WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical groups 1977-1983

  1. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Survey and evaluation of the external research and development programme 1977-1983 of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the external research programme of SSI is undertaken. The main research programme is in this report divided into five subprogrammes according to the main programmes of the Institute. This report covers research projects reported 1977-1983. An evaluation of the impact of the R and D programme is included in the report. The external R and D research programme of SSI has had an important impact on the radiation protection work in Sweden. The methods for evaluation of research programmes are also discussed in the report

  3. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  4. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  5. Chemical Evolution models of Local Group galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi., M

    2003-01-01

    Status quo and perspectives of standard chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies are summarized, discussing what we have learnt from them, what we know we have not learnt yet, and what I think we will learn in the near future. It is described how Galactic chemical evolution models have helped showing that: i) stringent constraints on primordial nucleosynthesis can be derived from the observed Galactic abundances of the light elements, ii) the Milky Way has been accreting external gas...

  6. Xingfa Group: To Be World-Famous Phosphorus Chemical Enterprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ As the biggest fine phosphorus chemical producer in China, Hubei Xingfa Chemicals Co., Ltd. (Xingfa Group, SH: 600141) is mainly engaged in the production and sales of phosphorus chemicals and fine chemicals.

  7. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This report marks the culmination of a 4-month review conducted to identify chemical safety vulnerabilities existing at DOE facilities. This review is an integral part of DOE's efforts to raise its commitment to chemical safety to the same level as that for nuclear safety.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory Chemicals by Groupings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) makes available information for more than 600 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or...

  9. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  10. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms

  11. Chemically Tagging the HR1614 Moving Group

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, G M; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Asplund, M; Bessell, M S

    2006-01-01

    We present abundances for a sample of F,G,K dwarfs of the HR1614 moving group based on high resolution, high S/N ratio spectra from AAT/UCLES. Our sample includes stars from Feltzing & Holmberg (2000, A&A, 357, 153), as well as from Eggen (1998, AJ, 115, 2453). Abundances were derived for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd, and Eu. The alpha, Fe, and Fe-peak element abundances show a bimodal distribution, with four stars having solar metallicities while the remaining 14 stars are metal rich [Fe/H] >= 0.25 dex. However the abundances of these two groups converge for the heavier n-capture elements. Based on their photometry and kinematics, three of the four deviating stars are likely non-members or binaries. Although one star cannot be excluded on these grounds, we do expect low-level contamination from field stars within the HR1614 moving group's range of magnitude, color and space velocities. Disregarding these four stars, the abundance scatter across the group members for all elements is ...

  12. -chain carboxylic acids from chemical group 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 49 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 07, including additional five substances in this Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission ...

  13. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports

  14. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

  15. Some Chemical Group Separations of Radioactive Trace Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a pretreatment for gamma spectrometric analysis methods have been developed for the chemical separation of traces of P, Sc, Ge, As, Se, Br, Zr, Nb, Ru, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Hf, Ta, Re, Os, Au and Hg into 9 different groups. By combining the present methods with already existing chemical group separation methods for traces of Na, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Mo, In, Fe, Cs, Ba, L.a, the rare earths, W and Ir, a complete separation scheme comprising 15 groups of elements has been worked out. The chemical 15-group separation method has been advantageously used in gamma spectrometric routine analysis of biological materials

  16. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site

  17. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

  18. Determination of OH groups by wet chemical methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuráň, P.; Janoš, P.; Madronová, L.; Novák, František

    New York : Nova Science Publisher, 2011 - (Madronová, L.), s. 47-60 ISBN 978-1-61668-965-0. - (Chemistry Research and Applications) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : determination * OH groups * wet chemical methods Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  19. Chemical compositions of lavas from Myoko volcano group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the volcanic rocks produced in island arc and continental margin arc, the phenomena of magma mixing is observed considerably generally. The research on these phenomena has been carried out also in Japan, and the periodically refilled magma chamber model has been proposed. In this report, the results of the photon activation analysis for the volcanic rock samples of Myoko volcano, for which the magma chamber model that the supply of basalt magma is periodically received was proposed, and of which the age of eruption and the stratigraphy are clearly known, are shown, and the above model is examined together with the published data of fluorescent X-ray analysis and others. The history of activities and the rate of magma extrusion of Myoko volcano group are described. The modal compositions of the volcanic rock samples of Myoko and Kurohime volcanos, for which photon activation analysis was carried out, are shown and discussed. The results of the analysis of the chemical composition of 39 volcanic rock samples from Myoko, Kurohime and Iizuna volcanos are shown. The primary magma in Myoko volcano group, the crystallization differentiation depth and moisture content of magma in Myoko and Kurohime volcanos, the presumption of Felsic and Mafic end-members in R type andesite in Myoko volcano group, and the change of magma composition with lapse of time are described. (K.I.)

  20. Reprocessed uranium handling at Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the experience of treating reprocessed uranium (RepU) at the Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGChE). SGChE is a nuclear fuel cycle production center. It has been working with nuclear technologies for more than 10 years. The SGChE's production is shipped both into the Russian Federation’s market and the international market. SGChE has been active on the international enrichment services market since 1993. The experience of processing RepU at SGChE includes the following activities: the purification at the radiochemical plant of spent slightly irradiated fuel from two commercial reactors operated by SGChE operated reactors and also RepU from power reactors, the conversion of uranium with up to 1% U235 into hexafluoride at the conversion plant, and the enrichment of uranium hexafluoride with up to 5% U235 using the gas centrifuge equipment of the enrichment plant. In 1992, the SGChE started the commercial-scale conversion and enrichment of RepU derived from spent power reactor fuel imported from France. Over seven years, SGChE processed a total of about 1700 tonnes RepU. The SGChE has capacities to process up to 1500 tonnes of RepU per year with further rendering enrichment services totalling about 1 million SWU. (author)

  1. Chemical Engineering Students: A Distinct Group among Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Allison; Potvin, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores differences between chemical engineering students and students of other engineering disciplines, as identified by their intended college major. The data used in this analysis was taken from the nationally representative Sustainability and Gender in Engineering (SaGE) survey. Chemical engineering students differ significantly…

  2. Quantifying Chemical Tagging: Towards Robust Group Finding in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschang, A W; Sharma, S; Zucker, D B

    2012-01-01

    The first generation of large-scale chemical tagging surveys, in particular the HERMES/GALAH million star survey, promises to vastly expand our understanding of the chemical and dynamical evolution of the Galaxy. This, however, is contingent on our ability to confidently perform chemical tagging on such a large data-set. Chemical homogeneity has been observed across a range of elements within several Galactic open clusters, yet the level to which this is the case globally, and particularly in comparison to the scatter across clusters themselves, is not well understood. The patterns of elements in coeval cluster members, occupying a complex chemical abundance space, are rooted in the evolution, ultimately the nature of the very late stages, of early generations of stars. The current astrophysical models of such stages are not yet sufficient to explain all observations, combining with our significant gaps in the understanding of star formation, makes this a difficult arena to tackle theoretically. Here, we desc...

  3. Chemical substructure and inhomogeneous mixing in Local Group dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venn, K. A.

    Evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in the Carina, Draco, and Sculptor dwarf galaxies is examined from chemical abundance patterns. Inhomogeneous mixing at early times is indicated in the classical dwarf galaxies, though cannot be ascertained in ultra faint dwarfs. Mixing efficiencies can affect the early metallicity distribution function, the pre-enrichment levels in globular clusters, and also have an impact on the structure of dwarf systems at early times. Numerical models that include chemical evolution explicitly do a better job in reproducing the observations, and make interesting predictions for the nature of dwarf galaxies and their first stars at the earliest times.

  4. Supporting Alternative Strategies for Learning Chemical Applications of Group Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, Daniel C.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    A group theory course for chemists was taught entirely with process oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL) to facilitate alternative strategies for learning. Students completed a test of one aspect of visuospatial aptitude to determine their individual approaches to solving spatial tasks, and were sorted into groups for analysis on the basis of…

  5. Group behaviour in physical, chemical and biological systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cihan Saçlioğlu; Önder Pekcan; Vidyanand Nanjundiah

    2014-04-01

    Groups exhibit properties that either are not perceived to exist, or perhaps cannot exist, at the individual level. Such `emergent’ properties depend on how individuals interact, both among themselves and with their surroundings. The world of everyday objects consists of material entities. These are, ultimately, groups of elementary particles that organize themselves into atoms and molecules, occupy space, and so on. It turns out that an explanation of even the most commonplace features of this world requires relativistic quantum field theory and the fact that Planck’s constant is discrete, not zero. Groups of molecules in solution, in particular polymers (`sols’), can form viscous clusters that behave like elastic solids (`gels’). Sol-gel transitions are examples of cooperative phenomena. Their occurrence is explained by modelling the statistics of inter-unit interactions: the likelihood of either state varies sharply as a critical parameter crosses a threshold value. Group behaviour among cells or organisms is often heritable and therefore can evolve. This permits an additional, typically biological, explanation for it in terms of reproductive advantage, whether of the individual or of the group. There is no general agreement on the appropriate explanatory framework for understanding group-level phenomena in biology.

  6. Group behaviour in physical, chemical and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saçlioğlu, Cihan; Pekcan, Önder; Nanjundiah, Vidyanand

    2014-04-01

    Groups exhibit properties that either are not perceived to exist, or perhaps cannot exist, at the individual level. Such 'emergent' properties depend on how individuals interact, both among themselves and with their surroundings. The world of everyday objects consists of material entities. These are, ultimately, groups of elementary particles that organize themselves into atoms and molecules, occupy space, and so on. It turns out that an explanation of even the most commonplace features of this world requires relativistic quantum field theory and the fact that Planck's constant is discrete, not zero. Groups of molecules in solution, in particular polymers ('sols'), can form viscous clusters that behave like elastic solids ('gels'). Sol-gel transitions are examples of cooperative phenomena. Their occurrence is explained by modelling the statistics of inter-unit interactions: the likelihood of either state varies sharply as a critical parameter crosses a threshold value. Group behaviour among cells or organisms is often heritable and therefore can evolve. This permits an additional, typically biological, explanation for it in terms of reproductive advantage, whether of the individual or of the group. There is no general agreement on the appropriate explanatory framework for understanding group-level phenomena in biology. PMID:24736152

  7. Exploration of the Chemical Space of Group 4 Polymer Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2013-03-01

    The current standards for capacitive energy storage applications are polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) which have large band gap and high breakdown strength, but a small dielectric constant. The envisaged next generation dielectric should provide high dielectric constant, while still preserving the insulating characteristics of PP and PE. To meet these growing needs, we use high throughput density functional theory (DFT) calculations in combination with machine learning (ML) methods to identify classes of polymers with large dielectric constant and band gap. In our work, we consider various possible local chemical modifications to polyethylene (PE). To be specific, we allow the -CH2- unit in the PE backbone segment to be replaced by -SiF2-, -SiCl2-, -GeF2-, -GeCl2-, -SnF2-, or -SnCl2- units in a systematic manner. High throughput methods were used first to accurately determine the dielectric constant and band gap of the chemically modified PE chains for a set of limited compositions and configurations. ML methods were then used to predict the properties of systems spanning a much larger part of the configurational and compositional space. A set of most promising PE modifications (with simultaneously large dielectric constant and band gap) is identified using this strategy.

  8. 76 FR 65385 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... hazard information on HPV chemical substances in use worldwide, including some of those on the 1990 U.S... hazards associated with chemical substances in their environment. Everyone--including industry..., industry, and others, to support adequate risk assessments. EPA uses data from TSCA section 4 test rules...

  9. Study on the chemical species of platinum group elements in geological samples by molecular activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical species of platinum group elements in some upper mantle-derived xenoliths from Eastern China are studied by molecular activation analysis, in which the chemical stepwise dissolution, nickel fire assay preconcentration and neutron activation analysis are jointly applied. The weighted sums of platinum group elements in 6 phases are in agreement with their total contents. The distribution patterns of platinum group elements in sulphides show that sulphide segregation is one of the important mechanisms for the fractionation of platinum group elements in upper mantle-derived material during partial melting

  10. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site

  11. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site.

  12. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation.

  13. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation

  14. A new-generation density functional towards chemical accuracy for chemistry of main group elements

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Igor Ying

    2013-01-01

    A New-Generation Density Functional: Towards Chemical Accuracy for Chemistry of Main Group Elements covers the most recent progress in the development of a new generation of density functional theory (DFT) for accurate descriptions of thermochemistry, thermochemical kinetics, and nonbonded interactions of main group molecules.

  15. Extended Functional Groups (EFG: An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Salmina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a classification system termed “extended functional groups” (EFG, which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models.

  16. Chemical Tagging of FGK Stars: Testing Membership to Young Stellar Kinematics Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, D; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution talk we summarize the results of our ongoing project of detailed analysis of the chemical content (chemical tagging) as a promising powerful method to provide clear constraints on the membership of FGK kinematic candidates to stellar kinematic groups of different ages that can be used as an alternative or complementary to the methods that use kinematics, photometry or age indicators. This membership information is very important to better understand the star formation history in the solar neighborhood discerning between field-like stars (associated with dynamical resonances (bar) or spiral structure) and real physical structures of coeval stars with a common origin (debris of star-forming aggregates in the disk). We have already applied the chemical tagging method to constrain the membership of FGK candidate stars to the Hyades supercluster and the Ursa Major moving group and in this contribution we present the preliminary results of our study of the Castor moving group.

  17. Development and Analysis of Group Contribution Plus Models for Property Prediction of Organic Chemical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustaffa, Azizul Azri

    and further development of the GCPlus approach for predicting mixture properties to be called the UNIFAC-CI model. The contributions of this work include an analysis of the developed Original UNIFAC-CI model in order to investigate why the model does not perform as well as the reference UNIFAC model......Prediction of properties is important in chemical process-product design. Reliable property models are needed for increasingly complex and wider range of chemicals. Group-contribution methods provide useful tool but there is a need to validate them and improve their accuracy when complex chemicals...... are present in the mixtures. In accordance with that, a combined group-contribution and atom connectivity approach that is able to extend the application range of property models has been developed for mixture properties. This so-called Group-ContributionPlus (GCPlus) approach is a hybrid model which...

  18. On a group-theoretical approach to the periodic table of chemical elements

    OpenAIRE

    Kibler, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of the group SO(4,2)xSU(2) to the periodic table of chemical elements. It is shown how the Madelung rule of the atomic shell model can be used for setting up a periodic table that can be further rationalized via the group SO(4,2)xSU(2) and some of its subgroups. Qualitative results are obtained from the table and the general lines of a programme for a quantitative approach to the properties of chemical elements are developed on the basis of the gro...

  19. Chemical composition, stratigraphy, and depositional environments of the Black River Group (Middle Ordovician), southwestern Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stith, David A.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical composition and stratigraphy of the Black River Group in southwestern Ohio were studied. Chemical analyses were done on two cores of the Black River from Adams and Brown Counties, Ohio. These studies show that substantial reserves of high-carbonate rock are present in the Black River at depths of less than 800 ft, in proximity to Cincinnati and the Ohio River. Stratigraphic studies show that the Black River Group has eight marker beds in its middle and upper portions and three distinct lithologic units in its lower portion; these marker beds and units are present throughout southwestern Ohio. The Black River Group correlates well with the High Bridge Group of Kentucky. Depositional environments of the Black River are similar to those of the High Bridge and to present-day tidal flats in the Bahamas.-Author

  20. A Group-Theoretical Approach to the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements: Old and New Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Kibler, M. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a companion article to the review paper by the present author devoted to the classification of matter constituents (chemical elements and particles) and published in the first part of the proceedings of The Second Harry Wiener International Memorial Conference (see quant-ph/0310155). It is mainly concerned with a group-theoretical approach to the Periodic Table of the neutral elements based on the noncompact group SO(4,2)xSU(2).

  1. Efficacy of Group Motivational Interviewing (GMI) for Psychiatric Inpatients with Chemical Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Ana, Elizabeth J.; Wulfert, Edelgard; Nietert, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Dually diagnosed patients with chemical dependency and a comorbid psychiatric disorder typically show poor compliance with aftercare treatment, which may result in costly and pervasive individual and societal problems. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of adding motivational interviewing in a group format to standard treatment for…

  2. Highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles on chemically modified graphene with aminophenyl groups for formic acid oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Su-Dong; Shen Cheng-Min; Tong Hao; He Wei; Zhang Xiao-Gang; Gao Hong-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A novel electrode material based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) with aminophenyl groups is covalently functionalized by a nucleophilic ring-opening reaction between the epoxy groups of graphene oxide and the aminophenyl groups of p-phenylenediamine.Palladium nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.2 nm are deposited on the CMG by a liquid-phase borohydride reduction.The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pd/CMG composite towards formic acid oxidation are found to be higher than those of reduced graphene oxide and commercial carbon materials such as Vulcan XC-72 supported Pd electrocatalysts.

  3. Highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles on chemically modified graphene with aminophenyl groups for formic acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel electrode material based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) with aminophenyl groups is covalently functionalized by a nucleophilic ring-opening reaction between the epoxy groups of graphene oxide and the aminophenyl groups of p-phenylenediamine. Palladium nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.2 nm are deposited on the CMG by a liquid-phase borohydride reduction. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pd/CMG composite towards formic acid oxidation are found to be higher than those of reduced graphene oxide and commercial carbon materials such as Vulcan XC-72 supported Pd electrocatalysts. (atomic and molecular physics)

  4. Surface functional group characterization using chemical derivatization X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagst, Eda

    2011-03-18

    Chemical derivatization - X-ray photolectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS) was applied successfully in order to determine different functional groups on thin film surfaces. Different amino group carrying surfaces, prepared by spin coating, self-assembly and plasma polymerization, were successfully investigated by (XPS) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Amino groups were derivatized with the widely used primary amino group tags, pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFB) and 4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzaldehyde (TFBA), prior to analysis. Primary amino group quantification was then carried out according to the spectroscopical data. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of different terminal groups were prepared and investigated with XPS and spectra were compared with reference surfaces. An angle resolved NEXAFS measurement was applied to determine the orientation of SAMs. Plasma polymerized allylamine samples with different duty cycle, power and pressure values were prepared in order to study the effects of external plasma parameters on the primary amino group retention. CD-XPS was used to quantify the amino groups and experiments show, that the milder plasma conditions promote the retention of amino groups originating from the allylamine monomer. An interlaboratory comparison of OH group determination on plasma surfaces of polypropylene treated with oxygen plasma, was studied. The surfaces were investigated with XPS and the [OH] amount on the surfaces was calculated. (orig.)

  5. The Parent Populations of 6 groups identified from Chemical Tagging in the Solar neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Quillen, Alice C; De Silva, Gayandhi; Freeman, Ken; Zucker, Dan B; Minchev, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the size and distribution of the parent populations for the 6 largest (at least 20 stars in the Solar neighborhood) chemical groups identified in the Chemical Tagging experiment by Mitschang et al.~2014. Stars in the abundance groups tend to lie near a boundary in angular momentum versus eccentricity space where the probability is highest for a star to be found in the Solar neighborhood and where orbits have apocenter approximately equal to the Sun's galactocentric radius. Assuming that the parent populations are uniformly distributed at all azimuthal angles in the Galaxy, we estimate that the parent populations of these abundance groups contain at least 200,000 members. The spread in angular momentum of the groups implies that the assumption of a uniform azimuthal distribution only fails for the two youngest groups and only for the highest angular momentum stars in them. The parent populations of three thin disk groups have narrow angular momentum distributions, but tails in the eccentricity and ...

  6. Chemical tagging of the Ursa Major moving group: A northern selection of FGK stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tabernero, H M; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez; Eiff, M Ammler-von

    2014-01-01

    Stellar kinematic groups are kinematical coherent groups of stars which might share a common origin.These groups spread through the Galaxy over time due to tidal effects caused by Galactic rotation and disc heating.However, the chemical information survives these processes. The information provided by the analysis of chemical elements can reveal the origin of these kinematic groups. Here we investigate the origin of the stars that belong to the Ursa Major Moving Group. We present high-resolution spectroscopic observations obtained from three different spectrographs of kinematically selected FGK stars of the Ursa Major moving group. Stellar atmospheric parameters (Teff, log(g), xi, and [Fe/H]) were determined using our own automatic code (StePar) which makes use of the sensitivity of iron equivalent widths measured in the spectra. We critically compare the StePar results with other methods (Teff values derived using the infrared flux method and log(g) values based on Hipparcos parallaxes). We derived the chemi...

  7. Hmb(off/on) as a switchable thiol protecting group for native chemical ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yun-Kun; Tang, Shan; Huang, Yi-Chao; Pan, Man; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Liu, Lei

    2016-05-01

    A new thiol protecting group Hmb(off/on) is described, which has a switchable activity that may be useful in the chemical synthesis of proteins. When placed on the side chain of Cys, Cys(Hmb(off)) is stable to trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in the process of solid-phase peptide synthesis. When Cys(Hmb(off)) is treated with neutral aqueous buffers, it is cleanly converted to acid-labile Cys(Hmb(on)), which can later be fully deprotected by TFA to generate free Cys. The utility of Cys(Hmb(off/on)) is demonstrated by the chemical synthesis of an erythropoietin segment, EPO[Cys(98)-Arg(166)]-OH through native chemical ligation. PMID:27102373

  8. Harmonic expansion of the effective potential in Functional Renormalization Group at finite chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Barnafoldi, G G; Posfay, P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method to study the Functional Renormalization Group at finite chemical potential. The method consists of mapping the FRG equations within the Fermi surface into a differential equation defined on a rectangle with zero boundary conditions. To solve this equation we use an expansion of the potential in a harmonic basis. With this method we determined the phase diagram of a simple Yukawa-type model; as expected, the bosonic fluctuations decrease the strength of the transition.

  9. Chemical Tagging Hyades Supercluster as a consistency test of Stellar Kinematic Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Tabernero, H M; Hernández, J I González

    2010-01-01

    Stellar Kinematic Groups are kinematical coherent groups of stars which may share a common origin. These groups spread through the Galaxy over time due to tidal effects caused by galactic rotation and disk heating, however the chemical information survives. The aim of chemical tagging is to show that abundances of every element in the analysis must be homogeneous between members. We have studied the case of the Hyades Supercluster in order to compile a reliable list of members (FGK stars) based on chemical tagging information and spectroscopic age determinations of this supercluster. This information has been derived from high-resolution echelle spectra obtained during our surveys of late-type stars. For a small subsample of the Hyades Supercluster, stellar atmospheric parameters (T_eff, log g, xi and [Fe/H]) have been determined using an automatic code which takes into account the sensibility of iron EWs measured in the spectra. We have derived absolute abundances consistent with galactic abundance trends re...

  10. A Kine-Chemical Investigation of the AB Dor Moving Group "Stream"

    CERN Document Server

    Barenfeld, Scott A; Mamajek, Eric E; Young, Patrick A

    2013-01-01

    The AB Dor Moving Group consists of a "nucleus" of ~10 stars at d ~ 20 pc, along with dozens of purported "stream" members distributed across the sky. We perform a chemical and kinematic analysis of a subsample of AB Dor stream stars to test whether they constitute a physical stellar group. We use the NEMO Galactic kinematic code to investigate the orbits of the stream members, and perform a chemical abundance analysis using high resolution spectra taken with the Magellan Clay 6.5-m telescope. Using a chi^2 test with the measured abundances for 10 different elements, we find that only half of the purported AB Dor stream members could possibly constitute a statistically chemically homogeneous sample. Some stream members with 3D velocities were hundreds of parsecs from the AB Dor nucleus ~10^8 yr ago, and hence were unlikely to share a common origin. We conclude that the published lists of AB Dor moving group stream members are unlikely to represent the dispersed remnant of a single star formation episode. A su...

  11. Anomalous Behaviour of a Protein During Sds/Page Corrected by Chemical Modification of Carboxylic Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Matagne, André; Joris, Bernard; Frère, Jean-Marie

    1991-01-01

    The 29,000-Mr Actinomadura R39 beta-lactamase exhibited a remarkably low electrophoretic mobility on SDS/PAGE, yielding an Mr value almost twice that computed from the corresponding gene sequence. We showed that chemical modification of the carboxylic groups of glutamic acid and aspartic acid residues restored a normal electrophoretic mobility and that the anomalous behaviour of that protein on SDS/PAGE was due to its very large negative charge at neutral pH. We also compared the behaviour of...

  12. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  13. The pharmaceutical industry in the industrial chemical group: The National Union of Chemical-Pharmaceutical Laboratories (1919-1936

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Nozal, Raúl

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical industry associations, as it happened with other businesses, had a significant rise during the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera and II Republic. The Cámara Nacional de Industrias Químicas, in Barcelona, represented the national chemical industry to its ultimate assimilation by the Organización Sindical in 1939. In this association, matters relating to pharmaceutical products —which we will specially deal with in this work— were managed by the Unión Nacional de Laboratorios Químico-Farmacéuticos, which defended the interests of pharmaceutical companies in the presence of government authorities, using the resources and mechanisms also managed by business pressure groups. The inclusion of industrial pharmacy in the Chemical lobby separated the pharmaceutical industry from traditional exercise and its corporate environment. This created ups and downs, conflicts of interests and finally, love and hate relationships with their colleagues of the pharmacy work placement and, of course, with the association that represented them: the Unión Farmacéutica Nacional.

    El asociacionismo farmacéutico industrial, al igual que ocurriera con otras actividades empresariales, experimentó un notable auge durante la Dictadura de Primo de Rivera y la II República. La Cámara Nacional de Industrias Químicas, desde Barcelona, representó a la industria química nacional hasta su asimilación definitiva por la Organización Sindical franquista, en 1939. Dentro de esta asociación, los asuntos relacionados con los productos farmacéuticos, a los que prestaremos especial atención en este trabajo, fueron gestionados por la Unión Nacional de Laboratorios Químico- Farmacéuticos, que defendió los intereses de los productores de medicamentos industriales ante las autoridades gubernamentales, utilizando para ello recursos y mecanismos también manejados por otros grupos empresariales de presión. La inclusión de la farmacia industrial

  14. Localizing chemical groups while imaging single native proteins by high-resolution atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Hilbert, Manuel; Steinmetz, Michel O; Müller, Daniel J

    2014-05-14

    Simultaneous high-resolution imaging and localization of chemical interaction sites on single native proteins is a pertinent biophysical, biochemical, and nanotechnological challenge. Such structural mapping and characterization of binding sites is of importance in understanding how proteins interact with their environment and in manipulating such interactions in a plethora of biotechnological applications. Thus far, this challenge remains to be tackled. Here, we introduce force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) for the high-resolution imaging of SAS-6, a protein that self-assembles into cartwheel-like structures. Using functionalized AFM tips bearing Ni(2+)-N-nitrilotriacetate groups, we locate specific interaction sites on SAS-6 at nanometer resolution and quantify the binding strength of the Ni(2+)-NTA groups to histidine residues. The FD-based AFM approach can readily be applied to image any other native protein and to locate and structurally map histidine residues. Moreover, the surface chemistry used to functionalize the AFM tip can be modified to map other chemical interaction sites. PMID:24766578

  15. Statistic analysis of grouping in evaluation of the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in effluent from uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) is a uranium mine off. The statistical analysis of clustering was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physico-chemical variables in their effluents. The use of cluster analysis proved effective in the evaluation, allowing to identify groups of chemical elements in physico-chemical variables and group analyzes (element and variables ). As a result, we can say, based on the analysis of the data, a strong link between Ca and Mg and between Al and TR2O3 (rare earth oxides) in the UTM effluents. The SO4 was also identified as strongly linked to total solids and dissolved and these linked to electrical conductivity. Other associations existed, but were not as strongly linked. Additional collections for seasonal evaluation are required so that assessments can be confirmed. Additional statistics analysis (ordination techniques) should be used to help identify the origins of the groups identified in this analysis. (author)

  16. DNA-Bank of the Siberian Group Chemical Enterprises workers and Seversk city residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the mostr common definition a DNA-bank is a system of a genetic material storage. Applying to nuclear-chemical plant workers, DNA-bank creation is determined by the necessity to preserve a hereditary material of these people and their descendants for the further evaluation of consequences fo technogenic factors action on human genome using a contemporary conceptual and applied advances of genetics. In the frameworks of the study of technogenic factors indluence on human genome and genetic-caused disorders development the Seversk Biophysical Research Center is being created DNA-bank of Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises workers exposed to radiation, their descendants, and ZATO Seversk and Tomsk city inhabitants. The DNA-bank will be a basis for all major research laboratory projects: analysis of molecular basis of individual radiosensitivity; analysis of technogenic factors role in congenital malformations and hereditary diseases development in nuclear-chemical plant workers offspring; elaboration of genotype-specific tes-systems of cancer prognosis and development of cardiovascular and other common disorders connected with the effect of technogenic factors. The DNA-bank creation is a technological issue aggravated by ethical problems. Whereas the DNA isolation is not a problem today, ethical complication id debated widely in the world. These questions strongly arise in a view of advances of Human Genome Project. Information consent on DNA usage is imperative today. Also questions on DNA property (who is its owner a doner or a banker) and of a confidentiality, which maintenance is a doubtable question in a case of multiple genetic testing, are not solved today. At present, the Genomic Medicine Laboratory disposes the DNA samples of more than 400 Sevesk and Tomsk inhabitants affected with breast and lung cancer. More than 800 blood samples of main manufacture of the Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises workers are collected. About 1500 DNA samples

  17. The XPS study of physical and chemical forms of neptunium group on the surface of minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption behavior and the physical and chemical forms of neptunium on the surface of minerals of the two chlorate samples, biotite and kaolin, with different contents of Fe(II was studied. The liquid-liquid extraction and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to identify the valence forms of neptunium. On the basis of the obtained data the quantitative elemental composition of the surface of the studied minerals, as well as the ionic composition of the formed neptunium complexes was determined. It was shown that the Np(IV and Np(VI containing compounds did not form, while the complexes Np(VO+ -hydroxyl did form on the surface. The oxygen ions bonded with iron and oxygen belonging to water and/or of carboxyl were suggested to be present in the equatorial plane of the neptunyl group NpO+.

  18. Group Analysis of Free Convection Flow of a Magnetic Nanofluid with Chemical Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Jashim Uddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics viscous incompressible free convective boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting, chemically reacting nanofluid from a convectively heated permeable vertical surface is presented. Scaling group of transformations is used in the governing equations and the boundary conditions to determine absolute invariants. A third-order ordinary differential equation which corresponds to momentum conservation and two second-order ordinary differential equations which correspond to energy and nanoparticle volume fraction (species conservation are derived. Our (group analysis indicates that, for the similarity solution, the convective heat transfer coefficient and mass transfer velocity are proportional to x-1/4 whilst the reaction rate is proportional to x-1/2, where x is the axial distance from the leading edge of the plate. The effects of the relevant controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle volume fraction are examined. The accuracy of the technique we have used was tested by performing comparisons with the results of published work and the results were found to be in good agreement. The present computations indicate that the flow is accelerated and temperature enhanced whereas nanoparticle volume fractions are decreased with increasing order of chemical reaction. Furthermore the flow is strongly decelerated, whereas the nanoparticle volume fraction and temperature are enhanced with increasing magnetic field parameter. Increasing convection-conduction parameter increases velocity and temperatures but has a weak influence on nanoparticle volume fraction distribution. The present study demonstrates the thermal enhancement achieved with nanofluids and also magnetic fields and is of relevance to nanomaterials processing.

  19. Five groups of red giants with distinct chemical composition in the globular cluster NGC 2808

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of multiple populations in the massive globular cluster (GC) NGC~2808 is addressed with the homogeneous abundance re-analysis of 140 red giant branch (RGB) stars. UVES spectra for 31 stars and GIRAFFE spectra for the other giants were analysed with the same procedures used for about 2500 giants in 23 GCs in our FLAMES survey, deriving abundances of Fe, O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Sc, Cr, Mn, and Ni. Iron, elements from alpha-capture, and in the Fe-group do not show intrinsic scatter. On our UVES scale the metallicity of NGC~2808 is [Fe/H]=-1.129+/-0.005+/-0.034$ (+/-statistical +/-systematic error) with sigma=0.030 (31 stars). Main features related to proton-capture elements are retrieved, but the improved statistics and the smaller associated internal errors allow to uncover five distinct groups of stars along the Na-O anticorrelation. We observe large depletions in Mg, anticorrelated with enhancements of Na and also Si, suggestive of unusually high temperatures for proton-captures. About...

  20. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 303 (FGE.303): Spilanthol from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    candidate substance spilanthol [FL-no: 16.121] is a branched chain unsaturated aliphatic amide from chemical group 30. The substance has been presented with specification of the stereoisomeric composition. The candidate substance was assigned to structural class III, according to the decision tree approach......, the Panel was requested to evaluate one flavouring substance in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 303, using the Procedure as referred to in the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The flavouring substance belongs to chemical group 30, Annex I of the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The....... In the absence of more precise information that would enable the Panel to make a more realistic estimate of the intakes of the flavouring substances, the Panel has decided also to perform an estimate of the daily intakes per person using a “modified Theoretical Added Maximum Daily Intake” (m...

