in dense clouds within the Milky Way disk and apparently consistent with a simple conversion from the cosmological ratio of D/H. These ratios are not readily explained by any available model of HD chemistry, and there are no obvious trends with metallicity or molecular content. Taken together, these two systems and the two published z>2 HD-bearing DLAs indicate that HD is either less effectively dissociated or more efficiently produced in high-redshift interstellar gas, even at low molecular fraction and/or solar metallicity. It is puzzling that such diverse systems should show such consistent HD/H2 ratios. Without clear knowledge of all the aspects of HD chemistry that may help determine the ratio HD/H2, we conclude that these systems are potentially more revealing of gas chemistry than of D/H itself and that it is premature to use such systems to constrain D/H at high redshift.

  14. Chemical engineering challenges in driving thermochemical hydrogen processes with the tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tandem Mirror Reactor is described and compared with Tokamaks, both from a basic physics viewpoint and from the suitability of the respective reactor for synfuel production. Differences and similarities between the TMR as an electricity producer or a synfuel producer are also cited. The Thermochemical cycle chosen to link with the fusion energy source is the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle, which is a purely thermal-driven process with no electrochemical steps. There are real chemical engineering challenges of getting this high quality heat into the large thermochemical plant in an efficient manner. We illustrate with some of our approaches to providing process heat via liquid sodium to drive a 1050 K, highly-endothermic, catalytic and fluidized-bed SO3 Decomposition Reactor. The technical, economic, and safety tradeoffs that arise are discussed

  15. Hydrogen reduction in GaAsN thin films by flow rate modulated chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of residual H in the GaAsN film grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) can be decreased by flow rate modulation growth. Many H atoms in the films grown by CBE exist as N-H or N-H2 structures. Although a higher growth temperature was required for decreasing the H concentration ([H]), it caused a decrease in the N concentration ([N]). A reduction in [H] while keeping [N] constant was necessary. By providing an intermittent supply of Ga source while continuously supplying As and N sources, [H] effectively decreased in comparison with the [H] value in the film grown at the same temperature by conventional CBE without reducing [N

  16. Hydrodynamic analysis of a three-fluidized bed reactor cold flow model for chemical looping hydrogen generation. Pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhipeng; Xiang, Wenguo; Chen, Shiyi; Wang, Dong [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG system consists of three reactors: a fuel reactor (FR), a steam reactor (SR) and an air reactor (AR). In the FR, the fuel gases react with iron oxides (hematite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, wuestite FeO), generating reduced iron oxides (FeO or even Fe), and with full conversion of gaseous fuels, pure CO{sub 2} can be obtained after cooling the flue gas from the fuel reactor; in the SR, FeO and Fe reacts with steam to generate magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and H{sub 2}, the latter representing the final target product of the process; in the AR, the magnetite is oxidized back to hematite which is used in another cycle. A cold flow model of three-fluidized bed for CLHG corresponding to 50 KW hot units has been built. A major novelty of this facility is the compact fuel reactor, which integrates a bubble and a fast fluidized bed to avoid the incomplete conversion of the fuel gas caused by the thermodynamics equilibrium. In order to study the pressure characteristics and the solids concentration of the system, especially in the fuel reactor, the gas velocity of three reactors, gas flow of L-type value, total solids inventory (TSI) and the secondary air of fuel reactor were varied. Results show that the pressure and the solids concentration are strongly influenced by the fluidizing-gas velocity of three reactors. Moreover, the entrainment of the upper part of fuel reactor increases as the total solids inventory increases, and the operating range of the FR can be changed by introducing secondary air or increasing the total solids inventory.

  17. Laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anton; Strydom, Christien A.; Uys, Hermann; Botha, Lourens R.

    2011-11-01

    Bimolecular chemical reaction control of gaseous CO and H2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses is presented. High intensity laser radiation applied to a reaction cell facilitates non-resonant bond breakage and the formation of a range of ions, which can then react to form new products. Stable reaction products are measured after irradiation of a reaction cell, using time of flight mass spectroscopy. Bond formation of C-O, C-C, and C-H bonds is demonstrated as CO2+, C2H2+, CH+, and CH3+ were observed in the time of flight mass spectrum of the product gas, analyzed after irradiation. The formation of CO2 is shown to be dependent on laser intensity, irradiation time, and on the presence of H2 in the reaction cell. Using negatively chirped laser pulses more C-O bond formation takes place as compared to more C-C bond formation for unchirped pulses.

  18. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  19. Synthesis and luminescent properties of low oxygen contained Eu2+-doped Ca-α-SiAlON phosphor from calcium cyanamide reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PIAO Xianqing; Ken-ichi Machida; Takashi Horikawa; Hiromasa Hanzawa

    2008-01-01

    A new convenient calcium cyanamide (CaCN2) reduction route was developed to synthesize the Eu2+ activated Ca-α-SiAlON phosphors containing low oxygen content. The luminescence properties of the obtained products were investigated for white LEDs application. The critical Eu2+ concentration in various hosts and its effect on the photoluminescence properties were studied. The optimized sample (10at.% Eu2+ vs. Ca2+) could be efficiently excited by the current GaN/InGaN blue LED chips and provided emission intensity competitive with that of YAG:Ce3+ (P46-Y3) standard, revealing that this phosphor was a potential candidate for phosphor-converted white LEDs.

  20. Inhibition of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root growth by cyanamide is due to altered cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska, Anita; Bogatek, Renata

    2012-11-01

    Cyanamide (CA) has been reported as a natural compound produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) and it was shown also to be an allelochemical, responsible for strong allelopathic potential in this species. CA phytotoxicity has been demonstrated on various plant species, but to date little is known about its mode of action at cellular level. Treatment of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots with CA (1.2 mM) resulted in inhibition of growth accompanied by alterations in cell division, and imbalance of plant hormone (ethylene and auxin) homeostasis. Moreover, the phytotoxic effect of CA was also manifested by modifications in expansin gene expression, especially in expansins responsible for cell wall remodeling after the cytokinesis (LeEXPA9, LeEXPA18). Based on these results the phytotoxic activity of CA on growth of roots of tomato seedlings is likely due to alterations associated with cell division. PMID:22847024

  1. Hydrogen Atom Collision Processes in Cool Stellar Atmospheres: Effects on Spectral Line Strengths and Measured Chemical Abundances in Old Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precise measurement of the chemical composition of stars is a fundamental problem relevant to many areas of astrophysics. State-of-the-art approaches attempt to unite accurate descriptions of microphysics, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation and 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In this paper I review progress in understanding inelastic collisions of hydrogen atoms with other species and their influence on spectral line formation and derived abundances in stellar atmospheres. These collisions are a major source of uncertainty in non-LTE modelling of spectral lines and abundance determinations, especially for old, metal-poor stars, which are unique tracers of the early evolution of our galaxy. Full quantum scattering calculations of direct excitation processes X(nl) + H ↔ X(n'l') + H and charge transfer processes X(nl) + H ↔ X+ + H− have been done for Li, Na and Mg [1,2,3] based on detailed quantum chemical data, e.g. [4]. Rate coefficients have been calculated and applied to non-LTE modelling of spectral lines in stellar atmospheres [5,6,7,8,9]. In all cases we find that charge transfer processes from the first excited S-state are very important, and the processes affect measured abundances for Li, Na and Mg in some stars by as much as 60%. Effects vary with stellar parameters (e.g. temperature, luminosity, metal content) and so these processes are important not only for accurate absolute abundances, but also for relative abundances among dissimilar stars.

  2. Hydrogen plasma enhanced alignment on CNT-STM tips grown by liquid catalyst-assisted microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes are grown directly on a scanning tunneling microscopy tip by liquid catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and effects of hydrogen plasma treatment on the tip have been investigated in detail by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The unaligned CNTs on the as-grown tip apex have been realigned and reshaped by subsequent hydrogen plasma treatment. The diameter of CNTs is enlarged mainly due to amorphous layers being re-sputtered over their outer shells

  3. Glassy carbon electrode modified with a graphene oxide/poly(o-phenylenediamine) composite for the chemical detection of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Van Hoa [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Nha Trang University, 2 Nguyen Dinh Chieu, Nha Trang (Viet Nam); Tran, Trung Hieu [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae-Jin, E-mail: jjshim@yu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Conducting poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD)/graphene oxide (GO) composites were prepared using a facile and efficient method involving the in-situ polymerization of OPD in the presence of GO in an aqueous medium. Copper sulfate was used as an oxidative initiator for the polymerization of OPD. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that POPD microfibrils were formed and distributed relatively uniformly with GO sheets in the obtained composites. X-ray diffraction results revealed the highly crystal structure of POPD. This composite exhibited good catalytic activity and stability. These results highlight the potential applications of POPD/GO composites as excellent electrochemical sensors. The composites were used to modify glass carbon electrodes for the chemical detection of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous media. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide/poly(o-phenylenediamine) composites were prepared efficiently. • POPD microfibrils were distributed relatively uniformly with GO sheets. • The composite exhibited good catalytic activity and stability for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensing.

  4. Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Co-B Amorphous Catalysts Prepared by Chemical Reduction in Variable Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Hui; CHAI, Wei-Mei; LUO, Hong-Shan; LI, He-Xing

    2006-01-01

    Five Co-B amorphous alloy catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction in different media, including pure water and pure ethanol as well as the mixture of ethanol and water with variable ethanol content. Their catalytic properties were evaluated using liquid phase furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol as the probe reaction. It was found that the reaction media had no significant influence on either the amorphous structure of the Co-B catalyst or the electronic interaction between metallic Co and alloying B. This could successfully account for the fact that all the as-prepared Co-B catalysts exhibited almost the same selectivity to furfuryl alcohol and the same activity per surface area ( RSH ), which could be considered as the intrinsic activity, since the nature of active sites remained unchanged. However, the activity per gram of Co ( RmH ) of the as-prepared Co-B catalysts increased rapidly when the ethanol content in the water-ethanol mixture used as the reaction medium for catalyst preparation increased. This could be attributed to the rapid increase in the surface area possibly owing to the presence of more oxidized boron species which could serve as a support for dispersing the Co-B amorphous alloy particles.

  5. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  6. Conformation and intramolecular hydrogen bonding of 2-chloroacetamide as studied by microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllendal, Harald; Samdal, Svein

    2006-02-16

    The microwave spectrum of 2-chloroacetamide (ClCH2CONH2) has been investigated at room temperature in the 19-80 spectral range. Spectra of the 35ClCH2CONH2 and 37ClCH2CONH2 isotopomers of one conformer, which has a symmetry plane (Cs symmetry), were assigned. The amide group is planar, and an intramolecular hydrogen bond is formed between the chlorine atom and the nearest hydrogen atom of the amide group. The ground vibrational state, six vibrationally excited states of the torsional vibration about the CC bond, as well as the first excited state of the lowest bending mode were assigned for the 35ClCH2CONH2 isotopomer, whereas the ground vibrational state of 37ClCH2CONH2 was assigned. The CC torsional fundamental vibration has a frequency of 62(10) cm(-1), and the bending vibration has a frequency of 204(30) cm(-1). The rotational constants of the ground and of the six excited states of the CC torsion were fitted to the potential function Vz = 16.1( + 2.3) cm(-1), where z is a dimensionless parameter. This function indicates that the equilibrium conformation has Cs symmetry. Rough values of the chlorine nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were derived as chi(aa) = -47.62(52) and chi(bb) = 8.22(66) MHz for the 35Cl nucleus and chi(aa) = -34.6(10) and chi(bb) = 6.2(11) MHz for the 37Cl nucleus. Ab initio and density functional theory quantum chemical calculations have been performed at several levels of theory to evaluate the equilibrium geometry of this compound. The density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) and B3LYP/cc-pVTZ levels of theory as well as ab initio calculations at the MP2(F)/cc-pVTZ level predict correct lowest-energy conformation for the molecule, whereas the ab initio calculations at the QCISD(FC)/6-311G(d) and MP2(F)/6-311++G(d,p) levels predict an incorrect equilibrium conformation. PMID:16466249

  7. Synthesis of new structurally related cyanamide compounds LiM(CN{sub 2}){sub 2} where M is Al{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+} or Yb{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubus, Mariusz, E-mail: mariusz.kubus@anorg.uni-tuebingen.de [Abteilung für Festkörperchemie und Theoretische Anorganische Chemie, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, Universität Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Heinicke, Robert; Ströbele, Markus [Abteilung für Festkörperchemie und Theoretische Anorganische Chemie, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, Universität Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Enseling, David; Jüstel, Thomas [Fachhochschule Münster, Labor für Angewandte Materialwissenschaft, Stegerwaldstrasse 39, D-48565 Steinfurt (Germany); Meyer, H.-Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.meyer@uni-tuebingen.de [Abteilung für Festkörperchemie und Theoretische Anorganische Chemie, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, Universität Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • New cyanamide compounds LiM(CN{sub 2}){sub 2} where M is Al{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+} or Yb{sup 3+}. • New luminescent material LiIn(CN{sub 2}){sub 2}:Tb{sup 3+}. • Reduction in efficiency of luminescence with temperature increase. - Abstract: New ternary cyanamide compounds isostructural to LiY(CN{sub 2}){sub 2} were obtained by solid state metathesis reaction. The crystal structure of LiAl(CN{sub 2}){sub 2} was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, the structures of LiIn(CN{sub 2}){sub 2} and LiYb(CN{sub 2}){sub 2} were solved from X-ray powder diffraction data. Photoluminescence properties of Tb{sup 3+}-doped LiIn(CN{sub 2}){sub 2} are reported too.

  8. Combined effects of cold work and chemical polishing on the absorption and release of hydrogen from SRF cavities inferred from resistance measurements of cavity-grade niobium bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyuba, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2014-03-01

    A series of small fine-grained and single-crystal bars, with strain from 0% (recrystallized) to 50%, were given different amounts of chemical polishing. Four-point resistivity (ρ) data was used to characterize the electron scattering from dislocations, hydrogen, and any other trace contaminants. As noted by previous studies, annealed Nb displayed a weak linear increase of ρ (11 K) with polishing time due to hydrogen absorption, and bulk hydrogen concentration did not exceed 15% for 200 μm metal removed. Cold-worked samples displayed steeper slopes with polishing time (after subtracting resistivity due to strain alone), suggesting that dislocations assist the absorption of hydrogen during polishing. Absorption accelerated above 30% strain and 100 μm material removal, with room-temperature hydrogen concentration rising rapidly from 2% up to 5%. This threshold is significant, since superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are usually polished as-formed, with >35% strain, and polishing removes >150 μm of metal. Resistance jumps between 40 and 150 K, which signal the formation of hydride precipitates, were stronger in cold-worked samples, suggesting that dislocations also assist precipitate nucleation. High-vacuum anneals at 800 °C for 2 h, which are known to fully recrystallize cavity-grade niobium and de-gas hydrogen, removed the 40-150 K jumps and recovered the resistivity increase due to chemical polishing entirely. But, about 30% of the resistivity increase due to cold work remained, possibly due to residual dislocation clusters. Continued annealing only facilitated the diffusion of surface impurities into the bulk and did not recover the initial 0% state. Strain, polishing, and annealing thus appear to combine as irreversible paths that change the material. Bearing this in mind, the significant difference in hydrogen uptake between annealed and cold-worked samples suggests that annealing SRF cavities prior to chemical polishing could greatly reduce

  9. Hydrogen production by the solar-powered hybrid sulfur process: Analysis of the integration of the CSP and chemical plants in selected scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Raffaele; Lanchi, Michela; Turchetti, Luca

    2016-05-01

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) is a water splitting process for hydrogen production powered with high temperature nuclear heat and electric power; among the numerous thermo-chemical and thermo-electro-chemical cycles proposed in the literature, such cycle is considered to have a particularly high potential also if powered by renewable energy. SOL2HY2 (Solar to Hydrogen Hybrid Cycles) is a 3 year research project, co-funded by the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking (FCH JU). A significant part of the project activities are devoted to the analysis and optimization of the integration of the solar power plant with the chemical, hydrogen production plant. This work reports a part of the results obtained in such research activity. The analysis presented in this work builds on previous process simulations used to determine the energy requirements of the hydrogen production plant in terms of electric power, medium (550°C) temperature heat. For the supply of medium temperature (MT) heat, a parabolic trough CSP plant using molten salts as heat transfer and storage medium is considered. A central receiver CSP (Concentrated Solar Power) plant is considered to provide high temperature (HT) heat, which is only needed for sulfuric acid decomposition. Finally, electric power is provided by a power block included in the MT solar plant and/or drawn from the grid, depending on the scenario considered. In particular, the analysis presented here focuses on the medium temperature CSP plant, possibly combined with a power block. Different scenarios were analysed by considering plants with different combinations of geographical location and sizing criteria.

  10. A Theoretical Study of two Novel Concept Systems for Maximum Thermal-Chemical Conversion of Biomass to Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob N. Chung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two concept systems that are based on the thermochemical process of high-temperature steam gasification of lignocellulosic biomass and municipal solid waste are introduced. The primary objectives of the concept systems are 1 to develop the best scientific, engineering, and technology solutions for converting lignocellulosic biomass, as well as agricultural, forest and municipal waste to clean energy (pure hydrogen fuel, and 2 to minimize water consumption and detrimental impacts of energy production on the environment (air pollution and global warming. The production of superheated steam is by hydrogen combustion using recycled hydrogen produced in the first concept system while in the second concept system concentrated solar energy is used for the steam production. A membrane reactor that performs the hydrogen separation and water gas shift reaction is involved in both systems for producing more pure hydrogen and CO2 sequestration. Based on obtaining the maximum hydrogen production rate the hydrogen recycled ratio is around 20% for the hydrogen combustion steam heating system. Combined with pure hydrogen production, both high temperature steam gasification systems potentially possess more than 80% in first law overall system thermodynamic efficiencies.

  11. Water-Soluble Iridium-NHC-Phosphine Complexes as Catalysts for Chemical Hydrogen Batteries Based on Formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Henrietta; Papp, Gábor; Szabolcsi, Roland; Kathó, Ágnes; Joó, Ferenc

    2015-09-21

    Molecular hydrogen, obtained by water electrolysis or photocatalytic water splitting, can be used to store energy obtained from intermittent sources such as wind and solar power. The storage and safe transportation of H2 , however, is an open and central question in such a hydrogen economy. Easy-to-synthesize, water-soluble iridium-N-heterocyclic carbene-phosphine (Ir(I) -NHC-phosphine) catalysts show unprecedented high catalytic activity in dehydrogenation of aqueous sodium formate. Fast reversible generation and storage of hydrogen can be achieved with these catalysts by a simple decrease or increase in the hydrogen pressure, respectively. PMID:26289830

  12. Low-temperature synthesis of microcrystalline 3C-SiC film by high-pressure hydrogen-plasma-enhanced chemical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of microcrystalline 3C-SiC films on glass substrates at relatively low temperatures (≤600 deg. C) by the plasma-enhanced chemical transport method was carried out using a high-pressure pure hydrogen glow discharge. This method used the chemical erosion products of graphite and silicon in the hydrogen plasma as the deposition source. The temperature dependence of the etching rate of graphite and the generated volatile C-species were investigated by exposing sintered graphite to a pure hydrogen plasma at 100 Torr. Infrared absorption gas analysis indicated that the C-related film precursor generated from the graphite was mainly CH4. The etch rate of graphite reached a maximum at a sample temperature of 200 deg. C. The deposition rate of the SiC film prepared at a hydrogen pressure of 200 Torr increased monotonically from 14 to 29 nm min-1 with an increase in substrate temperature (Tsub) from 100 to 600 deg. C. The Si/C composition ratio in the films was independent of Tsub and all the film compositions were nearly stoichiometric. The prepared SiC films were microcrystalline 3C-SiC. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the film quality significantly depends on Tsub. The electrical conductivity of the films at room temperature was found to increase exponentially from 3 x 10-4 to 1.7 S cm-1 with Tsub.

  13. The role of hydrogen in oxygen-assisted chemical vapor deposition growth of millimeter-sized graphene single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Cheng, Yu; Zhao, Dongchen; Yin, Kun; Zhang, Xuewei; Song, Meng; Yin, Shaoqian; Song, Yenan; Wang, Peng; Wang, Miao; Xia, Yang; Wang, Hongtao

    2016-03-01

    Involving oxygen in the traditional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has proven a promising approach to achieve large-scale graphene single crystals (GSCs), but its many relevant fundamental aspects are still not fully understood. Here we report a systematic study on the role of hydrogen in the growth of millimeter-sized GSCs using enclosure-like Cu structures via the oxygen-assisted CVD process. Results show that GSCs have different first layer growth behaviors on the inside and outside surfaces of a Cu enclosure when the H2 environment is varied, and these behaviors will consequently and strongly influence the adlayer formation in these GSCs, leading to two entirely different growth modes. Low H2 partial pressure (PH2) tends to result in fast growth of dendritically shaped GSCs with multiple small adlayers, but high PH2 can modify the GSC shape into hexagons with single large adlayer nuclei. This difference of adlayers is attributed to the different C diffusion paths determined by the shapes of their host GSCs. On the basis of these observations, we developed an isothermal two-step method to obtain GSCs with significantly improved growth rate and sample quality, in which low PH2 is first set to accelerate the growth rate followed by high PH2 to restrict the adlayer nuclei. Our results prove that the growth of GSCs can reach a reasonable optimization between their growth rates and sample quality by simply adjusting the CVD H2 environment, which we believe will lead to more improvements in graphene synthesis and fundamental insight into the related growth mechanisms.Involving oxygen in the traditional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has proven a promising approach to achieve large-scale graphene single crystals (GSCs), but its many relevant fundamental aspects are still not fully understood. Here we report a systematic study on the role of hydrogen in the growth of millimeter-sized GSCs using enclosure-like Cu structures via the oxygen-assisted CVD

  14. Insight into the effect of hydrogenation on efficiency of hydrothermal liquefaction and physico-chemical properties of biocrude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, HongYi; Hu, Jiao; Zhang, ZhiJian; Wang, Hang; Ping, Fan; Zheng, ChangFeng; Zhang, HaiLuo; He, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina (N. salina) and larvae-vermicompost were conducted under both non-hydrogenating and hydrogenating subcritical conditions using H2 and Ni-Mo/Al2O3. Hydrogenation raised biocrude yields from 33.2% to 43.5% (vermicompost) and 55.6% to 78.5% (N. salina), whereas high heat values increased from 32.89 to 34.24 MJ/kg (vermicompost) and 36.30 to 37.53 MJ/kg (N. salina). Compared with the non-hydrogenated HTL process, the contents of acids, amides, phenols, and alcohols decreased, whereas hydrocarbons content increased. More branched cyclic nitrogenous compounds were detected in the hydrogenated biocrudes, whereas the aromatic/hetero-aromatic functionality was somewhat decreased. Smaller molecular weights and polydispersity index of the hydrogenated biocrudes were also detected. Results show that hydrogenation enhanced the removal of hydrophilic functional groups and the stabilization of radicals, thereby leading to the inhibition of loss of mass toward liquid and gaseous products and the upgrading of oil quality. PMID:24813386

  15. Effect of calcium cyanamid synthetic drug on Schistosoma japonicum egg morphology%氰氨化钙合成药物对血吸虫虫卵形态学影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周义生; 彭国华; 胡主花; 冯小武; 朱蓉; 魏望远; 郭家钢

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察虫卵经氰氨化钙合成药物作用后的形态改变,为进一步研究氰氨化钙合成药物杀灭血吸虫虫卵作用机理提供依据。方法向含有血吸虫虫卵的阳性牛粪中加入氰氨化钙合成药物并搅拌,模拟野粪自然形态堆放于洲滩上;同时设空白对照。于1、2、3、7d后分别取样,收集血吸虫虫卵,于显微镜下观察虫卵形态。结果虫卵经氰氨化钙合成药物作用后,颜色逐步加深,毛蚴萎缩,卵壳变厚,3d后胚膜不完整,7d后毛蚴严重变形;对照组毛蚴未见明显萎缩。结论氰氨化钙合成药物对虫卵胚膜及毛蚴有损伤作用,且随时间延长而损伤加重。%Objective To study the morphological change of Schistosoma japonicum eggs processed by calcium cyanamide synthetic drug,so as to provide the basis for further study of the mechanism that calcium cyanamide synthetic drug to schisto⁃some eggs. Methods The calcium cyanamide synthetic drug was added to the cattle feces containing schistosome eggs and mixed up,and then the cattle feces was stacked as original shape on the marshland. Blank controls were set at the same time. The cattle feces samples were collected and the schistosome eggs were observed under a microscope on the 1st,2nd,3rd,7th day after the experiment. Results By the effect of calcium cyanamide synthetic drug,the color of eggs was deepening gradual⁃ly,the miracidia were atrophied,and the shells of eggs were thickened. The embryonic membrane of miracidia was no longer completed 3 days later,and the miracidia were deformed severely 7 days later. The atrophy of miracidia was not obvious in the blank controls. Conclusion The schistosome miracidia and embryonic membrane can be damaged by the calcium cyanamide synthetic drug,and worse damaged with time extending.

