WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical hydride slurry

  1. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  2. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  3. Hydrogen transmission/storage with a metal hydride/organic slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.; McClaine, A. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has developed a new approach for the production, transmission, and storage of hydrogen. In this approach, a chemical hydride slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. The slurry protects the hydride from unanticipated contact with moisture in the air and makes the hydride pumpable. At the point of storage and use, a chemical hydride/water reaction is used to produce high-purity hydrogen. An essential feature of this approach is the recovery and recycle of the spent hydride at centralized processing plants, resulting in an overall low cost for hydrogen. This approach has two clear benefits: it greatly improves energy transmission and storage characteristics of hydrogen as a fuel, and it produces the hydrogen carrier efficiently and economically from a low cost carbon source. The preliminary economic analysis of the process indicates that hydrogen can be produced for $3.85 per million Btu based on a carbon cost of $1.42 per million Btu and a plant sized to serve a million cars per day. This compares to current costs of approximately $9.00 per million Btu to produce hydrogen from $3.00 per million Btu natural gas, and $25 per million Btu to produce hydrogen by electrolysis from $0.05 per Kwh electricity. The present standard for production of hydrogen from renewable energy is photovoltaic-electrolysis at $100 to $150 per million Btu.

  4. Slurry sampling hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry for arsenic speciation analysis in baby food

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huber, C. S.; Vale, M. G. R.; Dessuy, M. B.; Svoboda, Milan; Dědina, Jiří

    Hungarian Chemical Society, 2016 - (Mihucz, V.). s. 165 ISBN 978-963-9970-65-6. [European Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry /ESAS 2016/ & Hungarian Spectrochemical Conference /59./. 31.03.2016-02.04.2016, Eger] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation * atomic spectrometry * hydride generation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  5. Potassium sorbate as an inhibitor in copper chemical mechanical planarization slurry. Part I. Elucidating slurry chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Magi; Starosvetsky, David [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Vaes, Jan [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ein-Eli, Yair, E-mail: eineli@tx.technion.ac.i [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2010-04-01

    The integration of an advanced inhibitor, potassium sorbate (K[CH{sub 3}(CH){sub 4}CO{sub 2}]), in a copper CMP slurry based on hydrogen peroxide and glycine is reported. The first part of the study discusses the slurry chemistry by qualitatively describing the processes involved and proposes a mechanism for a hydrogen peroxide-glycine based slurry having sorbate anion as an inhibitor. For this purpose, the specific role of each chemical constituent in the slurry was elucidated at a fundamental level by electrochemical studies, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements, all linked to the CMP performance on blanket wafers. Once the polishing mechanism was resolved the influence of the inhibitor was evaluated by CMP processing of patterned wafers.

  6. Potassium sorbate as an inhibitor in copper chemical mechanical planarization slurry. Part I. Elucidating slurry chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integration of an advanced inhibitor, potassium sorbate (K[CH3(CH)4CO2]), in a copper CMP slurry based on hydrogen peroxide and glycine is reported. The first part of the study discusses the slurry chemistry by qualitatively describing the processes involved and proposes a mechanism for a hydrogen peroxide-glycine based slurry having sorbate anion as an inhibitor. For this purpose, the specific role of each chemical constituent in the slurry was elucidated at a fundamental level by electrochemical studies, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements, all linked to the CMP performance on blanket wafers. Once the polishing mechanism was resolved the influence of the inhibitor was evaluated by CMP processing of patterned wafers.

  7. Chemical aspects of coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, R.; Caprio, V.; Insola, A.

    1988-03-01

    Coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries is reviewed from the chemical point of view. Available information is considered in the light of questions relating to coal liquefaction. A lack of chemical knowledge in this area is noted, especially on model compounds. 72 refs.

  8. Light metal chemical hydrides slurry for hydrogen production and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen has immense potential as an efficient and environmentally friendly energy carrier of the future. It can be used directly by fuel cells to produce electricity with>50% efficiency and with zero emissions. Ultra-low emissions are also achievable when hydrogen is combusted with air to power an engine (especially in the new hybrid systems) or to provide process heat, since the only pollutant produced, NOx, is then easily controlled. To realize this potential, however, cost effective methods for producing, transporting, and storing hydrogen must be developed. (author)

  9. Study on Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption by Metal Hydride Slurries Ⅰ. Absorption of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Storage Alloy MlNi5 Suspended in Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安越; 陈长聘; 徐国华; 蔡官明; 王启东

    2002-01-01

    The absorption of hydrogen was studied in metal hydride slurry, which is formed by benzene and hydrogen storage alloy powder. The influence of temperature on the rate of absorption was discussed using three-phase mass transfer model. It is also concluded that the suitable absorption temperature is 313 K.

  10. Multidimensional Chemical Modeling. III. Abundance and excitation of diatomic hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; Stäuber, P; Doty, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory opens the sky for observations in the far infrared at high spectral and spatial resolution. A particular class of molecules will be directly observable; light diatomic hydrides and their ions (CH, OH, SH, NH, CH+, OH+, SH+, NH+). These simple constituents are important both for the chemical evolution of the region and as tracers of high-energy radiation. If outflows of a forming star erode cavities in the envelope, protostellar far UV (FUV; 6 100 K) for water ice to evaporate. If the cavity shape allows FUV radiation to penetrate this hot-core region, the abundance of FUV destroyed species (e.g. water) is decreased. In particular, diatomic hydrides and their ions CH$+, OH+ and NH+ are enhanced by many orders of magnitude in the outflow walls due to the combination of high gas temperatures and rapid photodissociation of more saturated species. The enhancement of these diatomic hydrides is sufficient for a detection using the HIFI and PACS instruments onboard Herschel. The effect...

  11. Stability for a novel low-pH alkaline slurry during the copper chemical mechanical planarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of a novel low-pH alkaline slurry (marked as slurry A, pH = 8.5) for copper chemical mechanical planarization was investigated in this paper. First of all, the stability mechanism of the alkaline slurry was studied. Then many parameters have been tested for researching the stability of the slurry through comparing with a traditional alkaline slurry (marked as slurry B, pH = 9.5), such as the pH value, particle size and zeta potential. Apart from this, the stability of the copper removal rate, dishing, erosion and surface roughness were also studied. All the results show that the stability of the novel low-pH alkaline slurry is better than the traditional alkaline slurry. The working-life of the novel low-pH alkaline slurry reaches 48 h. (semiconductor technology)

  12. Synthesis and enhanced hydrogen desorption kinetics of magnesium hydride using hydriding chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Ho [Icheon Branch, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology (KICET), Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Goan [Korea Energy Materials Co.Ltd., 409, Daegu Technopark, 1-11, Hosan-Dong, Dalse-Gu 704-230 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yong-Mook, E-mail: dake@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Dongguk University-Seoul, 100715 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized pure MgH{sub 2} by a hydriding chemical vapor synthesis process in a hydrogen atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particle size HCVS-MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} desorbed hydrogen up to about 7.2 wt% and 7.1 wt%. - Abstract: This paper describes the hydriding chemical vapor synthesis (HCVS) of the hydrogen storage alloy MgH{sub 2} in a hydrogen atmosphere and the product's hydrogenation properties. Mg powder was used as a starting material to produce submicron MgH{sub 2} and uniformly heated to a temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C for Mg vaporization. The effects of deposited positions in HCVS reactor on the morphology and the composition of the obtained products were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. It is clearly seen that after the HCVS process, the particle size of synthesized MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale and these showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. The hydrogen desorption temperatures of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). It was found that after the HCVS process, the desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} decreased from 430 to 385 Degree-Sign C and, simultaneously, the smallest particle size and the highest specific surface area were obtained. These observations indicate that the minimum hydrogen desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} powder with needle-like form can be obtained, and that this temperature is dependent on the particle size and the specific surface area of the products. The thermogravimetric

  13. Effect of chemical additives on flow characteristics of coal slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Mosa; A.-H. M. Saleh; T.A. Taha; A.M. El-Molla [Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt). Mining & Petroleum Engineering Department

    2008-07-01

    In the present paper, the effect of chemical additives or reagents on rheological characteristics of coal water slurry (CWS) was investigated. The power-law model was applied to determine the non-Newtonian properties of coal slurries. Three types of dispersants namely, sulphonic acid, sodium tripolyphosphate and sodium carbonate were studied and tested at different concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5% by weight from total solids. Sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (Na-CMC) and xanthan gum were tested as stabilizers at concentrations in the range of 0.05 to 0.25% by weight from total solids. It was found that apparent viscosity and flow properties of CWS are sensitive to the use of chemical additives (dispersants and stabilizers). Among studied dispersing agents, sulphonic acid recorded the best performance in modification and reducing CWS viscosity. The best dosage of all tested dispersants was found to be 0.75% by wt of solids. With regard to studied stabilizers, Na-CMC recorded better performance than xanthan gum. The best dosage of investigated stabilizers was found to be as 0.1 % by wt. from total solids. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  15. Static dissolution rate of tungsten film versus chemical adjustments of a reused slurry for chemical mechanical polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten is widely used as deposited layer for the multi-level interconnection structures of wafers. The chemical composition of abrasive slurry plays an important role in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process. Removal of tungsten is driven by complex oxidation mechanisms between slurry components. The slurry for tungsten CMP generally contains oxidizer, iron catalyst, complexing agents and stabilizers in a pH adjusted solution of abrasive particles. Interaction between iron complex and H2O2 in the slurry is the main factor governing the chemical mode of material removal, oxidation potencies and kinetics. In this study, we investigate the effects of chemical additives in silica (SiO2)-based slurry on the removal rate of the tungsten film. Experiments were carried out in static batch as a preliminary study to understand and optimize chemical mechanisms in CMP-Tungsten process. Experiment designs were conducted to understand the influence of the chemical additives on the main performances of W-CMP. Used slurry, concentrated and retreated with chemical adjustments, is compared to the original slurry as a reference.

  16. Preparation and chemical crystallographic study of new hydrides and hydro-fluorides of ionic character

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the context of a growing interest in the study of reversible hydrides with the perspective of their application in hydrogen storage, this research thesis more particularly addressed the case of ternary hydrides and fluorides, and of hydro-fluorides. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of alkaline hydrides, of alkaline earth hydrides and of europium hydride, and then the elaboration of ternary hydrides. He addresses the preparation of caesium fluorides and of calcium or nickel fluorides, of Europium fluorides, and of ternary fluorides. Then, he addresses the preparation of hydro-fluorides (caesium, calcium, europium fluorides, and caesium and nickel fluorides). The author presents the various experimental techniques: chemical analysis, radio-crystallographic analysis, volumetric mass density measurement, magnetic measurements, ionic conductivity measurements, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance. He reports the crystallographic study of some ternary alkaline and alkaline-earth hydrides (KH-MgH2, RbH-CaH2, CsH-CaH2, RbH-MgH2 and CsH-MgH2) and of some hydro-fluorides (CsCaF2H, EuF2H, CsNiF2H)

  17. Surface characteristics of ruthenium in periodate-based slurry during chemical mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Jiang, Liang; Lu, Xinchun, E-mail: xclu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • The Ru surface chemical and mechanical property varies with KIO{sub 4} slurry pH. • In alkaline slurry, the corrosion proceeds uniformly like a direct dissolution. • In neutral and acidic slurries, Ru exhibits passivation behavior. • MRR is highest in neutral slurry due to inhomogeneous RuO{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O/RuO{sub 3} passivation. • Weak alkaline slurry is preferred to get good MRR and avoid toxic RuO{sub 4} formation. - Abstract: When the feature size of integrated circuit continues to shrink below 14 nm, ruthenium (Ru) has become one of the most promising candidates for the application of novel barrier layer. To reveal the material removal mechanism of Ru during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), surface characteristics of Ru in KIO{sub 4}-based slurry were investigated. The corrosion behavior of ruthenium was measured by the surface chemistry and morphology analysis. Then the mechanical properties of the passivated/corroded surface were evaluated by AES and tribocorrosion experiments. CMP experiments were carried out to make clear the effects of surface property during polishing. It was found that the Ru surface chemistry and mechanical properties vary obviously as a function of slurry pH. In neutral slurries, the Ru surface is covered with RuO{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O/RuO{sub 3} inhomogeneous passivation films, with the highest material removal rate obtained during the CMP process. It could be concluded that the material removal mechanism largely depends on the slurry pH values. In near neutral slurries, Ru is passivated with thick and heterogeneous oxides film, which proves the easiest to be mechanically removed during polishing. The weak alkaline slurry is preferred in order to achieve desirable polishing rate as well as avoid the formation of toxic RuO{sub 4}.

  18. Surface characteristics of ruthenium in periodate-based slurry during chemical mechanical polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Ru surface chemical and mechanical property varies with KIO4 slurry pH. • In alkaline slurry, the corrosion proceeds uniformly like a direct dissolution. • In neutral and acidic slurries, Ru exhibits passivation behavior. • MRR is highest in neutral slurry due to inhomogeneous RuO2·2H2O/RuO3 passivation. • Weak alkaline slurry is preferred to get good MRR and avoid toxic RuO4 formation. - Abstract: When the feature size of integrated circuit continues to shrink below 14 nm, ruthenium (Ru) has become one of the most promising candidates for the application of novel barrier layer. To reveal the material removal mechanism of Ru during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), surface characteristics of Ru in KIO4-based slurry were investigated. The corrosion behavior of ruthenium was measured by the surface chemistry and morphology analysis. Then the mechanical properties of the passivated/corroded surface were evaluated by AES and tribocorrosion experiments. CMP experiments were carried out to make clear the effects of surface property during polishing. It was found that the Ru surface chemistry and mechanical properties vary obviously as a function of slurry pH. In neutral slurries, the Ru surface is covered with RuO2·2H2O/RuO3 inhomogeneous passivation films, with the highest material removal rate obtained during the CMP process. It could be concluded that the material removal mechanism largely depends on the slurry pH values. In near neutral slurries, Ru is passivated with thick and heterogeneous oxides film, which proves the easiest to be mechanically removed during polishing. The weak alkaline slurry is preferred in order to achieve desirable polishing rate as well as avoid the formation of toxic RuO4

  19. Effects of pig slurry application on soil physical and chemical properties and glyphosate mobility

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Pig slurry applied to soil at different rates may affect soil properties and the mobility of chemical compounds within the soil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of rates of pig slurry application in agricultural areas on soil physical and chemical properties and on the mobility of glyphosate through the soil profile. The study was carried out in the 12th year of an experiment with pig slurry applied at rates of 0 (control), 50, 100 and 200 m³ ha-1 yr-1 on a Latossolo Ver...

  20. Soil chemical properties related to acidity under successive pig slurry application

    OpenAIRE

    Cledimar Rogério Lourenzi; Carlos Alberto Ceretta; Leandro Souza da Silva; Gustavo Trentin; Eduardo Girotto; Felipe Lorensini; Tadeu Luis Tiecher; Gustavo Brunetto

    2011-01-01

    Pig slurry application as soil manure can alter the chemical properties of the soil and affect its acidity, modifying the environment for crop growth and development. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical properties related to soil acidity subjected to successive applications of pig slurry. The experiment was conducted in May 2000, in an experimental area of the Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM) under no-tillage and lasted until January 2008. Nineteen surface applica...

  1. Separation of phosphorus from pig slurry using chemical additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estevez Rodriguez, M.D.; Gomez del Puerto, A.M.; Montealegre Meléndez, M.L.;

    2005-01-01

    Increasing livestock production and regulation of the amount of phosphorus (P) that may be applied to arable land may force livestock farmers to transport animal manure over long distances if plant nutrients in the manure are to be used in a sustainable way. Animal slurry contains large amounts of...... retention of P in a solid fraction. The laboratory studies showed that 98% of the P in slurry was retained in the solid fraction retained on the filter net (12% to 28% retained W:W) after the addition of coagulants and flocculants. Linear cationic polyacrylamide polymers proved to be more efficient at lower...

  2. Non-Precious Bimetallic Catalysts for Selective Dehydrogenation of an Organic Chemical Hydride System

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2015-07-06

    Methylcyclohexane (MCH)-Toluene (TOL) chemical hydride cycles as a hydrogen carrier system is successful with the selective dehydrogenation reaction of MCH to TOL, which has been achieved only using precious Pt-based catalysts. Herein, we report improved selectivity using non-precious metal nickel-based bimetallic catalysts, where the second metal occupies the unselective step sites.

  3. Evaluation of chemical amendments to control phosphorus losses from dairy slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, R.B.; Fenton, O.; Rodgers, M.; Healy, M.G. [National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    Land application of dairy slurry can result in incidental losses of phosphorus (P) to runoff in addition to increased loss of P from soil as a result of a buildup in soil test P (STP). An agitator test was used to identify the most effective amendments to reduce dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) loss from the soil surface after land application of chemically amended dairy cattle slurry. This test involved adding slurry mixed with various amendments (mixed in a beaker using a jar test flocculator at 100 rpm), to intact soil samples at approximate field capacity. Slurry/amended slurry was applied with a spatula, submerged with overlying water and then mixed to simulate overland flow. In order of effectiveness, at optimum application rates, ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 2}) reduced the DRP in overlying water by 88%, aluminium chloride (AlCl{sub 2}) by 87%, alum (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot} nH{sub 2}O) by 83%, lime by 81%, aluminium water treatment residuals (Al-WTR; sieved to < 2 mm) by 77%, flyash by 72%, flue gas desulphurization by-product by 72% and Al-WTR sludge by 71%. Ferric chloride (eurO{sub 4}.82/m{sup 3} treated slurry) was the most cost-effective chemical amendment. However, Al compounds are preferred owing to stability of Al-P compared with Fe-P bonds. Alum is less expensive than AlCl{sub 2} (euro6.67/m{sup 3}), but the risk of effervescence needs further investigation at field-scale. Phosphorus sorbing materials (PSM) were not as efficient as chemicals in reducing DRP in overlying water. The amendments all reduced P loss from dairy slurry, but the feasibility of these amendments may be limited because of the cost of treatment.

  4. Chemical attributes of a Hapludox soil after nine years of pig slurry application

    OpenAIRE

    Milton da Veiga; Carla Maria Pandolfo; Alvadi Antonio Balbinot Junior; Evandro Spagnollo

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pig slurry application effects on chemical attributes of a Hapludox soil managed under no-tillage system. Treatments consisted of 50, 100 and 200 m³ ha-1 per year of pig slurry application, and a control with replacement of P and K exported through harvested grains. Attributes related to soil chemical reaction, exchange complex, and nutrient contents were determined in soil samples collected in the ninth year of experimentation from 0 - 0.025, 0...

  5. Changes of Physico–Chemical Properties of Pig Slurry During Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Mansyur; Hong L Choi

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine changes of the characteristics of raw pig slurry as liquid organic fertilizer at various storage times. A completely randomized design was used in this research. The treatments were storage times, i.e.: 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days. Variables observed were loss of the slurry, degree of acidity (pH), electrical conductivity (EC), total solid (TS), volatile solid (VS), total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD), soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), total nitrogen (TN)...

  6. Effects of pig slurry application on soil physical and chemical properties and glyphosate mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida de Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pig slurry applied to soil at different rates may affect soil properties and the mobility of chemical compounds within the soil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of rates of pig slurry application in agricultural areas on soil physical and chemical properties and on the mobility of glyphosate through the soil profile. The study was carried out in the 12th year of an experiment with pig slurry applied at rates of 0 (control, 50, 100 and 200 m³ ha-1 yr-1 on a Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (Hapludox soil. In the control, the quantities of P and K removed by harvested grains were replaced in the next crop cycle. Soil physical properties (bulk density, porosity, texture, and saturated hydraulic conductivity and chemical properties (organic matter, pH, extractable P, and exchangeable K were measured. Soil solution samples were collected at depths of 20, 40 and 80 cm using suction lysimeters, and glyphosate concentrations were measured over a 60-day period after slurry application. Soil physical and chemical properties were little affected by the pig slurry applications, but soil pH was reduced and P levels increased in the surface layers. In turn, K levels were increased in sub-surface layers. Glyphosate concentrations tended to decrease over time but were not affected by pig slurry application. The concentrations of glyphosate found in different depths show that the pratice of this application in agricultural soils has the potential for contamination of groundwater, especially when the water table is the surface and heavy rains occur immediately after application.

  7. Planarization mechanism of alkaline copper CMP slurry based on chemical mechanical kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shengli; Yin Kangda; Li Xiang; Yue Hongwei; Liu Yunling

    2013-01-01

    The planarization mechanism of alkaline copper slurry is studied in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process from the perspective of chemical mechanical kinetics.Different from the international dominant acidic copper slurry,the copper slurry used in this research adopted the way of alkaline technology based on complexation.According to the passivation property of copper in alkaline conditions,the protection of copper film at the concave position on a copper pattern wafer surface can be achieved without the corrosion inhibitors such as benzotriazole (BTA),by which the problems caused by BTA can be avoided.Through the experiments and theories research,the chemical mechanical kinetics theory of copper removal in alkaline CMP conditions was proposed.Based on the chemical mechanical kinetics theory,the planarization mechanism of alkaline copper slurry was established.In alkaline CMP conditions,the complexation reaction between chelating agent and copper ions needs to break through the reaction barrier.The kinetic energy at the concave position should be lower than the complexation reaction barrier,which is the key to achieve planarization.

  8. Interstellar Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier R

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar hydrides -- that is, molecules containing a single heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms -- were among the first molecules detected outside the solar system. They lie at the root of interstellar chemistry, being among the first species to form in initially-atomic gas, along with molecular hydrogen and its associated ions. Because the chemical pathways leading to the formation of interstellar hydrides are relatively simple, the analysis of the observed abundances is relatively straightforward and provides key information about the environments where hydrides are found. Recent years have seen rapid progress in our understanding of interstellar hydrides, thanks largely to far-IR and submillimeter observations performed with the Herschel Space Observatory. In this review, we will discuss observations of interstellar hydrides, along with the advanced modeling approaches that have been used to interpret them, and the unique information that has thereby been obtained.

  9. Impact of chemically amended pig slurry on greenhouse gas emissions, soil properties and leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Flynn, Cornelius J; Healy, Mark G; Lanigan, Gary J; Troy, Shane M; Somers, Cathal; Fenton, Owen

    2013-10-15

    The effectiveness of chemical amendment of pig slurry to ameliorate phosphorus (P) losses in runoff is well studied, but research mainly has concentrated only on the runoff pathway. The aims of this study were to investigate changes to leachate nutrient losses, soil properties and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to the chemical amendment of pig slurry spread at 19 kg total phosphorus (TP), 90 kg total nitrogen (TN), and 180 kg total carbon (TC) ha(-1). The amendments examined were: (1) commercial grade liquid alum (8% Al2O3) applied at a rate of 0.88:1 [Al:TP], (2) commercial-grade liquid ferric chloride (38% FeCl3) applied at a rate of 0.89:1 [Fe:TP] and (3) commercial-grade liquid poly-aluminium chloride (PAC) (10% Al2O3) applied at a rate of 0.72:1 [Al:TP]. Columns filled with sieved soil were incubated for 8 mo at 10 °C and were leached with 160 mL (19 mm) distilled water wk(-1). All amendments reduced the Morgan's phosphorus and water extractable P content of the soil to that of the soil-only treatment, indicating that they have the ability to reduce P loss in leachate following slurry application. There were no significant differences between treatments for nitrogen (N) or carbon (C) in leachate or soil, indicating no deleterious impact on reactive N emissions or soil C cycling. Chemical amendment posed no significant change to GHG emissions from pig slurry, and in the cases of alum and PAC, reduced cumulative N2O and CO2 losses. Chemical amendment of land applied pig slurry can reduce P in runoff without any negative impact on nutrient leaching and GHG emissions. Future work must be conducted to ascertain if more significant reductions in GHG emissions are possible with chemical amendments. PMID:23850764

  10. Fourier-Domain Analysis of Hydriding Kinetics Using Pneumato-Chemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Millet, P.; C. Decaux; R. Ngameni; Guymont, M.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of phase transformation processes observed in hydrogen absorbing materials (pure metals, alloys, or compounds) is still a matter of active research. Using pneumato-chemical impedance spectroscopy (PIS), it is now possible to analyze the mechanism of hydriding reactions induced by the gas phase. Experimental impedance diagrams, measured on activated LaNi5 in single- and two-phase domains, are reported in this paper. It is shown that their shape is mostly affected by the slope of the i...

  11. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  12. Ab initio analysis of magnetovolume versus chemical effects in CeRuSi and its hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Samir F.

    2007-03-01

    The change from heavy fermion to antiferromagnetic behavior of intermetallic system CeRuSi upon hydrogenation is addressed on bases of lattice expansion and chemical bonding effects within the density-functional theoretical framework using all electron scalar-relativistic augmented spherical wave method. While no magnetic moment develops in the 111 system, from total-energy differences, the hydride is found to be stable as an antiferromagnet in the ground state, in agreement with experiment. The role of anisotropic lattice expansion induced by hydrogen insertion is shown to be prevailing over the chemical bonding between hydrogen and the metallic species especially cerium.

  13. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  14. Soil chemical properties and maize yield under application of pig slurry biofertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo E. Bócoli; José R. Mantovani; José M. Miranda; Douglas J. Marques; Adriano B. da Silva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Organic materials subjected to a process of anaerobic digestion in a digester produce biofertilizer that can be used in agriculture as nutrient source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pig slurry biofertilizer on soil chemical properties and on corn yield and nutrient concentrations in leaves and kernels. The experiment was conducted in the field from November 2012 to April 2013, and was arranged in a randomized block design with seven treatments and four rep...

  15. Effects of Pig Slurry Application and Crops on Phosphorus Content in Soil and the Chemical Species in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The application of pig slurry rates and plant cultivation can modify the soil phosphorus (P) content and distribution of chemical species in solution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the total P, available P and P in solution, and the distribution of chemical P species in solution, in a soil under longstanding pig slurry applications and crop cultivation. The study was carried out in soil columns with undisturbed structure, collected in an experiment conducted for eight years in the...

  16. Determination of gold by chemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The chemical vapour generation (CVG) of transition and noble metals opens a novel route for introduction of these elements into atomic spectrometric sources. It can be accomplished by merging an acidic sample with tetrahydroborate reductant solution (Y. L. Feng et al., J. of Anal. At. Spectrom., 20 (2005) 255-265). There have been some studies for determination of Au; however, only mg L-1 levels of gold have been determined by CVG - Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) (G. Ertas et al., Applied Spectroscopy, 60 (2006) 423-429). Volatile Au species were generated in flow injection arrangement from acid environment in presence of surfactants. The core of the system is a mixing manifold based on 3 concentric capillaries (T. Matousek et al., J. of Anal. At. Spectrom., 18 (2003) 487-494) protruding into the glass gas-liquid separator (glass, volume 3 ml). Optimum flow rate of Ar as a carrier gas was found at 240 mL/min. The study of generation parameters as well as the use of reaction modifiers-surfactants and dithiocarbamate- will be presented. Quartz tube multiatomizer for AAS was employed for atomization. Atomization conditions including composition of carrier gases and their flow rates and atomization temperature were optimized. 900 deg C was found as the optimum atomization temperature; over 900 deg C, peak area of Au signal decreased; in addition, peak shape was altered. A sharp maximum of 6 mL/min oxygen as the outer gas was observed. Another important point was that hydrogen-rich atmosphere caused signal depression. Analytical performance of this approach to generation and atomization will be discussed and perspectives of its future will be outlined. This work was supported by the GA ASCR (grant No. A400310507 and IAA400310704) and Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i. (project no. AV0Z40310501). This work also was supported from OYP (Faculty Development Program) from the Middle East Technical University

  17. Performance of high temperature chemical heat pump with metal hydride reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI has been developing a hydrogen storage type high temperature chemical heat pump not only to amplify thermal energy of the temperature 373 K to 1273 K as well as store mass hydrogen energy, but hydrogen transportation to remote side. To testify the concept of this type of heat pump, heat pump element test facility was constructed and has been testing its performance. Heat conversion from 773 K to 1173 K was achieved with high heat exchanged coefficient by helium cooling technique. Present paper reports the recent tests results of the facility, including R and D on metal-hydride and structural materials for this system. (author)

  18. Chemical attributes of a Hapludox soil after nine years of pig slurry application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton da Veiga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the pig slurry application effects on chemical attributes of a Hapludox soil managed under no-tillage system. Treatments consisted of 50, 100 and 200 m³ ha-1 per year of pig slurry application, and a control with replacement of P and K exported through harvested grains. Attributes related to soil chemical reaction, exchange complex, and nutrient contents were determined in soil samples collected in the ninth year of experimentation from 0 - 0.025, 0.025 - 0.05, 0.05 - 0.10, 0.10 - 0.20, 0.20 - 0.40 and 0.40 - 0.60 m soil depths. The continuous application of high doses of pig slurry on the Oxisol surface under no-tillage acidifies the soil and increases Al, P, Cu, and Zn contents down to 0.2-m depth, and K levels down to 0.6-m depth.

  19. DFT modeling of the electronic and magnetic structures and chemical bonding properties of intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents an ab initio study of several classes of intermetallics and their hydrides. These compounds are interesting from both a fundamental and an applied points of view. To achieve this aim two complementary methods, constructed within the DFT, were chosen: (i) pseudo potential based VASP for geometry optimization, structural investigations and electron localization mapping (ELF), and (ii) all-electrons ASW method for a detailed description of the electronic structure, chemical bonding properties following different schemes as well as quantities depending on core electrons such as the hyperfine field. A special interest is given with respect to the interplay between magneto-volume and chemical interactions (metal-H) effects within the following hydrided systems: binary Laves (e.g. ScFe2) and Haucke (e.g. LaNi5) phases on one hand, and ternary cerium based (e.g. CeRhSn) and uranium based (e.g. U2Ni2Sn) alloys on the other hand. (author)

  20. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argabright, T. A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 1100 C (160 to 2300 F) for the source heat and 140 to 1900 C (280 to 3750 F) for the product heat.

  1. Effects of Slurry Chemistry on the Rate of Agglomeration of Alumina Nanoparticles for Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Neil Anjan

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is a polishing process used during the manufacture of microelectronic integrated circuits. During fabrication of multilevel circuitry, excess deposited material must be removed and the wafer surface globally planarized for proper function of devices. This is especially necessary with copper interconnects, thus, copper CMP was the focus of this study. CMP requires the use of a slurry containing nanometer-sized abrasive particles along with a variety of chemical additives. The particles and chemicals act synergistically to mechanically and chemically remove material and provide a near globally planar surface. For optimal CMP performance, the effective abrasive particle size must be controlled. If particles aggregate, CMP performance may diminish and possibly even cause defective devices. The chemistry of the slurry (pH, ions present, etc) can not only affect the mean aggregate size of the abrasive particles, but also growth of aggregate over time. This research investigated the aggregation behavior of suspensions of 150 nm alumina particles in 1mM KNO3 with various additives (glycine, H2O2, benzotriazole, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) used in CMP of copper through effective particle (agglomerate) size versus time and zeta potential measurements. Aggregate size rate data were analyzed to elucidate the mechanism of aggregation, as well its effect on the structure of the resultant aggregate. The effects of temperature of the slurry were also explored. Finally, particle size distribution data collected at various stages of aggregation were incorporated into the Luo and Dornfeld model of CMP to investigate the dynamic nature of the CMP process.

  2. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi; Kim, Taesung

    2016-04-01

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of the radiation-chemical synthesis of krypton hydrides in solid krypton matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes occurring in the X-irradiated C2H2/Kr and HCl/Kr systems in the temperature range of 7–30 K were studied using a combination of FTIR and EPR spectroscopy. In both cases, irradiation results in effective decomposition of isolated molecules (C2H2 or HCl) and production of trapped H atoms. The thermal decay of trapped atoms in solid krypton was attributed to “local” reactions (below 21 K) and long-range mobility activated in the temperature range of 23–27 K. Two krypton hydrides, HKrCCH and HKrCl, were synthesized from the radiation-induced hydrogen atoms. In the case of C2H2/Kr system, competitive reaction channels of H atoms at various absorbed doses were investigated in details, and HKrCCH was found to be one of the main reaction products. The X-ray radiolysis in krypton matrices was concluded to be a promising method to obtain krypton hydrides. - Highlights: • Reactions of radiolytic H atoms in solid krypton were monitored by EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. • The role of “local” and “global” mobility of H atoms was established. • HKrCCH and HKrCl were prepared by the radiation-chemical method

  4. Effects of Calcination and Milling Process Conditions for Ceria Slurry on Shallow-Trench-Isolation Chemical-Mechanical Polishing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Seok; Kang, Hyun-Goo; Kanemoto, Manabu; Paik, Ungyu; Park, Jea-Gun

    2007-12-01

    To improve the performance of shallow trench isolation chemical-mechanical polishing (STI-CMP) in terms of the removal selectivity of oxide and nitride films and the formation of surface defects, we investigated the effects of the calcination and milling process conditions during ceria slurry synthesis. We have focused on the effects of particle size distribution, the large-particle size, and the dispersion stability in a ceria slurry. We determined the optimum bead size for milling and appropriate calcination temperatures in order to obtain a reasonable particle distribution, with lower numbers of fine primary particles and large, agglomerated particles, in ceria slurry. This was achieved by reducing the quantity of aggregated particles during milling and two-step calcination process generating higher-density particles. These results can be qualitatively explained by abrasive collisions occurring between the milling beads and the decarbonation of cerium carbonate through diffusion during the manufacturing process used for the ceria slurry.

  5. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing using environment-friendly slurry for mercury cadmium telluride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Guo, Dongming; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) semiconductors. Firstly, fixed-abrasive lapping is used to machine the MCT wafers, and the lapping solution is deionized water. Secondly, the MCT wafers are polished using the developed CMP slurry. The CMP slurry consists of mainly SiO2 nanospheres, H2O2, and malic and citric acids, which are different from previous CMP slurries, in which corrosive and toxic chemical reagents are usually employed. Finally, the polished MCT wafers are cleaned and dried by deionized water and compressed air, respectively. The novel approach of CMP is environment-friendly. Surface roughness Ra, and peak-to-valley (PV) values of 0.45, and 4.74 nm are achieved, respectively on MCT wafers after CMP. The first and second passivating processes are observed in electrochemical measurements on MCT wafers. The fundamental mechanisms of CMP are proposed according to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Malic and citric acids dominate the first passivating process, and the CMP slurry governs the second process. Te4+3d peaks are absent after CMP induced by the developed CMP slurry, indicating the removing of oxidized films on MCT wafers, which is difficult to achieve using single H2O2 and malic and citric acids solutions.

  6. The Effect of Chemical Amendments Used for Phosphorus Abatement on Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Cattle Slurry: Synergies and Pollution Swapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Raymond B.; Healy, Mark G.; Fenton, Owen; Lanigan, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Land application of cattle slurry can result in incidental and chronic phosphorus (P) loss to waterbodies, leading to eutrophication. Chemical amendment of slurry has been proposed as a management practice, allowing slurry nutrients to remain available to plants whilst mitigating P losses in runoff. The effectiveness of amendments is well understood but their impacts on other loss pathways (so-called ‘pollution swapping’ potential) and therefore the feasibility of using such amendments has not been examined to date. The aim of this laboratory scale study was to determine how the chemical amendment of slurry affects losses of NH3, CH4, N2O, and CO2. Alum, FeCl2, Polyaluminium chloride (PAC)- and biochar reduced NH3 emissions by 92, 54, 65 and 77% compared to the slurry control, while lime increased emissions by 114%. Cumulative N2O emissions of cattle slurry increased when amended with alum and FeCl2 by 202% and 154% compared to the slurry only treatment. Lime, PAC and biochar resulted in a reduction of 44, 29 and 63% in cumulative N2O loss compared to the slurry only treatment. Addition of amendments to slurry did not significantly affect soil CO2 release during the study while CH4 emissions followed a similar trend for all of the amended slurries applied, with an initial increase in losses followed by a rapid decrease for the duration of the study. All of the amendments examined reduced the initial peak in CH4 emissions compared to the slurry only treatment. There was no significant effect of slurry amendments on global warming potential (GWP) caused by slurry land application, with the exception of biochar. After considering pollution swapping in conjunction with amendment effectiveness, the amendments recommended for further field study are PAC, alum and lime. This study has also shown that biochar has potential to reduce GHG losses arising from slurry application. PMID:26053923

  7. The Effect of Chemical Amendments Used for Phosphorus Abatement on Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Cattle Slurry: Synergies and Pollution Swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Raymond B; Healy, Mark G; Fenton, Owen; Lanigan, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Land application of cattle slurry can result in incidental and chronic phosphorus (P) loss to waterbodies, leading to eutrophication. Chemical amendment of slurry has been proposed as a management practice, allowing slurry nutrients to remain available to plants whilst mitigating P losses in runoff. The effectiveness of amendments is well understood but their impacts on other loss pathways (so-called 'pollution swapping' potential) and therefore the feasibility of using such amendments has not been examined to date. The aim of this laboratory scale study was to determine how the chemical amendment of slurry affects losses of NH3, CH4, N2O, and CO2. Alum, FeCl2, Polyaluminium chloride (PAC)- and biochar reduced NH3 emissions by 92, 54, 65 and 77% compared to the slurry control, while lime increased emissions by 114%. Cumulative N2O emissions of cattle slurry increased when amended with alum and FeCl2 by 202% and 154% compared to the slurry only treatment. Lime, PAC and biochar resulted in a reduction of 44, 29 and 63% in cumulative N2O loss compared to the slurry only treatment. Addition of amendments to slurry did not significantly affect soil CO2 release during the study while CH4 emissions followed a similar trend for all of the amended slurries applied, with an initial increase in losses followed by a rapid decrease for the duration of the study. All of the amendments examined reduced the initial peak in CH4 emissions compared to the slurry only treatment. There was no significant effect of slurry amendments on global warming potential (GWP) caused by slurry land application, with the exception of biochar. After considering pollution swapping in conjunction with amendment effectiveness, the amendments recommended for further field study are PAC, alum and lime. This study has also shown that biochar has potential to reduce GHG losses arising from slurry application. PMID:26053923

  8. The Effect of Chemical Amendments Used for Phosphorus Abatement on Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Cattle Slurry: Synergies and Pollution Swapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond B Brennan

    Full Text Available Land application of cattle slurry can result in incidental and chronic phosphorus (P loss to waterbodies, leading to eutrophication. Chemical amendment of slurry has been proposed as a management practice, allowing slurry nutrients to remain available to plants whilst mitigating P losses in runoff. The effectiveness of amendments is well understood but their impacts on other loss pathways (so-called 'pollution swapping' potential and therefore the feasibility of using such amendments has not been examined to date. The aim of this laboratory scale study was to determine how the chemical amendment of slurry affects losses of NH3, CH4, N2O, and CO2. Alum, FeCl2, Polyaluminium chloride (PAC- and biochar reduced NH3 emissions by 92, 54, 65 and 77% compared to the slurry control, while lime increased emissions by 114%. Cumulative N2O emissions of cattle slurry increased when amended with alum and FeCl2 by 202% and 154% compared to the slurry only treatment. Lime, PAC and biochar resulted in a reduction of 44, 29 and 63% in cumulative N2O loss compared to the slurry only treatment. Addition of amendments to slurry did not significantly affect soil CO2 release during the study while CH4 emissions followed a similar trend for all of the amended slurries applied, with an initial increase in losses followed by a rapid decrease for the duration of the study. All of the amendments examined reduced the initial peak in CH4 emissions compared to the slurry only treatment. There was no significant effect of slurry amendments on global warming potential (GWP caused by slurry land application, with the exception of biochar. After considering pollution swapping in conjunction with amendment effectiveness, the amendments recommended for further field study are PAC, alum and lime. This study has also shown that biochar has potential to reduce GHG losses arising from slurry application.