  1. Grouping chemicals for health risk assessment: A text mining-based case study of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Guo, Yufan; Silins, Ilona; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla; Korhonen, Anna

    2016-01-22

    As many chemicals act as carcinogens, chemical health risk assessment is critically important. A notoriously time consuming process, risk assessment could be greatly supported by classifying chemicals with similar toxicological profiles so that they can be assessed in groups rather than individually. We have previously developed a text mining (TM)-based tool that can automatically identify the mode of action (MOA) of a carcinogen based on the scientific evidence in literature, and it can measure the MOA similarity between chemicals on the basis of their literature profiles (Korhonen et al., 2009, 2012). A new version of the tool (2.0) was recently released and here we apply this tool for the first time to investigate and identify meaningful groups of chemicals for risk assessment. We used published literature on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-persistent, widely spread toxic organic compounds comprising of 209 different congeners. Although chemically similar, these compounds are heterogeneous in terms of MOA. We show that our TM tool, when applied to 1648 PubMed abstracts, produces a MOA profile for a subgroup of dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) which differs clearly from that for the rest of PCBs. This suggests that the tool could be used to effectively identify homogenous groups of chemicals and, when integrated in real-life risk assessment, could help and significantly improve the efficiency of the process. PMID:26562772

  2. Epitaxial growth of group IV materials by chemical vapor deposition for Germanium Metal Oxide Semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, Benjamin; Loo, Roger; Caymax, Matty [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    Over the past 5-10 years, germanium has attracted a lot of interest to replace Silicon as a high carrier mobility material in future p-Metal Oxide Semiconductors transistors. This paper reviews developments of epitaxial Group IV materials (silicon, germanium, tin and alloys) by means of Reduced Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition for use as Channel, Gate stack and Source/Drain in high performance Germanium transistors. We first describe Germanium growth on standard Silicon wafers. Selective epitaxial growth within Shallow Trench Isolation structures allows seamless integration of Germanium channels in Si platform with a significant defect reduction down to levels required for state-of-the-art VLSI technology. Next we focus on the most successful passivation approach for Germanium MOS interfaces by means of ultrathin epitaxial Si capping layers. This moves the problem of gate stack formation from a germanium surface to a silicon surface. We discuss novel extremely low temperature CVD processes involving innovative precursors, and impacts of point defects, strain relaxation and Silicon-Germanium intermixing on Germanium device performance. Finally, the implementation of Germanium-Tin alloys in embedded Source/Drain regions in Germanium transistors is proposed as an innovative architecture to implement strain in Germanium channels.

  3. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method

  4. Chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of indigenous pasture plants in different plant groups (Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torstein H. Garmo

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Several plant species from the following plant groups: ferns + horsetails, lichens, conifers (juniper, three leaves (Salix spp., Betula spp., Populus tremula, Sorbus aucuparid, heathers, grassens, rushes/sedges and forbs were collected in a mountain area of southerns Norway during the growing season from the 15th of June up to the 15th of September the years 1982 — 1984. Mean values (% of dry matter of the different chemical constituents and in vitro dry matter digestibility of the different plant groups sampled throughout the growing season are given in Table 2. The mean crude protein content varied from 4.1% in lichens up to 17.5% in forbs; the crude fat were lowest for rushes/sedges (1.9% and highest in juniper (13.3%; the crude fibre varied from 14.1% to 26.1% of three leaves and grasses, respectively; NFE showed lowest values for grasses (54% and highest in lichens (74%. Ferns + horsetails contained the greatest (13.3% and lichens the lowest (1.9% amount of ash of the different plant groups. The levels of the macrominerals calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and potassium were all lowest in lichens (0.15; 0.09; 0.05; 0.13% and highest in the forbs (1.19; 0.36; 0.37; 1.65%. Sodium levels varied from 0.029% in the heathers to 0.116% of ferns + horsetails. The forbs showed the highest mean in vitro dry matter digestibility (69% and lichens the lowest (35%. However, the in vitro method (using sheep rumen inoculum probably underestimates the dry matter digestibility of lichens, three leaves, juniper and heathers. Great variations in most of the chemical constituents as well as in vitro dry matter digestibility throughout the growing season for the different plant groups were demonstrated (Table 2. Keywords: nutrients, macrominerals, digestibility, livestock, wild ruminants, native pastures.Kjemisk innhald og in vitro fordøyelsesgrad av planter innan ulike plantegrupper frå fjellbeite (Førebels rapport.Abstract in Norwwegian / Samandrag: Ulike

  5. Determination of nuclear distances and chemical-shift anisotropy from 1H MAS NMR sideband patterns of surface OH groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenzke, Dieter; Hunger, Michael; Pfeifer, Harry

    A procedure is described which allows a separate determination of the proton-aluminum distance and of the chemical-shift anisotropy for the bridging OH groups of crystalline molecular sieves from their 'H MAS NMR sideband patterns. For the bridging OH groups which point into the 6-rings of the framework (line "c"), the 1H- 27Al distance could be determined to be 0.237 ± 0.004 and 0.234 ± 0.004 nm for molecular sieves of type H-Y and SAPO-5, respectively. In contrast, for the bridging OH groups of the 12-rings (line "b"), the corresponding distances are equal and distinctly larger, 0.248 ± 0.004 nm. Within the limits of error, the values of the chemical-shift anisotropy are equal (about 19 ± 2 ppm) except for line b of SAPO-5, which exhibits a much smaller value of 14.5 ± 2 ppm.

  6. Type and distribution of chemical groups from controlled photo-oxidation of gyroid nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol

    2011-01-01

    Photo-oxidation of nanoporous polymers is little studied. The high UV penetration depth and high surface concentration in these materials give unprecedented possibilities both in fundamental work on surface photochemistry and in nanotechnological applications related for example to patterned...... hydrophilicity or refractive index. This is a quantitative study of the photo-oxidation products of nanoporous gyroid 1,2-polybutadiene in air. Irradiation of the porous sample with UV in the wavelength range of 300–400nm enables tuning of the hydrophilicity of the nanoporous polymer through formation of...... hydrophilic chemical groups, carboxyl and hydroxyls, mainly onto the large air–polymer interface. The nature and abundance of the chemical groups induced by photo-oxidation is identified by solid-state 13C-NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The distribution of photo-oxidation groups, both relative to the nanometre...

  7. Chemical classification of iron meteorites. VIII - Groups IC, IIE, IIIF and 97 other irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Wasson, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for determinations of Ni, Ga, Ge, and Ir concentrations in 106 iron meteorites. Three new groups are defined (IC, IIE, and IIIF) which contain 10, 12, and 5 irons, respectively. It is noted that group IC is a cohenite-rich group distantly related to IA, group IIE consists of those irons previously designated as Weekeroo Station type together with five others having similar compositions but diverse structures, and group IIIF is a well-defined group of low-Ni and low-Ge irons. Several anomalous irons are discussed, including a cluster of five plessitic octahedrites and ataxites with Ge/Ga atomic ratios ranging from 10 to 16 and a meteorite that has the second highest Ni content of any iron. It is shown that the IIE irons are compositionally similar to the mesosiderites and pallasites, and it is suggested that the three groups probably formed at approximately the same heliocentric distance.

  8. Effects of cognitive and experiential group therapy on self-efficacy and perceptions of employability of chemically dependent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, O

    1999-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study assessed effects of cognitive and experiential group therapy on self-efficacy and perceptions of employability for 52 chemically dependent adult women. The sample was 98% African American. Therapy consisted of six 90-min group sessions held twice weekly. The participants were pre- and posttested with the Self-Efficacy Scale (M. Sherer et al., 1982) and the Ghiselli Self-Description Inventory (E. E. Ghiselli, 1975). After the intervention, the cognitive group had significantly higher levels than the experiential group of social self-efficacy and need for self-actualization, an indicator of aspiration for employment. General self-efficacy and decisiveness, indicators of employability, significantly increased over time for both groups. Interventions to enhance people's belief in their ability to successfully perform tasks and control outcomes, promote personal growth, teach responsibility, and enhance self-awareness could be used to develop employability skills that reduce recidivism. PMID:10633639

  9. Chemical characterization of Flavobacterium odoratum, Flavobacterium breve, and Flavobacterium-like groups IIe, IIh, and IIf.

    OpenAIRE

    Dees, S B; Moss, C W; Hollis, D G; Weaver, R E

    1986-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid, sphingolipid, and isoprenoid quinone compositions of Flavobacterium odoratum, Flavobacterium breve, and Flavobacterium-like groups IIe, IIh, and IIf were determined, using thin-layer, gas-liquid, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The fatty acid data showed that groups IIe, IIh, and IIf were similar to recognized Flavobacterium species by the presence of relatively large amounts of iso-branched hydroxy and nonhydroxy acids. Groups IIe and IIh we...

  10. Modifications of chemical functional groups of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb and its effect towards biosorption of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohd. Zamri; Ismail, Siti Salwa

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of non-living biomass as an alternative biosorbent for heavy metal removal has gain a tremendous consideration through the years. Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb or pandan leaves, which is widely used as food additives in the South East Asia region, has been selected for its viability in the said effort due to the presence of chemical functional groups on its cellular network that enables the sorption to occur. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms participated during the heavy metal removal process, the biosorbent undergone a series of modification techniques to alter the chemical functional groups present on its constituent. From the outcome of the chemically-modified biosorbent being subjected to the contact with metal cations, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups present on the biosorbent are believed to be responsible for the metal uptake to occur through complexation mechanism. Modifying amine groups causes 14% reduction of Cu(II) uptake, whereas removing protein element increases the uptake to 26% as compared to the unmodified biosorbent. Also, scanning electron micrographs further suggested that the adsorption mechanism could perform in parallel, as attributed to the evidence of porous structure throughout the biosorbent fibrous nature.

  11. Modifications of chemical functional groups of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb and its effect towards biosorption of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of non-living biomass as an alternative biosorbent for heavy metal removal has gain a tremendous consideration through the years. Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb or pandan leaves, which is widely used as food additives in the South East Asia region, has been selected for its viability in the said effort due to the presence of chemical functional groups on its cellular network that enables the sorption to occur. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms participated during the heavy metal removal process, the biosorbent undergone a series of modification techniques to alter the chemical functional groups present on its constituent. From the outcome of the chemically-modified biosorbent being subjected to the contact with metal cations, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups present on the biosorbent are believed to be responsible for the metal uptake to occur through complexation mechanism. Modifying amine groups causes 14% reduction of Cu(II) uptake, whereas removing protein element increases the uptake to 26% as compared to the unmodified biosorbent. Also, scanning electron micrographs further suggested that the adsorption mechanism could perform in parallel, as attributed to the evidence of porous structure throughout the biosorbent fibrous nature

  12. Modifications of chemical functional groups of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb and its effect towards biosorption of heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Mohd Zamri, E-mail: zamriab@petronas.com.my; Ismail, Siti Salwa [Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The utilization of non-living biomass as an alternative biosorbent for heavy metal removal has gain a tremendous consideration through the years. Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb or pandan leaves, which is widely used as food additives in the South East Asia region, has been selected for its viability in the said effort due to the presence of chemical functional groups on its cellular network that enables the sorption to occur. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms participated during the heavy metal removal process, the biosorbent undergone a series of modification techniques to alter the chemical functional groups present on its constituent. From the outcome of the chemically-modified biosorbent being subjected to the contact with metal cations, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups present on the biosorbent are believed to be responsible for the metal uptake to occur through complexation mechanism. Modifying amine groups causes 14% reduction of Cu(II) uptake, whereas removing protein element increases the uptake to 26% as compared to the unmodified biosorbent. Also, scanning electron micrographs further suggested that the adsorption mechanism could perform in parallel, as attributed to the evidence of porous structure throughout the biosorbent fibrous nature.

  13. Study on physico-chemical properties of dialdehyde yam starch with different aldehyde group contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dialdehyde yam starches (DASs) are prepared and characterized. Compared with native starch, viscosity average molecular weight of DASs decreases, and the extent of degradation depends on content of the aldehyde groups. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra confirm that the characteristic peak for C=O group at 1732 cm-1 is enhanced with the increasing of content of the aldehyde groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs show that the surface of starch granules becomes wrinkled. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns clearly indicate that their crystallinity decreases with the increasing content of the aldehyde groups before they become amorphous at higher oxidation states. The experimental results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) show that DASs have poor stability as compared to native starch. With the increase in content of the aldehyde groups, the thermal stability of DAS declines gradually. According to the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gelatinization temperature (To and Tp) of DASs are increased, whereas the gelatinization enthalpy decreased.

  14. SIMILARITY ANALYSIS OF DNA SEQUENCES BASED ON THE CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEOTIDE BASES, FREQUENCY AND POSITION OF GROUP MUTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima KABLI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA sequences similarity analysis approaches have been based on the representation and the frequency of sequences components; however, the position inside sequence is important information for the sequence data. Whereas, insufficient information in sequences representations is important reason that causes poor similarity results. Based on three classifications of the DNA bases according to their chemical properties, the frequencies and average positions of group mutations have been grouped into two twelve-components vectors, the Euclidean distances among introduced vectors applied to compare the coding sequences of the first exon of beta globin gene of 11 species.

  15. Grassmann tensor renormalization group for the one-flavor lattice Gross–Neveu model with finite chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply the Grassmann tensor renormalization group (GTRG) to the one-flavor lattice Gross–Neveu model in the presence of a chemical potential. We compute the fermion number density and its susceptibility and confirm the validity of GTRG for the finite-density system. We introduce a method analogous to the reweighting method for the Monte Carlo method and test it for some parameters

  16. Study on physico-chemical properties of dialdehyde yam starch with different aldehyde group contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liming, E-mail: zhanglmd@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Liu, Peng; Wang, Yugao [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Gao, Wenyuan [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2011-01-10

    Dialdehyde yam starches (DASs) are prepared and characterized. Compared with native starch, viscosity average molecular weight of DASs decreases, and the extent of degradation depends on content of the aldehyde groups. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra confirm that the characteristic peak for C=O group at 1732 cm{sup -1} is enhanced with the increasing of content of the aldehyde groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs show that the surface of starch granules becomes wrinkled. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns clearly indicate that their crystallinity decreases with the increasing content of the aldehyde groups before they become amorphous at higher oxidation states. The experimental results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) show that DASs have poor stability as compared to native starch. With the increase in content of the aldehyde groups, the thermal stability of DAS declines gradually. According to the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gelatinization temperature (T{sub o} and T{sub p}) of DASs are increased, whereas the gelatinization enthalpy decreased.

  17. Chemically Modified Multi-walled Carbon Nano tubes (MWCNTs) with Anchored Acidic Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs) was carried out using a gas phase treatment in a Universal Temperature Program (UTP) reactor by flowing SO3 gas onto the CNTs while being heated at different temperatures. The functionalized nano tubes were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The amount of oxygen and sulfur containing groups was determined by acid-base titration. The titration results were in good agreement with elemental analysis using x-ray fluorescence. FTIR analysis showed the presence of oxygen and sulfur containing groups, S=O, C-S, C=O and -COOH. Raman spectroscopy confirmed that oxygen and sulfur containing acidic groups covalently attached to the sidewall of the MWCNTs. (author)

  18. Research of group and chemical composition of pyrocondensate and its products

    OpenAIRE

    Запорожець, О.І.; Національний авіаційний університет; Вовк, О.О.; Національний авіаційний університет; Нікітченко, Ю.С.; Національний авіаційний університет

    2010-01-01

     Identity of physical-chemical properties of pyrocondensate with properties of oil-derived products is a reason of erroneous assumption about possible spheres of its application. For example, most spreaded application is like a substitution of heating oil or mazut, but petrol fraction (ab. 30 % of mass) makes this use risky. And some others characteristics don’t correspond to the norms of legacy standards on oil-derived products. That’s why direct using without any technological operations is...

  19. Features of soil microbial groups in the area Kilmezsky landfill dumping of toxic chemicals ( Kirov Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berezin Grigory Ivanovich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the influence of pesticides a transformation of soil microbial complexes occurs. In the area of Kilmezsky dumping of toxic chemicals (Kirov Region the species composition of soil phototrophes and quantitative characteristics of soil algo-cyano-mycological complexes change as a result of chronic exposure to pesticides . The content of cyanobacteria in the structure of phototrophic systems and the degree of mikromycets populations melanization can be used as bioindicators of soil contamination complementing the set of indicators based on certified laboratory methods of biotesting.

  20. Phase Measurement for Accurate Mapping of Chemical Bonds in Acentric Space Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the electron density is fundamental to the study of chemical bonding and density-functional theory, it cannot be accurately mapped experimentally for the important class of crystals lacking inversion symmetry, since structure factor phase information is normally inaccessible. We report the combination of x-ray and electron diffraction experiments for the determination of the electron density in acentric AlN, using multiple-scattering effects in convergent-beam electron diffraction to obtain sensitivity to structure factor phases, and describe a new error metric and weighting scheme for multipole refinement using combined measurements of structure factor magnitudes and phases

  1. Inhibition of Synaptosomal Biogenic Amine Transport by a Diverse Group of Neurotoxic Chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Bracken, William M.

    1980-01-01

    Synaptosomal membrane functions were monitored, after in vitro exposure to select environmental pollutants, in synaptosomal preparations originating from rat cerebral cortices. The uptake of NE and 5HT into the synaptosomes was monitored as was the K+-dependent phosphate activity of the membrane. CH3HgCl, Hg(NO3)2, CdCl2, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), paraoxon, acrylamide and Kepone were the test chemicals whose effects were studied. CH3HgCl, Hg(NO3)2 and Kepone had the greatest inhibi...

  2. A Systems Biology Approach for Identifying Hepatotoxicant Groups Based on Similarity in Mechanisms of Action and Chemical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebels, Dennie G A J; Rasche, Axel; Herwig, Ralf; van Westen, Gerard J P; Jennen, Danyel G J; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2016-01-01

    When evaluating compound similarity, addressing multiple sources of information to reach conclusions about common pharmaceutical and/or toxicological mechanisms of action is a crucial strategy. In this chapter, we describe a systems biology approach that incorporates analyses of hepatotoxicant data for 33 compounds from three different sources: a chemical structure similarity analysis based on the 3D Tanimoto coefficient, a chemical structure-based protein target prediction analysis, and a cross-study/cross-platform meta-analysis of in vitro and in vivo human and rat transcriptomics data derived from public resources (i.e., the diXa data warehouse). Hierarchical clustering of the outcome scores of the separate analyses did not result in a satisfactory grouping of compounds considering their known toxic mechanism as described in literature. However, a combined analysis of multiple data types may hypothetically compensate for missing or unreliable information in any of the single data types. We therefore performed an integrated clustering analysis of all three data sets using the R-based tool iClusterPlus. This indeed improved the grouping results. The compound clusters that were formed by means of iClusterPlus represent groups that show similar gene expression while simultaneously integrating a similarity in structure and protein targets, which corresponds much better with the known mechanism of action of these toxicants. Using an integrative systems biology approach may thus overcome the limitations of the separate analyses when grouping liver toxicants sharing a similar mechanism of toxicity. PMID:27311473

  3. Transparent conducting oxide films of group V doped titania prepared by aqueous chemical solution deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elen, Ken [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Strategisch Initiatief Materialen (SIM), SoPPoM Program (Belgium); Capon, Boris [Strategisch Initiatief Materialen (SIM), SoPPoM Programm (Belgium); Coating and Contacting of Nanostructures, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Dobbelaere, Christopher [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Dewulf, Daan [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Peys, Nick [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Detavernier, Christophe [Coating and Contacting of Nanostructures, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Hardy, An [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Van Bael, Marlies K., E-mail: marlies.vanbael@uhasselt.be [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2014-03-31

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films of titania doped with vanadium (V), niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) are obtained by aqueous Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD). The effect of the dopant on the crystallization and microstructure of the resulting films is examined by means of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. During annealing of the thin films, in-situ characterization of the crystal structure and sheet resistance is carried out. Niobium doped anatase films, obtained after annealing in forming gas, show a resistivity of 0,28 Ohm cm, which is the lowest resistivity reported for a solution deposited anatase-based TCO so far. Here, we demonstrate that aqueous CSD may provide a strategy for scalable TCO production in the future. - Highlights: • Aqueous chemical solution deposition of doped titanium dioxide • Doping delays the phase transition from anatase to rutile • Lowest resistivity after doping with niobium and annealing in Forming Gas • Transparency higher than 80% in the visible range of optical spectrum.

  4. Transparent conducting oxide films of group V doped titania prepared by aqueous chemical solution deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films of titania doped with vanadium (V), niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) are obtained by aqueous Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD). The effect of the dopant on the crystallization and microstructure of the resulting films is examined by means of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. During annealing of the thin films, in-situ characterization of the crystal structure and sheet resistance is carried out. Niobium doped anatase films, obtained after annealing in forming gas, show a resistivity of 0,28 Ohm cm, which is the lowest resistivity reported for a solution deposited anatase-based TCO so far. Here, we demonstrate that aqueous CSD may provide a strategy for scalable TCO production in the future. - Highlights: • Aqueous chemical solution deposition of doped titanium dioxide • Doping delays the phase transition from anatase to rutile • Lowest resistivity after doping with niobium and annealing in Forming Gas • Transparency higher than 80% in the visible range of optical spectrum

  5. Group Interventions with Low-Income African American Women Recovering from Chemical Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Olivia G. M.; Moxley, David P.

    2003-01-01

    Presents finding from an investigation of two group therapy modalities involving 93 women with dependent children and limited education and income levels. An overview of intervention activities that participants found beneficial is presented. Programs were found to help participants develop a sense of community, reduce stress, improve…

  6. 75 FR 52355 - Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group Reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... National Conversation project. RESOLVE is convening the National Conversation Leadership Council and... Conversation project includes a Leadership Council, which will author the action agenda, and six work groups... will finalize their reports during the fall of 2010. The National Conversation Leadership Council...

  7. The chemical evolution of Kurnub Group palcowater in the Sinai-Negev province - A mass balance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, E.; Jones, B.F.; Weinberger, G.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical evolution of the Kurnub Group paleowater was studied starting from rainwater in recharge areas of the Sinai and along groundwater flowpaths leading to the natural outlets of this regional aquifer. This was achieved by investigating the chemical composition of groundwater, ionic ratios, degrees of saturation with common mineral species, normative analysis of dissolved salts and by modeling of rock/water interaction and mixing processes occurring along groundwater flow paths. The initial groundwater composition used is from the Nakhel well in Sinai. It evolves from desert rainwater percolating through typical Kurnub Group lithology in Sinai. This rainwater dissolves mainly gypsum, halite and dolomite together with smaller amounts of marine aerosol and K-feldspar. At the same time it precipitates calcite, SiO2, smectite and degasses CO2. Between the area of Nakhel and the northern Negev the chemistry of Kurnub Group waters is influenced by dissolution of halite and lesser amounts of gypsum of surficial origin in recharge areas, small amounts of feldspars and of dolomite cement in sandstones eroded from the Arabo-Nubian igneous massif of Sinai and organic degradation-derived CO2. Concomitantly, there is precipitation of calcite, smectite, SiO2 and probably analcime characteristic of sediments in continental closed basins. North of the Negev, the Kurnub Group fluids are diluted and altered by mixing with Judea Group aquifer groundwaters. On the E there is mixing with residual brines from the water body ancestral to the Dead Sea, prior to discharge into the Arava valley. Rock/water interaction indicated by NETPATH and PHREEQC modeling is in agreement with lithology and facies changes previously observed in the Kurnub Group sequence.

  8. The chemical evolution of Kurnub Group paleowater in the Sinai-Negev province-a mass balance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical evolution of the Kurnub Group paleowater was studied starting from rainwater in recharge areas of the Sinai and along groundwater flowpaths leading to the natural outlets of this regional aquifer. This was achieved by investigating the chemical composition of groundwater, ionic ratios, degrees of saturation with common mineral species, normative analysis of dissolved salts and by modeling of rock/water interaction and mixing processes occurring along groundwater flow paths. The initial groundwater composition used is from the Nakhel well in Sinai. It evolves from desert rainwater percolating through typical Kurnub Group lithology in Sinai. This rainwater dissolves mainly gypsum, halite and dolomite together with smaller amounts of marine aerosol and K-feldspar. At the same time it precipitates calcite, SiO2, smectite and degasses CO2. Between the area of Nakhel and the northern Negev the chemistry of Kurnub Group waters is influenced by dissolution of halite and lesser amounts of gypsum of surficial origin in recharge areas, small amounts of feldspars and of dolomite cement in sandstones eroded from the Arabo-Nubian igneous massif of Sinai and organic degradation-derived CO2. Concomitantly, there is precipitation of calcite, smectite, SiO2 and probably analcime characteristic of sediments in continental closed basins. North of the Negev, the Kurnub Group fluids are diluted and altered by mixing with Judea Group aquifer groundwaters. On the E there is mixing with residual brines from the water body ancestral to the Dead Sea, prior to discharge into the Arava valley. Rock/water interaction indicated by NETPATH and PHREEQC modeling is in agreement with lithology and facies changes previously observed in the Kurnub Group sequence. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation results show that the model is significant and stable and that the predicted accuracy is within 0.146 MJ kg−1, with an overall root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP below 0.183 MJ kg−1. Strong correlations were observed between the heat of explosion and the charges (R2 = 0.9533 and 15N NMR chemical shifts (R2 = 0.9531 of the studied compounds. In addition, the dependence of the heat of explosion on the presence of activating or deactivating groups of nitroaromatic explosives was analyzed. All calculations, including optimizations, NBO charges, and 15NNitro NMR chemical shifts analyses, were performed using density functional theory (DFT and a 6-311+G(2d,p basis set. Based on these results, this practical quantitative model can be used as a tool in the design and development of highly energetic materials (HEM based on nitroaromatic compounds.

  10. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Flammability Properties of Chemicals using Group-Contribution Property Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    time constraints, property prediction models like group contribution (GC) models can estimate flammability data. The estimation needs to be accurate, reliable and as less time consuming as possible. However, GC property prediction methods frequently lack rigorous uncertainty analysis. Hence, there is...... no information about the reliability of the data. Furthermore, the global optimality of the GC parameters estimation is often not ensured. In this research project flammability-related property data, like LFL and UFL, are estimated using the Marrero and Gani group contribution method (MG method). In...... addition to the parameter estimation an uncertainty analysis of the estimated data and a comparison to other methods is performed. A thorough uncertainty analysis provides information about the prediction error, which is important for the use of the data in process safety studies and assessments. The...

  11. Radiation-chemical synthesis of polypropylene fabrics with sulfonic acid functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Kug; Park, Jung Soo; Han, Do Hung, E-mail: dhhan@yumail.ac.kr; Bondar, Iuliia, E-mail: juliavad@yahoo.co

    2011-04-01

    A sorption-active material carrying sulfonic acid groups was synthesized by the radiation-induced graft polymerization of styrene monomer onto the surface of non-woven polypropylene fabric, followed by sulfonation of the grafted polystyrene chains. The effect of the main experimental parameters (absorbed dose, monomer concentration, reaction time) on the styrene degree of grafting was investigated. The sulfonation process with 5% chlorosulfonic acid at room temperature was investigated in detail and the optimal sulfonation conditions for the samples with a medium degree of grafting (70-140%) were determined. Densities of 3.5-5 meq/g were obtained by applying those sorption-active PP fabrics with a sulfonic acid group.

  12. PHYSIC AND CHEMICAL BASIS FOR THE INVOLVEMENT OF D-ELEMENTS OF THE FOURTH GROUP (TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, HAFNIUM) IN THE SYNTHESIS OF BUILDING AND SILICATE MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.; Savin, Yu. L.; O. P. Prykhodko; L. S. Savin; Kulbashnyi, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    In the paper the studies of physico-chemical grounds of involving the fourth group elements (titanium, zirconium, hafnium) for syntheses of construction silicate materials are presented. The physico-chemical approach proposed allows involving the great group of technogenic titanium-containing semi-products, concentrates, slags and slimes for production of construction silicate materials and manufacture the products and building structures.

  13. PHYSIC AND CHEMICAL BASIS FOR THE INVOLVEMENT OF D-ELEMENTS OF THE FOURTH GROUP (TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, HAFNIUM) IN THE SYNTHESIS OF BUILDING AND SILICATE MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.; Savin, Yu. L.; O. P. Prykhodko; L. S. Savin; Kulbashnyi, V. M.

    2008-01-01

    In the paper the studies of physico-chemical grounds of involving the fourth group elements (titanium, zirconium, hafnium) for syntheses of construction silicate materials are presented. The physico-chemical approach proposed allows involving the great group of technogenic titanium-containing semi-products, concentrates, slags and slimes for production of construction silicate materials and manufacture the products and building structures.

  14. The early chemical enrichment histories of two Sculptor group dwarf galaxies as revealed by RR lyrae variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of our analysis of the RR Lyrae (RRL) variable stars detected in two transition-type dwarf galaxies (dTrans), ESO294-G010 and ESO410-G005 in the Sculptor group, which is known to be one of the closest neighboring galaxy groups to our Local Group. Using deep archival images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have identified a sample of RRL candidates in both dTrans galaxies (219 RRab (RR0) and 13 RRc (RR1) variables in ESO294-G010; 225 RRab and 44 RRc stars in ESO410-G005). The metallicities of the individual RRab stars are calculated via the period-amplitude-[Fe/H] relation derived by Alcock et al. This yields mean metallicities of ([Fe/H])ESO294 = –1.77 ± 0.03 and ([Fe/H])ESO410 = –1.64 ± 0.03. The RRL metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) are investigated further via simple chemical evolution models; these reveal the relics of the early chemical enrichment processes for these two dTrans galaxies. In the case of both galaxies, the shapes of the RRL MDFs are well described by pre-enrichment models. This suggests two possible channels for the early chemical evolution for these Sculptor group dTrans galaxies: (1) the ancient stellar populations of our target dwarf galaxies might have formed from the star forming gas which was already enriched through 'prompt initial enrichment' or an 'initial nucleosynthetic spike' from the very first massive stars, or (2) this pre-enrichment state might have been achieved by the end products from more evolved systems of their nearest neighbor, NGC 55. We also study the environmental effects of the formation and evolution of our target dTrans galaxies by comparing their properties with those of 79 volume limited (D ☉ < 2 Mpc) dwarf galaxy samples in terms of the luminosity-metallicity relation and the H I gas content. The presence of these RRL stars strongly supports the idea that although the Sculptor Group galaxies have a considerably

  15. Formation of a Molecular Wire Using the Chemically Adsorbed Monomolecular Layer Having Pyrrolyl Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Ogawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular wire containing polypyrrolyl conjugate bonds has been prepared by a chemical adsorption technique using 1,1,1-trichloro-12-pyrrolyl-1-siladodecane (PNN and an electrooxidative polymerization technique, and the conductivity of the molecular wire without any dopant has been measured by using AFM/STM at room temperature. When sample dimension measured was about 0.3 nm (thickness of the conductive portion in the PNN monomolecular layer ×100 μm (the average width of an electric path ×2 mm (the distance between Pt positive electrode and the AFM tip covered with Au, the conductivity of the polymerized PNN molecular wire at room temperature was larger than 1.6 × 105 S/cm both in an atmosphere and in a vacuum chamber of 10−5 Torr. The activation energy obtained by Arrhenius' plots was almost zero in the temperature range between 320 and 450 K.

  16. Chemical modification and pH dependence of kinetic parameters to identify functional groups in a glucosyltransferase from Strep. Mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glucosyltransferase, forming a predominantly al-6 linked glucan, was partially purified from the culture filtrate of S. mutans GS-5. The kinetic properties of the enzyme, assessed using the transfer of 14C glucose from sucrose into total glucan, were studied at pH values from pH 3.5 to 6.5. From the dependence of km on pH, a group with pKa = 5.5 must be protonated to maximize substrate binding. From plots of V/sub max/ vs pH two groups, with pKa's of 4.5 and 5.5 were indicated. The results suggest the involvement of either two carboxyl groups (one protonated, one unprotonated in the native enzyme) or a carboxyl group (unprotonated) and some other protonated group such as histidine, cysteine. Chemical modification studies showed that Diethylyrocarbonate (histidine specific) had no effect on enzyme activity while modification with p-phydroxy-mercuribenzoate or iodoacetic acid (sulfhydryl reactive) and carbodimide reagents (carboxyl specific) resulted in almost complete inactivation. Activity loss was dependent upon time of incubation and reagent concentration. The disaccharide lylose, (shown to be an inhibitor of the enzyme with similar affinity to sucrose) offers no protection against modification by the sulfhydryl reactive reagents

  17. Analysis of the number of hydrogen bond groups of a multiwalled carbon nanotube probe tip for chemical force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we describe a statistical method of quantification of the number of functional groups at the contact area of a probe tip for atomic force microscopy from the result of repetitive pull-off force measurements. We have investigated laboratory-made carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips to apply them for chemical force microscopy because limited number of functional groups at the tip-end is expected. Using a CNT tip, we conducted repetitive pull-off force measurements against a self-assembled monolayer terminated with carboxyl group and analyzed them in terms of the number of hydrogen bond groups at the CNT tip. The elementary hydrogen bond rupture force quantum in n-decane medium was estimated to be 84.2 ± 0.5 pN in the present system. Thus it was revealed that only a couple of hydrogen bond groups of the CNT tip were participating in hydrogen bonding with the sample on an average in this experimental system.

  18. Chemical and morphological segregation of Alternaria arborescens, A-infectoria and A-tenuissima species-groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Krøger, Elisabeth; Roberts, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    belonging to the genus Alternaria were examined. They were grown under standardised conditions and subjected to morphological and chemical examination. All isolates were grouped according to their three-dimensional sporulation pattern on potato carrot agar and their colony colour on dichloran rose bengal......Correct morphological identification of Alternaria is important and demands a combination of modern standardised methods and up-to-date literature. The production of secondary metabolites has previously been used as a means of identification and classification. In this study, 153 fungal isolates...