  16. Investigating the Chemical Reactivity for Hydrogen in Siliciclastic Sediments: two Work Packages of the H2STORE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, M.; Pilz, P.

    2014-12-01

    The H2STORE ("Hydrogen to Store") collaborative project, funded by the German government, investigates the feasibility of industrial-scale hydrogen storage from excess wind energy in siliciclastic depleted gas and oil reservoirs or suitable saline aquifers. In particular, two work packages (geochemical experiments and modelling) hosted at the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) focus on the possible impact of hydrogen on formation fluids and on the mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical properties of reservoirs and caprocks. Laboratory experiments expose core samples from several potential reservoirs to pure hydrogen or hydrogen mixtures under site-specific conditions (temperatures up to 200 °C and pressure up to 300 bar). The resulting qualitative and, whereas possible, quantitative data are expected to ameliorate the precision of predictive geochemical and reactive transport modelling, which is also performed within the project. The combination of experiments and models will improve the knowledge about: (1) solubility model and mixing rule for of hydrogen and its gas mixtures in high saline formation fluids; (2) hydrogen reactivity in a broad spectrum of P-T conditions; (3) thermodynamics and kinetics of mineral dissolution or precipitation reactions and redox processes. It is known that under specific P-T conditions reactions between hydrogen and anorganic rock components such as carbonates can occur. However these conditions have never been precisely defined to date. A precise estimation of the hydrogen impact on reservoir behavior of different siliciclastic rock types is crucial for site selection and optimization of storage depth. Enhancing the overall understanding of such systems will benefit the operational reliability, the ecological tolerance, and the economic efficiency of future energy storing plants, crucial aspects for public acceptance and for industrial investors.

  17. Physical, chemical and microbiological properties of mixed hydrogenated palm kernel oil and cold-pressed rice bran oil as ingredients in non-dairy creamer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunakorn Katsri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The physical, chemical and microbiological properties of hydrogenated palm kernel oil (PKO and cold-pressed rice bran oil (RBOas ingredients in the production of liquid and powdered non-dairy creamer (coffee whitener were studied. The mixing ratios between hydrogenated PKO and cold-pressed RBO were statistically designed as of 100:0, 90:10,80:20, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, 30:70, 20:80, 10:90 and 0:100.The color, absorbanceand viscosity of the mixtures were investigated. As the ratio of cold-pressed RBO increased, the color became darker (L*of 93.06 to 86.25 and the absorbance significantly increased, while the viscosity of the mixtures of 20:80, 10:90 and 0:100 (54 cp. were the highest amongst the ratios tested.The hydrogenated PKO and cold-pressed RBO mixtures were further chemically tested for fatty acids, -oryzanol, -tocopherol, trans-fat contents andantioxidant activity. There were 10 fatty acids present in hydrogenated PKO with saturated fatty acid being the most predominant. Comparatively, there were only 5 fatty acids found in cold-pressed RBO with monounsaturated fatty acid being the major fatty acid. -Oryzanol and -tocopherol contents were higher with increasingcold-pressed RBO from 0-100% (0 to 1,155.00 mg/100g oil and 0.09 to 30.82 mg/100g oil, respectively. Antioxidant activity was increased with increasing cold-pressed RBO from 0-100% (9.26 to 94.24%.The pure hydrogenated PKO contained higher trans-fat content than that of the 90:10 and 80:20 mixtures (2.73, 1.93 and 1.85mg/100g oil,respectively while other samples had no trans-fat. No microorganisms were present in any of the samples.Therefore, substitution of hydrogenated PKO by cold-pressed RBO from 30-100% would offer more nutritional values and better chemical and physical properties of non-dairy creamer.

  18. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  19. Evaluating the safety and regulatory aspects of the combined nuclear/chemical complex for Hydrogen production / Gerhardus Petrus Schalkwyk

    OpenAIRE

    Schalkwyk, Gerhardus Petrus

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been an exceptional resurgence of interest in the nuclear power industry and the cogeneration of hydrogen from nuclear process heat and electricity, with climate change and energy security the main drivers for the implementation of these technologies. Nuclear-assisted hydrogen production technologies include electrochemical, thermochemical and hybrid-thermochemical options that respectively require electricity, high-temperature process heat and both electricity and high-tem...

  20. Role of atomic hydrogen density and energy in low power chemical vapor deposition synthesis of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond films were synthesized on silicon substrates without diamond seeding by a very low power (∼40-80 W) microwave plasma continuous vapor deposition reaction of a mixture of helium-hydrogen-methane (48.2/48.2/3.6%) or argon-hydrogen-methane (17.5/80/2.5%). However, predominantly graphitic carbon films or no films formed when neon, krypton, or xenon was substituted for helium or argon. The films were characterized by time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It is proposed that each of He+ and Ar+ served as a catalyst with atomic hydrogen to form an energetic plasma since only plasmas having these ions in the presence of atomic hydrogen showed significantly broadened H α lines corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of >100 eV as reported previously. It was found that not only the energy, but also the H density uniquely increases in He-H2 and Ar-H2 plasmas. Bombardment of the carbon surface by highly energetic hydrogen formed by the catalysis reaction may play a role in the formation of diamond. Then, by this novel pathway, the relevance of the CO tie line is eliminated along with other stringent conditions and complicated and inefficient techniques which limit broad application of the versatility and superiority of diamond thin film technology

  1. Hydrogen Production From Water By Thermo-Chemical Methods (UT-3): Evaluation of Side Reactions By Simulation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydogen fuel with its advantages will be able to replace all the positions of fossil fuels post oil and gas or migas. Among the advantages of hydrogen fuel are pollution free, abundant of raw material in the form of water molecule, flexible in application, able to stroge and transport as well as fossil energy sources (oil and gas). Hydogen could be produced from water by means of thermochemical, thermolysis, photolysis and electrolysis. Nuclear heat (HTGR), solar heat or waste heat from steel industry can be used as energy source for these processes. In case of thermochemical method, some problems realated to production process should be studied and evaluated. Simulation is considered can be applied to study the effects of side reactions and also to resolve its problems in hydrogen production process. In this paper is reported the evalution results of hydrogen production process by thermochemical (UT-3) through both of the experimental and computer simulation. It has been proposed a new flow chart of hydrogen production to achieve the hydrogen production continuously. A simulator has been developed based on experimental data and related mathematical equations. This simulator can be used to scle-up the UT-3 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production process

  2. Corrosion resistance of amorphous hydrogenated SiC and diamond-like coatings deposited by r.f.-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the properties and corrosion resistance of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated SiC films deposited by r.f.-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition at low temperatures (below 200 C). SiC coatings were prepared from SiH4-CH4 gas mixtures. Hydrogenated diamond-like coatings were deposited from classical CH4-H2 mixtures. The influence of various deposition parameters was investigated. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the films were studied (density, hydrogen content, nanohardness, internal stress, critical load and friction coefficient). Two examples of corrosion resistance are given: (1) the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of SiC and diamond-like coatings deposited on metal implants (Ti alloy) (the corrosion resistance is evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization tests in biological media; the biocompatibility of coated and uncoated metals is compared using differentiated human cell cultures); and (2) the corrosion resistance of SiC-coated magnesium in chloride-containing boric borate buffer at pH = 9.3 evaluated from anodic polarization curves and scanning electron microscopy studies. (orig.)

  3. Hydrogen production by ethanol partial oxidation over nano-iron oxide catalysts produced by chemical vapour synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Wael Ahmed Abou Taleb Sayed

    2011-01-13

    This work presents the experimental results of the synthesis of unsupported and supported SiC iron oxide nanoparticles and their catalytic activity towards ethanol partial oxidation. For comparison, further unsupported iron oxide phases were investigated towards the ethanol partial oxidation. These {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase catalysts were prepared by the CVS method using Fe(CO){sub 5} as precursor, supplied by another author. The {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles were prepared by the CVS method using a home made hot wall reactor technique at atmospheric pressure. Ferrocene and tetramethylsilane were used as precursor for the production process. Process parameters of precursor evaporation temperature, precursor concentration, gas mixture velocity and gas mixture dilution were investigated and optimised to produce particle sizes in a range of 10 nm. For Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC catalyst series production, a new hot wall reactor setup was used. The particles were produced by simultaneous thermal decomposition of ferrocene and tetramethylsilane in one reactor from both sides. The production parameters of inlet tube distance inside the reactor, precursor evaporation temperature and carrier gas flow were investigated to produce a series of samples with different iron oxide content. The prepared catalysts composition, physical and chemical properties were characterized by XRD, EDX, SEM, BET surface area, FTIR, XPS and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The catalytic activity for the ethanol gas-phase oxidation was investigated in a temperature range from 260 C to 290 C. The product distributions obtained over all catalysts were analysed with mass spectrometry analysis tool. The activity of bulk Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles was compared with prepared nano-iron oxide phase catalysts. The reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature and O{sub 2}/ethanol ratio were investigated. The catalysts

  4. Screening of NiFe2O4 Nanoparticles as Oxygen Carrier in Chemical Looping Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Shuai; He, Fang; Huang, Zhen;

    2016-01-01

    ) porosity test. The performance of the prepared materials was first evaluated in a TGA reactor through a CO reduction and subsequent steam oxidation process. Then a complete redox process was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor, where the NiFe2O4 oxygen carrier was first reduced by simulated biomass pyrolysis...... gas (24% H2 + 24% CO + 12% CO2 + N2 balance), then reacted with steam to produce H2, and finally fully oxidized by air. The NiFe2O4 oxygen carrier prepared by the sol gel method showed the best capacity for hydrogen production and the highest recovery degree of lattice oxygen, in agreement with the......The objective of this paper is to systematically investigate the influences of different preparation methods on the properties of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles as oxygen carrier in chemical looping hydrogen production (CLH). The solid state (SS), coprecipitation (CP), hydrothermal (HT), and sol-gel (SG...

  5. Best mix of primary energy resources by renewable energy and fossil fuel with CCS in view of security,stability and sustainability——A vision on hydrogen supply chain by organic chemical hydride method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junichi; SAKAGUCHI

    2010-01-01

    The best mix scenario by renewable energy and fossil fuel with or without CCS(Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage) would be a solution to compromise Greenhouse Gases emission issue caused by carbon dioxide(CO2),and depletion of crude oil and natural gas reserves.As fossil fuel with pre-combustion CCS means hydrogen manufacturing and also hydrogen can be produced via electrolysis with renewable energy,it is desirable to establish transportation and storage systems of hydrogen as a clean energy.In this paper a vision on Hydrogen Supply Chain by Organic Chemical Hydride(OCH) Method as well as comparison of CCS configuration are discussed.

  6. Miniaturized and green method for determination of chemical oxygen demand using UV-induced oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and single drop microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a green method for the determination of low levels of chemical oxygen demand. It is based on the combination of (a) UV-induced oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, (b) headspace single-drop microextraction with in-drop precipitation, and (c) micro-turbidimetry. The generation of CO2 after photolytic oxidation followed by its sequestration onto a microdrop of barium hydroxide gives rise to a precipitate of barium carbonate which is quantified by turbidimetry. UV-light induced oxidation was studied in the absence and presence of H2O2, ultrasound, and ferrous ion. Determinations of chemical oxygen demand were performed using potassium hydrogen phthalate as a model compound. The optimized method gives a calibration curve that is linear between 3.4 and 20 mg L−1 oxygen. The detection limit was 1.2 mg L−1 of oxygen, and the repeatability (as relative standard deviation) was around 5 %. The method was successfully applied to the determination of chemical oxygen demand in different natural waters and a synthetic wastewater. (author)

  7. Evidence for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 4-chlorosalicylic acid from combined experimental and computational studies: Quantum chemical treatment of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental and computational studies on the photophysics of 4-chlorosalicylic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopically established ESIPT reaction substantiated by theoretical calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum chemical treatment of IMHB unveils strength, nature and directional nature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superiority of quantum chemical treatment of H-bond over geometric criteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of H-bond as a modulator of aromaticity. -- Abstract: The photophysical study of a pharmaceutically important chlorine substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 4-chlorosalicylic acid (4ClSA) has been carried out by steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. A large Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependence marks the spectroscopic signature of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in 4ClSA. Theoretical calculation by ab initio and Density Functional Theory methods yields results consistent with experimental findings. Theoretical potential energy surfaces predict the occurrence of proton transfer in S{sub 1}-state. Geometrical and energetic criteria, Atoms-In-Molecule topological parameters, Natural Bond Orbital population analysis have been exploited to evaluate the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction and to explore its directional nature. The inter-correlation between aromaticity and resonance assisted H-bond is also discussed in this context. Our results unveil that the quantum chemical treatment is a more accurate tool to assess hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison to geometrical criteria.

  8. Effects of H{sub 2} and Ar flow rates on the deposition of hydrogenated silicon thin films by an inductive coupled plasma-chemical vapor deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan, E-mail: cli10@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, 32001, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, J.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei, 24301, Taiwan (China); Huang, K.L.; Shao, Yu Ting; Chen, Yi Wen [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon films were deposited on quartz substrates in an inductive coupled plasma-chemical vapor deposition system with four internal low inductance antennas units. Different Ar and hydrogen flow rates were tested for their influences on the structures of deposited films. For monitoring purposes, Langmuir probe and optical emission spectrometer were installed to detect the variation of electrical field in plasma during deposition. Data from Langmuir probe and optical emission spectrometer were analyzed subsequently. After deposition, the films were examined by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometer for their microstructures. Results indicate that under the supply of pure Ar flow, the deposition rate can be expedited to 3.5 nm/s and amorphous films were formed on quartz substrates. With the supply of mixed hydrogen and argon (Ar 15 sccm + H{sub 2} 50 sccm + SiH{sub 4} 50 sccm), the deposition rate can reach 4.5 nm/s. Although it is well known that a high supply of H{sub 2} helps the formation of micro-crystalline silicon, these deposited hydrogenated Si films, confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectroscopy, all maintained their amorphousness under various range of Ar and H{sub 2} flow rates. - Highlights: • Amorphous hydrogenated silicon films were deposited by inductive coupled plasma. • Different Ar and H{sub 2} flow rates were tested for their effects on the structures of films. • Under pure Ar flow, the deposition rate of can be expedited to 3.5 nm/sec. • The deposition rate reached 4.5 nm/sec under Ar 15 sccm, H{sub 2} 50 sccm, SiH{sub 4} 50 sccm. • All films are amorphous confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  9. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  10. Deciphering the "chemical" nature of the exotic isotopes of Hydrogen by the MC-QTAIM analysis: Positive Muon and Muonic Helium as new members of The Periodic Table

    CERN Document Server

    Goli, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This report is a primarily survey on the chemical nature of the positively charged muon and muonic Helium (negatively charged muon plus Helium nucleus), as exotic isotopes of hydrogen, using the newly developed multi-component quantum theory of atoms in molecules (MC-QTAIM) analysis. To perform the analysis, the non-Born-Oppenhiemer (non-BO) ab initio methodology termed the fully variational multi-component molecular orbital method (FV-MC_MO) is used to deduce non-BO wavefunctions of various three and four-component molecular systems, as isotopomers of the orthodox hydrogen molecule, replacing proton(s) with muon, deuterium, tritium and muonic Helium. The derived three-component non-BO wavefunctions then are used for the "atoms in molecules" analysis within the context of the MC-QTAIM framework. Using various asymmetric isotopomers of hydrogen molecule, it is demonstrated that both the positively charged muon and muonic Helium are capable to form atoms in molecules in the considered molecules; thus, they reta...

  11. Study of porogen removal by atomic hydrogen generated by hot wire chemical vapor deposition for the fabrication of advanced low-k thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain low-k dielectric films, a subtractive technique, which removes sacrificial porogens from a hydrogenated silicon oxycarbide (SiOC:H) film, has been used successfully by different groups in the past. In this paper, we report on the porogen removal from porogenated SiOC:H films, using a hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) equipment. Molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atomic hydrogen by the hot wires and these atoms may successfully remove the hydrocarbon groups from the porogenated SiOC:H films. The temperature of the HWCVD filaments proved to be a determining factor. By Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), ellipsometric porosimetry and capacitance-voltage analyses, it was possible to determine that for temperatures higher than 1700 °C, efficient porogen removal occurred. For temperatures higher than 1800 °C, the presence of OH groups was detected. The dielectric constant was the lowest, 2.28, for the samples processed at a filament temperature of 1800 °C, although porosity measurements showed higher porosity for the films deposited at the higher temperatures. XRR and SIMS analyses indicated densification and Tungsten (W) incorporation at the top few nanometers of the films

  12. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Long

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA linear functionalized polymer (PLF, was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, mustard gas (HD, chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES, 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can’t be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  13. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yin; Wang, Yang; Du, Xiaosong; Cheng, Luhua; Wu, Penglin; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA) linear functionalized polymer (PLF), was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW) device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), mustard gas (HD), chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES), 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP) and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can't be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed. PMID:26225975

  14. Converting Chemical Energy to Electricity through a Three-Jaw Mini-Generator Driven by the Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Wang, Lei; Ji, Fanqin; Shi, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity is one of the most important research advancements to come from the horizontal locomotion of small objects. Until now, the Marangoni effect has been the only propulsion method to produce the horizontal locomotion to induce an electromotive force, which is limited to a short duration because of the specific property of surfactants. To solve this issue, in this article we utilized the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide the propulsion for a sustainable energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity. We fabricated a mini-generator consisting of three parts: a superhydrophobic rotator with three jaws, three motors to produce a jet of oxygen bubbles to propel the rotation of the rotator, and three magnets integrated into the upper surface of the rotator to produce the magnet flux. Once the mini-generator was placed on the solution surface, the motor catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. This generated a large amount of oxygen bubbles that caused the generator and integrated magnets to rotate at the air/water interface. Thus, the magnets passed under the coil area and induced a change in the magnet flux, thus generating electromotive forces. We also investigated experimental factors, that is, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the turns of the solenoid coil, and found that the mini-generator gave the highest output in a hydrogen peroxide solution with a concentration of 10 wt % and under a coil with 9000 turns. Through combining the stable superhydrophobicity and catalyst, we realized electricity generation for a long duration, which could last for 26 000 s after adding H2O2 only once. We believe this work provides a simple process for the development of horizontal motion and provides a new path for energy reutilization. PMID:27093949

  15. (Z-N-{3-[(6-Chloropyridin-3-ylmethyl]-1,3-thiazolidin-2-ylidene}cyanamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Sheng Gao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C10H9ClN4S, common name thiacloprid, comprises two molecules. In both molecules, the thiazolidine rings are almost planar (with r.m.s. deviations of 0.016 and 0.065 Å and form dihedral angles of 73.36 (6 and 70.25 (8° with the 2-chloropyridine rings. In the crystal, intermolecular C—H...N hydrogen bonds links the molecules into chains propagating in [overline101].

  16. Effect of nickel loading on hydrogen production and chemical oxygen demand (COD) destruction from glucose oxidation and gasification in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    minutes of reaction time increased the hydrogen yield from 0.618 mol/mol to 1.45 mol/mol. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was 75 % in presence of both commercial and synthesized catalysts and 90 % without catalyst. This study showed that the same hydrogen yield can be obtained from the synthesized low nickel alumina loading (18 wt %) catalyst with (65 wt %) nickel on silica-alumina loading commercial catalyst. (author)

  17. Pretreatment of bottom sludge of crude oil storage tanks using chemical oxidation process with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Nabizadeh

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: Mere application of chemical oxidation is not capable of complete treatment of the sludge but it is an effective process as a pre-treatment step for decreasing toxicity and increasing its biodegradability.

  18. AB INITIO STUDY OF CHEMICAL ACTIVATION AND HYDROGENATION OF WHITE PHOSPHORUS IN REACTION WITH RHODIUM TRIHYDRIDE COMPLEX

    OpenAIRE

    Iolanta I. Balan; Natalia N. Gorinchoy

    2011-01-01

    The four-stage mechanism of reaction of the rhodium trihydride complex [(triphos)RhH3] (triphos=1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphanylmethyl)ethane) with the white phosphorus molecule resulting in the phosphane and the cyclo-P3 complex [(triphos)M(η3-P3] is analyzed on the basis of ab initio calculations of reactants, products, and intermediate complexes of reaction. It is shown that generation of the transient complex [(triphos)RhH(η1:η1-P4)] followed by intramolecular hydrogen atom migration from t...

  19. X-231B technology demonstration for in situ treatment of contaminated soil: Laboratory evaluation of chemical oxidation using hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatability studies were conducted as part of a comprehensive research project initiated to demonstrate as well as evaluate in situ treatment technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radioactive substances in wet, slowly permeable soils. The site of interest for this project was the X-231B Oil Biodegradation unit at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility in southern Ohio. This report describes the treatability studies that investigated the feasibility of the application of low-strength hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solutions to treat trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated soil

  20. Quantum chemical investigation of linear hydrogen bonding in ONCCN···HX (X = F, Cl, Br) dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pradeep R.

    Linear hydrogen bonding formed between the nitrogen end of cyanogen-N-oxide (ONCCN) and hydrogen halides HX (X = F, Cl, Br) has been observed in their ground ? states. The order of agreement of energetic stabilities between the correlated functionals used in this calculation is: B3LYP bonds in these dimers follows the conventional trend: ONCCN···HF > ONCCN···HCl > ONCCN···HBr in the series, except H-bond lengths and static dipole polarizabilities which are in reverse order. The atomic charges obtained from the Mulliken and natural population analysis is used to assess the charge transfer effects that accompany the dimer formation. It is found from the investigation that the dimers having highest binding energy are accompanied by the highest transfer of charge. The 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the monomer ON1CCN2 are found to be decreased upon complection and in the series it increases from F through Br. We observed enhancements in the values of the dimer dipole moment and intrinsic dipole polarizabilities compared with the sum of the monomer values by intermolecular electrical interaction. Investigation reveals vibrational spectral shifts of HX and CN stretching modes similar to the conventional red-shifted H-bonded dimers; for the former case, the infrared band intensity increases significantly. Finally, the new vibrational modes originated from the intermolecular interaction are outlined.