  9. Mobility and chemical bond of hydrogen in titanium and palladium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probabilities for π- meson capture by hydrogen are measured at 25, 155 and 200 deg C in TiHsub(1.65) hydride and at 25, -120 and -196 deg C in PdHsub(0.67) hydride. An analysis of the results obtained shows that within the accuracy of the measurements (approximately 10%) a sharp (up to 1012) change in the mobility of hydrogen in the hydrides induced by temperature changes within the ranges indicated does not noticeably affect the probabilities for π- meson capture by bound hydrogen, i.e. does not lead to appreciable changes in the Me-H bond. A comparison of the capture probabilities for palladium hydride and hydrides of neighboring transition metals shows that there are no pronounced anomalies in the Pd-H bond

  10. Kinetics of Liquid-Phase Hydrogenation of Benzene in a Metal Hydride Slurry System Formed by M1Ni5 and Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代世耀; 徐国华; 安越; 陈长聘; 陈立新; 王启东

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzene in misch metal nickel-five (M1Ni5) and benzene slurry system was studied by investigating the influences of the reaction temperature, pressure, alloy concentration and stirring speed on the mass transfer-reaction processes inside the slurry. The results show that the whole process is controlled by the reaction at the surface of the catalyst. The mass transfer resistance at gas-liquid interface and that from the bulk liquid phase to the surface of the catalyst particles are negligible. The apparent reaction rate is zero order for benzene concentration and first order for hydrogen concentration in the liquid phase. The kinetic model obtained fits the experimental data very well. The apparent activation energy of the hydrogen absorption reaction of M1Ni5-C6H6 slurry system is 42.16 kJ·mo1-1.

  11. The Effect of Chemical Amendments Used for Phosphorus Abatement on Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Cattle Slurry: Synergies and Pollution Swapping

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Raymond B.; Healy, Mark G.; Owen Fenton; Gary J. Lanigan

    2015-01-01

    Land application of cattle slurry can result in incidental and chronic phosphorus (P) loss to waterbodies, leading to eutrophication. Chemical amendment of slurry has been proposed as a management practice, allowing slurry nutrients to remain available to plants whilst mitigating P losses in runoff. The effectiveness of amendments is well understood but their impacts on other loss pathways (so-called 'pollution swapping' potential) and therefore the feasibility of using such amendments has no...

  12. Conference 'Chemistry of hydrides' Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of thesis of conference of Chemistry hydrides presents the results of investigations concerning of base questions of chemistry of nonorganic hydrides, including synthesis questions, studying of physical and chemical properties, thermodynamics, analytical chemistry, investigation of structure, equilibriums in the systems of metal-hydrogen, behaviour of nonorganic hydrides in non-water mediums and applying investigations in the chemistry area and technology of nonorganic hydrides

  13. Leaf tissues proportion and chemical composition of Axonopus jesuiticus x A. scoparius as a function of pig slurry application

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Reschke Lajús; Mário Miranda; Simone Meredith Scheffer Basso; Cercí Maria Carneiro; Pedro Alexandre Varella Escosteguy

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the chemical and anatomical attributes of leaves of giant missionary grass to application of 0, 62, 124, 186, 248 and 310m³ ha-1 of pig slurry. At 83 days after the last application of fertilizer, the leaf blades were collected, fixed in FAA 70%, sectioned, stained, photographed and digitalized. The transversal section of leaf blades were evaluated for proportion of epidermis, lignified vascular tissue + sclerenchyma, non-lignified vascular tissue and parenchyma w...

  14. Iron trichloride as oxidizer in acid slurry for chemical mechanical polishing of Ge2Sb2Te5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of iron trichloride (FeCl3) on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) film is investigated in this paper. The polishing rate of GST increases from 38 nm/min to 144 nm/min when the FeCl3 concentration changes from 0.01 wt% to 0.15 wt%, which is much faster than 20 nm/min for the 1 wt% H2O2-based slurry. This polishing rate trends are inversely correlated with the contact angle data of FeCl3-based slurry on the GST film surface. Thus, it is hypothesized that the hydrophilicity of the GST film surface is associated with the polishing rate during CMP. Atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical microscope (OM) are used to characterize the surface quality after CMP. The chemical mechanism is studied by potentiodynamic measurements such as Ecorr and Icorr to analyze chemical reaction between FeCl3 and GST surface. Finally, it is verified that slurry with FeCl3 has no influence on the electrical property of the post-CMP GST film by the resistivity–temperature (RT) tests. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  15. Determination of bismuth in environmental samples by slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using combined chemical modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Dobrzyńska, Joanna; Gawrońska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry technique was applied for the determination of Bi in environmental samples. The study focused on the effect of Zr, Ti, Nb and W carbides, as permanent modifiers, on the Bi signal. Because of its highest thermal and chemical stability and ability to substantially increase Bi signal, NbC was chosen as the most effective modifier. The temperature programme applied for Bi determination was optimized based on the pyrolysis and atomization curves obtained for slurries prepared from certified reference materials (CRMs) of the soil and sediments. To overcome interferences caused by sulfur compounds, Ba(NO₃)₂ was used as a chemical modifier. Calibration was performed using the aqueous standard solutions. The analysis of the CRMs confirmed the reliability of the proposed analytical method. The characteristic mass for Bi was determined to be 16 pg with the detection limit of 50 ng/g for the optimized procedure at the 5% (w/v) slurry concentration. PMID:25384374

  16. Gallic Acid as a Complexing Agent for Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing Slurries at Neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yung Jun; Kang, Min Cheol; Kwon, Oh Joong; Kim, Jae Jeong

    2011-05-01

    Gallic acid was investigated as a new complexing agent for copper (Cu) chemical mechanical polishing slurries at neutral pH. Addition of 0.03 M gallic acid and 1.12 M H2O2 at pH 7 resulted in a Cu removal rate of 560.73±17.49 nm/min, and the ratio of the Cu removal rate to the Cu dissolution rate was 14.8. Addition of gallic acid improved the slurry performance compared to glycine addition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and contact angle measurements showed that addition of gallic acid enhanced the Cu polishing behavior by suppressing the formation of surface Cu oxide.

  17. Effects of Pig Slurry Application and Crops on Phosphorus Content in Soil and the Chemical Species in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandro De Conti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of pig slurry rates and plant cultivation can modify the soil phosphorus (P content and distribution of chemical species in solution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the total P, available P and P in solution, and the distribution of chemical P species in solution, in a soil under longstanding pig slurry applications and crop cultivation. The study was carried out in soil columns with undisturbed structure, collected in an experiment conducted for eight years in the experimental unit of the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM, Santa Maria (RS. The soil was an Argissolo Vermelho distrófico arênico (Typic Hapludalf, subjected to applications of 0, 20, 40, and 80 m3 ha-1 pig slurry. Soil samples were collected from the layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, and 40-60 cm, before and after black oat and maize grown in a greenhouse, for the determination of available P, total P and P in the soil solution. In the solution, the concentration of the major cations, anions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and pH were determined. The distribution of chemical P species was determined by software Visual Minteq. The 21 pig slurry applications increased the total P content in the soil to a depth of 40 cm, and the P extracted by Mehlich-1 and from the solution to a depth of 30 cm. Successive applications of pig slurry changed the balance between the solid and liquid phases in the surface soil layers, increasing the proportion of the total amount of P present in the soil solution, aside from changing the chemical species in the solution, reducing the percentage complexed with Al and increasing the one complexed with Ca and Mg in the layers 0-5 and 5-10 cm. Black oat and maize cultivation increased pH in the solution, thereby increasing the proportion of HPO42- and reducing H2PO4- species.

  18. Nutrients behavior from the association pig slurry and chemical fertilizers on soybean crop

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Smanhotto; Silvio César Sampaio; Tatiane Cristina Dal Bosco; Maritane Prior; Rosimaldo Soncela

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effects of pig slurry application with mineral fertilizer on ions leaching from the soil in soybean crop. The experiment was carried out in 24 drainage lysimeters under protection. The soybean cultivar CD 202/COODETEC was sown in a soil that received 0, 100, 200 and 300 m³ha-1of pig slurry in one cycle, with or without mineral fertilizer. There were three samplings of soil throughout the trial to determine the pH, N, NO3-, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, Cu+2, Zn+2, OM...

  19. Materials engineering of metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermetallic hydrides of the AB5 type have enthalpies in the range valid for chemical heat pumps. A scheme for manufacturing hydrides with optimal properties for a chemical heat pump is described, using LaNi/sub 5-x/Al/sub x/ and ZrV/sub 2x/Cr/sub x as examples. The Laves-phase ternary hydrides appear to be good candidates for gettering hydrogen in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  20. Hydride compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  1. Impact of chemical amendment of dairy cattle slurry on phosphorus, suspended sediment and metal loss to runoff from a grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, R B; Fenton, O; Grant, J; Healy, M G

    2011-11-01

    Emerging remediation technologies such as chemical amendment of dairy cattle slurry have the potential to reduce phosphorus (P) solubility and consequently reduce P losses arising from land application of dairy cattle slurry. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of chemical amendment of slurry to reduce incidental losses of P and suspended sediment (SS) from grassland following application of dairy cattle slurry and to examine the effect of amendments on metal concentrations in runoff water. Intact grassed-soil samples were placed in two laboratory runoff boxes, each 200-cm-long by 22.5-cm-wide by 5-cm-deep, before being amended with dairy cattle slurry (the study control) and slurry amended with either: (i) alum, comprising 8% aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) (1.11:1 aluminium (Al):total phosphorus (TP) of slurry) (ii) poly-aluminium chloride hydroxide (PAC) comprising 10% Al(2)O(3) (0.93:1 Al:TP) (iii) analytical grade ferric chloride (FeCl(2)) (2:1 Fe:TP), (iv) and lime (Ca(OH)(2)) (10:1 Ca:TP). When compared with the study control, PAC was the most effective amendment, reducing dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) by up to 86% while alum was most effective in reducing SS (88%), TP (94%), particulate phosphorus (PP) (95%), total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) (81%), and dissolved unreactive phosphorus (DUP) (86%). Chemical amendment of slurry did not appear to significantly increase losses of Al and Fe compared to the study control, while all amendments increased Ca loss compared to control and grass-only treatment. While chemical amendments were effective, the reductions in incidental P losses observed in this study were similar to those observed in other studies where the time from slurry application to the first rainfall event was increased. Timing of slurry application may therefore be a much more feasible way to reduce incidental P losses. Future work must examine the long-term effects of amendments on P loss to runoff and not only incidental

  2. Efficient Hydrogenolysis of Alkanes at Low Temperature and Pressure Using Tantalum Hydride on MCM-41, and a Quantum Chemical Study

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogenolysis of hydrocarbons is of considerable technological importance for applications such as the hydroprocessing of petrochemical feedstocks to generate high-value and useful chemicals and fuels. We studied the catalytic activity of tantalum hydride supported on MCM-41 for the hydrogenolysis of alkanes at low temperature and low atmospheric pressure in a dynamic reactor. The reactions proceed with good turnover numbers, and the catalyst could be reused for several times, which makes the overall catalytic process sustainable. We derived the plausible mechanism by using DFT calculations and identified the preferred pathways by the analysis of potential energy surface. Our results and the proposed reaction mechanism demonstrate the viability of the "catalyst-by-design" approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Integrated use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, biogas slurry and chemical nitrogen for sustainable production of maize under salt-affected conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinity is one of the most critical constraints hampering agricultural production throughout the world, including Pakistan. Some plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have the ability to reduce the deleterious effect of salinity on plants due to the presence of ACC-deaminase enzyme along with some other mechanisms. The integrated use of organic, chemical and biofertilizers can reduce dependence on expensive chemical inputs. To sustain high crop yields without deterioration of soil fertility, it is important to work out optimal combination of chemical and biofertilizers, and manures in the cropping system. A pot trial was conducted to study the effect of integrated use of PGPR, chemical nitrogen, and biogas slurry for sustainable production of maize under salt-stressed conditions and for good soil health. Results showed that sole application of PGPR, chemical nitrogen and biogas slurry enhanced maize growth but their combined application was more effective. Maximum improvement in maize growth, yield, ionic concentration in leaves and nutrient concentration in grains was observed in the treatment where PGPR and biogas slurry was used in the presence of 100% recommended nitrogen as chemical fertilizer. It also improved the soil pH, ECe, and available N, P and K contents. It is concluded that integrated use of PGPR, biogas slurry and chemical nitrogen not only enhanced maize growth, yield and quality but also improved soil health. So, it may be evaluated under field conditions to get sustained yield of maize from salt-affected soils. (author)

  4. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  5. Chemical vapour deposition of amorphous Ru(P) thin films from Ru trialkylphosphite hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, W Jeffrey; Yang, Xiaoping; DePue Anderson, Lauren J; Jones, Richard A

    2012-11-21

    The ruthenium phosphite hydride complexes H(2)Ru(P(OR)(3))(4) (R = Me (1), Et (2), (i)Pr (3)) were used as CVD precursors for the deposition of films of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloys. The as-deposited films were X-ray amorphous and XPS analysis revealed that they were predominantly comprised of Ru and P in zero oxidation states. XPS analysis also showed the presence of small amounts of oxidized ruthenium and phosphorus. The composition of the films was found to depend on ligand chemistry as well as the deposition conditions. The use of H(2) as the carrier gas had the effect of increasing the relative concentrations of P and O for all films. Annealing films to 700 °C under vacuum produced films of polycrystalline hcp Ru while a flowing stream of H(2) resulted in polycrystalline hcp RuP. PMID:23018487

  6. Environmentally clean slurry using nano-TiO2-abrasive mixed with oxidizer H2O2 for ruthenium-film chemical mechanical planarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A colloidal silica-abrasive-based slurry mixed with periodate salts has been used for chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of ruthenium (Ru) film in semiconductor-chip fabrication. This slurry has serious environmental problems such as generation of toxic RuO4 gas, corrosion, and ionic contamination. We developed an environmentally clean slurry using nano-TiO2 abrasive mixed with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the purpose of Ru-film CMP. Moreover, this slurry is free of corrosion and ionic contamination. The polishing rates of Ru and SiO2 films with this slurry strongly depended on the H2O2 concentration; the Ru-film polishing rate rapidly increased with H2O2 concentration up to 1 wt% and then slightly decreased or saturated, whereas the SiO2-film polishing rate abruptly dropped to ∼50 Å/min. In particular, the adsorbed amount of H2O2 on nano-TiO2 abrasive directly determined the Ru-film polishing rate, indicating a new CMP mechanism of Ru film in the slurry.

  7. Hydrolysis of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its high hydrogen density and unique nuclear chemistry, lithium hydride, in all its isotopic forms, has an unsurpassed place in modem nuclear weapons. The hydrolysis of the material, and the outgassing of hydrogen from the bulk, are crucial to the performance of the material in service. This thesis describes research conducted at AWE Aldermaston, UK, to examine the hydrolysis and hydrogen outgassing from the bulk material, with the aim of ultimately developing the kinetics 8c mechanisms responsible. The basic chemistry is of great interest, especially the reaction with water. This reaction, whilst being fairly extensively studied in the past, has not been conclusively described with an accepted mechanism and associated kinetics. The last significant UK work on the topic was by Imperial College, London, under contract to AW(R)E in the late 1960s. This thesis describes the development of: (i) a solid state NMR spectroscopy technique to examine semi-quantitatively the surface of bulk lithium hydride for its chemical composition, and (ii) a dedicated lithium hydride inert atmosphere gravimetric analysis glove box to study the hydride/water reaction. Solid State NMR Spectroscopy has been utilised for the first time to probe the hydride/hydroxide ratio of partially hydrolysed lithium hydride. 6Li chemical shifts have been established for species of interest and extremely long, up to 17 hours, T1 relaxation times have been measured for 6Li hydride and hydroxide. A method for semi-quantitatively determining the hydroxide/hydride composition of a partially reacted sample has been developed, based on a 'dual-scan' technique using one short and one long pulse sequence. Gravimetric analysis has been developed for lithium hydride/humidity studies. This facility fully contains gravimetric analysis within an argon glove box, with the ability to control the sample atmosphere from room temperature to 60 deg C and from 0.5 to 40 percent relative humidity. The hydrolysis of

  8. Influence of different fibre sources in diets for growing pigs on chemical composition of faeces and slurry and ammonia emission from slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Jørgen; Chwalibog, André; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    The present study was carried out to investigate how three different fibre sources, sugar beet pulp, soya bean hulls and pectin residue, in diets for growing pigs influenced the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in faeces, pH-value in faeces and slurry, excretion of nitrogen in urine...... and faeces and ammonia emission from slurry under dynamic conditions. Eight castrated crossbreed pigs (30-80 kg live weight) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin-square design with one control diet and three fibre containing diets. The ammonia emission was measured continuously over 46 h from an open...... with sugar beet pulp and pectin residue. The fibre diets influenced the excretion of nitrogen because nitrogen was repartitioned from urine to faeces. The pH-value in faeces was significantly lower for the fibre diets (6.57-6.73) compared to the control diet (7.00). There was a tendency for a diet...

  9. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) – namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.

  10. Development of High-Speed Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing Slurry for Through Silicon Via Application Based on Friction Analysis Using Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanokura, Jin; Ono, Hiroshi; Hombo, Kyoko

    2011-05-01

    In order to obtain a high-speed copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process for through silicon vias (TSV) application, we developed a new Cu CMP slurry through friction analysis of Cu reaction layer by an atomic force microscope (AFM) technique. A lateral modulation friction force microscope (LM-FFM) is able to measure the friction value properly giving a vibration to the layer. We evaluated the torsional displacement between the probe of the LM-FFM and the Cu reaction layer under a 5 nm vibration to cancel the shape effect of the Cu reaction layer. The developed Cu CMP slurry forms a frictionally easy-removable Cu reaction layer.

  11. Sustainable nutrients recovery and recycling by optimizing the chemical addition sequence for struvite precipitation from raw swine slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeo, Raffaele; Kolppo, Kari; Lepistö, Raghida

    2016-09-15

    Livestock farming contributes heavily to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) flows into the environment, a major cause of eutrophication of coastal and freshwater systems. Furthermore, the growing demand for N-P fertilizers is increasing the emission of anthropogenic reactive N into the atmosphere and the depletion of the current P reserves. Therefore, it is essential to minimize the anthropogenic impact on the environment and recycle the wasted N-P for agricultural reuse. This study focused on enhancing struvite (MgNH4PO4*6H2O) precipitation from raw swine slurries in batch and laboratory-scale reactors. Different chemical addition sequences were evaluated, and the best removal efficiency (E%) was obtained when the chemicals were mixed before the precipitation process. Struvite was detected at a pH as low as 6 (E%N-P∼50%), and high E%N-P was found at pH 7-9.5 (80-95%). Furthermore, air stripping was used in place of NaOH to adjust pH, returning the same efficiency as if only alkali had been used. XRD and FE-SEM analysis of the precipitate showed that the recovered struvite was of high purity with orthorhombic crystalline structure and only trace amounts of impurities from matrix organics, co-precipitation products (CaO and amorphous calcium-phosphates), and residuals of added chemicals (MgO). PMID:27208994

  12. Chemical and toxicological characterization of slurry reactor biotreatment of explosives-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Vass, A.A.; Ho, C.H.

    1998-08-01

    Treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil in the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) soil slurry bioreactor (SSBR) eliminated detectable TNT but left trace levels of residual monoamino and diamino metabolites under some reactor operating conditions. The reduction of solvent-extractable bacterial mutagenicity in the TNT-contaminated soil was substantial and was similar to that achieved by static pile composts at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity (UMDA) field demonstration. Aquatic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia from TNT in the leachates of TNT-contaminated soil was eliminated in the leachates of JAAP SSBR product soil. The toxicity of soil product leachates to Ceriodaphnia dubia was reasonably predicted using the specific toxicities of the components detected, weighted by their leachate concentrations. In samples where TNT metabolites were observed in the soil product and its leachates, this method determined that the contribution to predicted toxicity values was dominated by trace amounts of the diamino-metabolites, which are very toxic to ceriodaphnia dubia. When the SSBR operating conditions reduced the concentrations of TNT metabolites in the product soils and their leachates to undetectable concentrations, the main contributors to predicted aquatic toxicity values appeared to be molasses residues, potassium, and bicarbonate. Potassium and bicarbonate are beneficial or benign to the environment, and molasses residues are substantially degraded in the environment. Exotoxins, pathogenic bacteria, inorganic particles, ammonia, and dissolved metals did not appear to be important to soil product toxicity.

  13. Organic chemical hydrides as storage medium of hydrogen on the basis of superheated liquid-film concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A catalysis pair of tetralin dehydrogenation / naphthalene hydrogenation has been proposed in the present paper as an organic chemical hydride for operating stationary fuel cells. Catalytic naphthalene hydrogenation, having been commercialized since the 1940's, proceeds to generate decalin via tetralin as an intermediate. The storage capacities of tetralin (3.0 wt%, 28.2 kg-H2 / m3) are lower than decalin (7.3 wt%, 64.8 kg-H2 / m3) but both tetralin dehydrogenation and naphthalene hydrogenation are much faster than the decalin / naphthalene pair. Moreover, existing infrastructures, e.g., gas station and tank lorry, are available for storage, transportation and supply of hydrogen. As for the stationary fuel cells with large space for hydrogen storage, tetralin as a hydrogen carrier is superior to decalin in terms of fast hydrogen supply. Rapid hydrogen supply from tetralin under mild conditions was only accomplished with the carbon supported metal catalysts in the 'superheated liquid-film states' under reactive distillation conditions. In contrast to the ordinary suspended states, the catalyst layer superheated in the liquid-film state gave high catalytic performances at around 250 C. As a result, serious coke formation over the catalyst surface and excessive exergy consumption were prevented simultaneously. (authors)

  14. Pulse NMR in solids: chemical shift, lead fluoride, and thorium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluorine chemical shift of a single crystal CaF2 was measured up to 4 kilobar at room temperature using multiple pulse NMR. The pressure dependence of the shift is found to be --1.7 +- 1 ppM/kbar, while an overlap model predicts a shift of --0.46 ppM/kbar.The chemical shift tensor is separated into ''geometrical'' and ''chemical'' contributions, and comparison of the proposed model calculations with recent data on hydroxyl proton chemical shift tensors shows that the geometrical portion accounts for the qualitative features of the measured tensors. A study of fluoride ion motion in β-PbF2 doped with NaF was conducted by measurement of the 19F transverse relaxation time (T2), spin lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T/sub 1r). Two samples of Th4H15, prepared under different conditions but both having the proper ratio of H/Th (to within 1 percent), were studied. The structure of the Th4H15 suggested by x-ray measurements is confirmed through a moment analysis of the rigid lattice line shape

  15. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-31

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 12, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  16. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.

    2011-10-20

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Third Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on July 7, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  17. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2014 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the Calendar Year (CY) 2014 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  18. Results For The Second Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-07-31

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Saltstone Facility Engineering (SFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  19. RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibling, R.

    2011-08-25

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Second Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on April 4, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the established limit in Reference 3. (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. (4) The reported concentration of

  20. Results for the Third Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-10-26

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  1. Results for the second quarter 2014 tank 50 WAC slurry sample chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-09-04

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2014 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  2. Results For The Second Quarter 2011 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Second Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on April 4, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for 59Ni is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the established limit in Reference 3. (3) The reported detection limit for 94Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. (4) The reported concentration of 242mAm is

  3. Results For The First Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-05-14

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminates unless noted in this section; {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  4. Results For The First Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-07-16

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted; The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit but below the estimated limit; {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits. However, they are below the limits established; The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from the WAC; The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from WAC; Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples; The values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument, however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  5. Results For The First Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted; The reported detection limit for 94Nb is above the requested limit but below the estimated limit; 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits. However, they are below the limits established; The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from the WAC; The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from WAC; Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples; The values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument, however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species

  6. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-01-27

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. SRS Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2009 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 2, 2009 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results

  7. Results For The Fourth Quarter Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. SRS Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2009 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 2, 2009 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results

  8. Synergistic hydrogen desorption behavior of magnesium aluminum hydride synthesized by mechano-chemical activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mg(AlH4)2 could release 3.1 wt% H2 at initial temperature as low as 100 °C. ► The synergistic and mutual catalytic effects of NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 were noticed. ► In situ synchrotron XRD confirmed the two-step dehydrogenation process of Mg(AlH4)2. - Abstract: A mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS) is employed to fabricate Mg(AlH4)2 via milling the precursors, specifically NaAlH4 and MgCl2. The corresponding dehydrogenation behavior of the synthesized powders is investigated. The experimental results showed that incomplete synthesis or premature dehydrogenation may occur if the milling process was not properly controlled. The hydrogen content of each synthesized powder is determined by using a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The dehydrogenation reactions of the synthesized powders are investigated by employing ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ synchrotron XRD and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results showed that the incompletely synthesized powder consisted of residual NaAlH4 in the synthesized Mg(AlH4)2, which demonstrated an initial dehydrogenation temperature as low as 100 °C and accompanied with a maximum amount (3.1 wt%) of H2 released below 350 °C. The mutual catalytic effect of both NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 on lowering their initial dehydrogenation temperature is confirmed.

  9. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-05-05

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (3) The reported detection limits for {sup 59}Ni and {sup 94}Nb are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are each below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for isopropanol is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limits for 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  10. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-12-09

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (i) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (ii) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (iii) The reported detection limit for {sup 242m}Am is greater than the requested limit from Attachment 8.4 of the WAC. (iv) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (v) The reported concentration of Isopropanol is greater than the limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (vi) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  11. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-02-05

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The concentration of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC Limits and Targets, unless noted in this section; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; Diisooctyl adipate (or diisooctyl hexanedioate) and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, plasticizers, were measured at 1.30E+00 mg/L and 3.00E+00 mg/L, respectively, in one of two replicate measurements conducted on an at-depth sample. The organic analysis of the at-depth sample was conducted at the request of SRR. These analytes were below the detection limits for the surface sample; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  12. RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-08-04

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).1 Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb and {sup 144}Ce are above both the established and requested limits from References 4 and 6. (3) The reported detection limits for {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (5) A measurable concentration of Norpar 13 is present in the sample. The reported concentration is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. (7) The detection limit for isopropanol has been lowered from 0.5 mg/L to 0.25 mg/L{sup 7}. This revised limit now satisfies the limit in Table 4 of the WAC.

  13. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2012 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-06-06

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the estimated limit in Reference 3; (3) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. however, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples, the values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and (7) The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  14. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M

    2011-02-22

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (3) There is an estimated concentration of trimethylbenzene (2.25 mg/L). This is not a WAC analyte, but it is the first time this organic compound has been detected in a quarterly WAC sample from Tank 50. (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  15. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2013 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.

    2014-04-01

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report:  SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminants unless noted in this section.  {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL.  Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility of these materials in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.  The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species. The semivolatile organic analysis (SVOA) method employed in the measurement of Norpar 13 and tributyl phosphate (TBP) has resulted in the erroneous reporting of a variety of small chain alcohols, including 4-methyl-3-hexanol and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, in previous quarterly sample reports. It has now been determined that these alcohols are an artifact of the sample preparation. Further work is being conducted in SRNL to delineate the conditions that produce these alcohols, and these findings will be reported separately.

  16. Results For The Third Quarter 2010 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (i) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (ii) The reported detection limits for 94Nb, 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (iii) The reported detection limit for 242mAm is greater than the requested limit from Attachment 8.4 of the WAC. (iv) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (v) The reported concentration of Isopropanol is greater than the limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (vi) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  17. Results For The Second Quarter 2010 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).1 Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for 94Nb and 144Ce are above both the established and requested limits from References 4 and 6. (3) The reported detection limits for 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (5) A measurable concentration of Norpar 13 is present in the sample. The reported concentration is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. (7) The detection limit for isopropanol has been lowered from 0.5 mg/L to 0.25 mg/L7. This revised limit now satisfies the limit in Table 4 of the WAC.

  18. Results for the First Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for 94Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the estimated limit in Reference 3; (3) 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. however, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples, the values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and (7) The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  19. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2010 Tank 50 Wac Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for 94Nb, 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (3) There is an estimated concentration of trimethylbenzene (2.25 mg/L). This is not a WAC analyte, but it is the first time this organic compound has been detected in a quarterly WAC sample from Tank 50. (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  20. Results For The First Quarter 2010 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (3) The reported detection limits for 59Ni and 94Nb are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are each below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for isopropanol is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limits for 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  1. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.

    2011-06-15

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2011 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above both the requested limits from Reference 2 and the established limits in Reference 3; (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. This is a change from previously reported results; (4) The reported concentration of {sup 242m}Am is above the target in Listed in Attachment 8.4 of the Saltstone WAC. This is a change from the previously reported results; (5) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (6) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (7) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; and (8) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank

  2. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2009 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.; Diprete, C.; Bibler, N.

    2009-10-06

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the chemical and radioactive contaminants were all less than their respective WAC Targets or Limits except for Am-242m. (2) The radionuclide Am-242m was not detected; however, its detection limit is above the WAC Target given in Attachment 8.4. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (3) The reported detection limit of isopropanol was lower than its WAC Limit for accident analysis but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 4 for vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities and is documented in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is lower than its WAC limit for accident analysis in Appendix 8.1 but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 3 in reference to vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (5) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately

  3. Chemical mechanical polishing of steel substrate using colloidal silica-based slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; He, Yongyong; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-03-01

    AISI 52100 steel has been widely used in the mechanical industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and high availability. In some cases, an ultra-smooth surface of AISI 52100 steel is needed and is even indispensable for the satisfactory performance of devices. In this paper, chemical mechanical polishing technique was employed to prepare the ultra-smooth surface of AISI 52100 steel. Colloidal silica was used as the abrasive. The effects of pH, complexing agent such as glycine, H2O2 and benzotriazole (BTA) on the polishing performance were studied. It is revealed that, with the increase of pH, the static etching rate (SER) and the material removal rate (MRR) are both gradually reduced, and the post-CMP surface roughness Ra decreases. This is attributed to the fact that compact and passive iron oxides, especially Fe(III) oxides, gradually form on the top surface. At pH 4.00, in the presence of glycine, and with the increase of the H2O2 concentration, the SER is further suppressed, and the surface roughness Ra gradually decreases; the MRR initially dramatically increases due to the fact that, with the addition of small amount of H2O2, the porous iron oxide layer with relatively low mechanical strength can be rapidly formed on the surface. Moreover, glycine intensifies the chemical dissolution by chelating iron ions, especially Fe(II) ions, and thereby the mechanical strength of the oxide layer further weakens. Then, after reaching the peak value, the MRR gradually decreases when the H2O2 concentration further increases since the compactness of the oxide layer gradually increases. With the increase of the BTA concentration, the MRR is gradually suppressed and the surface roughness Ra decreases due to the formation of Fe-BTA passivating film on the top surface. Finally, a two-step polishing process was developed. The polishing results show that, within 20 min, a rough surface of AISI 52100 steel with the Ra value of 188 nm can be polished into an ultra

  4. Results For The First Quarter 2011 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2011 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for 59Ni is above both the requested limits from Reference 2 and the established limits in Reference 3; (3) The reported detection limit for 94Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. This is a change from previously reported results; (4) The reported concentration of 242mAm is above the target in Listed in Attachment 8.4 of the Saltstone WAC. This is a change from the previously reported results; (5) 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (6) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (7) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; and (8) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  5. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2009 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the chemical and radioactive contaminants were all less than their respective WAC Targets or Limits except for Am-242m. (2) The radionuclide Am-242m was not detected; however, its detection limit is above the WAC Target given in Attachment 8.4. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (3) The reported detection limit of isopropanol was lower than its WAC Limit for accident analysis but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 4 for vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities and is documented in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is lower than its WAC limit for accident analysis in Appendix 8.1 but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 3 in reference to vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (5) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately

  6. Results For The Third Quarter 2009 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. Recently, a review of the radionuclide inventory in Saltstone Vaults 1 and 4 identified several additional radionuclides, not currently in the WAC, which require quantification (40K, 108mAg, 133Ba, 207Bi, 227Ac, 228Ra, 228Th, 231Pa, 247Cm, 249Cf, 251Cf). In addition, several of the radionuclides previously reported with minimum detection limits below the requirements listed in the WAC required analysis with reduced detection limits to support future inventory reporting requirements (22Na, 26Al, 59Ni, 94Nb, 106Ru, 144Ce, 152Eu, 155Eu, 226Ra). This added scope was formally requested in a revision to the standing Technical Task Request for CY2009 Saltstone support and is further discussed in several supporting documents. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants are less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for 59Ni, 94Nb, 247Cm, and 249Cf are above the limits requested by LWO; however, they are below the achievable limits established by Analytical Development (AD). (3) The reported detection limit of isopropanol is lower than its WAC Limit for accident analysis in Appendix 8.1, but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 4 for vault flammability. The higher detection limit is expected based on current analytical capabilities and is documented in the Task

  7. Hydraulic Behavior and Chemical Characterization of Lapilli as Material for Natural Filtering of Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereida Falcón-Cardona

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Livestock effluents are a beneficial nutrient supply for crops, whereby their use is critical to ensure the sustainability of the farms global management. However, they can cause serious ecological problems if misused, polluting soils and groundwater. Combining “soft technology” and local materials is a low cost solution in terms of finance and energy. The REAGUA project (REuso AGUA, Water reuse in Spanish analyzes the possibility of using “picon” (lapilli as a material for the treatment of liquid manure from ruminants, for later use in subsurface drip irrigation system to produce forage and biofuels, in which the soil acts as a subsequent advanced treatment. A three-phase system, in which the effluent was poured with a vertical subsurface flow in an unsaturated medium, is designed. In order to determine the management conditions that optimize the filter, it was necessary to characterize the hydraulic behavior of lapilli and its ability to remove substances. Using three lapilli-filled columns, unsaturated flux, and a ruminant effluent, the reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD, biochemical oxygen demand after 5 days (BOD5 and ammonia, phosphorus and suspension solids (SS obtained was over 80%, 90%, and 95% respectively, assumable values for irrigation.

  8. Chemical mechanical planarization of Ge2Sb2Te5 using IC1010 and Politex reg pads in acidic slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper, chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is investigated using IC1010 and Politex reg pads in acidic slurry. For the CMP with blank wafer, it is found that the removal rate (RR) of GST increases with the increase of pressure for both pads, but the RR of GST polished using IC1010 is far more than that of Politex reg. To check the surface defects, GST film is observed with an optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). For the CMP with Politex reg, many spots are observed on the surface of the blank wafer with OM, but no obvious spots are observed with SEM. With regard to the patterned wafer, a few stains are observed on the GST cell, but many residues are found on other area with OM. However, from SEM results, a few residues are observed on the GST cell, more dielectric loss is revealed about the trench structure. For the CMP with IC1010, the surface of the polished blank wafer suffers serious scratches found with both OM and SEM, which may result from a low hardness of GST, compared with those of IC1010 and abrasives. With regard to the patterned wafer, it can achieve a clean surface and almost no scratches are observed with OM, which may result from the high-hardness SiO2 film on the surface, not from the soft GST film across the whole wafer. From the SEM results, a clean interface and no residues are observed on the GST surface, and less dielectric loss is revealed. Compared with Politex reg, the patterned wafer can achieve a good performance after CMP using IC1010. (special topic — international conference on nanoscience and technology, china 2013)

  9. Chemical mechanical planarization of Ge2Sb2Te5 using IC1010 and Politex reg pads in acidic slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ao-Dong; Liu, Bo; Song, Zhi-Tang; Wang, Liang-Yong; Liu, Wei-Li; Feng, Gao-Ming; Feng, Song-Lin

    2014-08-01

    In the paper, chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is investigated using IC1010 and Politex reg pads in acidic slurry. For the CMP with blank wafer, it is found that the removal rate (RR) of GST increases with the increase of pressure for both pads, but the RR of GST polished using IC1010 is far more than that of Politex reg. To check the surface defects, GST film is observed with an optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). For the CMP with Politex reg, many spots are observed on the surface of the blank wafer with OM, but no obvious spots are observed with SEM. With regard to the patterned wafer, a few stains are observed on the GST cell, but many residues are found on other area with OM. However, from SEM results, a few residues are observed on the GST cell, more dielectric loss is revealed about the trench structure. For the CMP with IC1010, the surface of the polished blank wafer suffers serious scratches found with both OM and SEM, which may result from a low hardness of GST, compared with those of IC1010 and abrasives. With regard to the patterned wafer, it can achieve a clean surface and almost no scratches are observed with OM, which may result from the high-hardness SiO2 film on the surface, not from the soft GST film across the whole wafer. From the SEM results, a clean interface and no residues are observed on the GST surface, and less dielectric loss is revealed. Compared with Politex reg, the patterned wafer can achieve a good performance after CMP using IC1010.

  10. Changes in the chemical and physicochemical properties of the solid fraction of cattle slurry during composting using different aeration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Flotats, Xavier; Marfà, Oriol

    2006-01-01

    Replacement of peat as a growing medium by a renewable material, such as an organic waste, is an issue of concern since harvesting of peat has a considerable environmental impact and, actually, it is a non-renewable resource. Cattle manure is a readily available organic waste, which means that once it goes through the composting process, it can be used as an alternative to peat, specifically, the solid fraction obtained from mechanical liquid-solid separation of cattle slurry (SF). Studies have shown it to be suitable for such uses. The purpose of this study was to detect possible changes in the physicochemical and chemical properties of SF when it is composted using different aeration strategies, with an emphasis on the changes that would make it feasible for use as a substrate. With this aim in mind, an experiment was designed with three aeration strategies that would be used during composting. The first consisted of applying air through a static method (forced ventilation). The second involved improving aeration by adding a bulking agent and a dynamic turning method. In the third strategy, aeration was carried out by turning (control). The results show that the different aeration strategies had a clear effect on the evolution of pH, electrical conductivity (EC), nitrate-N, ammonia-N and bicarbonate content. Nitrification was favored under good aeration conditions using the static composting method, probably due to the greater availability of ammonia-N that was transformed into nitrate-N. In general, the low buffering capacity allowed for a reduction of the pH during the curing stage of composting (in conjunction with low temperatures during this period), a characteristic that favors the use of this compost as a growing medium. We also conclude that measuring bicarbonate levels during composting could be used as an indicator of the possible acidification of the material and as a way of evaluating the level of material aeration. PMID:16146687

  11. Synthesis of Fe metal precipitated colloidal silica and its application to W chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Jae; Prasad, Y Nagendra; Kim, In-Kwon; Jung, Seok-Jo; Park, Jin-Goo

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a new method of Fe (metal) precipitation on colloidal silica to overcome the stability problem, which would be responsible in producing defects, with commercially available fumed silica slurry containing Fe ions. The slurry was developed by using sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) as a raw material and the concentration of precipitation of metal was controlled by addition of Fe salt (Fe(NO(3))(3)). To compare the concentration of precipitated Fe with directly added Fe ions in slurry solutions, static electrochemical and peroxide decomposition experiments were performed. Although the performance of the Fe precipitation appeared to be lower than Fe ion addition during these experiments, nearly equal removal rate was observed due to the dynamic condition during polishing. The Fe precipitated colloidal silica particles at the concentration of 52ppm showed the similar W removal rate and selectivity of W to TEOS (tetraethylorthosilicate) to commercially available fumed silica slurry containing externally added Fe ions. The introduction of Fe particle precipitation on colloidal silica particles would result in a longer shelf life time and hence lower defect level in W CMP. PMID:20546766

  12. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formedby chemical reaction between hydrogen and ...