  19. A Chemical Eight Group Separation Method for Routine Use in Gamma Spectrometric Analysis. II. Detailed analytical schema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed ion-exchange procedure for the separation of chemical elements in eight groups suitable for subsequent gamma spectrometric analysis is described. The method has been in use for gamma spectrometry of some inorganic - but mostly organic - samples for one year. The separation time for inorganic samples, is usually about 1.5 hours and for organic samples as least 2 hours. One man can separate and count three samples per day. In comparative measurements of short-lived isotopes in biological material 10-12 elements can be analysed thus making possible 30 - 35 determinations per day for one man

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of Group IV carbides from single source precursors: The use of homoleptic alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, M.D.; Smith, D.C.; Springer, R.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Rubiano, R.R. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The use of M[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} [M = Ti, Zr, Hf] and related compounds to form thin films of Group IV metalcarbides has been investigated. Zirconium carbide can be deposited on Si substrates from Zr[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} at temperatures in the range of 300 to750{degrees}C and pressures from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}4} torr. The effects of deposition conditions on the resulting material has been examined by SEM, XPS, and AES. In situ mass spectrometry and analysis of the hydrocarbon fragments generated in the reactor have also been studied. The mechanism of decomposition of Zr[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} under conditions approximating the CVD experiment is related to solution phase decomposition studies and to properties of the resulting thin films. Variation of the coordination sphere of the group IV metal has allowed for a preliminary determination of desirable ligands for this system. Studies with Zr[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} showed that crystalline films can be deposited at high temperature (>550{degrees}C) regardless of pressure. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling trends indicated all films to be uniform in composition (with a constant metal to carbon ratio) and to contain some residual oxygen in the bulk. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows carbon to be present in carbidic and graphitic forms, while zirconium is single phase with a small amount of zirconium dioxide present in the bulk.

  1. The Early Chemical Enrichment Histories of Two Sculptor Group Dwarf Galaxies as Revealed by RR Lyrae Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soung-Chul; Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel; Sarajedini, Ata; Kim, Sang Chul; Kyeong, Jaemann

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of our analysis of the RR Lyrae (RRL) variable stars detected in two transition-type dwarf galaxies (dTrans), ESO294-G010 and ESO410-G005 in the Sculptor group, which is known to be one of the closest neighboring galaxy groups to our Local Group. Using deep archival images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have identified a sample of RRL candidates in both dTrans galaxies (219 RRab (RR0) and 13 RRc (RR1) variables in ESO294-G010; 225 RRab and 44 RRc stars in ESO410-G005). The metallicities of the individual RRab stars are calculated via the period-amplitude-[Fe/H] relation derived by Alcock et al. This yields mean metallicities of lang[Fe/H]rangESO294 = -1.77 ± 0.03 and lang[Fe/H]rangESO410 = -1.64 ± 0.03. The RRL metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) are investigated further via simple chemical evolution models; these reveal the relics of the early chemical enrichment processes for these two dTrans galaxies. In the case of both galaxies, the shapes of the RRL MDFs are well described by pre-enrichment models. This suggests two possible channels for the early chemical evolution for these Sculptor group dTrans galaxies: (1) the ancient stellar populations of our target dwarf galaxies might have formed from the star forming gas which was already enriched through "prompt initial enrichment" or an "initial nucleosynthetic spike" from the very first massive stars, or (2) this pre-enrichment state might have been achieved by the end products from more evolved systems of their nearest neighbor, NGC 55. We also study the environmental effects of the formation and evolution of our target dTrans galaxies by comparing their properties with those of 79 volume limited (D ⊙ giant host galaxies, loosely bound and very low local density), they share a common epoch of early star formation with the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Group.

  2. Chemical Abundances of Seven Irregular and Three Tidal Dwarf Galaxies in the M81 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Croxall, Kevin V; Lee, Henry; Skillman, Evan D; Lee, Janice C; Côté, Stéphanie; Kennicutt, Robert C; Miller, Bryan W; 10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/723

    2009-01-01

    We have derived nebular abundances for 10 dwarf galaxies belonging to the M81 Group, including several galaxies which do not have abundances previously reported in the literature. For each galaxy, multiple H \\ii regions were observed with GMOS-N at the Gemini Observatory in order to determine abundances of several elements (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, neon, and argon). For seven galaxies, at least one H \\ii region had a detection of the temperature sensitive [OIII] $\\lambda$4363 line, allowing a "direct" determination of the oxygen abundance. No abundance gradients were detected in the targeted galaxies and the observed oxygen abundances are typically in agreement with the well known metallicity-luminosity relation. However, three candidate "tidal dwarf" galaxies lie well off this relation, UGC 5336, Garland, and KDG 61. The nature of these systems suggests that UGC 5336 and Garland are indeed recently formed systems, whereas KDG 61 is most likely a dwarf spheroidal galaxy which lies along the same line of sigh...

  3. Final Programme and Abstracts. COST Action CM0603 Free Radicals in Chemical Biology (CHEMBIORADICAL) Joint Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the Action is to promote a chemical biology approach for the investigation of free radical pathways. Chemical reactivity and molecular libraries are the start of a multidisciplinary research context 'from small molecules to large systems', culminating in the biological complexity. The Action aims at improving communication and exchange among neighbouring scientific fields, such as chemistry with several domains of life sciences, specifically addressing the real barrier consisting of specialist language and tools. Four working groups address the formation, reactivity and fate of free radicals involving bio-molecules, such as unsaturated lipids, aromatic-, cyclic- and sulphur-containing amino acid residues, sugar and base moieties of nucleic acids. Tasks concern the role of free radicals in normal cell metabolism and in damages, defining structural and functional modifications, in the framework of physiologically and pathologically related processes relevant to human quality of life and health. In the programme are involved 19 universities and research institutions from nearly all European countries. The research programme of the group has been carried and is still continued based on close bilateral collaboration with many foreign laboratories from Europe, USA (Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory) and Chile

  4. An efficient approach to derive hydroxyl groups on the surface of barium titanate nanoparticles to improve its chemical modification ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shinn-Jen; Liao, Wei-Sheng; Ciou, Ci-Jin; Lee, Jyh-Tsung; Li, Chia-Chen

    2009-01-15

    Highly hydroxylated barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) nanoparticles have been prepared via an easy and gentle approach which oxidizes BaTiO(3) nanoparticles using an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The hydroxylated BaTiO(3) surface reacts with sodium oleate (SOA) to form oleophilic layers that greatly enhance the dispersion of BaTiO(3) nanoparticles in organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, toluene, and n-octane. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed that the major functional groups on the surface of H(2)O(2)-treated BaTiO(3) nanoparticles are hydroxyl groups which are chemically active, favoring chemical bonding with SOA. The results of transmission electron microscopy of SOA-modified BaTiO(3) nanoparticles suggested that the oleate molecules were bonded to the surfaces of nanoparticles and formed a homogeneous layer having a thickness of about 2 nm. Furthermore, the improved dispersion capability of the modified BaTiO(3) nanoparticles in organic solvents was verified through analytic results of its settling and rheological behaviors. PMID:18977001

  5. Construction of a technique plan repository and evaluation system based on AHP group decision-making for emergency treatment and disposal in chemical pollution accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Different chemical pollution accidents were simplified using the event tree analysis. • Emergency disposal technique plan repository of chemicals accidents was constructed. • The technique evaluation index system of chemicals accidents disposal was developed. • A combination of group decision and analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was employed. • Group decision introducing similarity and diversity factor was used for data analysis. - Abstract: The environmental pollution resulting from chemical accidents has caused increasingly serious concerns. Therefore, it is very important to be able to determine in advance the appropriate emergency treatment and disposal technology for different types of chemical accidents. However, the formulation of an emergency plan for chemical pollution accidents is considerably difficult due to the substantial uncertainty and complexity of such accidents. This paper explains how the event tree method was used to create 54 different scenarios for chemical pollution accidents, based on the polluted medium, dangerous characteristics and properties of chemicals involved. For each type of chemical accident, feasible emergency treatment and disposal technology schemes were established, considering the areas of pollution source control, pollutant non-proliferation, contaminant elimination and waste disposal. Meanwhile, in order to obtain the optimum emergency disposal technology schemes as soon as the chemical pollution accident occurs from the plan repository, the technique evaluation index system was developed based on group decision-improved analytical hierarchy process (AHP), and has been tested by using a sudden aniline pollution accident that occurred in a river in December 2012

  6. Pyruvate dehydrogenase and 3-fluoropyruvate: chemical competence of 2-acetylthiamin pyrophosphate as an acetyl group donor to dihydrolipoamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the decomposition of 3-fluoropyruvate to CO2, fluoride anion, and acetate. Acetylthiamin pyrophosphate (acetyl-TPP) is an intermediate in this reaction. Incubation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex with 3-fluoro[1,2-14]pyruvate, TPP, coenzyme A (CoASH), and either NADH or pyruvate as reducing systems leads to the formation of [14]acetyl-CoA. In this reaction the acetyl group of acetyl-TPP is partitioned by transfer to both CoASH (87 +/- 2%) and water (13 +/- 2%). When the E1 component is incubated with 3-fluoro[1,2-14]pyruvate, TPP, and dihydrolipoamide, [14]acetyldihydrolipoamide is produced. The formation of [14C]acetyldihydrolipoamide was examined as a function of dihydrolipoamide concentration (0.25-16 mM). A plot of the extent of acetyl group partitioning to dihydrolipoamide as a function of 1/[dihydrolipoamide] showed 95 +/- 2% acetyl group transfer to dihydrolipoamide when dihydrolipoamide concentration was extrapolated to infinity. It is concluded that acetyl-TPP is chemically competent as an intermediate for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzed oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate

  7. Chemical and morphological segregation of Alternaria arborescens, A-infectoria and A-tenuissima species-groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Krøger, Elisabeth; Roberts, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Correct morphological identification of Alternaria is important and demands a combination of modern standardised methods and up-to-date literature. The production of secondary metabolites has previously been used as a means of identification and classification. In this study, 153 fungal isolates...... belonging to the genus Alternaria were examined. They were grown under standardised conditions and subjected to morphological and chemical examination. All isolates were grouped according to their three-dimensional sporulation pattern on potato carrot agar and their colony colour on dichloran rose bengal...... yeast extract sucrose agar (DRYES). After extraction, all isolates were analysed by a high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a diode array detector and the resulting metabolite profiles were subjected to multivariate statistic analyses. The analyses of metabolite profiles showed that the...

  8. Synthesis of SF5CF2-Containing Enones and Instability of This Group in Specific Chemical Environments and Reaction Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziński, Piotr; Matsnev, Andrej V; Thrasher, Joseph S; Haufe, Günter

    2016-06-01

    The chemistry of the SF5CF2 moiety has been scarcely investigated. In this report, we present synthetic pathways to a variety of SF5CF2-substituted compounds starting from vinyl ethers and SF5CF2C(O)Cl. In specific chemical environments and under particular reaction conditions, the SF5CF2 moiety is unstable in downstream products resulting in the elimination of the SF5(-) anion and its decomposition to SF4 and F(-). Surprisingly, the formed F(-) can attack the intermediate difluorovinyl moiety to form trifluoromethyl substituted products. This appears to happen when an intermediate neighboring group participation involving a double bond is possible. Under slightly different conditions, the reaction stops at the stage of a difluorovinyl compound. PMID:27159371

  9. Chemical history of isolated dwarf galaxies of the Local Group - I. dSphs: Cetus and Tucana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Vergara, N.; Carigi, L.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Durazo, R.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, we obtain chemical evolution models (CEMs) for Tucana and Cetus, two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group. The CEMs have been built from the star formation histories (SFHs) and the metallicity histories, both obtained independently by the Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs (LCID) project from deep colour-magnitude diagrams. Based on our models, we find that the chemical histories were complex and can be divided into different epochs and scenarios. In particular, during 75 per cent of the SFH, the galaxies behaved as closed boxes and, during the remaining 25 per cent, either received a lot of primordial gas by accretion or they lost metals through metal-rich winds. In order to discriminate between these two scenarios, abundances ratios in old stars are needed. At t ˜ 4.5 Gyr, the galaxies lost most of their gas due to a short-strong, well-mixed wind. We obtain very similar CEMs for both galaxies, although Cetus is twice as massive as Tucana. We conclude that the star formation in both galaxies began with only 1.5 per cent of the baryonic mass fraction predicted by Λ cold dark matter.

  10. Lie Group Solution for Free Convective Flow of a Nanofluid Past a Chemically Reacting Horizontal Plate in a Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rashidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM is employed to investigate the steady laminar incompressible free convective flow of a nanofluid past a chemically reacting upward facing horizontal plate in a porous medium taking into account heat generation/absorption and the thermal slip boundary condition. Using similarity transformations developed by Lie group analysis, the continuity, momentum, energy, and nanoparticle volume fraction equations are transformed into a set of coupled similarity equations. The OHAM solutions are obtained and verified by numerical results using a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method. The effect of the emerging flow controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle volume fraction have been presented graphically and discussed. Good agreement is found between analytical and numerical results of the present paper with published results. This close agreement supports our analysis and the accuracy of the numerical computations. This paper also includes a representative set of numerical results for reduced Nusselt and Sherwood numbers in a table for various values of the parameters. It is concluded that the reduced Nusselt number increases with the Lewis number and reaction parameter whist it decreases with the order of the chemical reaction, thermal slip, and generation parameters.

  11. Chemical history of isolated dwarf galaxies of the Local Group: I. dSphs: Cetus and Tucana

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Vergara, N; Hidalgo, S L; Durazo, R

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, we obtain chemical evolution models (CEMs) for Tucana and Cetus, two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) of the Local Group. The CEMs have been built from the star formation histories (SFHs) and the metallicity histories, both obtained independently by the LCID project from deep color-magnitude dia- grams. Based on our models, we find that the chemical histories were complex and can be divided into different epochs and scenarios. In particular, during 75 percent of the SFH, the galaxies behaved as closed boxes and, during the remaining 25 percent, either received a lot of primordial gas by accretion or they lost metals through metal-rich winds. In order to discriminate between these two scenarios, abundances ratios in old stars are needed. At t approximately 4.5 Gyr, the galaxies lost most of their gas due to a short-strong, well-mixed wind. We obtain very similar CEMs for both galaxies, although Cetus is twice as massive as Tucana. We conclude that the star formation in both galaxi...

  12. PHYSIC AND CHEMICAL BASIS FOR THE INVOLVEMENT OF D-ELEMENTS OF THE FOURTH GROUP (TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, HAFNIUM IN THE SYNTHESIS OF BUILDING AND SILICATE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Bolshakov

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the studies of physico-chemical grounds of involving the fourth group elements (titanium, zirconium, hafnium for syntheses of construction silicate materials are presented. The physico-chemical approach proposed allows involving the great group of technogenic titanium-containing semi-products, concentrates, slags and slimes for production of construction silicate materials and manufacture the products and building structures.

  13. Functional group analysis by H NMR/chemical derivatization for the characterization of organic aerosol from the SMOCC field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tagliavini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble organic compounds (WSOC in aerosol samples collected in the Amazon Basin in a period encompassing the middle/late dry season and the beginning of the wet season, were investigated by H NMR spectroscopy. HiVol filter samples (PM2.5 and PM>2.5 and size-segregated samples from multistage impactor were subjected to H NMR characterization. The H NMR methodology, recently developed for the analysis of organic aerosol samples, has been improved by exploiting chemical methylation of carboxylic groups with diazomethane, which allows the direct determination of the carboxylic acid content of WSOC. The content of carboxylic carbons for the different periods and sizes ranged from 12% to 20% of total measured carbon depending on the season and aerosol size, with higher contents for the fine particles in the transition and wet periods with respect to the dry period. A comprehensive picture is presented of WSOC functional groups in aerosol samples representative of the biomass burning period, as well as of transition and semi-clean atmospheric conditions. A difference in composition between fine (PM2.5 and coarse (PM>2.5 size fractions emerged from the NMR data, the former showing higher alkylic content, the latter being largely dominated by R-O-H (or R-O-R' functional groups. Very small particles (<0.14 μm, however, present higher alkyl-chain content and less oxygenated carbons than larger fine particles (0.42–1.2 μm. More limited variations were found between the average compositions in the different periods of the campaign.

  14. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of Chemicals Group, Olin Corporation (formerly Blockson Chemical Company) Joliet, Illinois March 27-November 28, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive radiological survey was conducted at Building 55 of the Chemicals Group, Olin Corporation, Joliet, Illinois. The survey included measurements of alpha and beta-gamma contamination, both fixed and removable; beta-gamma exposure readings at contact and at 1 m (3 ft) above the floor or ground level; estimates of radon-daughter concentrations in the air as airborne contaminants; and determinations of concentrations of 137Cs, the 232Th decay chain, the 226Ra decay chain, and uranium in the soil on the site. Thirty-three spots or localized areas and three larger general areas within Building 55 exceeded the allowable limits as given in the Draft ANSI Standard N13.12 for uranium, and the general roof area exceeded the acceptable limits for radium-226. Additionally, two spots or localized areas on the roof substantially exceeded those limits. In 15 instances, the contamination was found to be removable from surfaces and readily available for transfer to other locations. Concentrations of radon daughters in the air of the building, as measured by grab-sampling techniques, were below the limit of 0.01 WL above background as given in the Surgeon General's Guidelines. Analyses of ten soil samples from the site indicated significantly elevated concentrations of uranium and radium at two sampling locations near Building 55. Based on a hypothetical exposure scenario, the maximum potential dose equivalent to an individual for external penetrating radiation resulting from exposure to radioactivity at this site was calculated to be 340 mrem per year. The internal radiation 50-year dose commitments from potential inhalation/ingestion of radioactive material were calculated to be 8300 mrem to the lung, 120 mrem to the bone, 26 mrem to the kidney, and 250 mrem whole body. Few individuals are expected to acquire such doses or dose commitments annually

  15. Estimation of Environment-Related Properties of Chemicals for Design of Sustainable Processes: Development of Group-Contribution+ (GC+) Property Models and Uncertainty Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this work is to develop group-contribution+ (GC+) method (combined group-contribution (GC) method and atom connectivity index (CI) method) based property models to provide reliable estimations of environment-related properties of organic chemicals together with uncert...

  16. Lessons learned from joint working group report on assessment and management of cancer risks from radiological and chemical hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation of radiological hazards to humans is greatly simplified by the existence of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The average RBE values or radiation weighting factors recommended by the ICRP are based on non-human data. The ICRP has also indicated that 'the standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk.' This statement appears to be supported by technical publications from other organizations. Two published objections by AECB staff to the scientific technical background of the ICRP statement do not offer any good reason to reject this ICRP statement. A brief summary is given of the joint working group report on the topic indicated in the title. It is noted that regulators of cancer-causing chemicals have in general paid less attention to natural sources than have the regulators of radiological hazards. Most non-human species are exposed to about 1 millisievert (mSv) equivalent dose of radiation per year from natural sources. Caribou and organisms living underground are noted as examples where radiation exposures from natural sources are considerably higher. The natural biota is in general remarkably resistant, both in the laboratory and in field studies, to the effects of high doses of radiation. A recent review by the International Atomic Agency concluded that dose rates below the equivalent of 400 mSv per year are unlikely to after the survival of non-human species. It is recommended that caution and common sense be applied in any future research on radiological protection of non-human species in the environment in Canada. Many of the proposed U.S. regulations to control chemical and radiation in the environment are not cost-effective. It is to be hoped that efforts to protect non-human species from potential radiological hazards in Canada do not slide into a similar kind of irrational quagmire. (author)

  17. Chemical and mineralogical alteration of ceramics from a Late Bronze Age kiln at Kommos, Crete: the effect on the formation of a reference group

    OpenAIRE

    Buxeda i Garrigós, Jaume; Kilikoglou, V; Day, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of reference groups comprises an important procedure in chemical provenance studies of archaeological pottery. Material from ancient kilns is thought to be especially suitable for reference groups, as it comprises a definite unit of past production. Pottery from the Late Minoan IA kiln excavated at Kommos, Crete was analysed in order to produce a reference group in this important area of Minoan ceramic production. The samples were characterized by a combination of techniques pro...

  18. High-throughput identification of chemical inhibitors of E. coli Group 2 capsule biogenesis as anti-virulence agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos C Goller

    Full Text Available Rising antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli, the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs, has placed a new focus on molecular pathogenesis studies, aiming to identify new therapeutic targets. Anti-virulence agents are attractive as chemotherapeutics to attenuate an organism during disease but not necessarily during benign commensalism, thus decreasing the stress on beneficial microbial communities and lessening the emergence of resistance. We and others have demonstrated that the K antigen capsule of E. coli is a preeminent virulence determinant during UTI and more invasive diseases. Components of assembly and export are highly conserved among the major K antigen capsular types associated with UTI-causing E. coli and are distinct from the capsule biogenesis machinery of many commensal E. coli, making these attractive therapeutic targets. We conducted a screen for anti-capsular small molecules and identified an agent designated "C7" that blocks the production of K1 and K5 capsules, unrelated polysaccharide types among the Group 2-3 capsules. Herein lies proof-of-concept that this screen may be implemented with larger chemical libraries to identify second-generation small-molecule inhibitors of capsule biogenesis. These inhibitors will lead to a better understanding of capsule biogenesis and may represent a new class of therapeutics.

  19. Introduction and summary of the 13th meeting of the Scientific Group on Methodologies for the Safety Evaluation of Chemicals (SGOMSEC): alternative testing methodologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, W S; Marafante, E

    1998-01-01

    A workshop on alternative toxicological testing methodologies was convened by the Scientific Group on Methodologies for the Safety Evaluation of Chemicals (SGOMSEC) 26-31 January 1997 in Ispra, Italy, at the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the current status of alternative testing methodologies available to evaluate adverse human health and environmental effects of chemicals. Another objective of the workshop was to identify...

  20. Flow-by-flow chemical stratigraphy and evolution of thirteen Serra Geral Group basalt flows from Vista Alegre, southernmost Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viter M Pinto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The geochemical characterization of thirteen Serra Geral Group flows in the Vista Alegre region (RS-SC, southern Brazil, displays the homogeneous basaltic composition near 50 wt.% SiO2. Each of the five basal flows (Pitanga-type, high-Ti/Y ~600, TiO2 > 3 wt.% and eight upper flows (Paranapanema-type, medium Ti/Y ~400, TiO2 > 2 wt.% can be identified from their chemical composition; sets of flows have parallel variation in chemical composition. The flow-by-flowcorrelation in four sections shows the horizontal position of the flows in three profiles and an approximately 200-m downdrop of the Itapiranga block with respect to the Frederico Westphalen block. The world-class amethyst geode mineralization and the systematic presence of native copper in the basalts make the correlation of great geological and economic significance.A caracterização geoquímica de treze derrames do Grupo Serra Geral na região de Vista Alegre (RS e SC, sul do Brasil, exibe uma composição basáltica homogênea próxima a 50% de SiO2. Os cinco derrames basais são classificados quimicamente como tipo Pitanga (alto Ti/Y ~600 e TiO2 > 3 em peso percentual, os demais oito derrames possuem médio Ti/Y ~400 com TiO2 ~2.5 em peso percentual, sendo classificados como magma tipo Paranapanema. Cada derrame pode ser identificado através de sua composição química e correlacionado, com variação paralela entre os perfis estudados. A correlação derrame a derrame nos quatro perfis demonstra uma posição horizontal em três perfis e um rejeito vertical de aproximadamente 200 m do bloco Itapiranga em relação ao bloco Frederico Westphalen. A presença de jazidas de ametista em geodos e a sistemática ocorrência de cobre nativo nos basaltos da região tornam a correlação de grande significado geológico e econômico.

  1. Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: clinical, parasitological, therapeutical and epidemiological findings (1977-1983

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro C. A. Marzochi

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available Forty dogs from the periphery of the city of Rio de Janeiro were studied. All dogs where diagnosed as positive for leishmaniasis either parasitologically and/or serologically. Among them, 19 came from areas where only Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL occurs (Realengo, Bangu, Senador Camará. Clinical signs of the disease were seen in 36.8% of the cases, including emaciation - 100%, lymphadenopathy and depilation - 85.7%. The other 21 dogs came from an area (Campo Grande where both diseases (VL, and American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis - ACL occur. Clinical signs of the disease, mainly cutaneous or mucocutaneous ulcers were seen in 76.2% of the cases. Leishmania parasites were found in 39 cases: 22% in viscera, 42.5% in viscera and normal skin and 35% in cutaneous or mucocutaneous ulcers. All the Leishmania stocks isolated from dogs which came from Realengo, Bangu, Senador Camará (VL area, and from Campo Grande (VL + ACL area were characterized as L. donovani (except in one case according to their schizodeme, zymodeme and serodeme. The only stock characterized as L. b. braziliensis, was isolated from the lymph node of a dog from Campo Grande with visceral disease and without skin lesions. Antimony therapy attempted in eight Leishmania donovani positive dogs was unsuccessful.Durante inquéritos caninos realizados na periferia da cidade do Rio de Janeiro, foram estudados clínica e laboratorialmente 40 cães. Todos apresentavam diagnóstico parasitológico e/ou sorológico de leishmaniose. Dentre esses, 19 procediam de áreas de ocorrência de leishmaniose visceral (LV - Realengo, Bangu e Senador Camará. Sinais clínicos sugestivos da infecção foram observados em 36,8% deles (incluindo emagrecimento - 100%, linfadenopatia e depilação - 85,7%. Outros 21 cães procediam da área de Campo Grande onde tanto a LV como a leishmaniose tegumentar americana (LTA ocorrem. Sinais clínicos da infecção por Leishmania, principalmente ulcerações cutâneas e mucocutâneas, foram observadas em 76,2% deles. Em 39 cães foram encontrados leishmanias: 22% em vísceras, 42,5% em vísceras e pele normal e 35% um ulcerações cutâneas ou mucocutâneas. Todos os estoques de Leishmania isolados de cães provenientes das áreas de LV e da área de LV + LTA foram caracterizados como L. donovani (exceto em um caso conforme seus esquisodemas, zimodemas e serodemas. O único estoque caracterizado como L. braziliensis brazilienzis foi isolado de linfonodo de um cão de Campo Grande, com leishmaniose visceral e sem alterações cutâneas. A tentativa de tratamento pelo antimonial em oito cães positivos para Leishmania donovani não reverteu o curso da doença e um deles apresentou intenso agravamento, morrendo em curto período.

  2. 76 FR 65579 - Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Test Rule and Significant New Use Rule; Fourth Group of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... bioconcentration factor (BCF) of about 1,000 (Refs. 17, 29, and 30). A chemical substance with a fish BCF value of... are required to show photographic identification, pass through a metal detector, and sign the EPA... there were no other factors that removed the chemical substances from the scope of the HPV Challenge....

  3. Electron microprobe chemical ages of monazite from Qinling Group in the Qinling Orogen:Evidence for Late Pan-African metamorphism?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; CHEN Nengsong; WANG Qinyan; SUN Min; WANG Xinyu; LI Xiaoyan; SHU Guiming

    2006-01-01

    Electron microprobe chemical dating was carried out on monazites enclosed in two generations of mineral paragenesis of St + Ky + Grt and Sil + And + Grt + St, respectively, from the Qinling Group. Two different ages, 520±23 Ma and 435±9 Ma,were obtained from these monazites. This indicates that the Qinling Group experienced a metamorphism during the Early Cambrian, which is probably in response to the Late Pan-African subduction-accretion tectonothermal event.

  4. Group Delphi Workshop on In Silico Methods : successful communication of scientific content on the example of testing chemical substances

    OpenAIRE

    Benighaus, Christina; Renn, Ortwin; Benighaus, Ludger; Hinderer, Nele; Alle, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    The REACH Regulation (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) contains the commitment to minimize the amount of animal testing necessary to achieve its aims. To do this, industry is providing justifications to waive animal tests in preference for in vitro or in silico methods. In silico methods rely on computer simulation or modeling and use results from existing tests to model the ways in which a chemical may be hazardous in the body and/or in the environment. T...

  5. Chemical constraints governing the origin of metabolism: the thermodynamic landscape of carbon group transformations under mild aqueous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    The thermodynamics of organic chemistry under mild aqueous conditions was examined in order to begin to understand its influence on the structure and operation of metabolism and its antecedents. Free energies (deltaG) were estimated for four types of reactions of biochemical importance carbon-carbon bond cleavage and synthesis, hydrogen transfer between carbon groups, dehydration of alcohol groups, and aldo-keto isomerization. The energies were calculated for mainly aliphatic groups composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The energy values showed (1) that generally when carbon-carbon bond cleavage involves groups from different functional group classes (i.e., carboxylic acids, carbonyl groups, alcohols, and hydrocarbons), the transfer of the shared electron-pair to the more reduced carbon group is energetically favored over transfer to the more oxidized carbon group, and (2) that the energy of carbon-carbon bond transformation is primarily determined by the functional group class of the group that changes oxidation state in the reaction (i.e., the functional group class of the group that donates the shared electron-pair during cleavage, or that accepts the incipient shared electron-pair during synthesis). In contrast, the energy of hydrogen transfer between carbon groups is determined by the functional group class of both the hydrogen-donor group and the hydrogen-acceptor group. From these and other observations we concluded that the chemistry involved in the origin of metabolism (and to a lesser degree modern metabolism) was strongly constrained by (1) the limited redox-based transformation energy of organic substrates that is readily dissipated in a few energetically favorable irreversible reactions; (2) the energy dominance of a few transformation half-reactions that determines whether carbon-carbon bond transformation (cleavage or synthesis) is energetically favorable (deltaG +3.5 kcal/mol); and (3) the dependence of carbon group transformation energy on the

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 305 (FGE.305): L - Methionylglycine of chemical group 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Lund, Pia; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that for the flavouring substance, evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. The present evaluation of the candidate substance L-methionylglycine [FL-no: 17.037] is only applicable for its......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate one flavouring substance, the dipeptide L-methionylglycine [FL-no: 17.037], in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 305, using the Procedure in Commission...... use in foods that are not heated or intended to be heated. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the material of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the material of commerce have...

  7. Revising Space Groups from Simulated SHELX·fcf Structure Factors. More Examples of Incorrect Space Groups, an Example of a Chemically-Incorrect Structure and the Special Case of P1 to P(-1) Revisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍锡荣; 谢兆雄

    2003-01-01

    The structure factors of any crystal structure can be simulated from its atomic coordinates (and temperature factors) in a SHELXL-97 run on a dummy hkl in which only the scale factor is refined. The squares of the structure factors are retrieved from the fcf, and such simulated data are used in the revision of the space groups of several incorrectly-refined crystal structures. Two cases, a P1 to P revision and a chemically-incorrect structure that is refined in a correct space group, are discussed.

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2): Primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, acid, and esters from chemical group 7

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular, the Panel was requested to evaluate nine flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2), using the Procedure as referred to in the ...

  9. High incidence of ultraviolet-B- or chemical-carcinogen-induced skin tumours in mice lacking the xeroderma pigmentosum group A gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a high frequency of skin cancer on sun-exposed areas, and neurological complications. XP has a defect in the early step(s) of nucleotide-excision repair (NER) and consists of eight different genetic complementation groups (groups A-G and a variant)1. We established XPA (group-A XP) gene-deficient mice by gene targeting of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The XPA-deficient mice showed neither obvious physical abnormalities more pathological alterations, but were defective in NER and highly susceptible to ultraviolet-B- or 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene-induced skin carcinogenesis. These findings provide in vivo evidence that the XPA protein protects mice from carcinogenesis initiated by ultraviolet or chemical carcinogen. The XPA-deficient mice may provide a good in vivo model to study the high incidence of carcinogenesis in group A XP patients. (Author)

  10. Repositioning of european chemicals groups and changes in innovation management : the case of the french chimical industry

    OpenAIRE

    Charue-Duboc, Florence

    2007-01-01

    Germany, Great Britain, and Switzerland are usually considered to be the dominant powers in the European chemical industry, since they are associated with companies of international stature such as Bayer, BASF, ICI, Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz. Founded decades ago, these firms have marked the sector dynamics with their strategies regarding academic relations, the importance of patents, diversification within a multidivisional structure, and internationalization. At first sight, France would seem to...

  11. Chemical and immunological comparison of surface fibrils of strains representing six taxonomic groups of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii.

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, N.; Ellen, R P; Fillery, E D; Grove, D A

    1983-01-01

    Human isolates of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii have been divided into six clusters in a numerical taxonomy study. Surface fibrils of strains representing these clusters were isolated and purified. Chemical analyses revealed that the major component of all fibrils was protein and that although differences in percentages of specific amino acid residues were found, the relative proportions of basic, acidic, polar uncharged, and nonpolar amino acids were rather similar among cl...

  12. Products of different chemical groups to control maize white spot
    Produtos de diferentes grupos químicos no controle da mancha branca do milho

    OpenAIRE

    Eliseu dos Santos Pedro; Ricardo Marcelo Gonçalves; Walter Fernandes Meirelles; Luzia Doretto Paccola-Meirelles

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of different products used to control maize white spot, a leaf disease caused by the bacterium Pantoea ananatis. Six products from different chemical groups were used for this experiment, and they were tested on the susceptible hybrid HS200. Parameters, such as severity (%), area under disease progress curve (AUDPC), and productivity, have been estimated. The treatment with oxytetracyline resulted higher grain productivity for maize. Natural products, s...