  1. Optical properties and chemical structures of Kapton-H film after proton irradiation by immersion in a hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Jingwei; Gong Chunzhi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tian Xiubo, E-mail: xiubotian@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yang Shiqin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2012-02-01

    Proton irradiation of Kapton-H films was physically simulated in plasma immersion configuration with hydrogen plasmas. Hydrogen ion was implanted into the samples biased to a negative pulse of 20 kV. Optical transmittance of the sample in the wavelength region of 200-2500 nm was determined by a UV-vis-NIR scanning spectrophotometer, and the functional group evolution was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was utilized to determine the roughness and morphology of the samples, and the bulk modification was analyzed by FTIR. The experimental results showed the optical transmittance of the treated sample in the wavelength of 500-2000 nm weakened after proton irradiation, and decreased with the increase of irradiation time. Finger-like bulges emerged on the surface of the sample irradiated by ion irradiation for 30 min, and became bigger and denser with the increase of the irradiation time. The content of C element of the sample increased after proton irradiation, while that of N and O elements decreased because of the bonds breakage of C=O, C-O-C and C-N during irradiation process.

  2. Extraction of Pd(II), Pt(IV), Fe(III), Zn(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) From Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with Selected Cyanamides as a Novel Extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three of structurally related novel extractants namely; N, Ndihexylcyanamide( DHCY), N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)cyanamide (DEHCY) and N, N-d-octyl cyanamid (DOCY) were synthesized in our laboratory and characterized by different techniques. The general method for synthesizing the above extractants was to react relevant secondary amines with cyanogen bromide in presence of sodium acetate anhydride. Their extracting ability for Pd(II), Pt(IV), Fe(III), Zn(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) from hydrochloric acid media in toluene as diluent has been studied. The extraction of hydrochloric acid was studied also. Pd(II) was strongly extracted by the extractants used at low hydrochloric acid concentration and the extraction decreased with increasing hydrochloric concentration while the reverse in extraction behavior was found in is the case of Pt(IV), Fe(III) and Zn(II) extraction. Both Cu(II) and Ag(I) were found to be poor extracted with this synthesized extractants. Hydrochloric acid was extracted only in its high concentration region. A systematic investigation has been carried out on the extraction of Pd(II) by using two synthesized extractants. Pd(II) was extracted as a solvated complex with the composition, metal:chloride ion:extractant = l:2:2 the extracted species was also studied using IR spectra

  3. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  4. Influence of Fe-doped on structural, electronic structural and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:Fe) films were deposited from an isobutene/ferrocene/H2 gas mixture by plasma enhanced chemical metal organic vapor deposition. Raman spectra were used to characterize the bonding structure of the a-C:H:Fe films and hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films. Optical properties were investigated by the UV-vis spectroscopy and the photoluminescence spectra. The number of six-numbered rings of the a-C:H films increases and sp2 clustering of the films decreases after Fe-doping. The Tauc optical gap of the a-C:H:Fe films becomes narrower by 0.15-0.23 eV relative to the value of the a-C:H films. The narrowing of the optical gap after doping is attributed primarily to the extended state around the Fe deep level in the band gap and the narrowing of the π and π* band edge states because of the increase of the number of six-numbered rings in the a-C:H films. Fe deep level defects of the a-C:H:Fe films contribute chiefly to non-radiative recombination.

  5. Chemical composition, hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios and tritium content of hot waters and steam condensates from the Oyasu-Doroyu-Akinomiya geothermal area in Akita prefecturs, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major and minor chemical components, hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios and tritium content of river, cold spring and hot spring waters and fumarolic condensates in the Oyasu-Doroyu-Akinomiya geothermal area were analyzed. The hot water and steam condensate blown off from explorative wells and the hot waters collected from different depth of a bore in the Oyasu area were also analyzed. The hot springs and fumaroles in this area erupt mostly from Neogene system, and are distributed predominantly in the NE-SW direction regionally but in the NW-SE direction locally. The acidic Cl- and (SO4)2- types of hot spring water show distinct oxygen shift accompanied by hydrogen shift, but the neutral Na+.Cl- type of hot spring water and the hot water from geothermal wells hardly showed the oxygen shift as compared with the river and cold spring waters. The tritium content of hot water is relatively high in case of the acidic Cl- and (SO4)2- types, but in case of the neutral Na+.Cl- type, it did not exceed 1T.U., and the origin of the water is supposed to be precipitation of probably more than thirty years ago. (Kobatake, H.)

  6. Preparation of high-quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon film with a new microwave electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition system assisted with hot wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Xiu-Hong; Chen Guang-Hua; Yin Sheng-Yi; Rong Yan-Dong; Zhang Wen-Li; Hu Yue-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The preparation of high-quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film with a new microwave electron cyclotron resonance-chemical vapour deposition (MWECR-CVD) system assisted with hot wire is presented. In this system the hot wire plays an important role in perfecting the microstructure as well as improving the stability and the optoelectronic properties of the a-Si:H film. The experimental results indicate that in the microstructure of the a-Si:H film, the concentration of dihydride is decreased and a trace of microcrystalline occurs, which is useful to improve its stability, and that in the optoelectronic properties of the a-Si:H film, the deposition rate reaches above 2.0nm/s and the photosensitivity increases up to 4.71× 105.

  7. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H2/CH4 in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10-4 to 6x10-4 Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  8. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polymers by surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas barrier characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin films coated on polymer sheets using the large-area surface-wave plasma (SWP) were studied. With SWP in He and CH4 gas mixture, a-C:H films were deposited over about 100 mm in diameter on high density polyethylene or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets at temperature less than 70 deg. C. Experimental results show that gas permeation in the case of a-C:H film coating on PET sheet was reduced by a factor of more than 150 (0.27 cm3/m2 day atm), compared with that before coating. Plasma characteristics of SWP, such as electron density and electron energy distribution functions, and other film characteristics measured with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope are presented and discussed

  9. Role of hydrogen addition in the plasma phase in determining the structural and chemical properties of RF sputtered ZnO films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Effects of H in corporation on ZnO thin films growth and properties. → Modification of the sputtering mechanism according to H2 percentage in the plasma. → Structural changes turns up with variations of the surface and bulk oxide chemistry. → Development of an hydroxide component due to atomic H incorporation. - Abstract: In the present work, ZnO thin films were RF sputtered from a pure ZnO target, without external heating, in H2:Ar plasma at different H2 concentrations (0-50%). Aim of the study was the identification of the effects of H incorporation on the film growth and properties. During the deposition experiments, optical emission (OES) spectra were recorded to monitor any variation in the plasma chemical species relative to different process or gas mixture settings. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to study the bulk and surface chemical composition of the films, while X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis allowed lattice structure and grain size determination. The introduction of hydrogen in the plasma phase appears to strongly affect the structural and chemical properties of ZnO films. Both FTIR spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns showed that all the films crystallized in the hexagonal wuertzite form. Nevertheless, while samples deposited in pure Ar plasma are highly textured, presenting just one dominant preferred orientation along the [0 0 2] axis, films sputtered in H2:Ar atmosphere exhibit multiple growth directions with crystallites of noticeably reduced dimensions. Such a structural modification turns up together with clear variations in the films surface chemical state which appears to deviate from the pure oxide (Zn-O). By combining XPS, ATR-FTIR and OES data we could correlate such variations with the process induced H incorporation in the crystal structure in the form of hydroxide species.

  10. Role of hydrogen addition in the plasma phase in determining the structural and chemical properties of RF sputtered ZnO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottardi, Gloria, E-mail: ggottard@fbk.eu [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Center for Materials and Microsystems, PAM Unit, via Sommarive 18, I - 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Bartali, Ruben; Micheli, Victor; Laidani, Nadhira [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Center for Materials and Microsystems, PAM Unit, via Sommarive 18, I - 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Avi, Damiano [University of Trento, Physics Department, Atomic and Molecular Physics Lab., Via Sommarive 14, I - 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2011-05-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Effects of H in corporation on ZnO thin films growth and properties. {yields} Modification of the sputtering mechanism according to H{sub 2} percentage in the plasma. {yields} Structural changes turns up with variations of the surface and bulk oxide chemistry. {yields} Development of an hydroxide component due to atomic H incorporation. - Abstract: In the present work, ZnO thin films were RF sputtered from a pure ZnO target, without external heating, in H{sub 2}:Ar plasma at different H{sub 2} concentrations (0-50%). Aim of the study was the identification of the effects of H incorporation on the film growth and properties. During the deposition experiments, optical emission (OES) spectra were recorded to monitor any variation in the plasma chemical species relative to different process or gas mixture settings. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to study the bulk and surface chemical composition of the films, while X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis allowed lattice structure and grain size determination. The introduction of hydrogen in the plasma phase appears to strongly affect the structural and chemical properties of ZnO films. Both FTIR spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns showed that all the films crystallized in the hexagonal wuertzite form. Nevertheless, while samples deposited in pure Ar plasma are highly textured, presenting just one dominant preferred orientation along the [0 0 2] axis, films sputtered in H{sub 2}:Ar atmosphere exhibit multiple growth directions with crystallites of noticeably reduced dimensions. Such a structural modification turns up together with clear variations in the films surface chemical state which appears to deviate from the pure oxide (Zn-O). By combining XPS, ATR-FTIR and OES data we could correlate such variations with the process induced H incorporation in the crystal structure in the form of

  11. The CH...O hydrogen bonds in biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoate studied by Raman and infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sato, H.; Dybal, Jiří; Murakami, R.; Hirose, F.; Senda, K.; Noda, I.

    Gold Coast : Queensland University of Technology, 2004, 051/1-051/2. ISBN 0-643-09122-X. [International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy. Gold Coast (AU), 08.08.2004-13.08.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : CH...O interactions * infrared spectroscopy * quantum chemical calculation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  12. Determination of the effective mechanism of chemically stimulated diffusion in semiconductors at their interaction with an atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper is devoted to calculate coefficients of chemically stimulated diffusion (CSD) of some impurities in near-the-surface layers of germanium and gallium arsenide following well-known mechanisms to determine governing mechanism of CSD depending on type of diffusing impurity and conditions to carry out experiment. Calculation results of CSD coefficients following the mentioned mechanisms for copper in germanium showed that their efficiency was rather unimpressive in contrast to CSD mechanisms associated with energy transfer to crystal atomic subsystem

  13. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  14. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  15. A quantum chemical insight to intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between cytosine and nitrosamine: Structural and energetic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Behzad

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions which are formed during complex formation between cytosine and nitrosamine have been fully investigated using B3LYP, B3PW91 and MP2 methods in conjunction with various basis sets including 6-311++G (d,p), 6-311++G (2d,2p), 6-311++G (df,pd) and AUG-cc-pVDZ. Three regions around the most stable conformer of cytosine in the gas phase with six possible double H-bonded interactions were considered. Two intermolecular hydrogen bonds of type NC-N-HNA and O-H(N-H)C-ONA were found on the potential energy surface in a cyclic system with 8-member in CN1, CN3, CN5 and 7-member in CN2, CN4, CN6 systems. Results of binding energy calculation at all applied methods reveal that the CN1 structure is the most stable one which is formed by interaction of nitrosamine with cytosine in S1 region. The BSSE-corrected binding energy for six complex system is ranging from -23.8 to -43.6 kJ/mol at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level and the stability order is as CN1 > CN2 > CN3 > CN4 > CN5 > CN6 in all studied levels of theories. The NBO results reveal that the charge transfer occurred from cytosine to nitrosamine in CN1, CN3, CN5 and CN6 whereas this matter in the case of CN2 and CN4 was reversed. The relationship between BEs with red shift of H-bond involved bonds vibrational frequencies, charge transfer energies during complex formation and electron densities at H-bond BCPs were discussed. In addition activation energetic properties related to the proton transfer process between cytosine and nitrosamine have been calculated at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level. AIM results imply that H-bond interactions are electrostatic with partially covalent characteristic in nature.

  16. Optical and passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for application on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, Daniel Nilsen

    2008-07-01

    quality, etch rate. The response of these parameters to high temperature anneals were correlated with structural changes in the silicon nitride films as measured by using the hydrogen bond concentration. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition allows continuous variation in nearly all deposition parameters. The parameters studied in this work are the gas flow ratios and excitation power. In both direct and remote deposition systems, the increase in deposition power density lead to higher activation of ammonia which in turn lead to augmented incorporation of nitrogen into the films and thus lower refractive index. For a direct system, the same parameter change lead to a drastic fall in passivation quality of Czochralski silicon attributed to an increase in ion bombardment as well as the general observation that as deposited passivation tends to increase with refractive index. Silicon nitride films with variations in refractive index were also made by varying the silane-to-ammonia gas flow ratio. This simple parameter adjustment makes plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride applicable to double layer anti-reflective coatings simulated in this work. The films were found to have an etch rate in 5% hydrofluoric acid that decreased with increasing refractive index. This behaviour is attributed to the decreasing concentration of nitrogen-to-hydrogen bonds in the films. Such bonds at the surface of silicon nitride have been suggested to be involved in the main reaction mechanism when etching silicon nitride in hydrofluoric acid. Annealing the films lead to a drastic fall in etch rates and was linked to the release of hydrogen from the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds. (author). 115 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs

  17. AB INITIO STUDY OF CHEMICAL ACTIVATION AND HYDROGENATION OF WHITE PHOSPHORUS IN REACTION WITH RHODIUM TRIHYDRIDE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanta I. Balan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The four-stage mechanism of reaction of the rhodium trihydride complex [(triphosRhH3] (triphos=1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphanylmethylethane with the white phosphorus molecule resulting in the phosphane and the cyclo-P3 complex [(triphosM(η3-P3] is analyzed on the basis of ab initio calculations of reactants, products, and intermediate complexes of reaction. It is shown that generation of the transient complex [(triphosRhH(η1:η1-P4] followed by intramolecular hydrogen atom migration from the metal to one of the phosphorus atoms is the energetically favourable process. Calculations also show that P4 molecule is activated by coordination to the above complex: the metal-bonded P-P edge is broken, and the tetrahedron P4 is opened to form the butterfly geometry. This activation is realized mainly due to the one-orbital back donation of 4d-electron density from the atom of Rh to the unoccupied antibonding triple degenerate t1*-MO of P4.

  18. A theoretical study of silicon-doped boron nitride nanotubes serving as a potential chemical sensor for hydrogen cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to search for a novel sensor to detect and control exposure to hydrogen cyanide (HCN) pollutant molecule in environments, the reactivities of pristine and silicon-doped (Si-doped) (8, 0) single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) towards the HCN molecule are investigated by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The HCN molecule presents strong chemisorption on both the silicon-substituted boron defect site and the silicon-substituted nitrogen defect site of the BNNT, which is in sharp contrast to its weak physisorption on pristine BNNT. A remarkable charge transfer occurs between the HCN molecule and the Si-doped BNNT as proved by the electronic charge densities. The calculated data for the electronic density of states (DOSs) further indicate that the doping of the Si atom improves the electronic transport property of the BNNT, and increases its adsorption sensitivity towards the HCN molecule. Based on calculated results, the Si-doped BNNT is expected to be a potential resource for detecting the presence of toxic HCN.

  19. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  20. Experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water (ZREX). Hydrogen generation and chemical augmentation of energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    The results of the first data series of experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water are described. These experiments involved dropping 1-kg batches of pure zirconium or zirconium-zirconium dioxide mixture melt into a column of water. A total of nine tests were conducted, including four with pure zirconium melt and five with Zr-ZrO{sub 2} mixture melt. Explosions took place only in those tests which were externally triggered. While the extent of zirconium oxidation in the triggered experiments was quite extensive, the estimated explosion energetics were found to be very small compared to the combined thermal and chemical energy available. (author)

  1. Chemical and enzymatic approaches for 11C-labelled octopamine synthesis using hydrogen [11C]cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Octopamine, the β-hydroxy derivative of tyramine, has been the objects of growing interest as biogenic trace amine. Studies using [3H]-labelled p- and m-octopamine have shown that they are both taken up in noradrenergic nerve terminals, accumulated in storage vesicles, and released together with noradrenaline on stimulation. p- and m-[11C]Octopamine have been synthesized from H[11C]CN in two-step sequence. Both chemical and enzymatic procedures have been used for the production of [11C]cyanohydrin intermediates as the key step. The enantiomeric composition of the labelled products obtained through the enzymatic process was assayed by analytical HPLC

  2. Analysis of nonequilibrium chemical processes in the plume of subsonic and supersonic aircraft with hydrogen and hydrocarbon combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starik, A.M.; Lebedev, A.B.; Titova, N.S. [Central Inst. of Aviation Motors, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    On the basic of quasi one dimensional mixing model the numerical analysis of nonequilibrium chemical processes in the plume of subsonic and hypersonic aircraft is presented. It was found that species HNO, HNO{sub 3}, HNO{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ClO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} could be formed as a result of nonequilibrium processes in the plume and their concentrations can essentially exceed both background values in free stream of atmosphere and their values at the nozzle exit plane. (author) 10 refs.

  3. Method and system for hydrogen evolution and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2012-12-11

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen (H.sub.2) employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  4. Chemical and structural analysis of solvothermal synthesized tungsten oxide nanotube without template and its hydrogen sensitive property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Imaged models of formation of nanotube during crystal growth: (a) precursor react with each other; (b) the crystal plane bended as crystallization; (c) the nanotube formed finally. Highlights: • The WO3 naonotube was prepared by solvothermal method without any addition. • The steric effect and the nucleation and growth mechanism resulted in the nanotube. • The nanotube film surface showed high oxygen vacancies. • The nanotube film showed diffusion dominated sensitivity. -- Abstract: Tungsten oxide nanotubes were synthesized by solvothermal process without template. The steric effect and the concentration of WCl6 are the dominant factors for the formation mechanism of the nanotube. The steric effect was experimentally and systematically studied with solvents including ethanol, isopropanol, n-propanol and butylalcohol, which have different molecular configuration and length, while the effect of concentration was investigated by characterizing the nanostructured productions. The samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface chemistry of the nanotube is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that the solvents species and WCl6 concentration obviously diversified the morphologies of the products; the nanotubes synthesized with isopropanol composed of W18O49 phase; the crystal defects (O atom vacancy) formed during rapid crystallization could be modified by heat treatment. The DC electrical response of the nanotube thin film to hydrogen was measured the temperature range from 200 °C to 300 °C, which indicated a decline in electrical resistance with good sensitivity, and showed the mechanism that the reaction limited process works at low temperature, whereas the diffusion limited process works at higher temperature

  5. Hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To the non-nonsense engineer, any talk of a hydrogen economy may seem like so much hot air. This paper reports that as legislative, safety and environmental issues continue to tighten, they're promoting hydrogen's chances as an energy source and, more immediately, its prospects as a chemical feedstock. Paradoxically, the environmental demands that are stimulating hydrogen demand are also inhibiting the gas's production. Previously, gasoline was made with benzene, which means that H2 was rejected. But now that the laws mandate lower aromatic and higher oxygenate levels in gasolines, there's less H2 available as byproduct. At the same time, H2 demand is rising in hydrodesulfurization units, since the same laws require refiners to cut sulfur levels in fuels. Supplementary sources for the gas are also shrinking. In the chlor-alkali industry, H2 output is dropping, as demand for its coproduct chlorine weakens. At the same time, H2 demand for the making of hydrogen peroxide is growing, as that environmentally safer bleach gains chlorine's market share

  6. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  7. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-01

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure. PMID:26841076

  8. Effect of hydrogen on passivation quality of SiNx/Si-rich SiNx stacked layers deposited by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on c-Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the role of hydrogen content and fixed charges of catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) SiNx/Si-rich SiNx stacked layers on the quality of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. Calculated density of fixed charges is on the order of 1012 cm−2, which is high enough for effective field effect passivation. Hydrogen content in the films is also found to contribute significantly to improvement in passivation quality of the stacked layers. Furthermore, Si-rich SiNx films deposited with H2 dilution show better passivation quality of SiNx/Si-rich SiNx stacked layers than those prepared without H2 dilution. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff) in c-Si passivated by SiNx/Si-rich SiNx stacked layers is as high as 5.1 ms when H2 is added during Si-rich SiNx deposition, which is much higher than the case of using Si-rich SiNx films prepared without H2 dilution showing τeff of 3.3 ms. - Highlights: • Passivation mechanism of Si-rich SiNx/SiNx stacked layers is investigated. • H atoms play important role in passivation quality of the stacked layer. • Addition of H2 gas during Si-rich SiNx film deposition greatly enhances effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff). • For a Si-rich SiNx film with refractive index of 2.92, τeff improves from 3.3 to 5.1 ms by H2 addition

  9. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  10. Hydrogen permeation and chemical stability of In-doped SrCe0.95Tm0.05O3−δ membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The formation of SCITm20 oxide was studied by using X-ray diffraction. • The In doping improves the sintering activity of strontium cerate oxide. • The improved sintering activity of membranes might be caused by the SrIn2O4 phase. • The In doping increases the chemical stability of strontium cerate against CO2. - Abstract: A series of SrCe0.95−xInxTm0.05O3−δ (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) samples were prepared by the sol–gel technique using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and citric acid as the complexing agents. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were carried out to study the formation of SrCe0.75In0.20Tm0.05O3−δ oxide. The results indicate that In can dissolve in the orthorhombic lattice of strontium cerate to form a solid solution at 1300 °C. The effects of In doping on the sinterability, chemical stability and hydrogen permeation flux of SrCe0.95Tm0.05O3−δ oxides were investigated by a variety of characterization methods. According to the results of XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), increasing In content in the oxides causes lattice constriction and promotes grain growth during sintering process at 1300 °C. The relative density and morphology variation of the sintered membranes reveals that In doping improves the sintering activity of SrCe0.95Tm0.05O3−δ membrane. The stability test shows that the stability of strontium cerate against CO2 increases with the increasing In content. Hydrogen permeation through the SrCe0.95−xInxTm0.05O3−δ membranes was carried out between 700 and 900 °C using 40% H2/He mixture as feed gas and Ar as sweep gas, respectively. The H2 permeation flux decreases with the increase of the In content. Activation energies of SrCe0.95Tm0.05O3−δ, SrCe0.85In0.10Tm0.05O3−δ and SrCe0.75In0.20Tm0.05O3−δ are 36.61, 52.25 and 73.06 kJ/mol, respectively

  11. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  12. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated.

  13. Structure, mechanical, and frictional properties of hydrogenated fullerene-like amorphous carbon film prepared by direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Junyan

    2016-07-01

    In this study, fullerene like carbon (FL-C) is introduced in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film by employing a direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The film has a low friction and wear, such as 0.011 and 2.3 × 10-9mm3/N m in the N2, and 0.014 and 8.4 × 10-8mm3/N m in the humid air, and high hardness and elasticity (25.8 GPa and 83.1%), to make further engineering applications in practice. It has several nanometers ordered domains consisting of less frequently cross-linked graphitic sheet stacks. We provide new evidences for understanding the reported Raman fit model involving four vibrational frequencies from five, six, and seven C-atom rings of FL-C structures, and discuss the structure evolution before or after friction according to the change in the 1200 cm-1 Raman band intensity caused by five- and seven-carbon rings. Friction inevitably facilitates the transformation of carbon into FL-C nanostructures, namely, the ultra low friction comes from both such structures within the carbon film and the sliding induced at friction interface.

  14. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated

  15. The influence of charge effect on the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.; Nelson, B.P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Mahan, A.H.; Crandall, R.S.; Benner, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The authors observe at lower substrate temperatures that the scatter in the dark conductivity on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films grown on insulating substrates (e.g., Corning 7059 glass) by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique (HWCVD) can be five orders of magnitude or more. This is especially true at deposition temperatures below 350 C. However, when the authors grow the same materials on substrates with a conductive grid, virtually all of their films have acceptable dark conductivity (< 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} S/cm) at all deposition temperatures below 425 C. This is in contrast to only about 20% of the materials grown in this same temperature range on insulating substrates having an acceptable dark conductivity. The authors estimated an average energy of 5 eV electrons reaching the growing surface in vacuum, and did additional experiments to see the influence of both the electron flux and the energy of the electrons on the film growth. Although these effects do not seem to be important for growing a-Si:H by HWCVD on conductive substrates, they help better understand the important parameters for a-Si:H growth, and thus, to optimize these parameters in other applications of HWCVD technology.