  13. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  14. Environmentally clean slurry using nano-TiO{sub 2}-abrasive mixed with oxidizer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for ruthenium-film chemical mechanical planarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Hao [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Advance Semiconductor Material and Device Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Hyung [Advance Semiconductor Material and Device Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jea-Gun, E-mail: parkjgL@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Advance Semiconductor Material and Device Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    A colloidal silica-abrasive-based slurry mixed with periodate salts has been used for chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of ruthenium (Ru) film in semiconductor-chip fabrication. This slurry has serious environmental problems such as generation of toxic RuO{sub 4} gas, corrosion, and ionic contamination. We developed an environmentally clean slurry using nano-TiO{sub 2} abrasive mixed with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) for the purpose of Ru-film CMP. Moreover, this slurry is free of corrosion and ionic contamination. The polishing rates of Ru and SiO{sub 2} films with this slurry strongly depended on the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration; the Ru-film polishing rate rapidly increased with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration up to 1 wt% and then slightly decreased or saturated, whereas the SiO{sub 2}-film polishing rate abruptly dropped to ∼50 Å/min. In particular, the adsorbed amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on nano-TiO{sub 2} abrasive directly determined the Ru-film polishing rate, indicating a new CMP mechanism of Ru film in the slurry.

  15. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Aline R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g{sup −1} using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g{sup −1} using NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ir and 10 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. - Highlights: • Lead has been determined in fertilizers using slurry sampling GF AAS. • The mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates was found to be the ideal chemical modifier. • Calibration could be carried out against aqueous standard solutions. • The proposed method is much faster than the EPA method, which includes sample digestion.

  16. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH4H2PO4 and NH4NO3/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH4H2PO4 was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH4NO3/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g−1 using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g−1 using NH4NO3/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g−1 Pb for Ir and 10 ng g−1 Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH4NO3/Pd. - Highlights: • Lead has been determined in fertilizers using slurry sampling GF AAS. • The mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates was found to be the ideal chemical modifier. • Calibration could be carried out against aqueous standard solutions. • The proposed method is much faster than the EPA method, which includes sample digestion

  17. Hydriding failure analysis based on PIE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure causes of the two fuel rods of a Korean nuclear power plant had been investigated by using PIE technique. The destructive and physico-chemical examinations revealed that the clad hydriding phenomena had caused the rod failures primarily and secondarily in each case. In this study the basic mechanisms of the primary and the secondary hydriding failures are reviewed, PIE data such as cladding inner and outer surface oxide thickness and the restructuring of fuel pellets are analyzed, and they are compared with predicted behaviors by a fuel performance code. The results strongly support that the hydriding processes, primary and secondary, had played critical roles in the respective fuel rods failures. (author)

  18. Determination of antimony in sediments and soils by slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a permanent chemical modifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard, E-mail: rdobrow@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Otto, Magdalena; Dobrzynska, Joanna

    2011-07-15

    For comparison of action of mixed permanent modifiers Ir/Nb and Ir/W, the influence of the amounts of modifier components was studied and the atomic absorption pyrolysis and atomization curves were determined with different modifiers. The optimum amounts of modifier components were 30 {mu}g Ir and 40 {mu}g of Nb that were deposited onto the L'vov platform in advance to analytical measurements. The long-term performance of the Ir and Nb permanent modifiers was derived from the investigations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The soil and sediment slurries were prepared in 4% hydrofluoric acid and 6% suspension of polytetrafluoroethylene in order to remove the high concentration of silica during the pyrolysis step of 900 deg. C. The calibration was made by using aqueous standards. The analysis of certified reference materials confirmed the accuracy and reliability of the proposed analytical approach. The precision of Sb determination was characterized with less than 6% RSD.

  19. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  20. Study of a new hybrid process combining slurry infiltration and Reactive Chemical Vapour Infiltration for the realisation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic matrix composites were originally developed for aerospace,military aeronautics or energy applications thanks to their good properties at high temperature. They are generally made by Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI). A new short hybrid process combining fiber preform slurry impregnation of ceramic powders with an innovative Reactive CVI (RCVI) route is proposed to reduce the production time. This route is based on the combination of Reactive Chemical Vapour Deposition (RCVD), which is often used to deposit coatings on fibres, with the Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI).In RCVD, the absence of one element of the deposited carbide in the initial gas phase involves the consumption/conversion of the solid substrate. In this work, the RCVD growth and the associated consumption were studied with different parameters in the Ti-H-Cl-C chemical system. The study has been completed with the chemical products analysis, combining XRD, XPS and FTIR. Then, the partial conversion of sub-micrometer carbon powders into titanium carbide and the consolidation of green bodies by RCVI from H2/TiCl4 gaseous infiltration were studied. The residual porosity and the final TiC content were measured in the bulk of the infiltrated powders by image analysis from scanning electron microscopy. Depending on temperature, few hundred micrometers-depth infiltrations are obtained.Finally, the results have been transposed to the RCVI into CMC-type pre-forms. Despite a minimal TiC content of 25% in the overall preform, the results shown a bad homogeneity of the infiltration and a poor cohesion of fibres with RCVI consolidated powder of their environment. (author)

  1. Mound Laboratory activities in chemical and physical research: July--December 1976. [Isotope separation; metal hydride research, separation chemistry and separation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-05-04

    The status of the following programs is reported: isotope separation of carbon, argon, helium, krypton, neon, xenon, oxygen, and sulfur; metal hydride research; separation chemistry; and separation research. (LK)

  2. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  3. Monitoring of slurry fields solutions of aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of annual monitoring of slurry fields solutions of aluminium industrial production of Tajik Aluminium Plant are considered in this work. It is found that in summer period the containing of sulfate, carbonate, hydro carbonate and fluoride salts in slurry fields solutions increase. This is due to intensive evaporation of solvent (water). In autumn-winter period due to air temperature decreasing the precipitation of above mentioned salts is observed. The results of chemical analysis of slurry fields solutions are presented in this work. The slurry fields solutions are analyzed by means of X-ray and thermal analysis. The flowsheet of purification of processed slurry fields solutions from sodium sulphate is proposed.

  4. Role of the Lysine as a Complexing Agent in Ge2Sb2Te5 Chemical Mechanical PolishingSlurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work,we investigate the polishing behavior, static dissolution and electrochemical performace of Ge2Sb2Te5 in the presense of lysine as a complexing agent with H2O2 employed as an oxidizer. Electrochemical techniques are used to investigate polishing behavior under static conditions as a function of lysine concentration .The polishing rate of GST increases with lysine concentraion increasing in acidic solutions at pH 5.2. The static dissolution rate shows the same trend. In the presence of lysine, the surface of GST film is smooth. To verify the complexes of the GST and lysine soluble, the Inductively Coupled Plasma is used which demonstrates that complexes with GST and lysine are soluble and the solubleness of Te element is increasing with lysine concentration increasing. In addition, electrochemical investigation indicates that an enhanced polishing rate and static dissolution is due to the Icorr increase varying lysine concentrations. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope results suggest that the chemical mechanism of lysine as a complexing agent is that lysine has the chemical reaction with GST oxide

  5. Chemical mechanical polishing for silicon wafer by composite abrasive slurry%利用复合磨粒抛光液的硅片化学机械抛光

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许雪峰; 马冰迅; 黄亦申; 彭伟

    2009-01-01

    为了提高硅片的抛光速率,利用复合磨粒抛光液对硅片进行化学机械抛光.分析了SiO2磨粒与聚苯乙烯粒子在溶液中的ζ电位及粒子间的相互作用机制,观察到SiO2磨粒吸附在聚苯乙烯及某种氨基树脂粒子表面的现象.通过向单一磨粒抛光液中加入聚合物粒子的方法获得了复合磨粒抛光液.对硅片传统化学机械抛光与利用复合磨粒抛光液的化学机械抛光进行了抛光性能研究,提出了利用复合磨粒抛光液的化学机械抛光技术的材料去除机理,并分析了抛光工艺参数对抛光速率的影响.实验结果显示,利用单一SiO2磨料抛光液对硅片进行抛光的抛光速率为180 nm/min;利用SiO2磨料与聚苯乙烯粒子或某氨基树脂粒子形成的复合磨粒抛光液对硅片进行抛光的抛光速率分别为273 nm/min和324 nm/min.结果表明,利用复合磨粒抛光液对硅片进行抛光提高了抛光速率,并可获得Ra为0.2 nm的光滑表面.%In order to increase the polishing rate for a silicon wafer,the composite abrasive slurry was used in Chemical Mechanical Polishing(CMP). Zeta potentials of silica abrasives and polystyrene particles in the slurry were measured at various pH values, and the mechanism of interactions between silica abrasives and polymer particles was analyzed. Small silica abrasives were observed to attach onto the surfaces of the polystyrene particles and some resin particles.Then,the composite abrasive slurry was obtained by adding some polymer particles into single abrasive slurry. In comparison with the polishing performance of traditional CMP and CMP using composite abrasive slurry, the mechanism of material removal of CMP using composite abrasive slurry was proposed, and the influence of craft parameters on the polishing rate was studied through the experiments. Experimental results indicate that the polishing rate is 180 nm/min with single silica abrasive slurry, and 273 nm/min, 324 nm

  6. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  7. Best mix of primary energy resources by renewable energy and fossil fuel with CCS in view of security,stability and sustainability——A vision on hydrogen supply chain by organic chemical hydride method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junichi; SAKAGUCHI

    2010-01-01

    The best mix scenario by renewable energy and fossil fuel with or without CCS(Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage) would be a solution to compromise Greenhouse Gases emission issue caused by carbon dioxide(CO2),and depletion of crude oil and natural gas reserves.As fossil fuel with pre-combustion CCS means hydrogen manufacturing and also hydrogen can be produced via electrolysis with renewable energy,it is desirable to establish transportation and storage systems of hydrogen as a clean energy.In this paper a vision on Hydrogen Supply Chain by Organic Chemical Hydride(OCH) Method as well as comparison of CCS configuration are discussed.

  8. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  9. Distribution of Pb and its chemical fractions in liquid and solid phases of digested pig and dairy slurries%猪、奶牛粪厌氧发酵中Pb的形态转化及其分布特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳红梅; 付广青; 常志州; 叶小梅

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion treatment effectively degrades the organic matter and causes obvious variations in physical and chemical properties of digested slurries, such as water content, pH, oxidation reduction potential and microbial activities. These changes may influence the chemical fraction of Pb, which is a critical factor in predicting its toxicity, environmental mobility, bioavailability and optimum removal methods. The speciation and phytotoxic effects of lead from sewage sludge and composted manure have been widely studied. There has been no study about the transfer and distribution of Pb during anaerobic digestion of manure slurries. The aim of the present work was to analyze the distribution of Pb in both liquid and solid phase after anaerobic digestion of pig slurries and dairy slurries, and their chemical speciation in solid fraction of digested residuals. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at condition of medium temperature [(37 ± 2)℃] was operated for 130 d. Lead in liquid and solid phases of raw materials and digested slurries was analyzed by first passing through a 0.45 µm filter paper. The chemical fractions in digested slurry solids were extracted by BCR method. Results showed that total amount of Pb was decreased 70% and 19% in digested pig slurries (DPS) and dairy slurries (DDS), respectively, , compared with raw slurries. The percentages of Pb in liquid fractions of DPS and DDS were 29%and 17%, which decreased by 17%and 58%. The decrease of Pb in DDS was significantly lower than that in DPS. One reason is that 90%of solids in DDS were discharged during the anaerobic digestion. Another reason is that Pb in digested slurries mainly exists as the solid form. Thus the amount of Pb left in the reactor for dairy manure digestion was significantly lower than that for pig manure digest. Due to the high removal efficiency, easy operation and low treatment cost of heavy metals in solid phase, transformation of liquid phase of heavy metals to the

  10. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffeld, M; Wang, M J; Goldstein, V; Kasza, K E

    2010-12-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. PMID:21528014

  11. The effect of additive chemicals on the viscosity of coal-petroleum coke-water slurry fuel for a gasification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S.J.; Choi, Y.C.; Lee, J.G. [Korean Institute of Energy Research, Taejon (Republic of Korea)

    2009-09-15

    As a preliminary study for the gasification of an anthracite and petroleum coke mixture, viscosity was measured at various temperatures (20-50{sup o}C, slurry concentrations (60-70 wt%) and additive amounts (0-0.8 wt%) by using an LV-II type viscometer. In addition, four types of different additives, sodium naphthalene sulfonate, poly(methyl methacrylate), polypropylene and a polypropylene glycol based additive, were applied to Korean anthracite, petroleum coke and mixtures of these materials, and the viscosity data were compared. Viscosity dependency values for coal, anthracite, bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, were compared, and it was found that a high content of moisture and particularly ash increases CWS viscosity. The four types of additives tested in this research can effectively diminish the viscosity of coal and especially petroleum coke-water slurry by more than 70% to 95%, respectively. Moreover, the sodium naphthalene sulfonate-based additive reduced the viscosity of coal and petroleum coke-water slurry best, especially at concentrations in excess of 65 wt%. Based on these results, highly loaded slurry created by mixing anthracite and petroleum coke with additives was achieved.

  12. Effects of using slurry ice during transportation on the microbiological, chemical, and sensory assessments of aquacultured sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) stored at 4 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakli, Sukran; Kilinc, Berna; Dincer, Tolga; Tolasa, Sebnem

    2006-01-01

    Slurry ice, a biphasic system consisting of small spherical ice crystals surrounded by seawater at subzero temperature, was evaluated as a new chilled storage method for whole sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) a sparidae fish species of remarkable commercial interests. In this study two different group of chilling methods were used during transportation; in slurry ice packaged (Group A), and flake ice packaged (Group B). The effect of this advanced system during transportation on quality losses and the shelf life of aquacultured sea bass was evaluated. Mesophilic counts for sea bass exceeded 7 log cfu/g, which is considered the maximum level for acceptability for freshwater and marine fish after 13 days for groups A and B. On day 13 TVB-N values of groups A and B, reached the legal limits (35 mg/100 g set for TVB-N) for consumption. According to the results of sensory analyses, up to day 9 all the groups were determined as "acceptable" but on day 13 the groups A and B were no longer acceptable. The main negative aspect related to quality loss in slurry ice group corresponded to the appearance of eyes and gills. Using slurry ice during transportation did not extend the shelf life of sea bass stored at 4 degrees C. PMID:16864138

  13. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  14. Slurry pipeline design approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betinol, Roy; Navarro R, Luis [Brass Chile S.A., Santiago (Chile)

    2009-12-19

    Compared to other engineering technologies, the design of a commercial long distance Slurry Pipeline design is a relatively new engineering concept which gained more recognition in the mid 1960 's. Slurry pipeline was first introduced to reduce cost in transporting coal to power generating units. Since then this technology has caught-up worldwide to transport other minerals such as limestone, copper, zinc and iron. In South America, the use of pipeline is commonly practiced in the transport of Copper (Chile, Peru and Argentina), Iron (Chile and Brazil), Zinc (Peru) and Bauxite (Brazil). As more mining operations expand and new mine facilities are opened, the design of the long distance slurry pipeline will continuously present a commercially viable option. The intent of this paper is to present the design process and discuss any new techniques and approach used today to ensure a better, safer and economical slurry pipeline. (author)

  15. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  16. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions in a single run. • Accurate analysis using isotope dilution and standard addition methods. • Vapor generation ICP-MS yielded superior detection limits compared to ETV-ICP-MS. • No sample dissolution increased sample through put. • Analysis of GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material for accuracy. - Abstract: A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL−1 Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g−1 for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample

  17. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Ni [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiuh-Jen, E-mail: sjjiang@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Ling [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Sahayam, A.C. [National Centre for Compositional Characterisation of Materials (CCCM), Hyderabad (India)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • Determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions in a single run. • Accurate analysis using isotope dilution and standard addition methods. • Vapor generation ICP-MS yielded superior detection limits compared to ETV-ICP-MS. • No sample dissolution increased sample through put. • Analysis of GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material for accuracy. - Abstract: A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL{sup −1} Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g{sup −1} for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample.

  18. Rheological properties of defense waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this two-year project has been to obtain refined and reliable experimental data about the rheological properties of melter feeds. The research has involved both experimental studies and model development. Two experimental facilities have been set up to measure viscosity and pressure drop. Mathematical models have been developed as a result of experimental observation and fundamental rheological theory. The model has the capability to predict the viscosity of melter slurries in a range of experimental conditions. The final results of the investigation could be used to enhance the current design base for slurry transportation systems and improve the performance of the slurry mixing process. If successful, the cost of this waste treatment will be reduced, and disposal safety will be increased. The specific objectives for this project included: (1) the design, implementation, and validation of the experimental facility in both batch and continuous operating modes; (2) the identification and preparation of melter feed samples of both the SRS and Hanford waste slurries at multiple solids concentration levels; (3) the measurement and analysis of the melter feeds to determine the effects of the solids concentration, pH value, and other factors on the rheological properties of the slurries; (4) the correlation of the rheological properties as a function of the measured physical and chemical parameters; and (5) transmission of the experimental data and resulting correlation to the DOE site user to guide melter feed preparation and transport equipment design

  19. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  20. Determination of As, Hg and Pb in herbs using slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chia-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of herbs for As, Hg and Pb has been carried out using slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with flow injection vapor generation. Slurry containing 0.5% m/v herbal powder, 0.1% m/v citric acid and 2% v/v HCl was injected into the VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Hg and Pb that obviate dissolution and mineralization. Standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for quantifications in selected herbal powders. This method has been validated by the determination of As, Hg and Pb in NIST standard reference materials SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The As, Hg and Pb analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision obtained by the reported procedure was better than 7% for all determinations. The detection limit estimated from standard addition curve was 0.008, 0.003, and 0.007 ng mL(-1) for As, Hg and Pb, respectively. PMID:26304347

  1. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2011-01-01

    Managing phosphorus (P) losses in soil leachate following land application of manure is key to curbing eutrophication in many regions. We compared P leaching from columns of variably textured, intact soils (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) subjected to surface application or injection of dairy cattle (Bos...... retention of particulate P and dissolved organic P, caused by placing slurry away from active flow paths in the fine-textured soil columns, as well as to chemical retention of dissolved inorganic P, caused by better contact between slurry P and soil adsorption sites. Dissolved organic P was less retained in...... soil after slurry application than other P forms. On these soils with low to intermediate P status, slurry injection lowered P leaching losses from clay-rich soil, but not from the sandy soils, highlighting the importance of soil texture in managing P losses following slurry application....

  2. Metal hydride actuation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-recocking actuation device is disclosed. One possible use for it is in conjunction with a pneumatic fire protection system. This invention employs the process known as occlusion to store large amounts of gas in a small volume. Metal hydrides in a chamber are used to store hydrogen in the disclosed preferred embodiment. Upon the application of heat-from a heat source like a resistance heater-the charged metal hydride releases its hydrogen (H2) in a chamber having only one exit opening which empties into a sealed bellows. This bellows contacts a piston located in another chamber wherein a biased resetting spring is provided to normally maintain the piston in contact with the bellows. As the pressure from the H2 gas builds up, it overcomes the biased spring to move it and the piston along with an associated pin or other actuator. If used to actuate a pneumatic fire protection system, the pin or actuator at the downward side of its stroke in turn, may puncture a shearable diaphragm or in some other way releases the contents of a container containing a second gas, like nitrogen (N2), which is then released from a second exit port in a different chamber to charge the fire protection system. Recocking of the piston begins as the heating of the metal hydride ceases. As cooling takes place the hydrogen is absorbed to reenter the hydride to decrease the gas pressure supplied. The piston's biased resetting spring then recocks the piston to its original position

  3. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  4. Slurry walls and slurry trenches - construction quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slurry (panel) walls and slurry trenches have become conventional methods for construction of deep underground structures, interceptor trenches and hydraulic (cutoff) barriers. More recently polymers mixed with water are used to stabilize the excavation instead of bentonite slurry. Slurry walls are typically excavated in short panel segments, 2 to 7 m (7 to 23 ft) long, and backfilled with structural materials; whereas slurry trenches are fairly continuous excavations with concurrent backfilling of blended soils, or cement-bentonite mixtures. Slurry trench techniques have also been used to construct interceptor trenches. Currently no national standards exist for the design and/or construction of slurry walls/trenches. Government agencies, private consultants, contractors and trade groups have published specifications for construction of slurry walls/trenches. These specifications vary in complexity and quality of standards. Some place excessive emphasis on the preparation and control of bentonite or polymer slurry used for excavation, with insufficient emphasis placed on quality control of bottom cleaning, tremie concrete, backfill placement or requirements for the finished product. This has led to numerous quality problems, particularly with regard to identification of key depths, bottom sediments and proper backfill placement. This paper will discuss the inspection of slurry wall/trench construction process, identifying those areas which require special scrutiny. New approaches to inspection of slurry stabilized excavations are discussed

  5. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. Thinning of kaolin slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasák, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    After mixing kaolin with water attractive and repulsive forces between kaolin particles initiate process of coagulation and peptisation, respectively. The coagulation process in the kaolin slurry gives rise to voluminous aggregates of kaolin particles, where a great deal of water is fixed.

  7. The hydride fluoride crystal structure database, HFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingl, F.; Gelato, L.; Yvon, K. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Lab. Crystallographie aux Rayons X

    1997-05-20

    HFD is a new data base containing crystal structure information on more than one thousand metal hydrides and fluorides. It includes space group, cell parameters, standardized atom positions, site occupancies and references. The compilation is critical as only refined crystal structures are considered and the data are checked for internal consistency. It is comprehensive as structural information is extracted from all major scientific journals, and it is continuously updated. HFD can be searched according to various criteria such as symmetry, chemical elements, composition etc. The primary motivation for creating HFD was to predict new metal hydrides and to study their structural analogies with metal fluorides. However, HFD can also be used for other applications such as the simulation of diffraction patterns and the drawing of crystal structures. (orig.) 13 refs.

  8. Hydrogen storage: hydrogen as a hydride. 1974-May, 1980 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1974-May 80. [135 abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography covers hydrogen storage as a hydride. Topics include the chemical and physical properties of the hydride, and how useful it may be for hydrogen storage. Also considered is the conversion of hydrogen to a hydride and the conversion back to hydrogen. (This updated bibliography contains 135 abstracts, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. A novel kind of TSV slurry with guanidine hydrochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a novel alkaline TSV (through-silicon-via) slurry with guanidine hydrochloride (GH) on CMP (chemical mechanical polishing) was investigated. The novel alkaline TSV slurry was free of any inhibitors. During the polishing process, the guanidine hydrochloride serves as an effective surface-complexing agent for TSV CMP applications, the removal rate of barrier (Ti) can be chemically controlled through tuned selectivity with respect to the removal rate of copper and dielectric, which is helpful to modifying the dishing and gaining an excellent topography performance in TSV manufacturing. In this paper, we mainly studied the working mechanism of the components of slurry and the skillful application guanidine hydrochloride in the TSV slurry. (paper)

  10. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffeld, M.; Wang, M.J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers ...

  11. Effects of microwave irradiation on metal hydrides and complex hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of single-mode microwave irradiation on metal hydrides, MHn (LiH, MgH2, CaH2, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48) and complex hydrides MBH4 (LiBH4, NaBH4, and KBH4) were systematically investigated. Among the metal hydrides, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 exhibit a rapid heating by microwave irradiation, where small amount of hydrogen (less than 0.5 mass%) are desorbed. On the other hand, LiBH4 is heated above 380 K by microwave irradiation, where 13.7 mass% of hydrogen is desorbed. The rapid heating of metal hydrides such as TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 are mainly due to the conductive loss. Meanwhile the microwave heating in LiBH4 is attributed to the conductive loss which is caused by a structural transition. The difference in the amount of desorbed hydrogen between metal hydrides and complex hydrides might be caused by the different microwave penetration depth and/or the temperature saturation in the microwave irradiation process. Microwave heating might be applied to hydrogen storage system, though further development of hydrides themselves and engineering techniques are required

  12. Modelling of slurry droplet drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadja, M.; Bergeles, G. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-05-01

    Heat, mass and momentum transfer between a slurry droplet and a gas flow are investigated numerically. The developed model can be applied to assess drying and combustion properties of slurries inside spray dryers or combustors and to estimate the time needed to reach ignition of the solid component in slurry fuels. The model was applied to coal water droplet slurries the properties of which are available in the literature but can also be used for study of drying of any other slurry such as that encountered in flue gas desulfurization systems. The parametric study revealed that the most important factor in slurry drying is the ambient temperature and that the injection velocity, the ambient pressure of the flowing medium or the particle initial temperature affect very little the drying rate.

  13. Mechanical characteristics of hydrides in titanium and titanium-palladium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of estimating of stress-strain curve and fracture strain of thin layer hydrides of pure titanium (Gr.1) and titanium-palladium alloy (Gr.17), we utilized dual indentation method and advanced indentation machine equipped with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system. We first estimated stress-strain curves of two base metals and two hydrides utilizing the dual indentation method. Next we estimated the fracture strain of two hydrides by FEM method using the critical indentation force to cause the Mode-I crack in hydrides during indentation tests. The critical force was correctly determined by waveform analysis of AEs detected during indentation test. The fracture strain of hydride of Gr.1 was estimated as 8.1% and larger than that (4.3%) of Gr.17 hydride. Fracture strains of two hydrides appear to be due to the chemical composition of the hydrides. Gr.1 produced a TiH2 hydride, while Gr.1 did a TiH1.971. (author)

  14. International symposium on slurry flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on two-phase slurry flow. Topics considered at the conference included flow models, drag, flow rate, stresses in a fluid-solid mixture, kinetic models, the shear viscosity of dense-phase slurries at varying shear rates, the modeling of particulates based on the Markov process, fluid-particle flows in geothermal drilling applications, two-phase nozzle flow, laminar flow, centrifugal slurry pumps, slurry pipeline flow, and the beneficiation of coal by agglomeration during hydraulic transport

  15. Preparation of metallic terbium and terbium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of metallic terbium preparation is described. The method consists in vacuum thermolysis of terbium hydride prepared as a result of terbium chloride interaction with lithium hydride. The prepared modification of terbium hydride demonstrates a high stability in the air. It is pointed out that problems arising from direct hydridation of the metal are responsible for certain advantages of the terbium hydride preparation method described

  16. Suspended-slurry reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-22

    An apparatus for generating a large volume of gas from a liquid stream is disclosed. The apparatus includes a first channel through which the liquid stream passes. The apparatus also includes a layer of catalyst particles suspended in a solid slurry for generating gas from the liquid stream. The apparatus further includes a second channel through which a mixture of converted liquid and generated gas passes. A heat exchange channel heats the liquid stream. A wicking structure located in the second channel separates the gas generated from the converted liquid.

  17. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  18. Chemical Bonding of AlH3 Hydride by Al-L2,3 Electron Energy-Loss Spectra and First-Principles Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Kazutaka Ikeda; Shin-Ichi Orimo; Kazuyoshi Tatsumi; Shunsuke Muto

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, we used transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy to investigate dehydrogenation of AlH3 particles. In the present study, we systematically examine differences in the chemical bonding states of Al-containing compounds (including AlH3) by comparing their Al-L2,3 EEL spectra. The spectral chemical shift and the fine peak structure of the spectra were consistent with the degree of covalent bonding of Al. This finding will be useful for futu...

  19. Chemical Bonding of AlH3 Hydride by Al-L2,3 Electron Energy-Loss Spectra and First-Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Ikeda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we used transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss (EEL spectroscopy to investigate dehydrogenation of AlH3 particles. In the present study, we systematically examine differences in the chemical bonding states of Al-containing compounds (including AlH3 by comparing their Al-L2,3 EEL spectra. The spectral chemical shift and the fine peak structure of the spectra were consistent with the degree of covalent bonding of Al. This finding will be useful for future nanoscale analysis of AlH3 dehydrogenation toward the cell.

  20. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  1. Performance of a Centrifugal Slurry Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Hawas Yahya Bajawi; Basharat Salim; Ziyadh Suhibani

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of speed, concentration and size of slurry on the performance of a centrifugal pump. For this purpose a facility was built where the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump was examined using aggregate slurry. Three sizes of slurry with three concentrations and at three impeller speeds were used for the performance investigations of a centrifugal slurry pump. As a reference performance the performance of centrifugal slurry pu...

  2. 水葫芦发酵沼液对紫叶莴苣生长和品质的影响%Effects of Different Ratios of Biogas Slurry of Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) Substitute Chemical Nitrogen Fertilizers on Growth and Quality of Lettuce (L.sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪吉东; 马洪波; 高秀美; 许仙菊; 宁运旺; 张辉; 张永春

    2011-01-01

    Field experiment was conducted to explore the effects of different ratios of biogas slurry substitute chemical nitrogen fertilizers on yield, nutrient accumulation and fresh quality of lettuce (L. Sativa). The results showed that the application of fertilizers and slurry could promote the growth of lettuce. The yields of treatments with 50%, 75% and 100% ratios of slurry were 9.1%, 16.1% and 10.3% respectively higher than that of 100% urea treatment, but chemical fertilizer as the basal got a better effect than slurry while biogas slurry got better growth and higher nutrient absorption as the after manuring compared to chemical N fertilizer. The economic yield increased with the increasing ratio of slurry. Compared to 100% chemical treatment, nitrate contents under biogas slurry application ratio of 50%, 75% and 100% were decreased by 13.6%, 14.3% and 11.3%, respectively. However, soluble sugar, Vc contents and free amino acid concentrations of 100% biogas slurry application were lower but were highest of 75% biogas slurry application. In conclusion, the proportion of 75% slurry application was the best fertilizer ratio.%利用田间小区试验研究了等氮量下不同比例水葫芦发酵沼液对紫叶莴苣生长、产量、氮磷钾养分吸收量及茎部品质的影响.结果表明,沼液替代化肥氮比例为50%、75%和100%处理莴苣产量分别比100%化肥氮处理增加9.1%、16.1%和10.3%.但基肥中化肥的比例上升能促进莴苣苗期的生长和提高氮的吸收,而沼液作为追肥较单施化肥更能促进莴苣的生长和养分的吸收.同时沼液氮施用比例增加,莴苣商品化率提高.和100%化肥处理相比,沼液施用比例为50%、75%和100%处理硝酸盐含量分别降低了13.6%、14.3%和11.3%.沼液氮施用比例为50%~100%处理中,100%沼液氮施用处理其可溶性糖、Vc含量和游离氨基酸含量都最低,而75%沼液氮施用比例下可获得最高的氨基

  3. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  4. Low density metal hydride foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam. 6 figures

  5. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  6. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: fuelpr@nuc.berkeley.edu; Greenspan, Ehud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Garkisch, Hans D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U{sub 0.3}ZrH{sub 1.6} pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to {approx}650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity {approx}100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of {approx}300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrH{sub x}, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1

  7. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U0.3ZrH1.6 pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to ∼650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity ∼100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of ∼300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrHx, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1.6 to ∼1.45 at the center and

  8. 过氧化氢抛光液体系中钌的化学机械抛光研究%Chemical Mechanical Planarization of Ruthenium in Hydrogen Peroxide- Based Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储向峰; 王婕; 董永平; 乔红斌; 张王兵

    2012-01-01

    本文研究了过氧化氢(H2O2)抛光液体系中金属钌的化学机械抛光行为,采用电化学分析方法和X射线光电子能谱仪(XPS)分析了氧化剂和络合剂对腐蚀效果的影响,利用原子力显微镜(AFM)观察抛光表面的微观形貌.结果表明:在过氧化氢抛光液体系中,金属钌表面钝化膜的致密度和厚度与醋酸(CH3COOH)和H2O2的浓度有关.抛光液中醋酸主要通过促进阳极反应的进行从而增强抛光液对金属钌的化学作用,CH3COOH作为络合剂比三乙醇胺(TEA)或酒石酸(C4H6O6)得到的抛光速率更高.低浓度H2O2通过增强抛光液对金属钌的化学腐蚀,抛光速率增大,较高浓度H2O2可能通过在金属表面形成较厚的氧化膜,抛光速率下降.XPS图谱说明钌片浸泡在含醋酸介质过氧化氢体系抛光液后,钌、氧原子相对含量之比约为2∶3,而且金属钌被氧化到四价和八价,这可能是因为金属钌表面生成RuO2和RuO4.抛光后的金属钌表面在5μm×5μm范围内平均粗糙度Sa由抛光前的33 nm降至6.99 nm.%In this paper,chemical mechanical polishing behaviors of Ruthenium(Ru) in hydrogen peroxide(H2O2)-based slurry are investigated.The effect of the oxidizing agent and complexing agents on the corrosion behaviors are investigated by using electrochemical measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.And the polished Ru surface is characterized by atomic force microscopy.Results show that the tightness and thickness of the passive film on the surface of Ru are related to the concentrations of CH3COOH and H2O2.CH3COOH can accelerate the anode reaction and enhance the chemical action of the slurry on the surface of Ru.The material removal rate(MRR) of Ru in slurries with CH3COOH as complexing agent is higher than that of TEA or C4H6O6.H2O2 at low concentration promotes the chemical corrosion ability to corrode Ru surface and increases MRR,the increasing of H2O2 concentration may

  9. Effect of lapping slurry on critical cutting depth of spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Measured spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different slurries. • Evaluated the softened layer thickness in different slurries. • Discussed the effect of slurries on critical cutting depth of spinel. - Abstract: The critical cutting depth for lapping process is very important because it influences the mode of material removal. In this paper, a serial of microscopic indentation experiments were carried out for measuring spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different lapping slurries. Their critical cutting depth and fracture toughness were calculated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also employed to study the surface chemical composition and softened layer thickness of wafers in different slurries. Experimental results indicate that the softened layers of spinel wafers are formed due to the corrosion of lapping slurries, which leads to a lower hardness and a larger fracture toughness of samples, and increases the critical cutting depth. Among them, the critical cutting depth in ethylene glycol solution is the largest and up to 21.8 nm. The increase of critical cutting depth is helpful to modify the surface quality of the work-piece being lapped via ductile removal mode instead of brittle fracture mode

  10. Investigation of properties of coal-water slurries produced by electric discharge methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyantuev, S.; Khmelev, A.; Kondratenko, A.; Baldynova, F.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of research is to obtain high quality coal-water slurry with minimum energy consumption. The paper presents the characteristics of coal-water slurries produced by electric discharge methods. The raw material is coal from different mines (Tugnuisky, Aduun- Chulunsky, etc.). Micrographs of the surface of the coal particles in the slurry and its chemical composition are obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Micrographs showed that the electric discharge treatment resulted in a significant dispersion of the coal particles. Elemental analysis showed a significant reduction of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Viscosity of slurries was determined by Brookfield rotational viscometer and corresponds to the standard of GB / T18856.4.

  11. Thermal and mechanical properties of zirconium hydrides with various hafnium contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium (Zr) hydride is currently expected as a neutron shield material for fast reactors. In order to evaluate safety and economic efficiency of the nuclear reactor, the thermal and mechanical properties of the hydride should be understood. In addition, since chemical properties of Zr and hafnium (Hf) are quite similar, Zr contains a few percent Hf generally. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the effect of Hf content on the properties of Zr hydride. In the present study, fine bulk samples of δ-phase Zr hydrides with various Hf contents were prepared and their thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. We examined the phase states and the microstructure of the hydrides by means of X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDX analyses. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the heat capacity and the thermal diffusivity of the hydrides were measured and the thermal conductivity was evaluated. The Vickers hardness and the sound velocity of the hydrides were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. The effects of temperature and Hf content on the properties of Zr hydrides were studied. (author)

  12. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  13. Slurry flow principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Shook, C A; Brenner, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Slurry Flow: Principles and Practice describes the basic concepts and methods for understanding and designing slurry flow systems, in-plan installations, and long-distance transportation systems. The goal of this book is to enable the design or plant engineer to derive the maximum benefit from a limited amount of test data and to generalize operating experience to new situations. Design procedures are described in detail and are accompanied by illustrative examples needed by engineers with little or no previous experience in slurry transport.The technical literature in this field is extensive:

  14. Slurry pipeline technology: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jay P. [Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Rafael; Pinto, Daniel; Vidal, Alisson [Ausenco do Brasil Engenharia Ltda., Nova Lima, MG (Brazil). PSI Div.

    2009-12-19

    Slurry pipelines represent an economical and environmentally friendly transportation means for many solid materials. This paper provides an over-view of the technology, its evolution and current Brazilian activity. Mineral resources are increasingly moving farther away from ports, processing plants and end use points, and slurry pipelines are an important mode of solids transport. Application guidelines are discussed. State-of-the-Art technical solutions such as pipeline system simulation, pipe materials, pumps, valves, automation, telecommunications, and construction techniques that have made the technology successful are presented. A discussion of where long distant slurry pipelines fit in a picture that also includes thickened and paste materials pipe lining is included. (author)

  15. Hydrogen storage in magnesium-based hydrides and hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mg and Mg-based hydrides have attracted much attention because of their high gravimetric hydrogen storage densities and favourable kinetic properties. Due to novel preparation methods and the development of suitable catalysts, hydrogen uptake and desorption is now possible within less than 2 min. However, the hydrogen reaction enthalpy of pure Mg is too high for many applications, for example, for the zero emission car. Therefore, different routes are explored to tailor the hydrogen reaction enthalpy to potential applications. This article summarizes the recent developments concerning sorption properties and thermodynamics of Mg-based hydrides for hydrogen storage applications. In particular, promising strategies to decrease the hydrogen reaction enthalpy by alloying and the use of reactive hydride composites are discussed

  16. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  17. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH3– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH3 and α-AlH3 irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH3 and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers

  18. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  19. Results for the First, Second, and Third Quarter Calendar Year 2015 Tank 50H WAC slurry samples chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-18

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the Calendar Year (CY) 2015 First, Second, and Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50H for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) & Saltstone Facility Engineering (D&S-FE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50H Waste Characterization System. Previous memoranda documenting the WAC analyses results have been issued for these three samples.

  20. Results for the First, Second, and Third Quarter Calendar Year 2015 Tank 50H WAC slurry samples chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the Calendar Year (CY) 2015 First, Second, and Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50H for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) & Saltstone Facility Engineering (D&S-FE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50H Waste Characterization System. Previous memoranda documenting the WAC analyses results have been issued for these three samples.

  1. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  2. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, M.S. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Van Essen, D.C. [Advanced Integrated Management Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses.

  3. Medical ice slurry production device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, Kenneth E.; Oras, John; Son, HyunJin

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  4. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses

  5. Thermomechanical properties of hafnium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine bulk samples of delta-phase Hf hydride with various hydrogen contents (CH) ranging from 1.62 to 1.72 in the atomic ratio (H/Hf) were prepared, and their thermomechanical properties were characterized. At room temperature, the sound velocity and Vickers hardness were measured. The elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the thermal expansion was measured by using a dilatometer, and the linear thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. Empirical equations describing the thermomechanical properties of Hf hydride as a function of CH were proposed. (author)

  6. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Eric Frickey, E; Leung Heung, L

    2004-02-23

    An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were

  8. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs

  9. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carleson, T.E.; Drown, D.C.; Hart, R.E.; Peterson, M.E.