  13. Ultrafast internal rotational dynamics of the azido group in (4S)-azidoproline: Chemical exchange 2DIR spectroscopic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Internal rotational dynamics of the azido group in SA (Ac-(4S)-Azp-NHMe) was studied in real time by using ultrafast 2DIR spectroscopic method. The time constant of the internal rotation around the Cγ–Nδ bond in SA was determined to be τir = 5.1 ps, which is found to be much faster than that around the C–C bond in ethane. Highlights: ► Femtosecond two-dimensional IR spectroscopy of internal rotational dynamics. ► Stereo-electronic effects of azido group in azido-derivatized proline peptide. ► The timescale of the azido group internal rotation is about 5.1 ps. - Abstract: The azido group in 4-azidoproline (Azp) derivative, SA (Ac-(4S)-Azp-NHMe), can form an intramolecular electrostatic interaction with the backbone peptide in the s-trans and Cγ-endo conformations of SA. As a result, the azido group exists as two forms, bound and free, which are defined by the presence and absence of such interaction, respectively. The bound and free azido forms are spectrally resolved in the azido IR spectrum of SA in CHCl3. Using the two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) and polarization-controlled IR pump–probe methods, we investigated the internal rotational and orientational relaxation dynamics of the azido group and determined the internal rotational time constant of the azido group to be 5.1 ps. The internal rotational motion is found to be responsible for the early part of the orientational relaxation of the azido group in SA. Thus, the femtosecond 2DIR spectroscopy is shown to be an ideal tool for studying ultrafast conformational dynamics of SA.

  14. Kinetic modelling of hydro-treatment reactions by study of different chemical groups; Modelisation cinetique des reactions d`hydrotraitement par regroupement en familles chimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnardot, J.

    1998-11-19

    Hydro-treatment of petroleum shortcuts permits elimination of unwanted components in order to increase combustion in engine and to decrease atmospheric pollution. Hydro-desulfurization (HDS), Hydro-denitrogenation (HDN) and Hydrogenation of aromatics (HDA) of a LCO (Light Cycle Oil)-Type gas oil have been studied using a new pilot at a fixed temperature with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. A hydrodynamic study showed that reactions occurring in the up-flow fixed bed reactor that has been used during the experiments, were governed exclusively by chemical reaction rates and not by diffusion. Through detailed chemical analysis, height chemical groups have been considered: three aromatics groups, one sulfided group, one nitrogenized and NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}. Two Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type kinetic models with either one or two types of sites have been established. The model with two types of site - one site of hydrogenation and one site of hydrogenolysis - showed a better fit in the modeling of the experimental results. This model enables to forecast the influence of partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and partial pressure of H{sub 2} on hydro-treatment reactions of a LCO-type gas oil. (author) 119 refs.

  15. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 2 (FGE.11Rev2): Aliphatic dialcohols, diketones, and hydroxyketones from chemical groups 8 and 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    substances in the present group have been reported to occur naturally in a wide range of food items. In its evaluation, the Panel as a default used the “Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake” (MSDI) approach to estimate the per capita intakes of the flavouring substances in Europe. However, when the Panel......, the Panel was requested to evaluate 12 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 2 (FGE.11Rev2), using the Procedure as referred to in the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. These 12 flavouring substances belong to chemical group 10, Annex I of the Commission...... required. For the remaining candidate substances, genotoxicity data are only available for a limited number of substances, and the genotoxicity could not be assessed adequately. However, the genotoxicity data available on these remaining 11 candidate substances do not preclude evaluation using the...

  16. Predicting the physical–chemical properties of biodiesel fuels assessing the molecular structure with the SAFT−γ group contribution approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of biodiesel as fuel are strongly defined by the molecular structure of its constituent species (saturated, unsaturated and hydroxylated fatty acid alkyl esters). Improving fuel properties and energetic patterns in biodiesel implies optimising its fatty ester structures and compositions. Biodiesel fuels derived from different sources can have significantly varying fatty acid profiles and properties, which claims for the theoretical prediction of the thermophysical and phase equilibria properties of biodiesel compounds and its mixtures. In this work the SAFT-γ (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory by group contribution) is applied for predicting these properties in biodiesel fuels by adequately representing the physical behaviour and stereochemistry of biodiesel molecules. A realistic representation of the molecular structure of long chain methyl esters and esters that contains hydroxyl groups, which are the typical biodiesel fuel constituents, is obtained. We implemented a simplex simulated annealing algorithm as global optimisation method to determine the SAFT-γ parameters for the groups that fully represent the biodiesel compounds, which were fitting to experimental data available for analogous chemical families like secondary alkanols and short chain esters. These parameters are theoretically justifiable following physically meaningful trends and can be generalised to others fatty acid methyl esters in the same homologous series. The group of like and unlike parameters obtained were used to represent the thermophysical properties of several commercial biodiesel fuels. The theory provides a very good description of the liquid vapour equilibria behaviour of the chemical families used to estimate the set of parameters. With the proposed model, any potential biodiesel fuel from any feedstock can be represented and modelled. - Highlights: • Biodiesel fuels are modelled using the molecular thermodynamic based group con-tribution approach SAFT-γ.

  17. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Occupational Exposure to Agricultural Pesticide Chemical Groups and Active Ingredients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Schinasi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes results from a systematic review and a series of meta-analyses of nearly three decades worth of epidemiologic research on the relationship between non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL and occupational exposure to agricultural pesticide active ingredients and chemical groups. Estimates of associations of NHL with 21 pesticide chemical groups and 80 active ingredients were extracted from 44 papers, all of which reported results from analyses of studies conducted in high-income countries. Random effects meta-analyses showed that phenoxy herbicides, carbamate insecticides, organophosphorus insecticides and the active ingredient lindane, an organochlorine insecticide, were positively associated with NHL. In a handful of papers, associations between pesticides and NHL subtypes were reported; B cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicides and the organophosphorus herbicide glyphosate. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicide exposure. Despite compelling evidence that NHL is associated with certain chemicals, this review indicates the need for investigations of a larger variety of pesticides in more geographic areas, especially in low- and middle-income countries, which, despite producing a large portion of the world’s agriculture, were missing in the literature that were reviewed.

  18. HM{sup +}–RG complexes (M = group 2 metal; RG = rare gas): Physical vs. chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Joe P.; Dodson, Hannah; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Breckenridge, W. H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Previous work on the HM{sup +}–He complexes (M = Be–Ra) has been extended to the cases of the heavier rare gas atoms, HM{sup +}–RG (RG = Ne–Rn). Optimized geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been calculated using MP2 theory and quadruple-ζ quality basis sets. Dissociation energies for the loss of the rare gas atom have been calculated at these optimized geometries using coupled cluster with single and double excitations and perturbative triples, CCSD(T)theory, extrapolating interaction energies to the basis set limit. Comparisons are made between the present data and the previously obtained helium results, as well as to those of the bare HM{sup +} molecules; furthermore, comparisons are made to the related M{sup +}–RG and M{sup 2+}–RG complexes. Partial atomic charge analyses have also been undertaken, and these used to test a simple charge-induced dipole model. Molecular orbital diagrams are presented together with contour plots of the natural orbitals from the quadratic configuration with single and double excitations (QCISD) density. The conclusion is that the majority of these complexes are physically bound, with very little sharing of electron density; however, for M = Be, and to a lesser extent M = Mg, some evidence for chemical effects is seen in HM{sup +}–RG complexes involving RG atoms with the higher atomic numbers.

  19. Estimation of environment-related properties of chemicals for design of sustainable processes: development of group-contribution+ (GC+) property models and uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukkerikar, Amol Shivajirao; Kalakul, Sawitree; Sarup, Bent; Young, Douglas M; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-11-26

    The aim of this work is to develop group-contribution(+) (GC(+)) method (combined group-contribution (GC) method and atom connectivity index (CI) method) based property models to provide reliable estimations of environment-related properties of organic chemicals together with uncertainties of estimated property values. For this purpose, a systematic methodology for property modeling and uncertainty analysis is used. The methodology includes a parameter estimation step to determine parameters of property models and an uncertainty analysis step to establish statistical information about the quality of parameter estimation, such as the parameter covariance, the standard errors in predicted properties, and the confidence intervals. For parameter estimation, large data sets of experimentally measured property values of a wide range of chemicals (hydrocarbons, oxygenated chemicals, nitrogenated chemicals, poly functional chemicals, etc.) taken from the database of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and from the database of USEtox is used. For property modeling and uncertainty analysis, the Marrero and Gani GC method and atom connectivity index method have been considered. In total, 22 environment-related properties, which include the fathead minnow 96-h LC(50), Daphnia magna 48-h LC(50), oral rat LD(50), aqueous solubility, bioconcentration factor, permissible exposure limit (OSHA-TWA), photochemical oxidation potential, global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, acidification potential, emission to urban air (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental rural air (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental fresh water (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental seawater (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), emission to continental natural soil (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic), and emission to continental agricultural soil (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) have been modeled and analyzed. The application

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of the use of amino acids (chemical group 34) when used as flavourings for all animal species

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2014-01-01

    Chemical group (CG) 34 comprises amino acids, of which 20 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of D,L-valine because of the lack of data on its purity. The Panel cannot conclude on the use of these compounds in water for drinking. In the absence of any information on the microbial strains or substrates used for the production of the additives, and with little information on the manufacturing process, the Panel cannot ascert...

  1. COMPARISON OF DAILY MILK YIELD AND ITS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION BETWEEN COWS FROM SELECTED GENETIC GROUPS OF BETA-LACTOGLOBULIN AND KAPPACASEIN GENES

    OpenAIRE

    Beata SITKOWSKA; BOGNA KOWALISZYN; SŁAWOMIR MROCZKOWSKI

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the research was to analyse the influence of selected genetic groups on the daily milk yield and its chemical composition in black and white Holstein-Friesian cows. The genotyping of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genes was conducted by means of the PCR-RFLP technique. The collected numeric data were analysed statistically with the covariance analysis. The joint effects of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genotypes were estimated. The greatest amount of milk was obtai...

  2. COMPARISON OF DAILY MILK YIELD AND ITS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION BETWEEN COWS FROM SELECTED GENETIC GROUPS OF BETA-LACTOGLOBULIN AND KAPPACASEIN GENES

    OpenAIRE

    Beata SITKOWSKA; KOWALISZYN, BOGNA; MROCZKOWSKI, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the research was to analyse the influence of selected genetic groups on the daily milk yield and its chemical composition in black and white Holstein-Friesian cows. The genotyping of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genes was conducted by means of the PCR-RFLP technique. The collected numeric data were analysed statistically with the covariance analysis. The joint effects of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genotypes were estimated. The greatest amount of milk was obtai...

  3. Brominated flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals, two groups of persistent contaminants in Belgian human blood and milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosens, Laurence [Toxicological Centre, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); D' Hollander, Wendy; Bervoets, Lieven [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Reynders, Hans; Van Campenhout, Karen [Environment and Health Unit, Department of Environment, Nature and Energy, Flemish Government - Koning Albert II-laan 20, Bus 8, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Cornelis, Christa; Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Koppen, Gudrun [Unit Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute of Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.covaci@ua.ac.b [Toxicological Centre, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    We assessed the exposure of the Flemish population to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) by analysis of pooled cord blood, adolescent and adult serum, and human milk. Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in blood (range 1.6-6.5 ng/g lipid weight, lw) and milk (range 2.0-6.4 ng/g lw) agreed with European data. Hexabromocyclododecane ranged between <2.1-5.7 ng/g lw in milk. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) dominated in blood and ranged between 1 and 171 ng/mL and <0.9-9.5 ng/mL, respectively. Total PFC levels in milk ranged between <0.5-29 ng/mL. A significant increase in PBDE concentrations was detected from newborns (median 2.1) to the adolescents and adults (medians 3.8 and 4.6 ng/g lw, respectively). An identical trend was observed for PFOS, but not for PFOA. We estimated that newborn exposure to BFRs and PFCs occurs predominantly post-natally, whereas placental transfer has a minor impact on the body burden. - The exposure to BFRs and PFCs of general Flemish population has been assessed throughout several age groups.

  4. Brominated flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals, two groups of persistent contaminants in Belgian human blood and milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed the exposure of the Flemish population to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) by analysis of pooled cord blood, adolescent and adult serum, and human milk. Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in blood (range 1.6-6.5 ng/g lipid weight, lw) and milk (range 2.0-6.4 ng/g lw) agreed with European data. Hexabromocyclododecane ranged between <2.1-5.7 ng/g lw in milk. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) dominated in blood and ranged between 1 and 171 ng/mL and <0.9-9.5 ng/mL, respectively. Total PFC levels in milk ranged between <0.5-29 ng/mL. A significant increase in PBDE concentrations was detected from newborns (median 2.1) to the adolescents and adults (medians 3.8 and 4.6 ng/g lw, respectively). An identical trend was observed for PFOS, but not for PFOA. We estimated that newborn exposure to BFRs and PFCs occurs predominantly post-natally, whereas placental transfer has a minor impact on the body burden. - The exposure to BFRs and PFCs of general Flemish population has been assessed throughout several age groups.

  5. Nondestructive mapping of chemical composition and structural qualities of group III-nitride nanowires using submicron beam synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonanno, P.L., E-mail: plb2@njit.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Gautier, S. [LMOPS + UMI: Laboratoire Matériaux Optiques, Photonique et micro-nano Systèmes, UMR CNRS 7132, Université de Metz et SUPELEC, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz, France, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Gmili, Y.El.; Moudakir, T. [UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Sirenko, A.A. [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Kazimirov, A. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cai, Z.-H. [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Martin, J. [LMOPS + UMI: Laboratoire Matériaux Optiques, Photonique et micro-nano Systèmes, UMR CNRS 7132, Université de Metz et SUPELEC, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz, France, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Goh, W.H. [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Martinez, A.; Ramdane, A.; Le Gratiet, L. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, UPR CNRS 20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Maloufi, N. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Application aux Matériaux UMR CNRS 7078 Ile du Saulcy 57045 METZ cedex 1 (France); Assouar, M.B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionisés et Applications, Nancy University, CNRS, BP 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cédex (France); Ougazzaden, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France)

    2013-08-31

    Submicron beam synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques have been developed and used to accurately and nondestructively map chemical composition and material quality of selectively grown group III-nitride nanowires. GaN, AlGaN, and InGaN multi-quantum-well nanowires have been selectively grown on lattice matched and mismatched substrates, and the challenges associated with obtaining and interpreting submicron beam XRD results are addressed and solved. Nanoscale cathodoluminescence is used to examine exciton behavior, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is used to verify chemical composition. Scanning transmission electron microscopy is later used to paint a more complete picture. The advantages of submicron beam XRD over other techniques are discussed in the context of this challenging material system. - Highlights: ► We used nano selective area growth to create nanowires of GaN, AlGaN and InGaN/GaN. ► We characterized them by synchrotron-based submicron beam X-ray diffraction (XRD). ► This technique accurately determined chemical and crystallographic properties. ► Challenges of XRD are addressed in the context of this challenging material system. ► Advantages of XRD over other characterization methods are discussed.

  6. Chemical zoning and colour changes in the phases of the sodalite group from the Mt. Vulture haüynophyre lava (Potenza-italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Muro, A.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Principe, C.

    2003-04-01

    The haüynophyre is a sulfur-rich differentiated lava flow erupted from a parasitic vent of the Vulture volcano (Potenza-Italy). This porphyritic lithotype (43 vol%) is characterised by a very high content (20-30 vol%) of feldspathoids belonging to the sodalite group. Chemical and structural analysis of the sodalite-group minerals has led to the identification of i) a colourless to white nosean, ii) a blue to light-blue haüyne, and iii) a black to grey haüyne. Numerous phenocrysts present a resorbed core and/or a pronounced concentric division into zones with a complex colour sequence. The X-ray diffraction study (XRPD through Gandolfi technique and single crystal structure refinements) has confirmed the occurrence of nosean and has allowed to discard the presence of lazurite. All the analysed crystals, those chromatically homogeneous as well as the zoned ones, have marked core-rim chemical variations. Nosean crystals contain small pyrite inclusions and are characterised by an evolution from a Ca-K poor core to Ca-K rich rim. K_2O content increases towards the rim in blue haüyne, while Na_2O/CaO ratio remains almost constant. Black haüyne has chemical characteristics intermediate between the nosean and the blue haüyne-end members and has the highest S/Cl ratio in the core. Black and blue haüyne have similar patterns of depletion in REE and most other highly lithophile elements relative to the bulk rock. Positive anomaly for the Eu content and spinel composition are indicative of high fO_2 conditions in the magmas in which both haüyne varieties formed. Higher contents of compatible (Sr, Ba) and semicompatible (Ta) elements characterise the black phase. A high Fe content in the black variety could be at least in part responsible for the chromatic difference. Limited contamination by sedimentary evaporites and probably mixing between a sulfur-rich black haüyne-bearing magma and a more cooled magma having stable blue haüyne and nosean is proposed to explain

  7. Molecular and ionic-scale chemical mechanisms behind the role of nitrocyl group in the electrochemical removal of heavy metals from sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, S W; Ahmed, I; Housani, A A; Giwa, A

    2016-01-01

    The chemical basis for improved removal rates of toxic heavy metals such as Zn and Cu from wastewater secondary sludge has been demonstrated in this study. Instead of using excess corrosive chemicals as the source of free nitrous acid (FNA) for improved solubility of heavy metals in the sludge (in order to enhance electrokinetics), an optimized use of aqua regia has been proposed as an alternative. Fragments of nitrocyl group originated from aqua regia are responsible for the disruption of biogenic mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) and this disruption resulted in enhanced removal of exposed and oxidized metal ions. A diversity of nitric oxide (NO), peroxy nitrous acid, and peroxy nitroso group are expected to be introduced in the mixed liquor by the aqua regia for enhanced electrochemical treatment. The effects of pectin as a post treatment on the Zn removal from sludge were also presented for the first time. Results revealed 63.6% Cu and 93.7% Zn removal efficiencies, as compared to 49% Cu and 74% Zn removal efficiencies reported in a recent study. Also, 93.3% reduction of time-to-filter (TTF), and 95 mL/g of sludge volume index (SVI) were reported. The total operating cost obtained was USD 1.972/wet ton. PMID:27550724

  8. Effect of Group-III precursors on unintentional gallium incorporation during epitaxial growth of InAlN layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unintentional incorporation of gallium (Ga) in InAlN layers grown with different molar flow rates of Group-III precursors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally investigated. The Ga mole fraction in the InAl(Ga)N layer was increased significantly with the trimethylindium (TMIn) flow rate, while the trimethylaluminum flow rate controls the Al mole fraction. The evaporation of metallic Ga from the liquid phase eutectic system between the pyrolized In from injected TMIn and pre-deposited metallic Ga was responsible for the Ga auto-incorporation into the InAl(Ga)N layer. The theoretical calculation on the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid phase Ga and the effective partial pressure of Group-III precursors based on growth parameters used in this study confirms the influence of Group-III precursors on Ga auto-incorporation. More Ga atoms can be evaporated from the liquid phase Ga on the surrounding surfaces in the growth chamber and then significant Ga auto-incorporation can occur due to the high equilibrium vapor pressure of Ga comparable to effective partial pressure of input Group-III precursors during the growth of InAl(Ga)N layer

  9. Effect of Group-III precursors on unintentional gallium incorporation during epitaxial growth of InAlN layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeomoh, E-mail: jkim610@gatech.edu; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Dupuis, Russell D. [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Unintentional incorporation of gallium (Ga) in InAlN layers grown with different molar flow rates of Group-III precursors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally investigated. The Ga mole fraction in the InAl(Ga)N layer was increased significantly with the trimethylindium (TMIn) flow rate, while the trimethylaluminum flow rate controls the Al mole fraction. The evaporation of metallic Ga from the liquid phase eutectic system between the pyrolized In from injected TMIn and pre-deposited metallic Ga was responsible for the Ga auto-incorporation into the InAl(Ga)N layer. The theoretical calculation on the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid phase Ga and the effective partial pressure of Group-III precursors based on growth parameters used in this study confirms the influence of Group-III precursors on Ga auto-incorporation. More Ga atoms can be evaporated from the liquid phase Ga on the surrounding surfaces in the growth chamber and then significant Ga auto-incorporation can occur due to the high equilibrium vapor pressure of Ga comparable to effective partial pressure of input Group-III precursors during the growth of InAl(Ga)N layer.

  10. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  11. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Flavouring Group Evaluation 46, Revision 1 (FGE.46Rev1): Ammonia and three ammonium salts from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present Flavouring Group Evaluation deals with ammonia [FL-no: 16.009], and three ammonia salts (diammonium sulphide [FL-no: 16.002], ammonium chloride [FL-no: 16.048] and ammonium hydrogen sulphide [FL-no: 16.059]). The flavouring substances cannot exist as geometrical or...... a wide range of food items up to very high amounts. Hydrogen sulphide is also reported to occur naturally in a wide range of food items. In its evaluation, the Panel as a default used the “Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake” (MSDI) approach to estimate the per capita intakes of the flavouring...

  12. COMPARISON OF DAILY MILK YIELD AND ITS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION BETWEEN COWS FROM SELECTED GENETIC GROUPS OF BETA-LACTOGLOBULIN AND KAPPACASEIN GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata SITKOWSKA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to analyse the influence of selected genetic groups on the daily milk yield and its chemical composition in black and white Holstein-Friesian cows. The genotyping of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genes was conducted by means of the PCR-RFLP technique. The collected numeric data were analysed statistically with the covariance analysis. The joint effects of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genotypes were estimated. The greatest amount of milk was obtained from the genotype combination AAAB, whereas the milk of the genotype combination AABB was characterized with the greatest fat content. The smallest number of samples was collected from cows with genes that are preferred in terms of technological processing, combination BBBB. During test milking, the BBBB genotype combination was characterised by high milk yield and protein content, but also the highest content of somatic cells in milk samples under analysis.

  13. From solution to in-cell study of the chemical reactivity of acid sensitive functional groups: a rational approach towards improved cleavable linkers for biospecific endosomal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Sylvain A; Leriche, Geoffray; Mosser, Michel; Nothisen, Marc; Muller, Christian D; Remy, Jean-Serge; Wagner, Alain

    2016-06-01

    pH-Sensitive linkers designed to undergo selective hydrolysis at acidic pH compared to physiological pH can be used for the selective release of therapeutics at their site of action. In this paper, the hydrolytic cleavage of a wide variety of molecular structures that have been reported for their use in pH-sensitive delivery systems was examined. A wide variety of hydrolytic stability profiles were found among the panel of tested chemical functionalities. Even within a structural family, a slight modification of the substitution pattern has an unsuspected outcome on the hydrolysis stability. This work led us to establish a first classification of these groups based on their reactivities at pH 5.5 and their relative hydrolysis at pH 5.5 vs. pH 7.4. From this classification, four representative chemical functions were selected and studied in-vitro. The results revealed that only the most reactive functions underwent significant lysosomal cleavage, according to flow cytometry measurements. These last results question the acid-based mechanism of action of known drug release systems and advocate for the importance of an in-depth structure-reactivity study, using a tailored methodology, for the rational design and development of bio-responsive linkers. PMID:27169758

  14. Comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity index analysis studies on 1H NMR chemical shift of NH group of diaryl triazene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofouie, M K; Salahinejad, M; Ghasemi, J B; Aghaei, A

    2013-05-01

    Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular field analysis region focusing (CoMFA-RF) for optimizing the region for the final partial least square analysis, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods were employed to develop three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models of (1)H NMR chemical shift of NH proton of diaryl triazene derivatives. The best orientation was searched by all-orientation search (AOS) strategy to minimize the effect of the initial orientation of the structures. The predictive abilities of CoMFA-RF and CoMSIA models were determined using a test set of ten compounds affording predictive correlation coefficients of 0.721 and 0.754, respectively, indicating good predictive power. For further model validation, cross validation (leave one out), progressive scrambling, and bootstrapping were also applied. The accuracy and speed of obtained 3D-QSAR models for the prediction of (1)H NMR chemical shifts of NH group of diaryl triazene derivatives were greater compared to some computational well-known procedures. PMID:23456682

  15. Photo and Chemical Reduction of Copper onto Anatase-Type TiO2 Nanoparticles with Enhanced Surface Hydroxyl Groups as Efficient Visible Light Photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarloo, Hamed; Badiei, Alireza; Behnajady, Mohammad A; Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the photocatalytic efficiency of anatase-type TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized using the sol-gel low-temperature method, were enhanced by a combined process of copper reduction and surface hydroxyl groups enhancement. UV-light-assisted photo and NaBH4 -assisted chemical reduction methods were used for deposition of copper onto TiO2. The surface hydroxyl groups of TiO2 were enhanced with the assistance of NaOH modification. The prepared catalysts were immobilized on glass plates and used as the fixed-bed systems for the removal of phenazopyridine as a model drug contaminant under visible light irradiation. NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated higher photocatalytic efficiency than that of pure TiO2 due to the extending of the charge carriers lifetime and enhancement of the adsorption capacity of TiO2 toward phenazopyridine. The relationship of structure and performance of prepared nanoparticles has been established by using various techniques, such as XRD, XPS, TEM, EDX, XRF, TGA, DRS and PL. The effects of preparation variables, including copper content, reducing agents rate (NaBH4 concentration and UV light intensity) and NaOH concentration were investigated on the photocatalytic efficiency of NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:25809844

  16. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of the use of amino acids (chemical group 34 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group (CG 34 comprises amino acids, of which 20 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of D,L-valine because of the lack of data on its purity. The Panel cannot conclude on the use of these compounds in water for drinking. In the absence of any information on the microbial strains or substrates used for the production of the additives, and with little information on the manufacturing process, the Panel cannot ascertain whether the manufacturing process introduces any safety concerns. The conclusions on target animals and consumer safety apply only to the compounds per se, and can be extrapolated only to feed additives containing these compounds when obtained by chemical synthesis or protein hydrolysis and to those produced by fermentation which have already undergone a strain-specific safety assessment by EFSA. The 19 compounds under assessment in CG 34 are safe at the proposed use level of 25 mg/kg feed for all animal species. The FEEDAP Panel considers the use of glycine at 20 g/kg in food for cats and dogs as safe. The safety of the proposed use of beta-alanine in pet food at 20 g/kg was not substantiated. Use of these compounds does not give rise to concern for consumer safety. The Panel considers it prudent to treat all 19 compounds as irritant to skin and eyes, skin sensitisers and hazardous by inhalation. They do not give rise to any concern for the safety of the environment. No further demonstration of their efficacy is necessary when used at concentrations up to 25 mg/kg complete feed. There is some evidence that high concentrations (20 g/kg in cat and dog food of glycine may influence the food preference of cats and dogs. Comparable evidence for beta-alanine is not available.

  17. Lie group analysis for the effects of temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and chemical reaction on MHD free convective heat and mass transfer with variable stream conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, Ramasamy, E-mail: future990@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Arts and Heritage, University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Ismoen, Muhaimin; Saim, Hashim Bin [Faculty of Science, Arts and Heritage, University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-01-15

    This paper concerns with a steady two-dimensional flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid over a vertical stretching surface. The flow is permeated by a uniform transverse magnetic field. The fluid viscosity is assumed to vary as a linear function of temperature. A scaling group of transformations is applied to the governing equations. The system remains invariant due to some relations among the parameters of the transformations. After finding three absolute invariants a third-order ordinary differential equation corresponding to the momentum equation and two second-order ordinary differential equation corresponding to energy and diffusion equations are derived. The equations along with the boundary conditions are solved numerically. It is found that the decrease in the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity makes the velocity to decrease with the increasing distance of the stretching sheet. At a particular point of the sheet the fluid velocity decreases with the decreasing viscosity but the temperature increases in this case. It is found that with the increase of magnetic field intensity the fluid velocity decreases but the temperature increases at a particular point of the heated stretching surface. Impact of chemical reaction in the presence of thermal radiation plays an important role on the concentration boundary layer. The results thus obtained are presented graphically and discussed.

  18. Products of different chemical groups to control maize white spotProdutos de diferentes grupos químicos no controle da mancha branca do milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseu dos Santos Pedro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of different products used to control maize white spot, a leaf disease caused by the bacterium Pantoea ananatis. Six products from different chemical groups were used for this experiment, and they were tested on the susceptible hybrid HS200. Parameters, such as severity (%, area under disease progress curve (AUDPC, and productivity, have been estimated. The treatment with oxytetracyline resulted higher grain productivity for maize. Natural products, such as Rocksil and Pyroligneous acid, even though they are used as supplement for plants, were not effective in controlling the maize white spot. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de diferentes produtos no controle da mancha branca do milho, doença foliar causada pela bactéria Pantoea ananatis. Para o experimento foram utilizados seis produtos pertencentes a diferentes grupos químicos, testados no híbrido suscetível HS200. Avaliaramse as variáveis severidade, área abaixo da curva de progresso da doença (AACPD e a produtividade de grãos. O tratamento com oxitetraciclina resultou maior produtividade de grãos da cultura do milho. Produtos naturais testados no experimento, como Rocksil e Ácido Pirolenhoso, utilizados como suplementos nutricionais para as plantas, não foram eficientes no controle da mancha branca do milho.

  19. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of aliphatic and aromatic mono- and di-thiols and mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups (chemical group 20 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 20 consists of aliphatic and aromatic mono- and di-thiols and mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups, of which 31 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of six compounds (methanethiol, methyl propyl disulphide, dipropyl trisulphide, 3-mercaptobutan-2-one, 3-(methylthiobutanal and 3-methyl-1,2,4-trithiane because of issues related to the purity of the compounds. The FEEDAP Panel concludes that the following 25 compounds are safe for the target species at the proposed maximum dose level (0.05 mg/kg complete feed: 3-(methylthiopropionaldehyde, methyl 3-(methylthiopropionate, allylthiol, dimethyl sulphide, dibutyl sulphide, diallyl disulphide, diallyl trisulphide, dimethyl trisulphide, dipropyl disulphide, allyl isothiocyanate, dimethyl disulphide, 2-methylbenzene-1-thiol, S-methyl butanethioate, allyl methyl disulphide, 3-(methylthiopropan-1-ol, 3-(methylthiohexan-1-ol, 1-propane-1-thiol, diallyl sulphide, 2,4-dithiapentane, 2-methyl-2-(methyldithiopropanal, 2-methylpropane-1-thiol, methylsulfinylmethane, propane-2-thiol, 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane and 2-methyl-4-propyl-1,3-oxathiane. No safety concern for the consumer would arise from the use of these 25 compounds of CG 20 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species, with the exception of allyl isothiocyanate. Although additional exposure to this substance through its low use level in animal feeds would not substantially increase consumer exposure, the FEEDAP Panel notes that the estimated exposure of consumers is already higher than the acceptable daily intake (ADI. All compounds should be considered irritant to skin, eyes and respiratory tract and as skin sensitisers. The proposed concentration of 0.05 mg flavour/kg feed is not expected to cause detrimental effects to the environment, except for 2-methylpropane-1-thiol, for which 0

  20. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity using the DEREK system for 30 chemicals currently being tested by the National Toxicology Program. The DEREK Collaborative Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Marchant, C A

    1996-01-01

    DEREK is a knowledge-based expert system for the qualitative prediction of toxicity. The DEREK system has been used to predict the carcinogenicity in rodents of the 30 chemicals in the second National Toxicology Program (NTP) carcinogenicity prediction exercise. Seven of the chemicals were predicted to be carcinogens. For 23 chemicals, there was no evidence in the DEREK knowledge base to suggest carcinogenic activity. Supplementary data from a variety of sources have been evaluated by human e...

  1. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of aliphatic and alicyclic ethers (chemical group 16 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 16 consists of aliphatic and alicyclic ethers, of which four are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of 1,5,5,9-tetramethyl-13-oxatricyclo[8.3.0.0.(4.9]tridecane and theaspirane because of issues related to the purity of the compounds. The FEEDAP Panel concludes that: i1,8-cineole is safe at the high use level proposed by the applicant (5 mg/kg complete feed for all animal species with a margin of safety of 5.6 to 28.2; ii2-(2-methylprop-1-enyl-4-methyltetrahydropyran (Class II is safe at a maximum of 0.3 mg/kg complete feed for cattle, salmonids and non food producing animals and of 0.5 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry. The absence of a margin of safety would not allow the simultaneous administration in feed and water for drinking of these substances. The total dose from all sources should not exceed that recommended when given in feed alone. No safety concern would arise for the consumer from the use of compounds belonging to CG 16 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. The FEEDAP Panel considers it prudent to treat both compounds under assessment as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract, and as skin sensitisers. The FEEDAP Panel considers that the concentrations of the compounds belonging to CG 16 in the environment are not expected to exceed levels of concern when used in animal feeds at the levels considered to be safe to the target species. Since these compounds are used in food as flavourings, and their function in feed is essentially the same as that in food, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  2. Medicodosimetric register of the Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises personnel as the basis for studying long-term effects of ionizing radiation at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the Seversk Biophysical Research Centre (SBRC) of the Russian Federal Medical and Biological Agency there has been created a Regional Medicodosimetric Register (RMDR) of the personnel of the Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGCE) to be the world biggest complex of atomic industry enterprises. The RMDR database accumulates information of personnel, medical and dosimetric character, as well as the data on occupational activity of the workers of the main SGCE productions, namely, reactor (RP), radiochemical (RC), and plutonium (PP) ones. Information on exogenous and endogenous risk factors (RF) for main diseases development (hereditary diseases, tobacco smoking, the level of psychoemotional overload etc.) is entered into the RMDR database. To evaluate the whole spectrum of stochastic effects of ionizing radiation (IR), both 'traditional' and hypothetic ones, within RMDR there have been created such thematic registers as the register of oncologic diseases; the register of congenital malformations and hereditary diseases; the register of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI); the register of the thyroid gland diseases; the register of osteoporosis. The RMDR database includes information on almost 65,600 SGCE employees to be divided into the following cohorts: RP workers exposed to external γ-radiation (8,102 persons); RC workers with both external and internal dose loads (6,136 persons); PP workers exposed to internal radiation from incorporated 239Pu (9,434 persons). At present the share of workers of the main SGCE productions with a determined life status makes up 80%. The overwhelming majority of workers were exposed to low-dose IR (87,9% of all SGCE personnel subjected to individual dosimetric monitoring have cumulative dose of external radiation in the range 0,03-200 mSv). The RMDR structure provides for the possibility to perform analysis on both the criterion of mortality and the one of morbidity. On the basis of RMDR a large-scale spectrum

  3. Usage of K-cluster and factor analysis for grouping and evaluation the quality of olive oil in accordance with physico-chemical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, M.; Nikolova, Kr.; Ivanova, Ir.; Dobreva, M.