  16. Hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  17. Reactivity towards nitriles, cyanamides, and carbodiimides of palladium complexes derived from benzyl alcohol. Synthesis of a mixed Pd2Ag complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, María-José; Martínez-Viviente, Eloísa; Vicente, José; Jones, Peter G

    2016-01-14

    The chelate complex [Pd(κ(2)-C,O-C6H4CH2O-2)(bpy)] () reacts with acetonitrile, cyanamides, or carbodiimides, in the presence of AgOTf (1 : 5 : 1 molar ratio) and residual water, to form complexes [Pd{κ(2)-C,N-C6H4{CH2OC([double bond, length as m-dash]NX)Y}-2}(bpy)](OTf), where X = H, Y = Me (), NMe2 (), NEt2 (), X = R, Y = NHR (R = (i)Pr (), Tol ()), as a result of the insertion of the unsaturated reagent into the O-Pd bond of and the protonation of one of the N atoms. In the absence of AgOTf the reaction of with TolN[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]NTol (Tol = p-Tolyl) results in the formation of the neutral complex [Pd{κ(2)-C,N-C6H4{CH2OC([double bond, length as m-dash]NTol)NTol}-2}(bpy)] (). Complexes and can be interconverted by deprotonation ( + KO(t)Bu) or protonation ( + KOTf + HOTf) reactions. When the reaction of with TolN[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]NTol in the presence of AgOTf is carried out in a 1 : 1 : 1 stoichiometric ratio, or for a short period of time, a mixture of and a mixed heterometallic Ag2Pd complex is obtained ( = [Ag(N-)2](OTf)). Complex is the major product when the AgOTf is added before the carbodiimide, and the reaction is stopped immediately. can also be obtained by reaction of with 0.5 equiv. of AgOTf. When complex [PdI(C6H4CH2OH-2)(bpy)] () reacts with (i)PrN[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]N(i)Pr in the presence of TlOTf, instead of AgOTf, a ca. 1 : 1 mixture of and [Pd{κ(2)-O,N-OCH2{C6H4{C([double bond, length as m-dash]NH(i)Pr)N(i)Pr}-2}}(bpy)](OTf) () forms. Complex is the result of the insertion of the carbodiimide into the C-Pd bond. Complexes have been extensively characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and the crystal structures of , , and ·2.5CHCl3·0.5Et2O have been determined by X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:26646443

  18. Hydrogen storage: beyond conventional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebrook, Andrew F; Gan, Weijia; Grasemann, Martin; Moret, Séverine; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2013-10-01

    The efficient storage of hydrogen is one of three major hurdles towards a potential hydrogen economy. This report begins with conventional storage methods for hydrogen and broadly covers new technology, ranging from physical media involving solid adsorbents, to chemical materials including metal hydrides, ammonia borane and liquid precursors such as alcohols and formic acid. PMID:23964360

  19. Hydrogen storage methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at Thost metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m(-3), approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is 70.8 kg.m(-3), and large volumes, where the

  20. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  1. Process design of a hydrogen production plant from natural gas with CO2 capture based on a novel Ca/Cu chemical loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Process design of a H2 production plant based on a novel Ca/Cu looping process is presented. • CuO reduction with syngas provides energy for CaCO3 calcination. • The effect of operating conditions on plant performance indexes is analysed. • Carbon capture efficiencies of around 94% are obtained. • Around 6% points of equivalent H2 efficiency improvement on conventional reforming. - Abstract: A detailed and comprehensive design of a H2 production plant based on a novel Ca/Cu chemical looping process is presented in this work. This H2 production process is based on the sorption-enhanced reforming concept using natural gas together with a CaO/CaCO3 chemical loop. A second Cu/CuO loop is incorporated to supply energy for the calcination of the CaCO3 via the reduction of CuO with a fuel gas. A comprehensive energy integration description of the different gas streams available in the plant is provided to allow a thermodynamic assessment of the process and to highlight its advantages and drawbacks. Hydrogen equivalent efficiencies of up to 77% are feasible with this novel Ca/Cu looping process, using an active reforming catalyst based on Pt, high oxidation temperatures and moderate gas velocities in the fixed bed system, which are around 6% points above the efficiency of a reference H2 production plant based on conventional steam reforming including CO2 capture with MDEA. Non-converted carbon compounds in the reforming stage are removed as CO2 in the calcination stage of the Ca/Cu looping process, which will be compressed and sent for storage. Carbon capture efficiencies of around 94% can be obtained with this Ca/Cu looping process, which are significantly higher than those obtained in the reference plant that uses MDEA absorption (around 85%). Additional advantages, such as its compact design and the use of cheaper materials compared to other commercial processes for H2 production with CO2 capture, confirm the potential of the Ca/Cu looping

  2. A Simple, Low-cost, and Robust System to Measure the Volume of Hydrogen Evolved by Chemical Reactions with Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Paul; Dann, Sandie; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Adcock, Paul; Foster, Simon

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing research interest in the development of portable systems which can deliver hydrogen on-demand to proton exchange membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells. Researchers seeking to develop such systems require a method of measuring the generated hydrogen. Herein, we describe a simple, low-cost, and robust method to measure the hydrogen generated from the reaction of solids with aqueous solutions. The reactions are conducted in a conventional one-necked round-bottomed flask placed in a temperature controlled water bath. The hydrogen generated from the reaction in the flask is channeled through tubing into a water-filled inverted measuring cylinder. The water displaced from the measuring cylinder by the incoming gas is diverted into a beaker on a balance. The balance is connected to a computer, and the change in the mass reading of the balance over time is recorded using data collection and spreadsheet software programs. The data can then be approximately corrected for water vapor using the method described herein, and parameters such as the total hydrogen yield, the hydrogen generation rate, and the induction period can also be deduced. The size of the measuring cylinder and the resolution of the balance can be changed to adapt the setup to different hydrogen volumes and flow rates. PMID:27584581

  3. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  4. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  5. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  6. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  7. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  8. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  9. New hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of the overall hydrogen system. There are separate sections for production, distribution, transport, storage; and applications of hydrogen. The most important methods for hydrogen production are steam reformation of natural gas and electrolysis of water. Of the renewable energy options, production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from wind turbines or by gasification of biomass were found to be the most economic for Finland. Direct use of this electricity or the production of liquid fuels from biomass will be competing alternatives. When hydrogen is produced in the solar belt or where there is cheap hydropower it must be transported over long distances. The overall energy consumed for the transport is from 25 to 40 % of the initial available energy. Hydrogen storage can be divided into stationary and mobile types. The most economic, stationary, large scale hydrogen storage for both long and short periods is underground storage. When suitable sites are not available, then pressure vessels are the best for short period and liquid H2 for long period. Vehicle storage of hydrogen is by either metal hydrides or liquid H2. Hydrogen is a very versatile energy carrier. It can be used to produce heat directly in catalytic burners without flame, to produce electricity in fuel cells with high efficiency for use in vehicles or for peak power shaving, as a fuel component with conventional fuels to reduce emissions, as a way to store energy and as a chemical reagent in reactions

  10. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  11. Identification of N–H related acceptor defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy using hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elleuch, Omar, E-mail: mr.omar.elleuch@gmail.com; Wang, Li; Lee, Kan-Hua; Ikeda, Kazuma; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-11-15

    The N–H related acceptor defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) are studied by hydrogen isotopes, H and D. When the films are grown by a conventional arsenic source, deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) reveals two energy levels at 0.11 and 0.19 eV above the valence band. These levels were considered to act as a double acceptor in the literature. When the films are grown by a deuterated arsenic source, new signals appear in DLTS spectra at 0.15 and 0.23 eV. This indicates that the new signals are originated from D-related defects. The energy differences between 0.15 and 0.11 eV, and that between 0.23 and 0.19 eV are same (0.04 eV). Although these energy levels become deeper with increasing the growth temperature, the energy differences are almost constant independent of the growth condition. In addition, the intensity ratios of the peaks at 0.15 (0.23) eV to that at 0.11 (0.19) eV have a good correlation with the isotopic concentration ratio of D to H in the grown films. Therefore, we conclude that the energy differences and intensity ratios of the DLTS peaks occur due to the structural change from N–H to N−D in the same type of defect, and that this acceptor is an N–H related defect. - Highlights: • The DLTS signals at 0.11 and 0.19 eV originate from a double acceptor. • Growth by D-TDMAAs: new defects that contain D are generated at 0.15 and 0.23 eV. • Energy differences between 0.15 (0.23) eV and 0.11 (0.19) eV: same, independent of T{sub G}. • Intensity ratios of peaks at 0.15 (0.23) eV to that at 0.11 (0.19) eV ≈ [D]/{[H]+[D]}. • Therefore, this acceptor is related to H.

  12. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in salicylic acid and its chloro derivatives. ► A complex effect of +R and −I effect of chlorine substituents on IMHB energy. ► Interplay between IMHB energy and aromaticity. ► Directional nature of IMHB from quantum chemical assessment. ► Quantum chemical treatment vs. geometrical criteria to assess weak interaction. - Abstract: Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇{sup 2}ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems.

  13. Hydrogen physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop on hydrogen bond was restarted changing its name to 'Hydrogen Physics' for grasping hydrogen bond from wider viewpoint and expecting the new development in this field hereafter. As the basic attitude, the phenomena related to hydrogen bond are reviewed from two different systems: hydrogen-lattice system and hydrogen-electron system. The Hydrogen Physics meeting was held on September 29 and 30, 1992, at National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, and 19 lectures were given. The themes were proton dynamics of hydrogen bond, water science and water with good taste, collective movement and fluctuation of water, neutron diffraction of water, hydrogen bond in water as seen from Raman scattering, electron and proton movements in organic crystals, new deuterium substitution effect of proton transfer in hydrogen bond in solids, infrared spectroscopy for one-dimensional hydrogen bond crystals, MSR in solid hydrogen, hydrogen in alkali metal-graphite intercalation compounds, lattice anomalies and Grueneisen parameters in high Tc superconducting salts, bio-substances and hydrogen, hydrogen bond net in nucleotide and control of crystalline structure change by hydrogen vapor pressure, ATP and structural change and crystal water of guanosine, spread of protons and electrons in hydrogen bond, anisotropy of loose scattering according to ice rule, high pressure effect and isotope mixed crystal effect of KHS crystals without hydrogen crystal network, state of motion and phase transformation of hydrogen in KDP, and development of hydrogen bond research by neutron scattering. This publication contains the papers and the transparencies presented at the meeting. (J.P.N.)

  14. Safe Hydrogen Generation by Nuclear HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several concepts of new high temperature nuclear reactors are designed to generate electricity and hydrogen. Hydrogen processes envisaged here are sulfur iodine thermo-chemical process and high temperature electrolysis. Proximity of hydrogen generation is a safety challenge for nuclear reactor. This paper describes prevention and protection against hydrogen hazards as a function of inventories and type of operation of the processes. This study is important for the designers because long distance between reactor and hydrogen facility induces difficult technological equipment. (authors)

  15. Measurement of atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in Beijing before and during the 2008 Olympic Games: Chemical and physical factors influencing their concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S. Z.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D. M.; Zhao, J. N.; Zhu, T.; Hu, M.; Zeng, L. M.

    2010-09-01

    For the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games full-scale control (FSC) of atmospheric pollution was implemented to improve the air quality from 20 July to 20 September 2008, resulting in a significant decrease in the emission of pollutants in urban Beijing, especially vehicular emissions. The combination of reduced emissions and weather condition changes provided us with a unique opportunity to investigate urban atmospheric chemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play significant roles in atmospheric processes, such as the cycling of HOx radicals and the formation of secondary sulfate aerosols and secondary organic aerosols. We measured atmospheric H2O2 and organic peroxides in urban Beijing, at the Peking University campus, from 12 July to 30 September, before and during the FSC. The major peroxides observed were H2O2, methyl hydroperoxide (MHP), and peroxyacetic acid (PAA), having maximal mixing ratios of 2.34, 0.95, and 0.17 ppbv (parts per billion by volume), respectively. Other organic peroxides were detected occasionally, such as bis-hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, ethyl hydroperoxide, and 1-hydroxyethyl hydroperoxide. On sunny days the concentrations of H2O2, MHP, and PAA exhibited pronounced diurnal variations, with a peak in the afternoon (1500-1900) and, occasionally, a second peak in the evening (2000-0200). The night peaks can be attributed to local night production from the ozonolysis of alkenes, coupled with the reaction between NO3 radicals and organic compounds. Sunny-day weather dominated during 16-26 July, and we found that the concentrations of H2O2, MHP, and PAA increased strikingly on 22-26 July, compared with the concentrations during 16-19 July. This effect was mainly attributed to the NOx (NO and NO2) decline because of the FSC, due to (i) the suppressing effect of NO and NO2 on the production of peroxides and (ii) the indirect effect of reduced NOx on the concentration of peroxides via O3 production in the

  16. New approaches to hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of a Hydrogen Economy will require the development of new media capable of safely storing hydrogen in a compact and light weight package. Metal hydrides and complex hydrides, where hydrogen is chemically bonded to the metal atoms in the bulk, offer some hope of overcoming the challenges associated with hydrogen storage. The objective is to find a material with a high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen density that can also meet the unique demands of a low temperature automotive fuel cell. Currently, there is considerable effort to develop new materials with tunable thermodynamic and kinetic properties. This tutorial review provides an overview of the different types of metal hydrides and complex hydrides being investigated for on-board (reversible) and off-board (non-reversible) hydrogen storage along with a few new approaches to improving the hydrogenation-dehydrogenation properties. PMID:19088966

  17. Comparison of the regiospecific distribution from triacylglycerols after chemical and enzymatic interesterification of high oleic sunflower oil and fully hydrogenated high oleic sunflower oil blend by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thiago I B; Ribeiro, Marilene D M M; Ming, Chiu C; Grimaldi, Renato; Gonçalves, Lireny A G; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2016-12-01

    The nutritional and organoleptic attributes of oils can proceed via interesterification of oils blends catalyzed by enzymes or chemicals. Enzymatic interesterification processes are preferred due the regiospecific outcome. Traditionally, monitoring of distribution of fatty acids (FA) in glycerol backbone is performed by enzymatic and chromatographic methods that are time-consuming, involving a series of chemical manipulations employing large volumes of organic solvents. Alternatively, carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) is a fast and reliable technique that could be applied to determine the saturated and unsaturated FA distribution of the triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in high oleic sunflower oil (SO) and fully hydrogenated high oleic sunflower oil (HSO) blends and their interesterification products. The enzymatic interesterification was conducted employing the immobilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM), the results show that the process was not completely regiospecific at sn-1,3 positions, due to the spontaneous acyl migration from position sn-2 to sn-1,3. PMID:27374579

  18. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  19. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  20. Modeling of sorption enhanced steam methane reforming—Part II: Simulation within a novel Ca/Cu chemical loop process for hydrogen production

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández García, José Ramón; Abanades García, Juan Carlos; Grasa Adiego, Gemma

    2012-01-01

    The initial stage of a novel Ca/Cu looping process for hydrogen production that involves the sorption enhanced reforming of methane (SER) at high pressure and at a moderate temperature is simulated using a mathematical model developed in Part I of this work. The SER reaction step has been analyzed under dynamic conditions within the framework of the following reactor parameters and operation conditions: catalyst/sorbent ratio, space time, operating temperature, operating pressure and steam/ca...

  1. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  2. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  3. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  4. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh, E-mail: rakesh@iitrpr.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar-140001 (India); R, Kamal Raj. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur-741246 (India); Kumar, T. J. Dhilip [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar-140001 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  5. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier

  6. Methanol, ethanol and hydrogen sensing using metal oxide and metal (TiO2–Pt) composite nanoclusters on GaN nanowires: a new route towards tailoring the selectivity of nanowire/nanocluster chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a new method for tailoring the selectivity of chemical sensors using semiconductor nanowires (NWs) decorated with metal and metal oxide multicomponent nanoclusters (NCs). Here we present the change of selectivity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocluster-coated gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire sensor devices on the addition of platinum (Pt) nanoclusters. The hybrid sensor devices were developed by fabricating two-terminal devices using individual GaN NWs followed by the deposition of TiO2 and/or Pt nanoclusters (NCs) using the sputtering technique. This paper present the sensing characteristics of GaN/(TiO2–Pt) nanowire–nanocluster (NWNC) hybrids and GaN/(Pt) NWNC hybrids, and compare their selectivity with that of the previously reported GaN/TiO2 sensors. The GaN/TiO2 NWNC hybrids showed remarkable selectivity to benzene and related aromatic compounds, with no measurable response for other analytes. Addition of Pt NCs to GaN/TiO2 sensors dramatically altered their sensing behavior, making them sensitive only to methanol, ethanol and hydrogen, but not to any other chemicals we tested. The GaN/(TiO2–Pt) hybrids were able to detect ethanol and methanol concentrations as low as 100 nmol mol−1 (ppb) in air in approximately 100 s, and hydrogen concentrations from 1 µmol mol−1 (ppm) to 1% in nitrogen in less than 60 s. However, GaN/Pt NWNC hybrids showed limited sensitivity only towards hydrogen and not towards any alcohols. All these hybrid sensors worked at room temperature and are photomodulated, i.e. they responded to analytes only in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) light. We propose a qualitative explanation based on the heat of adsorption, ionization energy and solvent polarity to explain the observed selectivity of the different hybrids. These results are significant from the standpoint of applications requiring room-temperature hydrogen sensing and sensitive alcohol monitoring. These results demonstrate the tremendous potential for tailoring

  7. In Situ Microfocus Chemical Computed Tomography of the Composition of a Single Catalyst Particle During Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene in the Liquid Phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, S. W.; Geraki, K.; Ignatyev, K.; Witte, P.T.; Beale, A.M.; Mosselmans, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis performed in the liquid phase is an important type of catalytic process which is rarely studied in situ. Using microfocus X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction computed tomography (μ-XRF-CT, μ-XRD-CT) in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), we have determined the active state of a Mo-promoted Pt/C catalyst (NanoSelect) for the liquid-phase hydrogenation of nitrobenzene under standard operating conditions. First, μ-XRF-CT and μ-XRD-CT rev...

  8. Canadian hydrogen : current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of hydrogen technology and details of current production and use of hydrogen in Canada were presented. Future demand for hydrogen was discussed. The aim of the report was to enable readers to better understand the significant size of the hydrogen industry. Canada is the largest per capita producer of hydrogen in the OECD, with production currently at 3.09 million tonnes per year. The current hydrogen surplus was attributed to a combination of short-term reductions in demand and excess capacity built in anticipation of growing demand. Mechanical and chemical processes that create hydrogen were reviewed, and details of prospective emerging technologies in hydrogen production, purification, transportation and storage were presented. Technical opportunities for hydrogen were explored. A regionalized inventory of hydrogen production in Canada was provided. Projected demands for 3 scenarios of hydrogen production were presented: (1) a business as usual perspective with no dramatic political or climatic impacts; (2) a carbon conscious agenda where major disturbances due to climate change have resulted in a focus on greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and fuel efficiency; and (3) a hydrogen priority path that promotes North American energy self-sufficiency and concerted actions by government to adopt the hydrogen economy. The production consequences of hydrogen demand under each scenario emphasized the potential size and location of Canada's hydrogen needs. It was concluded that Canadian companies and research facilities have established a strong technical and commercial presence in hydrogen production over the last 10 years. tabs., figs

  9. Chemical functionalization of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Katsnelson, M I

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on chemical functionalization of graphene are reviewed. Using hydrogenated graphene as a model system, general principles of the chemical functionalization are formulated and discussed. It is shown that, as a rule, 100% coverage of graphene by complex functional groups (in contrast with hydrogen and fluorine) is unreachable. A possible destruction of graphene nanoribbons by fluorine is considered. The functionalization of infinite graphene and graphene nan...

  10. Hydrogen from renewable resources research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, P.K.; McKinley, K.R.

    1990-07-01

    In 1986 the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were contracted by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) to conduct an assessment of hydrogen production technologies and economic feasibilities of the production and use of hydrogen from renewable resources. In the 1989/90 period all monies were directed toward research and development with an emphasis on integration of tasks, focusing on two important issues, production and storage. The current year's efforts consisted of four tasks, one task containing three subtasks: Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Glucose and Wet Biomass in Supercritical Water; Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen; Photoemission and Photoluminescence Studies of Catalyzed Photoelectrode Surfaces for Hydrogen Production; Solar Energy Chemical Conversion by Means of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Methods Using Coated Silicon Electrodes; Assessment of Impedance Spectroscopy Methods for Evaluation of Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces; Solar Energy Conversion with Cyanobacteria; Nonclassical Polyhydride Metal Complexes as Hydrogen Storage Materials. 61 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Hydrogen application dynamics and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E. [Air Liquide Large Industries, Champigny-sur-Marne (France)

    2010-12-30

    The Chemical Industry consumes large volumes of hydrogen as raw material for the manufacture of numerous products (e.g. polyamides and polyurethanes account for 60% of hydrogen demand). The hydrogen demand was in the recent past and will continue to be driven by the polyurethane family. China will host about 60% of new hydrogen needs over the period 2010-2015 becoming the first hydrogen market next year and reaching 25% of market share by 2015 (vs. only 4% in 2001). Air Liquide supplies large volumes of Hydrogen (and other Industrial Gases) to customers by on-site plants and through pipeline networks which offer significant benefits such as higher safety, reliability and flexibility of supply. Thanks to its long term strategy and heavy investment in large units and pipeline networks, Air Liquide is the Industrial Gas leader in most of the world class Petrochemical basins (Rotterdam, Antwerp, US Gulf Coast, Yosu, Caojing,..) (orig.)

  12. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  13. Electricity and hydrogen multi production process with new solid electrolyte for HTGR, (1). Tri-generation process into thermal-electricity-chemical energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical review of conceptual multi power conversion system with productions of electrical power and hydrogen synthesis gas by methane partial oxidation reaction in combination of gas cooled reactor and SOFC was made. This system can produce electrical power, hydrogen synthesis gas and power load by coupling HTGR to supply high temperature thermal energy to cover enthalpy change in the methane reforming process. In present paper the performance of this system was discussed, and the following conclusions were derived. (1) This system requires very high performance electrolyte materials for SOFC in the high temperature service over 1,000 K, and CeSmO2 materials was doped by 3b elements such as Al3+, Ga3+ and Ga3+, and it is found that In3+ dopant improves density and ion conductivity of CeSmO2, and best composition of the doped material was optimized as Ce0.8Sm0.15In0.05O1.9. (2) In the methane partial oxidation test with SOFC single cell of Ce0.8Sm0.15In0.05O1.9, 74% free energy change was converted into electrical power and 90% methane reforming was achieved. (author)

  14. Why hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  15. Gamma ray slush hydrogen monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Peng; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1992-01-01

    Mass attenuation for 109Cd radiation have been measured in mixtures of phases and in single phases of five chemical compounds. As anticipated, the mass attenuation coefficients are independent of the phases of the test chemicals. It is recommended that a slush hydrogen monitoring system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation be developed for utilization aboard the NASP.