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Surface treatments toward obtaining clean GaN(0 0 0 1) from commercial hydride vapor phase epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition substrates in ultrahigh vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied processes of cleaning GaN(0 0 0 1) surfaces on four different types of wafers: two types were hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) free-standing substrates and two types were metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) films grown on these HVPE substrates and prepared by annealing and/or Ar ion sputtering in ultra high vacuum. We observed the surfaces through treatments using in situ low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and Auger electron spectroscopy, and also using ex situ temperature programmed desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. For HVPE samples, we obtained relatively clean surfaces under optimized three-step annealing conditions (200 deg. C for 12 h + 400 deg. C for 1 h + 500 deg. C for 5 min) without sputtering, after which the surface contamination of oxide and carbide was reduced to ∼20% of that before annealing. Clear GaN(0 0 0 1)1x1 patterns were obtained by LEED and RHEED. STM images showed flat terraces of ∼10 nm size and steps of ∼0.5 nm height. Upon annealing the HVPE-GaN samples at a much higher temperature (>550 deg. C), three-dimensional (3D) islands with facets were formed and the surface stoichiometry was broken down with the desorption of nitrogen in the form of ammonia, since the samples include hydrogen as an impurity. Ar+ sputtering was effective for removing surface contamination, however, postannealing could not recover the surface roughness but promoted the formation of 3D islands on the surface. For MOCVD/HVPE homoepitaxial samples, the surfaces are terminated by hydrogen and the as-introduced samples showed a clear 1x1 structure. Upon annealing at 500-600 deg. C, the surface hydrogen was removed and a 3x3 reconstruction structure partially appeared, although a 1x1 structure was dominant. We summarize the structure differences among the samples under the same

  11. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  12. Effects of storage in ozonised slurry ice on the sensory and microbial quality of sardine (Sardina pilchardus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carmen A; Rodríguez, Oscar; Losada, Vanesa; Aubourg, Santiago P; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge

    2005-08-25

    The use of slurry ice, both alone and in combination with ozone, as compared with traditional flake ice was investigated as a new refrigeration system for the storage of sardine (Sardina pilchardus). Microbiological, chemical and sensory analyses were carried out throughout a storage period of 22 days. According to sensory analyses, sardine specimens stored in ozonised slurry ice had a shelf life of 19 days, while counterpart batches stored in slurry ice or flake ice had shelf lives of 15 and 8 days, respectively. Storage in ozonised slurry ice led to significantly lower counts of aerobic mesophiles, psychrotrophic bacteria, anaerobes, coliforms, and both lipolytic and proteolytic microorganisms in sardine muscle, and of surface counts of mesophiles and psychrotrophic bacteria in sardine skin as compared with the slurry ice and the flake ice batches. In all cases, the slurry ice batch also exhibited significantly lower microbial counts, both in muscle and skin, than the flake ice batch. Chemical parameters revealed that the use of slurry ice slowed down the formation of TVB-N and TMA-N to a significant extent in comparison with storage in flake ice. A combination of slurry ice with ozone also allowed a better control of pH and TMA-N formation as compared with slurry ice alone. This work demonstrates that the combined use of slurry ice and ozone for the storage of sardine can be recommended to improve the quality and extend the shelf life of this fish species. PMID:16083815

  13. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha;

    2016-01-01

    Livestock production systems can be major sources of trace gases including ammonia (NH3), the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and odorous compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Short-term campaigns have indicated that acidification of livestock slurry during in....... The effect of acidification on emissions of H2S differed between experiments. Implications of slurry acidification for subsequent field application, including N and S availability, and soil pH, are discussed....... rates were generally high. It was concluded that the contribution from floors to NH3 emissions was <50%. There was some evidence for reduced CH4 emissions from acidified slurry, but CH4 emissions were generally low and apparently dominated by enteric fermentation. No effect on N2O emissions was observed...

  14. The CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry; Le coulis de glace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, O.; Hu, J.; Eicher, S.; Brun, F. [Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Sari, O.; Hu, J. [Clean Cooling Solutions, spin off of University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Homsy, P. [Nestec Ltd, Vevey (Switzerland); Logel, J.-C. [Axima Refrigeration, Bischheim (France)

    2007-12-15

    A new, very promising refrigerant was developed, which could be used in industrial processes as well as air conditioners: the CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry. Replacing hydrochlorofluorocarbon HCFC refrigerants has a high priority, due to the strong negative environmental impact of these fluids. New refrigerants have to be environment friendly, non-inflammable, cheap and made of natural materials. CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries and/or a mixture of ice slurry and CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry meet these requirements. The University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland in Yverdon, together with industrial partners, investigated the properties of such slurries. The slurries were created using the Coldeco process: the refrigerating fluid is directly injected into the liquid brine. The evaporation of the refrigerating fluid cools the liquid down to its freezing point and homogeneously distributed small crystals appear in the liquid. A test rig was built to measure the physical and chemical properties of the slurries obtained in this way. CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries have a higher energy storage capacitance (500 kJ/kg) than ice slurries (333 kJ/kg). The production of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries in large quantities in a continuous process was demonstrated. The solid particle concentration was 10%, the pressure amounted to 30 bar and the temperature 2 to 4 {sup o}C. Such slurries can be pumped and circulated in pipe networks. Stainless steel is the appropriate material for such networks. However, the main advantage of the new refrigerant will be, according to the authors, a reduced energy consumption compared to traditional refrigerating cycles: the difference between the temperature required by the user and the refrigerant temperature is reduced, thanks to the use of the latent heat in the new process.

  15. Nanometric Antimony Powder Synthesis by Activated Alkaline Hydride Reduction of Antimony Pentachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel chemical reduction method using an activated alkaline hydride (LiH or NaH-t-BuONa) in tetrahydrofuran solvent has been applied to antimony salt reduction. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies have been carried out to characterize the morphology and structure of the materials. Alkali hydride nature influence has been proved. In both cases the process allows to prepare antimony particles in nanometer range from few nanometers to about 20nm which could be used as anodic materials for lithium-ion batteries. With lithium hydride well-crystallized particles inclined to agglomeration were observed whereas finely dispersed amorphous particles were pointing out after activated sodium hydride reduction

  16. The microstructure and hydriding characteristics of high temperature aged U-13 at.%Nb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hefei; Shi, Peng; Li, Ruiwen; Jiang, Chunli; Yang, Jiangrong; Hu, Guichao

    2015-09-01

    Niobium as alloying element significantly improves physical and chemical properties of metallic uranium, exhibiting great application potential in uranium alloy materials. The corrosion resistance performance as well as the internal alloy phase structure of uranium-niobium alloy is closely related to aging processes. Microstructure and hydriding characteristics of the 400 °C/9 h + 500 °C/2 h aged uranium-13 at.% niobium alloys (U-13 at.%Nb) were investigated from the point of view of relationship between the microstructure and growth of the hydriding areas. The microstructure, morphology and composition of the alloy phases before and after the hydriding were well characterized by the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Experimental results indicated that the hydrogen preferentially reacted with the Nb-depleted phase α-like-U to form monolithic β-UH3Nbx, and the alloy microstructure played an important role in hydride growth.

  17. PWR fuel failure analysis due to hydriding based on PIE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently failures of nuclear fuel rods in Korean nuclear power plants were reported and their failure causes have been investigated by using PIE techniques. Destructive and physico-chemical examinations reveal that the clad hydriding phenomena had caused the rod failures primarily and secondarily in each case. In this study, the basic mechanisms of the primary and the secondary hydriding failures are reviewed, PIE data such as cladding inner and outer surface oxide thickness and the restructuring of the fuel pellets are analyzed, and they are compared with the predicted behaviors by a fuel performance code. In addition, post-defected fuel behaviors are reviewed and qualitatively analyzed. The results strongly support that the hydriding processes, primary and secondary, played critical roles in the respective fuel rods failures and the secondary hydriding failure can take place even in the fuel rod with low linear heat generation rate. (author)

  18. Deformation of vanadium and niobium on hydridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deformation of wire samples made of polycrystalline vanadium and niobium on hydridation is studied. It is shown that sample allowance under loading after deformation below the yield strength doesn't cause considerable creep. Cathode saturation of samples with hydrogen sharply accelerates vanadium microdeformation velocity, that is connected with the beginning of intensive vanadium hydride precipitation (β-phase) from α-solid vanadium-hydrogen solution. Niobium hydridation at the first stage doesn't hydridation at the first stage doesn't cause negative deformation, then change in deformation direction takes place at the moment of intensive growth of the hydride phase. The conclusion is made that in both metals microdeformation is determined by contribution of two components: deformation caused by changing a shift module of metal-hydrogen system, and deformation caused by the oriented growth of the hydride phase in the field of apphed stresses

  19. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly...... followed by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was...

  20. Tritium processing using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company is commissioned by the US Department of Energy to operate the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory. The primary purpose of the plant is to produce radioactive materials for national defense. In keeping with current technology, new processes for the production of tritium are being developed. Three main objectives of this new technology are to ease the processing of, ease the storage of, and to reduce the operating costs of the tritium production facility. Research has indicated that the use of metal hydrides offers a viable solution towards satisfying these objectives. The Hydrogen and Fuels Technology Division has the responsibility to conduct research in support of the tritium production process. Metal hydride technology and its use in the storage and transportation of hydrogen will be reviewed

  1. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  2. Effect of novel alkaline copper slurry on 300 mm copper global planarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijuan, Liu; Yuling, Liu; Chenwei, Wang; Guodong, Chen; Mengting, Jiang; Haobo, Yuan; Pengfei, Cheng

    2014-09-01

    The copper removal rate and uniformity of two types copper slurries were investigated, which was performed on the 300 mm chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) platform. The experiment results illustrate that the removal rate of the two slurries is nearly the same. Slurry A is mainly composed of a FA/OII type chelating agent and the uniformity reaches to 88.32%. While the uniformity of slurry B is 96.68%, which is mainly composed of a FA/OV type chelating agent. This phenomenon demonstrates that under the same process conditions, the uniformity of different slurries is vastly different. The CMP performance was evaluated in terms of the dishing and erosion values. In this paper, the relationship between the uniformity and the planarization was deeply analyzed, which is mainly based on the endpoint detection mechanism. The experiment results reveal that the slurry with good uniformity has low dishing and erosion. The slurry with bad uniformity, by contract, increases Cu dishing significantly and causes copper loss in the recessed region. Therefore, the following conclusions are drawn: slurry B can improve the wafer leveling efficiently and minimize the resistance and current density along the line, which is helpful to improve the device yield and product reliability. This investigation provides a guide to improve the uniformity and achieve the global and local planarization. It is very significant to meet the requirements for 22 nm technology nodes and control the dishing and erosion efficiently.

  3. Effect of novel alkaline copper slurry on 300 mm copper global planarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The copper removal rate and uniformity of two types copper slurries were investigated, which was performed on the 300 mm chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) platform. The experiment results illustrate that the removal rate of the two slurries is nearly the same. Slurry A is mainly composed of a FA/OII type chelating agent and the uniformity reaches to 88.32%. While the uniformity of slurry B is 96.68%, which is mainly composed of a FA/OV type chelating agent. This phenomenon demonstrates that under the same process conditions, the uniformity of different slurries is vastly different. The CMP performance was evaluated in terms of the dishing and erosion values. In this paper, the relationship between the uniformity and the planarization was deeply analyzed, which is mainly based on the endpoint detection mechanism. The experiment results reveal that the slurry with good uniformity has low dishing and erosion. The slurry with bad uniformity, by contract, increases Cu dishing significantly and causes copper loss in the recessed region. Therefore, the following conclusions are drawn: slurry B can improve the wafer leveling efficiently and minimize the resistance and current density along the line, which is helpful to improve the device yield and product reliability. This investigation provides a guide to improve the uniformity and achieve the global and local planarization. It is very significant to meet the requirements for 22 nm technology nodes and control the dishing and erosion efficiently. (semiconductor technology)

  4. Drying dichloromethane over calcium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of dichloromethane by a simple 10 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. First, dichloromethane is refluxed with calcium hydride to remove water. Then, dichloromethane is distilled to separate it from the byproducts of the reflux reaction. This procedure can be implemented in 1 day. ### Introduction In many instances i...

  5. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  6. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  7. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions

  8. NMR study of hydride systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrides of thorium (ThH2, Th4H15 and Th4D15) and the intermetallic compound system (Zr(Vsub(1-x)Cosub(x))2 and its hydrides were investigated using the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. From the results for the thorium hydride samples it was concluded that the density of states at the Fermi level n(Esub(f)) is higher in Th4H15 than in ThH2; there is an indirect reaction between the protons and the d electrons belonging to the Th atoms in Th4H15; n(E) has a sharp structure near Esub(f). It was also found that the hydrogen diffusion mechanism changes with temperature. From the results for the intermetallic compound system conclusions were drawn concerning variations in the electronic structure, which explain the behavior of the system. In hydrogen diffusion studies in several samples it was found that Co atoms slow the diffusion rate. Quadrupole spectra obtained at low temperatures show that the H atoms preferably occupy tetrahedral sites formed by three V atoms and one Z atom. (H.K.)

  9. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  10. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids (CSS) from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids.

  11. Production of propylene from 1-butene on highly active "bi-functional single active site" catalyst: Tungsten carbene-hydride supported on alumina

    KAUST Repository

    Mazoyer, Etienne

    2011-12-02

    1-Butene is transformed in a continuous flow reactor over tungsten hydrides precursor W-H/Al2O3, 1, giving a promising yield into propylene at 150 °C and different pressures. Tungsten carbene-hydride single active site operates as a "bi-functional catalyst" through 1-butene isomerization on W-hydride and 1-butene/2-butenes cross-metathesis on W-carbene. This active moiety is generated in situ at the initiation steps by insertion of 1-butene on tungsten hydrides precursor W-H/Al2O3, 1 followed by α-H and β-H abstraction. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5 % Nb: effect of hydride blisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the zirconium base alloys subjected to a local thermal gradient, in presence of hydrogen, fully hydride region (frequently called blisters) can be formed. Due to the brittle character of the zirconium hydride, cracks are usually found inside the blisters. These cracks are prone to growing, under stress and temperature, by successive hydride precipitation at the crack tip. This process is called hydride induced delayed cracking (HIDC). In a previous work, hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. In the present one, blisters were grown on Zr-2.5 wt % Nb pressure tubes. Then, tensile specimens were submitted to HIDC tests. During the test, the radial hydrides length increase due to stress concentrator effect of the blister. If a crack, that was initiated into the blister, reaches the Zr matrix therefore can propagate through the radial hydrides. (author)

  13. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  14. On the chemistry of hydrides of N atoms and O$^+$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, Zainab; Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low density lines of sight towards G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H$_2$ formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O$^+$ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O$^+$ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

  15. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH2.7(s), PuN(s), Pu2O3(s), N2, O2 and H2, therefore , the system described involves of 2 independent reactions ,both those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The present paper has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect.

  16. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A manifold coupling continuous electrolytic hydride generation of volatile hydrides with atomization in graphite tube atomizers after in situ collection was used for Se(IV) determination. Laboratory-made thin-layer flow-through cells with lead wire (cell I) and granular lead (cell II) as the cathode material were used as the electrolytic generators of volatile selenium hydride. The automatic sampling equipment of the graphite atomizer, with an untreated fused silica capillary, was used both for the introduction of volatile hydride into the atomizer and for pretreatment of the graphite furnace surface with a palladium modifier. The influence of the experimental parameters on the analytical signal was studied and optimum conditions for selenium determination were found. The optimum experimental parameters for hydride generation were: catholyte (1 mol l-1 HCl)/anolyte (2 mol l-1 H2SO4) flow rate of 2.0 ml min-1; applied generation current of 1.2 A (cell I) and 0.8 A (cell II); and carrier gas flow rate of 40 (cell I) and 70 ml min-1 (cell II). The hydride generated was collected in the graphite tube (pre-treated with 5 μg of Pd reduced at 800 deg. C) at a temperature of 400 deg. C for 30 s. The overall efficiency of H2Se electrochemical generation, transport and collection was 71±7% for cell I and 80±5% for cell II. The results for electrochemical generation of H2Se (cell II) (absolute limit of detection 50 pg, 3σ criterion) were compared with the original generation of H2Se using NaBH4 as a reduction agent (absolute limit of detection 30 pg) and with conventional liquid sampling. The repeatability at the 1.0 ng ml-1 level was better than 2.4% (relative standard deviation) for electrochemical hydride generation and better than 2.8% for chemical hydride generation

  17. Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakainen, Kati

    new metal hydrides with novel structures and properties, because of the drastically increased chemical potential of hydrogen. Pressures up to 10 GPa can be easily achieved using the multi-anvil (MA) hydrogenations while maintaining sufficient sample volume for structure and property characterization. Gigapascal MA hydrogenations using ammonia borane (BH3

  18. Hydrogen Storage using Metal Hydrides in a Stationary Cogeneration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the development of a hydrogen production and storage unit to supply a 40 kW stationary fuel cell, a metal hydride storage tank was chosen according to its reliability and high energetic efficiency. The study of AB5 compounds led to the development of a composition adapted to the project needs. The absorption/desorption pressures of the hydride at 75 C (2 / 1.85 bar) are the most adapted to the specifications. The reversible storage capacity (0.95 %wt) has been optimized to our work conditions and chemical kinetics is fast. The design of the Combined Heat and Power CHP system requires 5 kg hydrogen storage but in a first phase, only a 0.1 kg prototype has been realised and tested. Rectangular design has been chosen to obtain good compactness with an integrated plate fin type heat exchanger designed to reach high absorption/desorption rates. In this paper, heat and mass transfer characteristics of the Metal Hydride tank (MH tank) during absorption/desorption cycles are given. (authors)

  19. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  20. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  1. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  2. Electronic structure of alkali metal hydrides on data of cluster calculations by LCAO MO SCF CNDO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of quantum-chemical study in where by M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, are presented. The calculation expresses the expected electron density distributions in hydrides on the hydrogen and metal atoms as well as the energy characteristics: M-H, M-M and compounds binding energies. The latter ones qualitatively correlate with the binding energies of LiH-CsH compounds. The calculated values for the Fermi energy and the width of the forbidden zone at the Fermi level make it possible to suppose that the ideally formed lithium hydride crystal will be characterized by the highest electrical resistance. It is established that quantum-chemical characteristics of the MH hydrides structure change nonmonotonously by transfer from Li to Cs

  3. Life Cycle Assessment of Slurry Management Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik; Petersen, Bjørn Molt

    This report contains the results of Life Cycle Assessments of two slurry management technologies - acidification and decentred incineration. The LCA foundation can be used by the contributing companies for evaluating the environmental sustainability of a specific technology from a holistic Life...... Cycle perspective. Through this the companies can evaluate the environmental benefits and disadvantages of introducing a specific technology for slurry management. From a societal perspective the results can contribute to a clarification of which slurry management technologies (or combination of...

  4. Flow behaviour of sand-water slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk

    Cranfield, Bedforshire : BHR Group, 2010 - (Heywood, N.), s. 383-392 ISBN 978-1-85598-119-5. [International Conference on Hydrotransport /18./. Rio de Janeiro (BR), 22.09.2010-24.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/1574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : sand slurry * sand -kaolin slurry * flow behavior * pressure drop * particle size distribution effect * concentration effect * slurry peptisation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  5. Experimental reproducibility analysis in DU hydriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Chung, Hongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A storage and delivery system (SDS) is used for storing hydrogen isotopes as a metal hydride form. The rapid hydriding of tritium is very important not only for safety reasons but also for the economic design and operation of the SDS. For the storage, supply, and recovery of hydrogen isotopes, depleted uranium (DU) has been extensively proposed. To develop nuclear fusion technology, it will be necessary to store and supply hydrogen isotopes needed for Tokamak operation. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments. The experimental reproducibility of tank pressure on DU hydriding was analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the tank pressure showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the bed temperatures increased up to maximum temperature with exothermic reaction and then they showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments.

  6. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- (Cp=eta5-C5H5 and PPN = (Ph3P)2) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN+[CpV(C)3X]- and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN+ [CpV(CO)3]2H-. The borohydride salt PPN+[CpV(CO)3BH4]- has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)3H- and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)3H-. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)2 or a mixture of CpRh(CO)2 and CpCo(CO)2 affords two new anions, PPN+ [Cp2Rh3(CO)4]- and PPN+[Cp2RhCo(CO)2]-. CpMo(CO)3H reacts with CpMo(CO)3R (R=CH3,C2H5, CH2C6H5) at 25 to 500C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO)3]2 and [CpMo(CO)2]2. In general, CpV(CO)3H- appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)3H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)3H- generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)3H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species

  7. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH2 as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH2 are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  8. Hydride observations using the neutrography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron radiography observations were performed at the RA-6 experimental nuclear facility in Bariloche. Images from a prototype of a hydride-based hydrogen storage device have been obtained. The technique allows visualizing the inner hydride space distribution. The hydride appeared compacted at the lower part of the prototype after several cycles of hydrogen charge and discharge. The technique has also been applied to the study of Zr/ZrH2 samples. There is a linear relation between the sample width/hydrogen concentration and the photograph grey scale. This information could be useful for the study of nuclear engineering materials and to determine their possible degradation by hydrogen pick up (author)

  9. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Tunold, Reidar

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... observed. The impedance analysis was found to be an efficient method for characterizing metal hydride electrodes in situ....

  10. Modeling of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis in a Slurry Reactor with Water Permeable Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabiano A. N. Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an important chemical process for the production of liquid fuels and olefins. In recent years, the abundant availability of natural gas and the increasing demand of olefins, diesel, and waxes have led to a high interest to further develop this process. A mathematical model of a slurry membrane reactor used for syngas polymerization was developed to simulate and compare the maximum yields and operating conditions in the reactor with that in a conventional slurry reactor.The carbon polymerization was studied from a modeling point of view in a slurry reactor with a water permeable membrane and a conventional slurry reactor. Simulation results show that different parameters affect syngas conversion and carbon product distribution, such as the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio,and the membrane parameters such as membrane permeance.

  11. SLURRY FLOW MODELLING BY CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Ghanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made in the present study to develop a generalized slurry flow model using CFD and utilize the model to predict concentration profile. The purpose of the CFD model is to gain better insight into the solid liquid slur¬ry flow in pipelines. Initially a three-dimensional model problem was developed to understand the influence of the particle drag coefficient on the solid concen¬tration profile. The preliminary simulations highlighted the need for correct mo¬delling of the inter phase drag force. The various drag correlations available in the literature were incorporated into a two-fluid model (Euler-Euler along with the standard k- turbulence model with mixture properties to simulate the tur¬bulent solid-liquid flow in a pipeline. The computational model was mapped on to a commercial CFD solver FLUENT6.2 (of Fluent Inc., USA. To push the en¬velope of applicability of the simulation, recent data from Kaushal (2005 (with solid concentration up to 50% was selected to validate the three dimensional simulations. The experimental data consisted of water-glass bead slurry at 125 and 440-micron particle with different flow velocity (from 1 to 5 m/s and overall concentration up to 10 to 50% by volume. The predicted pressure drop and concentration profile were validated by experimental data and showed excel-lent agreement. Interesting findings came out from the parametric study of ve-locity and concentration profiles. The computational model and results discus¬sed in this work would be useful for extending the applications of CFD models for simulating large slurry pipelines.

  12. Very low conductivity self-hardening slurry for permanent enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attapulgite clay and ground blast furnace slag cement can form a low solids slurry which, after setting and curing, exhibits very low permeability and substantial strength. Compared to better known cement bentonite slurries, the conductivity is 3 orders of magnitude lower and the strength is four times higher at a similar solids content. Coefficients of permeability have been measured in the 10-10 cm/sec. range. As a containment barrier, no chemical compound has had detrimental effects on the integrity of the material. Compatibility with leachates at a pH under 2 has been demonstrated. Compared to leachable Ordinary Portland Cement and to bentonite gel shrinkage in the presence of certain organic compounds, the attapulgite clay and the selected slag cement behave as remarkably inert. A number of successful applications as vertical barriers, trenched and by the vibrated beam method, have been installed at remedial sites. Applications by jet grouting have been implemented under utilities to provide continuity. The potential for placement of such materials to form horizontal barriers by jet grouting or frac-grouting/mud jacking techniques, offers the possibility of creating complete enclosures in soils. The purely mineral nature of these slurries ensures long term chemical stability necessary for permanent containment

  13. Reactions of NO with nitrogen hydrides x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebel, A. M.; Lin, M. C.

    In this review, we consider the reactions of NO ( x 1,2) with the nitrogen x hydrides NH, NH and NH . The reactions are relevant to the post-combustion, non-catalytic reduction of NO with NH in the thermal de-NO process and with x x HNCO in the rapid reduction of NO as well as to the thermal decomposition of x some high-energy materials, including ammonium dinitramide. The practical importance has motivated considerable theoretical interest in these reactions. We review numerous ab - initio molecular orbital studies of potential energy surfaces for NO NH and theoretical calculations of their kinetic parameters, such as x y thermal rate constants and branching ratios of various products. The most advanced theoretical calculations are carried out using the Gaussian-2 family of methods which provides the chemical accuracy (within 2 kcal mol ) for the energetics and molecular parameters of the reactants, products, intermediates and transition states. We present a detailed comparison of the theoretical results with available experimental data. We show that the reactions of NO with NH and NH x are very fast because they occur without a barrier and lead to the formation of multiple products which include radicals and stable molecules. The reactions of NO with NH , taking place by the H abstraction to form NH and HNO , are slow x x but still relevant to the NH de-NO system, because of their fast reverse processes x which have not yet been measured experimentally.

  14. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H2 separation factors and rates of HT--H2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  15. Studies on Slurry Design Fundamentals for Advanced CMP Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Basim, G. B.

    2013-06-14

    New developments and device performance requirements in microelectronics industry add to the challenges in chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. One of the recently introduced materials is germanium which enables improved performance through better channel mobility in shallow trench isolation (STI) applications. This paper reports on the slurry design alternatives for Ge CMP with surfactant mediation to improve on the silica/germanium selectivity using colloidal silica slurry. In addition to the standard CMP tests to evaluate the material removal rates, atomic force microscopy (AFM) based wear tests were also conducted to evaluate single particle-surface interaction of the polishing system. Furthermore, nature of the surface oxide film of germanium was studied through contact angle measurements and surface roughness tested by AFM. It was observed that the CMP selectivity of the silica/germanium system and defectivity control were possible with a reasonable material removal rate value by using self-assembled structures of cationic surfactants.

  16. A compact hydrogen recycling system using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas recycling system to prevent losses of isotopically enriched hydrogen gas has been developed for the operation of a liquid target (2.7 l) used by the Radiative Muon Capture group at TRIUMF. The experimental requirements for high gas purity (chemical impurities below 10-9), low operating pressure (below 1 bar abs) and high loading pressure (about 10 bar needed for a palladium purifier) together with the usual hydrogen safety requirements were satisfied with a metal hydride storage device in combination with a small pump/compressor system. A description of the complete system together with its characteristic operational data are given in this paper. ((orig.))

  17. Slurry discharge management-beach profile prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, R.; Nawrot, J.R. [Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-11-01

    Mine tailings dams are embankments used by the mining industry to retain the tailings products after the mineral preparation process. Based on the acid-waste stereotype that all coal slurry is acid producing, current reclamation requires a four foot soil cover for inactive slurry disposal areas. Compliance with this requirement is both difficult and costly and in some case unnecessary, as not all the slurry, or portions of slurry impoundments are acid producing. Reduced costs and recent popularity of wetland development has prompted many operators to request reclamation variances for slurry impoundments. Waiting to address slurry reclamation until after the impoundment is full, limits the flexibility of reclamation opportunities. This paper outlines a general methodology to predict the formation of the beach profile for mine tailings dams, by the discharge volume and location of the slurry into the impoundment. The review is presented under the perspective of geotechnical engineering and waste disposal management emphasizing the importance of pre-planning slurry disposal land reclamation. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model. Version 2

    OpenAIRE

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model. In second version of...

  19. Atomistic Potentials for Palladium-Silver Hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Zhou, X.

    2013-01-01

    New EAM potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the mis...

  20. Analysis of the hydridation dynamics of metals by gaseous impedance spectroscopy. Application to electrolytic hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the hydridation dynamics in presence of impurities is analyzed by pneumato-chemical impedance spectroscopy. The measurements are carried out with a Sieverts volumetric frame. The obtention conditions of the experimental impedances are discussed in relation with the thermodynamic states of the metal-H studied systems. A software of specific modelling has been developed: with this software, it is possible to calculate the experimental impedances and, from model equations, to accede to the microscopic kinetic parameters bound to the hydridation reactions. The results obtained on different materials, in presence of oxygen, are presented and analyzed. (O.M.)

  1. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John, E-mail: john.knowles@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase.

  2. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase

  3. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  4. Characterization of nano-scaled metal-hydrides confined in nano-porous carbon frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaslee, David Edward

    Metal hydrides are currently being studied to provide hydrogen for use in fuel cells and for transportation applications. Hydrogen can be stored in chemical compounds at higher density and lower volume than liquid H2 or compressed gas. Thermodynamic properties of metal hydrides differ between bulk and nano-sized particles. Many metal hydrides with useful volumetric and gravimetric capacities have high decomposition temperatures, but when placed in nano-sized frameworks (or templates) desorption and adsorption temperatures can be fine-tuned to meet engineering requirements for real-world systems. Additionally, some metal hydrides have shown a change in the decomposition pathway when infiltrated into these frameworks, thereby reducing the amount of unwanted byproducts, and potentially improving the cyclability of the material. The Temperature Programmed Decomposition Mass Spectrum Residual Gas Analyzer can be used to characterize gas desorption, decomposition temperatures, picogram changes in mass, and ionization energies for a variety of materials and gasses. The goal of the system is to characterize desorption of the hydrogen (including byproduct gasses) and the decomposition of the metal hydrides. The experimental apparatus is composed of four main components: the residual gas analyzer (RGA), the low temperature stage quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the high temperature heating stage, and two vacuum chambers separated by a small flow hole which allows a direct line-of-site to the RGA.

  5. Digestion and preparation methods of different samples determine elements produced hydride generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to explain the principle of hydride generation technique, which is another technique of atomic absorption spectrometry, in addition to flame and graphite techniques. This technique is used to determine some metals and nonmetals (Se, Sn, Te, Sb, Bi, AS, Hg ) which produce volatile compounds in their reactions. The study focuses on the analytical capabilities of the hydride generation technique, the principle of hydride generation process, the interferences that affect the analysis process (spectra interference, chemical interference, kinetic interference, oxidation state interference, gas layer interference) and the methods to overcome these interferences. The working steps of the technique have been reported, finally some experimental work has been performed on different kind of samples such as: waste, tripolyphosphate, volcanic rock and phosphogypsum to determine mercury and blood sample to determine arsenic. (Authors)

  6. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Yale University

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  7. Angle-dependent hard X-ray photoemission study of Nb hydride formation in high-pressure supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soda, Kazuo, E-mail: j45880a@cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kondo, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Kanta; Kato, Masahiko [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiraki, Tatsuhito; Niwa, Ken; Kusaba, Keiji; Hasegawa, Masashi [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Xeniya, Kozina; Ikenaga, Eiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nb hydrides in 10-GPa supercritical water are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. • The hydride components of the Nb 3d core-level spectra are increased with the depth. • The bulk valence-band spectrum shows a split band due to the Nb–H bond formation. • The hydrides are formed in the bulk and their surfaces are covered with Nb oxides. - Abstract: Nb hydrides formation in 10-GPa supercritical water has been investigated by angle-dependent micro-beam hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In the Nb 3d core-level spectra, Nb hydride components are found in the slightly high binding energy side of the metallic components, and the oxide ones are observed even though little oxides are recognized in X-ray diffraction patterns. Obtained emission-angle dependence of the Nb 3d core-level spectra of Nb hydride specimens shows that the Nb hydride components increase with the emission angle decreased i.e. the sampling depth increased, while the oxide ones decrease. The bulk valence-band spectrum is obtained by decomposing the measured valence-band spectra into a bulk and surface components with use of the emission-angle dependence of the core-level and valence-band spectra; it consists of two bands. This implies the Nb–H chemical bond formation and Nb in an oxidation state, consistent with reported band structure calculations and the observed core-level chemical shifts. Thus it is confirmed by valence-band and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy that the Nb hydrides are formed inside the specimen, irrespective to the well-known high oxidation ability of supercritical water.

  8. gamma-Zr-Hydride Precipitate in Irradiated Massive delta- Zr-Hydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, M. R.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    During examination of A Zircaloy-2-clad fuel pin, which had been part of a test fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor, several regions of severe internal hydriding were noticed in the upper-plenum end of the pin. Examination of similar fuel pins has shown that hydride of this type is caused by...

  9. Thermophilic slurry-phase treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoheterotrophic thermophilic bacteria were used to achieve enhanced hydrocarbon degradation during slurry-phase treatment of oily waste sludges from petroleum refinery operations. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were examined under thermophilic conditions to assess the effects of mode of metabolism on the potential for petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. The study determined that both aerobic and anaerobic thermophilic bacteria are capable of growth on petroleum hydrocarbons. Thermophilic methanogenesis is feasible during the degradation of hydrocarbons when a strict anaerobic condition is achieved in a slurry bioreactor. Aerobic thermophilic bacteria achieved the largest apparent reduction in chemical oxygen demand, freon extractable oil, total and volatile solid,s and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when treating oily waste sludges. The observed shift with time in the molecular weight distribution of hydrocarbon material was more pronounced under aerobic metabolic conditions than under strict anaerobic conditions. The changes in the hydrocarbon molecular weight distribution, infrared spectra, and PAH concentrations during slurry-phase treatment indicate that the aerobic thermophilic bioslurry achieved a higher degree of hydrocarbon degradation than the anaerobic thermophilic bioslurry during the same time period

  10. Catalytic oxidation of calcium sulfite in solution/aqueous slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-qin; WU Zhong-biao; WANG Da-hui

    2004-01-01

    Forced oxidation of calcium sulfite aqueous slurry is a key step for the calcium-based flue gas desulfurization(FGD) residue. Experiments were conducted in a semi-batch system and a continuous flow system on lab scales. The main reactor in semi-batch system is a 1000 ml volume flask. It has five necks for continuous feeding of gas and a batch of calcium sulfite solution/aqueous slurry. In continuous flow system, the main part is a jacketed Pyrex glass reactor in which gas and solution/aqueous slurry are fed continuously. Calcium sulfite oxidation is a series of complex free-radical reactions. According to experimental results and literature data, the reactions are influenced significantly by manganese as catalyst. At low concentration of manganese and calcium sulfite, the reaction rate is dependent on 1.5 order of sulfite concentration, 0.5 order of manganese concentration, and zero order of oxygen concentration in which the oxidation is controlled by chemical kinetics. With concentrations of calcium sulfite and manganese increasing, the reactions are independent gradually on the constituents in solution but are impacted by oxygen concentration. Manganese can accelerate the free-radical reactions, and then enhances the mass transfer of oxygen from gas to liquid. The critical concentration of calcium sulfite is 0.007 mol/L, manganese is 10-4 mol/L, and oxygen is of 0.2-0.4 atm.

  11. Acidification of animal slurry--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangueiro, David; Hjorth, Maibritt; Gioelli, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia emissions are a major problem associated with animal slurry management, and solutions to overcome this problem are required worldwide by farmers and stakeholders. An obvious way to minimize ammonia emissions from slurry is to decrease slurry pH by addition of acids or other substances. This solution has been used commonly since 2010 in countries such as Denmark, and its efficiency with regard to the minimization of NH3 emissions has been documented in many studies. Nevertheless, the impact of such treatment on other gaseous emissions during storage is not clear, since the studies performed so far have provided different scenarios. Similarly, the impact of the soil application of acidified slurry on plant production and diffuse pollution has been considered in several studies. Also, the impact of acidification upon combination with other slurry treatment technologies (e.g. mechanical separation, anaerobic digestion …) is important to consider. Here, a compilation and critical review of all these studies has been performed in order to fully understand the global impact of slurry acidification and assess the applicability of this treatment for slurry management. PMID:25463570

  12. Performance of a Centrifugal Slurry Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawas Yahya Bajawi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of speed, concentration and size of slurry on the performance of a centrifugal pump. For this purpose a facility was built where the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump was examined using aggregate slurry. Three sizes of slurry with three concentrations and at three impeller speeds were used for the performance investigations of a centrifugal slurry pump. As a reference performance the performance of centrifugal slurry pump was also tested with clean water. The performance of pump has been reported as variations of head, power and efficiency at various flow rates along with the system characteristics of the pump. The results reveal that the pump performance is grossly affected by the type of slurry, its concentration and size. Besides this the variation in speed also affects the performance as is observed in pumps with water. The maximum decrease in the head, with respect to clear water, at the operating point was found to be 47% for aggregate for size 20 mm, 15% concentration and 2600 rpm. The maximum decrement in efficiency at operating point for aggregate was found to be 47% for 4 mm size, 15% concentration and at 2200 rpm. The power increment requirement for aggregate was 9% for 4 mm size, 15% concentration and 2600 rpm.

  13. Interstellar chemistry of nitrogen hydrides in dark clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, Romane Le; Faure, Alexandre; Forêts, Guillaume Pineau des; Rist, Claire; Maret, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to perform a comprehensive analysis of the interstellar chemistry of nitrogen, focussing on the gas-phase formation of the smallest polyatomic species and in particular nitrogen hydrides. We present a new chemical network in which the kinetic rates of critical reactions have been updated based on recent experimental and theoretical studies, including nuclear spin branching ratios. Our network thus treats the different spin symmetries of the nitrogen hydrides self-consistently together with the ortho and para forms of molecular hydrogen. This new network is used to model the time evolution of the chemical abundances in dark cloud conditions. The steady-state results are analysed, with special emphasis on the influence of the overall amounts of carbon, oxygen, and sulphur. Our calculations are also compared with Herschel/HIFI observations of NH, NH$_2$, and NH$_3$ detected towards the external envelope of the protostar IRAS 16293-2422. The observed abundances and abundance ratios ...

  14. Liquefying of concentrated fine-grained slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk

    Jaroslavl: Jaroslavskij Gosudarstvennyj technicheskij Institut, 2007 - (Balakirev, V.), s. 114-121 ISBN 5-230-20704-3. [Mezhdunarodnaja nauchnaja konferencija Matematicheskije Metody v Nauke i Technologijach /20./. Yaroslavl (RU), 29.05.2007-01.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600503; GA MPO FF-P/051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : fine-grained slurries * drag reduction * kaolin slurry * fluidic ash slurry * laminar/turbulent transition Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  15. Boron–nitrogen based hydrides and reactive composites for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars H. Jepsen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen forms chemical compounds with most other elements and forms a variety of different chemical bonds. This fascinating chemistry of hydrogen has continuously provided new materials and composites with new prospects for rational design and the tailoring of properties. This review highlights a range of new boron and nitrogen based hydrides and illustrates how hydrogen release and uptake properties can be improved.

  16. On-stream analysis, by x-ray diffraction, of apatite-containing slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the equipment and method developed for the on-stream analysis of apatite in the slurries of a beneficiation plant. The equipment uses a divergent beam of X-rays that irradiates the slurry as it flows through a sample presenter. The diffracted beam is focused by an elastically bent quartz monochromator crystal into a scintillation detector. The P2O5 content and percentage solids in the slurry are determined from peak and background intensities by the use of a quadratic equation. Measurements showed that the accuracy of these determinations is comparable with that of chemical analysis, which is the method used at present. In addition, one analysis takes two minutes as against the 20 minutes required for each chemical analysis

  17. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless-steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount (≈20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor can be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for determining absolute hydrogen concentrations

  18. Thermoreversible Gelling Slurry for Solid Freeforming Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct-Ink-writing technique (DIW) can perform solid freeforming fabrication (SFF) to produce on-demand complex ceramic components. In this study, thermally gelling concentrated alumina slurry was prepared as a new ink for the direct-ink-writing technique. By employing the triblock copolymers of poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly (propylene oxide) (PPO), the concentrated alumina slurry showed nearly Newtonian behavior (sol state) at cooled temperature (5 deg. C) and thickened (gel state) at room temperature (30 deg. C). These states were reversible with the temperature change. The thermally-thickened alumina slurry had enough viscoelastic response to perform direct-ink-writing of 3D periodic colloidal structures with feature sizes of around 100μm in air without any clogging. The cooled slurry can be also handled easily on its setting up for DIW due to its low viscosity.