    2015-11-01

    25 olive oils were studied- different in origin and ways of extraction, in accordance with 17 physico-chemical parameters as follows: color parameters - a and b, light, fluorescence peaks, pigments - chlorophyll and β-carotene, fatty-acid content. The goals of the current study were: Conducting correlation analysis to find the inner relation between the studied indices; By applying factor analysis with the help of the method of Principal Components (PCA), to reduce the great number of variables into a few factors, which are of main importance for distinguishing the different types of olive oil;Using K-means cluster to compare and group the tested types olive oils based on their similarity. The inner relation between the studied indices was found by applying correlation analysis. A factor analysis using PCA was applied on the basis of the found correlation matrix. Thus the number of the studied indices was reduced to 4 factors, which explained 79.3% from the entire variation. The first one unified the color parameters, β-carotene and the related with oxidative products fluorescence peak - about 520 nm. The second one was determined mainly by the chlorophyll content and related to it fluorescence peak - about 670 nm. The third and the fourth factors were determined by the fatty-acid content of the samples. The third one unified the fatty-acids, which give us the opportunity to distinguish olive oil from the other plant oils - oleic, linoleic and stearin acids. The fourth factor included fatty-acids with relatively much lower content in the studied samples. It is enquired the number of clusters to be determined preliminary in order to apply the K-Cluster analysis. The variant K = 3 was worked out because the types of the olive oil were three. The first cluster unified all salad and pomace olive oils, the second unified the samples of extra virgin oilstaken as controls from producers, which were bought from the trade network. The third cluster unified samples from

  4. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  5. Applied group theory applications in the engineering (physical, chemical, and medical), biological, social, and behavioral sciences and in the fine arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A generalized applied group theory is developed, and it is shown that phenomena from a number of diverse disciplines may be included under the umbrella of a single theoretical formulation based upon the concept of a group consistent with the usual definition of this term.

  6. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 4 (FGE.09Rev4: Secondary alicyclic saturated and unsaturated alcohols, ketones and esters containing secondary alicyclic alcohols from chemical group 8 and 30, and an ester of a phenol derivative from chemical group 25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC No 1565/2000. The present revision of FGE.09 includes the assessment of four additional flavouring substances, p-menthan-3-one [FL-no: 07.059], 2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-2-en-1-one [FL-no: 07.202], l-piperitone [FL-no: 07.255] and menthol 1-and 2-propylene glycol carbonate [FL-no: 09.843]. None of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that the 20 substances [FL-no: 02.070, 02.075, 02.135, 02.167, 06.136, 07.059, 07.202, 07.203, 07.255, 09.154, 09.355, 09.520, 09.618, 09.619, 09.621, 09.843, 09.870, 09.929, 09.935 and 09.949] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. For the remaining candidate substance [FL-no: 07.207], additional toxicity data are requested (further metabolism and/or toxicity studies. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all candidate substances.

  7. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    OpenAIRE

    Topham, Christopher M.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2006-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the bindin...

  8. Chemical evolution of Local Group dwarf galaxies in a cosmological context -- I. A new modelling approach and its application to the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Donatella

    2013-01-01

    We present a new approach for chemical evolution modelling, specifically designed to investigate the chemical properties of dwarf galaxies in a full cosmological framework. In particular, we focus on the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy as a test bed for our model. We select four candidate Sculptor-like galaxies from the satellite galaxy catalogue generated by implementation of a version of the Munich semi-analytic model for galaxy formation on the level 2 Aquarius dark matter simulations. We follow explicitly the evolution of several chemical elements, both in the cold gas out of which the stars form and in the hot medium residing in the halo. We take into account in detail the lifetimes of stars of different initial masses, the distribution of the delay times for type Ia supernova explosions and the dependency of the stellar yields from the initial metallicity of the stars. We allow large fractions of metals to be deposited into the hot phase, either directly as stars die or through reheated gas flows power...

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2): Primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, acid, and esters from chemical group 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    group 7. Seven of the nine flavouring substances possess one or more chiral centres and additionally, and due to the presence of a double bond, one of these substances can exist as geometric isomer. For two of these substances, the stereoisomeric composition has not been specified. The nine flavouring...... precise information that would enable the Panel to make a more realistic estimate of the intakes of the flavouring substances, the Panel has decided also to perform an estimate of the daily intakes per person using a “modified Theoretical Added Maximum Daily Intake” (mTAMDI) approach based on the normal...... precise data on use and use levels. According to the default MSDI approach, the nine flavouring substances in this group have intakes in Europe from 0.011 to 43 micrograms/capita/day, which are below the threshold of concern value for structural class I (1800 micrograms/person/day) substances. The...

  10. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, Revision 1: Bi- and tricyclic secondary, ketones and related esters from chemical groups 7 and 8

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate six flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, including an additional two substances in this Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates informati...

  11. Comparison of 4 nutrient databases with chemical composition data from the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension trial. DASH Collaborative Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, M L; Karanja, N M; Lin, P H; Obarzanek, E; Phillips, K M; Laws, R L; Vollmer, W M; O'Connor, E A; Champagne, C M; Windhauser, M M

    1999-08-01

    Accuracy of computerized nutrient databases is an important consideration in selecting a nutrient analysis system. We project compared the nutrient content of daily menus calculated from 4 microcomputer programs to chemical analysis of menus analyzed for the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) trial. Thirty-six menus were entered at 2 independent DASH sites using the ESHA Food Processor, Minnesota Nutrition Data System, Moore's Extended Nutrient Database, and Nutritionist IV databases. Food prepared according to these menus was chemically analyzed at the Food Analysis Laboratory Control Center at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Biochemistry, Blacksburg. Estimates for 13 nutrients were compared: energy, total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, carbohydrate, protein, cholesterol, calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, and sodium. The overall intraclass correlation between the 2 sites' data entry was 0.998; thus, values were averaged for analyses. Databases varied significantly in their mean deviations from chemical analyses values for saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, potassium, magnesium, and iron (P < .05); however, these differences were small (< 10%). Absolute deviations, which estimate the combined effect of bias and precision, were significantly different among databases for energy, saturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated acids. Absolute differences from the laboratory values varied by < 15%, except for iron. All 4 databases were comparable in accuracy and precision and performed well. Criteria for database selection depends not only on overall database accuracy, especially for nutrients of interest, but also on the ease of use of the program, relevant features of the associated software; and cost. PMID:10450294

  12. Chemical condition responsible for thermoswelling or thermoshrinking type of volume phase transition in gels. Effect of relative amounts of hydrophobic to hydrophilic groups in the side chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative molar ratio of a hydrophobic to the hydrophilic group in three polyacrylamide derivative gels described in this paper determines whether or not the gel will thermoswell or thermoshrink. This transition occurs with a change from 1 to 2 in the relative molar ratio. 21 refs., 3 figs

  13. Chemical condition responsible for thermoswelling or thermoshrinking type of volume phase transition in gels. Effect of relative amounts of hydrophobic to hydrophilic groups in the side chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Seiji [Univ. of Shizuoka (Japan)

    1992-06-25

    The relative molar ratio of a hydrophobic to the hydrophilic group in three polyacrylamide derivative gels described in this paper determines whether or not the gel will thermoswell or thermoshrink. This transition occurs with a change from 1 to 2 in the relative molar ratio. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, Revision 4 (FGE.20Rev4): Benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, a related acetal, benzoic acids, and related esters from chemical groups 23 and 30

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 45 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, Revision 4 (FGE.20Rev4), using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision 4 is made due to inclusion of four additional substances, o-, m- and p-tolualdehyde [FL no: 05.026, 05.028 and 05.029] and phenylmethyl 2-methyl-2-butenoate [FL no: 09.858]. None of the su...

  15. Statistic analysis of grouping in evaluation of the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in effluent from uranium mining; Analise de agrupamento na avaliacao do comportamento de elementos quimicos estaveis e parametros fisico-quimicos em efluente de mineracao de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (GETA/LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Py Junior, Delcy de A.; Dores, Luis A. de C.B.; Campelo, Emanuele L.C.; Morais, Gustavo F. de; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.br, E-mail: kclecom@uol.com.br [lndustrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Pereira, Juliana R. de S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) is a uranium mine off. The statistical analysis of clustering was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physico-chemical variables in their effluents. The use of cluster analysis proved effective in the evaluation, allowing to identify groups of chemical elements in physico-chemical variables and group analyzes (element and variables ). As a result, we can say, based on the analysis of the data, a strong link between Ca and Mg and between Al and TR{sub 2}O{sub 3} (rare earth oxides) in the UTM effluents. The SO{sub 4} was also identified as strongly linked to total solids and dissolved and these linked to electrical conductivity. Other associations existed, but were not as strongly linked. Additional collections for seasonal evaluation are required so that assessments can be confirmed. Additional statistics analysis (ordination techniques) should be used to help identify the origins of the groups identified in this analysis. (author)

  16. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  17. meeting) structurally related to a subgroup of substances within the group of ‘ Furfuryl and furan derivatives with and without additional side - chain substituents and heteroatoms from chemical group 14’ evaluated by JECFA in FGE.13Rev2 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substances are evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and...... toxicity. FGE.65 concerns a group of 33 sulfur-substituted furan derivatives evaluated by the JECFA at their 59th meeting. The Panel concluded in FGE.65 that the evaluation could not be finalised for four of the 33 substances [FL-no: 13.056, 13.160, 13.193 and 13.194] due to lack of toxicity data. In the...

  18. Group theory transformation for Soret and Dufour effects on free convective heat and mass transfer with thermophoresis and chemical reaction over a porous stretching surface in the presence of heat source/sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, R., E-mail: future990@gmail.com [Computational Fluid Dynamics, FSSW, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johore (Malaysia); Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Mathematics, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 1451 (Saudi Arabia); Obaidat, S. [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 1451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > The group theoretic method is of wide applicability. > Concentration boundary layer is significantly suppressed by the thermophoretic force. > Impact of Soret and Dufour effects in the presence of thermophoresis particle deposition with chemical reaction plays an important role on the flow field. - Abstract: The group theoretic method is applied for solving the problem of combined effect of thermal diffusion and diffusion thermo on free convective heat and mass transfer over a porous stretching surface in the presence of thermophoresis particle deposition with variable stream conditions. The application of one-parameter groups reduces the number of independent variables by one and consequently, the system of governing partial differential equations with the boundary conditions reduces to a system of ordinary differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions. The equations along with the boundary conditions are solved numerically by using Runge Kutta Gill integration scheme with shooting technique. Impact of Soret and Dufour effects in the presence of thermophoresis particle deposition with chemical reaction plays an important role on the flow field. The results thus obtained are presented graphically and discussed.

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 3 (FGE.21Rev3): Thiazoles, thiophenes, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical groups 29 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 59 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, including an additional three substances in this Revision 3, using the Procedure in...... Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since the publication of the last revision of this FGE, the EFSA has been requested to evaluate three additional substances [FL-no: 15.057, 15.079 and 15.135], which have been included in the present revision of FGE.21. Seven of the substances [FL-no: 15.060, 15.......091, 15.092, 15.093, 15.094, 15.096, 15.097, 15.106, 15.107, 15.129 and 15.135] evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also...

  20. Profile characterization of soil developed on pelitic rocks from the Bambui Group through chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and Moessbaur spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five sample from a Red-yellow latosol developed on pelitic rocks from the Bambui Group, located close to Paraopeba, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were collected and studied. The sample with color patterns varying from yellowish (sample SL11; 0.3m depth), in superficial horizons, to reddish (SL12; 1.0m) in intermediate profile positions, and various shades (SL14A and SL14V; 3.0m), in deeper horizons, were studied through Moessbauer spectroscopy in order to characterize, in detail, the ferruginous species present. The total iron content within the soil is practically constant in relation to the depth. Yet, the hematite/goethite content ratio varies within the expected sequence according to the color. A linear relationship was observed between the reddish intensity and the hematite content of the argillaceous fraction. The hematite contents are proportionally less in the SL14A sample, apparently due to deficient drainage in the past, and in the SL11 sample, due to organic matter effects. This latter sample is also characterized by at least two goethite populations: one with 20% mol replacing aluminum and another with certainly more than 30% mol. In to explan this difference, three hypothesis were elaborated. The most suitable one suggests that the goethite is destroyed and formed again through the soil column, in response to pedo environmental changes closer to the surface. (D.J.M.)

  1. Simultaneous detection of forbidden chemical residues in milk using dual-label time-resolved reverse competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay based on amine group functionalized surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Zhang

    Full Text Available In this study, a sensitive dual-label time-resolved reverse competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay was developed for simultaneous detection of chloramphenicol (CAP and clenbuterol (CLE in milk. The strategy was performed based on the distinction of the kinetic characteristics of horseradish peroxidase (HRP and alkaline phosphatase (ALP in chemiluminesecence (CL systems and different orders of magnitude in HRP CL value for CAP and ALP CL value for CLE in the chemiluminescent immunoassay. Capture antibodies were covalently bound to the amine group functionalized chemiluminescent microtiter plate (MTP for efficient binding of detection antibodies for the enzymes labeled CAP (HRP-CAP and CLE (ALP-CLE. The CL signals were recorded at different time points by the automatic luminometers with significant distinction in the dynamic curves. When we considered the ALP CL value (about 10(5 of CLE as background for HRP CL signal value (about 10(7 of CAP, there was no interaction from ALP CL background of CLE and the differentiation of CAP and CLE can be easily achieved. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 values of CAP and CLE in milk samples were 0.00501 µg L(-1 and 0.0128 µg L(-1, with the ranges from 0.0003 µg L(-1 to 0.0912 µg L(-1 and from 0.00385 µg L(-1 to 0.125 µg L(-1, respectively. The developed method is more sensitive and of less duration than the commercial ELISA kits, suitable for simultaneous screening of CAP and CLE.

  2. Fate of injected CO2 in the Wilcox Group, Louisiana, Gulf Coast Basin: Chemical and isotopic tracers of microbial-brine-rock-CO2 interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Warwick, Peter D.; Lee Zhi Yi, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The “2800’ sandstone” of the Olla oil field is an oil and gas-producing reservoir in a coal-bearing interval of the Paleocene–Eocene Wilcox Group in north-central Louisiana, USA. In the 1980s, this producing unit was flooded with CO2 in an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project, leaving ∼30% of the injected CO2 in the 2800’ sandstone post-injection. This study utilizes isotopic and geochemical tracers from co-produced natural gas, oil and brine to determine the fate of the injected CO2, including the possibility of enhanced microbial conversion of CO2 to CH4 via methanogenesis. Stable carbon isotopes of CO2, CH4 and DIC, together with mol% CO2 show that 4 out of 17 wells sampled in the 2800’ sandstone are still producing injected CO2. The dominant fate of the injected CO2appears to be dissolution in formation fluids and gas-phase trapping. There is some isotopic and geochemical evidence for enhanced microbial methanogenesis in 2 samples; however, the CO2 spread unevenly throughout the reservoir, and thus cannot explain the elevated indicators for methanogenesis observed across the entire field. Vertical migration out of the target 2800’ sandstone reservoir is also apparent in 3 samples located stratigraphically above the target sand. Reservoirs comparable to the 2800’ sandstone, located along a 90-km transect, were also sampled to investigate regional trends in gas composition, brine chemistry and microbial activity. Microbial methane, likely sourced from biodegradation of organic substrates within the formation, was found in all oil fields sampled, while indicators of methanogenesis (e.g. high alkalinity, δ13C-CO2 and δ13C-DIC values) and oxidation of propane were greatest in the Olla Field, likely due to its more ideal environmental conditions (i.e. suitable range of pH, temperature, salinity, sulfate and iron concentrations).

  3. Fate of injected CO2 in the Wilcox Group, Louisiana, Gulf Coast Basin: Chemical and isotopic tracers of microbial–brine–rock–CO2 interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 1980s enhanced oil recovery attempt investigated using isotope geochemistry in north-central Louisiana, USA. • CO2 injection was not the primary cause for increased microbial methanogenesis previously seen in the Olla Field. • Injected CO2 did not migrate uniformly within the reservoir. • Ideal geochemical conditions likely promoted methanogenesis in the Olla Field. - Abstract: The “2800’ sandstone” of the Olla oil field is an oil and gas-producing reservoir in a coal-bearing interval of the Paleocene–Eocene Wilcox Group in north-central Louisiana, USA. In the 1980s, this producing unit was flooded with CO2 in an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project, leaving ∼30% of the injected CO2 in the 2800’ sandstone post-injection. This study utilizes isotopic and geochemical tracers from co-produced natural gas, oil and brine to determine the fate of the injected CO2, including the possibility of enhanced microbial conversion of CO2 to CH4 via methanogenesis. Stable carbon isotopes of CO2, CH4 and DIC, together with mol% CO2 show that 4 out of 17 wells sampled in the 2800’ sandstone are still producing injected CO2. The dominant fate of the injected CO2 appears to be dissolution in formation fluids and gas-phase trapping. There is some isotopic and geochemical evidence for enhanced microbial methanogenesis in 2 samples; however, the CO2 spread unevenly throughout the reservoir, and thus cannot explain the elevated indicators for methanogenesis observed across the entire field. Vertical migration out of the target 2800’ sandstone reservoir is also apparent in 3 samples located stratigraphically above the target sand. Reservoirs comparable to the 2800’ sandstone, located along a 90-km transect, were also sampled to investigate regional trends in gas composition, brine chemistry and microbial activity. Microbial methane, likely sourced from biodegradation of organic substrates within the formation, was found in all oil fields sampled

  4. Magnitude Differences in Bioactive Compounds, Chemical Functional Groups, Fatty Acid Profiles, Nutrient Degradation and Digestion, Molecular Structure, and Metabolic Characteristics of Protein in Newly Developed Yellow-Seeded and Black-Seeded Canola Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, Katerina; Zhang, Xuewei; Vail, Sally; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-06-10

    Recently, new lines of yellow-seeded (CS-Y) and black-seeded canola (CS-B) have been developed with chemical and structural alteration through modern breeding technology. However, no systematic study was found on the bioactive compounds, chemical functional groups, fatty acid profiles, inherent structure, nutrient degradation and absorption, or metabolic characteristics between the newly developed yellow- and black-seeded canola lines. This study aimed to systematically characterize chemical, structural, and nutritional features in these canola lines. The parameters accessed include bioactive compounds and antinutrition factors, chemical functional groups, detailed chemical and nutrient profiles, energy value, nutrient fractions, protein structure, degradation kinetics, intestinal digestion, true intestinal protein supply, and feed milk value. The results showed that the CS-Y line was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in neutral detergent fiber (122 vs 154 g/kg DM), acid detergent fiber (61 vs 99 g/kg DM), lignin (58 vs 77 g/kg DM), nonprotein nitrogen (56 vs 68 g/kg DM), and acid detergent insoluble protein (11 vs 35 g/kg DM) than the CS-B line. There was no difference in fatty acid profiles except C20:1 eicosenoic acid content (omega-9) which was in lower in the CS-Y line (P condensed tannins with averages of 0.3 and 3.1 g/kg DM, respectively. When protein was portioned into five subfractions, significant differences were found in PA, PB1 (65 vs 79 g/kg CP), PB2, and PC fractions (10 vs 33 g/kg CP), indicating protein degradation and supply to small intestine differed between two new lines. In terms of protein structure spectral profile, there were no significant differences in functional groups of amides I and II, α helix, and β-sheet structure as well as their ratio between the two new lines, indicating no difference in protein structure makeup and conformation between the two lines. In terms of energy values, there were significant differences in total digestible nutrient

  5. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Topham, Christopher [University of Heidelberg

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  6. Orientation preferences of backbone secondary amide functional groups in peptide nucleic acid complexes: quantum chemical calculations reveal an intrinsic preference of cationic D-amino acid-based chiral PNA analogues for the P-form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-02-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNA.DNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs. PMID:17071666

  7. Molecular Conductance: Chemical Trends of Anchoring Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, San-Huang; Baranger, Harold U.; Yang, Weitao

    2004-01-01

    Combining density functional theory calculations for molecular electronic structure with a Green function method for electron transport, we calculate from first principles the molecular conductance of benzene connected to two Au leads through different anchoring atoms -- S, Se, and Te. The relaxed atomic structure of the contact, different lead orientations, and different adsorption sites are fully considered. We find that the molecule-lead coupling, electron transfer, and conductance all dep...

  8. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  9. Group cubization

    OpenAIRE

    Osajda, Damian

    2016-01-01

    We present a procedure of group cubization: It results in a group whose some features resemble the ones of a given group, and which acts without fixed points on a CAT(0) cubical complex. As a main application we establish lack of Kazhdan's property (T) for Burnside groups. Other applications include new constructions of non-exact groups.

  10. A critical quantum chemical and experimental study of the potentiality of direct labeling of the CN group with [99mTc(CO)3]+ or [186/188Re(CO)3]+ in CN containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: It was determined recently that [99mTc(OH2)2(X-)(CO3)3] could strongly bind to the CN group, allowing direct labeling of CN in vitamin B12 despite the presence of a benzimidazole group. The aim of this paper was to perform a critical study of this potentiality, coupling quantum chemical calculations to experimental evidence. Methods: Computational methods: Within the density functional theory calculations, the 6-31+G** basis set (C, H, O, N atoms) and the LANL2DZ basis set (Tc,Re) were used. Stability calculations of the [RCNM(CO)3]+) (M=Tc,Re) complexes were performed with the Gaussian 03 suite of programs, while for the evaluation of relative stability substitution reactions were used. Radiochemistry: Vitamin B12, 4-hydroxy-benzylcyanide and 4-methoxy-benzonitrile were labeled at 100 deg. C during 30 min. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis was performed using radioactive and UV detection. Results: Computational methods: The influence of different ligands on the stability yielded a sequence: imidazole>tBuCN>NH3∼CH3CN>HCN (mimicking the best CoCN)>H2O. The transmetalation reaction indicates that all ligands prefer Re to Tc. The preference for the nitrogen atom of imidazole to the cyanide nitrogen atom for complex formation with [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+ is interpreted in terms of the hard and soft acid and base properties principle. Radiochemistry: 4-Hydroxy-benzylcyanide and 4-methoxy-benzonitrile did not show any labeling. An excess of acetonitrile did not inhibit the labeling of vitamin B12 as expected if the CN group should be involved, indicating that the labeling occurs on a stronger complexing group present like benzimidazole. Conclusion: Both theory and experiments prove that [CN-Tc(CO)3(H2O)(2-x)Lx]+ complexes are weak and that in vitamin B12 most probably the benzimidazole group is involved

  11. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  12. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  13. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  14. Abelian Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, A.P.

    1995-10-15

    This fifth survey of reviews on abelian groups comprises papers reviewed in 1985-1992. Just as in the preceding surveys, the issues concerning finite abelian groups, topological groups, ordered groups, group algebras, modules (with rare exceptions), and topics on logic are not considered. The issues on the lattice of subgroups of an abelian group are included in Section 11. In contrast to the fourth survey, this one does not contain Sections 6 (N-high subgroups), 9 (rings with a given additive group), and 10 (valuated groups); since only a few papers treated these topics, the material discussed earlier in Sections 9, and 10 is now included in Section 11 and the material of the former Section 6 will be found in Sections 1, 7, 8, and 11 of this survey. On the other hand, the fifth survey has three new sections devoted to separable groups (a new Sect. 5), Butler groups (a new Sect. 6), and the endormorphism rings and automorphism groups of abelian groups (a new Sect. 9).

  15. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  16. Galaxy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  17. Galaxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Tully, R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  18. Learning the Functional Groups: Keys to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Shannon; Hildreth, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the difficulties students have when they are expected to learn functional groups, which are frameworks for chemical and physical properties of molecules. Presents a classification key for functional groups categorized by 10 common functional groups. (YDS)

  19. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols and esters with esters containing tertiary alcohols ethers (chemical group 6 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 6 consists of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols and esters with esters containing tertiary alcohols ethers, of which 13 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The high use level proposed by the applicant for linalool (25 mg/kg complete feed is safe for salmonids, veal calves, cattle for fattening and pets (excluding cats without a margin of safety with the exception of dogs (SF = 1.4. The safe use level for pigs and dairy cows is 20, for piglets 12 and for poultry 10 mg/kg complete feed. The high use level of 5 mg/kg complete feed for linalyl acetate, linalyl butyrate, linalyl formate, linalyl propionate, linalyl isobutyrate, terpineol, α-terpineol and terpineol acetate and 4-terpinenol is safe for all species with a margin of safety of 1.2 to 12. For nerolidol, 2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-ol and 2-(4-methylphenylpropan-2-ol, the maximum safe concentration is 1 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry and 1.5 mg/kg complete feed for all other species. The absence of a margin of safety would not allow the simultaneous administration in feed and water for drinking of the following compounds: linalool, nerolidol, 2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-ol and 2-(4methylphenylpropan-2-ol. No safety concern would arise for the consumer from the use of compounds belonging to CG 6 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. All compounds should be considered as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract, and as skin sensitisers. All compounds of CG 6 are predicted to be safe to the soil compartment when used at levels safe to the target species. Using predictions based on chemical structure, 2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-ol and 2-(4-methylphenylpropan-2-ol were estimated to be safe to aquatic compartments. In the absence of experimental data, safety to aquatic compartments could not be established for linalyl butyrate, linalyl isobutyrate, terpineol acetate, 4

  20. Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, R Brent

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10^12 Msun are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosi...

  1. Construction and practice of diversified comprehensive compensation management system in large energy chemical group%大型能化集团多元化全面薪酬管理体系构建与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申顺更

    2014-01-01

    为解决河南能源化工集团重组后薪酬管理中的矛盾和困难,构建多元化全面薪酬管理管理体系,以建立统一规范、灵活高效的激励机制,促进企业深度融合与快速发展等方面。从确立多元化全面薪酬管理体系思路,健全企业价值、岗位价值评价标准体系,开展全方位开放式岗位价值测评,保障内部一致性和外部竞争性,建立多元化全面薪酬管理体系,薪酬管理和调控6个方面,解析了多元化全面薪酬管理体系的构建方法。%In order to solve the contradictions and difficulties in compensation management in Henan Energy Chemical Group after its reorganization,the diversified comprehensive compensa-tion management system is constructed to establish a unitary,standard,flexible and efficient in-centive mechanism,and to promote the deep integration of the enterprise and its fast develop-ment.And the construction method of the diversified comprehensive compensation management system is analyzed from the 6 aspects of establishing the diversified comprehensive compensation management system thinking,perfecting the evaluation criterion system for enterprise value and post value,carrying out all-round open post value evaluation,ensuring the internal consistency and external competition,building the diversified comprehensive compensation management sys-tem,compensation management and control.

  2. Hydra groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dison, Will

    2010-01-01

    We give examples of CAT(0), biautomatic, free-by-cyclic, one-relator groups which have finite-rank free subgroups of huge (Ackermannian) distortion. This leads to elementary examples of groups whose Dehn functions are similarly extravagant. This behaviour originates in manifestations of Hercules-versus-the-hydra battles in string-rewriting.

  3. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  4. The chemical ecology of cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro N. Leão; Engene, Niclas; Antunes, Agostinho; Gerwick, William H; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2012-01-01

    This review covers the literature on the chemically mediated ecology of cyanobacteria, including ultraviolet radiation protection, feeding-deterrence, allelopathy, resource competition, and signalling. To highlight the chemical and biological diversity of this group of organisms, evolutionary and chemotaxonomical studies are presented. Several technologically relevant aspects of cyanobacterial chemical ecology are also discussed.

  5. Group 2. Grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the findings of the Grouting Working Group which met during the Workshop on Radioactive, Hazardous, and/or Mixed Waste Sludge Management. The scope of this working group was to identify issues related to laboratory-scale experimentation in support of operation and design of an actual plant. The group recognizes that several stabilization/solidification (S/S) host media are available and, whichever is chosen, must be proven appropriate for the specific disposal scenario. However, the group focused on developing a systematic approach for the selection of cement-based grouting as an option, because of the prevalence of its application. It should be recognized that many of the issues will be generic to any stabilization process. Prior to the workshop, this group's members identified over 30 issues for discussion. At a previous informal session, the group distilled these to four issues that are believed to be at the heart of the 30 considered. The four issues were: (1) that both standard and site process-specific performance criteria must be identified, (2) that the waste-binder chemical interactions and the subsequent effect of these interactions on the chemical and physical properties of the resulting waste form must be better understood, (3) that scale-up factors must be considered in order to improve the probability of successfully developing waste-form products, and (4) that if S/S technology is to remain a widely used treatment option, product quality and performance must be confirmed over time

  6. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject of...... algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group-theorists, and to...

  7. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  8. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  9. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  10. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  11. Microstructural observation and chemical dating on monazite from the Shilu Group, Hainan Province of South China: Implications for origin and evolution of the Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Deru; Kusiak, Monika A.; Wang, Zhilin; Chen, Huayong; Bakun-Czubarow, Nonna; Wu, Chuanjun; Konečný, Patrik; Hollings, Peter

    2015-02-01

    New monazite chemical U-Th-total-Pb (CHIME) ages, combined with microstructural observations, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemistry, indicate that the large-scale, banded iron formation (BIF)-type Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district in Hainan Province, South China is a multistage product of sedimentation, metamorphism, and hydrothermal-metasomatic alteration associated with multiple orogenies. Two types of monazite, i.e. "polygenetic" and "metamorphic", were identified. The "polygenetic monazite" comprises a magmatic and/or metamorphic core surrounded by a metamorphic rim, and shows complex zoning. Breakdown corona structure, with a core of monazite surrounded by a mantle of fluorapatite, allanite, and/or epidote as concentric growth rings, is commonly observed. This type of monazite yielded three main CHIME-age peaks at ca. 980 Ma, ca. 880 Ma and ca. 450 Ma. The ages which range up to ca. 880 Ma for detrital cores, record a pre-deformational magmatic and/or metamorphic event(s), and is considered to be the depositional time-interval of the Shilu Group and interbedded BIFs in a marine, back-arc foreland basin likely due to the Grenvillian or South China Sibao orogeny. After deposition, the Shilu district was subjected to an orogenic event, which is recorded by the syndeformational metamorphic monazite with ca. 560-450 Ma population. Probably this event not only caused amphibolite facies metamorphism and associated regional foliation S1 but also enriched the original BIFs, and most likely corresponds to the "Pan-African" and/or the South China Caledonian orogeny. The post-deformational "metamorphic" monazite occurs mostly as inclusions in garnet and shows ca. 260 Ma age. It likely represents the Late Permian post-magmatic hydrothermal and related retrograde event(s) initiated by the Indosinian orogeny due to the closure of the Paleo-Tethys. The breakdown of monazite to secondary coronal mineral phases as well as the Fe-remobilization and associated skarnization

  12. Chemical functionalization of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Katsnelson, M I

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on chemical functionalization of graphene are reviewed. Using hydrogenated graphene as a model system, general principles of the chemical functionalization are formulated and discussed. It is shown that, as a rule, 100% coverage of graphene by complex functional groups (in contrast with hydrogen and fluorine) is unreachable. A possible destruction of graphene nanoribbons by fluorine is considered. The functionalization of infinite graphene and graphene nan...

  13. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  14. Chemical machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yardimeden

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials. Advantages and disadvantages of the chemical machining are mentioned.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, chemical machining process was described its importance as nontraditional machining process. The steps of process were discussed in detail. The tolerances of machined parts were examined.Findings: Paper describes the chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials.Practical implications: The machining operation should be carried out carefully to produce a desired geometry. Environmental laws have important effects when chemical machining is used.Originality/value: The importance of nontraditional machining processes is very high.

  15. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  16. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  17. Chemical properties of transactinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäggeler, H. W.

    2005-09-01

    First investigations of chemical properties of bohrium (Z = 107) and hassium (Z = 108) showed an expected behaviour as ordinary members of groups 7 and 8 of the periodic table. Two attempts to study element 112 yielded some indication for a behaviour like a very volatile noble metal. However, a very recent experiment to confirm this preliminary observation failed. Two examples are described how chemical studies may help to support element discovery claims from purely physics experiments. The two examples are the discovery claims of the elements 112 and 115, respectively, where the progenies hassium and dubnium were chemically identified.