  16. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  17. The effect of chemical reducing agents in the synthesis of sol-gel Ru-Sn catalysts: Selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, J.; Mäki-Arvela, P.; Toukoniitty, E.; Kumar, N.; Salmi, T.; Murzin, DY.; Červený, L.; Paseka, Ivo; Laine, E.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2004), s. 187-195. ISSN 0928-0707 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : chemical reduction- sol-gel bimetallic catalyst * cinnamaldehyde Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.150, year: 2004

  18. Incorporation of atomic carbon and hydrogen in high-melting oxide - nuclear-chemical, dilatometric and infrared spectroscopical investigations on C- and H-doped MgO and CaO-monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C and H doped monocrystals of MgO and CaO were investigated in a temperature region of 78 K to 1500 K for the chemical state of the doping agents and their temperature-dependent behaviour. Starting with monocrystals obtained by coal arcing, carbon doping was carried out via the nuclear reaction 12C (d,p)13C, whereas hydrogen doping is present from the start of the crystal growth due to remaining moisture of the initial product. Hydrogen is present in the form of OH-contained defects or secondary produced Hz bubbles. All investigations, namely laser microprobe investigations, infrared spectroscopy, CO2 and hydrocarbon formation measurements and argon and O2 atmosphere, C-profile measurements, diffusion measurements, thermal expansion, lead to the result that carbon in the atomic form is present in the lattice on interstitial places or cation vacancies. The reaction mechanisms are discussed. An interaction model (between OH and C defects) does not completely clarify the complex IR spectra in detail, however shows good agreement with the experimental results. (RB)

  19. 化学气相沉积法制备的石墨烯晶畴的氢气刻蚀∗%Hydrogen etching of chemical vap or dep osition-grown graphene domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彬; 冯雅辉; 王秋实; 张伟; 张丽娜; 马晋文; 张浩然; 于广辉; 王桂强

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the reason of the etching trenches in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene domain and study the influence factor in the distribution and morphology of wrinkles. Graphene is synthesized on Cu substrate. The Cu substrate is annealed at 1050 ◦C for 60 min with 1000 sccm Ar and 200 sccm H2. After annealing, 500 sccm Ar, 20 sccm H2, and 1 sccm dilute CH4 (mixed with Ar) are introduced into the CVD system for graphene growth. Hydrogen etchings of graphene are conducted with flows of 500 sccm Ar and 200 sccm H2 at atmospheric pressure, and etching are performed at 950 and 1050 ◦C. The striated and reticular etching trenches are observed after etching via optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Every graphene domain is divided into island structures by these etching trenches. However, the edge of graphene domain is not etched and the size of domain is not changed. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is conducted to analyze the different morphologies of etching trenches. According to the EBSD analysis, the etching trench is closely associated with the Cu crystal orientation. Different Cu planes result in differences in mode, shape, and density of the etching trench. We conduct a verification experiment to judge whether the etching trenches are caused by the gaps between graphene and Cu substrate or by the hydrogenation of wrinkles. The graphene domains grown on Cu substrate with the same growth condition are etched immediately after growth without cooling process. We select graphene which grows across the Cu grain boundary, via optical microscope. A small number of regular hexagons are observed in graphene surface and the region of Cu boundary, but no etching trench is found. As the graphene growing across Cu boundary is the suspending graphene and there is no etching trench, we consider that the gap between graphene and Cu species is not a significant factor of forming etching trench. For comparison, the etching trenches

  20. Structure and gas-barrier properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on inner walls of cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Gong, Chunzhi; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of radio-frequency (RF) power on the structure and gas permeation through amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples is investigated. The results show that a higher radio-frequency power leads to a smaller sp 3/sp 2 value but produces fewer defects with smaller size. The permeability of PET samples decreases significantly after a-C:H deposition and the RF only exerts a small influence. However, the coating uniformity, color, and wettability of the surface are affected by the RF power. A higher RF power results in to better uniformity and it may be attributed to the combination of the high-density plasma and sample heating.

  1. Structure and gas-barrier properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on inner walls of cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of radio-frequency (RF) power on the structure and gas permeation through amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples is investigated. The results show that a higher radio-frequency power leads to a smaller sp3/sp2 value but produces fewer defects with smaller size. The permeability of PET samples decreases significantly after a-C:H deposition and the RF only exerts a small influence. However, the coating uniformity, color, and wettability of the surface are affected by the RF power. A higher RF power results in to better uniformity and it may be attributed to the combination of the high-density plasma and sample heating.

  2. Production, storage, transporation and utilization of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is produced from water and it can be used for fuel. Water is formed again by combustion of hydrogen with oxygen in the air. Hydrogen is an ideal fuel because hydrogen itself and gases formed by the combustion of hydrogen are not greenhouse and ozone layer damaging gases. Therefore, hydrogen is the most environmental friendly fuel that we have ever had. Hydrogen gas does not naturally exist. Therefore, hydrogen must be produced from hydrogen containing compounds such as water and hydrocarbons by adding energy. At present, hydrogen is produced in large scale as a raw material for the synthesis of ammonia, methanol and other chemicals but not for fuel. In other words, hydrogen fuel has not been realized but will be actualized in the near future. In this paper hydrogen will be discussed as fuel which will be used for aircraft, space application, power generation, combustion, etc. Especially, production of hydrogen is a very important technology for achieving hydrogen energy systems. Storage, transportation and utilization of hydrogen fuel will also be discussed in this paper

  3. Low corrosive chemical decontamination method using pH control. 2. Decomposition of reducing agent by using catalyst with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of a new chemical decontamination method which provides a high decontamination effect, less corrosion of base metal, and less radioactive waste generation, we developed a decomposition method for oxalic acid coexisting with hydrazine to decrease the amount of radioactive waste. Using a catalyst of 0.5wt% Ru supported by activated carbon grains, we decomposed oxalic acid and hydrazine, simultaneously and efficiently, with a stoichiometric concentration of H2O2. The decomposition ratios were decreased by the deposition of oxides. But even if the simulated reducing agent solution with high concentrations of coexisting Fe and K ions, which negatively effect decomposition ratio, was decomposed, the decomposition ratios of oxalic acid and hydrazine were kept high during decomposition of the amount of reducing agent used in actual chemical decontamination. Additionally, we examined the deposition ratios of metal ions on the catalyst as metal oxides. These results indicated about 2% of the radioactive species which were removed by the chemical decontamination were deposited on the catalyst column. 59Fe and 51Cr were estimated to be about 90% of the total deposited amount of radioactive species and about 60% of the dose equivalent in the model calculation. But this problem should be easily dealt with by using shielding. (author)

  4. Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, E.

    2011-02-13

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon

  5. Hydrogen energy progress; Proceedings of the Third World Hydrogen Energy Conference, Tokyo, Japan, June 23-26, 1980. Volumes 1, 2, 3 & 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Fueki, K.; Ohta, T.

    Papers are presented in the areas of electrolytic hydrogen production, thermochemical and hybrid hydrogen production, innovative hydrogen production, hydrogen storage and transmission, vehicles and hydrogen combustion, chemical and metallurgical usage of hydrogen, overall systems, environmental and materials aspects of hydrogen energy, and industrial aspects of hydrogen energy. Specific topics include advanced alkaline water electrolysis plants, polyethylene-based solid polymer electrolytes, the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and char production by flash coal carbonization, photoassisted water electrolysis by Si electrodes, hydrogen production by a thermophilic blue-green alga, the hydrogen storage properties of Fe(1-x)Nb(x)Ti alloys, and hydrogen-fueled compression-ignition engines. Attention is also given to ammonia as an energy vector for the hydrogen economy, a solar hydrogen energy system for an isolated island, a photovoltaic electrolysis system, and the economics of synthetic fuel and chemical production from nuclear power and coal.

  6. Superconductivity in compressed hydrogen-rich materials: Pressing on hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-07-01

    Periodic table of elements starts with hydrogen, a simplest element of all. The simplicity is lost when the element is compressed to high densities or participates in a chemical bonding in compounds, being subjected to "chemical pressure" of surrounding atoms or molecules. The chemical nature of hydrogen is dictated by its simplest electronic shell, which has only one electron. Hydrogen can donate this electron and behave like alkali metal, or accept an extra electron and form a hydride ion with closed shell resembling a group VII element. The complexity of hydrogen goes beyond these simplest configurations, when hydrogen is involved in a multicenter bonding or in hydrogen bonds. This complex behavior is tightly related to the ability of hydrogen to participate in the process of electronic transport in solids and potentially be able to contribute to the superconductivity in a material. Hydrogen by itself when compressed to immense pressures of 400-500 GPa may form a simple atomic phase with very high critical superconducting temperatures (Tc) well above room temperature. While this theoretical insight awaits confirmation at pressures at the limit of current experimental capabilities, a variety of other hydrogen-rich materials have been suggested recently to have record high Tc values. The very existence of many of these materials still lacks experimental confirmation. In this review article, we will present an extensive list of such predicted materials. We will also review superconductivity in classical hydrides (mostly metal hydrides) and current theoretical understanding of relatively low Tc's in metal hydrides of transition and noble metals.

  7. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century

  8. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

  9. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  10. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian;

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3......−, and conceptually illustrates the remediation of a waste product for producing valuable chemicals....

  11. CO2 hydrogenation to methanol

    OpenAIRE

    Frilund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The literature survey discusses the recent developments in heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Special focus was given to new coated catalysts and reactors. Methanol is an important chemical that is currently produced from synthesis gas. Methanol can also be produced from CO2, but the reaction is less thermodynamically favoured. The main reaction is the exothermic CO2 hydrogenation, and there is a competing fast reaction, the reverse water-gas shift, which converts CO2 t...

  12. The energetic future of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen seems to have a leading role in the energy future for a country without any fossile resource, such as France. Two competing methods may be envisaged to get cheep nuclear hydrogen: the nuclear reforming of methane studied in Germany in view of storing the power produced from HTR being presently rejected on behalf of advanced electrolysis and the thermal cycles for water chemical decomposition. Both modes of hydrogen production tend to bring the power yields of nuclear reactors nearer to those of Carnot cycle. Hydrogen advantages lie in the possibilities of an easy distribution as for natural gas, and of the storage of large amounts of hydrogen inside large aquifers or saliniferous cavities previously deprived of their salt by circulating water

  13. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  14. Alkenone δD as an ecological indicator: A culture and field study of physiologically-controlled chemical and hydrogen-isotopic variation in C37 alkenones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolhowe, Matthew D.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; Langer, Gerald; Oviedo, Angela Maria; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2015-08-01

    A combined culture and field study was conducted in order to (1) more firmly identify the physiological controls on hydrogen isotopic composition of C37 alkenones produced by open-ocean coccolithophores and (2) determine the degree to which these controls are manifested in a natural water column. Nutrient-limitation experiments in culture, combined with previously published data, show that net fractionation between the growth medium and alkenones (αK37) varies with cellular alkenone content and production rate, and, by extension, growth phase. It is hypothesized that the relationship of αK37 with cellular alkenone content and production rate is due to increased use of anabolic NADPH in response to high rates of lipid synthesis. Euphotic zone profiles of δDK37, measured in suspended material from the Gulf of California and Eastern Tropical North Pacific, decreased with depth and light availability, and did not correlate in any expected way with previously-suggested controls on αK37. It is possible that the field data are driven by behavior in light-limited cells that is not represented by the available, nutrient-limited culture data. If true, δDK37 may have utility as an indicator of production depth in settings prone to subsurface production maxima. Relationships between αK37, cell density, and the carbon-isotopic fractionation term εp, however, suggest that αK37 acts an indicator of growth rate, which in this setting is only partially dependent on light, consistent with our interpretation of the culture data. If this latter interpretation proves correct, δDK37 may be a powerful ecological proxy specific to these climatically-important, calcifying, temperature-encoding species.

  15. Quantum chemical investigation on the role of Li adsorbed on anatase (101) surface nano-materials on the storage of molecular hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasadesikan, V; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-06-01

    Lithiation of TiO2 has been shown to enhance the storage of hydrogen up to 5.6 wt% (Hu et al. J Am Chem Soc 128:11740-11741, 2006). The mechanism for the process is still unknown. In this work we have carried out a study on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the surface and migration into subsurface layers of anatase (101) by periodic density functional theory calculations implementing on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U). The model consists of 24 [TiO2] units with 11.097 × 7.655 Å(2) surface area. Adsorption energies have been calculated for different Li atoms (1-14) on the surface. A maximum of 13 Li atoms can be accommodated on the surface at two bridged O, Ti-O, and Ti atom adsorption sites, with 83 kcal mol(-1) adsorption energy for a single Li atom adsorbed between two bridged O atoms from where it can migrate into the subsurface layer with 27 kcal mol(-1) energy barrier. The predicted adsorption energies for H2 on the lithiated TiO2 (101) surface with 1-10 Li atoms revealed that the highest adsorption energies occurred on 1-Li, 5-Li, and 9-Li surfaces with 3.5, 4.4, and 7.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The values decrease rapidly with additional H2 co-adsorbed on the lithiated surfaces; the maximum H2 adsorption on the 9Li-TiO2(a) surface was estimated to be only 0.32 wt% under 100 atm H2 pressure at 77 K. The result of Bader charge analysis indicated that the reduction of Ti occurred depending on the Li atoms covered on the TiO2 surface. PMID:25966674

  16. Hydrogen Effect against Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Kanezaki, Toshihiko; Mine, Yoji

    2010-10-01

    The well-known term “hydrogen embrittlement” (HE) expresses undesirable effects due to hydrogen such as loss of ductility, decreased fracture toughness, and degradation of fatigue properties of metals. However, this article shows, surprisingly, that hydrogen can have an effect against HE. A dramatic phenomenon was found in which charging a supersaturated level of hydrogen into specimens of austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316L drastically improved the fatigue crack growth resistance, rather than accelerating fatigue crack growth rates. Although this mysterious phenomenon has not previously been observed in the history of HE research, its mechanism can be understood as an interaction between hydrogen and dislocations. Hydrogen can play two roles in terms of dislocation mobility: pinning (or dragging) and enhancement of mobility. Competition between these two roles determines whether the resulting phenomenon is damaging or, unexpectedly, desirable. This finding will, not only be the crucial key factor to elucidate the mechanism of HE, but also be a trigger to review all existing theories on HE in which hydrogen is regarded as a dangerous culprit.

  17. Room temperature hydrogen gas sensor based on ZnO nanorod arrays grown on a SiO2/Si substrate via a microwave-assisted chemical solution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Highly quality ZnO nanorods arrays were grown on SiO2 substrate using chemical solution. ► We use PVA–Zn(OH)2 nanocomposites as seed layer to grow ZnO nanorods. ► ZnO nanorods arrays show good sensitivity at room temperature to H2 gas. - Abstract: High-quality zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were grown on a silicon dioxide (SiO2/Si) substrate via a microwave irradiation-assisted chemical solution method. The SiO2/Si substrate was seeded with polyvinyl alcohol–Zn (OH)2 nanocomposites prior to the complete growth of ZnO nanorods through a chemical solution method. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, and photoluminescence results indicated the high quality of the produced ZnO nanorods. The hydrogen (H2)-sensing capabilities of the ZnO nanorod arrays were investigated at room temperature (RT), and the sensitivity was 294% in the presence of 1000 ppm of H2. The sensing measurements for H2 gas at various temperatures (25–250 °C) were repeatable for over 100 min. The sensor exhibited a sensitivity of 1100% at 250 °C upon exposure to 1000 ppm of H2. Hysteresis was observed in the sensor at different H2 concentrations at different temperatures. Moreover, the response times ranged from 60 to 25 s over the range of operating temperatures from RT to 250 °C.

  18. Room temperature hydrogen gas sensor based on ZnO nanorod arrays grown on a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate via a microwave-assisted chemical solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, J.J., E-mail: j1j2h72@yahoo.com [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq); Mahdi, M.A. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq); Chin, C.W.; Abu-Hassan, H. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia); Hassan, Z., E-mail: zai@usm.my [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia)

    2013-01-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly quality ZnO nanorods arrays were grown on SiO{sub 2} substrate using chemical solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use PVA-Zn(OH){sub 2} nanocomposites as seed layer to grow ZnO nanorods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanorods arrays show good sensitivity at room temperature to H{sub 2} gas. - Abstract: High-quality zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were grown on a silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}/Si) substrate via a microwave irradiation-assisted chemical solution method. The SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate was seeded with polyvinyl alcohol-Zn (OH){sub 2} nanocomposites prior to the complete growth of ZnO nanorods through a chemical solution method. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, and photoluminescence results indicated the high quality of the produced ZnO nanorods. The hydrogen (H{sub 2})-sensing capabilities of the ZnO nanorod arrays were investigated at room temperature (RT), and the sensitivity was 294% in the presence of 1000 ppm of H{sub 2}. The sensing measurements for H{sub 2} gas at various temperatures (25-250 Degree-Sign C) were repeatable for over 100 min. The sensor exhibited a sensitivity of 1100% at 250 Degree-Sign C upon exposure to 1000 ppm of H{sub 2}. Hysteresis was observed in the sensor at different H{sub 2} concentrations at different temperatures. Moreover, the response times ranged from 60 to 25 s over the range of operating temperatures from RT to 250 Degree-Sign C.

  19. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  20. Hydrogen Production Technologies: Current State and Future Developments

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is currently used mainly in the chemical industry for the production of ammonia and methanol. Nevertheless, in the near future, hydrogen is expected to become a significant fuel that will largely contribute to the quality of atmospheric air. Hydrogen as a chemical element (H) is the most widespread one on the earth and as molecular dihydrogen (H2) can be obtained from a number of sources both renewable and nonrenewable by various processes. Hydrogen global production has so far ...

  1. Fiber optic hydrogen sensors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Dai, Jixiang

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen is one of the next generation energies in the future, which shows promising applications in aerospace and chemical industries. Hydrogen leakage monitoring is very dangerous and important because of its low ignition energy, high combustion efficiency, and smallest molecule. This paper reviews the state-of-art development of the fiber optic hydrogen sensing technology. The main developing trends of fiber optic hydrogen sensors are based on two kinds of hydrogen sensitive materials, i.e. palladium-alloy thin films and Pt-doped WO3 coatings. In this review work, the advantages and disadvantages of these two kinds of sensing technologies will be evaluated.

  2. Stability of hydrogenation states of graphene and conditions for hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Hyun; Jung, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Park, Noejung

    2012-04-01

    The hydrogen spillover mechanism has been discussed in the field of hydrogen storage and is believed to have particular advantage over the storage as metal or chemical hydrides. We investigate conditions for practicality realizing the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto carbon surfaces, using first-principles methods. Our results show that contrary to common belief, types of hydrogenation configurations of graphene (the aggregated all-paired configurations) can satisfy the thermodynamic requirement for room-temperature hydrogen storage. However, the peculiarity of the paired adsorption modes gives rise to a large kinetic barrier against hydrogen migration and desorption. It means that an extremely high pressure is required to induce the migration-derived hydrogenation. However, if mobile catalytic particles are present inside the graphitic interstitials, hydrogen migration channels can open and the spillover phenomena can be realized. We suggest a molecular model for such a mobile catalyst which can exchange hydrogen atoms with the wall of graphene.

  3. 多孔阳极氧化铝的化学修饰及其应用于过氧化氢的测定%Chemical Modification of Porous Anodic Alumina and Application in Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国荣; 唐安平

    2011-01-01

    A new hydrogen peroxide electrochemical biosensor was fabricated through adsorbed cytochrome C in porous anodic alumina chemically modified. The barrier layer at the bottom of the porous anodic alumina was erased by chemical and electrochemical erosion. The Au nano particles were deposited in porous anodic alumina by two-step electroless deposition, and then the cytochrome C was immobilization on Nano Au bed in solution including L-cyste-ine through self-assembled technology. Then a new hydrogen peroxide biosensor was fabricated. The electrochemical and electro catalytic behavior of the cytochrome C electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and chrono-amperometry. The cytochrome C electrode showed a pair of stable and well-defined peaks at about -50 mV and -190 mV at 80 mV/s in pH 7.0 PBS and displayed excellent electro catalytic responses to the reduction of hydrogen peroxide with linear relationship over a concentration range from 1.5xl0-5 mol/L to 4. 8xl0-4 mol/L,and a detection limit of 3.5 x10-6 mol/L( S/N = 3). The results of this study reveal porous anodic alumina chemically modified could be used for the design of biosensors with good operational lifetimes.%多孔阳极氧化铝经化学修饰后吸附细胞色素C,制备了过氧化氢生物传感器电极。多孔阳极氧化铝通过电化学和化学腐蚀阻挡层后,用两步无电沉积方法制备了纳米金修饰的多孔阳极氧化铝电极,再在含有L-半胱氨酸的细胞色素C的溶液中通过吸附制备细胞色素C电极。用循环伏安法和计时电流法测试细胞色素C电极的电化学性能及催化对过氧化氢的还原。结果表明,包覆的细胞色素C电极显示较好的稳定性,在扫描速度为80 mV/s时于-50 mV、-190mV附近出现一对稳定的氧化还原峰。该电极对过氧化氢具有良好的电催化还原性能,在1.5×10-5mol/L~4.8×10-4 mol/L浓度范围内,电流与浓度呈良好的线性关系。多孔阳极氧化铝

  4. Electrolytic hydrogen in beta titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permeation of electrolytic hydrogen through beta titanium foils with palladium coated surfaces was studied using Ti--11.5 Mo--6 Zr--4.5 Sn. Ion bombardment etching followed by thin film vapor deposition of palladium were used to produce oxide-free titanium specimens for electrochemical hydrogen permeation and embrittlement studies. A thin metallic foil is cathodically charged with hydrogen on one side while the other side is maintained at a sufficiently anodic potential so that all the diffusing hydrogen is oxidized and turned into an equivalent current. The current is analyzed to determine diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen. X-ray diffraction was also used to determine the effects of hydrogen on the lattice parameter. Permeation experiments conducted with basic cyanide solutions exhibited simple diffusion behavior. The diffusivity at 210C for hydrogen through the beta alloy was 5.60 (+-1.92) x 10-7 cm2/s. Anomalous permeation occurred with hydrogen chemical potentials in acidic and basic solutions without cyanide during the later stages of the approach to steady state in the charging. This behavior is consistent with the trapping model of hydrogen in metals of McNabb and Foster. Plastic deformation and spontaneous cracking at the wetted portion of the specimen were observed under extreme conditions during this anomalous behavior. Part of the deformation is found to be reversible. In the mandrel bend experiments on the embrittlement phenomenon, the transgranular cleavage mode of fracture occurred. Interstitially dissolved hydrogen expanded the bcc lattice of the beta titanium with accompanying diffraction line broadening. The lattice contracted upon removal of the hydrogen. The satisfactory performance of the beta alloy Ti--11.5 Mo--6 Zr--4.5 Sn, in moderate electrochemical environments results principally from the protective oxide film

  5. Petal-like CuO nanostructures prepared by a simple wet chemical method, and their application to non-enzymatic amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniform and petal-like CuO nanostructures have been deposited on a copper foil substrate by a simple wet chemical method at room temperature through oxidation of elemental copper in strongly alkaline solution. The concentration of NaOH in the precursor solution is critical for the product morphology. The morphology of the CuO nanostructures was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffraction. Their electrochemical performance was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, amperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The CuO films are shown to represent active electrode materials for non-enzymatic amperometric determination of H2O2. Response to H2O2 in solutions of pH 7.4 at a working potential of −200 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) is linear in the 10 to 960 μM concentration range, with the detection limit 2.1 μM and the sensitivity 5030 μA∙mM−1. Its excellent electrocatalytic activity, large specific surface area, efficient mass transport and electron transfer properties make this electrode a highly sensitive and reliable tool for electrochemical determination of H2O2. (author)

  6. In-situ doping of erbium in hydrogenated amorphous carbon by low temperature metalorganic radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant improvement in the photoluminescence of erbium doped amorphous carbon (a-C:H(Er)) is reported. The effects of the RF power on the anode and cathode a-C:H films were investigated in terms of the microstructural and local bonding features. It was determined that Er doped a-C:H films should be placed on the anode to obtain wider bandgap and lower percentage of sp2 carbon bonding. The metalorganic compound, tris(6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluoro-2,2-dimethyl-3,5-octanedionate) Erbium(+ III) or Er(fod)3, was incorporated in-situ into an a-C:H host by metalorganic rf plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. This technique provides the capability of doping Er in a vertically uniform profile. The high erbium concentration (3.9 at.%), partial fluorination of the surrounding ligands, and the large optical bandgap of the host a-C:H are the primary factors that enable enhancement of the photoluminescence. - Highlights: • High and uniform Er concentration (3.9 at.%) in a-C:H(Er) films is achieved. • Room-temperature photoluminescence peaking at 1.54 μm is demonstrated. • Optically active Er3+ ions are preserved in as-grown samples at low growth temperature. • Non-radiative C-H vibrational quenching is reduced by fluorination of a-C host. • Metalorganic-RF-PECVD provides the potential of doping Er in vertically uniform profiles

  7. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Zhang, Z. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Photoelectrochemical devices-direct photoconversion systems utilizing a photovoltaic-type structure coated with water-splitting catalysts-represent a promising option to meet this goal. Direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies greater than 7% and photoelectrode lifetimes of up to 30 hours in 1 molar KOH have been demonstrated in our laboratory using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Loss analysis models indicate that the DOE`s goal of 10% solar-to-chemical conversion can be met with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, we describe recent progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, improvements in photoelectrode efficiency and stability, and designs for higher efficiency and greater stability.