  19. Mechanism of corrosion of zirconium hydride and impact of precipitated hydrides on the Zircaloy-4 corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Higher corrosion rate of hydride compared to matrix (Zy4). • Higher oxygen diffusion coefficient through oxide formed on hydride. • Presence of Zr3O phase between hydride and oxide. • Hydrogen from the hydride phase is not integrated in the oxide during the corrosion process. - Abstract: In Pressurized Water Reactors, zirconium hydrides precipitate in the matrix and could increase the oxidation rate of the claddings. To understand their effect, corrosion tests, TEM and μ-XRD analyses have been performed. This work showed that the oxidation rate and the oxygen diffusion coefficient in the oxide formed on massive hydride are much greater than those of Zircaloy-4. Moreover, oxide characterizations indicated an additional phase indexed as the sub-oxide Zr3O between the oxide film and the massive hydride. Finally, the hydrogen of the hydrides is not incorporated in the oxide during the corrosion process

  20. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125 μm in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150 μm. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  1. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, M M [Materiales Dentales, Facultad de OdontologIa, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Marcelo T de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grana, D R; Kokubu, G A [PatologIa I. Escuela de OdontologIa, Facultad de Medicina. Asociacion Odontologica Argentina-Universidad del Salvador, Tucuman 1845 (1050) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Luppo, M I; Mintzer, S; Vigna, G, E-mail: mbarreiro@mater.odon.uba.a, E-mail: dgrana@usal.edu.a, E-mail: luppo@cnea.gov.a, E-mail: vigna@cnea.gov.a [Departamento Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San MartIn, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125{mu}m in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150{mu}m. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  2. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  3. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Davorin Matanović; Gracijan Krklec

    1994-01-01

    During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures) and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production...

  4. Physics of hydrogen storage in metal-hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical aspects of the hydrogenation-dehydrogenation mechanisms of metal-metal hydride systems were examined. Experimental investigation was conducted for magnesium hydride as a case study. Theoretical analysis and computational study were carried out. The kinetics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation of traditionally prepared Mg-MgH2 and chemically synthesized Mg-MgH2 were experimentally investigated. A detailed investigation was carried out to determine the reasons for the improved performance of a chemically synthesized Mg-MgH2 previously reported by Bogdanovic and co-workers. A scanning electron microscope was used to examine the surface morphology of the samples. The surface of chemically prepared samples appeared to be covered with micro-spheroidal beads ranging in radius between 0.5 μm and 0.05 μm formed in a fractal-like configuration. Theoretical analysis indicated that the unusual surface structure of the chemically prepared samples could be responsible for the rapid uptake and release of hydrogen. The uptake and release enhancement is believed to be partially due to the substantial increase n the surface area and partially due fast diffusion into the smaller particles. The effect of the addition to nickel to the surface was also investigated. Theoretical analysis was carried, out. Models for the process at the surface as well as in the bulk were developed. Diffusion equation was examined taking into account the diffusion coefficient being function of concentration. A nonlinear differential equation resulted for this case. The differential equation was numerically solved

  5. The versatility of hydride-forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Already in 1866 it was realised by Graham that large amounts of hydrogen gas were, as he called it, occluded in pure metallic palladium. Even after more than one century of research in the field of hydrogen storage materials this area is still of great interest. This is not only due to the present-day commercial importance of rechargeable Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries, in which hydride-forming intermetallic materials are widely exploited, but also from a fundamental point of view where new discoveries are still being made. In this review these two areas will be highlighted on the basis of two illustrative examples. The first example relates to the application of hydride-forming bulk materials as electrodes in NiMH batteries. Several hydride-forming compounds are, in principle, available to be used as energy storage electrode material. It turned out, however, that AB5 -type compounds are most successfully applied due to their excellent electrode properties, like high storage capacity, rate capability and rapid electrode activation. Another important aspect is the electrode stability during cycling, which determines the battery cycle life. By designing multicomponent AB5 compounds it has been shown that this stability can be drastically improved. Recently, a second class of very stable compounds has been proposed. These so-called non-stoichiometric AB5+x compounds are characterised by the fact that the severe particle size reduction, always accompanying the hydride-formation process, is reduced. The stability mechanism responsible for this remarkable behaviour will be outlined. The second example relates to thin film applications. Recently, it has been found that the electronic conductivity of thin films composed of rare earth metal hydrides like, for example, yttrium hydride and gadolinium hydride, changes dramatically from metallic in the dihydride state to semiconducting in the trihydride state. In line with these conductivity changes the

  6. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, M. B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch.

  7. Automotive cooling systems based on metal hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on metal hydride sorption systems as an alternative technology for automotive air-conditioning systems. Although this technology offers the possibility to increase the energy efficiency of a car (by utilising waste heat) and consequently reduces the CO2 emissions, its weight specific cooling power has so far been the main obstacle for an automotive application. Based on investigations of various metal hydrides, two alloys (LmNi4.91Sn0.15 and Ti0.99Zr0.01V0.43Fe0.09Cr0...

  8. Hydride Ions, HCO+ and Ionizing Irradiation in Star Forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2016-06-01

    Hydrides are fundamental precursor molecules in cosmic chemistry and many hydride ions have become observable in high quality for the first time thanks to the Herschel Space Observatory. Ionized hydrides, such as CH+ and OH+ and also HCO+ affect the chemistry of molecules such as water. They also provide complementary information on irradiation by far UV (FUV) or X-rays and gas temperature.We explore hydrides of the most abundant heavier elements in an observational survey covering star forming regions with different mass and evolutionary state. Twelve YSOs were observed with HIFI on Herschel in 6 spectral settings providing fully velocity-resolved line profiles. The YSOs include objects of low (Class 0 and I), intermediate, and high mass, with luminosities ranging from 4 Ls to 2 105 Ls.The targeted lines of CH+, OH+, H2O+, and C+ are detected mostly in blue-shifted absorption. H3O+ and SH+ are detected in emission and only toward some high-mass objects. For the low-mass YSOs the column density ratios of CH+/OH+ can be reproduced by simple chemical models implying an FUV flux of 2 – 400 times the ISRF at the location of the molecules. In two high-mass objects, the UV flux is 20 – 200 times the ISRF derived from absorption lines, and 300 – 600 ISRF using emission lines. Upper limits for the X-ray luminosity can be derived from H3O+ observations for some low-mass objects.If the FUV flux required for low-mass objects originates at the central protostar, a substantial FUV luminosity, up to 1.5 Ls, is required. For high-mass regions, the FUV flux required to produce the observed molecular ratios is smaller than the unattenuated flux expected from the central object(s) at the Herschel beam radius. This is consistent with an FUV flux reduced by circumstellar extinction or by bloating of the protostar.The ion molecules are proposed to form in FUV irradiated cavity walls that are shocked by the disk wind. The shock region is turbulent, broadening the lines to some 1

  9. Electrochemical behavior and polishing properties of silicon wafer in alkaline slurry with abrasive CeO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiao-lan; XU Da-yu; ZHANG Xiao-wei; SHI Xun-da; JIANG Nan; QIU Guan-zhou

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of silicon wafer in alkaline slurry with nano-sized CeO2 abrasive was investigated. The variations of corrosion potential (φcorr) and corrosion current density (Jcorr) of the P-type (100) silicon wafer with the slurry pH value and the concentration of abrasive CeO2 were studied by polarization curve technologies. The dependence of the polishing rate on the pH and the concentration of CeO2 in slurries during chemical mechanical polishing(CMP) were also studied. It is discovered that there is a large change of φcorr and Jcorr when slurry pH is altered and the Jcorr reaches the maximum (1.306 μA/cm2) at pH 10.5 when the material removal rate(MRR) comes to the fastest value. The Jcorr increases gradually from 0.994 μA/cm2 with 1% CeO2 to 1.304 μA/cm2 with 3% CeO2 and reaches a plateau with the further increase of CeO2 concentration. There is a considerable MRR in the slurry with 3% CeO2 at pH 10.5. The coherence between Jcorr and MRR elucidates that the research on the electrochemical behavior of silicon wafers in the alkaline slurry could offer theoretic guidance on silicon polishing rate and ensure to adjust optimal components of slurry.

  10. Light metal hydrides and complex hydrides for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüth, F; Bogdanović, B; Felderhoff, M

    2004-10-21

    The availability of feasible methods for hydrogen storage is one of the key-maybe the key-requirements for the large scale application of PEM fuel cells in cars. There are in principle four different approaches, i.e. cryostorage in liquid form, high pressure storage, storage in the form of a chemical compound which is converted to hydrogen by on-board reforming, or reversible chemical storage in different kinds of storage materials. New developments in the field of chemical storage make such systems attractive compared to the other options. This review will discuss the different possibilities for chemical storage of hydrogen and the focus on the presently most advanced system with respect to storage capacity and kinetics, i.e. catalyzed alanates, especially NaAlH(4). PMID:15489969

  11. Studies of coal slurries property; Slurry no seijo ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, M.; Aihara, Y.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sakaki, T.; Shibata, M.; Hirosue, H. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Saga (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It was previously found that the increase of slurry temperature provides a significant effect of slurry viscosity reduction for the coal slurry with high concentration of 50 wt%. To investigate the detailed influence of slurry temperature for the coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt%, influence of temperature on the successive change of apparent viscosity was observed at the constant shear rate. When the concentration of coal was increased from 45 wt% to 50 wt%, viscosity of the slurry was rapidly increased. When heated above 70{degree}C, the apparent viscosity decreased during heating to the given temperature, but it increased successively after reaching to the given temperature. The apparent viscosity showed higher value than that of the initial viscosity. The coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt% showed the fluidity of Newtonian fluid at the lower shear rate region, but showed the fluidity of pseudo-plastic fluid at the higher shear rate region. The slurry having high apparent viscosity by the successive change showed higher apparent viscosity with increasing the higher even by changing the shear rate. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  12. Optical measurement of slurry concentration profile in a concurrent-flow gas-slurry column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical technique is described which allows the measurement of steady-state slurry concentration profile in a slender concurrent-flow gas-slurry bubble column. The optically measured profile is compared with that predicted by a previously reported semiempirical dispersion model. Qualitative agreement is observed between them, and the reliability of the technique is supported by additional experimental data

  13. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data

  14. Biogas production by anaerobic co-digestion of cattle slurry and cheese whey

    OpenAIRE

    Comino, Elena; Riggio, Vincenzo Andrea; Rosso, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Biogas yield of mixtures of cattle slurry and cheese whey, rates of production of methane, removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD) were investigated at 35 C. Stable biogas production of 621 l/kg volatile solids at a hydraulic retention time of 42 days in a mixture containing 50% slurry and whey was obtained. The concentration of methane in the biogas was around 55%. Maximum removal efficiencies for COD and BOD5 were 82% and 90%, respectively. A ...

  15. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  16. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement

  17. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changji; Xiong, Liangyin; Wu, Erdong; Liu, Shi, E-mail: sliu@imr.ac.cn

    2015-02-15

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement.

  18. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi5 in a Ni/H2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  19. Are RENiAl hydrides metallic?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eichinger, K.; Havela, L.; Prokleška, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Daniš, S.; Šantavá, Eva; Miliyanchuk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2009), s. 1200-1202. ISSN 1862-5282 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/07/0418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : rare earth metals * magnetism * hydrides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  20. Computational study of metal hydride cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satheesh, A.; Muthukumar, P.; Dewan, Anupam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2009-04-15

    A computational study of a metal hydride cooling system working with MmNi{sub 4.6}Al{sub 0.4}/MmNi{sub 4.6}Fe{sub 0.4} hydride pair is presented. The unsteady, two-dimensional mathematical model in an annular cylindrical configuration is solved numerically for predicting the time dependent conjugate heat and mass transfer characteristics between coupled reactors. The system of equations is solved by the fully implicit finite volume method (FVM). The effects of constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions on the reaction bed temperature distribution, hydrogen concentration, and equilibrium pressures of the reactors are investigated. A dynamic correlation of the pressure-concentration-temperature plot is presented. At the given operating temperatures of 363/298/278 K (T{sub H}/T{sub M}/T{sub C}), the cycle time for the constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions of a single-stage and single-effect metal hydride system are found to be 1470.0 s and 1765.6 s, respectively. The computational results are compared with the experimental data reported in the literature for LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} hydride pair and a good agreement between the two was observed. (author)

  1. Investigation on Dispersed Catalyst for Slurry Bed Hydroprocessing of Heavy Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong; Guo Aijun; Ma Kuiju; Que Guohe

    2006-01-01

    The slurry-bed hydrocracking of Karamay VGO with water-soluble dispersed catalyst was studied and the catalyst after being separated from the reaction products was analyzed by using LRS, XRD and XPS to identify the crystal structure of the catalyst. In this paper, the catalytic functions of molybdenum, nickel and iron were studied respectively during the slurry-phase hydrocracking while using diphenylmethane as the model compound and VGO from Karamay crude as the feedstock. The test results showed that, during the slurry-phase hydrocracking of heavy oil, the metal sulfides entered into chemical reactions with the free radical intermediate H· formed on the catalyst surface. The free-radical intermediate H· formed on the catalyst surface could react with the free-radicals of big molecules and could suppress coke deposition.

  2. Nanoconfined hydrides for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Thomas K.; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-05-01

    The world in the 21st century is facing increasing challenges within the development of more environmentally friendly energy systems, sustainable and `green chemistry' solutions for a variety of chemical and catalytic processes. Nanomaterials science is expected to contribute strongly by the development of new nanotools, e.g. for improving the performance of chemical reactions. Nanoconfinement is of increasing interest and may lead to significantly enhanced kinetics, higher degree of stability and/or more favourable thermodynamic properties. Nanoconfined chemical reactions may have a wide range of important applications in the near future, e.g. within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy. This review provides selected examples within nanoconfinement of hydrogen storage materials, which may serve as an inspiration for other research fields as well. Selected nanoporous materials, methods for preparation of nanoconfined systems and their hydrogen storage properties are reviewed.The world in the 21st century is facing increasing challenges within the development of more environmentally friendly energy systems, sustainable and `green chemistry' solutions for a variety of chemical and catalytic processes. Nanomaterials science is expected to contribute strongly by the development of new nanotools, e.g. for improving the performance of chemical reactions. Nanoconfinement is of increasing interest and may lead to significantly enhanced kinetics, higher degree of stability and/or more favourable thermodynamic properties. Nanoconfined chemical reactions may have a wide range of important applications in the near future, e.g. within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy. This review provides selected examples within nanoconfinement of hydrogen storage materials, which may serve as an inspiration for other research fields as well. Selected nanoporous materials, methods for preparation of nanoconfined systems and their hydrogen storage

  3. Origin of high oxide to nitride polishing selectivity of ceria-based slurry in the presence of picolinic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liang-Yong; Liu Bo; Song Zhi-Tang; Liu Wei-Li; Feng Song-Lin; David Huang; S.V Babu

    2011-01-01

    We report on the investigation of the origin of high oxide to nitride polishing selectivity of ceria-based slurry in the presence of picolinic acid. The oxide to nitride removal selectivity of the ceria slurry with picolinic acid is as high as 76.6 in the chemical mechanical polishing. By using zeta potential analyzer, particle size analyzer, horizon profilometer, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the pre-and the post-polished wafer surfaces as well as the pre-and the post-used ceria-based slurries are compared. Possible mechanism of high oxide to nitride selectivity with using ceria-based slurry with picolinic acid is discussed.

  4. High polishing selectivity ceria slurry for formation of top electrode in spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Hao [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae-Hyung [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Hyung [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jea-Gun, E-mail: parkjgL@hanyang.ac.kr [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-01

    During the formation of the top electrode (T.E.) in spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory, a slurry with a high polishing rate of SiO{sub 2} and a low polishing rate of metal (T.E. material) is required in the chemical mechanical planarization application area. We used a ceria-based slurry with a polymeric additive to maintain the high polishing rate of SiO{sub 2} while it suppresses the polishing rate of the T.E. material, tantalum and ruthenium. We found ruthenium showed a significantly higher selectivity than tantalum in the ceria-based slurry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the adsorption characteristics of the polymeric additive on the T.E. material. Except for the adsorbed polymeric additive, we found that zeta potential of the T.E. material played a critical role in determining the polishing selectivity of SiO{sub 2}-to-T.E. material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High selective chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) slurry was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The slurry has a high selectivity of SiO{sub 2}-to-metals like tantalum and ruthenium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spin-transfer-torque magnetic memory requires such high selectivity slurry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface zeta potential was used to explain CMP mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tantalum and ruthenium have different rate-determining steps during CMP.

  5. Role of silicon hydride bonding environment in alpha-silicon:hydrogen films for c-silicon surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Michael Z.

    High efficiency silicon solar cells achieve greater than 700 mV open circuit voltage through excellent surface passivation of the monocyrstalline absorber. This work studies the bifacial plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) intrinsic amorphous silicon ((i) alpha-Si:H) passivation structure. To enable the correct interpretation of FTIR detected vibrational modes a model of the layered substructure of ultra-thin (i) alpha-Si:H is constructed. A high fraction of di-hydride bonding is associated with defective, low density amorphous film, and control of this parameter is established by varying hydrogen dilution ratio. The hypothesis that a high fraction of di-hydride bonding over mono-hydride within the film would lead to a poor passivation layer is tested and shown to be false. This is due to the bulk layer within the model defining the di-hydride fraction and indicates that the interface layer plays the more dominant role. A comparison between rf plasma PECVD deposited films and dc plasma shows that upon 30 min, 285°C annealing, large improvements in passivation occur when dc plasma was used with gains in minority carrier effective lifetimes over 1 msec possible. The passivation quality of rf generated films is less effected by annealing. rf plasma films show detectable mono-, di-, and tri-hydride high-potential modes in the as-deposited condition that are removed upon annealing. The finite loss of bulk mono-hydride and these interfacial hydrides do not have a strong impact on film passivation quality. It is concluded that the film has reached an equilibrium level of interfacial defect density which is unaffected by the limited loss of hydride bonding observed. dc plasma films undergo large improvements in passivation quality upon annealing. An increase in mono-hydride bonding at the internal surfaces of nanometer sized voids is detected. It is proposed that this mono-hydride bonding is reducing the density of unsaturated bonds, lowering the interfacial

  6. Improving profitability through slurry management: a look at the impact of slurry pH on various glass types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Abigail R.; Boffa, Christopher C.; Sarkas, Harry W.; Cureton, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    When building an optical system, optical fabricators and designers meticulously choose the glass types for their application knowing that each one will have different chemical, thermal and mechanical properties. As the requirements for new optical systems have grown more demanding, the range of available glass types has vastly expanded and the specifications on the produced products have grown tighter. In an attempt to simplify processes and streamline consumable purchases, optical polishing houses often rely on one polishing slurry to manage these vast array of glass types. An unforeseen consequence of these practices can be a reduction in productivity by reduced removal rate, poor yields and frequent rework all translating into higher costs and reduced profitability. In this paper, the authors will examine the impact slurry pH has on glass types of different compositions and chemical, thermal and mechanical properties when using a double-sided polishing process. Experiments will use material removal rate, surface quality, and surface figure to provide insight into improving process control for differing glass types. Further guidance will be provided on how simple on-site monitoring and adjustment can deliver improved profitability on challenging substrates.

  7. Rocketdyne's advanced coal slurry pumping program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D. E.; Wong, G. S.; Gilman, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation is conducting a program for the engineering, fabrication, and testing of an experimental/prototype high-capacity, high-pressure centrifugal slurry feed pump for coal liquefaction purposes. The abrasion problems in a centrifugal slurry pump are primarily due to the manner in which the hard, solid particles contained in the slurry are transported through the hydraulic flow passages within the pump. The abrasive particles can create scraping, grinding, cutting, and sandblasting effects on the various exposed parts of the pump. These critical areas involving abrasion and impact erosion wear problems in a centrifugal pump are being addressed by Rocketdyne. The mechanisms of abrasion and erosion are being studied through hydrodynamic analysis, materials evaluation, and advanced design concepts.

  8. Proton-hydride tautomerism in hydrogen evolution catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Luis M Aguirre; Johnson, Samantha I; Corona, Sydney L; Villatoro, Walther; Goddard, William A; Takase, Michael K; VanderVelde, David G; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B; Blakemore, James D

    2016-06-01

    Efficient generation of hydrogen from renewable resources requires development of catalysts that avoid deep wells and high barriers. Information about the energy landscape for H2 production can be obtained by chemical characterization of catalytic intermediates, but few have been observed to date. We have isolated and characterized a key intermediate in 2e(-) + 2H(+) → H2 catalysis. This intermediate, obtained by treatment of Cp*Rh(bpy) (Cp*, η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; bpy, κ(2)-2,2'-bipyridyl) with acid, is not a hydride species but rather, bears [η(4)-Cp*H] as a ligand. Delivery of a second proton to this species leads to evolution of H2 and reformation of η(5)-Cp* bound to rhodium(III). With suitable choices of acids and bases, the Cp*Rh(bpy) complex catalyzes facile and reversible interconversion of H(+) and H2. PMID:27222576

  9. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    instruments were utilized for this work and their data collection and analysis are reported. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were conducted at NIST Center for Neutron Research to characterize atomic hydrogen diffusion in bulk and nano-confined NaAlH4. It was observed that upon confinement of NaAlH4, a significantly higher fraction of hydrogen atoms were involved in diffusive motion on the pico-second to nano-second timescales. However, the confinement had no impact on the lattice diffusivities (jump/hopping rates) of atomic hydrogen, indicating that the improved hydrogen release rates were not due to any kinetic destabilization effects. Instead, the investigation strongly suggested thermodynamic destabilization as the major effect of nano-confinement. The local interaction of the metal sites in metal organic frameworks with the infiltrated hydride was studied using extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy technique. The experiments were conducted at Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices at Louisiana State University. The metal sites were found to be chemically un-altered, hence ruling out any catalytic role in the dehydrogenation at room temperatures. The fractal morphology of NaAlH4 was characterized by ultra-small angle x-ray scattering experiments performed at Argonne National Lab. The studies quantitatively estimated the extent of densification in the course of one desorption cycle. The particle sizes were found to increase two-fold during heat treatment. Also, the nano-confinement procedure was shown to produce dense mass fractals as opposed to pristine NaAlH4, exhibiting a surface fractal morphology. Based on this finding, a new method to identify confined material from un-confined material in nano-composites was developed and is presented. Preliminary results of modeling and correlating multi-scale phenomena using a phase-field approach are also presented as the foundation for future work.

  10. Continuous in-house acidification affecting animal slurry composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Maibritt; Cocolo, Giorgia; Jonassen, Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    The emerging slurry acidification technology affects gaseous emissions, fertiliser value, biogas production and solid-liquid separation; however, maximising the advantages is difficult, as the effect of acidification on the slurry characteristics resulting in those observations remains unclarifie...... acidification-induced aggregation. Overall, the acidified slurry was significantly different from untreated slurry; it had higher conductivity, more dissolved inorganic components, fewer small organic compounds, more large dissolved organic compounds, and larger particles....

  11. Feasibility study for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabatini, J.C.; Field, E.L.; Wu, I.C.; Cox, M.R.; Barnett, B.M.; Coleman, J.T. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This feasibility study examined three possible recycling processes for two compositions (AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5}) of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries to determine possible rotes for recovering battery materials. Analysts examined the processes, estimated the costs for capital equipment and operation, and estimated the value of the reclaimed material. They examined the following three processes: (1) a chemical process that leached battery powders using hydrochloric acid, (2) a pyrometallurical process, and (3) a physical separation/chemical process. The economic analysis revealed that the physical separation/chemical process generated the most revenue.

  12. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  13. Development of a phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooher, J.P. [Adelphi Univ., Garden City, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Highly concentrated suspensions of coal particles in water or alternate fluids appear to have a wide range of applications for energy production. For enhanced implementation of coal slurry fuel technology, an understanding of coal slurry atomization as a function coal and slurry properties for specific mechanical configurations of nozzle atomizers should be developed.

  14. Observations on microbial activity in acidified pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Finster, Kai; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2009-01-01

    . Oxygen consumption rate, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction were all reduced by more than 98% in the stored acidified slurry compared to untreated slurry. Despite higher sulphate concentration, the microbial metabolism was greatly compromised or absent in the acidified slurry. This could be explained...

  15. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH2 and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH2 to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH2 as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV0.62Mn1.5 alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles

  16. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  17. SANS Measurement of Hydrides in Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SANS scattering is shown to be an effective method for detecting the presence of hydrogen precipitates in uranium. High purity polycrystalline samples of depleted uranium were given several hydriding treatments which included extended exposures to hydrogen gas at two different pressures at 630 C as well as a furnace anneal at 850 C followed by slow cooling in the near absence hydrogen gas. All samples exhibited neutron scattering that was in proportion to the expected levels of hydrogen content. While the scattering signal was strong, the shape of the scattering curve indicated that the scattering objects were large sized objects. Only by use of a very high angular resolution SANS technique was it possible to make estimates of the major diameter of the scattering objects. This analysis permits an estimate of the volume fraction and means size of the hydride precipitates in uranium

  18. NMR investigations of YMn2Hx hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The YMn2Hx hydrides with x = 1, 2, 3 were investigated by 55Mn NMR spin echo measurements at atmospheric and high pressure. Resonance lines at frequencies up to 440 MHz were observed for the hydrides, corresponding to a huge increase of the hyperfine fields at those Mn with hydrogen neighbours. At high pressure the initial decrease of the magnitude of the Mn hyperfine field of YMn2H1 at 4.2 K was found to be 4% per kbar which is an order of magnitude bigger than observed in the other magnetically ordered materials. The effects are interpreted in terms of changes of the orbital contribution and valence electron contribution to the hyperfine field caused by hydrogenation and the influence of the external pressure. (orig.)

  19. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  20. Synthesis of metal hydrides by cold rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' In the development of metal hydrides for commercial applications, a special attention should be devoted to the ways of production. For commercial success, the raw elements of the hydrogen storage materials should be of low cost, the synthesis process should be inexpensive and easily scalable. Therefore, it is important to put some effort on the elaboration of new and more efficient means of producing metal hydrides. In this perspective, cold rolling was investigated as a new means of producing nanocrystalline materials. This technique is well-known in the industry and easily scalable. Cold rolling was performed on Mg-Ni system. The evolution of morphology, crystal structure, crystallite size, deformation, and preferred orientation was studied as a function of number of rolling passes. Cold rolling followed by a heat treatment produced the intermetallic Mg2Ni. Without heat treatment and for a large number of rolling, an amorphous phase was synthesized. (author)

  1. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  2. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ALUMINA-ZIRCONIA COMPOSITE BY SLURRY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JYOTI PRAKASH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Alumina has got some excellent properties like chemical inertness, thermal and mechanical strength against hazardous environment. Alumina is a good ceramic material which is being used for structuralapplications. To enhance the toughness and strength of the body some Zirconia is also used with it. The use of Zirconia in alumina is known as toughening of alumina. One difficulty arises, when alumina and alumina toughened composite are sintered , because the low sinterability of Alumina-Zirconia forced the compact to give very low density body. To overcome this problem alumina and alumina composites are made from slurry method which gives nearly theoretical density. The combined effect of alumina and Zirconia on the phase transformation and microstructure development of heat-treated Alumina-Zirconia composites has been studied. Slurry is prepared by adding water, dispersant, binder and anti-foaming agent. In the present study, Sintering schedule is optimized and kept constant for all samples. After sintering, mechanical behaviour of the composite has been studied.

  3. Investigation of microbial nitrate reduction processes in Boom Clay slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. At the moment, many countries are considering geological disposal of nuclear waste in a clay formation. In Belgium, the Boom Clay is currently studied as a potential host formation, due to its interesting physicochemical properties, which cause a delay and spread in time of the migration of leached radionuclides. However, waste disposal will have a certain impact on the barrier function of the clay. Emplacement of the Belgian bituminized waste, Eurobitum, which contains 20 to 30 weight% NaNO3, is expected to result in certain perturbations of the clay barrier. Both a mechanical disturbance due to an osmotically induced pressure increase and a physico-chemical disturbance caused by the leaching of NaNO3 from the Eurobitum into the clay can be expected. One of these chemical perturbations is the microbial reduction (assimilatory and/or dissimilatory) of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay. Assimilation of nitrate or nitrite leads to the formation of R-NH2, while denitrification (dissimilatory pathway) results in gas production (NO, N2O and N2). In some bacterial species, a dissimilative reduction of nitrite into ammonia can also occur, followed by the excretion of NH3 into the medium. A high gas pressure could result in a gas-driven transport of pore water (i.e. two-phase transport), and hence of radionuclides, and possibly in a fracturing of the clay (i.e. gas breakthrough). Besides these microbial reduction processes, abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite by Boom Clay components cannot be excluded. The oxidation of Boom Clay components would result in a less reducing capacity towards redox-sensitive radionuclides, and thus could increase their migration rate in the oxidized Boom Clay. To study the microbial reduction processes of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay, batch reactor tests were performed. In a first series of tests, Boom Clay slurries (solid/liquid weight ratio 2/3 g/ml) were mixed in two reactors to

  4. Speciesion arsenic and selenium using hydride method atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrides production - atomic absorption spectroscopy system was studied. Hydrides production tool and gas-liquid separator were tested and successfully used in this work. Hydride was produced through natrium borohydride reaction with sample solution. Emitted gas was separated by gas-liquid separator before it is carried by nitrogen gas through T tube which is put in atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer. Efficiency of the system was tested through standard reference sample and seawater / sediment samples which is collected from Negeri Johor water bays

  5. Settlement of tailings slurries by creep compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.D.; Chalaturnyk, R.J.; Jeeravipoolvarn, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Large volumes of sand, silt, clay and small amounts of bitumen are produced from the oil sand mining operations in northern Alberta. A model is being developed to predict the consolidation behaviour of highly thixotrophic tailings slurries. The model incorporates effective stress-void ratio and void ratio-hydraulic conductivity relationships for the material. The thixotrophic strength-time relationship and the void ratio-creep rate relationship is also considered along with the mineralogy, bitumen content and water chemistry. Most analytical predictions of the rate and magnitude tailings settling overestimate how fast pore pressures will dissipate. Field deposits of non-segregating tailings to mature fine tailings demonstrate continued high pore pressures near the surface which deter surface reclamation. A finite strain theory is used in geotechnical analyses which predict the consolidation behavior of soft soils. However, this theory does not predict the full range of sedimentation, consolidation and pore pressure dissipation which occurs in thixotrophic tailings slurries. This new strain consolidation model assumes that the creep rate of the slurry exceeds the pore pressure dissipation rate. The model is useful for rapidly deposited, low permeability thixotrophic slurries where the upwards drainage path increases by several metres a year such as in oil sand tailings ponds and consolidated tailings (CT) deposits. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  6. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  7. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species. PMID:25427244

  8. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of volautile inorganic hydrides in binary gaseous mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on possibility of single and continuons analysis of binary mixtures (hydride-gas) for the content of volatile inorganic hydrides (VIH) from absorption spectra in the 185-280 nm band. Dependences of the percentage of VIH transmission on the wavelength are presented. It is shown that the maximum of their absorption depends on the element-hydrogen the bond length and binding energy. Detection limit for boron hydride was established to be n x 10-3% vol at 185-190 nm wavelength. Technique for spectrophotometric hydride determination in binary mixtures with hydrogen, argon, helium was developed. The technique provides the continuous control of gaseous mixture composition

  10. Identification of the zirconium hydrides metallography in zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technique for the Identification of the zirconium hydrides in metallographic specimens have been developed. Microhardness, quantitative estimation and relative orientation of the present hydrides as well as grain size determination of the different Zircaloy-2 tube specimens have also been made. The specimens used were corrosion- tested in water during various periods of time at 300 degree castrating, prior to the metallographic examination. Reference specimens, as received, and heavily hydride specimens in a hydrogen atmosphere at 800 degree centigrees, have been used in the previous stages of the work. No difficulties have been met in this early stage of acquaintanceship with the zirconium hydrides. (Author) 5 refs

  11. Storage temperature affects distribution of carbon, VFA, ammonia, phosphorus, copper and zinc in raw pig slurry and its separated liquid fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Olga; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2012-08-01

    Chemical-mechanical separation of pig slurry into a solid fraction rich in dry matter, P, Cu and Zn and a liquid fraction rich in inorganic N but poor in dry matter may allow farmers to manage surplus slurry by exporting the solid fraction to regions with no nutrient surplus. Pig slurry can be applied to arable land only in certain periods during the year, so it is commonly stored prior to field application. This study investigated the effect of storage duration and temperature on chemical characteristics and P, Cu and Zn distribution between particle size classes of raw slurry and its liquid separation fraction. Dry matter, VFA, total N and ammonium content of both slurry products decreased during storage and were affected by temperature, showing higher losses at higher storage temperatures. In both products, total P, Cu and Zn concentrations were not significantly affected by storage duration or temperature. Particle size distribution was affected by slurry separation, storage duration and temperature. In raw slurry, particles larger than 1 mm decreased, whereas particles 250 μm-1 mm increased. The liquid fraction produced was free of particles >500 μm, with the highest proportions of P, Cu and Zn in the smallest particle size class (particles particle size classes followed a similar pattern to dry matter. PMID:22591817

  12. Evaluation of slurry characteristics for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lithium-ion battery slurries are prepared for rechargeable batteries. • The dispersion state of slurry constituents is identified. • Thermal, morphological, rheological, and electrical properties of slurries are analyzed. - Abstract: A multi-component slurry for rechargeable batteries is prepared by dispersing LiCoO2, conductive additives, and polymeric binders in a solvent. The physical properties, including rheological, morphological, electrical, and spectroscopic features of battery slurries are investigated. The relationship between the measured physical properties and the internal structure of the slurry is analyzed. It is found that the rheological behavior of the slurry is determined by the interaction of active materials and binding materials (e.g., network structure) and that the dispersion state of conductive additives (e.g., agglomeration) also depends on the binder–carbon interaction

  13. Elemental analysis of slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct analysis of wet slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is challenging due to problems of sedimentation, splashing, and surface turbulence. Also, water can quench the laser plasma and suppress the LIBS signal, resulting in poor sensitivity. The effect of water on LIBS spectra from slurries was investigated. As the water content decreased, the LIBS signal was enhanced and the standard deviation was reduced. To improve LIBS slurry analysis, dried slurry samples prepared by applying slurry on PVC coated slides were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on the LIBS spectra of the dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si, and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give a good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  14. Stress field computation for hydride blister forming in Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen migration under thermal gradient in zirconium alloys results in formation of hydride blisters. An array of blisters makes Zirconium alloy components of nuclear reactors susceptible to fracture. The whole process of hydride blister formation and fracture of these components is very complex and involves hydrogen migration under thermal gradient, hydride precipitation, straining of the matrix, setting up of hydrostatic stress gradient, enhanced hydrogen migration under the combined influence of thermal and stress gradients, stress reorientation of hydrides, cracking of hydrides, crack growth by delayed hydride cracking mechanism, interlinking of blisters and spontaneous fracture of the component. In this work we estimate the stress components in hydride blisters and the surrounding matrix for certain assumed blister depth as a function of hydride matrix yield strength ratio. The simulation was carried out for a semi ellipsoidal blister using ABAQUS finite element package. The blister formation was simulated by single step and multiple step transformation of the matrix to hydride. It is felt that the same methodology can be used to estimate the stress field around semi constrained inclusion such as hydride blister(s) in hydride forming metals like uranium, zirconium, titanium etc. and of localized corrosion products in metals and alloys. A matrix of dimension in the ratio 5 (along direction 1):1 (along direction 2) was considered for the computations. The Zr matrix having hexagonal crystal structure and faced centered cubic zirconium hydride was modeled as elastically isotropic. Both matrix and hydride was modeled to undergo linear work hardening up to ultimate tensile strength (=1.25Xyield strength), corresponding to a plastic strain of 10 percent. A small strain small displacement theory was adopted. Computations were made for an axisymmetric case with the symmetry axis along the 2 direction. Transformation of zirconium hydrogen solid solution into hydride

  15. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  16. Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.

    2004-06-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the

  17. Thermal response of a can handling unit (CHU) to a postulated plutonium hydride burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of analyses were performed to support the design of the Can Handling Unit (CHU). The subject analyses focused on determining the time to repressurize a subatmospheric storage can containing plutonium metal versus the initial hole size and the transient thermal response to a postulated chemical reaction of 150 grams of plutonium hydride. Limiting the amount of gaseous reactants either by inerting the CHU or using a very small hole size for the initial opening appears to be a viable method of controlling the rate of the exothermic chemical reactions and system temperatures

  18. High ramp rate thermogravimetric analysis of zirconium(II) hydride and titanium(II) hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A unique arc image device has been proposed for high ramp rate thermogravimetry. • Powder oxidation influences decomposition kinetics at temperatures below 933 K. • Particle size has a negligible effect on TiH2 decomposition behavior. • Improvements to the device are required to conduct accurate kinetic analysis. - Abstract: Zirconium and titanium hydride are utilized in liquid phase metal foam processing techniques. This application results in immediate exposure to molten metal and almost immediate decomposition at high temperatures. Most decomposition characterization techniques utilize slow heating rates and are unable to capture the decomposition behavior of hydrides under foam processing conditions. In order to address this issue a specialized high ramp rate thermogravimetric analyzer was created from a xenon arc image refiner. In addition to thermogravimetry, complimentary techniques including X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize hydride decomposition and compare the results to literature. Hydrides were partially oxidized and separated into particles size ranges to evaluate the influence of these factors on decomposition. Oxidizing treatments were found to decrease decomposition rate only at temperatures below 933 K (660 °C) while particle size effects appeared to be negligible. Several improvements to the unique TGA apparatus presented in the current work are suggested to allow reliable kinetic modeling and analysis

  19. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  20. Kinetics of Final Degassing of Hydrogen Desorption by Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The proposed model concerns the 'confluent shrinking core' scenario and reproduces the desorption kinetic after the complete decay of the stoichiometric hydride ($\\beta$-phase). The exact analytical solution is obtained, the numerical values are demonstrated by the example of magnesium hydride.

  1. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  2. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk;

    2006-01-01

    -hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...

  3. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  4. Ultra-sonic observation in niobium hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hidrogen embrittlement of exothermic ocluders, had been considered as due to applied stress induced hydride precipitates leading to brittle fracture. The results of simultaneous measurements of macroscopic deformation and elastic change due to hydride precipitation, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique are showed. THen it was tested the possibility of kinectis precipitation parameters evoluation. (Author)

  5. Problems of soil and groundwater pollution in the disposal of ``marble'' slurries in NW Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G.; D'Agostino, F.; Ercoli, L.