  18. Chemical properties of transactinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First investigations of chemical properties of bohrium (Z = 107) and hassium (Z = 108) showed an expected behaviour as ordinary members of groups 7 and 8 of the periodic table. Two attempts to study element 112 yielded some indication for a behaviour like a very volatile noble metal. However, a very recent experiment to confirm this preliminary observation failed. Two examples are described how chemical studies may help to support element discovery claims from purely physics experiments. The two examples are the discovery claims of the elements 112 and 115, respectively, where the progenies hassium and dubnium were chemically identified. (orig.)

  19. Chemical properties of transactinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    First investigations of chemical properties of bohrium (Z = 107) and hassium (Z = 108) showed an expected behaviour as ordinary members of groups 7 and 8 of the periodic table. Two attempts to study element 112 yielded some indication for a behaviour like a very volatile noble metal. However, a very recent experiment to confirm this preliminary observation failed. Two examples are described how chemical studies may help to support element discovery claims from purely physics experiments. The two examples are the discovery claims of the elements 112 and 115, respectively, where the progenies hassium and dubnium were chemically identified. (orig.)

  20. Group representations

    CERN Document Server

    Karpilovsky, G

    1994-01-01

    This third volume can be roughly divided into two parts. The first part is devoted to the investigation of various properties of projective characters. Special attention is drawn to spin representations and their character tables and to various correspondences for projective characters. Among other topics, projective Schur index and projective representations of abelian groups are covered. The last topic is investigated by introducing a symplectic geometry on finite abelian groups. The second part is devoted to Clifford theory for graded algebras and its application to the corresponding theory

  1. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  2. Tectaria group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Polypodiaceae subfam. Dryopteridoideae section A, auct.: C. Chr. in Verdoorn, Man. Pteridol. (1938) 543, p.p. Aspidiaceae tribe Aspidieae auct.: Ching, Sunyatsenia 5 (1940) 250, excl. Lomariopsis and related genera. — Aspidiaceae, group of Ctenitis Copel., Gen. Fil. (1947) 153. Aspidiaceae auct.: Pi

  3. Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  4. Chemical networks*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One o...

  5. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea;

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the...... various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in...

  6. Group therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In his review 'Genesis of Unified Gauge Theories' at the symposium in Honour of Abdus Salam (June, page 23), Tom Kibble of Imperial College, London, looked back to the physics events around Salam from 1959-67. He described how, in the early 1960s, people were pushing to enlarge the symmetry of strong interactions beyond the SU(2) of isospin and incorporate the additional strangeness quantum number. Kibble wrote - 'Salam had students working on every conceivable symmetry group. One of these was Yuval Ne'eman, who had the good fortune and/or prescience to work on SU(3). From that work, and of course from the independent work of Murray Gell- Mann, stemmed the Eightfold Way, with its triumphant vindication in the discovery of the omega-minus in 1964.' Yuval Ne'eman writes - 'I was the Defence Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in London and was admitted by Salam as a part-time graduate student when I arrived in 1958. I started research after resigning from the Embassy in May 1960. Salam suggested a problem: provide vector mesons with mass - the problem which was eventually solved by Higgs, Guralnik, Kibble,.... (as described by Kibble in his article). I explained to Salam that I had become interested in symmetry. Nobody at Imperial College at the time, other than Salam himself, was doing anything in groups, and attention further afield was focused on the rotation - SO(N) - groups. Reacting to my own half-baked schemes, Salam told me to forget about the rotation groups he taught us, and study group theory in depth, directing me to Eugene Dynkin's classification of Lie subalgebras, about which he had heard from Morton Hamermesh. I found Dynkin incomprehensible without first learning about Lie algebras from Henri Cartan's thesis, which luckily had been reproduced by Dynkin in his 1946 thesis, using his diagram method. From a copy of a translation of Dynkin's thesis which I found in the British Museum Library, I

  7. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  8. Chemical machining

    OpenAIRE

    A. Yardimeden; T. Ozben; O. Cakir

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and mac...

  9. Chemical Radioprotectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Upadhyay

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Protection of biological systems against radiation damage is of paramount importance during accidental and unavoidable exposure to radiation. Several physico-chemical and biological factors collectively contribute to the damage caused by radiation and are, therefore, targets for developing radioprotectors. Work on the development of chemicals capable of protecting biological systemsfrom radiation damage was initiated nearly six decades ago with cysteine being the first molecule to be reported. Chemicals capable of scavenging free radicals, inducing oxygen depletion,antioxidants and modulators of immune response have been some of the radioprotectors extensively investigated with limited success. Mechanism of action of some chemical radioprotectors and their combinations have been elucidated, while further understanding is required in many instances. The present review elaborates on structure-activity relationship of some of the chemical radioprotectors, their evaluation, and assessment, limitation, and future prospects.

  10. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence, the...... phase out the entire sourcing collaboration with Flextronics. This sudden change in its sourcing strategy posed LEGO management with a number of caveats. Despite the bright forecasts, the collaboration did not fulfill the initial expectations, and the company needed to understand why this had happened...

  11. Chemical Absorption Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Chemical absorption materials that potentially can be used for post combustion carbon dioxide capture are discussed. They fall into five groups, alkanolamines, alkali carbonates, ammonia, amino acid salts, and ionic liquids. The chemistry of the materials is discussed and advantages and drawbacks...... are mentioned. References to review papers, papers with experimental data, and papers describing the thermodynamic modelling of the systems are given....

  12. Chemical Absorption Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Chemical absorption materials that potentially can be used for post combustion carbon dioxide capture are discussed. They fall into five groups, alkanolamines, alkali carbonates, ammonia, amino acid salts, and ionic liquids. The chemistry of the materials is discussed and advantages and drawbacks...

  13. Properties of Group Five and Group Seven transactinium elements

    OpenAIRE

    Wilk, Philip A.

    2001-01-01

    The detection and positive identification of the short-lived, low cross section isotopes used in the chemical studies of the heaviest elements are usually accomplished by measuring their alpha-decay, thus the nuclear properties of the heaviest elements must be examined simultaneously with their chemical properties. The isotopes 224 Pa and 266,267 Bh have been studied extensively as an integral part of the investigation of the heaviest members of the groups five and seven of the periodic...

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  15. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  16. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  17. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  18. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pills, who subsequently become pregnant or have a history of brownish facial discoloration. Scarring Reactivation of cold sores What can I expect after having a chemical peel? All peels require some follow-up care: ...

  19. Unnecessary Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  20. Chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives descriptions of chemical kinetics. It starts summary of chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism, and explains basic velocity law, experiment method for determination of reaction velocity, temperature dependence of reaction velocity, theory of reaction velocity, theory on reaction of unimolecular, process of atom and free radical, reaction in solution, catalysis, photochemical reaction, such as experiment and photochemical law and rapid reaction like flame, beam of molecule and shock tube.

  1. Group evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  2. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  3. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  5. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kurtis M. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Gorenstein, David G. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Iwahara, Junji, E-mail: juiwahar@utmb.edu, E-mail: j.iwahara@utmb.edu [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain {sup 15}N and DNA phosphorodithiaote {sup 31}P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well.

  6. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their 1H and 15N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain 15N and DNA phosphorodithiaote 31P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well

  7. Platinum Group Metals New Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming; ZHANG Jiankang; WANG Saibei; HU Jieqiong; LIU Manmen; CHEN Yongtai; ZHANG Jiming; YANG Youcai; YANG Yunfeng; ZHANG Guoquan

    2012-01-01

    Platinum group metals (PGM) include six elements,namely Pt,Pd,Rh,Ir,Os and Ru.PGM and their alloys are the important fundamental materials for modern industry and national defense construction,they have special physical and chemical properties,widely used in metallurgy,chemical,electric,electronic,information,energy,environmental protection,aviation,aerospace,navigation and other high technology industry.Platinum group metals and their alloys,which have good plasticity and processability,can be processed to electrical contact materials,resistance materials,solder,electronic paste,temperature-measurement materials,elastic materials,magnetic materials and high temperature structural materials.

  8. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU), there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000): 215-220

  9. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  10. From mapping class groups to automorphism groups of free groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    We show that the natural map from the mapping class groups of surfaces to the automorphism groups of free groups, induces an infinite loop map on the classifying spaces of the stable groups after plus construction. The proof uses automorphisms of free groups with boundaries which play the role of...... mapping class groups of surfaces with several boundary components....

  11. Efeitos do grupo genético, sexo e peso ao abate sobre as propriedades físico-químicas da carne de cordeiros em crescimento Effects of breed group, gender and slaughter weight group on the physical-chemical parameter of the growing lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xisto Rodrigues Souza

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar a evolução do pH post mortem, cor, perda de peso por cozimento e força de cisalhamento dos músculos Longissimus dorsi (LD e Semimembranosus (SM de 49 cordeiros provenientes de cruzamentos entre as raças Bergamácia com Santa Inês (BgxSI e Ile de France com Santa Inês (IFxSI, machos inteiros e fêmeas, distribuídos nos grupos pesos ao abate de 15, 25, 35 e 45kg. Os grupos genéticos apresentaram diferenças (PThe objective of this work was to evaluate the post mortem pH evolution, color, cooking losses and shear force of longissimus dorsi (LD and semimembranosus (SM muscles of forty nine sheep from two breed group, Bergamácia x Santa Inês (BgxSI and Ile de France x Santa Inês (IFxSI, males and females of four slaughter weight groups of 15, 25, 35 and 45kg. The breed group presented differences of pH in the LD and SM muscles (P<0,05. The breed group BgxSI showed higher pH than breed group IFxSI. The color, the gender factor presented no significant effect differences for color, however breed group had effect: L* (P<0.001 of 35.25 and 32.89 for breed group IFxSI and BgxSI, respectively; and value a* (P<0.001 of 16.09 and 14.64 for breed group BgxSI and IFxSI, respectively. In the cooking losses LD and SM muscles showed no significant effect of the breed group, sex and slaughter weight group. The factors studied shear force had no effect on SM muscle. However, the slaughter weight group had effect on the shear force (P<0.005 of the LD muscle, with slaughter weight groups of 15 and 25kg showing higher shear force (13.57 and 10.98kgf, respectively than slaughter weight groups of 35 and 45kg (8.56 and 7.97kgf, respectively.

  12. Chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Wing-Fai

    2015-09-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One on-going research subject is finding new paths to synthesize species either in the gas-phase or on grain surfaces. Specific formation routes for water or carbon monoxide are discussed in more details. 13th Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  13. Molecular invariants: atomic group valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular invariants may be deduced in a very compact way through Grassman algebra. In this work, a generalized valence is defined for an atomic group; it reduces to the Known expressions for the case of an atom in a molecule. It is the same of the correlations between the fluctions of the atomic charges qc and qd (C belongs to the group and D does not) around their average values. Numerical results agree with chemical expectation. (author)

  14. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    BACKGROUND: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to reproductive changes in boys in the Western world, however, less is known about influence of EDCs in women. The incidence of precocious breast development is increasing in USA and Europe and mammary gland development has been...... examination showed changes in epithelial morphology in male (hypertrophic epithelium) and female (lobuloalveolar morphology) mammary glands in adult rats exposed to phytoestrogens. Anti-androgenic chemicals showed signs of feminisation of adult male mammary glands. No effects of anti-androgens were observed...... in female mammary glands. The histological changes observed in adult female and male mammary glands were not present consistently in the groups of estrogenic or anti-androgenic chemicals and may be due to other modes of action of thechemicals. Female genital malformations were affected by the potent...

  15. Chemical pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Andreas; Amstutz, Nahid; Delahaye, Sandra; Sadki, Asmaâ; Schenker, Sabine; Sieber, Regula; Zerara, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    The physical and photophysical properties of three classic transition metal complexes, namely [Fe(bpy)3]2+, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, and [Co(bpy)3]2+, can be tuned by doping them into a variety of inert crystalline host lattices. The underlying guest-host interactions are discussed in terms of a chemical pressure.

  16. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... Chemical peels public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  17. Chemical Mahjong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  18. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  19. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOP'S FOR THE TREATMENT OF CCL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on treatment of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) chemicals is being conducted. Specific groups of contaminants on the CCL will be evaluated using numerous advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Initially, these CCL contaminants will be evaluated in groups based on chemical...

  20. Chemical modifiers of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only two groups, anticancer drugs and radiosensitizers are discussed among many groups of chemical modifiers. In combined radiotherapy (RT) with chemotherapy (CT), sequential administration seems to be superior to concomitant administration, because simultaneous use enhances intensively normal tissue damage. In sequential administration, interruption of CT during RT causes growth of distant metastases. So, alternating scheme of RT and CT is proposed and evaluated clinically. Hypoxic cell sensitizers including well-known misonidazole and PLDR inhibitors (Ara-A etc.) are promising in radiotherapy. They should be used intermittently two or three times during RT in order to avoid neurotoxicity of misonidazole. (author) 70 refs

  1. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 210 Revision 2 (FGE.210Rev2): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.4 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 14 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 210 (FGE.210). In FGE.210, the Panel concluded that the genotoxic potential could not be ruled out for any of the flavouring substances. In FGE.210 Revision1, the Panel.......226 and 07.231] the concern for genotoxicity remains and additional data were requested. The Flavour Industry has submitted additional genotoxicity data for allyl a-ionone [FL-no: 07.061], that are evaluated in the present revision of FGE.210 (Revision 2). Based on these new data the Panel concluded that...

  2. EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 74, Revision 1 (FGE.74Rev1): Consideration of Simple Aliphatic Sulphides and Thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 61st meeting) Structurally related to Aliphatic and Alicyclic Mono-, Di-, Tri-, and Polysulphides with or without Additional Oxygenated Functional Groups from Chemical Group 20 evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev1 (2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular, the Panel was requested to consider the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA) evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000, and to dec...

  3. 植物类中药寒热药性与有机成分化合物次级基团相关性的文献研究%Literature study on the relationship between the cold-heat nature of Chinese medicine and the secondary structure groups of chemical constituents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 王振国

    2012-01-01

    目的:探寻植物类中药中有机成分化合物次级基团与植物类中药寒热属性的相关性.方法:利用现有文献提供的信息资料,通过文献检索收集植物类中药化学成分信息,利用化学信息学对资料进行整理,运用多种数据统计分析与挖掘方法分析化学信息数据,建立Logistic回归方程,对植物类中药寒热属性进行判别.结果:以有机成分化合物次级基团建立的Logistic回归方程,可以对植物类中药的寒热属性进行判别.结论:植物类中药寒热药性与有机成分具有相关性.%Objectives: Study on the relationship between the cold-heat nature of Chinese medicine and the secondary structure groups of chemical constituents. Methods: Use the information from existing literatures; Collect chemical information of herbal medicine by document retrieval. Then use chemical informatics to collate the data and analyze it. Establish Logistic regression equation based on the secondary structure groups of chemical constituents. Use the regression equation to distinguish cold-heat nature of herbs. Results: The Logistic regression equation could distinguish cold and heat of herbs. Conclusion: There is a correlation between cold-heat nature of Chinese medicine and organic constituents.

  4. Chemical flashlamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have characterized the optical output and Nd:glass pumping performance of large-scale (120-cm-long, 1.2-cm-inner-diam), metal-oxidizer chemical flashlamps supplied to us by G.T.E. Sylvania. The experimental results were obtained on the same test bed that was used to study xenon electrical flashlamps, as described in Dependence of Flashlamp Performance on Gas Fill and Bore Size, earlier in this section. The peak Nd inversion levels produced by the chemical lamps were less than or equal to 10% of those generated by a xenon lamp of similar size and energy loading. The Peak Nd levels are in good agreement with predictions for the pumping rates in Nd:glass by a blackbody at the color temperatures of 30000 to 50000C, which they have measured during the burn of the pyrotechnic lamp

  5. Group Chemical Changes and Physical Property Correlations in Refining of Lube Base Stocks. Physico-Chemical and Adsorption Chromatography Parameters Corrélations entre les propriétés physiques et les changements de composition chimique au cours du raffinage des huiles de base. Paramètres physico-chimiques et de chromatographie par adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Singh H.; Gulati I. B.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in twenty-two lubricating oil base stocks prepared from Darius and Assam Mix Crudes by different types of refining treatment and severity of refining have been investigated. Changes in the viscosity index with progressive refining in base stocks of different viscosity have been studied in relation to physico-chemical properties, structural analysis and saturate contents of the base oils. Correlations between the concentration of saturates, saturate-to-aromatic ratio and VI of the base...

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 3 (FGE.06Rev3): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 50 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 6, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the subs...

  7. Chemical Dependence and Clinical Depression in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kayreen; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Assessed the extent and depth of depression in 54 chemically dependent pregnant women, divided into three groups by age. Results indicated that the older chemically dependent women scored significantly higher on the depression index than did either of the two younger groups, while the teenagers obtained a mean score comparable to that of the…

  8. Group Chemical Changes and Physical Property Correlations in Refining of Lube Base Stocks. Physico-Chemical and Adsorption Chromatography Parameters Corrélations entre les propriétés physiques et les changements de composition chimique au cours du raffinage des huiles de base. Paramètres physico-chimiques et de chromatographie par adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh H.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in twenty-two lubricating oil base stocks prepared from Darius and Assam Mix Crudes by different types of refining treatment and severity of refining have been investigated. Changes in the viscosity index with progressive refining in base stocks of different viscosity have been studied in relation to physico-chemical properties, structural analysis and saturate contents of the base oils. Correlations between the concentration of saturates, saturate-to-aromatic ratio and VI of the base stocks are reported.

  9. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  10. Integrated Groups and Smooth Distribution Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro J. MIANA

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove directly that α-times integrated groups define algebra homo-morphisms. We also give a theorem of equivalence between smooth distribution groups and α-times integrated groups.

  11. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  12. Chemical sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, the author focuses on chemical sputtering by keV ions, treating two specific examples: the chemical effects occurring when bombarding simple condensed gases and the mechanisms of the ion-assisted etching process. First, however, the mechanism of sputtering of condensed gases in general is discussed. These mechanisms have been investigated using condensed noble gases as target material. The thesis is a compilation of articles published elsewhere. Contents: sputtering of condensed noble gases by keV heavy ions; surface distribution as an observable factor in the energy distribution of sputtered particles; reactive sputtering of simple condensed gases by keV heavy ion bombardment; mass spectra of nozzle-produced small molecular clusters of H2O, NH3, CO and CH4; mass and energy distribution of particles sputter-etched from Si in a XeF2 environment; argon-ion assisted etching of silicon by molecular chlorine; energy distribution of sputtered poly-atomic molecules. (Auth.)

  13. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 74, Revision 3 (FGE.74Rev3): Consideration of Simple Aliphatic Sulphides and Thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 61st meeting) Structurally related to Aliphatic and Alicyclic Mono-, Di-, Tri-, and Polysulphides with or without Additional Oxygenated Functional Groups from Chemical Group 20 evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev5 (2012)

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2014-01-01

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 19 simple aliphatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by the JECFA at the ...

  14. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur as...... unit groups. We deduce this classification from a more general result, which holds for groups G with no non-trivial normal 2-subgroup....

  15. The ergonomics of chemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past three years the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station has developed and implemented a comprehensive chemical control program. The program encompasses all United States regulatory requirements, industry guidelines, and manufacturer recommendations related to hazardous chemicals for both the compliance groups and employees. More than 35,000 man-hours were expended in the development, implementation, and maintenance of this program. This paper details that effort and outlines the resource allocation and summarizes the lessons learned

  16. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, Revision 3 (FGE.20Rev3): Benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, a related acetal, benzoic acids, and related esters from chemical groups 23 and 30

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2011-01-01

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in this revision 3 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, the SCF Opinion on benzoic acid. Furthermore information on stereoisomeric composition for two substances [FL-no: 06.104 and 09.570] and new information to support the re-allocation of the structural class for the candidate substance piperonyl alcohol [FL-no: 02.205] has been submitted. The 41 flavou...

  17. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  18. Group Composition, Group Interaction and Achievement in Cooperative Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.

    This study investigated interaction and achievement in cooperative small groups in four junior high school mathematics classrooms. Ninety-six students learned a one-week unit on consumer mathematics in mixed-ability or uniform-ability groups. Students in mixed-ability groups scored higher on a problem-solving test than students in uniform-ability…

  19. Group dynamic processes in email groups

    OpenAIRE

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed provide insight into email group interactions, but that...

  20. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  1. Probability groups as orbits of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The set of double cosets of a group with respect to a subgroup and the set of orbits of a group with respect to a group of automorphisms have structures which can be studied as multigroups, hypergroups or Pasch geometries. When the subgroup or the group of automorphisms are finite, the multivalued products can be provided with some weightages forming so-called Probability Groups. It is shown in this paper that some abstract probability groups can be realized as orbit spaces of groups. (author)

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4 (FGE.08Rev4): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    publication of the last revision of this FGE, the EFSA has been requested to evaluate 10 additional substances, which have been included in the present revision of FGE.08. For the substances methyl methanethiosulphonate [FL-no: 12.159], 2-methylbutane-2-thiol [FL-no: 12.172], 2-methylpropane-2- thiol [FL......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since the.......112, 12.116, 12.120, 12.164, 12.167, 12.199, 15.007, 15.102 and 15.125 and 15.134], evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also...

  3. EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 2 (FGE.23Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    ether, three are alicyclic hydrocarbons with an ether side chain, two are ethers containing a benzene moiety, eight are phenol ethers and one is a naphthol ether. Five of the 19 candidate substances possess one or more chiral centres and three can exist as geometrical isomers. For one substance [FL...... enable the Panel to make a more realistic estimate of the intakes of the flavouring substances, the Panel has decided also to perform an estimate of the daily intakes per person using a “modified Theoretical Added Maximum Daily Intake” (mTAMDI) approach based on the normal use levels reported by Industry...... levels. According to the default MSDI approach, the 19 flavouring substances in this group have intakes in Europe from 0.011 to 49 micrograms/capita/day, which are below the threshold of concern value for structural class I of 1800 micrograms/person/day, for structural class II of 540 micrograms/person...

  4. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended. PMID:24441299

  5. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 74, Revision 3 (FGE.74Rev3): Consideration of Simple Aliphatic Sulphides and Thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 61st meeting) Structurally, related to Aliphatic and Alicyclic Mono-, Di-, Tri-, and Polysulphides with or wi thout Additional Oxygenated Functional Groups from Chemical Group 20 evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev5 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Lund, Pia; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 19 simple aliphatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by the JECFA at the 53rd meeting in 1999 and the 61st meeting in 2003. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach...... basis of the MSDI approach. For 10 candidate substances in FGE.74Rev3 [FL-no: 12.009, 12.013, 12.020, 12.023, 12.045, 12.074, 12.155, 12.169, 12.241 and 12.280] evaluated through the Procedure, the Panel concluded that additional toxicity data are required....

  6. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 5 (FGE.08Rev5): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since the...... publication of the last revision of this FGE, the EFSA has been requested to evaluate additional toxicological data submitted for two flavouring substances, one on supporting substance 2,5-dihydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dithiane [FL-no: 15.006], which support the evaluation of the candidate substance 2...... present revision of FGE.08. For the substances methyl methanethiosulphonate [FL-no: 12.159], 2-methylbutane-2-thiol [FL-no: 12.172], 2-methylpropane-2-thiol [FL-no: 12.174], ethyl-2-mercapto-2-methyl propanoate [FL-no: 12.304] and 2,4,4-trimethyl-1,3-oxathiane [FL-no: 16.057] there is an indication of a...

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 2 (FGE.06Rev2): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .143, 09.341, 09.612, 09.871, 09.872 and 09.938]. Thirty-one of the 48 substances can exist as geometrical isomers [FL-no: 02.152, 02.195, 02.222, 02.234, 05.061, 05.082, 05.203, 05.217, 05.218, 05.220, 08.074, 08.102, 09.377, 09.567, 09.569, 09.572, 09.575, 09.638, 09.640, 09.643, 09.672, 09.673, 09...... wide range of food items. According to the default MSDI approach, the 48 flavouring substances in this group have intakes in Europe from 0.001 to 120 microgram/capita/day, which are below the thresholds of concern value for both structural class I (1800 microgram/person/day) and structural class II...... (540 microgram/person/day) substances. On the basis of the reported annual production volumes in Europe (MSDI approach), the combined intake of the 46 candidate substances belonging to structural class I and of the two candidate substances belonging to structural class II would result in a total intake...

  9. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  10. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  11. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  12. Mixture toxicity of PBT-like chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Dai, Lina; Ramskov, Tina;

    Even though most chemicals regulation is still conducted on a chemical by chemical basis, mixture toxicity is achieving increasing attention. The scientific understanding has increased substantially in the last decades, and a general consensus now seems to have been acieved that concentration...... addition is a suitable model for default estimations of mixture effects. One of the major challenges is therefore how to select specific chemicals for actual mixture toxicity assessments. Persistant chemicals are likely to be present in the environment for an extended period of time, thus increasing the...... likelihood of them being present in environmentally found mixtures. Persistant, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemicals are therefore a highly relevant group of chemicals to consider for mixture toxicity regulation. The present study evaluates to what extent a number of PBT-like chemicals posess concern...

  13. Chemical research at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the research projects in the Chemical Research group will be given. The work involves actinide waste and processing chemistry, separations chemistry, radiation studies, and calorimetry and thermodynamics. Details will be given of the actinide separations research, including work with macroreticular anion exchangers and bidentate organophosphorus extractants

  14. Recommended Inorganic Chemicals for Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    All analytical techniques depend on the use of calibration chemicals to relate analyte concentration to instrumental parameters. Discusses the preparation of standard solutions and provides a critical evaluation of available materials. Lists elements by group and discusses the purity and uses of each. (MVL)

  15. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Boya, Luis J

    2011-01-01

    This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the $1+1+16=18$ families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated "pariah" groups. The (old) five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group $\\mathbb M$, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the $5+7+8+6=26$ sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  16. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  17. Gene expression module-based chemical function similarity search

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yun; Hao, Pei; Zheng, Siyuan; Tu, Kang; Fan, Haiwei; Zhu, Ruixin; Ding, Guohui; Dong, Changzheng; Wang, Chuan; Li, Xuan; Thiesen, H.-J.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Jiang, HuaLiang; Liu, Lei; Li, Yixue

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of biological processes using selective chemical interventions is generally applied in biomedical research and drug discovery. Many studies of this kind make use of gene expression experiments to explore cellular responses to chemical interventions. Recently, some research groups constructed libraries of chemical related expression profiles, and introduced similarity comparison into chemical induced transcriptome analysis. Resembling sequence similarity alignment, expression pat...

  18. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Koodali, Ranjit; Sereda, Grigoriy; Engebretson, Dan; Fong, Hao; Puszynski, Jan; Shende, Rajesh; Ahrenkiel, Phil

    2012-03-13

    The South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG) is a collaborative project with mission to develop advanced catalysts for energy conversion with two primary goals: (1) develop photocatalytic systems in which polyfunctionalized TiO2 are the basis for hydrogen/oxygen synthesis from water and sunlight (solar fuels group), (2) develop new materials for hydrogen utilization in fuel cells (fuel cell group). In tandem, these technologies complete a closed chemical cycle with zero emissions.

  19. Photochemical release of various functional groups

    OpenAIRE

    Bochet, Christian G.

    2006-01-01

    The photochemical liberation of functional groups is an attractive alternative to the traditional chemical approach. Several photolabile protecting groups have been developed in the past decades, but they were mainly designed to protect amines and carboxylic acids. In this account, we present some of our recent work on the photochemical release of other functions, such as silanols, aldehydes, and ketones. We also describe a new form of differentiation among several photolabile groups by the u...

  20. Chemical characterization of element 112.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, R; Aksenov, N V; Belozerov, A V; Bozhikov, G A; Chepigin, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Dressler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Gorshkov, V A; Haenssler, F; Itkis, M G; Laube, A; Lebedev, V Ya; Malyshev, O N; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Petrushkin, O V; Piguet, D; Rasmussen, P; Shishkin, S V; Shutov, A V; Svirikhin, A I; Tereshatov, E E; Vostokin, G K; Wegrzecki, M; Yeremin, A V

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of (283)112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived (287)114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of (283)112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides. PMID:17476264

  1. Chemical characterization of element 112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, R.; Aksenov, N. V.; Belozerov, A. V.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Chepigin, V. I.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Dressler, R.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Haenssler, F.; Itkis, M. G.; Laube, A.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Malyshev, O. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Petrushkin, O. V.; Piguet, D.; Rasmussen, P.; Shishkin, S. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Vostokin, G. K.; Wegrzecki, M.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of 283112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived 287114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of 283112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides.

  2. Experience with Group Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weiqin

    2006-01-01

    Supervision can take a few different forms. For example, it can be one-to-one supervision and it can also be group supervision. Group supervision is an important process within the scientific community. Many research groups use this form to supervise doctoral- and master students in groups. Some efforts have been made to study this process. For example, Samara (2002) studied the group supervision process in group writing. However, group supervision has not been studied thorough...

  3. VALIDATION GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following guidelines for laboratories engaged in the forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism. This document provides a baseline framework and guidance for...

  4. Chemical Engineering and Modular Instruction: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Karen C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reported here are the responses of a group of chemical engineering educators to questions relating to the use of a series of undergraduate chemical engineering modules developed by the CHEMI Project. (BB)

  5. Small Group Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  6. Group B Strep Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Group B Strep Infection Overview What is group B strep? Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a certain kind ... in the intestine, rectum, and vagina (in women). Group B strep doesn’t usually cause problems in ...

  7. Chemical investigation of hassium (Hs, Z = 108)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, a Hs containing compound has been investigated chemically. With the formation of a very volatile tetroxide, Hs behaves as expected and is a typical member of group 8 of the periodic table. (orig.)

  8. Redefining Cohesiveness in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann; Springston, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Attempted to replicate and extend research on work of Kelly and Duran in assessing relationship of group member perceptions of group interaction to group effectiveness. Concludes perceived similarity may not always align with perceptions of cohesiveness. (Author/ABL)

  9. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos Gil, José Ignacio; Feliu, E.

    2009-01-01

    We give a new construction of higher arithmetic Chow groups for quasi-projective arithmetic varieties over a field. Our definition agrees with the higher arithmetic Chow groups defined by Goncharov for projective arithmetic varieties over a field. These groups are the analogue, in the Arakelov context, of the higher algebraic Chow groups defined by Bloch. The degree zero group agrees with the arithmetic Chow groups of Burgos. Our new construction is shown to be a contravariant functor and is ...

  10. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  11. Chemical Modification of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssein Awada

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial chemical modification of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA was performed through tosylation followed by azidation. Amine functional PVA was also prepared by grafting propargylamine using click chemistry reaction. Through this approach, a tosyl group (a good leaving group, azide group (a group used in click chemistry and amine group (a group used for amidation were attached to PVA polymer chains. The three chemical modifications were performed in water. FTIR and XPS analysis confirmed the chemical modification after each step. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was used to study the thermal stability of the modified PVA.

  12. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  13. Sinopec Group: Expanding Its Ethylene Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Since its establishment in 1998, Sinopec Group, China's largest integrated energy chemical enterprise, has been sticking to the principle of'developing the petrochemical industry and building core businesses' and actively promoted the development of its ethylene business under the favorable conditions of opportunities and industrial status. In particular in recent years, the group helped China to be the second largest ethylene producing country in the world by the way of importing-learning and absorbing-integrating and innovation through giving more attention to technology innovation, developing its comprehensive advantages, promoting integration between refining and chemical processes.

  14. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, J. I. Burgos; Feliu, Elisenda

    2012-01-01

    context, of the higher algebraic Chow groups defined by Bloch. For projective varieties the degree zero group agrees with the arithmetic Chow groups defined by Gillet and Soulé, and in general with the arithmetic Chow groups of Burgos. Our new construction is shown to be a contravariant functor and is...... endowed with a product structure, which is commutative and associative....

  15. Assertive Training in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, David L.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a group approach to helping the nonassertive client. After describing the group composition and goals, he presents a session by session description for conducting the assertive training group. In addition, he presents suggestions based on experiences in leading the group. (Author)

  16. Robust Group Linkage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Pei; Dong, Xin Luna; Guo, Songtao; Maurino, Andrea; Srivastava, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of group linkage: linking records that refer to entities in the same group. Applications for group linkage include finding businesses in the same chain, finding conference attendees from the same affiliation, finding players from the same team, etc. Group linkage faces challenges not present for traditional record linkage. First, although different members in the same group can share some similar global values of an attribute, they represent different entities so can also...

  17. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences)

  18. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  19. 76 FR 1067 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Second Group of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... (Reapproved 2005)--liquid chromatography) (Ref. 24). Method C (40 CFR 799.6756--generator column). Water... castor oil, oxidized (CASRN 68187-84-8). EPA is also not requiring water solubility or log K ow testing for castor oil, sulfated, sodium salt (CASRN 68187-76-8). These changes are further discussed in...

  20. 75 FR 8575 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ...). Method B (ASTM E 1147-92(2005)--liquid chromatography) (Ref. 20). Method C (40 CFR 799.6756--generator... Method B: ASTM E or C. 1147-92(2005) log Kow range > 4- (liquid 6: Method B or C. chromatography). log... substances, benzene, 1,2-dimethyl-3-nitro-acetaldehyde (CAS No. 83-41-0); tar oils, coal (CAS No....