  8. Hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report briefly describes the results of the single projects promoted by the German Council of Research (DFG). The subjects deal with diffusion, effusion, permeation and solubility of hydrogen in metals. They are interesting for many disciplines: metallurgy, physical metallurgy, metal physics, materials testing, welding engineering, chemistry, nuclear physics and solid-state physics. The research projects deal with the following interrelated subjects: solubility of H2 in steel and effects on embrittlement, influence of H2 on the fatigue strength of steel as well as the effect of H2 on welded joints. The studies in solid-state research can be divided into methodological and physico-chemical studies. The methodological studies mainly comprise investigations on the analytical determination of H2 by means of nuclear-physical reactions (e.g. the 15N method) and the application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy. Physico-chemical problems are mainly dealt with in studies on interfacial reactions in connection with the absorption of hydrogen and on the diffusion of H2 in different alloy systems. The properties of materials used for hydrogen storage were the subject of several research projects. 20 contributions were separately recorded for the data bank 'Energy'. (MM)

  9. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  10. Intramolecular versus intermolecular hydrogen bonding in solution

    OpenAIRE

    Vliegenthart, J. F. G.; Kroon, Jan; Kroon-Batenburg, L.M.J.; Leeflang, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    The balance between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding is studied for a solution of methyl beta-cellobioside in water and dimethylsulfoxide by 1H NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. In water O(3) predominantly interacts with water molecules, whereas in dimethylsulfoxide it is intramolecularly hydrogen bonded to O(5Œ). The temperature coefficient of the chemical shift of the hydroxy groups appears to be a reliable indicator of intermolecular hydrogen-bond formation, whereas the ex...

  11. Hydrogen at the Lunar Terminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, T. A.; Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Evans, L. G.; Litvak, M. L.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R. D.; Su, J. J.

    2015-10-01

    Suppression of the Moon's naturally occurring epithermal neutron leakage flux near the equatorial dawn terminator is consistent with the presence of diurnally varying quantities of hydrogen in the regolith with maximum concentration on the day side of the dawn terminator. This flux suppression has been observed using the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) on the polar-orbiting Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The chemical form of hydrogen is not determined, but other remote sensing methods and elemental availability suggest water. The observed variability is interpreted as frost collecting in or on the cold nightside surface, thermally desorbing in sunlight during the lunar morning,and migrating away from the warm subsolar region across the nearby terminator to return to the lunar surface. The maximum concentration, averaged over the upper ~1m of regolith to which neutron detection is sensitive,is estimated to be 0.0125±0.0022 weight-percent water-equivalent hydrogen (wt% WEH), yielding an accumulation of 190±30 ml recoverable water per square meter of regolith at each dawn. The source of hydrogen (water) must be in equilibrium with losses due to solar photolysis and escape. A chemical recycling process or self-shielding from solar UV must be assumed in order to bring the loss rate down to compatibility with possible sources, including solar wind or micrometeoroid delivery of hydrogen, which require near-complete retention of hydrogen,or outgassing of primordial volatiles, for which a plausible supply rate requires significantly less retention efficiency.

  12. The formation and evolution of hydrogen-deficient post-AGB white dwarfs: the emerging chemical profile and the expectations for the PG1159-DB-DQ evolutionary connection

    CERN Document Server

    Althaus, L G; Panei, J A; Corsico, A H; García-Berro, E; Scoccola, C G

    2005-01-01

    This paper is designed to explore the formation and evolution of hydrogen-deficient post-AGB white dwarfs. To this end, we compute the complete evolution of an initially 2.7 M_sun star from the zero-age main sequence through the thermally pulsing and mass-loss phases to the white dwarf stage. Particular attention is given to the chemical abundance changes during the whole evolution. A time-dependent scheme for the simultaneous treatment of abundance changes caused by nuclear reactions, diffusive overshooting, salt fingers and convection is considered. We employed the double-diffusive mixing-length theory of convection for fluids with composition gradients (Grossman & Taam 1996). The study can therefore be considered as a test of its performance in low-mass stars. Also, time-dependent element diffusion for multicomponent gases is taken into account during the white dwarf evolution. The evolutionary stages corresponding to the last helium thermal pulse on the early white-dwarf cooling branch and the followi...

  13. Hydrogen permeation barrier development and characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of hydrogen losses in a hydrogen production industrial plant is of crucial importance especially for its safety implications. The high temperatures and pressures required in hydrogen production processes as well as the corrosive process fluids can enhance drastically the intrinsic permeation characteristics of metals and alloys. To reduce hydrogen permeation and a subsequent mechanical degradation of structural materials, hydrogen permeation barriers can be applied. As shown by previous works performed in the frame of the European Fusion Technology Programme, satisfactory hydrogen permeation reductions were achieved using alumina-rich coatings. Several deposition techniques were investigated and coatings were obtained by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and hot dipping, and these processes seem to have exhibited a better TPB efficiency with respect to the coatings obtained by spray techniques. This work contains a review of the deposition techniques and the efficiency of the different hydrogen permeation barriers developed in the frame of the EU Fusion Programme. (author)

  14. Hydrogen production using plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma processing is a promising method of extracting hydrogen from natural gas while avoiding the greenhouse gas (GHG) production typical of other methods such as steam methane reforming. This presentation describes a plasma discharge process based that, in a single reactor pass, can yield hydrogen concentrations of up to 50 % by volume in the product gas mixture. The process is free of GHG's, does not require catalysts and is easily scalable. Chemical and morphological analyses of the gaseous and solid products of the process by gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry, microscopic Raman analyses and electron microscopy respectively are reviewed. The direct production of hydrogen-enriched natural gas (HENG) as a fuel for low pollution internal combustion engines and its purification to high-purity hydrogen (99.99%) from the product gas by pressure swing adsorption (PSA) purifier beds are reviewed. The presentation reviews potential commercial applications for the technology

  15. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  16. Saga of hydrogen civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': Fossil fuels (i.e., petroleum, natural gas and coal), which meet most of the world's energy demand today, are being depleted quickly. Also, their combustion products are causing global problems such as the greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion, acid rains and pollution, all of which are posing great danger for our environment and eventually for the life on our planet. Many engineers and scientists agree that the solution to these global problems would be to replace the existing fossil fuel system by the hydrogen energy system. Hydrogen is a very efficient and clean fuel. Its combustion will produce no greenhouse gases, no ozone layer depleting chemicals, and little or no acid rain ingredients and pollution. Hydrogen, produced from renewable energy (e.g., solar) sources, would result in a permanent energy system which we would never have to change. However, there are other energy systems proposed for the post-petroleum era, such as a synthetic fossil fuel system. In this system, synthetic gasoline and synthetic natural gas will be produced using abundant deposits of coal. In a way, this will ensure the continuation of the present fossil fuel system. The two possible energy systems for the post-fossil fuel era (i.e., the solar-hydrogen energy system and the synthetic fossil fuel system) are compared with the present fossil fuel system by taking into consideration production costs, environmental damages and utilization efficiencies. The results indicate that the solar-hydrogen energy system is the best energy system to ascertain a sustainable future, and it should replace the fossil fuel system before the end of the 21st century. (author)

  17. Hydrogen production processes: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, does not occur freely on our planet. However, it is predominantly present on earth in combination with oxygen as water and with carbon and other elements as fossil fuels, hydrocarbons, and biomass. Production of hydrogen from these sources is an energy intensive process. Hydrogen production processes can be broadly classified into three general categories: thermal, electrolytic, and photolytic. At present about 96 % of world's hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels using thermal processes like steam methane reforming, partial oxidation, and gasification of coal or biomass while remaining comes from electrolysis of water. Most of the hydrogen produced is primarily used in the chemical industry. More recently hydrogen is perceived as a clean, renewable energy carrier for sustainable energy supply in the future especially when issues like growing concern about global warming due to emission of green house gases and depletion of fossil fuel resources have become paramount. In association with the fuel cell technology, hydrogen appears to be a promising alternative to the fossil fuels for transport applications

  18. Decentralized and direct solar hydrogen production: Towards a hydrogen economy in MENA region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensebaa, Farid; Khalfallah, Mohamed; Ouchene, Majid

    2010-09-15

    Hydrogen has certainly some advantages in spite of its high cost and low efficiency when compared to other energy vectors. Solar energy is an abundant, clean and renewable source of energy, currently competing with fossil fuel for water heating without subsidy. Photo-electrochemical, thermo-chemicals and photo-biological processes for hydrogen production processes have been demonstrated. These decentralised hydrogen production processes using directly solar energy do not require expensive hydrogen infrastructure for packaging and delivery in the short and medium terms. MENA region could certainly be considered a key area for a new start to a global deployment of hydrogen economy.

  19. Hydrogen environment embrittlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  20. In situ NMR study of hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of ZrCr2 and physisorbed hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► In situ NMR study of hydrogenation of C14-ZrCr2. ► Observation of physisorbed hydrogen peak in NMR spectra. ► Change of chemical shift of physisorbed H2 (δphy) with degree of hydrogenation. ► Linearity between δphy and degree of hydrogenation. ► Linearity between degree of hydrogenation and density of states, Nd(EF). - Abstract: In situ proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of ZrCr2. The powder samples prepared by arc melting followed by homogenizing heat treatment and grinding were put inside a boron nitride (BN) crucible, which was placed inside a quartz tube attached to a high pressure assembly specially designed for in situ NMR measurements. The samples were activated at 573 K under vacuum inside the high temperature probe and then exposed to the required hydrogen gas pressure at room temperature for hydrogenation. Gradual hydrogenation of the samples was recorded through in situ NMR. Before activation of the sample, the exposure to high pressure showed two peaks with NMR shifts of 8.5 and −3.3 ppm, which were assigned to hydrogen gas and physisorbed hydrogen, respectively. After activation, the sample showed absorption manifested through the appearance of a broad peak with an NMR shift of −141 ppm. The NMR shift of absorption peak increased to higher magnetic fields as the hydrogen absorption proceeded. It was also accompanied by a change in NMR shift of physisorbed hydrogen peak in the same direction. Both the shifts, i.e., of absorbed hydrogen as well as of physisorbed hydrogen were linearly related with the degree of hydrogenation. This change in NMR shift of physisorbed hydrogen was explained on the basis of increase in density of d-electronic states at Fermi level with an increase in the absorbed hydrogen.

  1. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  2. Hydrogen producing method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a process for producing hydrogen from water by utilizing a γ · X ray radiation source such as spent nuclear fuels. Hydrogen is formed from water by combining a scintillator which uses a γ · X ray radiation source as an energy source to emit UV light and an optical catalyst or an optical catalyst electrode which undergoes UV light to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen. The present invention provides a method of effectively using spent fuel assemblies which have not been used at present and capable of converting them into hydrogen as storable chemical energy. (N.H.)

  3. Steps toward the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen economy is defined as the industrial system in which one of the universal energy carriers is hydrogen (the other is electricity) and hydrogen is oxidized to water that may be reused by applying an external energy source for dissociation of water into its component elements hydrogen and oxygen. There are three different primary energy-supply system classes which may be used to implement the hydrogen economy, namely, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas, and as yet largely unused supplies such as shale oil, oil from tar sands, natural gas from geo-pressured locations, etc.), nuclear reactors including fission reactors and breeders or fusion nuclear reactors over the very long term, and renewable energy sources (including hydroelectric power systems, wind-energy systems, ocean thermal energy conversion systems, geothermal resources, and a host of direct solar energy-conversion systems including biomass production, photovoltaic energy conversion, solar thermal systems, etc.). Examination of present costs of hydrogen production by any of these means shows that the hydrogen economy favored by people searching for a non-polluting gaseous or liquid energy carrier will not be developed without new discoveries or innovations. Hydrogen may become an important market entry in a world with most of the electricity generated in nuclear fission or breeder reactors when high-temperature waste heat is used to dissociate water in chemical cycles or new inventions and innovations lead to low-cost hydrogen production by applying as yet uneconomical renewable solar techniques that are suitable for large-scale production such as direct water photolysis with suitably tailored band gaps on semiconductors or low-cost electricity supplies generated on ocean-based platforms using temperature differences in the tropical seas

  4. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  5. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  6. Hydrogen storage: hydrogen as a hydride. 1974-May, 1980 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1974-May 80. [135 abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography covers hydrogen storage as a hydride. Topics include the chemical and physical properties of the hydride, and how useful it may be for hydrogen storage. Also considered is the conversion of hydrogen to a hydride and the conversion back to hydrogen. (This updated bibliography contains 135 abstracts, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  7. Estimation of optimal capacity of the module through the demand analysis of refinery hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young-Seek; Kim, Ho-Jin; Kim, Il-Su [SK energy Institution of Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-02-15

    Hydrogen is focused as energy carrier, not an energy source on the rising of problems such as exhaustion of fossil fuel and environment pollution. Thermochemical hydrogen production by nuclear energy has potential to efficiently produce large quantities of hydrogen without producing greenhouse gases. The oil refiners and petro-chemical plant are very large, centralized producers and users of industrial hydrogen, and they a high-potential early market for hydrogen produced by nuclear energy. Therefore, hydrogen market of petro-chemical industry as demand site for nuclear hydrogen was investigated and worked for demand forecast of hydrogen in 2020. Also we suggested possible supply plans of nuclear hydrogen considered regional characteristics. The hydrogen production cost was analyzed and estimated for nuclear hydrogen as well as conventional hydrogen production such as natural gas reforming and coal gasification in various range.

  8. HTTR workshop (workshop on hydrogen production technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various research and development efforts have been performed to solve the global energy and environmental problems caused by large consumption of fossil fuels. Research activities on advanced hydrogen production technology by the use of nuclear heat from high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, have been flourished in universities, research institutes and companies in many countries. The Department of HTTR Project and the Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology of JAERI held the HTTR Workshop (Workshop on Hydrogen Production Technology) on July 5 and 6, 2004 to grasp the present status of R and D about the technology of HTGR and the nuclear hydrogen production in the world and to discuss about necessity of the nuclear hydrogen production and technical problems for the future development of the technology. More than 110 participants attended the Workshop including foreign participants from USA, France, Korea, Germany, Canada and United Kingdom. In the Workshop, the presentations were made on such topics as R and D programs for nuclear energy and hydrogen production technologies by thermo-chemical or other processes. Also, the possibility of the nuclear hydrogen production in the future society was discussed. The workshop showed that the R and D for the hydrogen production by the thermo-chemical process has been performed in many countries. The workshop affirmed that nuclear hydrogen production could be one of the competitive supplier of hydrogen in the future. The second HTTR Workshop will be held in the autumn next year. (author)

  9. Hydrogen Safety Project: Chemical analysis support task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core samples taken from tank 101-SY at Hanford during ''window E'' were analyzed for organic and radiochemical constituents by staff of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Westinghouse Hanford company submitted these samples to the laboratory

  10. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-02-28

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storage applications, but later on it was found to be unable to store enough amounts of hydrogen under ambient conditions. New arrangements of carbon nanotubes were constructed and hydrogen sorption properties were investigated using state-of-the-art simulation methods. The simulations indicate outstanding total hydrogen uptake (up to 19.0 wt.% at 77 K and 5.52wt.% at 300 K), which makes these materials excellent candidates for storage applications. This reopens the carbon route to superior materials for a hydrogen-based economy. Zeolite imidazolate frameworks are subclass of MOFs with an exceptional chemical and thermal stability. The hydrogen adsorption in ZIFs was investigated as a function of network geometry and organic linker exchange. Ab initio calculations performed at the MP2 level to obtain correct interaction energies between hydrogen molecules and the ZIF framework. Subsequently, GCMC simulations are carried out to obtain the hydrogen uptake of ZIFs at different thermodynamic conditions. The best of these materials (ZIF-8) is found to be able to store up to 5 wt.% at 77 K and high pressure. We expected possible improvement of hydrogen capacity of ZIFs by substituting the metal atom (Zn{sup 2+}) in the structure by lighter elements such as B or Li. Therefore, we investigated the energy landscape of LiB(IM)4 polymorphs in detail and analyzed their hydrogen storage capacities. The structure with the fau topology was shown to be one of the best materials for hydrogen storage. Its

  11. Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Jason; Crowl, Daniel; Caspary, David; Naber, Jeff; Allen, Jeff; Mukerjee, Abhijit; Meng, Desheng; Lukowski, John; Solomon, Barry; Meldrum, Jay

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this project was four-fold. First, we developed new courses in alternative energy and hydrogen laboratory and update existing courses in fuel cells. Secondly, we developed hydrogen technology degree programs. Thirdly, we developed hydrogen technology related course material for core courses in chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, and electrical engineering. Finally, we developed fuel cell subject material to supplement the Felder & Rousseau and the Geankoplis chemical engineering undergraduate textbooks.

  12. Steam reforming of sunflower oil for hydrogen gas production

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont V.

    2007-01-01

    Methods of current hydrogen production for the petroleum refinery industry as well as future technologies under research and development in preparation for a global hydrogen-based economy are briefly reviewed. The advantages of biomass and of liquid biofuels, including vegetable oils as fuel sources in the sustainable production of hydrogen gas are then presented. The bulk of this lecture is thereafter concerned with the thermo-chemical means of hydrogen production which are suitable to the c...

  13. Polarographic catalytic wave of hydrogen--Parallel catalytic hydrogen wave of bovine serum albumin in thepresence of oxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    过玮; 刘利民; 林洪; 宋俊峰

    2002-01-01

    A polarographic catalytic hydrogen wave of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at about -1.80 V (vs. SCE) in NH4Cl-NH3@H2O buffer is further catalyzed by such oxidants as iodate, persulfate and hydrogen peroxide, producing a kinetic wave. Studies show that the kinetic wave is a parallel catalytic wave of hydrogen, which resulted from that hydrogen ion is electrochemically reduced and chemically regenerated through oxidation of its reduction product, atomic hydrogen, by oxidants mentioned above. It is a new type of poralographic catalytic wave of protein, which is suggested to be named as a parallel catalytic hydrogen wave.

  14. A review of experimental studies of hydrogen as a new therapeutic agent in emergency and critical care medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Meihua; Zhang, Hongying; Yu, Congjun; Wang, Fan; Sun, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the Universe, but is seldom regarded as a therapeutic agent. Recent evidence has shown that hydrogen is a potent antioxidative, antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory agent and so may have potential medical applications in cells, tissues and organs. There are several methods to administer hydrogen, such as inhalation of hydrogen gas, aerosol inhalation of a hydrogen-rich solution, drinking hydrogen dissolved in water, injecting hydrogen-rich sali...

  15. Cutaneous reactions simulating erythema multiforme and Stevens Johnson syndrome due to occupational exposure to a plant-growth regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inamadar Arun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, hydrogen cyanamide (Dormex ® is a plant growth regulator used mainly for the bud-breaking of grapevines. The use of this chemical may result in severe cutaneous reactions simulating erythema multiforme (EM, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN. Methods: Studies were conducted on four seasonal grapevine workers who developed severe cutaneous reactions following the unprotected use of Dormex ® (hydrogen cyanamide. Results: Two of the patients had EM-like skin lesions and the other two developed SJS-TEN-like skin lesions. A latent period of 5-7 days existed between the contact with the chemical and the development of the skin lesions. The histopathological picture was suggestive of EM. All the patients responded to systemic steroids and antihistamines. Conclusions: Hydrogen cyanamide may act as a hapten, initiating cytotoxic immunological attack on keratinocytes, resulting in EM- and SJS-TEN-like clinical picture. Awareness regarding such severe cutaneous reactions due to the inappropriate handling of Dormex ® is required. The use of personal protection equipments while handling agricultural chemicals is essential.

  16. Nuclear energy for sustainable Hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is general agreement that hydrogen as an universal energy carrier could play increasingly important role in energy future as part of a set of solutions to a variety of energy and environmental problems. Given its abundant nature, hydrogen has been an important raw material in the organic chemical industry. At recent years strong competition has emerged between nations as diverse as the U.S., Japan, Germany, China and Iceland in the race to commercialize hydrogen energy vehicles in the beginning of 21st Century. Any form of energy - fossil, renewable or nuclear - can be used to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen production by nuclear electricity is considered as a sustainable method. By our presentation we are trying to evaluate possibilities for sustainable hydrogen production by nuclear energy at near, medium and long term on EC strategic documents basis. The main EC documents enter water electrolysis by nuclear electricity as only sustainable technology for hydrogen production in early stage of hydrogen economy. In long term as sustainable method is considered the splitting of water by thermochemical technology using heat from high temperature reactors too. We consider that at medium stage of hydrogen economy it is possible to optimize the sustainable hydrogen production by high temperature and high pressure water electrolysis by using a nuclear-solar energy system. (author)

  17. Hydrogen-based industry from remote excess hydroelectricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines synergies, opportunities and barriers associated with hydrogen and excess hydro-electricity in remote areas. The work is based on a case study that examined the techno-economic feasibility of a new hydrogen-based industry using surplus/off-peak generating capacity of the Taltson Dam and Generating Station in the Northwest Territories, Canada. After evaluating the amount and cost of hydrogen that could be produced from the excess capacity, the study investigates three hydrogen utilization scenarios: (1) merchant liquid or compressed hydrogen, (2) hydrogen as a chemical feedstock for the production of hydrogen peroxide, (3) methanol production from biomass, oxygen and hydrogen. Hydrogen peroxide production is the most promising and attractive strategy in the Fort Smith context. The study also illustrates patterns that recur in isolated sites throughout the world. (Author)

  18. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, A. S. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mazumder, M. K. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Karabacak, T. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kannarpady, Ganesh [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Sharma, R. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  19. Benefits of hydrogen production research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvi, R.; Fujita, T.; Rossen, W.; Jacobs, C.

    1976-01-01

    An economic analysis of total monetary benefits arising from increased volume and efficiency of hydrogen production from various primary energy sources is carried out. The analysis is based on NASA's projections of future hydrogen demand in terms of both established industrial-chemical uses and new energy system applications, along with the mix of primary energy sources needed to meet this demand. A cost methodology model is worked out with the basic cost elements being plant construction costs, feedstock and energy costs, and operating and labor-related costs. A computer simulation technique was developed and a set of model calculations was performed. Some representative outputs of the computer analysis are displayed and conclusions are drawn on major factors determining the overall savings possible in hydrogen production and on its technological and economic impact.