    2008-09-01

    This work deals with disposal of slurries generated during the cutting and polishing processes of slabs of decorative sedimentary carbonate rocks in the north western Sicily. At present, they are used as fillers of dismantled quarries near the sawmills and, as a final step of reclamation, are covered with earth layers. In spite of such inexpensive solution, there is lack of knowledge about the composition of the waste. In order to assess if there is any threat for the environment and to suggest indications for alternative solutions, such as recycling or inactivation processes, the slurries were analysed by XR diffraction, simultaneous thermal analysis, ICP/MS, ionic chromatography, FTIR, UV-Vis, COD and TOC measurements, grain size analysis. Results indicate that the slurries can threaten the groundwater, because of the high chemical oxygen demand; furthermore they can modify the mechanism of groundwater recharge, because of their grain size distribution. Some laboratory tests show that, even in very aggressive conditions, the solid pollutants persist in the waste and slowly release into water the products of their degradation. The slurry therefore should be subjected to inactivation treatment before disposal or, alternatively, recycled as secondary raw material for a suitable process.

  6. Effect of magnesium salts on the sulphation capacity of limestone slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozyuguran, A.; Altun-Ciftcioglu, G.; Karatepe, N.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    The effect of different magnesium salts such as MgO, MgSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O and Mg(OH){sub 2} on the total sulphation capacities of limestone slurries prepared from five different limestone samples was investigated. Sulphation reactions of slurries were conducted at a constant temperature of 323 K in a gaseous mixture consisting of 5% O{sub 2}, 10% CO{sub 2}, 0.5% SO{sub 2} and a balance of nitrogen by volume. It was found that the total sulphation capacities of limestone slurries increased with the addition of MgO and Mg(OH){sub 2} salts and decreased with the addition of MgSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O salt. Depending on the chemical composition of the limestone samples the total sulphation capacities of limestone slurries were increased between 22.30% and 75.00% by MgO addition and between 23.70% and 69.00% by Mg(OH){sub 2} addition.

  7. Effect of magnesium salts on the sulphation capacity of limestone slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyuğuran, Ayşe; Altun-Ciftçioğlu, Gökçen; Karatepe, Nilgün; Ersoy-Meriçboyu, Ayşegül

    2006-01-01

    The effect of different magnesium salts such as MgO, MgSO(4).7H2O and Mg(OH)2 on the total sulphation capacities of limestone slurries prepared from five different limestone samples was investigated. Sulphation reactions of slurries were conducted at a constant temperature of 323 K in a gaseous mixture consisting of 5% O2, 10% CO2, 0.5% SO2 and a balance of nitrogene by volume. It was found that the total sulphation capacities of limestone slurries increased with the addition of MgO and Mg(OH)2 salts and decreased with the addition of MgSO4.7H2O salt. Depending on the chemical composition of the limestone samples the total sulphation capacities of limestone slurries were increased between 22.30% and 75.00% by MgO addition and between 23.70% and 69.00% by Mg(OH)2 addition. PMID:16849139

  8. Determination of particle size distribution of salt crystals in aqueous slurries. [From reprocessing of fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.G.

    1977-10-01

    A method for determining particle size distribution of water-soluble crystals in aqueous slurries is described. The salt slurries, containing sodium salts of predominantly nitrate, but also nitrite, sulfate, phosphate, aluminates, carbonate, and hydroxide, occur in radioactive, concentrated chemical waste from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel elements. The method involves separating the crystals from the aqueous phase, drying them, and then dispersing the crystals in a nonaqueous medium based on nitroethane. Ultrasonic treatment is important in dispersing the sample into its fundamental crystals. The dispersed crystals are sieved into appropriate size ranges for counting with a HIAC brand particle counter. A preponderance of very fine particles in a slurry was found to increase the difficulty of effecting complete dispersion of the crystals because of the tendency to retain traces of aqueous mother liquor. Traces of moisture produce agglomerates of crystals, the extent of agglomeration being dependent on the amount of moisture present. The procedure is applicable to particles within the 2 to 600 ..mu..m size range of the HIAC particle counter. The procedure provides an effective means for measuring particle size distribution of crystals in aqueous salt slurries even when most crystals are less than 10 ..mu..m in size. 19 figures.

  9. Viscosity Reduction with Self-Assembly of Cationic Surfactant on Tetra-n-butyl Ammonium Bromide Semi-Clathrate Hydrate Aqueous Slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Kawamura, Kazushi

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To utilize hydrate slurry for phase change refrigerants, the rheological properties are essential. In the present study, the viscosity characteristics of hydrate slurry are investigated. Additionally, the effect of cationic surfactant on viscosity is also evaluated. Study Design: Experimental and analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Division of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, between D...

  10. Field test of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting into rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline rocks have fractures which may cause unexpected routes of groundwater seepage. Cement grouting is one of the most effective methods to minimize seepage; however, cement materials may not be suitable for the purpose of extra-long durability, because cement is neutralized or degraded by chemical and physical influence of chemical reaction. Natural clay like bentonite is one of the most promising materials for seepage barrier; however, water/bentonite grout is so viscous that enough amount of bentonite can not be grouted into rock fractures. To increase bentonite content in grout with low viscosity, the utilization of ethanol as a mixing liquid was studied. Ethanol suppresses bentonite swelling, and more bentonite can be injected more than that of water/bentonite slurry. In this paper, grouting into in-situ rock mass fracture from the ground surface was tested to investigate the barrier performance and workability of ethanol/bentonite slurry as a grouting material. (author)

  11. Environmental Consequences of Pig Slurry Treatment Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ten Hoeve, Marieke

    compared with a reference scenario. The treatment scenarios were field acidification, in-house acidification, screw press separation with and without composting of the solid fraction, decanter centrifuge separation with and without ammonia stripping of the liquid fraction, and four anaerobic digestion...... scenarios with different co-substrates. These co-substrates were straw that would otherwise have been left on the field, straw that would otherwise have been incinerated, the organic fraction of household waste and the solid fraction of slurry. The impact categories analysed were climate change potential...... occur during manure storage and after field application. The main emissions are ammonia, nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, nitrate, phosphorus and odour. Slurry treatment technologies have been and are being developed in order to reduce the environmental impacts of manure. However, it is important...

  12. Preferred hydride growth orientations on oxide-coated gadolinium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The preferred hydride growth orientations on gadolinium metal coated by a thin oxide layer are presented. ► A preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the face centered cubic (FCC) GdH2 is observed for the hydride spots forming below the oxidation layer. ► A change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates for the hydride's Growth Centers. ► The texture change is attributed to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation layer on the developing hydride. - Abstract: The initial development of hydrides on polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd), as on some other hydride forming metals, is characterized by two sequential steps. The first step involves the rapid formation of a dense pattern of small hydride spots (referred to as the “small family” of hydrides) below the native oxidation layer. The second stage takes place when some of the “small family” nucleants (referred to as “growth centers”, GCs) break the oxide layer, leading to their rapid growth and finally to the massive hydriding of the sample. In the present study, the texture of the two hydride families was studied, by combining X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis with a microscopic analysis of the hydride, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been observed that for the “small family”, a preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the cubic GdH2 takes place, whereas for the GCs, a change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates. These preferred growth orientations were analyzed by their structure relation with the (0 0 .1)m basal plane of the Gd metal. It has been concluded that the above texture change is due to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation overlayer on the developing hydride, preventing the (0 0 .1)m||(1 1 1)h growth orientation. This stress is relieved upon the rupture of that overlayer and the development of the GCs, leading to the

  13. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  15. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  16. Research advances in settling slurry flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Václav; Vlasák, Pavel

    Tel Aviv, 2015. [The 8th International Conference for Conveying and Handling of Particulate Solids. Tel Aviv (IL), 03.05.2015-07.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/0383; GA ČR GAP105/10/1574; GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/12/1082 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : slurry flows * flow patterns * turbulent dispersion * collisional dispersion * particle-support mechanisms Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  17. Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactor modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Harke, F.W. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results on hydrodynamic studies. The experiments were conducted in a hot-pressurized Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). It includes experimental results of Drakeol-10 oil/nitrogen/glass beads hydrodynamic study and the development of an ultrasonic technique for measuring solids concentration. A model to describe the flow behavior in reactors was developed. The hydrodynamic properties in a 10.16 cm diameter bubble column with a perforated-plate gas distributor were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.36 MPa, and at temperatures from 20 to 200{degrees}C, using a dual hot-wire probe with nitrogen, glass beads, and Drakeol-10 oil as the gas, solid, and liquid phase, respectively. It was found that the addition of 20 oil wt% glass beads in the system has a slight effect on the average gas holdup and bubble size. A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed from an ill-posed model. The new model has computed solid holdup distributions consistent with experimental observations with no artificial {open_quotes}fountain{close_quotes} as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of multiphase flows of practical interest. An ultrasonic technique is being developed to measure solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 180 {degrees}C and 0.1 MPa. The data show that both the sound speed and attenuation are well-defined functions of both the solid and gas concentrations in the slurries. The results suggest possibilities to directly measure solids concentration during the operation of an autoclave reactor containing molten wax.

  18. Emplacement-related layering in magma slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Textures and structures such as layering, grading and foliations preserved in igneous rocks offer a glimpse into the magma emplacement process. However, despite recent advances, a full and proper understanding of the fluid dynamics of congested fluid-particle mixtures during shear remains elusive. This is a shame as without recourse to such fundamental understanding, the interpretation of structural field data in the context of magma flow remains problematic. One way to gain insight into the process is to treat flowing magma as a dynamic material with a rheology similar to sheared, congested slurries. The idea that dense magma equates to a high temperature slurry is an attractive one, and opens up a way to examine the emplacement process that does not rely on equilibrium thermodynamics as a final explanation for commonly observed igneous structures. Using the Basement Sill, Antarctica, as a world class example of a magmatic slurry, shearing at high Peclet (Pe) number where particle diffusion is negligible has the potential to impart a rich diversity of structures including layering, grading and flow segregation. Work to model numerically the flow of the Basement Sill slurry using a range of theoretical and experimentally-derived non-Newtonian magma rheologies will be presented and assessed. A key impilcation is that in addition to more classical explanations such as compaction and gravitational settling, igneous layering can also arise spontaneously during shear associated with the ascent and emplacement of congested magma. A final aspect of the emplacement model considers the irregular geometry of the Basement Sill boundaries. Movement of magma along these boundaries results in the formation of local eddies and fluid swirl/back-flow that add additional complexity to macroscopic flow field.

  19. Low-frequency excitations in zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow inelastic neutron scattering (INS) on ZrHx systems (x = 0.38, 0.52) revealed new excitations located within the energy range 2-10 MeV. Besides the acoustic vibrations specific to α-HCP Zr and γ-FCO Zr hydride the fine structure of these excitations is clearly observed. The origin of the new observed peaks is not very clear but a proton tunneling or a resonance effect in α-Zr lattice could be taken into account

  20. Tritium immobilization and packaging using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium recovered from CANDU heavy water reactors will have to be packaged and stored in a safe manner. Tritium will be recovered in the elemental form, T2. Metal tritides are effective compounds in which to immobilize the tritium as a stable non-reactive solid with a high tritium capacity. The technology necessary to prepare hydrides of suitable metals, such as titanium and zirconium, have been developed and the properties of the prepared materials evaluated. Conceptual designs of packages for containing metal tritides suitable for transportation and long-term storage have been made and initial testing started. (author)

  1. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  2. Formation of hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of zirconium hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys due to the presence of a thermal gradient is a possible phenomenon which may occur in structural components of a reactor (pressure tubes), thus resulting a very important matter for the nuclear industry. For this reason, a series of experiments were initiated in the Hydrogen Damage Laboratory so as to obtain blisters of zirconium alloys and to study the aspects related to them. Zry-4 and Zr-2.5% Nb blisters were obtained. The propagation of a fissure present in a blister and the fracture surface were observed. The fissure propagated weakly in the blister and stopped in the Zry-4 matrix. (Author)

  3. Hydrogen in novel solid-state metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state metal hydrides display hydrogen densities close to that of liquid hydrogen and thus provide a safe and efficient way of storing hydrogen. As a result of recent neutron and synchrotron diffraction work some novel metal hydrides have been characterized that shed new light on the nature of metal-hydrogen interactions. While hydrogen appears as an anion surrounded by a large inventory of cation configurations in ionic hydrides such as Ca4Mg3H14, Ca19Mg8H54, Eu2MgD6, Eu6Mg7D26 and Eu2Mg3D10, it acts as a terminal ligand in covalently bonded hydride complexes based on p-elements such as [BH4]- and d-elements such as [IrH5]4- and [IrH4]5- in the complex hydrides LiBH4 and Mg6Ir2H11, respectively. Surprisingly, hydride complexes and hydride anions can also be discerned in typically metallic (interstitial) hydrides such as NdMgNi4H4 (= Nd3+Mg+2.[Ni4H4]5-) and LaMg2NiD7 (= La3+Mg+22.[NiH4]4-.3H-). Some hydrides also reveal other interesting features such as a hydrogenation induced Ce4+→Ce3+ valence change in CeMn1.8Al0.2H4.4 at room temperature that is accompanied by a Mn/Al metal atom exchange over distances of ∝2.6 A, and a hydrogen induced metal-to-nonmetal transition near ambient conditions that leads from the metallic compound Mg3Ir to the red colored hydride Mg6Ir2H11. In this article recent work and some methodological aspects are highlighted. (orig.)

  4. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  5. Development of hydride absorber for fast reactor. Application of hafnium hydride to control rod of large fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hafnium hydride (Hf-hydride) to a control rod for a large fast reactor where the B4C control rod is originally employed is studied. Three types of Hf-hydride control rods are designed. The control rod worth and its change during the burnup are evaluated for different hydrogen-to-hafnium ratios and are compared with those of the original B4C control rod. The result indicates that the worths of the Hf-hydride and the 10B-enriched B4C control rods are approximately the same, and the lifetime of the Hf-hydride control rod is almost four times longer than that of the 10B-enriched B4C control rod. The core performances of the shutdown margin, sodium void reactivity, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and breeding ratio are analyzed. It is indicated that those for the Hf-hydride control rod are almost the same as those for the original B4C control rod. The behavior of neutrons moderated by the Hf-hydride control rod is analyzed. It is confirmed that the Hf-hydride control rod does not cause any thermal spike problems in the fast reactor core. (author)

  6. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  7. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd3H4 follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one

  8. Mechanism of n-butane hydrogenolysis promoted by Ta-hydrides supported on silica

    KAUST Repository

    Pasha, Farhan Ahmad

    2014-06-06

    The mechanism of hydrogenolysis of alkanes, promoted by Ta-hydrides supported on silica via 2 ≡ Si-O- bonds, has been studied with a density functional theory (DFT) approach. Our study suggests that the initial monohydride (≡ Si-O-)2Ta(III)H is rapidly trapped by molecular hydrogen to form the more stable tris-hydride (≡ Si-O-) 2Ta(V)H3. Loading of n-butane to the Ta-center occurs through C-H activation concerted with elimination of molecular hydrogen (σ-bond metathesis). Once the Ta-alkyl species is formed, the C-C activation step corresponds to a β-alkyl transfer to the metal with elimination of an olefin. According to these calculations, an α-alkyl transfer to the metal to form a Ta-carbene species is of higher energy. The olefins formed during the C-C activation step can be rapidly hydrogenated by both mono- and tris-Ta-hydride species, making the overall process of alkane cracking thermodynamically favored. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Pneumatic Artificial Muscle Actuation via Hydrogen Driving Metal Hydride-LaNi5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thananchai Leephakpreeda

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative understanding of mechanical actuation of intricate Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) actuators is technically required in control system design for effective real-time implementation.This paper presents mathematical modeling of the PAM driven by hydrogen-gas pressure due to absorption and desorption of metal hydride.Empirical models of both mechanical actuation of industrial PAM and chemical reaction of the metal hydride-LaNi5 are derived systematically where their interactions comply with the continuity principle and energy balance in describing actual dynamic behaviors of the PAM actuator (PAM and hydriding/dehydriding-reaction bed).Simulation studies of mechanical actuation under various loads are conducted so as to present dynamic responses of the PAM actuators.From the promising results,it is intriguing that the heat input for the PAM actuator can be supplied to,or pumped from the reaction bed,in such a way that absorption and desorption of hydrogen gas take place,respectively,in controlling the pressure of hydrogen gas within the PAM actuator.Accordingly,this manipulation results in desired mechanical actuation of the PAM actuator in practical uses.

  10. Injection of Aqueous Slurry for Making Zirconia Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shun'ai; LI Maoqiang

    2009-01-01

    Zirconia aqueous slurry was prepared with fine zirconia powder.Injection process for making zirconia fiber was demonstrated,including preparation of aqueous slurry,injection of slurry,fiber setting in acetone,and fiber firing.The principle of the process was discussed.The effects of solid loading in the zirconia slurry,addition of dispersant in the slurry,and ball milling time on the rheological properties of the slurry,especially yield stress,were illustrated.The role of acetone as curing agent was discussed.Zirconia poly-crystalline fber with at 1 530 ℃ for 5 h.Microstructure of the sintered zirconia fiber was investigated.

  11. Neutron scattering on hydrides of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review surveys the application of neutron scattering for the investigation of the microscopic behaviour of hydrogen in intermetallic compounds. This concerns the structure as well as the dynamics. Neutron diffraction experiments were performed on Ti1.2Mn1.8D3 and LaNi5D7. In the latter case the dominant nickel scattering could be suppressed by isotope substitution with 60Ni, and the anisotropic broadening of the Bragg peaks could be modelled in a correspondingly modified Rietveld-profile refinement. For the investigation of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides by means of quasielastic neutron scattering an iterative multiple scattering correction procedure has been developped which allows a reliable determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients. The mechanism of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides comprises three types of jumps: escape jumps out of energetically lower interstitials, transport jumps over the energetically higher sites and locally restricted jump processes. For Ti1.2Mn1.8H3 the main features of the diffusional behaviour could be described quantitatively in the framework of a three state model. By means of neutron vibrational spectroscopy information about the occupied hydrogen sites and thus about the structure can be extracted from the symmetry splitting of the vibrational modes. In this way we showed that in α-LaNi5Hx, La2Ni4-octahedral and La2Ni2-tetrahedral interstitial sites are occupied. (orig./GG)

  12. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  13. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  14. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)]. PMID:22040085

  15. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Wenyan Chen; Qiang Cai; Yuan Zhao; Guojuan Zheng; Yuting Liang

    2014-01-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested...

  16. Ultrasonic measurements in ice slurry generation by direct contact evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Vuarnoz, Didier; Ata-Caesar, Derrick; Sari, Osmann; Egolf, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Important reductions of refrigerant amounts can be achieved by using secondary refrigeration fluids. Ice slurry is a two-phase fluid and thus, compared to single phase secondary refrigeration fluids, offers the advantage of the latent heat of fusion when the ice phase melts during heat exchange. Therefore, the challenges that the introduction of ice slurry as a common thermal fluid is facing are, in the first place, how to generate ice slurry in an efficient and ecological way. Optimal design...

  17. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  18. Heterogeneous ice slurry flow and concentration distribution in horizontal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A Mixture CFD model is applied to describe heterogeneous ice slurry flow. • The ice slurry rheological behavior is considered piecewise. • The coupled flow and concentration profiles in heterogeneous slurry flow is acquired. • The current numerical model achieves good balance between precision and universality. -- Abstract: Ice slurry is an energy-intensive solid–liquid mixture fluid which may play an important role in various cooling purposes. Knowing detailed flow information is important from the system design point of view. However, the heterogeneous ice slurry flow makes it difficult to be quantified due to the complex two phase flow characteristic. The present study applies a Mixture computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on different rheological behavior to characterize the heterogeneous ice slurry flow. The Mixture CFD model was firstly validated by three different experiments. Then the validated Mixture CFD model was applied to solve the ice slurry isothermal flow by considering the rheological behavior piecewise. Finally, the numerical solutions have displayed the coupled flow information, such as slurry velocity, ice particle concentration and pressure drop distribution. The results show that, the ice slurry flow distribution will appear varying degree of asymmetry under different operating conditions. The rheological behavior will be affected by the asymmetric flow distributions. When mean flow velocity is high, Thomas equation can be appropriate for describing ice slurry viscosity. While with the decreasing of mean flow velocity, the ice slurry behaves Bingham rheology. As compared with experimental pressure drop results, the relative errors of numerical computation are almost within ±15%. The Mixture CFD model is validated to be an effective model for describing heterogeneous ice slurry flow and could supply plentiful flow information

  19. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  20. Environmental vulnerability and phosphorus fractions of areas with pig slurry applied to the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa Couto, Rafael; Santos, Matheus Dos; Comin, Jucinei José; Pittol Martini, Luíz Carlos; Gatiboni, Luciano Colpo; Martins, Sérgio Roberto; Filho, Paulo Belli; Brunetto, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The application of pig slurry as a fertilizer can cause soil and water contamination. Intrinsic characteristics of the environment may enhance this effect and influence the vulnerability of the agricultural system. The goal of this study was to evaluate the accumulation of soil P fractions in areas treated with pig slurry and in forest areas and to propose an evaluation of the areas' vulnerability to P contamination. Soil samples were collected from 10 areas with pig slurry applied to the soil and one in forest without a history of pig slurry application, all located in the Coruja and Bonito rivers microbasin at Braço do Norte, Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Samples were prepared and subjected to P chemical fractionation. Two versions of the P index method, based on soil P forms or only on P extracted by Mehlich-1, were used to evaluate the environmental risk of the studied areas. Estimated soil losses were lower for the forest and natural pasture and highest in areas with black oat ( Schreb.)-corn ( L.) crop cultivation. Concentrations of P fractions, especially of organic and inorganic P extracted by 0.1 and 0.5 mol L NaOH and NaHCO and of inorganic P extracted by anion exchange resin and HCl, were higher in areas with a longer history and higher frequency of pig slurry applications. Vulnerability to P contamination was mainly influenced by soil P concentrations and soil losses in the studied areas. The P index based on Hedley's fractionation P forms resulted in a more accurate risk scoring of the studied areas than the P index based on the concentration of available P extracted by Mehlich-1. PMID:25602331

  1. Analytical services: 222-S characterization of 242-A Evaporator Slurry, Campaign 94-1. Addendum 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 242-A Evaporator's 94-1 campaign, five process samples were collected from the slurry stream for waste characterization. The five samples were collected over a 36 day time span, respectively on May 4, May 9, May 16, May 23, and June 9, 1994. Sample collections were performed per the protocol described in 242-A Evaporator Waste Analysis Plan, WHC-SD-WM-EV-060, Rev. 3 and in 242-A Evaporator Quality Assurance Project Plan, WHC-SD-WM-QAPP-009, Rev. 0. Slurry waste was characterized chemically and radiochemically by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 222-S Laboratory as directed

  2. Analytical services: 222-S characterization of 242-A Evaporator Slurry, Campaign 94-1. Addendum 1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-13

    During the 242-A Evaporator`s 94-1 campaign, five process samples were collected from the slurry stream for waste characterization. The five samples were collected over a 36 day time span, respectively on May 4, May 9, May 16, May 23, and June 9, 1994. Sample collections were performed per the protocol described in 242-A Evaporator Waste Analysis Plan, WHC-SD-WM-EV-060, Rev. 3 and in 242-A Evaporator Quality Assurance Project Plan, WHC-SD-WM-QAPP-009, Rev. 0. Slurry waste was characterized chemically and radiochemically by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 222-S Laboratory as directed.

  3. State of the art on phase change material slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A bibliographic study on PCM slurries. ► Clathrate Hydrate slurry, Microencapsulated PCM Slurry, shape-stabilized PCM slurries and Phase Change Material Emulsions. ► Formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfers properties and applications of these four PCS systems. ► The use of thermal energy storage and distribution based on PCM slurries can improve the refrigerating machine performances. - Abstract: The interest in using phase change slurry (PCS) media as thermal storage and heat transfer fluids is increasing and thus leading to an enhancement in the number of articles on the subject. In air-conditioning and refrigeration applications, PCS systems represent a pure benefit resulting in the increase of thermal energy storage capacity, high heat transfer characteristics and positive phase change temperatures which can occur under low pressures. Hence, they allow the increase of energy efficiency and reduce the quantity of thermal fluids. This review describes the formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfer properties and applications of four PCS systems: Clathrate hydrate slurry (CHS), Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials Slurry (MPCMS), shape-stabilized PCM slurries (SPCMSs) and Phase Change Material Emulsions (PCMEs). It regroups a bibliographic summary of important information that can be very helpful when such systems are used. It also gives interesting and valuable insights on the choice of the most suitable PCS media for laboratory and industrial applications.

  4. Denitrification in nitric-acid-treated cattle slurry during storage.

    OpenAIRE

    Oenema, O.; G. L. Velthof

    1993-01-01

    Lowering the pH of cattle slurry with HNO3 was used to reduce NH3 volatilization during storage and after application. Incubation studies were carried out to examine possible NO3 losses and N2O emission from HNO3 treated slurry during storage. Batches of cattle slurry were treated with various amounts of HNO3 to obtain a pH range of 6.0 to 3.0. The slurries were stirred once or twice a week and stored for 6 months at 15 degrees C. Changes in pH, Eh, NO3- and NH4 concn, and emissions of N2O, C...

  5. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established

  6. Microbial decontamination of polluted soil in a slurry process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil-contaminated soil (2.3--17 g/kg), even soil with high clay and silt content, was remediated microbiologically in a slurry reactor. The presence of soil, however, limits the degradation rate of oil. In contrast with results form experiments using oil dispersed in water, the relative composition of the oil components in a soil slurry after degradation was about the same as that of the original oil. Thus the composition of the degraded oil is the same as that of the original oil, which is indicative for a physical, rather than a (bio)chemical, limitation on the oil degradation rate. About 70% of the contaminant was readily available and was degraded in less than eight days. The dual injected turbulent suspension (DITS) reactor is able to combine remediation of part of the contaminated (polydisperse) soil with separation of the soil into a heavily and a lightly polluted fraction. In continuous operation, lowering the overall soil residence time from 200 to 100 h did not significantly increase the oil concentration in the effluent soil. Therefore a soil residence time of less than 100 h is feasible. With a residence time of 100 h, overall oil degradation rates at the steady state were more than 70 times faster than in a comparable land farm. After treatment in a DITS reactor, the remaining oil in the contaminated soil fraction is slowly released from the soil. From a batch experiment it was found that another 10 weeks were needed to reach the Dutch reference level of 50 mg/kg. This can be done in a process with a low energy input, such as a landfarm

  7. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2004-10-01

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

  8. Effect of metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effect of some metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron is studied for the first time. • We are the first to conduct a TG experiment on boron samples at high temperatures (a maximum of 1750 °C). • The thermal reaction process of boron is firstly divided into five stages according to the weight gain rate of the sample. • Specific values of metal hydrides on ignition delay time and combustion intensity of boron are obtained. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of four metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron was investigated. Thermogravimetric experiment results show that the thermal reaction process of boron samples can be divided into five stages. The thermal reactions of boron can be significantly promoted with LiH, which can reduce the initial temperature of the first violent reaction stage by ∼140 °C. The starting temperature of the post-reaction stage also decreases by ∼260 °C. The results of the laser ignition experiment suggest that all four metal hydrides can promote boron burning. Nonetheless, different metal hydrides display varied promotional effects. Among the studied hydrides, LiH is the most effective additive and shortens the ignition delay time of boron by ∼34.1%. Moreover, it enhances the combustion intensity of boron by ∼117.6%. The other three metal hydrides (CaH2, TiH2, and ZrH2) can also contribute to boron burning

  9. Zircaloy-4 hydriding. Hydrogen distribution in PWR's rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurised water reactors, Zircaloy 4 is used as fuel cladding in contact with hot water. The precipitation of hydrides at room temperatures causes mechanical deterioration of the cladding. As the cladding is subjected to a radial temperature gradient, the hydrogen distribution is greatly affected. The image analysis method is used to determine the hydride distribution in the irradiated cladding. To calibrate this method, a device was specially built for the preparation of Zircaloy specimens with known hydrogen contents. The hydriding conditions and hydrogen content determination procedures were fixed. We have successfully realized specimens with various hydrogen contents. With these specimens, a relationship between the parameter Sv (surface density of hydrides) and the hydrogen content was established. This parameter Sv is independent from the Zircaloy 4 metallurgical state (i.e. stress relieved or recrystallized) and from the analysis section (longitudinal or transverse). Study of hydrogen content and hydride distribution in irradiated cladding by means of image analysis showed that the method is limited by its ability of separation between neighbouring hydrides at cladding's periphery where the hydrogen content can reach several thousands ppm. Nevertheless, this method gives us some information about hydride distribution inside the cladding. A model for thermal diffusion was developped to stimulate the migration of hydrogen in Zirconium alloys. This model was used to predict hydrogen distribution in the irradiated cladding. Comparison of model predictions with results of image analysis shows good agreement. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  10. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  11. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis; Sintese e caracterizacao de pastas de cimento aditivadas com resinas epoxi - analises cineticas, termodinamicas e calorimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S., E-mail: macleybiane@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  12. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  13. Nitrogen fertiliser value of digested dairy cow slurry, its liquid and solid fractions, and of dairy cow slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cavalli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of crop availability of livestock slurry nitrogen (N is necessary to maximise crop N use efficiency and to minimise environmental losses. Results from field and laboratory incubation experiments suggest that first-year crop availability of slurry N comes mainly from its ammonium fraction because net mineralisation of organic N is often negligible in the short term. A two-year field experiment during 2011 and 2012 in northern Italy was undertaken with several aims: to estimate the N fertiliser value of raw dairy cow slurry, digested dairy cow slurry, and the liquid and solid fractions of the digested slurry, and to verify if applied ammonium recovery was similar both among slurries and between slurries and inorganic N fertiliser (ammonium sulphate. Different fertilisers were applied before silage maize cultivation followed by an unfertilised Italian ryegrass crop. The results showed that ammonium recovery was significantly higher in mineral-fertilised (75% versus slurry-fertilised (30% treatments, except in digested slurry (65%. This indicates that ammonium applied with organic materials is less efficient than when applied with mineral fertiliser. For the digested slurry and its liquid fraction, most of the applied ammonium was available to the maize during its application year (55% due to a low carbon (C/organic N ratio. The apparent N recovery of the raw slurry and digested slurry solid fraction increased substantially between the first (-1.4% and second (20% years, as these materials had high C/organic N ratios; they likely immobilised N for several months post application, producing residual effects during the Italian ryegrass and next maize crops.

  14. Optimization of slurry nebulization inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the analysis of ZrO2-powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization and use of ICP-AES with slurry nebulization for the direct analysis of ZrO2-powder is described. The powder samples are dispersed in water, acidified to pH 2 and the slurry is fed into a Babington nebulizer. The effects of grain size, pH of the suspending medium and standing time on the stability of the slurry are discussed. For the optimization of the ICP operating conditions, a simplex technique is applied and for this purpose three types of objective functions were examined. Identical behaviour of slurries and solutions with the same matrix concentrations in the ICP-AES is achieved for powders with particle sizes lower than 10 μm; in the latter case calibration can be performed by standard addition with aqueous solutions. The detection limits for Al, B, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ti, V, Y are 0.03 μg/g to 10 μg/g and the standard deviation is generally lower than 10%. Six commercially available ZrO2 powders are analyzed by slurry nebulization ICP-AES and the results were found to agree well with those obtained by ICP-AES after chemical decomposition of the samples. (orig.)

  15. Structural relationships in complex hydrides of the late transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature data on complex hydrides of the late transition metals (groups 7-10), such as the hydrogen storage material Mg2NiH4, are reviewed with respect to order-disorder phase transitions and structural relationships. They are analysed in terms of crystallographic group-subgroup trees and their use in understanding the different crystal structures from a symmetry point of view is demonstrated. New data are presented on the low temperature behaviour of magnesium iridium hydrides and strontium rhodium hydrides studied by powder X-ray diffraction. (orig.)

  16. PIE techniques for hydride reorientation test at NDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry storage of spent fuels in the interim storage facility is being planned in Japan. However, the gradual deterioration of the mechanical property of fuel cladding due to internal pressure and temperature during the storage term is known. Therefore, the integrity of stored fuel rods should be confirmed before the start of dry storage. For the last several years, NDC had a lot of experiences on the hydride reorientation test. The specimen preparation techniques on the hydride reorientation test and the mechanical testing techniques after the hydride reorientation are shown in this paper. (author)

  17. Rheology of sludge-slurry grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of rheograms was developed that relates the critical velocity (velocity where flow changes from laminar to turbulent) of a cementitious grout that incorporates a suspended sludge-slurry to the critical velocity of a reference grout made with a simulated waste solution. The sludge that is now in the Gunite waste tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be suspended and pumped to the new waste storage tanks in Melton Valley. The sludge will then be blended with a cement mix base to form a grout which will be injected underground by the shale fracturing process. This report describes the materials, equipment, and techniques used in the laboratory studies to suspend sludges and mix sludge-slurry grouts that have flow properties similar to those of current shale fracturing grouts. Bentonite clay is an effective suspender in dilute NaNO3 solutions; 15 wt % solids can be suspended with 2.0 wt % bentonite in a 0.1 M NaNO3 solution. Other suspending materials were evaluated, but bentonite gave the best results. If a slurry grout becomes too viscous to pump, methods must be available to thin the mixture. A number of thinners, friction reducers, and plasticizers were examined. Q-Broxin, a thinner supplied by Baroid, reduced the velocity of a grout required for turbulent flow in a 5.0-cm (2-in.)-diam tube from 1.76 to 1.20 m/s (5.79 to 3.95 ft/s); FX-32C, a plasticizer supplied by Fox Industries, Inc., reduced the velocity from 1.76 to 0.75 m/s

  18. Si-modified aluminide coating deposited on TiAlNb alloy by slurry method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tetsui

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Increasing oxidation resistance of TiAl intermetallic alloy by depositing aluminide coating by slurry method and investigation of the influence of Si addition on structure of obtained coatings.Design/methodology/approach: The structure of coatings was investigated by light scanning microscopy. The chemical composition of coatings was investigated by EDS method and XRD phase analysis was used as well.Findings: The investigation has showed that the thickness of the coatings was 40 μm. The structure of the silicon-modified aluminide coatings is as follows:• the outer zone consisting of TiAl3 phase and titanium silicides,• the middle zone consisting of columnar titanium silicides in phase TiAl3 matrix,• the inner zone consisting of TiAl2 phase.The analysis of the average chemical composition of the outer zone exhibited the gradual increase of the silicon content along with the increase of this element in the slurry.Practical implications: The slurry method can be applied in aerospace and automotive industry as low-cost technology of producing of aluminide coatings on intermetallics.Originality/value: New method of depositing of Si modified aluminide coatings on TiAl alloys.

  19. Acidification of pig slurry before separation to improve slurry management on farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Iria; Coutinho, João; Balsari, Paolo; Popovic, Olga; Fangueiro, David

    2016-08-01

    Pig slurry, rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), is generally applied to soil as organic fertilizer. However, costs related to slurry transport may limit its utilization to fields close to the farm, leading to significant N losses, namely ammonia (NH3) emissions. Slurry acidification, to minimize NH3 emissions, is a potential solution to this problem, while solid-liquid separation leads to a solid fraction (SF) - rich in organic matter (OM) and phosphorus - and a liquid fraction (LF) rich in soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that a combination of acidification and separation could affect the quality of the resulting fractions depending on the separation technique used. After acidification, the two most common techniques for separation, centrifugation (CF) and screw-press (SP), were applied. The main characteristics of the slurry fractions in terms of nutrient concentrations and speciation as well as the potential N mineralization (PNM) were analysed. Our results show SFs with improved properties, mostly N and PNM when acidification is performed before separation with both techniques. The PNM was significantly increased in LFs from both techniques after acidification. The [Formula: see text] concentration increased in LFs from SP with acidification; therefore, slurry acidification is recommended to avoid any N losses during the separation process with SP, while CF may not require such pretreatment. Acidification could allow the use of a cheaper technique such as SP relative to CF since it prevents NH3 emissions during the separation process and leads to more equilibrated fractions in terms of nutrient composition. PMID:26695081

  20. Delayed hydride in zirconium based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) velocity along the axial direction of Zirconium-2.5% Nb pressure tube materials of different origins i.e. CANDU and RBMK (TMT -I), has been determined in the temperature range of 162 to 250 degree C. DHC crack growth was monitored using Direct Current Potential Drop Technique. It has been observed that the DHC velocity of both materials increases with increase in test temperature. The DHC velocity for the RBMK (TMT -I) material was found about 2 to 5 times lower than that for the CANDU materials at each temperature. In addition, the activation energy of the phenomena was calculated taking into account that DHC is a thermal activated mechanism, following an Arrhenius-type law. (author)

  1. Study on Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption by Metal Hydride Slurries Ⅱ. Hydrogenation of Benzene Catalyzed by MlNi5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安越; 陈长聘; 徐国华; 蔡官明; 王启东

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the hydrogenation of benzene into cyclohexane over the hydrogen storage alloy MlNi5 catalyst was studied in the temperature range of 402~463 K. The results show that the reaction order is zero and the energy of activation is 28.9 kJmol-1.