  1. Pretty Private Group Management

    CERN Document Server

    Heen, Olivier; Neumann, Christoph; Onno, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Group management is a fundamental building block of today's Internet applications. Mailing lists, chat systems, collaborative document edition but also online social networks such as Facebook and Twitter use group management systems. In many cases, group security is required in the sense that access to data is restricted to group members only. Some applications also require privacy by keeping group members anonymous and unlinkable. Group management systems routinely rely on a central authority that manages and controls the infrastructure and data of the system. Personal user data related to groups then becomes de facto accessible to the central authority. In this paper, we propose a completely distributed approach for group management based on distributed hash tables. As there is no enrollment to a central authority, the created groups can be leveraged by various applications. Following this paradigm we describe a protocol for such a system. We consider security and privacy issues inherently introduced by rem...

  2. Groups as Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kandasamy, W B Vasantha

    2009-01-01

    For the first time we represent every finite group in the form of a graph in this book. The authors choose to call these graphs as identity graph, since the main role in obtaining the graph is played by the identity element of the group. This study is innovative because through this description one can immediately look at the graph and say the number of elements in the group G which are self-inversed. Also study of different properties, like the subgroups of a group, normal subgroups of a group, p-sylow subgroups of a group and conjugate elements of a group are carried out using the identity graph of the group in this book. This book has four chapters. The first chapter is introductory. The second chapter represents groups as graphs. In the third chapter, we have defined similar types of graphs for algebraic structures like commutative semigroups, loops, commutative groupoids and commutative rings. The final chapter poses 52 problems.

  3. TIS General Safety Group Annual Report 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2001-01-01

    This report summarises the main activities of the General Safety (GS) Group of the Technical Inspection and Safety Division (TIS) during the year 2000, and the results obtained. The different topics in which the Group is active are covered: general safety inspections and ergonomy, electrical, chemistry and gas safety, chemical pollution containment and control, industrial hygiene, the safety of civil engineering works and outside contractors, fire prevention and the safety aspects of the LHC experiments.

  4. Chemical Characterization of Asturian Cider

    OpenAIRE

    Picinelli, A.M. (Anna); Suárez, Belén; Moreno, Javier; Rodríguez, Roberto; Caso-García, L.M. (Lourdes); Mangas, J.J. (Juan)

    2011-01-01

    Ninety-four samples of Asturian natural cider were analyzed for titratable and volatile acidities, pH, alcoholic, total polyphenol, and acidic polysaccharide contents, nonvolatile acids, polyalcohols, residual sugars, and major volatile compounds. A partial least-squares regression analysis (PLR-1) was performed to correlate the chemical composition and the origin of the raw material, the cider samples being grouped into two categories: an “odd” class, cider made from foreign appl...

  5. Design of chemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes design of chemical plant, which includes chemical engineer and plan for chemical plant, development of chemical process, cost engineering pattern, design and process development, general plant construction plan, project engineering, foundation for economy on assets and depreciation, estimation for cost on capital investment and manufacturing cost, design with computers optimal design and method like fluid mechanics design chemical device and estimation for cost, such as dispatch of material and device writing on design report and appendixes.

  6. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  7. Fast Overlapping Group Lasso

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The group Lasso is an extension of the Lasso for feature selection on (predefined) non-overlapping groups of features. The non-overlapping group structure limits its applicability in practice. There have been several recent attempts to study a more general formulation, where groups of features are given, potentially with overlaps between the groups. The resulting optimization is, however, much more challenging to solve due to the group overlaps. In this paper, we consider the efficient optimization of the overlapping group Lasso penalized problem. We reveal several key properties of the proximal operator associated with the overlapping group Lasso, and compute the proximal operator by solving the smooth and convex dual problem, which allows the use of the gradient descent type of algorithms for the optimization. We have performed empirical evaluations using the breast cancer gene expression data set, which consists of 8,141 genes organized into (overlapping) gene sets. Experimental results demonstrate the eff...

  8. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  9. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some women carry in their intestines and ... Mosby; 2015:chap 55. Pannaraj PS, Baker CJ. Group B streptococcal infections. In: Cherry J, Harrison GJ, ...

  10. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  11. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that ...

  12. Excavation research with chemical explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Army Engineer Nuclear Cratering Group (NCG) is located at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Livermore, California. NCG was established in 1962 and assigned responsibility for technical program direction of the Corps of Engineers Nuclear Excavation Research Program. The major part of the experimental program has been the execution of chemical explosive excavation experiments. In the past these experiments were preliminary to planned nuclear excavation experiments. The experience gained and technology developed in accomplishing these experiments has led to an expansion of NCG's research mission. The overall research and development mission now includes the development of chemical explosive excavation technology to enable the Corps of Engineers to more economically accomplish Civil Works Construction projects of intermediate size. The current and future chemical explosive excavation experiments conducted by NCG will be planned so as to provide data that can be used in the development of both chemical and nuclear excavation technology. In addition, whenever possible, the experiments will be conducted at the specific sites of authorized Civil Works Construction Projects and will be designed to provide a useful portion of the engineering structures planned in that project. Currently, the emphasis in the chemical explosive excavation program is on the development of design techniques for producing specific crater geometries in a variety of media. Preliminary results of two such experiments are described in this paper; Project Pre-GONDOLA III, Phase III, Reservoir Connection Experiment; and a Safety Calibration Series for Project TUGBOAT, a small boat harbor excavation experiment

  13. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  14. SUPPORT GROUPS IN ICEHEARTS

    OpenAIRE

    Cacho, Corey

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cacho, Corey Support groups in Icehearts. 33 p., 0 appendices. Language: English. Spring 2016. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences. Degree Programme in Social Services, Bachelor of Social Services. The purpose of my thesis is to provide a social support group model for the employees of Icehearts. The social support group model covers the mental health and wellbeing of the employees. The aim of the support group model is to give the employees a creative way of ...

  15. Group Wage Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Bartik, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Using panel data on U.S. MSAs, this paper estimates how a typical MSA's wages of different demographic groups, and prices, are affected by overall MSA unemployment, the distribution of unemployment among different groups, and national prices and wages. MSA unemployment has strong effects on MSA wages and prices, but the distribution of unemployment among different groups has weak effects on wages and prices. Using these estimates, simulations show that targeting high-unemployment groups for u...

  16. Introduction to quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Podles, P.; Muller, E.

    1997-01-01

    We give an elementary introduction to the theory of algebraic and topological quantum groups (in the spirit of S. L. Woronowicz). In particular, we recall the basic facts from Hopf (*-) algebra theory, theory of compact (matrix) quantum groups and the theory of their actions on compact quantum spaces. We also provide the most important examples, including the classification of quantum SL(2)-groups, their real forms and quantum spheres. We also consider quantum SL_q(N)-groups and quantum Loren...

  17. A multivariate chemical map of industrial chemicals--assessment of various protocols for identification of chemicals of potential concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Mia; Linusson, Anna; Tysklind, Mats; Andersson, Patrik L

    2009-08-01

    In present study the Industrial chemical map was created, and investigated. Molecular descriptors were calculated for 56072 organic substances from the European inventory of existing commercial chemical substances (EINECS). The resulting multivariate dataset was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA), giving five principal components, mainly reflecting size, hydrophobicity, flexibility, halogenation and electronical properties. It is these five PCs that form the basis of the map of organic, industrial chemicals, the Industrial chemical map. The similarities and diversity in chemical characteristics of the substances in relation to their persistence (P), bioaccumulation (B) and long-range transport potential were then examined, by superimposing five sets of entries obtained from other relevant databases onto the Industrial chemical map. These sets displayed very similar diversity patterns in the map, although with a spread in all five PC vectors. Substances listed by the United Nations Environment Program as persistent organic pollutants (UNEP POPs) were on the other hand clearly grouped with respect to each of the five PCs. Illustrating similarities and differences in chemical properties are one of the strengths of the multivariate data analysis method, and to be able to make predictions of, and investigate new chemicals. Further, the results demonstrate that non-testing methods as read-across, based on molecular similarities, can reduce the requirements to test industrial chemicals, provided that they are applied carefully, in combination with sound chemical knowledge. PMID:19515399

  18. Graphical Cyclic Permutation Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    We establish conditions for a permutation group generated by a single permutation of a prime power order to be an automorphism group of a graph or an edge-colored graph. This corrects and generalizes the results of the two papers on cyclic permutation groups published in 1978 and 1981 by S. P. Mohanty, M. R. Sridharan, and S. K. Shukla.

  19. Change through Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  20. AREVA group overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  1. Groups, combinatorics and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A A; Saxl, J

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the theory of groups in particular simplegroups, finite and algebraic has influenced a number of diverseareas of mathematics. Such areas include topics where groups have beentraditionally applied, such as algebraic combinatorics, finitegeometries, Galois theory and permutation groups, as well as severalmore recent developments.

  2. Microscopic group constants determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of microscopic group constants determination for nuclear reactor calculations is described in this paper. The principle of this method is group averaging of microscopic cross sections with respect to the standard spectrum. The group cross sections obtained are used for the calculation of fast critical assembly Jezebel. (author)

  3. Relative influence of chemical and non-chemical stressors on invertebrate communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Brink, van den Paul J.; Leitner, Patrick; Graf, Wolfram; Focks, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge for the ecological risk assessment of chemicals has been to evaluate the relative contribution of chemical pollution to the variability observed in biological communities, as well as to identify multiple stressor groups. In this study we evaluated the toxic pressure exerted by >

  4. Group I intron ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Group I intron ribozymes constitute one of the main classes of ribozymes and have been a particularly important model in the discovery of key concepts in RNA biology as well as in the development of new methods. Compared to other ribozyme classes, group I intron ribozymes display considerable...... intronic products of these pathways have the potential to integrate into targets and to form various types of circular RNA molecules. Thus, group I intron ribozymes and associated elements found within group I introns is a rich source of biological phenomena. This chapter provides a strategy and protocols...... for initial characterization of new group I intron ribozymes....

  5. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  6. Splittings of knot groups

    OpenAIRE

    Friedl, Stefan; Silver, Daniel S.; Williams, Susan G.

    2013-01-01

    Let K be a knot of genus g. If K is fibered, then it is well known that the knot group pi(K) splits only over a free group of rank 2g. We show that if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over non-free groups of arbitrarily large rank. Furthermore, if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over every free group of rank at least 2g. However, pi(K) cannot split over a group of rank less than 2g. The last statement is proved using the recent results of Agol, Przytycki-Wise and Wise.

  7. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  8. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  9. CHAOTIC GROUP ACTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiEnhui; ZhouLizhen; ZhouYoucheng

    2003-01-01

    It is proved that there is no chaotic group actions on any topological space with free arc.In this paper the chaotic actions of the group like G×F,where F is a finite group,are studied.In particular,under a suitable assumption ,if F is a cyclic group,then the topological space which admits a chaotic action of Z×F must admit a chatotic homeomorphism.A topological space which admits a chaotic group action but admits no chaotic horneomorphism is constructed.

  10. On -nilpotent abelian groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Mehdi Nasrabadi; Ali Gholamian

    2014-11-01

    Let be a group and $A = \\text{Aut}(G)$ be the group of automorphisms of . Then, the element $[g, ] = g^{-1}(g)$ is an autocommutator of $g \\in G$ and $ \\in A$. Hence, for any natural number the -th autocommutator subgroup of is defined as $K_{m}(G)=\\langle [g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}]|g\\in G,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}\\in A\\rangle$, where $[g, _{1}, _{2},\\ldots, _{m}] = [[g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m−1}], _{m}]$. In this paper, we introduce the new notion of -nilpotent groups and classify all abelian groups which are -nilpotent groups.

  11. Perfect numbers and groups

    OpenAIRE

    Leinster, Tom

    2001-01-01

    A number is perfect if it is the sum of its proper divisors; here we call a finite group `perfect' if its order is the sum of the orders of its proper normal subgroups. (This conflicts with standard terminology but confusion should not arise.) The notion of perfect group generalizes that of perfect number, since a cyclic group is perfect exactly when its order is perfect. We show that, in fact, the only abelian perfect groups are the cyclic ones, and exhibit some non-abelian perfect groups of...

  12. Group Psychotherapy in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Lars Bo; Thygesen, Bente; Aagaard, Søren

    2015-10-01

    This is a short article on the history and training standards in the Institute of Group Analysis in Copenhagen (IGA-CPH). We describe theoretical orientations and influences in the long-term training program and new initiatives, like courses in mentalization-based group treatment and a dynamic short-term group therapy course, as well as research in group psychotherapy in Denmark. Some group analytic initiatives in relation to social issues and social welfare are presented, as well as initiatives concerning the school system and unemployment. PMID:26401798

  13. E-groups training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  14. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    The chapter considers how groups might be relevant as objects of policies of toleration and the different senses 'group' might have in relation to questions of toleration. The chapter argues that groups can be relevant to toleration in several different ways as objects of toleration. Toleration is...... routinely defined as involving an objection component, a power requirement and an acceptance component. The objection and acceptance components refer to reasons or dispositions of the subjects of toleration, e.g. public authorities deciding how to act in relation to groups. The power condition refers to the...... toleration allows receivers of toleration to enjoy. The chapter shows how groups may be objects of toleration in different ways in relation to each of these components or conditions of toleration. The sense of 'group' relevant to toleration may differ when the group is an object of power, i.e. when others...

  15. Alternatives for pseudofinite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Houcine, Abderezak Ould

    2012-01-01

    The famous Tits' alternative states that a linear group either contains a nonabelian free group or is soluble-by-(locally finite). We study in this paper similar alternatives in pseudofinite groups. We show for instance that an $\\aleph_{0}$-saturated pseudofinite group either contains a subsemigroup of rank $2$ or is nilpotent-by-(uniformly locally finite). We call a class of finite groups $G$ weakly of bounded rank if the radical $rad(G)$ has a bounded Pr\\"ufer rank and the index of the sockel of $G/rad(G)$ is bounded. We show that an $\\aleph_{0}$-saturated pseudo-(finite weakly of bounded rank) group either contains a nonabelian free group or is nilpotent-by-abelian-by-(uniformly locally finite). We also obtain some relations between this kind of alternatives and amenability.

  16. Chemical treatments and usage in offshore oil and gas production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the uses of production treating chemicals, gas processing chemicals, and stimulation and workover chemicals in U.S. offshore oil and gas production operations. The purpose, solubility properties, primary generic chemical types, treatment methods, and typical use concentrations of each chemical group are discussed. Acute aquatic toxicity data and solubility information are presented

  17. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  18. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of straight-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing saturated alcohols and acetals containing saturated aldehydes (chemical group 1 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 1 (CG 1 consists of straight-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing saturated alcohols and acetals containing saturated aldehydes of which 86 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of ethyl oleate because of its insufficient purity. The following compounds are considered to be safe for all animal species at the use level proposed for feed flavourings: formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, octanoic acid, decanoic acid, dodecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, oleic acid, decanol, dodecanol, decyl acetate and dodecyl acetate. The remaining substances are considered safe for all animal species at 5 mg/kg complete feed (with a margin of safety between 1 and 120 and at 25 mg/kg complete feed (ethyl acetate and hexyl acetate, with a margin of safety between 2 and 6; and at 1 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry and 1.5 mg/kg complete feed for all other species (ethylacrylate, ethyl hex-3-enoate, ethyl trans-2-butenoate, ethyl isobutyrate, ethyl isovalerate, butyl isovalerate, methyl isovalerate, hexyl isobutyrate, methyl 2-methyl butyrate, pentyl isovalerate, butyl 2-methyl butyrate, hexyl isovalerate, ethyl 2-methyl butyrate, hexyl 2-methyl butyrate and methyl 2-methylvalerate. No safety concern would arise for the consumer from the use of compounds belonging to CG 1 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. The FEEDAP Panel considers it prudent to treat all compounds under assessment as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract and as skin sensitizers. No risk for the safety for the environment is foreseen. Since all 85 compounds are used in food as flavourings, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  19. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of branched-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing branched-chain alcohols and acetals containing branched-chain aldehydes (chemical group 2 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Chemical group 2 consists of branched-chain primary aliphatic alcohols/aldehydes/acids, acetals and esters with esters containing branched-chain alcohols and acetals containing branched-chain aldehydes, of which 34 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The use of 2-methylpropionic acid, isopentyl acetate, 3-methylbutyl butyrate and 2-methylbutyl acetate is safe at the proposed use level of 25 mg/kg complete feed for cattle, salmonids and non food producing animals and at 5 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry. 2-Methylpropan-1-ol, isopentanol, 2-ethylhexan-1-ol, 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutyraldehyde, 3-methylbutyric acid, 2-methylvaleric acid, 2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-methylbutyric acid, 2-methylheptanoic acid, 4-methyloctanoic acid, isobutyl acetate, isobutyl butyrate, 3-methylbutyl propionate, 3-methylbutyl formate, glyceryl tributyrate, isobutyl isobutyrate, isopentyl isobutyrate, isobutyl isovalerate, isopentyl 2-methylbutyrate, 2-methylbutyl isovalerate and 2-methylbutyl butyrate are safe at the proposed use level of 5 mg/kg complete feed for all animal species. 3,7-Dimethyloctan-1-ol, 2-methylundecanal, 4-methylnonanoic acid, 3-methylbutyl hexanoate, 3-methylbutyl dodecanoate, 3-methylbutyl octanoate and 3-methylbutyl 3-methylbutyrate are safe at a maximum of 1.5 mg/kg complete feed for cattle, salmonids and non food-producing animals and of 1.0 mg/kg complete feed for pigs and poultry. No safety concern was identified for the consumer from the use of these compounds up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species. All compounds should be considered as irritants to skin, eyes and respiratory tract, and as skin sensitisers. The compounds do not pose a risk to the environment when used at concentrations considered safe for the target species. Since all compounds are used in food as flavourings, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  20. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress. PMID:26401793

  1. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  2. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  3. Personal Chemical Exposure informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical Exposure science is the study of human contact with chemicals (from manufacturing facilities, everyday products, waste) occurring in their environments and advances knowledge of the mechanisms and dynamics of events that cause or prevent adverse health outcomes. (adapted...

  4. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  5. Chemical Search Web Utility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Chemical Search Web Utility is an intuitive web application that allows the public to easily find the chemical that they are interested in using, and which...

  6. Capacitive chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  7. Chemicals Industry Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  8. Blood groups systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system.

  9. Blood groups systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  10. Stochastic Lie group integrators

    CERN Document Server

    Malham, Simon J A

    2007-01-01

    We present Lie group integrators for nonlinear stochastic differential equations with non-commutative vector fields whose solution evolves on a smooth finite dimensional manifold. Given a Lie group action that generates transport along the manifold, we pull back the stochastic flow on the manifold to the Lie group via the action, and subsequently pull back the flow to the corresponding Lie algebra via the exponential map. We construct an approximation to the stochastic flow in the Lie algebra via closed operations and then push back to the Lie group and then to the manifold, thus ensuring our approximation lies in the manifold. We call such schemes stochastic Munthe-Kaas methods after their deterministic counterparts. We also present stochastic Lie group integration schemes based on Castell--Gaines methods. These involve using an underlying ordinary differential integrator to approximate the flow generated by a truncated stochastic exponential Lie series. They become stochastic Lie group integrator schemes if...

  11. Presentations of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, D L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to combinatorial group theory. Any reader who has completed first courses in linear algebra, group theory and ring theory will find this book accessible. The emphasis is on computational techniques but rigorous proofs of all theorems are supplied. This new edition has been revised throughout, including new exercises and an additional chapter on proving that certain groups are infinite.

  12. Group Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Experimental research by social and cognitive psychologists has established that cooperative groups solve a wide range of problems better than individuals. Cooperative problem solving groups of scientific researchers, auditors, financial analysts, air crash investigators, and forensic art experts are increasingly important in our complex and interdependent society. This comprehensive textbook--the first of its kind in decades--presents important theories and experimental research about group problem solving. The book focuses on tasks that have demonstrably correct solutions within mathematical

  13. Blood groups systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ranadhir Mitra; Nitasha Mishra; Girija Prasad Rath

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importa...

  14. Incentives and group identity

    OpenAIRE

    MASELLA, Paolo; Meier, Stephan; Zahn, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates in a principal-agent environment whether and how group membership influences the effectiveness of incentives and when incentives can have “hidden costs”, i.e., a detrimental effect. We show experimentally that in all interactions control mechanisms can have hidden costs for reasons specific to group membership. In within-group interactions control has detrimental effects because the agent does not expect to be controlled and reacts negatively when being controlled. In ...

  15. Group therapy for adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Nada Hribar

    2001-01-01

    The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed som...

  16. Bayesian Group Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, Seppo; Klami, Arto; Khan, Suleiman A; Kaski, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a factor analysis model that summarizes the dependencies between observed variable groups, instead of dependencies between individual variables as standard factor analysis does. A group may correspond to one view of the same set of objects, one of many data sets tied by co-occurrence, or a set of alternative variables collected from statistics tables to measure one property of interest. We show that by assuming group-wise sparse factors, active in a subset of the sets, the variat...

  17. Semisimple Metacyclic Group Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurmeet K Bakshi; Shalini Gupta; Inder Bir S Passi

    2011-11-01

    Given a group of order $p_1p_2$, where $p_1,p_2$ are primes, and $\\mathbb{F}_q$, a finite field of order coprime to $p_1p_2$, the object of this paper is to compute a complete set of primitive central idempotents of the semisimple group algebra $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$. As a consequence, we obtain the structure of $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$ and its group of automorphisms.

  18. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics.

  19. Models of Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    The basic principles underlying galactic chemical evolution and the most important results of chemical evolution models are discussed. In particular, the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, for which we possess the majority of observational constraints, is described. Then, it is shown how different star formation histories influence the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. Finally, the role of abundances and abundance ratios as cosmic clocks is emphasized an...

  20. Chemical evolution and life

    OpenAIRE

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before na...

  1. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  2. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  3. Factoring groups into subsets

    CERN Document Server

    Szabo, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Decomposing an abelian group into a direct sum of its subsets leads to results that can be applied to a variety of areas, such as number theory, geometry of tilings, coding theory, cryptography, graph theory, and Fourier analysis. Focusing mainly on cyclic groups, Factoring Groups into Subsets explores the factorization theory of abelian groups. The book first shows how to construct new factorizations from old ones. The authors then discuss nonperiodic and periodic factorizations, quasiperiodicity, and the factoring of periodic subsets. They also examine how tiling plays an important role in n

  4. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions.......Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  5. Lie groups for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry J

    2002-01-01

    According to the author of this concise, high-level study, physicists often shy away from group theory, perhaps because they are unsure which parts of the subject belong to the physicist and which belong to the mathematician. However, it is possible for physicists to understand and use many techniques which have a group theoretical basis without necessarily understanding all of group theory. This book is designed to familiarize physicists with those techniques. Specifically, the author aims to show how the well-known methods of angular momentum algebra can be extended to treat other Lie group

  6. What Is Chemical Stoichiometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William R.; Missen, Ronald W.

    1979-01-01

    Chemical stoichiometry is discussed free from kinetic or thermodynamic considerations. The means for determining the following are presented: the number of stoichiometric degrees of freedom, the number of components, a permissible set of chemical equations, and a permissible set of components, for a closed system undergoing chemical reaction.…

  7. Chemical Recycle of Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fatima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Various chemical processes currently prevalent in the chemical industry for plastics recycling have been discussed. Possible future scenarios in chemical recycling have also been discussed. Also analyzed are the effects on the environment, the risks, costs and benefits of PVC recycling. Also listed are the various types of plastics and which plastics are safe to use and which not after rcycle

  8. Equilibrium Chemical Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Tatsuo; Sasa, Shin-ichi

    1997-01-01

    An equilibrium reversible cycle with a certain engine to transduce the energy of any chemical reaction into mechanical energy is proposed. The efficiency for chemical energy transduction is also defined so as to be compared with Carnot efficiency. Relevance to the study of protein motors is discussed. KEYWORDS: Chemical thermodynamics, Engine, Efficiency, Molecular machine.

  9. Chemical and Environmental Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheather, Harry

    The two-year curriculum in chemical technology presented in the document is designed to prepare high school graduates for technical positions in the chemical industry. Course outlines are given for general chemistry, chemical calculations, quantitative analysis, environmental chemistry, organic chemistry 1 and 2, instrumental analysis, and…

  10. Galactic chemical evolution: the observational side

    OpenAIRE

    McWilliam, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In this review I outline some ideas in chemical evolution, necessary for understanding the evolution of galaxies from measured elemental abundance ratios. I then discuss abundance results from studies of Local Group dwarf galaxies and the globular cluster Omega Cen. I present a qualitative scenario of prolonged chemical enrichment in a leaky box that can explain the observed abundance ratios in these systems. Space limitations prevent a comprehensive review of this vast field, so I have restr...

  11. Weyl group invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Kameko, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    For any odd prime $p$, we prove that the induced homomorphism from the mod $p$ cohomology of the classifying space of a compact simply-connected simple connected Lie group to the Weyl group invariants of the mod $p$ cohomology of the classifying space of its maximal torus is an epimorphism except for the case $p=3$, $G=E_8$.

  12. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These pedagogical lectures contain some motivation for the study of quantum groups; a definition of ''quasi triangular Hopf algebra'' with explanations of all the concepts required to build it up; descriptions of quantised universal enveloping algebras and the quantum double; and an account of quantised function algebras and the action of quantum groups on quantum spaces. (author)

  13. Topologies on Abelian Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, E. G.; Protasov, I. V.

    1991-04-01

    A filter phi on an abelian group G is called a T-filter if there exists a Hausdorff group topology under which phi converges to zero. G{phi} will denote the group G with the largest topology among those making phi converge to zero. This method of defining a group topology is completely equivalent to the definition of an abstract group by defining relations. We shall obtain characterizations of T-filters and of T-sequences; among these, we shall pay particular attention to T-sequences on the integers. The method of T-sequences will be used to construct a series of counterexamples for several open problems in topological algebra. For instance there exists, on every infinite abelian group, a topology distinguishing between sequentiality and the Fréchet-Urysohn property (this solves a problem posed by V.I. Malykhin) we also find a topology on the group of integers admitting no nontrivial continuous character, thus solving a problem of Nienhuys. We show also that on every infinite abelian group there exists a free ultrafilter which is not a T-ultrafilter.

  14. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  15. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series presents contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study o

  16. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  17. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  18. Advances in chemical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  19. Development of chemical dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical dosimeter is a system that measures the energy by virtue of chemical changes from ionizing absorbed radiation produced unit when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. In all chemical dosimeters radiation induced chemical reaction produces at least one, initially absent species, which is properties long lived enough to determine its quantity or the change in the initial systems. Different types of chemical dosimeters were discussed such as aqueous, gaseous and solid, but the great consideration was given to aqueous systems because of their vital role in setting many processes.(Author)

  20. Nylon and Chemical Fiber Industry of Shifeng Developing Synchronously

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Yinshi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, over 40 people of the investigation group of the 10th Chinese Caprolactam and Nylon Market Forum went to Shifeng Group for visitation and investigation. They learnt the overall general situation of Shifeng Group in details, visited the factory areas such as chemical fiber & tire industrial park and agricultural automobile industrial park, and listened to the development process of Shifeng Group, the present production and future development of such products as nylon chip, nylon yarn and flat chafer fabric under nylon and chemical fiber project, and the market growth in recent two years. The investigation group showed great cooperation intention on the caprolactam project of Shifeng Group.

  1. Natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Natural Analogue Working Group was established by the Commission of the European Communities in 1985. The purpose of this group is to bring together modellers with earth scientists and others, so that maximum benefit can be obtained from natural analogue studies with a view to safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. The first meeting of this group was held in Brussels from November 5 to 7, 1985. The discussions mainly concerned the identification of the modellers' needs and of the earth scientists' capacity to provide for them. Following the debates, a written statement was produced by the Group; this document forms the core of the present Report. Notes and outlines of many of the presentations made are grouped in four appendixes. The valuable contribution of all those involved in the meeting is gratefully acknowledged

  2. Isotropy in group cohomology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben David, Nir; Ginosar, Yuval; Meir, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    The analog of Lagrangians for symplectic forms over finite groups is studied, motivated by the fact that symplectic G  -forms with a normal Lagrangian N◃G  are in one-to-one correspondence, up to inflation, with bijective 1-cocycle data on the quotients G/N  . This yields a method to construct...... groups of central type from such quotients, known as Involutive Yang–Baxter groups. Another motivation for the search of normal Lagrangians comes from a non-commutative generalization of Heisenberg liftings that require normality. Although it is true that symplectic forms over finite nilpotent groups...... always admit Lagrangians, we exhibit an example where none of these subgroups is normal. However, we prove that symplectic forms over nilpotent groups always admit normal Lagrangians if all their p  -Sylow subgroups are of order less than p 8   ....

  3. Cyclic Soft Groups and Their Applications on Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Aktaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  4. Chemical dependency and adolescent self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, D; Anderson, M A

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study is to determine whether self-esteem differs between chemically dependent adolescents and adolescents from the general high school population. The Self-Esteem Inventory (Coopersmith, 1987) was completed by 119 adolescents (31 inpatient, 31 aftercare, and 57 general high school students) aged 13 to 18. Findings suggest that inpatient, chemically dependent adolescents have lower self-esteem than the other two groups. For the chemically dependent adolescent, nursing case management with communication among and between health care providers, school professionals, and family may facilitate successful, long-term recovery. For adolescents at risk for development of chemical dependence, nursing health promotion behaviors, such as early assessment and implementation of self-esteem-building activities, may assist in prevention of chemical dependency. PMID:7633338

  5. Heuristics for chemical compound matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Masahiro; Okuno, Yasushi; Goto, Susumu; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an efficient algorithm for comparing two chemical compounds, where the chemical structure is treated as a 2D graph consisting of atoms as vertices and covalent bonds as edges. Based on the concept of functional groups in chemistry, 68 atom types (vertex types) are defined for carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other atomic species with different environments, which has enabled detection of biochemically meaningful features. Maximal common subgraphs of two graphs can be found by searching for maximal cliques in the association graph, and we have introduced heuristics to accelerate the clique finding. Our heuristic procedure is controlled by some adjustable parameters. Here we applied our procedure to the latest KEGG/LIGAND database with different sets of parameters, and demonstrated the correlation of parameters in our algorithm with the distribution of similarity scores and/or the execution time. Finally, we showed the effectiveness of our heuristics for compound pairs along metabolic pathways. PMID:15706529

  6. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This

  7. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  8. Critical groups - basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential exposure pathways from the land application site to man are presented. It is emphasised that the critical group is not necessary the population group closest to the source. It could be the group impact by the most significant pathways(s). Only by assessing the importance of each of these pathways and then combining them can a proper choice of critical group be made. It would be wrong to select a critical group on the basis that it seems the most probable one, before the pathways have been properly assessed. A calculation in Carter (1983) suggested that for the operating mine site, the annual doses to an Aboriginal person, a service worker and a local housewife, were all about the same and were in the range 0.1 to 0.2 mSv per year. Thus it may be that for the land application area, the critical group turns out to be non-Aboriginal rather than the expected Aboriginal group. 6 refs., 3 figs

  9. The General Safety Group Annual Report 2001/2002

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the main activities of the General Safety (GS) Group of the Technical Inspection and Safety Division during 2001 and 2002, and the results obtained. The different topics in which the group is active are covered: general safety inspections and ergonomics, electrical, chemical and gas safety, chemical pollution containment and control, industrial hygiene, the safety of civil engineering works and outside contractors, fire prevention and the safety aspects of the LHC experiments.

  10. Quantum group connections

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Jerzy; Okolow, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The Ahtekar-Isham C*-algebra known from Loop Quantum Gravity is the algebra of continuous functions on the space of (generalized) connections with a compact structure Lie group. The algebra can be constructed by some inductive techniques from the C*-algebra of continuous functions on the group and a family of graphs embedded in the manifold underlying the connections. We generalize the latter construction replacing the commutative C*-algebra of continuous functions on the group by a non-commu...

  11. Group therapy for adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Hribar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed some assertiveness skills: eye contact" and effective communication skills, persistence, refusing and requesting, giving and receiving critism, etc. The methods of work and techniques were based on principles of cognitive-behaviour therapy.

  12. Group ring cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Cryptographic systems are derived using units in group rings. Combinations of types of units in group rings give units not of any particular type. This includes cases of taking powers of units and products of such powers and adds the complexity of the {\\em discrete logarithm} problem to the system. The method enables encryption and (error-correcting) coding to be combined within one system. These group ring cryptographic systems may be combined in a neat way with existing cryptographic systems, such as RSA, and a combination has the combined strength of both systems. Examples are given.

  13. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  14. Accelerated Stochastic Simulation of Large Chemical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao; AO Ling

    2007-01-01

    For efficient simulation of chemical systems with large number of reactions, we report a fast and exact algorithm for direct simulation of chemical discrete Markov processes. The approach adopts the scheme of organizing the reactions into hierarchical groups. By generating a random number, the selection of the next reaction that actually occurs is accomplished by a few successive selections in the hierarchical groups. The algorithm which is suited for simulating systems with large number of reactions is much faster than the direct method or the optimized direct method. For a demonstration of its efficiency, the accelerated algorithm is applied to simulate the reaction-diffusion Brusselator model on a discretized space.