  20. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  1. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  3. Hydrogen production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of this first Gedepeon workshop on hydrogen production processes are: to stimulate the information exchange about research programs and research advances in the domain of hydrogen production processes, to indicate the domains of interest of these processes and the potentialities linked with the coupling of a nuclear reactor, to establish the actions of common interest for the CEA, the CNRS, and eventually EDF, that can be funded in the framework of the Gedepeon research group. This document gathers the slides of the 17 presentations given at this workshop and dealing with: the H2 question and the international research programs (Lucchese P.); the CEA's research program (Lucchese P., Anzieu P.); processes based on the iodine/sulfur cycle: efficiency of a facility - flow-sheets, efficiencies, hard points (Borgard J.M.), R and D about the I/S cycle: Bunsen reaction (Colette S.), R and D about the I/S cycle: the HI/I2/H2O system (Doizi D.), demonstration loop/chemical engineering (Duhamet J.), materials and corrosion (Terlain A.); other processes under study: the Westinghouse cycle (Eysseric C.), other processes under study at the CEA (UT3, plasma,...) (Lemort F.), database about thermochemical cycles (Abanades S.), Zn/ZnO cycle (Broust F.), H2 production by cracking, high temperature reforming with carbon trapping (Flamant G.), membrane technology (De Lamare J.); high-temperature electrolysis: SOFC used as electrolyzers (Grastien R.); generic aspects linked with hydrogen production: technical-economical evaluation of processes (Werkoff F.), thermodynamic tools (Neveu P.), the reactor-process coupling (Aujollet P.). (J.S.)

  4. Hydrogen passivation of silicon nanowire structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, S.; Benabderrahmane Zaghouani, R.; Bachtouli, N.; Bessais, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we focus on hydrogen passivation of silicon nanowire structures (SiNWs) obtained by metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) intended to be used in silicon-based solar cells. SiNWs present high surface defects density causing the minority carrier lifetime reduction. Our results show that hydrogen passivation of SiNWs ameliorates minority carrier lifetime by reducing the dangling bonds and then the surface recombination velocity. This enhancement is limited by SiNWs distribution.

  5. Energy conversion using hydrogen PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that hydrogen is the most promising solution of future energy, both for long and medium term strategies. Hydrogen can be produced using many primary sources (naphthalene, natural gas, methanol, coal, biomass), solar cells power, etc. It can be burned or chemically reacted having a high yield of energy conversion and is a non-polluted fuel. This paper presents the results obtained by ICSI Rm. Valcea in an experimental-demonstrative conversion energy system consisting in a catalytic methane reforming plant for hydrogen production and three synthesis gas purification units in order to get pure hydrogen with a CO level lower than 10 ppm that finally feeds a hydrogen fuel stock. (authors)

  6. Hydrogen in aluminum during alkaline corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, Saikat; Ai, Jiahe [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Hebert, Kurt R., E-mail: krhebert@iastate.ed [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ho, K.M.; Wang, C.Z. [US DOE, Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2010-07-30

    The thermodynamic state of hydrogen in aluminum during alkaline corrosion was investigated, using a two-compartment hydrogen permeation cell with an Al/Pd bilayer membrane. The open-circuit potential of the Pd layer in a pH 7.0 buffer solution was monitored to sense the hydrogen chemical potential, {mu}{sub H}. At pH 12.5-13.5, the measurements established a minimum {mu}{sub H} of 0.55 eV relative to the ideal gas reference, equivalent to a H{sub 2} gas pressure of 5.7 GPa. Statistical mechanics calculations show that vacancy-hydrogen defects are stable in Al at this condition. A dissolution mechanism was proposed in which H at very high {mu}{sub H} is produced by oxidation of interfacial aluminum hydride. The mechanism explains the observed rapid accumulation of H in the metal by extensive formation of vacancy-hydrogen defects.

  7. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  8. Alloying effect on the electronic structures of hydrogen storage compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, H.; Moringa, M.; Takahashi, Y. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mater. Sci. and Eng.

    1997-05-20

    The electronic structures of hydrogenated LaNi{sub 5} containing various 3d transition elements were investigated by the DV-X{alpha} molecular orbital method. The hydrogen atom was found to form a strong chemical bond with the Ni rather than the La atoms. The alloying modified the chemical bond strengths between atoms in a small metal octahedron containing a hydrogen atom at the center, resulting in the change in the hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of LaNi{sub 5} with alloying. (orig.) 7 refs.

  9. Hydrogen Production by Homogeneous Catalysis: Alcohol Acceptorless Dehydrogenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    for the energy sector is the application of a hydrogen economy, which transform the chemical energy in water and/or biomass into hydrogen. Considered as an energy carrier, hydrogen is then transported to the site of use where fuel cells convert its chemical energy into electricity.Here, we review the progress...... in hydrogen production from biomass using homogeneous catalysis. Homogeneous catalysis has the advance of generally performing transformations at much milder conditions than traditional heterogeneous catalysis, and hence it constitutes a promising tool for future applications for a sustainable energy sector...

  10. Hydrogen: an energy vector for the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Used today in various industrial sectors including refining and chemicals, hydrogen is often presented as a promising energy vector for the transport sector. However, its balance sheet presents disadvantages as well as advantages. For instance, some of its physical characteristics are not very well adapted to transport use and hydrogen does not exist in pure form. Hydrogen technologies can offer satisfactory environmental performance in certain respects, but remain handicapped by costs too high for large-scale development. A great deal of research will be required to develop mass transport application. (author)

  11. LIGHT-WEIGHT NANOCRYSTALLINE HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; B. Zande; R.T. Obermyer; S. Simizu

    2005-11-21

    During Phase I of this SBIR Program, Advanced Materials Corporation has addressed two key issues concerning hydrogen storage: 1. We have conducted preliminary studies on the effect of certain catalysts in modifying the hydrogen absorption characteristics of nanocrystalline magnesium. 2. We have also conducted proof-of-concept design and construction of a prototype instrument that would rapidly screen materials for hydrogen storage employing chemical combinatorial technique in combination with a Pressure-Composition Isotherm Measurement (PCI) instrument. 3. Preliminary results obtained in this study approach are described in this report.

  12. Hydrogen energy - An inexhaustible abundant clean energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, M. G.

    1981-04-01

    A review is presented of various hydrogen production processes from possible primary energy resources. The processes covered are nuclear coal gasification, thermochemical hydrogen production, and hydrogen production by electrolysis, which includes solid polymer electrolyte-based electrolyzers, high-temperature electrolyzers, and photoelectrochemical decomposition of water. Attention is given to hydrogen transport and storage (in metal hydride systems) and to its application as an automotive fuel. Hydrogen as a secondary energy source is also discussed, and its uses as an off-peak power storage medium and as an energy transmission medium are described. Costs, flow diagrams and chemical formulas are analyzed in detail.

  13. 过氧化氢抛光液体系中钌的化学机械抛光研究%Chemical Mechanical Planarization of Ruthenium in Hydrogen Peroxide- Based Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储向峰; 王婕; 董永平; 乔红斌; 张王兵

    2012-01-01

    本文研究了过氧化氢(H2O2)抛光液体系中金属钌的化学机械抛光行为,采用电化学分析方法和X射线光电子能谱仪(XPS)分析了氧化剂和络合剂对腐蚀效果的影响,利用原子力显微镜(AFM)观察抛光表面的微观形貌.结果表明:在过氧化氢抛光液体系中,金属钌表面钝化膜的致密度和厚度与醋酸(CH3COOH)和H2O2的浓度有关.抛光液中醋酸主要通过促进阳极反应的进行从而增强抛光液对金属钌的化学作用,CH3COOH作为络合剂比三乙醇胺(TEA)或酒石酸(C4H6O6)得到的抛光速率更高.低浓度H2O2通过增强抛光液对金属钌的化学腐蚀,抛光速率增大,较高浓度H2O2可能通过在金属表面形成较厚的氧化膜,抛光速率下降.XPS图谱说明钌片浸泡在含醋酸介质过氧化氢体系抛光液后,钌、氧原子相对含量之比约为2∶3,而且金属钌被氧化到四价和八价,这可能是因为金属钌表面生成RuO2和RuO4.抛光后的金属钌表面在5μm×5μm范围内平均粗糙度Sa由抛光前的33 nm降至6.99 nm.%In this paper,chemical mechanical polishing behaviors of Ruthenium(Ru) in hydrogen peroxide(H2O2)-based slurry are investigated.The effect of the oxidizing agent and complexing agents on the corrosion behaviors are investigated by using electrochemical measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.And the polished Ru surface is characterized by atomic force microscopy.Results show that the tightness and thickness of the passive film on the surface of Ru are related to the concentrations of CH3COOH and H2O2.CH3COOH can accelerate the anode reaction and enhance the chemical action of the slurry on the surface of Ru.The material removal rate(MRR) of Ru in slurries with CH3COOH as complexing agent is higher than that of TEA or C4H6O6.H2O2 at low concentration promotes the chemical corrosion ability to corrode Ru surface and increases MRR,the increasing of H2O2 concentration may

  14. Alloying effects on hydrogen permeability of V without catalytic Pd overlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yukawa, H.; Suzuki, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Nambu, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oita National College of Technology, Maki, Oita 870-0152 (Japan); Murata, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Air–treated V–based alloy membranes without catalytic Pd overlayer are found to possess excellent hydrogen permeability. • They also exhibit good durability at high temperature. • Alloying effects are discussed in view of the new description of hydrogen permeation based on hydrogen chemical potential. - Abstract: Hydrogen permeability of air–treated V–based alloy membranes without Pd coating have been investigated. The diffusion–limiting hydrogen permeation reaction takes place even without catalytic Pd overlayer on the surface. It is shown that pure V and its alloy membranes without Pd overlayer possess excellent hydrogen permeability and good durability at high temperature. The new description of hydrogen permeation based on hydrogen chemical potential has been applied and the hydrogen flux is analyzed in terms of the mobility of hydrogen atom and the PCT factor, f{sub PCT}.

  15. Hydrogen Embrittlement Understood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Sofronis, P.; Nagao, A.; Martin, M. L.; Wang, S.; Gross, D. W.; Nygren, K. E.

    2015-06-01

    The connection between hydrogen-enhanced plasticity and the hydrogen-induced fracture mechanism and pathway is established through examination of the evolved microstructural state immediately beneath fracture surfaces including voids, "quasi-cleavage," and intergranular surfaces. This leads to a new understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in which hydrogen-enhanced plasticity processes accelerate the evolution of the microstructure, which establishes not only local high concentrations of hydrogen but also a local stress state. Together, these factors establish the fracture mechanism and pathway.

  16. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  17. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  18. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H+ in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H2. Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs

  19. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCluskey, M D [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  20. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the hydrogen permeation barriers which can be applied to the structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Pb-17Li blanket designs, although barriers are also necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers which provide greater than a 1000- fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors (PRFs) of 1000 to over 100000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison with laboratory experiments, i.e. less than 150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the radiation- and electric-field-induced enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower PRFs during in-reactor experiments. (orig.)

  1. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of hydrogen permeation barriers that can be applied to structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Li17-Pb blanket designs, although barriers also appear necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers that provide greater than a 1000 fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors, PRFS, from 1000 to over 100,000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison to laboratory experiments, i.e., <150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the REID enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower permeation reduction factors during in-reactor experiments

  2. Calculation of LUEC using HEEP Software for Nuclear Hydrogen Production Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To achieve the hydrogen economy, it is very important to produce a massive amount of hydrogen in a clean, safe and efficient way. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow massive production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding environments pollution by reducing the release of carbon dioxide. A Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is considered as an efficient reactor to couple with the thermo-chemical Sulfur Iodine (SI) cycle to achieve the hydrogen economy. HEEP(Hydrogen Economy Evaluation Program) is one of the software tools developed by IAEA to evaluate the economy of the nuclear hydrogen production system by estimating unit hydrogen production cost. In this paper, the LUHC (Levelized Unit Hydrogen Cost) is calculated by using HEEP for nuclear hydrogen production plant, which consists of 4 modules of 600 MWth VHTR coupled with SI process. The levelized unit hydrogen production cost(LUHC) was calculated by the HEEP software

  3. Calculation of LUEC using HEEP Software for Nuclear Hydrogen Production Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongho; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Minhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To achieve the hydrogen economy, it is very important to produce a massive amount of hydrogen in a clean, safe and efficient way. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow massive production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding environments pollution by reducing the release of carbon dioxide. A Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is considered as an efficient reactor to couple with the thermo-chemical Sulfur Iodine (SI) cycle to achieve the hydrogen economy. HEEP(Hydrogen Economy Evaluation Program) is one of the software tools developed by IAEA to evaluate the economy of the nuclear hydrogen production system by estimating unit hydrogen production cost. In this paper, the LUHC (Levelized Unit Hydrogen Cost) is calculated by using HEEP for nuclear hydrogen production plant, which consists of 4 modules of 600 MWth VHTR coupled with SI process. The levelized unit hydrogen production cost(LUHC) was calculated by the HEEP software.

  4. Hydrogen-Assisted IC Engine Combustion as a Route to Hydrogen Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre Boehman; Daniel Haworth

    2008-09-30

    composition and utilization through laboratory studies of spark-ignition engine operation on H{sub 2}-NG and numerical simulation of the impact of hydrogen blending on the physical and chemical processes within the engine; and (2) Examination of hydrogen-assisted combustion in advanced compression-ignition engine processes. To that end, numerical capabilities were applied to the study of hydrogen assisted combustion and experimental facilities were developed to achieve the project objectives.

  5. Illustrating Chemical Concepts through Food Systems: Introductory Chemistry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E., IV; Setser, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrations involving foods that illustrate chemical concepts are described, including vaporization of liquids and Graham's law of diffusion, chemical reaction rates, adsorption, properties of solutions, colloidal dispersions, suspensions, and hydrogen ion concentration. (CS)

  6. Pd doped reduced graphene oxide for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pd nanoparticles dispersed reduced graphene oxide sample has been prepared by a simple chemical method using hydrazine as the reducing agent. Based on XRD and 13C MAS NMR studies it is confirmed that, Pd nanoparticles are effectively mixed with the reduced graphene oxide sample. Maximum hydrogen storage capacity has been estimated to be ∼1.36 wt % at 123K. Improved hydrogen storage capacity of Pd incorporated sample can be explained based on the phenomenon of spillover of atomic hydrogen

  7. Pd doped reduced graphene oxide for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Seemita; Sudarsan, V.

    2015-06-01

    Pd nanoparticles dispersed reduced graphene oxide sample has been prepared by a simple chemical method using hydrazine as the reducing agent. Based on XRD and 13C MAS NMR studies it is confirmed that, Pd nanoparticles are effectively mixed with the reduced graphene oxide sample. Maximum hydrogen storage capacity has been estimated to be ˜1.36 wt % at 123K. Improved hydrogen storage capacity of Pd incorporated sample can be explained based on the phenomenon of spillover of atomic hydrogen.

  8. Hydrogen production using high temperature nuclear reactors : A feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Sivertsson, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrogen is predicted to increase substantially in the future, both as chemical feedstock and also as energy carrier for transportation. The annual world production of hydrogen amounts to some 50 million tonnes and the majority is produced using fossil fuels like natural gas, coal and naphtha. High temperature nuclear reactors (HTRs) represent a novel way to produce hydrogen at large scale with high efficiency and less carbon footprint. The aim of this master thesis has been to eva...

  9. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  10. Hydrogen, this hallucinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the origin of hydrogen for energetic use (mainly by extraction from water), the possible uses of this cumbersome gas (in vehicles, in electricity storage), and outlines that hydrogen economy consumes a lot of other energies (nuclear, wind, sun, biomass, and so on) for a high cost, and that hydrogen is therefore not a solution for the future. Other elements are given in appendix: production methods and processes, figures of energy production, ways to use and to store hydrogen in vehicles, assessment of possibilities for a vehicle, techniques and figures for hydrogen packaging, transport and distribution, energy cost, energetic assessment of hydrogen production, problems associated with distribution (tank filling)

  11. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  12. A hydrogen ice cube

    OpenAIRE

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept but where can we put the hydrogen? For many years now metal hydrides, which are compounds of metals and hydrogen, have been considered the perfect solution for this storage and safety problem but a ...

  13. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular structures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhanting

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the advances in the studies of hydrogen-bonding-driven supramolecular systems  made over the past decade. It is divided into four parts, with the first introducing the basics of hydrogen bonding and important hydrogen bonding patterns in solution as well as in the solid state. The second part covers molecular recognition and supramolecular structures driven by hydrogen bonding. The third part introduces the formation of hollow and giant macrocycles directed by hydrogen bonding, while the last part summarizes hydrogen bonded supramolecular polymers. This book is designed to b

  14. [Hydrogen peroxide in artificial photosynthesizing systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A V; Komissarov, G G

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of the concepts of hydrogen peroxide as a source of photosynthetic oxygen (hydrogen) coordination and photochemical properties of chlorophyll and its aggregates towards hydrogen peroxide were considered. The binding energy of H2O and H2O2 with chlorophyll and chlorophyllide depending on their form (monomers, dimers and trimers) was estimated by quantum chemical calculations. It is shown that at an increase of the degree of the pigment aggregation binding energy of H2O2 was more than the energy of H2O. Analysis of experimental results of the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using chlorophyll was carried out. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (deltaG degrees and deltaH degrees) of the formation of organic compounds from CO2 with water and hydrogen peroxide were compared. The interaction of CO2 with H2O2 requires much less energy consumption than with water for all considered cases. The formation of organic products (formaldehyde, alcohols, carboxylic and carbonylic compounds) and simultaneous production of O2 under the influence of visible light in the systems of inorganic carbon--hydrogen peroxide--chlorophyll (phthalocyanine) is detected by GC/MS method, FTIR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. PMID:25702472

  15. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  16. Purification and analysis of hydrogen in SHMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the SHMs, as a functional material, has become an extremely important field of scientific research. Hydrogen produced from these materials have been mainly employed in the industry of energy, and was stored, transported, as a clean, un-contaminated artificial fuel (dual energy). SHMs being researched in the work now can be divided into four systems: such as Rare-Earth element system; Titanium system; Magnesium system; Vandium, Niobium, and Zirconium system. Several units of our country have been studied; hydrogen stored tanks that can produce super-high purity hydrogen with various SHMs, respectively. These tanks have been employed in electronic, metallurgical, chemical and other industries. Impurity content (such as O/sub 2/, Ar, CH/sub 4/, Co and CO/sub 2/ except water) of purified hydrogen can be less than 0.01 PPM. The purity of produced hydrogen can be comparable with that of purified by the palladium diffusive purifier. Besides, these equipments possess a lot of advantages, such as convenience, safety, reliability, long life time and low price. At present, chemical and electronic industries in high purity hydrogen always adopt low temperature adsorption, because of applying a large amount of liquid nitrogen, much energy consumed

  17. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  18. Theoretical Study of Hydrogenated Tetrahedral Aluminum Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Wagatsuma, Ayumu; Watanabe, Kouhei; Szarek, Pawel; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We report on the structures of aluminum hydrides derived from a tetrahedral aluminum Al4 cluster using ab initio quantum chemical calculation. Our calculation of binding energies of the aluminum hydrides reveals that stability of these hydrides increases as more hydrogen atoms are adsorbed, while stability of Al-H bonds decreases. We also analyze and discuss the chemical bonds of those clusters by using recently developed method based on the electronic stress tensor.

  19. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  20. 21 CFR 522.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... subcutaneous or intramuscular injection every 8 to 12 hours, as follows: Weight of animal in pounds Dosage in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.62... § 522.62 Aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. (a) Chemical name....

  1. Solar Hydrogen Fuel Cell Projects at Brooklyn Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, Alex; Farah, Shadia; Farley, Daithi; Ghani, Naureen; Kuo, Emmy; Aponte, Cecielo; Abrescia, Leo; Kwan, Laiyee; Khan, Ussamah; Khizner, Felix; Yam, Anthony; Sakeeb, Khan; Grey, Daniel; Anika, Zarin; Issa, Fouad; Boussayoud, Chayama; Abdeldayem, Mahmoud; Zhang, Alvin; Chen, Kelin; Chan, Kameron Chuen; Roytman, Viktor; Yee, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the projects on solar hydrogen powered vehicles using water as fuel conducted by teams at Brooklyn Technical High School. Their investigations into the pure and applied chemical thermodynamics of hydrogen fuel cells and bio-inspired devices have been consolidated in a new and emerging sub-discipline that they define as solar…

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Micro-Sensor for Biomass Fouling Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)is the leading chemical agent causing human fatalities following inhalation exposures. The overall aim of this project is to develop and...

  3. Investigation of the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of Phase I of an investigation directed towards quantifying the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide in air are described. The first phase is focussed on detonation in free hydrogen sulphide/air clouds. Detonation properties, including velocity and pressure, have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The observed detonation structure together with critical tube tests tests are used to assess the detonability of hydrogen sulphide/air mixtures relative to hydrogen and common hydrocarbon gases. Detailed chemical kinetic modelling of hydrogen sulphide combustion in air has been performed to correlate the detonation cell size data and to determine the influence of water vapour on the detonability of hydrogen sulphide in air. Calculations of the blast wave properties for detonation of a hydrogen sulphide/air cloud provide the data required to assess the blast effects of such explosions

  4. Doping in the Valley of Hydrogen Solubility: A Route to Designing Hydrogen-Resistant Zirconium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mostafa; Yang, Ming; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen pickup and embrittlement pose a challenging safety limit for structural alloys used in a wide range of infrastructure applications, including zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors. Previous experimental observations guide the empirical design of hydrogen-resistant zirconium alloys, but the underlying mechanisms remain undecipherable. Here, we assess two critical prongs of hydrogen pickup through the ZrO2 passive film that serves as a surface barrier of zirconium alloys; the solubility of hydrogen in it—a detrimental process—and the ease of H2 gas evolution from its surface—a desirable process. By combining statistical thermodynamics and density-functional-theory calculations, we show that hydrogen solubility in ZrO2 exhibits a valley shape as a function of the chemical potential of electrons, μe . Here, μe , which is tunable by doping, serves as a physical descriptor of hydrogen resistance based on the electronic structure of ZrO2 . For designing zirconium alloys resistant against hydrogen pickup, we target either a dopant that thermodynamically minimizes the solubility of hydrogen in ZrO2 at the bottom of this valley (such as Cr) or a dopant that maximizes μe and kinetically accelerates proton reduction and H2 evolution at the surface of ZrO2 (such as Nb, Ta, Mo, W, or P). Maximizing μe also promotes the predomination of a less-mobile form of hydrogen defect, which can reduce the flux of hydrogen uptake. The analysis presented here for the case of ZrO2 passive film on Zr alloys serves as a broadly applicable and physically informed framework to uncover doping strategies to mitigate hydrogen embrittlement also in other alloys, such as austenitic steels or nickel alloys, which absorb hydrogen through their surface oxide films.

  5. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  6. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  7. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  8. [Hydrogen Breath Tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussler, Ulrich; Götz, Martin

    2016-02-01

    In the field of gastroenterology hydrogen breath test are used for the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption and small intestine bacterial overgrowth. This paper provides information on performing a hydrogen breath test and shows potential sources of error. PMID:26886040

  9. Nickel hydrogen capacity loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goualard, Jacques; Paugam, D.; Borthomieu, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The results of tests to assess capacity loss in nickel hydrogen cells are presented in outline form. The effects of long storage (greater than 1 month), high hydrogen pressure storage, high cobalt content, and recovery actions are addressed.