  2. The progress of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews research at the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, on the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials. Nanocrystalline materials have been synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by annealing. Examples of the materials include TiFe-, ZrV2-, LaNi5 and Mg2Ni-type phases. Details on the process used and the enhancement of properties due to the nanoscale structures are presented. The synthesized alloys were used as negative electrode materials for Ni-MH battery. The properties of hydrogen host materials can be modified substantially by alloying to obtain the desired storage characteristics. For example, it was found that the respective replacement of Fe in TiFe by Ni and/or by Cr, Co, Mo improved not only the discharge capacity but also the cycle life of these electrodes. The hydrogen storage properties of nanocrystalline ZrV2- and LaNi5-type powders prepared by mechanical alloying and annealing show no big difference with those of melt casting (polycrystalline) alloys. On the other hand, a partial substitution of Mg by Mn or Al in Mg2Ni alloy leads to an increase in discharge capacity, at room temperature. Furthermore, the effect of the nickel and graphite coating on the structure of some nanocrystalline alloys and the electrodes characteristics were investigated. In the case of Mg2Ni-type alloy mechanical coating with graphite effectively reduced the degradation rate of the studied electrode materials. The combination of a nanocrystalline TiFe-, ZrV2- and LaNi5-type hydride electrodes and a nickel positive electrode to form a Ni-MH battery, has been successful. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  4. Comparative study of Hydrogen Storage Efficiency and Thermal Effects of Metal Hydrides vs. Carbon Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage of hydrogen is one of the key challenges in developing hydrogen economy. Conventional storage methods such as high-pressure gas or cryogenic liquid hydrogen can not fulfill the set future storage goals. Storage in solid fuel form by chemically or physically combined within materials has potential advantages over other storage methods. There is enduring research both on modifying and optimizing the known solid store materials. In the present paper, recent developments of metal hydrides and carbon based materials based on storage capacity, operating conditions and thermal effects are comparatively reported. The reported work will provide guidance to planned future programs. (authors)

  5. Experimental determination of heat transfer coefficients in uranium zirconium hydride fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the experiments and theoretical analysis to determine the temperature parameter of the uranium zirconium hydride fuel elements, used in the TRIGA IPR-R1 Research Nuclear Reactor. The fuel thermal conductivity and the heat transfer coefficient from the cladding to the coolant were evaluated experimentally. It was also presented a correlation for the gap conductance between the fuel and the cladding. In the case of nuclear fuels the heat parameters become functions of the irradiation as a result of change in the chemical and physical composition. The value of the heat transfer coefficients should be determined experimentally. (author)

  6. Experimental determination of heat transfer coefficients in uranium zirconium hydride fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z.; Rezende, Hugo C.; Costa, Antonio Carlos L. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: amir@cdtn.br; hcr@cdtn.br; aclc@cdtn.br

    2005-07-01

    This work presents the experiments and theoretical analysis to determine the temperature parameter of the uranium zirconium hydride fuel elements, used in the TRIGA IPR-R1 Research Nuclear Reactor. The fuel thermal conductivity and the heat transfer coefficient from the cladding to the coolant were evaluated experimentally. It was also presented a correlation for the gap conductance between the fuel and the cladding. In the case of nuclear fuels the heat parameters become functions of the irradiation as a result of change in the chemical and physical composition. The value of the heat transfer coefficients should be determined experimentally. (author)

  7. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  8. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  9. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane [Victhom Human Bionics Inc., Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, QC (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  10. Formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloy pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fracture of the Zircaloy-2 pressure tube in the Pickering Unit 2 power reactor was associated with the growth of hydride blisters at points of contact between the pressure tube and the cooler calandria tube surrounding it. Similar blisters have been observed in a Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tube in WR-1, an organic-cooled research reactor. These hydride blisters were formed and grew as a result of the thermal diffusion of hydrogen in the zirconium, a mechanism whereby hydrogen diffuses down a temperature gradient. If the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen is exceeded in the cooler regions, hydride will precipitate. In this paper, the time required to grow these hydride blisters will be estimated from the blister size and the hydrogen distribution in its neighborhood, by using simple equations derived from thermal diffusion theory

  11. Out-of-pile accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy fasteners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical joints between Zircaloy and nickel-bearing alloys, mainly the Zircaloy-4/Inconel-600 combination, were exposed to water at 4500F and 5200F to study hydriding of Zircaloy in contact with a dissimilar metal. Accelerated hydriding of the Zircaloy occurred at both temperatures. At 4500F the dissolved hydrogen level of the water was over ten times that at 5200F. At 5200F the initially high hydrogen ingress rate decreased rapidly as exposure time increased and was effectively shut off in about 25 days. Severely hydrided Zircaloy components successfully withstood thermal cycling and mechanical testing. Chromium plating of the nickel-bearing parts was found to be an effective and practical barrier in preventing nickel-alloy smearing and accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy

  12. A nuclear analytical model for uranium zirconium hydride reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear analytical model and codes for the uranium zirconium hydride reactor are outlined. The criticality and control rods effeciency of abroad TRIGA reactor are obtained using this model and codes. The results are satisfactory

  13. A mechanistic approach to develop the secondary hydriding criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable criteria of secondary hydriding failures are important to assure safe operation of nuclear fuel in LWR power units. The present paper reviews available data on massive hydriding of Zirconium claddings covering out-of-pile studies and in-pile tests in research reactors. Analyses of these experimental data give evidence that threshold conditions leading to the onset of massive hydriding are drastically changed under irradiation. The changes are caused mainly by irradiation damage of oxygen sublattice in ZrO2 by fission fragments leaving the periphery of fuel pellets. The tests in research reactors provide a basis to develop a parametric dependency which relates the threshold of massive hydriding to composition of steam-hydrogen mixture, irradiation dose rate and temperature

  14. The Settling and Compaction of Nuclear Waste Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The settling and compaction of simulated and real nuclear waste slurries were extensively studied. Experiments were carried out with simulated wastes at laboratory and large-scale sizes, and the results compared. A model of settling was derived and a method developed to correlate and scale-up settling data for different slurries and vessel sizes

  15. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard;

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification using sulfuric acid reduces ammonia emissions but also affects sulfur (S) cycling. Emission of sulfur is a source of malodor and reduces the sulfur fertilizer value of the slurry. We investigated the effect of sulfate and methionine amendments, alone or in combination with ac...

  16. The Settling and Compaction of Nuclear Waste Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACLEAN, G.T.

    1999-11-15

    The settling and compaction of simulated and real nuclear waste slurries were extensively studied. Experiments were carried out with simulated wastes at laboratory and large-scale sizes, and the results compared. A model of settling was derived and a method developed to correlate and scale-up settling data for different slurries and vessel sizes.

  17. Inactivation of Aujeszky's disease virus in slurry at various temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette

    Survival of Aujeszky's disease virus in pig slurry was investigated during anaerobic storage at 5, 20, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55°C using 100-ml laboratory models simulating the conditions in slurry tanks during winter and summer seasons and during anaerobic digestion in batch reactors. The inactivation...

  18. The slurry-column coal beneficiation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, G.F.; Noah, K.S. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Biotechnology Dept.

    1997-11-01

    The slurry-column coal beneficiation process is described. It is a second-generation process developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the beneficiation of fine (60 mesh x 10 {mu}m) coal by a combination of the physical separation of mineral matter and the biooxidation of pyrite. The bioreactor is slurry-type airlift, specifically designed to allow the large liberated inclusions of pyrite and other insoluble minerals to settle out. They are transferred to a similar reactor, called the rougher/propagator, that gives a second stage of physical separation, as well as the longer residence time for the biodegradation of the large pyritic inclusions and the associated bacterial growth. The bioreactors operate in sequencing-batch mode, and also serve as settlers for coal/water separation when the air turned off. This separation allows counter-current flow of coal and water, which minimizes the volumes of water consumed and wastewater generated. The complete flow sheet incorporates two-stage washing to remove sulfate and bacteria from the product coal, and recycle of bacteria into the process to inoculate the feed coal. A description of the process illustrates some general principles applicable to the optimum design of any coal bioprocess. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Bauxite slurry pipeline: start up operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othon, Otilio; Babosa, Eder; Edvan, Francisco; Brittes, Geraldo; Melo, Gerson; Janir, Joao; Favacho, Orlando; Leao, Marcos; Farias, Obadias [Vale, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, Nilton [Anglo Ferrous Brazil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The mine of Miltonia is located in Paragominas-PA, in the north of Brazil. Bauxite slurry pipeline starts at the Mine of Miltonia and finishes in the draining installation of Alunorte refinery at the port of Barcarena-PA, located approximately 244km away from the mine. The pipeline runs over seven cities and passes below four great rivers stream beds. The system was designed for an underground 24 inches OD steel pipe to carry 9.9 million dry metric tonnes per annum (dMTAs) of 50.5% solid concentration bauxite slurry, using only one pumping station. The system is composed by four storage tanks and six piston diaphragm pumps, supplying a flow of 1680 m3/h. There is a cathodic protection system along the pipeline extension to prevent external corrosion and five pressure monitoring stations to control hydraulic conditions, there is also a fiber optic cable interconnection between pump station and terminal station. Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI) was the designer and followed the commissioning program of the start up operations. This paper will describe the beginning of the pipeline operations, technical aspects of the project, the operational experiences acquired in these two years, the faced problems and also the future planning. (author)

  20. Effective Compressibility of a Bubbly Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, S. I.; Gauglitz, P. A.; Rossen, W. R.

    2001-09-01

    The goal of this study is to fit model parameters to changes in waste level in response to barometric pressure changes in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This waste compressibility is a measure of the quantity of gas, typically hydrogen and other flammable gases, that can pose a safety hazard, retained in the waste. A one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model for compressibility of a bubbly slurry is presented in a companion paper. Fitting these results to actual waste level changes in the tanks implies that bubbles in the slurry layer are long and the ratio of pore-body radius to pore-throat radius is close to 1; unfortunately, compressibility can not be quantified unambiguously from the data without additional information on pore geometry. Therefore, determining the quantity of gas in the tanks requires more than just waste-level data. The non-uniqueness of the fit is also found with two other simple models: a capillary-tube model with contact angle hysteresis and a spherical-pore model. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11502128

  1. Transparent yttrium hydride thin films prepared by reactive sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Mongstad, T.; Platzer-Björkman, C.; Karazhanov, S. Zh.; Holt, A.; Maehlen, J. P.; Hauback, B. C.

    2011-01-01

    Metal hydrides have earlier been suggested for utilization in solar cells. With this as a motivation we have prepared thin films of yttrium hydride by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The resulting films are metallic for low partial pressure of hydrogen during the deposition, and black or yellow-transparent for higher partial pressure of hydrogen. Both metallic and semiconducting transparent YHx films have been prepared directly in-situ without the need of capping layers and post-deposi...

  2. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  3. Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setten, van M.J.; Popa, V.A.; Wijs, de G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-partic

  4. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology. List of papers. Papers II-VI are removed from the thesis due to copyright restrictions. Paper I C. Platzer-Björkman, T. Mongstad, S. Zh. Karazhanov, J. P. Mæhlen, E. S. Marst...

  5. Suppression of the critical temperature in binary vanadium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Addition of 10 mol% Cr to V increases the β-hydride TC to >200 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Ni to V increases the β-hydride TC to >400 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Al to V decreases the β-hydride TC to 90Al10 membrane can be cycled to 2 without β-hydride formation. -- Abstract: The tendency of vanadium-based alloy membranes to embrittle is the biggest commercialisation barrier for this hydrogen separation technology. Excessive hydrogen absorption and the α → β hydride transition both contribute to brittle failure of these membranes. Alloying is known to reduce absorption, but the influence of alloying on hydride phase formation under conditions relevant to membrane operation has not been studied in great detail previously. Here, the effect of Cr, Ni, and Al alloying additions on V–H phase equilibrium has been studied using hydrogen absorption measurements and in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The addition of 10 mol% Ni increases the critical temperature for α + β hydride formation to greater than 400 °C, compared to 170 °C for V. Cr also increases the critical temperature, to between 200 and 300 °C. The addition of 10 mol% Al, however, suppresses the critical temperature to less than 30 °C, thereby enabling this material to be cycled thermally and hydrostatically while precluding formation of the β-hydride phase. This is despite Al also decreasing hydrogen absorption. The implication of this finding is that one of the mechanisms of brittle failure in vanadium-based hydrogen-selective membranes has been eliminated, thereby increasing the robustness of this material relative to V

  6. Modelling of fuel rod hydriding failures in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanistic models which were developed to describe primary hydriding phenomena in claddings of initially intact rods with residual moisture are described. The models include the following key processes: fuel rod thermal behavior, UO2 fuel oxidation in steam-hydrogen atmosphere under irradiation, hydrogen diffusion in zirconium and in the hydride, growth of the hydride phase. Fuel rod thermomechanical behavior is calculated by using RTOP integral fuel code. An oxidation model represents the effects of temperature dynamics and temperature profile along fuel axis and radius on fuel oxidation as well as on hydrogen accumulation inside the fuel rod. Along with ordinary thermal dissociation of water molecules, the oxidation model also addresses radiolysis of the steam-hydrogen mixture due to fission fragments. The present radiolysis model takes into account the effects of the gas mixture composition, temperature and pressure. A new model of cladding hydriding is proposed in which calculation of the massive hydride growth is performed in 2-D geometry. Hydrogen transport in zirconium cladding is modeled with account for thermodiffusion. The RTOP code comprising the models developed allows us to calculate different scenarios of hydriding rod failures under given operation conditions. Test calculations were carried out and compared to available data. It is shown that there are threshold values of initial steam content inside the intact fuel rod which lead to the possibility of through-cladding hydride growth and formation of the primary defect. The threshold values depend on the oxidation state of the cladding inner surface, linear power profile in the fuel rod, fuel rod geometry, cladding temperature conditions and hydrogen diffusivities in zirconium and zirconium hydride

  7. Dark cloud chemistry of nitrogen hydrides with the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, R.; Hily-Blant, P.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Stars form in dark clouds. A complete knowledge of dark cloud chemical composition can be helpful to understand star- and planet-formation processes. Nitrogen is the sixth most abundant interstellar element, and also a basic component of prebiotic molecules. Yet, the reservoir of gaseous nitrogen in dark clouds is not precisely known. It is expected to be mainly N and/or N_2, but both are unobservable in dark gas. Their abundances therefore derive indirectly from those of other N-bearing species through chemical modelling. In this context, our work focuses on a revision of the nitrogen-hydride chemistry in dark clouds using fundamental rotational transitions of NH, NH_2, and NH_3 observed with Herschel/HIFI towards a sample of low-mass protostellar objects. To this purpose, we update and upgrade a chemical network containing the chemistry of the ortho and para forms of nitrogen-hydride molecules, allowing to reproduce the NH:NH_2:NH_3 ratios observed with Herschel/HIFI towards IRAS 16293-2422, putting constraints on the budget of gas-phase carbon, oxygen and sulphur. Furthermore, our results explain the non-thermodynamical ortho-to-para ratio of ammonia observed in cold diffuse gas.

  8. Hydride distribution around a blister in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blisters were grown in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube sections by a thermal gradient without applying external stress. The surrounding hydride distribution was analyzed. Hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. The precipitation of these hydrides was found to be favored by low temperature of blister growth and slow cooling rate after blister formation. The misfit strain produced by hydride blister growth provides the stress necessary to promote radial precipitation. During the subsequent tensile test at 200 C (delayed hydride cracking test) the radial hydride length and thickness are increased. This increase is explained by a stress concentrator effect of the blister. When this effect vanishes, the increase of radial hydrides continues by an autocatalytic effect and stress concentrator effect of the hydride platelet. If a crack originated in the blister reaches the matrix it could propagate along a radial hydride previously precipitated. (orig.)

  9. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  10. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C. E. Rönnebro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later, which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT metal hydride operating reversibly at 600–800 °C to generate heat, as well as a low-temperature (LT hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is the need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram-sized samples scaled up to kilogram quantities with retained performance. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a ~200-kWh/m3 bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated, and we demonstrated the ability to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  11. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  12. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-α phase to transform to UH3: a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert γ -phase to α -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this α -phase to UH3. The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  13. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. Power

  14. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr–H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented

  15. Enhanced conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using a CNT-incorporated TiO{sub 2} slurry-based photoanode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jiaoping; Chen, Zexiang, E-mail: zxchen@uestc.edu.cn; Li, Jun; Wang, Yan, E-mail: zxchen@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Jijun; Li, Hai [School of Opto-electronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Xiang, Dong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    A new titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) slurry formulation is herein reported for the fabrication of TiO{sub 2} photoanode for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared TiO{sub 2} photoanode featured a highly uniform mesoporous structure with well-dispersed TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The energy conversion efficiency of the resulting TiO{sub 2} slurry-based DSSC was ∼63% higher than that achieved by a DSSC prepared using a commercial TiO{sub 2} slurry. Subsequently, the incorporation of acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the TiO{sub 2} slurry was examined. More specifically, the effect of varying the concentration of the CNTs in this slurry on the performance of the resulting DSSCs was studied. The chemical state of the CNTs-incorporated TiO{sub 2} photoanode was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A high energy conversion efficiency of 6.23% was obtained at an optimum CNT concentration of ∼0.06 wt.%. The obtained efficiency corresponds to a 63% enhancement when compared with that obtained from a DSSC based on a commercial TiO{sub 2} slurry. The higher efficiency was attributed to the improvement in the collection and transport of excited electrons in the presence of the CNTs.

  16. Enhanced conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using a CNT-incorporated TiO2 slurry-based photoanode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new titanium dioxide (TiO2) slurry formulation is herein reported for the fabrication of TiO2 photoanode for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared TiO2 photoanode featured a highly uniform mesoporous structure with well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. The energy conversion efficiency of the resulting TiO2 slurry-based DSSC was ∼63% higher than that achieved by a DSSC prepared using a commercial TiO2 slurry. Subsequently, the incorporation of acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the TiO2 slurry was examined. More specifically, the effect of varying the concentration of the CNTs in this slurry on the performance of the resulting DSSCs was studied. The chemical state of the CNTs-incorporated TiO2 photoanode was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A high energy conversion efficiency of 6.23% was obtained at an optimum CNT concentration of ∼0.06 wt.%. The obtained efficiency corresponds to a 63% enhancement when compared with that obtained from a DSSC based on a commercial TiO2 slurry. The higher efficiency was attributed to the improvement in the collection and transport of excited electrons in the presence of the CNTs

  17. Testing of In-Line Slurry Monitors and Pulsair Mixers with Radioactive Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    Three in-line slurry monitoring instruments were demonstrated, tested, and evaluated for their capability to determine the transport properties of radioactive slurries. The instruments included the Endress + Hauser Promass 63M Coriolis meter for measuring density, the Lasentec M600P for measuring particle size distribution, and a prototype ultrasonic monitor that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory for measuring suspended solids concentration. In addition, the power consumption of the recirculation pump was monitored to determine whether this parameter could be used as a tool for in-line slurry monitoring. The Promass 63M and the M600P were also evaluated as potential indicators of suspended solids concentration. In order to use the Promass 63M as a suspended solids monitor, the densities of the fluid phase and the dry solid particle phase must be known. In addition, the fluid phase density and the dry solids density must remain constant, as any change will affect the correlation between the slurry density and the suspended solids concentration. For the M600P, the particle size distribution would need to remain relatively constant. These instruments were demonstrated and tested at the Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The testing of the instruments was conducted in parallel with the testing of a Pulsair mixing system, which was used to mix the contents of the selected tank. A total of six tests were performed. A submersible pump was positioned at two depths, while the Pulsair system was operated at three mixing rates.

  18. Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH4 and transition metals-added magnesium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H2, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H2, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti and MgH2. Highlights: ► Addition of Ni, LiBH4, and Ti to MgH2 to increase reaction rates. ► Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ► At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. ► Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH2 was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH4 with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H2. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH2, Mg, Ni, TiH1.924, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH4, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg2Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample

  19. PCB dechlorination in anaerobic soil slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy's, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges, including mixed wastes; however, a practical remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBS. The onset of dechlorination activity can be accelerated by addition of nutritional amendments and inducers. After 15 weeks of incubation with PCB-contaminated soil and nutrient solution, dechlorination has been observed under several working conditions. The best results show that the average chlorine content steadily dropped from 4.3 to 3.5 chlorines per biphenyl over a 15-week period

  20. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hietala, J. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Wendland, R.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Collins, F. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  1. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  2. Desulfurization from Bauxite Water Slurry (BWS) Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xuzhong; Ge, Lan; Wang, Zhi; Zhuang, Siyuan; Wang, Yuhua; Ren, Lihui; Wang, Mingyong

    2016-02-01

    Feasibility of high-sulfur bauxite electrolysis desulfurization was examined using the electrochemical characterization, XRD, DTA, and FTIR. The cyclic voltammetry curves indicated that bauxite water slurry (BWS) electrolysis in NaOH system was controlled by diffusion. Additionally, the desulfurization effect of NaCl as the electrolyte was significantly better than that of NaOH as an electrolyte. As the stirring rate increased, the desulfurization ratio in NaCl system was not increased obviously, while the desulfurization ratio in NaOH system increased significantly, indicating further that electrolysis desulfurization in NaOH solution was controlled by diffusion. According to XRD, DTA, and FTIR analysis, the characteristic peaks of sulfur-containing phase in bauxite after electrolysis weakened or disappeared, indicating that the pyrite in bauxite was removed from electrolysis. Finally, the electrolytic desulfurization technology of bauxite was proposed based on the characteristics of BWS electrolysis.

  3. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  4. ORGANIC NITROGEN IN A TYPIC HAPLUDOX FERTILIZED WITH PIG SLURRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco André Grohskopf

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of pig slurry may have a different effect on nitrogen dynamics in soil compared to mineral fertilization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the different forms of organic N in a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico (Typic Hapludox and their relationship to N uptake by crops in response to 10 years of annual application of pig slurry and mineral fertilizer. The treatments were application rates of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 m3 ha-1 of pig slurry, in addition to mineral fertilizer, organized in a randomized block design with four replications. The N contents were determined in the plant tissue and in the forms of total N and acid hydrolyzed fractions: ammonium-N, hexosamine-N, α-amino-N, amide-N, and unidentified-N. Annual application of pig slurry or mineral fertilizer increased the total-N content in the 0-10 cm depth layer. The main fractions of organic N in the soil were α-amino-N when pig slurry was applied and unidentified-N in the case of mineral fertilizers. Pig slurry increased the N fractions considered as labile: α-amino-N, ammonium-N, and amide-N. The increase in these labile organic N fractions in the soil through pig slurry application allows greater N uptake by the maize and oat crops in a no-tillage system.

  5. Toxicity evaluation of pig slurry using luminescent bacteria and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenyan; Cai, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan; Zheng, Guojuan; Liang, Yuting

    2014-07-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v) and 1.95% (v/v) respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v). Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR), while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v) and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent. PMID:24995598

  6. Coal-water slurry as utility boiler fuel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffee, R.S.; Boyd, T.J.; Rossmeissl, N.P.; McHale, E.T.; Henderson, C.B.; Glenn, R.D.

    1982-03-01

    Coal-water slurries are a potential replacement for heavy fuel oil in utility boilers. Slurries have the major advantages of low cost, ease of handling, and early availability. A program was conducted to characterize the formulation, processing, handling, combustion, and storage of coal-water slurries made from cleaned coals. Acceptable slurries containing between 67 and 70% coal (by weight) were made from two different coals. A selected slurry was burned with good results in the Atlantic Research Corporation's one-million Btu/h experimental furnace. Approximately five tons (4,500 kg) of slurry were prepared on a pilot line for testing in the four-million Btu/h Babcock and Wilcox Basic Combustion Test Unit. A plant flowsheet was developed for a slurry plant designed to process five-million tons (4.5 x 10/sup 9/ kg) of coal a year. Total plant investment is estimated at $104-million (1980). Assuming a delivered coal cost of $50/ton (800 kg), the production costs are estimated to be $58/ton of coal or $2.14/million Btu. This cost compares favorably to a cost of $4.76/million Btu for heavy fuel oil at $30/barrel. These costs exclude certain ancillary costs such as marketing, fees and permits, insurance, interest on capital, profit, local taxes, and corporate income tax.

  7. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in DU Hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of nuclear fusion reaction are deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Generally, D is fused into T, which generates helium atoms and neutrons. At this time, a tremendous amount of energy is generated. D + T → 4He + n (E = 17.6 MeV) Hydrogen is a gas, and cannot be stored in large amounts. In addition, it can be explosive. Therefore, one of the storing methods for hydrogen is metal hydride. In this research, several kinds of metal hydrides including U, Zr, ZrCo, ZrNi, and LaNi5 have been simulated through modeling work of hydrogen absorption, desorption, and pressure effect in a bed using DU. For the exact modeling of the hydriding process, it is necessary to calculate simultaneous heat and mass transfer because, in the hydriding process, not only is hydrogen gas transported by mass transport and chemisorption but heat transfer also occurs through absorption. Therefore, in this paper, we tried to calculate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer using numerical analysis methods. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in DU hydriding is well fitted compared to the experimental data, and is more reasonable considering only one variable. The hydriding process changes the temperature and atomic ratio simultaneously, and thus it is necessary to consider in company with two transport phenomena. The numerical analysis method applied Euler's method; however, the Runge-Kutta method is a more widely used numerical solution of a differential equation. Therefore, when analyzing the hydriding process, Runge-Kutta or another method will henceforth be applied

  8. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  9. Flow behavior of coarse-grained slurries in pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasák, P.; Chára, Z.; Kysela, B. (Bohuš); Sobota , J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the experimental investigation of model coarse-grained slurry on a recirculation pipe loop with smooth stainless steel pipes. Graded pebble gravel and glass balls were used as a model for poly-metallic nodules, and very fine glass beads as a model for fine-grained sand. The investigation was focused on evaluating the effect of slurry velocity and particle concentration on pressure drops and the slurry flow behavior in the turbulent regime. Also the effect of fine-grained p...

  10. Evaluation of plant available nitrogen in concentrated pig slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Northeast Spin the expansion of the pig industry has brought as a result the production of vast amounts of pig slurry that exceeds field crops fertilization needs and consequently has contributed to the environmental deterioration of the region particularly ground water with NO3 pollution. Under such circumstances, it is needed to treat and/or export pig slurry. During the last year the implantation of cogeneration plants that take advantage of the surplus of energy to produce concentrate pig slurry by water evaporation that could easily transported. (Author)

  11. ORGANIC NITROGEN IN A TYPIC HAPLUDOX FERTILIZED WITH PIG SLURRY

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The application of pig slurry may have a different effect on nitrogen dynamics in soil compared to mineral fertilization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the different forms of organic N in a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico (Typic Hapludox) and their relationship to N uptake by crops in response to 10 years of annual application of pig slurry and mineral fertilizer. The treatments were application rates of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 m3 ha-1 of pig slurry, in addition to mineral fer...

  12. Use of radiation-induced polymers in cement slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water loss from cement slurries is reduced by incorporating within a cement slurry a polymer obtained as a product of radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide and/or methacrylamide and acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, and/or alkali metal salts thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in 10-60 percent aqueous monomer solution with gamma radiation. The aqueous monomer solution preferably contains 25-99 percent acrylamide and 75-1 percent sodium acrylate. The polymer can be present in concentration of about 0.001 to about 3.0 weight percent, based on the aqueous phase of the slurry

  13. Use of radiation-induced polymers in cement slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water loss from cement slurries is reduced by incorporating within a cement slurry a polymer obtained as a product of radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide and/or methacrylamide and acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, and/or alkali metal salts thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in 10 to 60 percent aqueous monomer solution with gamma radiation. The aqueous monomer solution preferably contains 25 to 99 percent acrylamide and 75 to 1 percent sodium acrylate. The polymer can be present in concentration of about 0.001 to about 3.0 weight percent, based on the aqueous phase of the slurry. (U.S.)

  14. Development of Syringe/Bottle Hybrids for Sampling Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convenient and effective sample bottle system based on simple modifications of disposable plastic syringes and bottles has been devised and tested for slurry samples. Syringe/ bottle hybrids (hereafter referred to as syringe bottles) have the convenience of regular flat-bottom bottles with screw cap closures. In addition, the syringe imparts a sliding and adjustable bottom to the bottle that forces the entire contents from the bottle. The system was designed especially to collect samples for high temperature work-ups of DWPF slurry samples. The syringe bottles together with fixed-bottom sample vial inserts would provide the DWPF with convenient and reliable methods for dealing with slurry samples

  15. Hydriding and neutron irradiation in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition of Zircaloy-4 for nuclear applications is specified by the ASTM B350 Standard, that fixes the amount of alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr) and impurities (Ni, Hf, O, N, C, among others) to optimize good corrosion and mechanical behavior.The recycling of zircaloy-4 scrap and chips resulting from cladding tube fabrication is an interesting issue.However, changes in the final composition of the recycled material may occur due to contamination with tool pieces, stainless steel chips, turnings, etc. while scrap is stored and handled. Since the main components of the possible contaminants are Fe, Cr and Ni, it arises the interest in studying up to what limit the Fe, Ni and Cr contents could be exceeded beyond the standard specification without affecting significantly the alloy properties.Zircaloy-4 alloys elaborated with Fe, Cr and Ni additions and others of standard composition in use in nuclear plants are studied by tensile tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.Some samples are tested in the initial condition and others after hydriding treatments and neutron irradiation in the RA6

  16. On-line slurry analyses by californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In chemical processing technology on-line activation methods gain an increasing importance for process monitoring and control. A method is described according to which the different fluorspar contents at various strategic points of a flotation plant are determined through neutron activation by 100 μg californium-252. A continuous analytical system for onstream process control of slurries was designed and constructed. A compact facility, called SUSAC, allows continuous application of the method on an industrial scale. The main components of the SUSAC facility are the irradiation and measurement cells. The cells are equipped with multistage countercurrent stirrers ensuring a proper radial and vertical distribution of the sample. The hollow shaft of the stirrer of the irradiation cell houses the Cf-source. The NaI-detector has been installed in a recess in the bottom of the measuring cell. The volumes are 9 dm3 for the irradiation cell, 7.5 dm3 for the measuring cell, 1/2 dm3 for the vonnection line and 4 dm3 for feed and drainage lines including the pump. Investigations on the following topics are discussed: selection of stirrers, residence time, flow rate, pulp density, calibration measurements. (T.G.)

  17. Progress towards a process for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric cells using a deep eutectic solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R.StJ. Foreman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction experiments relating to the recycling of the transition metals and lanthanides in nickel metal hydride cells are presented. The metal extraction is occurring from a deep eutectic solvent which is formed from chemicals suitable for use in food and related products. While it has been shown that the water content of the DES has a large effect on the extraction of transition metals by a mixture of chloride ionic liquid (Aliquat 336 and an aromatic solvent, the water content has a smaller effect on the solvent extraction of lanthanides with a solution of di(2-ethylhexyl hydrogen phosphate (DEHPA in a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbon. This study suggests that an industrial scale solvent extraction process for the recycling of metals from nickel hydride electrical cells will be feasible.

  18. Microstructure of silicon carbide nano powder-polycarbosilane-solvent mixed slurries and observed shear rate dependence in slurry viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SiC powder, polycarbosilane and xylene mixed slurries were prepared for microstructure observation and viscosity measurement. Slurries with averaged primary SiC size of 270 or 50 nm revealed existence of isolated secondary particles smaller than 1 μm in optical microscope observation. These secondary particles showed a Brownian motion in a xylene-PCS medium. On the other hand, slurry with an averaged primary SiC size of 20 nm revealed existence of large secondary particles in the size of 2-5 μm. The apparent area occupied with these secondary particles was far larger than that occupied by secondary particles of 270 or 50 nm in spite of a low SiC content. It was suggested that the secondary particles observed in the 20 nm slurry possessed small spaces among the primary SiC particles. Viscosity measurement presented that apparent viscosity of the slurry was high in general when the primary SiC particle size was small. In particular, the 20 nm SiC slurries showed quite high viscosity even at a SiC content of 5-6 mass%, which almost corresponded to that of 40 mass% for a SiC 270 nm slurry. Shear thinning effect was also remarkable when the primary SiC particle size was small

  19. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV

  20. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  1. Carbon dynamics in different soil types amended with pig slurry, pig manure and its biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanardag, Ibrahim H.; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Büyükkiliç-Yanardaǧ, Asuman; Mermut, Ahmet R.

    2014-05-01

    Chernozem had higher volatile compounds than Regosol, with no significant differences among treatments. Changes in total weight loss of soil among treatments were small, although endothermic and exothermic calorimetric peaks were different depending on the treatment, mainly in Regosol and Luvisol, being higher in biochar amended samples. The proportion of C containing gas species below 550 ºC was higher in Luvisol and Kastanozem with no differences among treatments. As a general pattern, FTIR absorbance intensity followed the pattern Kastanozem > Luvisol > Regosol due to the different amount of organic matter. Areas of bands representing chemically terminal alkenes moieties at 3286 cm-1 and 3340 cm-1 in Luvisol and Kastanozem. Chemically refractory aromatic moieties at 1580 cm-1 and 1594 cm-1 in Luvisol and Chernozem, and at 729 cm-1 and 754 cm-1 in the three types of soils. Areas of bands representing chemically terminal alkane moieties at 1359 cm-1 and 1380 cm-1, alkenyl moieties at 962 cm-1 and 975 cm-1, and alkynes at 636 cm-1 and 663 cm-1 in all types of soils. The soil samples measured before incubation presented higher absorbance intensity than at the end of incubation, indicating mineralization of organic matter with incubation. No significant alterations in the functional groups were observed with the application of the amendments in any soil. This study suggested that the application of 5 g C kg-1 soil was not sufficient to modify organic functional groups at short term. Thus, different soil types behave differently in terms of amendments applications, being the Regosol more prone to alter SOC content and stability after applications. The application of biochar promoted higher SOC concentrations and stability at the end of the incubation. Keywords: Pig slurry, Pig Manure, Biochar, thermogravimetric analysis, FTIR, soil respiration, soil mineralization.

  2. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  3. Influence of Specific Surface Area of Powder on Hydrogen Desorption Kinetics for Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The observable results for desorption kinetics by powder of metal hydride on the example of mangesium hydride are reproduced with the model formulated in terms of specific surface of powder. A volumetric measurement of hydrogen desorption process is evaluated on an example of wet ball milled magnesium hydride, and can be applied generally for any metal hydride. The exact solution of the model reproduces the shape of experimental curves for desorption process providing a satisfying agreement with experimental data.

  4. Effect of Impeller Agitation on Preparation of Tetra-n-Butyl Ammonium Bromide Semiclathrate Hydrate Slurries

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiro Inoue; Kazunari Ohgaki; Shunsuke Hashimoto; Hiroyuki Ito

    2012-01-01

    The slurries-containing tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) solution and its semiclathrate hydrate have attracted a lot of interest as latent heat transport media. These hydrate slurries contain some microparticles of crystal, and the size and shape of these hydrate particles could affect the mobility of slurries. Hence, it is essential to investigate the efficient hydrate-slurry preparation methods and the effect of hydrate particles on the fluid property of slurries for the application to...

  5. New-Generation Sealing Slurries For Borehole Injection Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryczek, Stanisław; Gonet, Andrzej; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Złotkowski, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The development of techniques and technologies thanks to which parameters of the ground medium can be modified makes specialists look for new recipes of geopolymers - binders for the reinforcing and sealing of unstable and permeable grounds. The sealing slurries are expected to meet a number of strict requirements, therefore it is important to find new admixtures and additives which could modify the fresh and hardened slurry. Special attention has been recently paid to the fluid ash - a by-product of the combustion of hard coals. However, the use of this additive is associated with the application of appropriate superplastifier. Laboratory analyses of rheological parameters of fresh sealing slurries and the ways of improving their liquidity by a properly selected third-generation superplastifier are presented in the paper. The slurries were based on Portland cement CEM I, milled granulated large-furnace slag and fly ash from fluidized-bed combustion of hard coal.

  6. Environmental Consequences of Future Biogas Technologies based on Separated Slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    This consequential life cycle assessment study highlights the key environmental aspects of producing biogas from separated pig and cow slurry, a relatively new but probable scenario for future biogas production, as it avoids the reliance on constrained carbon cosubstrates. Three scenarios involving...... different slurry separation technologies have been assessed and compared to a business-as-usual reference slurry management scenario. The results show that the environmental benefits of such biogas production are highly dependent upon the efficiency of the separation technology used to concentrate the...... volatile solids in the solid fraction. The biogas scenario involving the most efficient separation technology resulted in a dry matter separation efficiency of 87% and allowed a net reduction of the global warming potential of 40%, compared to the reference slurry management. This figure comprises the...

  7. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2011-01-01

    soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 μm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam......-textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting...... physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil...

  8. Cost estimate for a coal slurry pipeline in western Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappelle, H.J.

    1982-08-01

    Contents: Introduction to pipeline slurry transport; Calculation of pressure drop due to friction; Calculation of the total pressure drop; Determination of the type of pumps; Wall thickness and the cost of the pipe; Storage capacity; Dewatering; Grinding; Cost evaluation.

  9. Ice slurry based thermal storage in multifunctional buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M. J.; Kusumoto, N.

    Ice slurry based thermal storage plays an important role in reshaping patterns of electricity use for space cooling and heating. It offers inherent advantages in energy efficiency, operating savings, load follow-up and flexible installation over conventional thermal storage technologies. This paper provides discussions on the generation mechanism and performance of ice slurry, as well as the operation principle of the ice slurry based thermal storage system. Details of the system design, control strategy and operation performance are given through a case study on a recent installation in Herbis Osaka, the largest simple building complex in Japan. An evaluation of different installations with ice slurry thermal storage reveals that it is a rewarding technology that provides significant operating savings for the building air-conditioning and improves energy utilization efficiency in modern society.

  10. Dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulose for whole slurry ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-03-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) followed by the whole slurry fermentation of the pretreated EFB slurry was investigated. The optimized pretreatment conditions were at 1% (w/v) sulfuric acid with 3 min ramping to 190 °C in a microwave digester. Pretreated and washed EFB exhibited enzymatic digestibility of 88.5% of theoretical glucose yield after 48 h of hydrolysis. When the whole slurry of pretreated and neutralized EFB was used in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sulfuric acid-pretreated EFB resulted in 52.5% of theoretical ethanol yield based on total glucan in the untreated initial EFB after 72 h of SSF. When pretreated EFB slurry was treated with activated carbon before subjecting to SSF, the SSF furnished 87.5% ethanol yield based on the initial glucan content in untreated EFB (after 48 h of SSF). PMID:23395763

  11. Flow injection electrochemical hydride generation inductively coupled plasma time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of hydride forming elements and its application to the analysis of fresh water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flow injection (FI) method was developed using electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) as a sample introduction system, coupled to an inductively coupled plasma time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-TOFMS) for rapid and simultaneous determination of six elements forming hydrides (As, Bi, Ge, Hg, Sb and Se). A novel low volume electrolysis cell, especially suited for FI experiments was designed and the conditions for simultaneous electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG; electrolyte concentrations and flow rates, electrolysis voltage and current) as well as the ICP-TOFMS operational parameters (carrier gas flow rate, modulation pulse width (MPW)) for the simultaneous determination of 12 isotopes were optimized. The compromise operation parameters of the electrolysis were found to be 1.4 and 3 ml min-1 for the anolyte and catholyte flow rates, respectively, using 2 M sulphuric acid. An optimum electrolysis current of 0.7 A (16 V) and an argon carrier gas flow rate of 0.91 l min-1 were chosen. A modulation pulse width of 5 μs, which influences the sensitivity through the amount of ions being collected by the MS per single analytical cycle, provided optimum results for the detection of transient signals. The achieved detection limits were compared with those obtained by using FI in combination with conventional nebulization (FI-ICP-TOFMS); values for chemical hydride generation (FI-CHG-ICP-TOFMS) were taken from the literature. By using a 200 l sample loop absolute detection limits (3σ) in the range of 10-160 pg for As, Bi, Ge, Hg, Sb and 1.1 ng for Se and a precision of 4-8% for seven replicate injections of 20-100 ng ml-1 multielemental sample solutions were achieved. The analysis of a standard reference material (SRM) 1643d (NIST, 'Trace Elements in Water') showed good agreement with the certified values for As and Sb. Se showed a drastic difference, which is probably due to the presence of hydride-inactive Se species in the sample. Recoveries better than 93

  12. Consensus Standardization of Slurry Simulant Development Process to Reduce Design Risk Within the DOE Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Gary L.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kurath, Dean E.; Denslow, Kayte M.

    2014-06-30

    A critical responsibility of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management is the design, construction, and operation of equipment and facilities to process legacy radioactive waste slurries for safe, long-term disposal. The accomplishment of this mission requires the extensive use of physical and chemical simulants to represent the hazardous radioactive waste. Development and characterization of simulants can often be difficult to compare or utilize as questions exist as to the basis, techniques, or consistency associated with reported parameters. In addition, controversy has existed in the interpretation and application of the characterization data for the wastes that the simulants are intended to represent.

  13. Effects of abrasive size and surfactant in nano ceria slurry for shallow trench isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won-Mo; Katoh, Takeo; Kang, Hyun-Goo; Park, Jea-Gun; Paik, Un-Gyu; Jeon, Hyeong-Tag [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-15

    The effects of the abrasive size and the surfactant concentration in ceria slurry on the removal rates for oxide and nitride films were investigated through a systematic chemical-mechanical-polishing (CMP) experiment. We found that the smaller the abrasives were, the more quickly the removal rates for both oxide and nitride films decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. This result was qualitatively explained by using a model in which abrasive particles move through a viscous layer caused by surfactant adsorption on the film surface being polished.

  14. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  15. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  16. The aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Massana Guitart, Jordi; Guerrero Bustos, Ana; Antón Fuentes, Rebeca; Garcimartin Molina, Miguel Angel; Sanchez Espinosa, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to measure the behaviour of various mortars employed in livestock media in central Spain and to analyse the aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement blended with fly ash mortars. To achieve this, mortar specimens were immersed in ponds storing pig slurry. Mortar specimens, of 40 ? 40 ? 160 mm, were made from four types of cement commonly used and recommended for rural areas. The types were a sulphate-resistant Portland cement and three cements blended in different proportions with ...

  17. A study on the treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of anionic flocculants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries has been investigated in a laboratory-scale vacuum filtration unit. Simultaneously the influence of certain surfactants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries with anionic flocculants has also been investigated. Test results show that the flocculated filter cake generally contains higher residual water than the unflocculated cake. The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 was effective in reducing the moisture content of the cake

  18. Resistance coefficient during ice slurry flow through pipe sudden constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ł. Mika

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the adverse environmental effects of some commonly-used refrigerants, efforts are still underway to find new cooling mediumsthat would be safer to the ozone layer and would not increase the greenhouse effect. Ice slurry as a new ecological coolant suits theprocesses requiring the preservation of constant and equal temperature in the cooling process of the full section of the cooled solid. Thanks to that, ice slurry can find a wide potential application in such branches of industry, as heat treatment, materials engineering, or foundry. In this paper, flow systems which are commonly used in fittings elements such as diameter’s reductions in ice slurry pipelines, are experimentally investigated. In the study reported in this paper, the consideration was given to the specific features of the slurry flow in which the flow qualities depend mainly on the volume fraction of solid particles. The results of the experimental studies on the flow resistance, presented herein, enabled to determine the resistance coefficient during the ice slurry flow through the pipe sudden constriction. The volume fraction of solid particles in the slurry ranged from 5 to 30%. The recommended and non-recommended range of the Reynolds number for the ice slurry flow through the pipe sudden constriction were presented in this paper. The experimental studies were conducted on a few variants of the most common reductions of copper pipes. Further studies on the determination of the resistance coefficient in the remaining fittings elements of the pipeline were recommended in the paper as well as the further theoretical studies intended to determine the theoretical relations to calculate the resistance coefficient in all the fittings elements in the pipeline (on the basis of the experimental studies and to elaborate the calculation pattern of the entire ice slurry system.

  19. A metal hydride-polymer composite for hydrogen storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To address the issue of the breakdown into fine powders that occurs in the practical use of metal hydrides, the possibility of using a polymeric material as a matrix that contains the active metal particles was experimentally assessed. A ball milling approach in the tumbling mode was used to develop a metal hydride-polymer composite with a high metal to polymer weight ratio. The alloy powder was blended with the polymer and a coating of the metal particles was obtained. The composite was consolidated by hot pressing and the pellets were characterized in terms of their hydriding-dehydriding properties. The materials did not show significant losses in either loading capacity or kinetic properties. The polymeric matrix resulted as being stable under hydrogen cycling. Further, from SEM observation it was confirmed that the metal powders remained embedded in the polymeric matrix even after a number of cycles and that the overall dimensional integrity was retained.

  20. Theoretical Estimate of Hydride Affinities of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Teng; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Aromatic carbonyl compounds are one type of the most important organic compounds, and the reductions ofthem by hydride agents such as LiAlH4 or NaBH4 are widely used in organic synthesis. The reactivity of carbonyl compounds generally increases in the following order: ketone < aldehyde, and amide < acid < ester < acid halide, which could be related to their hydride affinities (HA). In the previous paper, Robert[1] calculated the absolute HAof a series of small non-aromatic carbonyl compounds. In this paper, we use DFT method at B3LYP/6-311 + + G (2d, 2p)∥B3LYP/6-31 + G* level to estimate hydride affinities of five groups of aromatic carbonyl compounds. The detailed results are listed in Table 1.

  1. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental and hot bands of the vibration--rotation transitions of 6 LiH, 7 LiH, 6 LiD, and 7 LiD were observed by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at Doppler-limited resolution. Lithium hydride molecules were produced by the reaction of the Li vapor with hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Some 40 transitions were observed and, after combined with submillimeter-wave spectra reported by G. M. Plummer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 4893 (1984)], were analyzed to yield Dunham-type constants with accuracies more than an order of magnitude higher than those published in the literature. It was clearly demonstrated that the Born--Oppenheimer approximation did not hold, and some parameters representing the breakdown were evaluated. The Born--Oppenheimer internuclear distance r/sup BO//sub e/ was derived to be 1.594 914 26 (59) A, where a new value of Planck's constant recommended by CODATA was employed. The relative intensity of absorption lines was measured to determine the ratio of the permanent dipole moment to its first derivative with respect to the internuclear distance: μ/sub e/ [(partialμpartialr)/sub e/ r/sub e/ ] = 1.743(86). The pressure broadening parameter Δν/sub p/ P was determined to be 6.40 (22) MHzTorr by measuring the linewidth dependence on the pressure of hydrogen, which was about four times larger than the value for the dipole--quadrupole interaction estimated by Kiefer and Bushkovitch's theory

  2. Investigation of aqueous slurries as fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical and experimental studies were carried out to assess the feasibility of using an aqueous slurry, with lithium in its solid component, to meet the tritium breeding, cooling, and shielding requirements of a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR). The numerical studies were designed to demonstrate the theoretical ability of a conceptual slurry blanket to breed adequate tritium to sustain the CTR. The experimental studies were designed to show that the tritium retention characteristics of likely solid components for the slurry were conducive to adequate tritium recovery without the need for isotopic separation. The numerical portion of this work consisted in part of using ANISN, a one-dimensional finite difference neutron transport code, to model the neutronic performance of the slurry blanket concept. The parameters governing tritium production and retention in a slurry were computed and used to modify the results of the ANISN computer runs. The numerical work demonstrated that the slurry blanket was only marginally capable of breeding sufficient tritium without the aid of a neutron multiplying region. The experimental portion of this work consisted of several neutron irradiation experiments, which were designed to determine the retention abilities of LiF particles

  3. Contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youzhi Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the cementation of deep wells, contamination at the contact surface between cement slurry and drilling fluid will present a technical challenge, which may threaten operation safety. To deal with the problem, lab tests and analysis were performed specifically on the compatibility of fluids during cementation in Sichuan and Chongqing gas fields. Impacts of commonly used additives for drilling fluids were determined on fluidity and thickening time of conventional cement slurry. Through the infrared spectrum analysis, SEM and XRD, infrared spectrum data of kalium polyacrylamide (KPAM and bio-viscosifier were obtained, together with infrared spectrum, SEM and XRD data of cement slurry with additives. Contamination mechanisms of the cement slurry by conventional additives for drilling fluid were reviewed. Test results show that both KPAM and bio-viscosifier are such high-molecular materials that the long chains in these materials may easily absorb cement particles in the slurry to form mixed network structures; as a result, cement particles were prone to agglomeration and eventually lost their pumpability. Finally, assessment of and testing methods for the contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry were further improved to form standards and codes that may help solve the said problems. This study will provide technological supports for the preparation of drilling fluids with desirable properties prior to cementation, the selection of optimal drilling fluids additives, and the development of innovative drilling fluids additives.

  4. Dissolution and Precipitation Temperatures of δ Hydrides in Zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anelastic effects due to the formation and dissolution of hydrides on crystal bar Zirconium (O-6 and 2x10-5 , in a gaseous atmosphere (He) to allow a better thermal conductivity inside the pendulum.Hydriding was achieved inside the pendulum by the inlet of hydrogen gas.The final hydrogen contents was determined by fusion analysis and resulted in 36 ppm.The first ''in situ'' hydriding is obtained by introducing an hydrogen pressure of 60kPa in the pendulum during 1h at 295K. Then, the hydrogen atmosphere is extracted by mechanical vacuum and an helium atmosphere is reinserted.The IF and G measurements are made in this condition. During the first heating an anomaly at 430K and a little step in the modulus G are obtained, indicating a d dissolution temperature TSSD of 430K for 8.6 wt ppm of H.After a solubilization of 10min at 495K, there are simultaneous effects: a step in G and an IF peak which is not enough developed on its right side.They presume a d precipitation temperature TSSP of 485K for 20 wt ppm of H. After a 1h at 490K, the peaks are again obtained with slight changes.The second ''in situ'' hydration during 8h at 173K, give rise to several peaks and modulus variations in the temperature range (300-400)K which are assessed to be due to transitions occurring to metastable γ and ε hydrides formed upon hydriding at low temperature, and to the δ hydride

  5. Sorption of 17b-Estradiol to Pig Slurry Separates and Soil in the Soil-Slurry Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Mostofa; Petersen, Søren O; Lægdsmand, Mette

    2012-01-01

    ) by separation technologies, which may also remove parts of the estrogens and enhance infiltration of the slurry on field application and hence the interaction between estrogens and the soil matrix. This study investigated how 17β-estradiol (E2), a natural estrogen commonly found in pig manure, sorbs...... to agricultural soils, to different size fractions of pig slurry separates, and to soils amended with each size fraction to simulate conditions in the soil–slurry environment. A crude fiber fraction (SS1) was prepared by sieving (<500 μm) the solids removed by an on-farm separation process. Three...... solids used. Sorption of E2 to soil increased with its organic carbon content for both liquid phases. The solid–liquid partition coefficients of slurry separates were 10 to 30 times higher than those of soils, but the organoic carbon normalized partition coefficient values, reflecting sorption per unit...

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Xiang [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  7. Energy management of fuel cell electric vehicle with hydrid tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Ravey, Alexandre; FAIVRE, Sébastien; HIGEL, Charles; HAREL, Fabien; Djerdir, Abdesslem

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel control strategy for fuel cell electric vehicle including hydrid tanks using fuzzy logic controller. The aim of the study is to manage both thermal and electric energy with the same controller in order to use the fuel cell system as a range extender by preventing the batteries state of charge to drop too quickly. The presented controller use both batteries state of charge and thermal status of hydrid tank to control the fuel cell power. This work is a part of the M...

  8. Hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. First-principles calculations suggested that CaSiH n is thermodynamically stable. Experimentally, the p -c isotherms clearly demonstrated plateau pressures in a temperature range of 473-573 K and the maximum hydrogen content was 1.9 weight % (wt.%) under a hydrogen pressure of 9 MPa at 473 K. The structure of CaSiH n is different from those of ZrNi hydrides, although CaSi has the CrB-type structure as well as ZrNi

  9. Fourier transformation IR spectroscopy of rare earth hydrides and manganates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication describes IR optical investigations of rare earth hybrids and manganates. Both of these material systems have a pronounced interaction with light in the IR spectral region and are therefore well suited for Fourier transformation IR spectroscopy. Especially the spectra of the La1-xCaxMnO3 films contain many structures that derive both from the investigated film and the substrate. Quantitative information on the properties of the material system is obtained by separating the optical properties of LCMO from the substrate by means of adaptation using a multilayer formalism. The temperature dependence of the IR spectra was investigated down to the low-temperature range. Splitting and frequency shifts of the phonon modes were quantified, and the sensitive influence of the oxygen concentration of the samples on their optical properties was demonstrated. As representatives of the class of rare earth hybrids, various aspects of the material systems NdH2, EuH2 and YHx were investigated in thin film samples grown on substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy. Detailed RHEED and Auger electron spectroscopy investigations provided information on the growth process, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the samples. By using a buffer layer between the rare earth metals and the palladium protective layer which is necessary with Nd and Eu, the minimum thickness of the Pd layer could be reduced about by half. The structural changes resulting from hydrogen loading are investigated by means of Raman measurements of the Nd hydride. The raman-active phonons that were observed for the first time by this method are strongly dependent on the crystal structure, i.e. the various phases are identified as a function of the hydrogen concentration. With the aid of the isotope effect, the origin of the phonons observed in the IR reflection and transmission spectra can be attributed to hydrogen oscillations. Evaluation of the spectra by multilayer formalism provides

  10. Computational study of sodium magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Valle, Fernando Antonio

    Hydrogen offers considerable potential benefits as an energy carrier. However, safe and convenient storage of hydrogen is one of the biggest challenges to be resolved in the near future. Sodium magnesium hydride (NaMgH 3) has attracted attention as a hydrogen storage material due to its light weight and high volumetric hydrogen density of 88 kg/m3. Despite the advantages, hydrogen release in this material occurs at approximately 670 K, which is well above the operable range for on-board hydrogen storage applications. In this regard, hydrogen release may be facilitated by substitution doping of transition-metals. This dissertation describes first-principles computational methods that enable an examination of the hydrogen storage properties of NaMgH3. The novel contribution of this dissertation includes a combination of crystal, supercell, and surface slab calculations that provides new and relevant insights about the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of NaMgH3. First-principles calculations on the pristine crystal structure provide a starting reference point for the study of this material as a hydrogen storage material. To the best of our knowledge, it is reported for the first time that a 25% mol doping concentration of Ti, V, Cu, and Zn dopants reduce the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen release for NaMgH3. The largest decrease in the DeltaH(298 K) value corresponds to the Zn-doped model (67.97 kJ/(mol H2)). Based on cohesive energy calculations, it is reported that at the 6.25% mol doping concentration, Ti and Zn dopants are the only transition metals that destabilize the NaMgH3 hydride. In terms of hydrogen removal energy, it is quantified that the energy cost to remove a single H from the Ti-doped supercell model is 0.76 eV, which is lower with respect to the pristine model and other prototypical hydrogen storage materials. From the calculation of electronic properties such as density of states, electron density difference, and charge population analysis

  11. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  12. Observations on Hydride Structures at the Tip of Arrested Cracks Grown under Conditions of Delayed Hydride Cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One sample of Zr2.5%Nb and one sample of cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 which have been tested for hydrogen induced crack growth have been examined in the crack tip region with the aim of determining the mechanism behind the growth of cracks. The proposed mechanisms are brittle failure of a crack tip hydride and hydrogen enhanced localized shear. The examinations were done by TEM and SEM. However attempts to produce a TEM specimen with a thinned region at the tip of the crack were unsuccessful in both samples. One feature observed in the Zr2.5%Nb material may however be an indication of intense shear deformation at the tip of the crack. On the other hand all observations on the Zircaloy-4 sample indicate precipitation of hydrides ahead of the crack tip and the presence of hydrides on the crack flanks

  13. Mixing and sampling of sludge-frit-CST slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thermal Fluids Lab of SRTC designed, built and operated a 1/240th-scale test facility to perform a series of mixing and sampling tests with aqueous and sludge-based slurries of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin. Note that the CST-based Ion Exchange (IX) process is one of the two options being assessed as a replacement to the original In-Tank TPB Precipitation Process to remove cesium from the high level waste stream. The particle size of as-received CST resin ranges from 200--800 microns, which is larger than the glass frit size range of 75--175 microns. This raises two technical issues of homogeneity and Hydragardregsign sampling of CST slurries. Seven different test series were conducted to address these issues. The first four tests used two batches of aqueous slurries of 10-wt% CST and the remaining three tests used three different batches of sludge-based slurries. Test results showed that the aqueous slurry of 10-wt% of ''as-received'' CST could not be effectively mixed with an agitator speed representative of DWPF mixing conditions. However, this slurry can easily be re-suspended by agitator. The agitation system could not effectively reduce the CST particle size. However, prolonged (18 hrs) repeated pumping of the slurry through a centrifugal pump broke up 55% of CST particles. The sludge-frit batch was homogeneously mixed under DWPF representative mixing conditions and the Hydragardregsign samples of sludge-frit slurry showed an excellent agreement with process tank grab samples. The sludge-frit reduced CST slurry was also homogeneously mixed under DWPG mixing conditions. However, the Hydragardregsign samples exhibited about 12% frit depletion as compared to grab samples. The CST/sludge ratios showed an excellent agreement with grab samples. Finally, the sludge-frit slurry with ''as-received'' CST repeatedly plugged the Hydrgardregsign sampler and no steady flow conditions were achieved. However, this sludge batch was well mixed in the process tank

  14. Neutral and Ionized Hydrides in Star-forming Regions -- Observations with Herschel/HIFI

    CERN Document Server

    Benz, Arnold O; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Staeuber, Pascal; Wampfler, Susanne F

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic abundance of hydrides depends critically on high-energy UV, X-ray, and particle irradiation. Here we study hydrides in star-forming regions where irradiation by the young stellar object can be substantial, and density and temperature can be much enhanced over interstellar values. Lines of OH, CH, NH, SH and their ions OH+, CH+, NH+, SH+, H2O+, and H3O+ were observed in star-forming regions by the HIFI spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Molecular column densities are derived from observed ground-state lines, models, or rotational diagrams. We report here on two prototypical high-mass regions, AFGL 2591 and W3 IRS5, and compare them to chemical calculations making assumptions on the high-energy irradiation. A model assuming no ionizing protostellar emission is compared with (i) a model assuming strong protostellar X-ray emission and (ii) a two-dimensional (2D) model including emission in the far UV (FUV, 6 -- 13.6 eV) irradiating the outflow walls that separate the outflowing gas an...

  15. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  16. Effect of an Excess of Chromium and Hydriding on Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of mechanical properties and microstructure morphologies of zircaloy-4 are presented.They were obtained in several laboratory made samples of chemical composition modified with respect to the ASTM B 350 by the addition of alloying elements as well as hydrides.This work is focused mainly on the effect of 900 ppm of additional Cr in excess as compared with the standard composition alloy and with two other laboratory alloys studied before, containing 250 ppm of Ni in excess and 1000 ppm of Fe in excess, respectively.The study is carried out by means of tensile tests at room temperature and at 240C, hardness tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.The neutron irradiation was carried out at Bariloche in the RA6-CNEA reactor.The results indicate that precipitates concentrate along grain boundaries in all cases, and that for higher contents of alloying elements corresponds a higher quantity of precipitates and smaller grain sizes.Except for the hydrided sample, the fracture is ductile with cavities nucleated at precipitates

  17. Heterogeneous reduction of carbon dioxide by hydride-terminated silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Chenxi; He, Le; Ghuman, Kulbir Kaur; Wong, Annabelle P. Y.; Jia, Jia; Jelle, Abdinoor A.; O'Brien, Paul G.; Reyes, Laura M.; Wood, Thomas E.; Helmy, Amr S.; Mims, Charles A.; Singh, Chandra Veer; Ozin, Geoffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon constitutes 28% of the earth's mass. Its high abundance, lack of toxicity and low cost coupled with its electrical and optical properties, make silicon unique among the semiconductors for converting sunlight into electricity. In the quest for semiconductors that can make chemicals and fuels from sunlight and carbon dioxide, unfortunately the best performers are invariably made from rare and expensive elements. Here we report the observation that hydride-terminated silicon nanocrystals with average diameter 3.5 nm, denoted ncSi:H, can function as a single component heterogeneous reducing agent for converting gaseous carbon dioxide selectively to carbon monoxide, at a rate of hundreds of μmol h−1 g−1. The large surface area, broadband visible to near infrared light harvesting and reducing power of SiH surface sites of ncSi:H, together play key roles in this conversion. Making use of the reducing power of nanostructured hydrides towards gaseous carbon dioxide is a conceptually distinct and commercially interesting strategy for making fuels directly from sunlight. PMID:27550234

  18. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  19. Nitrogen hydrides and the H2 ortho-to-para ratio in dark clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Dislaire, Vincent; Faure, Alexandre; Maret, Sébastien; Bacmann, Aurore; Forêts, Guillaume Pineau Des

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen bearing species are common tracers of the physical conditions in a wide variety of objects, and most remarkably in dark clouds. The reservoir of gaseous nitrogen is expected to be atomic or molecular, but none of the two species are observable in the dark gas. Their abundances therefore derive indirectly from those of N-bearing species through chemical modelling. The recent years have accumulated data which stress our incomplete understanding of the nitrogen chemistry in dark cloud conditions. To tackle this problem of the nitrogen chemistry in cold gas, we have revised the formation of nitrogen hydrides, which is initiated by the key reaction \\ce{N+ + H2 -> NH+ + H}. We propose a new rate for this reaction which depends on the ortho-to-para ratio of H2. This new rate allows to reproduce the abundance ratios of the three nitrogen hydrides, NH, \\ce{NH2}, and \\ce{NH3}, observed towards IRAS16293-2422, provided that the channel leading to NH from the dissociative recombination of \\ce{N2H+} is not closed...

  20. Nitrogen hydrides in the cold envelope of IRAS16293-2422

    CERN Document Server

    Hily-Blant, Pierre; Bacmann, Aurore; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Parise, Bérengère; Caux, Emmanuel; Faure, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen is the fifth most abundant element in the Universe, yet the gas-phase chemistry of N-bearing species remains poorly understood. Nitrogen hydrides are key molecules of nitrogen chemistry. Their abundance ratios place strong constraints on the production pathways and reaction rates of nitrogen-bearing molecules. We observed the class 0 protostar IRAS16293-2422 with the heterodyne instrument HIFI, covering most of the frequency range from 0.48 to 1.78~THz at high spectral resolution. The hyperfine structure of the amidogen radical o-NH2 is resolved and seen in absorption against the continuum of the protostar. Several transitions of ammonia from 1.2 to 1.8~THz are also seen in absorption. These lines trace the low-density envelope of the protostar. Column densities and abundances are estimated for each hydride. We find that NH:NH2:NH3=5:1:300. {Dark clouds chemical models predict steady-state abundances of NH2 and NH3 in reasonable agreement with the present observations, whilst that of NH is underpredi...

  1. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of titanium hydride (TiH2) powder in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Rasooli; M A Boutorabi; M Divandari; A Azarniya

    2013-04-01

    DTA and TGA curves of titanium hydride powder were determined in air at different heating rates. Also the thermal decomposition behaviour of the aforementioned powder at high heating rates was taken into consideration. A great breakthrough of the practical interest in the research was the depiction of the H2-time curves of TiH2 powder at various temperatures in air. In accordance with the results, an increase in heating rate to higher degrees does not change the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride powder, while switching it from internal diffusion to chemical reaction. At temperatures lower than 600 °C, following the diffusion of hydrogen and oxygen atoms in titanium lattice, thin layers TiH phase and oxides form on the powder surface, controlling the process. On the contrary, from 700 °C later on, the process is controlled by oxidation of titanium hydride powder. In fact, the powder oxidation starts around 650 °C and may escalate following an increase in the heating rate too.

  2. Studies of boron hydrides: new heteroboranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I. The chemistry of the bipentaborane 2,2'-(B5H8)2 is investigated to some extent. Pyrolysis of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 resulted in the formation of non-volatile solid boron hydrides and hydrogen. Treatment of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with bromine in the presence of AlBr3 resulted in the isolation of 1,1'Br2-2,2'-(B5H7)2. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with deprotonating agents resulted in the formation of the corresponding anions. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with diborane followed by acidification afforded n-B9H15 and B10H14 in moderate yield. II. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with potassium polyselenide resulted in the isolation of stable white crystals of B9H9SSe. Treatment of B9H9SSe with one equivalent of base in methanol gave the unstable heteroborane B8H9(OCH3)SSE and treatment with two equivalents of base afforded yellow crystals of B7H9SSe. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with arsenic trioxide in aqueous basic solution gave the electron-rich heteroborane, B8H8As2S in moderate yield. This resulted in the isolation and identification of Et3N.BH3 and the new metalloborane B7H7As2SCo(C5H5). Treatment of B10H11Se- with As2O3 resulted in the isolation of the stable nido-heteroborane B8H8As2Se in low yield. Reaction of B7C2H13 with potassium polyselenide gave the arachno selenacarborane B7H2C11Se in low yield. The structure of the new heteroborane is proposed on the basis of 11B and 1H nmr spectra. Reaction of B7C2H13 with AsCl3 resulted in the isolation of white stable crystals of B7C2H9As2 in 40 percent yield

  3. Polarization of modified titanium and titanium–zirconium creates nano-structures while hydride formation is modulated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Matthias J.; Walter, Martin S. [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstrasse 15, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bucko, Miroslaw M. [Department of Ceramics and Refractory Materials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pamula, Elzbieta [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Lyngstadaas, S. Petter [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Haugen, Håvard J., E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-10-01

    The majority of titanium based bone-level dental implants available on the market today feature a sand-blasted and acid-etched (SBAE) surface that contains comparably high hydrogen levels. Cathodic polarization of titanium in acidic solutions is known to further increase titanium hydride on the surface. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of cathodic reduction on titanium (Ti) and titanium–zirconium (TiZr) with a SBAE surface in order to investigate the potential of such a process for further improving surfaces for bone anchored dental implants. Samples of both materials were cathodically polarized in acidic solution at different current densities and for different process times. Chemical analysis of the hydrogen levels by SIMS showed that cathodic reduction re-arranged the hydride already present on the surfaces from the etching process but could not significantly increase hydride levels. The hydrogen layer created by the preceding hot acid etching appeared to modulate further hydride creation. Analysis of the surface topography by SEM showed changes to the nano-topography of both materials after polarization. TiZr showed homogeneously distributed nano-spheres as they were already observed for TiZr SBAE at increased size of 80–100 nm on the whole surface. By contrast, polarization of Ti created nano-nodules and nano-spheres of 150–200 nm on the surface. These spheres were interconnected to form flower-like structures along the ridges and peaks of the surface. Moreover the flanks were covered by a rippled structure of isotropically distributed small-diameter (10–20 nm) nano-nodules.

  4. Polarization of modified titanium and titanium–zirconium creates nano-structures while hydride formation is modulated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of titanium based bone-level dental implants available on the market today feature a sand-blasted and acid-etched (SBAE) surface that contains comparably high hydrogen levels. Cathodic polarization of titanium in acidic solutions is known to further increase titanium hydride on the surface. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of cathodic reduction on titanium (Ti) and titanium–zirconium (TiZr) with a SBAE surface in order to investigate the potential of such a process for further improving surfaces for bone anchored dental implants. Samples of both materials were cathodically polarized in acidic solution at different current densities and for different process times. Chemical analysis of the hydrogen levels by SIMS showed that cathodic reduction re-arranged the hydride already present on the surfaces from the etching process but could not significantly increase hydride levels. The hydrogen layer created by the preceding hot acid etching appeared to modulate further hydride creation. Analysis of the surface topography by SEM showed changes to the nano-topography of both materials after polarization. TiZr showed homogeneously distributed nano-spheres as they were already observed for TiZr SBAE at increased size of 80–100 nm on the whole surface. By contrast, polarization of Ti created nano-nodules and nano-spheres of 150–200 nm on the surface. These spheres were interconnected to form flower-like structures along the ridges and peaks of the surface. Moreover the flanks were covered by a rippled structure of isotropically distributed small-diameter (10–20 nm) nano-nodules.

  5. Uranium Hydride Nucleation Kinetics: Effects of Oxide Thickness and Vacuum Outgassing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many factors such as impurities in the oxide and metal, microstructure, gas impurities, and oxide thickness may influence the rate and location of the nucleation of hydride on uranium. This work has concentrated on isolating one of these variables, the oxide thickness, and measuring the effect of the oxide thickness on uranium hydride nucleation. Uranium samples, all from the same lot, were prepared with different oxide thicknesses. The oxide thickness was measured using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Oxidized uranium samples were then exposed to ultra-high purity hydrogen gas under constant volume conditions. Decreases in pressure indicated hydrogen uptake by the sample. The time for hydride nucleation--as well as the maximum hydriding rate--was then calculated from the measured decreases in pressure. The time to nucleate a hydride was found to increase whereas the maximum hydriding rate was found to decrease with increasing oxide thickness. The density of hydride pits also decreased with increasing oxide thickness. The observed results support the argument that the nucleation of hydride is controlled somewhat by diffusion of hydrogen through the oxide layer. Vacuum outgassing of samples, thereby removing the oxide impurities and keeping the oxide thickness constant, dramatically decreased the nucleation time and increased the maximum hydriding rate. Again, this is consistent with hydrogen diffusion through the oxide controlling the nucleation of hydride. Impurities in the oxide layer can decrease the diffusivity of hydrogen and therefore delay the nucleation of uranium hydride

  6. Internal friction study of hydrides in zirconium at low hydrogen contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Internal friction and shear modulus measurements were carried out on crystal bar zirconium in the as received and hydride conditions using an inverted forced pendulum. Hydriding was achieved in two ways: inside and out of the pendulum. The final hydrogen content determined by fusion analysis in the 'in situ' hydride sample was of 36 ppm. Another sample was hydride by the cathodic charge method with 25 ppm. The thermal solid solubility (TSS) phase boundary presents hysteresis between the precipitation (TSSP) and the dissolution (TSSD) temperatures for the zirconium hydrides. During the first thermal cycling the anelastic effects could be attributed to the δ, ε and metastable γ zirconium hydrides. After 'in situ' annealing at 490 K, these peaks completely disappear in the electrolytically charged sample, while in the 'in situ' hydride, the peaks remain with decreasing intensity. This effect can be understood in terms of the different surface conditions of the samples. (author)

  7. Comparison of irradiation hardening and microstructure evolution in ion-irradiated delta and epsilon hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oono, Naoko, E-mail: n-oono@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Higuchi, Toru; Sakamoto, Kan; Nakatsuka, Masafumi [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Naritacho Oarai, Higashi-Ibaraki, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hasegawa, Akiko; Kondo, Sosuke; Iwata, Noriyuki Y.; Matsui, Hideki; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    A δ-Zr-hydride was irradiated with 6.4 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ions to clarify the relationship between hardening and microstructural changes of bulk Zr-hydrides under neutron irradiation. Irradiation hardening was measured by nanoindentation tests. Transmission electron microscope cross-sectional observations showed that the deformation mechanism of the δ-Zr-hydride was both slip and twinning. Dislocation loops were observed in the irradiated hydride matrix. These irradiation-induced defects make slip deformation difficult and consequently promote the twin deformation of δ-Zr-hydride. This work is a continuation of the previous our work (J. Nucl. Mater. 419 (2011) 366–370) focused upon ε-Zr-hydride and we discuss a comparison between the two Zr-hydrides.

  8. Cooling Performance Improvement of the Heat Driven Type Metal Hydride Refrigerator-Heat Transfer Enhancement Influence of Metal Hydride Sheet Loading Into a Metal Hydride Particle Bed

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Sangchul; Katsuta, Masafumi; Homma, Ikuto; Morita, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    In the refrigeration and air conditioning fields, the demands of energy conservation and renewable energy have been increased recently. In this study, we aim at the development of the heat driven type metal hydride (abbr., MH) that can be driven by the low temperature exhaust or solar heat under 100ᵒC. In order to use this system commercially, heat transfer enhancement of MH particle bed, activation characteric improvement and production cost reduction of MH must be achieved. In this study, w...

  9. Electrochromism of Mg-Ni hydride switchable mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidorsson, Jan; Giebels, I. A. M. E.; Di Vece, M.; Griessen, Ronald

    2001-11-01

    Switchable mirrors have so far been made of rare-earth and rare-earth-magnesium based metal-hydrides. In this investigation we study Mg-Ni-hydrides, which have been shown by Richardson et al. to exhibit switchable properties similar to those of the rare-earth hydrides. Cyclic voltammetry on MgzNiHx samples with 0.8 less than z less than 3.7 shows that addition of one Mg atom per Mg2Ni gives the best ab/desorption kinetics for hydrogen. X- ray diffraction reveals a structural change as hydrogen is absorbed. The metal-insulator transition is confirmed with simultaneous resistivity measurements. A pressure- composition isotherm of Mg2NiHx is also determined electrochemically. Optical spectrometry during gas loading gives an optical band gap of 1.6 eV for Mg2NiH4. This gap increases with increasing Mg content in a way similar to that of the Mg-doped rare-earth hydrides.

  10. Structural deformation of metallic uranium surrounding hydride growth sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • UH3 formation on uranium surfaces by a controlled uptake of hydrogen at 240 °C. • Large hydride growths (35–125 μm in diameter) form at the surface. • Confined hydride expansion during growth generates stress in the subsurface. • EBSD scans found micro-cracking and twins as forms of stress relief in the metal. - Abstract: Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was utilised to probe the microstructure of uranium metal in the vicinity of surface corrosion pits, resulting from hydrogen exposure (5 × 104 Pa, at 240 °C). Microstructural analysis of the surface revealed a subtle increase of grain orientation variation for grains at the border of the hydride growths. Cross sectional analysis, at pit sites, revealed significant microstructure deformation in the form of crystal twinning and micro-cracking beneath the surface. These observations provide qualitative evidence that local stress intensities generated as a consequence of hydride growth and confinement, were sufficient to cause deformation within the parent metal

  11. Design and integration of a hydrogen storage on metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a hydrogen storage system using metal hydrides for a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. Hydride storage technology has been chosen due to project specifications: high volumetric capacity, low pressures (≤ 3.5 bar) and low temperatures (≤ 75 C: fuel cell temperature). During absorption, heat from hydride generation is dissipated by fluid circulation. An integrated plate-fin type heat exchanger has been designed to obtain good compactness and to reach high absorption/desorption rates. At first, the storage system has been tested in accordance with project specifications (absorption 3.5 bar, desorption 1.5 bar). Then, the hydrogen charge/discharge times have been decreased to reach system limits. System design has been used to simulate thermal and mass comportment of the storage tank. The model is based on the software Fluent. We take in consideration heat and mass transfers in the porous media during absorption/desorption. The hydride thermal and mass behaviour has been integrated in the software. The heat and mass transfers experimentally obtained have been compared to results calculated by the model. The influence of experimental and numerical parameters on the model behaviour has also been explored. (author)

  12. Nanocrystalline Metal Hydrides Obtained by Severe Plastic Deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Huot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD techniques could be used to obtain nanostructured metal hydrides with enhanced hydrogen sorption properties. In this paper we review the different SPD techniques used on metal hydrides and present some specific cases of the effect of cold rolling on the hydrogen storage properties and crystal structure of various types of metal hydrides such as magnesium-based alloys and body centered cubic (BCC alloys. Results show that generally cold rolling is as effective as ball milling to enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics. However, for some alloys such as TiV0.9Mn1.1 alloy ball milling and cold rolling have detrimental effect on hydrogen capacity. The exact mechanism responsible for the change in hydrogenation properties may not be the same for ball milling and cold rolling. Nevertheless, particle size reduction and texture seems to play a leading role in the hydrogen sorption enhancement of cold rolled metal hydrides.

  13. Study on the effect of hydrogen purification with metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of hydrogen purification with a AB5-type metal hydride were studied for the development of hydrogen purification system. The system set up two packed-beds, heat exchangers, data acquisition equipment and automatic control unit was used in the work and the compositions of two different gas-mixtures have CO, CH4, CO2, O2 and N2. We investigated about its tolerance against impurities, pressure-composition-isotherm and life cycle test, XRD and particle size analysis with a used metal hydride. Gas chromatograph was used for the analysis of feed and product gas. The used metal hydride is a La, Nd-rich Mm-based AB5 type which has the hydrogen storage capacity of 1.4 wt%. In life cycle test, there were no change of plateau pressure and hysteresis after 600 cycles but hydrogen storage capacity was decreased by about 6.8% and 10.7% after 220, 600 cycles, respectively. The used sample is high strong against CH4 and CO2 but very weak in CO atmosphere. The hydrogen purification performance with gas mixtures was decreased in the order of CH4 ≥ CO ≥ O2 ≥ N2 ≥ CO2. The reason CO investigated high purification effect in gas mixture is due to a strong chemisorption in metal hydride matrix that CO was not released out of the alloy. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver;

    2010-01-01

    The dissociative sticking probability for H-2 on Pd films supported on sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has been derived from measurements of the rate of the H-D exchange reaction at 1 bar. The sticking probability for H-2, S. is higher on Pd hydride than on Pd (a factor of 1.4 ...

  15. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  16. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  17. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Lam; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2000-09-01

    The objective if this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with PIV measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. This phase of the work was presented at the Chemical Reaction Engineering VIII: Computational Fluid Dynamics, August 6-11, 2000 in Quebec City, Canada. To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. The results together with simulations will be presented at the annual meeting of AIChE in November 2000.

  18. Impedance spectroscopy studies of surface engineered TiO2 nanoparticles using slurry technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sasidhar Siddabattuni; Sri Harsha Akella; Abilash Gangula; Sandeep Patnaik

    2015-09-01

    Dielectric analysis of nanometre range size ceramic particles like TiO2 is very important in the understanding of the performance and design of their polymer nanocomposites for energy storage and other applications. In recent times, impedance spectroscopy is shown to be a very powerful tool to investigate the dielectric characteristics of not only sintered and/or pelleted ceramic materials but also particulates/powders (both micron-sized and nano-sized) using the slurry technique. In the present work, impedance spectroscopy employing slurry methodology was extended to study the influence of various chemical groups on the nano-TiO2 surface on the electrical resistivity and the dielectric permittivity of nanoparticles. In this regard, different organophosphate ligands with linear, aromatic and extended aromatic nature of organic groups were employed to remediate the surface effects of nanoTiO2. It was observed that the type of chemical nature of surface engineered nanoparticles’ surface played significant role in controlling the surface electrical resistivity of nanoparticles. Surface passivated nanoTiO2 yielded dielectric permittivity of about 70–80, respectively.

  19. Changes in soil acidity and organic carbon in a sandy typic hapludalf after medium-term pig-slurry and deep-litter application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Brunetto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Successive applications of liquid swine waste to the soil can increase the contents of total organic carbon and nutrients and change acidity-related soil chemical properties. However, little information is available on the effects of swine waste application in solid form, as of swine deep-litter. The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations of organic carbon and acidity-related properties of a soil after eight years of pig slurry and deep-litter application. In the eighth year of a field experiment established in Braço do Norte, Santa Catarina (SC on a sandy Typic Hapludalf samples were taken (layers 0-2.5; 2.5-5; 5-10; 10-15; 15-20 and 20-30 cm from unfertilized plots and plots with pig slurry or deep-litter applications, providing the simple or double rate of N requirement of Zea mays and Avena strigosa in rotation. Soil total organic carbon, water pH, exchangeable Al, Ca and Mg, and cation exchange capacity (CECeffective and CECpH7.0, H+Al, base saturation, and aluminum saturation were measured. The application of pig slurry and deep-litter for eight years increased total organic carbon and CEC in all soil layers. The pig slurry and deep-litter applications reduced active acidity and aluminum saturation and increased base saturation down to a depth of 30 cm. Eight years of pig slurry application did not affect soil acidity.

  20. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongstad, Trygve Tveiteraas

    2012-11-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology.The work presented here has comprised an experimental study, focusing on three different materials: Magnesium hydride (MgH2), magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) and yttrium hydride (YHx). Reactive sputter deposition was used to prepare the metal hydride film samples.This synthesis method is relatively uncommon for metal hydrides. Here,the first demonstration of reactive sputtering synthesis for YHx and Mg2NiH4 is given. Different challenges in forming singlephase, pure metal hydrides were identified: MgH2 could not be deposited without 3-16% metallic Mg present in the films, and YHx was found to react strong-ly to oxygen (O) during the deposition process. On the other hand, Mg2NiH4 films formed easily and apparently without major metallic clusters and with low O content.Mg2NiH4 is a semiconductor with an optical band gap that is suitable for PV solar cells. This study has showed that films with promising electrical and optical properties can be synthesized using reactive cosputtering of Mg and Ni. Using optical methods, the band gap for the as deposited samples was estimated to 1.54-1.76 eV, depending on the Mg-Ni composition. The asdeposited films were amorphous or nano-crystalline, but could be crystallized into the high-temperature fcc structure of Mg2NiH4 using heat treatment at 523 K. The band gap of the crystalline films was 2.1-2.2 eV, depending on the composition.A pronounced photochromic reaction to visible and UV light was observed for transparent yttrium hydride (T-YHx) samples. The optical transmission was reduced when the samples were illuminated, and the original optical transmission was restored when the samples were kept under dark conditions