  10. On hydrogen energy strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article focuses on hydrogen energy strategies. Possible problems regarding world stability, progress of hydrogen energy, possible strategies for hydrogen, and essential factors for hydrogen energy technologies are investigated and discussed in detail. Technical, environmental, sustainability and other perspectives are taken into consideration. The importance of hydrogen energy in reducing world problems and achieving a sustainable energy system is also investigated. It is seen that hydrogen energy can play an important role in reducing global problems and improving the sustainability of energy systems. Accordingly, hydrogen strategies based non-fossil energy sources should be developed to reduce world problems and unrest and to increase the level of sustainable development. It is expected that this article will contribute to the development of hydrogen energy strategies that is alternative to fossil-based strategies. (author)

  11. Metallic Hydrogen: A Game Changing Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to produce metallic hydrogen in the laboratory using an innovative approach, and to study its metastability properties. Current theoretical and experimental considerations expect that extremely high pressures of order 4-6 megabar are required to transform molecular hydrogen to the metallic phase. When metallic hydrogen is produced in the laboratory it will be extremely important to determine if it is metastable at modest temperatures, i.e. remains metallic when the pressure is released. Then it could be used as the most powerful chemical rocket fuel that exists and revolutionize rocketry, allowing single-stage rockets to enter orbit and chemically fueled rockets to explore our solar system.

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Hydro-Cracker Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low carbon steel elbows of the hydro-cracker pipe in an oil refinery plant were failed after six months operation. The elbows were manufactured according to ASTM A234 WPB, which specifies the processing requirements for the parts used in sour gas environment. The chemical compositions, mechanical properties, microstructures and crack morphologies were evaluated and compared to ASTM specification. It was found that ingress of hydrogen with the aid of hydrogen sulfide to the deformed area drove the parts to the failure. The deformed structures in failed elbows, which resulted in high hardness and low ductility, enhanced sulfide stress cracking(SSC) in sour gas service. The effects of normalizing and cold working on the sulfide stress cracking were simulated by electrolytic hydrogen charging. It was found that normalized steel was not susceptible to SSC after the hydrogen charging. The preventive measures against SSC were discussed

  13. Numerical Study on the Acetylene Concentration in the Hydrogen-Carbon System in a Hydrogen Plasma Torch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longwei; SHEN Jie; SHU Xingsheng; FANG Shidong; ZHANG Lipeng; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the hydrogen/carbon mole ratio and pyrolysis gas pressure on the acetylene concentration in the hydrogen-carbon system in a plasma torch were numerically calculated by using the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium method of Gibbs free energy. The calculated results indicate that the hydrogen concentration and the pyrolysis gas pressure play crucial roles in acetylene formation. Appropriately abundant hydrogen, with a mole ratio of hydrogen to carbon about 1 or 2, and a relatively high pyrolysis gas pressure can enhance the acetylene concentration. In the experiment, a compromised project consisting of an appropriate hydrogen flow rate and a feasible high pyrolysis gas pressure needs to be carried out to increase the acetylene concentration from coal pyrolysis in the hydrogen plasma torch.

  14. Study of hydrogenated silicene: The initialization model of hydrogenation on planar, low buckled and high buckled structures of silicene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the hydrogenation structures possessed by silicene i.e. planar (PL), low buckled (LB) and high buckled (HB). On those structures we found the hydrogenation process occurs with some particular notes. Hydrogen stable position on the silicene surface is determined by its initial configuration. We only considered the fully hydrogenated case with the formula unit (SiH)n for all of these structures. Physical and electronic structure shift after the process are compared with hydrogenated graphene. Moreover, we observed a chemical process in the presence of hydrogen on the PL structure by nudged elastic band (NEB) which illustrates how hydrogen has a significant impact to the force barrier of the PL that changing it from its original structure

  15. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  16. Nuclear electrolytic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive study of hydrogen supply has recently been carried out by Ontario Hydro which indicates that electrolytic hydrogen produced from nuclear electricity could offer the lowest cost option for any future large scale hydrogen supply in the Province of Ontario, Canada. This paper provides a synopsis of the Ontario Hydro study, a brief overview of the economic factors supporting the study conclusion and discussion of a number of issues concerning the supply of electrolytic hydrogen by electric power utilities

  17. Solar hydrogen generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Sabol, A. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus, using solar energy to manufacture hydrogen by dissociating water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules is described. Solar energy is concentrated on a globe containing water thereby heating the water to its dissociation temperature. The globe is pervious to hydrogen molecules permitting them to pass through the globe while being essentially impervious to oxygen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are collected after passing through the globe and the oxygen molecules are removed from the globe.

  18. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398. ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  19. Biological hydrogen formation by thermophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielen, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

      Hydrogen gas (H2) is an important chemical commodity. It is used in many industrial processes and is applicable as a fuel. However, present production processes are predominantly based on non-renewable resources. In a biological H2 (bioH2) production process,

  20. Thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Holst, Bastian; Desjarlais, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    We study the thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen using quantum molecular dynamics simulations. New results are presented for the pair distribution functions, the equation of state, the Hugoniot curve, and the reflectivity. We compare with available experimental data and predictions of the chemical picture. Especially, we discuss the nonmetal-to-metal transition which occurs at about 40 GPa in the dense fluid.

  1. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C. PMID:25022362

  2. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  3. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen barriers are disclosed which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures. 2 claims, 3 figures

  4. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  5. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01

    The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines

  6. Hydrogen Bonds Involving Metal Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović, G.; N. Raos

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds involving metal center as a hydrogen donor or hydrogen acceptor are only a specific type of metal-hydrogen interactions; it is therefore not easy to differentiate hydrogen bond from other metal-hydrogen interactions, especially agostic ones. The first part of the review is therefore devoted to the results of structural chemistry and molecular spectroscopy (NMR, IR), as a tool for differentiating hydrogen bondings from other hydrogen interactions. The classical examples of Pt···...

  7. Hydrogen perspectives in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furutani, H. [Japan Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The Japan Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) is promoting the World Energy Network System Project which considers hydrogen energy to be a long term option for a sustainable energy economy. The project involves the construction of a global energy network for the effective supply, transportation, storage, and use of hydrogen as a renewable energy carrier. The first phase of the research and development program began in 1998. It involved the construction of a global-scale hydrogen energy network system based on renewable energies which will contribute to a real reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, ensure an adequate future energy supply and improve the quality of air in urban areas. The major research and development results of phase 1 included a conceptual design of a system to generate hydroelectric power at a site where water power resources are abundant enough to convert the hydroelectric power into hydrogen by the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) water electrolysis method. The research also involved the transport and storage of hydrogen to and at demand sites. The objective was to generate electric power by hydrogen combustion turbines through systems using liquid hydrogen, methanol and ammonia. The PEM water electrolysis system was considered to be the most promising high efficient hydrogen production technology with approximately 90 per cent energy efficiency at a current density of 1 A/cm{sup 2}. Phase 2 of the project began in 1999 and involved hydrogen utilization technology, hydrogen production technology, hydrogen transport, hydrogen storage, hydrogen absorbing alloy for distributed hydrogen storage and transport, innovative and leading technology plus system research. Phase 3 will eventually lead to the development of hydrogen combustion engines. 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  8. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  9. Materials for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Züttel

    2003-09-01

    The goal is to pack hydrogen as close as possible, i.e. to reach the highest volumetric density by using as little additional material as possible. Hydrogen storage implies the reduction of an enormous volume of hydrogen gas. At ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, 1 kg of the gas has a volume of 11 m3. To increase hydrogen density, work must either be applied to compress the gas, the temperature decreased below the critical temperature, or the repulsion reduced by the interaction of hydrogen with another material.

  10. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  11. Cryogenic hydrogen data pertinent to magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To aid future hydrogen fusion researchers, I have correlated the measured physical and chemical properties of the hydrogens below 300K. I have further estimated these properties for deuterium--deuterium tritide--tritium (D2--DT--T2) fusion fuel. My resulting synthesis offers a timely view and review of cryogenic hydrogen properties, plus some hydrogen data to room temperature. My general thrust is for workers new to the field, although my discussion of the scientific background of the material would suit specialists

  12. Study on stability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Xiu-Hong; Chen Guang-Hua; Zhang Wen-Li; Ding Yi; Ma Zhan-Jie; Hu Yue-Hui; He Bin; Rong Yan-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films with high and same order of magnitude photosensitivity (~105) but different stability were prepared by using microwave electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition system under the different deposition conditions. It was proposed that there was no direct correlation between the photosensitivity and the hydrogen content (CH) as well as H-Si bonding configurations, but for the stability, they were the critical factors. The experimental results indicated that higher substrate temperature, hydrogen dilution ratio and lower deposition rate played an important role in improving the microstructure of a-Si:H films. We used hydrogen elimination model to explain our experimental results.

  13. Application of Hydrogen for the Reduction of Bauxite Mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, B. R.; Sahoo, S. K.; Bhoi, B.; Satapathy, B. K.; Paramguru, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    Reduction of oxides present in bauxite through hydrogen was investigated in the present study. The bauxite samples were subjected to reduction through molecular hydrogen and hydrogen plasma at 650oC and 800oC with different flow rates of hydrogen for different time periods respectively. The samples, after the reduction processes, were characterized by X-ray diffraction technique and chemical analysis. It was observed that the oxides of iron present in bauxite were only undergone through reduction while other oxides remain unreduced. An attempt was then made to separate pure Al2O3 present in bauxite samples through acid leaching process.

  14. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  15. Contribution to the study of new hydrogen production, purification and storage processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis addresses the various aspects of hydrogen production, purification and process within the scope of hydrogen-based energy production. Hydrogen production is achieved by water decomposition through a thermo-chemical process. The author reports the thermodynamic assessment of a water decomposition thermo-chemical cycle for chlorine and sulphur-related cycles. He reports the experimental investigation of hydrogen purification by selective diffusion, the study of contamination of a CeMg12 alloy by nitrogen, oxygen and water vapour with application to hydrogen storage under the form of hydrides

  16. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  17. Safety considerations for continuous hydrogen production test apparatus with capacity of 50 N-litter hydrogen per hour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the thermochemical hydrogen production Iodine-Sulfur process decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen using toxic chemicals such as sulfuric acid, iodine and hydriodic acid, safety considerations are very important in its research and development. Therefore, before construction of continuous hydrogen production test apparatus with capacity of 50 N-litter hydrogen per hour, comprehensive safety considerations were carried out to examine the design and construction works of the test apparatus, and the experimental plans using the apparatus. Emphasis was given on the safety considerations on prevention of breakage of glasswares and presumable abnormalities, accidents and their countermeasures. This report summarizes the results of the considerations. (author)

  18. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  19. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  20. Hydrogen-ion sputtering of borated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and choice of material for the first wall and other energy-stressed parts of the discharge chamber are an important aspect of fusion reactor construction. In particular, carbon-graphite materials are proposed for making limiters and protective shields of the first wall and receiving plates of diverter devices. Sputtering under ion bombardment is one of the main mechanisms of material erosion; in addition, in the case of carbon-graphite materials chemical sputtering also occurs as a result of the formation of highly volatile hydrocarbon compounds during the reaction with ions of hydrogen isotopes. Sputtering MPG carbon-graphite materials and USB-15 carbon-fiber-reinforced glass ceramic has been well studied and experimental data have been obtained on the coefficients of physical and chemical sputtering. It has been determined that hydrogen-ion sputtering of USB-15 in the range from room temperature to 1070 K is less than that of MPG-8 graphite a factor of 2-10. Bulk doping of graphite with boron substantially reduces chemical sputtering. Since processes in the surface layers are crucially important in sputtering, the possibility of reducing chemical sputtering by surface boration of carbon-graphite materials has been explored. The objective of this work was to continue the experimental investigation to determine the physical processes of sputtering of surface-borated graphite under hydrogen-ion bombardment in the temperature range corresponding to maximum chemical sputtering. Surface boration of MPG-8 and USB-15 samples was carried out by vapor-phase isothermal deposition mediated by gaseous iodine at 1223 K for 4 h (the sample was placed in a pure boron stock). The mass transfer during the vapor-phase deposition is based on the difference of the chemical potentials of iodine and carbon under isothermal conditions. The samples of the initial and borated carbon-graphite materials irradiated with a poly-energetic beam of hydrogen ions

  1. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  2. Evaluation of hydrogen cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute advances the research and development of the thermochemical water splitting IS process technology as well as the integration technology between a high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) and a hydrogen production system using the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) aiming at the commercialization of the HTGR hydrogen production system around 2025. Hydrogen system for fuel cell cars consists of off-site system and on-site system. In thinking about off-site system like the HTGR hydrogen production system, it is necessary to consider the cost of transportation of hydrogen as well as the cost of hydrogen production, storage and refueling. Moreover, when the hydrogen is produced with the fossil fuel, the cost of carbon dioxide disposal should be considered. The economy evaluation of the HTGR hydrogen production system must include all costs of hydrogen production, storage, transportation and refueling. In this paper, the cost evaluation data related to storage, transportation and refueling in Japan and the USA are investigated in addition to the hydrogen production cost. The cost evaluation of several off-site and on-site systems is carried out. (author)

  3. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  4. Hydrogen energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the Energy and Material consumption Scenarios (EMS), by which emission reduction of CO2 and other greenhouse gases can be calculated, calculations are executed by means of the MARKAL model (MARket ALlocation, a process-oriented dynamic linear programming model to minimize the costs of the energy system) for the Netherlands energy economy in the period 2000-2040, using a variable CO2 emission limit. The results of these calculations are published in a separate report (ECN-C--92-066). The use of hydrogen can play an important part in the above-mentioned period. An overview of several options to produce or use hydrogen is given and added to the MARKAL model. In this report techno-economical data and estimates were compiled for several H2-application options, which subsequently also are added to the MARKAL model. After a brief chapter on hydrogen and the impact on the reduction of CO2 emission attention is paid to stationary and mobile applications. The stationary options concern the mixing of natural gas with 10% hydrogen, a 100% substitution of natural gas by hydrogen, the use of a direct steam generator (combustion of hydrogen by means of pure oxygen, followed by steam injection to produce steam), and the use of fuel cells. The mobile options concern the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector. In brief, attention is paid to a hydrogen passenger car with an Otto engine, and a hydrogen passenger car with a fuel cell, a hybrid (metal)-hydride car, a hydrogen truck, a truck with a methanol fuel cell, a hydrogen bus, an inland canal boat with a hydrogen fuel cell, and finally a hydrogen airplane. 2 figs., 15 tabs., 1 app., 26 refs

  5. 1H-MAS-NMR Chemical Shifts in Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Chlorophenols (Pentachlorophenol, 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol, 2,6-Dichlorophenol, 3,5-Dichlorophenol, and p-Chlorophenol) and Amine, and H/D Isotope Effects on 1H-MAS-NMR Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Hisashi Honda

    2013-01-01

    Chemical shifts (CS) of the 1H nucleus in N···H···O type hydrogen bonds (H-bond) were observed in some complexes between chlorophenols [pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4,6-tricholorophenol (TCP), 2,6-dichlorophenol (26DCP), 3,5-dichlorophenol (35DCP), and p-chlorophenol (pCP)] and nitrogen-base (N-Base) by solid-state high-resolution 1H-NMR with the magic-angle-spinning (MAS) method. Employing N-Bases with a wide range of pKa values (0.65–10.75), 1H-MAS-NMR CS values of bridging H atoms in H-bonds...

  6. Studies on water splitting hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on two kinds of water splitting process for hydrogen production, i.e. thermochemical Iodine-Sulfur(IS) Process and high temperature steam electrolysis, have been conducted at JAERI which utilize high temperature nuclear heat supplied by HTGR. IS process, which is composed of three chemical reactions, works as a chemical engine producing hydrogen driven by HTGR. A laboratory scale experimental study has been conducted to demonstrate the continuous hydrogen production by IS process, using a glass-made apparatus designed to include all the elemental unit operations. So far, stable production of hydrogen and oxygen at the rate of 1.5 liter-H2/hr has been successfully demonstrated for over 8 hours. In parallel with the demonstration study, studies for improving the process thermal efficiency have been conducted focusing on the hydrogen iodide decomposition step. Also, a study on the materials of construction suitable for the corrosive process environments is under way for large scale realization of the process. High temperature steam electrolysis is an advanced electrolysis process using solid oxide electrolytes working at high temperature ranging from 850degC to 1000degC. The electrolysis process features its simple process scheme and lower working electricity than the conventional water electrolysis. Through laboratory-scale experiments, electrolysis cells such as tubular cells and planar cells have been developed to improve hydrogen production performance. Using a planar cell, hydrogen could be produced at a rate of 2.4 liter/hr at steam temperature of 850degC. (J.P.N.)

  7. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma; Peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo hidrogenado (a-C:H) obtenidas mediante deposito quimico de vapores asistido por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia H, J.A.; Camps C, E.E.; Escobar A, L.; Romero H, S.; Chirino O, S. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [IIM-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10{sup -4} to 6x10{sup -4} Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  8. Hydrogen utilization and the role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: the upcoming years and decades, it is anticipated that the need to develop energy strategies to substitute for oil and gas will become increasingly acute. This will be motivated by declining supplies and increasing prices, and by considerations of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere by fossil fuels. Nuclear energy as a source and hydrogen as an energy carrier offer many attractive features. Electricity from nuclear energy can already be utilized for hydrogen production through optimized hot electrolysis. However, new Generation IV designs with high temperature gas reactors or heavy metal systems may be coupled with promising thermo chemical production processes such as the I-S or Ca-Br processes. Thermo chemical production of hydrogen offers the dual attraction that the source material is water and there is no resulting CO2. The efficiencies of the thermo chemical processes may approach 50%. This could provide for attractive economics. Early opportunities may exist for demonstration and implementation of nuclear generated hydrogen. The need for hydrogen in the refining industry is growing significantly. This demand is the result of using increasingly heavier crude oils in the manufacture gasoline and other petroleum products. Consequently, additional quantities of hydrogen are required to meet performance and environmental requirements. Currently natural gas serves as the feedstock for hydrogen production through steam reforming methods. If the price of natural gas remains at current levels or climbs, alternative approaches to hydrogen production will become attractive. In addition, in some locations, the infrastructure already exists that can favorably accommodate nuclear generated hydrogen. Strategic planning based on emerging designs and technologies coupled these new uses of nuclear energy offer important opportunities. The needs of the refining industry may represent the first large scale use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production and an initial but

  9. Negligible Isotopic Effect on Dissociation of Hydrogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chuanqi; Shen, Yuneng; Deng, Gang-Hua; Tian, Yuhuan; Yu, Dongqi; Yang, Xueming; Yuan, Kaijun; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-03-31

    Isotopic effects on the formation and dissociation kinetics of hydrogen bonds are studied in real time with ultrafast chemical exchange spectroscopy. The dissociation time of hydrogen bond between phenol-OH and p-xylene (or mesitylene) is found to be identical to that between phenol-OD and p-xylene (or mesitylene) in the same solvents. The experimental results demonstrate that the isotope substitution (D for H) has negligible effects on the hydrogen bond kinetics. DFT calculations show that the isotope substitution does not significantly change the frequencies of vibrational modes that may be along the hydrogen bond formation and dissociation coordinate. The zero point energy differences of these modes between hydrogen bonds with OH and OD are too small to affect the activation energy of the hydrogen bond dissociation in a detectible way at room temperature. PMID:26967376

  10. Survey of hydrogen production and utilization methods. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D. P.; Pangborn, J. B.; Gillis, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as a synthetic fuel is considered. Processes for the production of hydrogen are described along with the present and future industrial uses of hydrogen as a fuel and as a chemical feedstock. Novel and unconventional hydrogen-production techniques are evaluated, with emphasis placed on thermochemical and electrolytic processes. Potential uses for hydrogen as a fuel in industrial and residential applications are identified and reviewed in the context of anticipated U.S. energy supplies and demands. A detailed plan for the period from 1975 to 1980 prepared for research on and development of hydrogen as an energy carrier is included.

  11. Hydrogenation of polycrystalline silicon thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honda, Shinya; Mates, Tomáš; Knížek, Karel; Ledinský, Martin; Fejfar, Antonín; Kočka, Jan; Yamazaki, T.; Uraoka, Y.; Fuyuki, T.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 501, - (2006), s. 144-148. ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 537; GA MŽP(CZ) SM/300/1/03; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010316; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010413; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0789 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : polycrystalline silicon * atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition * hydrogen passivation * photoluminescence * Raman spectroscopy * Si-H 2 bonding * hydrogen molecules Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.666, year: 2006

  12. Experimental results and analysis on hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam-mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger-scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperature between 300K and 650K at a fixed pressure of 0.1 MPa. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K to 650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments. Experiments were conducted to measure the rate of hydrogen oxidation in the absence of ignition sources at temperatures of 500K and 650K, for hydrogen-air mixtures of 15% and 50%, and for a mixture of equimolar hydrogen-air and 30% steam at 650K. The rate of hydrogen oxidation was found to be significant at 650K. Reduction of hydrogen concentration by chemical reaction from 50 to 44% hydrogen, and from 15 to 11% hydrogen, were observed on a time frame of minutes. The DeSoete rate equation predicts the 50% experiment very well, but greatly underestimates the reaction rate of the lean mixtures

  13. Evidence of Hydrogen Bonding in Chloroform and Polyacrylates from NMR Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen bonding in chloroform and polyacrylate mixtures was demonstrated by observation of 1H- and 13C-NMR chemical shifts. Comparison of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift in polymer solutions with their low molecular mass analogues showed the effect of steric hindrance on hydrogen bonding. This initial investigation is helpful for understanding the intermolecular interaction in relatively weak hydrogen bonding polymer solutions.

  14. Boron–nitrogen based hydrides and reactive composites for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars H. Jepsen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen forms chemical compounds with most other elements and forms a variety of different chemical bonds. This fascinating chemistry of hydrogen has continuously provided new materials and composites with new prospects for rational design and the tailoring of properties. This review highlights a range of new boron and nitrogen based hydrides and illustrates how hydrogen release and uptake properties can be improved.

  15. Optical determination of the mass density of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon layers with different hydrogen contents

    OpenAIRE

    Remeš, Z.; Vaněček, Milan; Torres, Pedro; Kroll, U.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the density of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films using an optical method. The mass density decreases with increasing hydrogen content, consistent with a hydrogenated di-vacancy model that fits the data for amorphous silicon. Material produced by hot wire assisted chemical vapour deposition, with low hydrogen content, has a higher density and is structurally different from glow discharge material with hydrogen content around 10 at.%. The lower density microcrystalli...

  16. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Yi WANG; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequent...

  17. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  18. Allylammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażej Dziuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated molecular salt, C3H8N+·C2HO4−·0.5H2O, the water O atom lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. The C=C—C—N torsion angle in the cation is 2.8 (3° and the dihedral angle between the CO2 and CO2H planes in the anion is 1.0 (4°. In the crystal, the hydrogen oxalate ions are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating [010] chains. The allylammonium cations bond to the chains through N—H...O and N—H...(O,O hydrogen bonds. The water molecule accepts two N—H...O hydrogen bonds and makes two O—H...O hydrogen bonds. Together, the hydrogen bonds generate (100 sheets.

  19. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  20. Basic concepts of hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of the interactions in the f-electron systems to modification of the crystal structure makes the experimental techniques involving alternation of the atomic arrangement especially important. Various studies under hydrostatic or uniaxial compression are wellknown examples of such methods. From this point of view hydrogenation can be treated as a complementary technique that provides „negative“ pressure. In the narrowest sense, the term hydride is used just in cases when metal lattice is changed upon hydrogen absorption. However we will use this term in wider sense. We will define hydrides as compounds for which the hydrogen absorption leads to the modifications of the crystal structure, such as pure lattice expansion or the formation of a new structure. Hydrogen absorption can be used to modify magnetic properties of the intermetallics. After interstitial hydrogen doping the crystal lattice can be several percent larger than before hydrogenation