  15. DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level.

  16. DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level

  17. Chemical and physical oceanographic data collected from numerous vessels in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event and compiled for the Joint Analysis Group summary report: NOAA Technical Report NOS OR&R 27 (NODC Accession 0087872)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Deepwater Horizon Joint Analysis Group (JAG) for Surface and Sub-Surface Oceanography, Oil and Dispersant Data was a working group with membership from federal...

  18. Group Chemical Changes and Physical Property Correlations in Refining of Lube Base Stocks. Ir and Nmr Spectroscopy Corrélations entre les propriétés physiques et les changements de composition chimique au cours du raffinage des huiles de base. Spectrométrie infra rouge et résonance magnétique nucléaire

    OpenAIRE

    Singh H.; Gulati I. B.

    2006-01-01

    Changes occurring in the chemical composition of lubricating oil base stocks with different degreeand typeof refining have been investigated by IR and NMR spectroscopy. Significant conclusions about the chemical composition have been reached through the study of structural parameters. Correlations between molecular parameters such as aromaticity , average number of carbon atoms per alkyl substituentand the Viscosity Indexof base oils are reported. The term degree of refininghas been assigned ...

  19. Radiolabelling of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeling of chemical additives with radioactive isotopes can solve numerous problems in geothermal operations. The physical and chemical behavior of many chemicals slated for geothermal operations can be studied with the required detail at the extremely low concentration of the commercially available (non-labeled) compounds. The problems of labeling and the basics of these radioactively labeled chemicals are described in this report. Conclusions of this study are: (1) chemicals labeled with radioactive isotopes can be used to investigate the chemical and physical behavior of chemical additives used in geothermal operations. The high detection limits make this technology superior to conventional analytical and monitoring methods; (2) severe difficulties exist for utilizing of radioactively labeled chemicals in geothermal operations. The labeling itself can cause technical problems. Another host of problems is caused by the reluctance of chemical manufacturers to release the necessary proprietary information on their chemicals required for proper labeling; and (3) previous attempts to manufacture radioactively labeled flocculants and to utilize them in a geothermal operation were prematurely abandoned for a number of reasons

  20. Homogenous finitary symmetric groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto‎. ‎H‎. Kegel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize strictly diagonal type of embeddings of finitary symmetric groups in terms of cardinality and the characteristic. Namely, we prove the following. Let kappa be an infinite cardinal. If G=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupG i , where G i =FSym(kappan i , (H=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupH i , where H i =Alt(kappan i , is a group of strictly diagonal type and xi=(p 1 ,p 2 ,ldots is an infinite sequence of primes, then G is isomorphic to the homogenous finitary symmetric group FSym(kappa(xi (H is isomorphic to the homogenous alternating group Alt(kappa(xi , where n 0 =1,n i =p 1 p 2 ldotsp i .

  1. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Initiative uses multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. The resources of the Frederick National Lab allocated to the RAS Hub are organized into seven laboratory groups, each contributing to the collaborative effort.

  2. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  3. Group Support Systems (GSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Gary P.; Wijesinghe, R.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware is a term describing an emerging computer software technology enhancing the ability of people to work together as a group, (a software driven 'group support system'). This project originated at the beginning of 1992 and reports were issued describing the activity through May 1995. These reports stressed the need for process as well as technology. That is, while the technology represented a computer assisted method for groups to work together, the Group Support System (GSS) technology als required an understanding of the facilitation process electronic meetings demand. Even people trained in traditional facilitation techniques did not necessarily aimlessly adopt groupware techniques. The latest phase of this activity attempted to (1) improve the facilitation process by developing training support for a portable groupware computer system, and (2) to explore settings and uses for the portable groupware system using different software, such as Lotus Notes.

  4. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  5. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  6. Radiation Protection Group

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Section of the Radiation Protection Group wishes to inform you that the Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre will be closed on the afternoon of Tuesday 19 December 2006. Thank-you for your understanding.

  7. Anxiety Disorders: Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidelines Scientific Council Special Interest Groups Child & Adolescent Anxiety SIG Peer Consultation OCD & Related Disorders SIG Peer ... Jobs and Fellowships Journal & Multimedia Announcements Depression and Anxiety Podcasts & Videos Resources Clinical Practice Reviews & Teaching Tools ...

  8. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  9. Genomics Research Group Session

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, D.; Chittur, S.V.; Raghavachari, N.; N Jafari; Aquino, C.; Perera, A; Reyero, N.G.

    2014-01-01

    The Genomics Research Group (GRG) presentation is intended to describe the current activities of the group in applying the latest tools and technologies for transcriptome analysis to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each of the platforms. We will present three ongoing projects. In the first project, we specifically evaluated microarrays, QPCR and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms for examining the sensitivity and specificity of microRNA detection using synthetic miRNA st...

  10. Reactivity of nitrosyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactivity of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes is considered. According to X-ray structure analysis data nitrogen oxide interaction with metals results in formation of two complexes. The first ones contain linear nitrosyls (valence bond angle 180 deg in M-NO grouping), the second ones - bend nitrosyls (the bond angle in M-N-O grouping 120-130 deg). The first type complexes react primarily with nucleophilic reagents (OH-, N3-), the second ones - with electrophilic reagents

  11. Introduction to group theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canals B.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This chapter is a concise mathematical introduction into the algebra of groups. It is build up in the way that definitions are followed by propositions and proofs. The concepts and the terminology introduced here will serve as a basis for the following chapters that deal with group theory in the stricter sense and its application to problems in physics. The mathematical prerequisites are at the bachelor level.1

  12. Arithmetic Cohomology Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sugahara, K.; Weng, L

    2015-01-01

    We first introduce global arithmetic cohomology groups for quasi-coherent sheaves on arithmetic varieties, adopting an adelic approach. Then, we establish fundamental properties, such as topological duality and inductive long exact sequences, for these cohomology groups on arithmetic surfaces. Finally, we expose basic structures for ind-pro topologies on adelic spaces of arithmetic surfaces. In particular, we show that these adelic spaces are topologically self-dual.

  13. Fuzzy Soft Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nazmul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Notions of Lowen type fuzzy soft topological space are introduced and some of their properties are established in the present paper. Besides this, a combined structure of a fuzzy soft topological space and a fuzzy soft group, which is termed here as fuzzy soft topological group is introduced. Homomorphic images and preimages are also examined. Finally, some definitions and results on fuzzy soft set are studied.

  14. Email Grouping Method

    OpenAIRE

    Taiwo Ayodele; Shikun Zhou; Rinat Khusainov

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we presents a neural network based system for automated email grouping into activities found in the email message- Email Grouping Method (EGM). Email users spend a lot of time reading, replying and organizing their emails and this seems to be time consuming and sometimes can resolves to less performance of daily duty, and un-necessary distractions. A new system that can manage mails on our behalf is required. EGM is developed to help organise email messages, intelligently struct...

  15. Membership in citizen groups

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Stefano; Mattozzi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the coordination problem of agents deciding to join a group that uses membership revenues to provide a discrete public good and excludable benefits. The public good and the benefits are jointly produced, so that benefits are valued only if the group succeeds in providing the public good. With asymmetric information about the cost of provision, the static membership game admits a unique equilibrium and we characterize the optimal membership fee. We show that heterogeneity in valuati...

  16. Group Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Klami, Arto; Virtanen, Seppo; Leppäaho, Eemeli; Kaski, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Factor analysis provides linear factors that describe relationships between individual variables of a data set. We extend this classical formulation into linear factors that describe relationships between groups of variables, where each group represents either a set of related variables or a data set. The model also naturally extends canonical correlation analysis to more than two sets, in a way that is more flexible than previous extensions. Our solution is formulated as variational inferenc...

  17. Interocular grouping without awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, San-Yuan; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Interocular grouping occurs when different parts of an image presented to each eye bound into a coherent whole. Previous studies anticipated that these parts are visible to both eyes simultaneously (i.e., the images altered back and forth). Although this view is consistent with the general consensus of binocular rivalry (BR) that suppressed stimuli receive no processing beyond rudimentary level (i.e., adaptation), it is actually inconsistent with studies that use continuous flash suppression (CFS). CFS is a form of interocular suppression that is more stable and causes stronger suppression of stimuli than BR. In the present study, we examined whether or not interocular grouping needs to occur at a conscious level as prior studies suggested. The modified double-rectangle paradigm used by Egly, Driver, and Rafal (1994) was adopted, and object-based attention was directed for successful grouping. To induce interocular grouping, we presented complementary parts of two rectangles dichoptically for possible interocular grouping and a dynamic Mondrian in front of one eye (i.e., CFS). Two concurrent targets were presented after one of the visible parts of the rectangles was cued. Participants were asked to judge which target appeared first. We found that the target showed on the cued rectangle after interocular grouping was reported to appear first more frequently than the target on the uncued rectangle. This result was based on the majority of trials where the suppressed parts of the objects remained invisible, which indicates that interocular grouping can occur without all the to-be-grouped parts being visible and without awareness. PMID:26851342

  18. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  19. N-ary Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gal'mak, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    The book "N-ary Groups" (in Russian) consists of two Parts. It is intended on the one hand as an initial introduction to the theory of n-ary groups, and on the other hand it contains the published results by the author on this subject. At present, the theory of n-ary groups developing but slowly from group theory. Nonetheless, ternary and n-ary structures have recently been applied to modern models of elementary particle physics. One of the author's goals in this book is to draw the attention of mathematicians and theoretical physicists to the theory of n-ary groups, to some of its distinguishing features, and to details relevant to its further development and application. Part I: Theorems of Post and Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.1. Classical definitions of n-ary groups. Examples. 1.2. Analogies of identity and inverse elements. 1.3. Equivalent sequences. 1.4. Post's coset theorem. 1.5. Theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.6. Connection between the Post's coset theorem and theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. Addition and comments. Part ...

  20. Independents' group posts loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low oil gas prices and special charges caused the group of 50 U.S. independent producers Oil and Gas Journal tracks to post a combined loss in first half 1992. The group logged a net loss of $53 million in the first half compared with net earnings of $354 million in first half 1991, when higher oil prices during the Persian Gulf crisis buoyed earnings in spite of crude oil and natural gas production declines. The combined loss in the first half follows a 45% drop in the group's earnings in 1991 and compares with the OGJ group of integrated oil companies whose first half 1992 income fell 47% from the prior year. Special charges, generally related to asset writedowns, accounted for most of the almost $560 million in losses posted by about the third of the group. Nerco Oil and Gas Inc., Vancouver, Wash., alone accounted for almost half that total with charges related to an asset writedown of $238 million in the first quarter. Despite the poor first half performance, the outlook is bright for sharply improved group earnings in the second half, assuming reasonably healthy oil and gas prices and increased production resulting from acquisitions and in response to those prices

  1. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  2. Properties of Group Five and Group Seven transactinium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection and positive identification of the short-lived, low cross section isotopes used in the chemical studies of the heaviest elements are usually accomplished by measuring their alpha-decay, thus the nuclear properties of the heaviest elements must be examined simultaneously with their chemical properties. The isotopes 224 Pa and 266,267 Bh have been studied extensively as an integral part of the investigation of the heaviest members of the groups five and seven of the periodic table. The half-life of 224 Pa was determined to be 855 plus/minus19 ms by measuring its alpha-decay using our rotating wheel, solid state detector system at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. Protactinium was produced by bombardment of a bismuth target. New neutron rich isotopes, 267 Bh and 266 Bh, were produced in bombardments of a 249 Bk target and their decay was observed using the rotating wheel system. The 266 Bh that was produced decays with a half-life of approximately 1 s by emission of alpha particles with an average energy of 9.25 plus/minus 0.03 MeV. 267 Bh was observed to decay with a 17 s half-life by emission of alpha-particles with an average energy of 8.83 plus/minus 0.03 MeV. The chemical behavior of hafnium, Ha (element 105) was investigated using the fast on-line continuous liquid extraction and detection system SISAK-LISSY. Hafnium was not observed in this experiment following transport and extraction. Protactinium was used as on-line test of the apparatus to determine the experimental efficiency of the entire system. Unfortunately, the amount of protactinium observed after the extraction, compared to the amount produced, was extremely small, only 2.5%. The extraction of the protactinium isotope indicated the efficiency of the apparatus was too low to observe the extraction of hafnium. The chemical behavior of oxychloride compounds of bohrium was investigated by isothermal gas adsorption chromatography in a quartz column at 180, 150

  3. Properties of Group Five and Group Seven transactinium elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilk, Philip A.

    2001-05-01

    The detection and positive identification of the short-lived, low cross section isotopes used in the chemical studies of the heaviest elements are usually accomplished by measuring their alpha-decay, thus the nuclear properties of the heaviest elements must be examined simultaneously with their chemical properties. The isotopes 224 Pa and 266,267 Bh have been studied extensively as an integral part of the investigation of the heaviest members of the groups five and seven of the periodic table. The half-life of 224 Pa was determined to be 855 plus/minus19 ms by measuring its alpha-decay using our rotating wheel, solid state detector system at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. Protactinium was produced by bombardment of a bismuth target. New neutron rich isotopes, 267 Bh and 266 Bh, were produced in bombardments of a 249 Bk target and their decay was observed using the rotating wheel system. The 266 Bh that was produced decays with a half-life of approximately 1 s by emission of alpha particles with an average energy of 9.25 plus/minus 0.03 MeV. 267 Bh was observed to decay with a 17 s half-life by emission of alpha-particles with an average energy of 8.83 plus/minus 0.03 MeV. The chemical behavior of hafnium, Ha (element 105) was investigated using the fast on-line continuous liquid extraction and detection system SISAK-LISSY. Hafnium was not observed in this experiment following transport and extraction. Protactinium was used as on-line test of the apparatus to determine the experimental efficiency of the entire system. Unfortunately, the amount of protactinium observed after the extraction, compared to the amount produced, was extremely small, only 2.5%. The extraction of the protactinium isotope indicated the efficiency of the apparatus was too low to observe the extraction of hafnium. The chemical behavior of oxychloride compounds of bohrium was investigated by isothermal gas adsorption chromatography in a quartz column at 180, 150

  4. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongwook, E-mail: dongwookleedl324@gmail.com [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Seo, Jiwon, E-mail: jiwonseo@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physics and IPAP, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin [Division of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Cole, Jacqueline M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  5. Ethics of Chemical Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Schummer

    2001-01-01

    Unlike other branches of science, the scientific products of synthetic chemistry are not only ideas but also new substances that change our material world, for the benefit or harm of living beings. This paper provides for the first time a systematical analysis of moral issues arising from chemical synthesis, based on concepts of responsibility and general morality. Topics include the questioning of moral neutrality of chemical synthesis as an end in itself, chemical weapons research, moral ob...

  6. Modelling the chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Advanced observational facilities allow to trace back the chemical evolution of the Universe, on the one hand, from local objects of different ages and, secondly, by direct observations of redshifted objects. The chemical enrichment serves as one of the cornerstones of cosmological evolution. In order to understand this chemical evolution in morphologically different astrophysical objects models are constructed based on analytical descriptions or numerical methods. For the comparison of their...

  7. Polymers for chemical sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna C. Persaud

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical sensors play an increasingly important role in monitoring the environment we live in, providing information on industrial manufacturing processes and their emissions, quality control of foods and beverages, and a host of other applications. Electrically conductive plastics are being developed for many useful applications. Improvement in understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms by which electrical conduction occurs in these materials is now leading to a new generation of chemical sensors, which are reviewed in this article.

  8. Chemical and biological weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the prospects of the multilateral negotiations aimed at achieving a complete and total ban on chemical weapons the Chemical Weapons convention (CWC). The control of the proliferation of chemical weapons is no longer just on East-West issue; it is also an issue of concern in Third World Countries, and in some of the wealthier middle eastern nations, such as Kuwait

  9. Group II Intron Self-Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Anna Marie

    2016-07-01

    Group II introns are large, autocatalytic ribozymes that catalyze RNA splicing and retrotransposition. Splicing by group II introns plays a major role in the metabolism of plants, fungi, and yeast and contributes to genetic variation in many bacteria. Group II introns have played a major role in genome evolution, as they are likely progenitors of spliceosomal introns, retroelements, and other machinery that controls genetic variation and stability. The structure and catalytic mechanism of group II introns have recently been elucidated through a combination of genetics, chemical biology, solution biochemistry, and crystallography. These studies reveal a dynamic machine that cycles progressively through multiple conformations as it stimulates the various stages of splicing. A central active site, containing a reactive metal ion cluster, catalyzes both steps of self-splicing. These studies provide insights into RNA structure, folding, and catalysis, as they raise new questions about the behavior of RNA machines. PMID:27391926

  10. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  11. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  12. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  13. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  14. Exploring the planetary boundary for chemical pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Miriam L; de Wit, Cynthia A; Molander, Sverker; Scheringer, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Lohmann, Rainer; Arvidsson, Rickard; Bergman, Åke; Hauschild, Michael; Holoubek, Ivan; Persson, Linn; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Vighi, Marco; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2015-05-01

    Rockström et al. (2009a, 2009b) have warned that humanity must reduce anthropogenic impacts defined by nine planetary boundaries if "unacceptable global change" is to be avoided. Chemical pollution was identified as one of those boundaries for which continued impacts could erode the resilience of ecosystems and humanity. The central concept of the planetary boundary (or boundaries) for chemical pollution (PBCP or PBCPs) is that the Earth has a finite assimilative capacity for chemical pollution, which includes persistent, as well as readily degradable chemicals released at local to regional scales, which in aggregate threaten ecosystem and human viability. The PBCP allows humanity to explicitly address the increasingly global aspects of chemical pollution throughout a chemical's life cycle and the need for a global response of internationally coordinated control measures. We submit that sufficient evidence shows stresses on ecosystem and human health at local to global scales, suggesting that conditions are transgressing the safe operating space delimited by a PBCP. As such, current local to global pollution control measures are insufficient. However, while the PBCP is an important conceptual step forward, at this point single or multiple PBCPs are challenging to operationalize due to the extremely large number of commercial chemicals or mixtures of chemicals that cause myriad adverse effects to innumerable species and ecosystems, and the complex linkages between emissions, environmental concentrations, exposures and adverse effects. As well, the normative nature of a PBCP presents challenges of negotiating pollution limits amongst societal groups with differing viewpoints. Thus, a combination of approaches is recommended as follows: develop indicators of chemical pollution, for both control and response variables, that will aid in quantifying a PBCP(s) and gauging progress towards reducing chemical pollution; develop new technologies and technical and social

  15. Linear algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Springer, T A

    1998-01-01

    "[The first] ten chapters...are an efficient, accessible, and self-contained introduction to affine algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. The author includes exercises and the book is certainly usable by graduate students as a text or for self-study...the author [has a] student-friendly style… [The following] seven chapters... would also be a good introduction to rationality issues for algebraic groups. A number of results from the literature…appear for the first time in a text." –Mathematical Reviews (Review of the Second Edition) "This book is a completely new version of the first edition. The aim of the old book was to present the theory of linear algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. Reading that book, many people entered the research field of linear algebraic groups. The present book has a wider scope. Its aim is to treat the theory of linear algebraic groups over arbitrary fields. Again, the author keeps the treatment of prerequisites self-contained. The material of t...

  16. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  17. Financial Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    carfí, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we see the evolution of a capitalized financial event e, with respect to a capitalization factor f, as the exponential map of a suitably defined Lie group G(f,e), supported by the half-space of capitalized financial events having the same capital sign of e. The Lie group G(f,e) depends upon the capitalization factor f and on the event e itself. After the extension of the definition of exponential map of a Lie group, we shall eliminate the dependence on the financial event e, recognizing the presence of essentially one unique financial Lie semigroup, supported by the entire space of capitalized financial events, determined by the capitalization factor f.

  18. Instructions to working groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  19. Group Psychotherapy in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Göran

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the national developments of group psychotherapy (GPS) in Sweden during the period from World War II until the present time. Methods and concepts, imported primarily from England and the United States, inspired trainings and widespread psychodynamic and group analytic applications in schools, health treatment, and social care. Education in psychotherapy and GPS at universities opened new therapeutic and vocational areas during the period 1970-2005. Increasing criticism of psychodynamics, as in other Western societies, but more radical in Sweden, has in the last decades made group analytic GPS diminish in favor of cognitive behavioral therapy models. Prospects for GPS further development may presently look bleak but, in a longer perspective, are promising. PMID:26401795

  20. Quantum threshold group signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In most situations, the signer is generally a single person. However, when the message is written on behalf of an organization, a valid message may require the approval or consent of several persons. Threshold signature is a solution to this problem. Generally speaking, as an authority which can be trusted by all members does not exist, a threshold signature scheme without a trusted party appears more attractive. Following some ideas of the classical Shamir’s threshold signature scheme, a quantum threshold group signature one is proposed. In the proposed scheme, only t or more of n persons in the group can generate the group signature and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. In the verification phase, any t or more of n signature receivers can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer receivers cannot verify the validity of the signature.

  1. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  2. Colored Group Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2009-01-01

    Group field theories are higher dimensional generalizations of matrix models. Their Feynman graphs are fat and in addition to vertices, edges and faces, they also contain higher dimensional cells, called bubbles. In this paper, we propose a new, fermionic Group Field Theory, posessing a color symmetry, and take the first steps in a systematic study of the topological properties of its graphs. Unlike its bosonic counterpart, the bubbles of the Feynman graphs of this theory are well defined and readily identified. We prove that this graphs are combinatorial cellular complexes. We define and study the cellular homology of this graphs. Furthermore we define a homotopy transformation appropriate to this graphs. Finally, the amplitude of the Feynman graphs is shown to be related to the fundamental group of the cellular complex.

  3. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

     An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics. This...... problem is not only found at Aalborg University but also at the engineering colleges in Denmark. For that reason a course was developed with the aim of addressing the problem and showing, how it can be dealt with. So far the course has been offered several times to supervisors at the engineering colleges...

  4. Fourier Analysis on Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rudin, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1950s, many of the more refined aspects of Fourier analysis were transferred from their original settings (the unit circle, the integers, the real line) to arbitrary locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. Rudin's book, published in 1962, was the first to give a systematic account of these developments and has come to be regarded as a classic in the field. The basic facts concerning Fourier analysis and the structure of LCA groups are proved in the opening chapters, in order to make the treatment relatively self-contained.

  5. A Quantum Groups Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Shahn

    2002-05-01

    Here is a self-contained introduction to quantum groups as algebraic objects. Based on the author's lecture notes for the Part III pure mathematics course at Cambridge University, the book is suitable as a primary text for graduate courses in quantum groups or supplementary reading for modern courses in advanced algebra. The material assumes knowledge of basic and linear algebra. Some familiarity with semisimple Lie algebras would also be helpful. The volume is a primer for mathematicians but it will also be useful for mathematical physicists.

  6. Hierarchies in student groups

    OpenAIRE

    Güntert, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This is a research about hierarchies in student groups. It shows how they are built und what sense they have. The position of a student in his student peer group is evaluated. The influence of the look, the style, the behaviour of the other sex, the gender, the origin, the prehistory, the appearance, achievement and their effect on hierarchies is analysed and the impact of charisma and organisation are compared. The meaning of this research is to indicate how a student must be to get the lead...

  7. Bell, group and tangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  8. Chemical defences against herbivores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavia, Henrik; Baumgartner, Finn; Cervin, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the recent and emerging research involving chemical defences against herbivory in aquatic primary producers. It provides an overview of plant chemical defence theories and highlights recent research on aquatic primary producers addressing a number of aspects of these...

  9. Chemical warfare in freshwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, Gabi

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field expe

  10. Multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Kupers, Ron;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent, non-specific symptoms in response to chemically unrelated exposures in non-toxic concentrations. Although the pathophysiology of MCS remains unknown, central sensitization may be an important factor...

  11. Microorganisms and Chemical Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the importance of microorganisms in chemical pollution and pollution abatement. Selected chemical pollutants are chosen to illustrate that microorganisms synthesize hazardous substances from reasonably innocuous precursors, while others act as excellent environmental decontaminating agents by removing undesirable natural and synthetic…

  12. CARACTERÍSTICAS FÍSICAS E QUÍMICAS DE FRUTOS DE MAMOEIRO DO GRUPO 'SOLO' COMERCIALIZADOS EM 4 ESTABELECIMENTOS DE BRASÍLIA-DF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FRUITS OF PAPAYA TREE FROM 'SOLO' GROUP COMMERCIALIZED IN 4 ESTABLISHMENTS IN BRASILIA-DF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GENI RODRIGUES FAGUNDES

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available As características físicas e químicas do mamão do grupo 'Solo' comercializado em 4 estabelecimentos de Brasília-DF, foram analisadas durante o período de setembro de 1997 a agosto de 1998. Foram coletados, mensalmente, 15 frutos em cada estabelecimento para determinar a sua qualidade. Frutos de plantas hermafroditas representaram 88% do total. O peso médio variou de 372,2 a 537,1g, sendo maior em junho. O comprimento e o diâmetro médio oscilaram entre 12,4 a 14,5cm e 7,6 a 8,7cm, respectivamente. O grau de maturação dos frutos coletados, na sua maioria, não estava no ponto de consumo. A firmeza da polpa dos frutos oscilou de 0,56 a 1,04 kg/cm², estando abaixo da firmeza adequada para comercialização. O teor médio de SST variou de 9,9º a 12,5(0 Brix, sendo mais alto em agosto. O pH oscilou entre 5,20 e 5,71 e foi mais alto em agosto e setembro. A acidez titulável, expressa em ácido cítrico, variou de 0,04 a 0,16%, e a relação SST-AT entre 74,7 e 275,7.The physical and chemical characteristics of papaya from 'Solo' group commercialized in 4 establishments located in Brasilia - DF, were analyzed from September 1997 to August 1998. From each establishment 15 fruits were collected monthly to determine fruit quality. Fruits originated from hermaphrodite plants accounted for 88% of the total. The average fruit weight varied from 372.2 to 537.1 being higher in June. The average size and diameter oscillated from 12.4 to 14.5cm and 7.6 to 8.7cm, respectively. The maturation degree of most collected papaya was not in the consumption stage. The firmness of the fruit pulp ranged from 0.56 to 1.04 kg/cm² being below the suitable firmness for commercialization. The average ºBrix varied from 9.9 to 12.5 being higher in August. The pH value oscillated from 5.20 to 5.71 being higher in August and September. The titratable acidity (TA, expressed as citric acid, varied from 0.04 to 0.16% and ºBrix -TA ratio from 74.7 and 275.7.

  13. Chemical Product Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights for a class of chemical products, the design process, their design with respect to the important issues, the need for appropriate tools and finally, lists some of the challenges and opportunities for the process systems engineering (PSE)/computer-aided process engineering...... (CAPE) community. The chemical products considered belong to the following types: chemical/biochemical/agrochemical products, coatings and solvents, food (nutraceuticals), HIM (household, industrial and institutional), personal care, pharmaceuticals and drugs. The challenges and opportunities are...... highlighted in terms of the needs for multi-level modeling with emphasis on property models that are suitable for computer-aided applications, flexible solution strategies that are able to solve a large range of chemical product design problems and finally, a systems chemical product design framework with the...

  14. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  15. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  16. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies. This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of ...

  17. FAW Group Gorporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Feng

    2007-01-01

    @@ As the founder of China's automobile industry, FAW Group Corporation (FAW) has maintained a dominant position in the automotive industry since its founding in 1953 in terms of its total assets, Production capacity, domestic and international sales, market share, and brand recognition.

  18. Group theory in cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Blackburn, Simon R; Mullan, Ciaran

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a guide for the pure mathematician who would like to know more about cryptography based on group theory. The paper gives a brief overview of the subject, and provides pointers to good textbooks, key research papers and recent survey papers in the area.

  19. Group theory in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cornwell, J F

    1989-01-01

    Recent devopments, particularly in high-energy physics, have projected group theory and symmetry consideration into a central position in theoretical physics. These developments have taken physicists increasingly deeper into the fascinating world of pure mathematics. This work presents important mathematical developments of the last fifteen years in a form that is easy to comprehend and appreciate.

  20. Space Systems Academic Group

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG) along with eight academic departments is an integral part of the Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. As an interdisciplinary association of professors it provides direction and guidance for two curricula: Space Systems Engineering and Space Systems Operations.

  1. Teaching Badminton to Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous ideas for teaching badminton to large groups are presented. The focus is on drills and techniques for off the court instructional stations. Instead of having students waiting their turn to play, more students can participate actively as they rotate from one station to another. (JN)

  2. Unclonable Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Dupont, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael Østergaard

    We introduce and motivate the concept of unclonable group identification, that provides maximal protection against sharing of identities while still protecting the anonymity of users. We prove that the notion can be realized from any one-way function and suggest a more efficient implementation...

  3. Group B Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H. Adriaanse

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae is an important cause of neonatal sepsis. Prevention is possible by intrapartum screening for maternal GBS carriership and antimicrobial treatment of colonized women with risk factors during labor. The conflicting results of diagnostic performance are reported both for the newly developed rapid GBS antigen tests and Gram's stain.

  4. Cohomology of quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Frønsdal, Christian

    1995-01-01

    Lecture notes. Introduction to the cohomology of algebras, Lie algebras, Lie bialgebras and quantum groups. Contains a new derivation of the classification of classical r-matrices in terms of deformation cohomology, and a calculation of the esoteric forms of quantum gl(N) by deformation theory.

  5. End Group Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus O; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Franzyk, Henrik

    , the most favorable hydrophobic activity-inducing moieties were found to be cyclohexylacetyl and pentafluorophenylacetyl groups, while the presence of a short PEG-like chain had no significant effect on activity. Introduction of cationic moieties conferred no effect or merely a moderate activity...

  6. Abandoning wells working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  7. Geodesic Renormalisation Group Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Brian P

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the renormalisation group flow in coupling constant space can be interpreted in terms of a dynamical equation for the couplings analogous to viscous fluid flow under the action of a potential. For free scalar field theory the flow is geodesic in two dimensions, while for $D \

  8. Teaching the renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renormalization group theory of continuous phase transitions is described with the use of a hands on model suitable for presentation as part of an undergraduate thermal physics course. It is an extension of the work of Maris and Kadanoff in that key concepts such as universality fixed points and critical surface are introduced

  9. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  10. Cohomology of kleinian groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kra, I

    1969-07-01

    Let [unk] be a (nonelementary) Kleinian group and q >/= 2 an integer. The group [unk] acts in a natural way on the vector space II(2q-2) of complex polynomials in one variable of degree group of [unk] with coefficients in II(2q-2). There are essentially two ways of constructing cohomology classes. One construction originated with Eichler and has recently been extended by Ahlfors. Another construction is due to Bers. We show that for finitely generated [unk], every cohomology class pepsilon H(1)([unk],II(2q-2)) can be written uniquely (if one chooses an invariant union of components of [unk]) as a sum of a Bers cohomology class and an Eichler cohomology class. Similar decompositions are obtained for the subgroups of parabolic cohomology classes introduced by Ahlfors. Some information on the structure of H(1)([unk],II(2q-2)) for infinitely generated groups [unk] is also obtained. PMID:16591774

  11. Anti- CC-Groups and Anti-PC-Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Russo

    2007-01-01

    subgroup H of G. An anti-PC group G is a group in which each nonfinitely generated subgroup K has the quotient group G/coreG(NG(K which is a polycyclic-by-finite group. Anti-CC groups and anti-PC groups are the subject of the present article.

  12. Activity Therapy Services and Chemical Dependency Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mark R.; Townsley, Robin K.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how music, occupational, and recreation therapies can contribute to comprehensive treatment programs for chemical dependency. Sees prime contribution of activity therapy as lying in nature of experiential education, applying insight gained in counseling sessions and discussion groups to practical real-life situations. (Author/NB)

  13. Teaching Chemical Bonding through Jigsaw Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning in teaching chemical bonding at tertiary level. This study was carried out in two different classes in the Department of Primary Science Education of Ataturk University during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was the non-jigsaw group (control) and the other was the…

  14. Toxicology of chemical mixtures: International perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Cassee, F.R.; Groten, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews major activities outside the United States on human health issues related to chemical mixtures. In Europe an international study group on combination effects has been formed and has started by defining synergism and antagonism. Successful research programs in Europe include the de

  15. Nonequilibrium Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal equilibrium properties of many-body or field theories are known to be efficiently classified in terms of renormalization group fixed points. A particularly powerful concept is the notion of infrared fixed points, which are characterized by universality. These correspond to critical phenomena in thermal equilibrium, where a characteristic large correlation length leads to independence of long-distance properties from details of the underlying microscopic theory. In contrast, a classification of properties of theories far from thermal equilibrium in terms of renormalization group fixed points is much less developed. The notion of universality or critical phenomena far from equilibrium is to a large extent unexplored, in particular, in relativistic quantum field theories. Here the strong interest is mainly driven by theoretical and experimental advances in our understanding of early universe cosmology as well as relativistic collision experiments of heavy nuclei in the laboratory. In these lectures I will introduce the functional renormalization group for the effective average action out of equilibrium. While in equilibrium typically a Euclidean formulation is adequate, nonequilibrium properties require real-time descriptions. For quantum systems a generating functional for nonequilibrium correlation functions with given density matrix at initial time can be written down using the Schwinger-Keldysh closed time path contour. In principle, this can be used to construct a nonequilibrium functional renormalization group along similar lines as for Euclidean field theories in thermal equilibrium. However, important differences include the absence of time-translation invariance for general out-of-equilibrium situations. The nonequilibrium renormalization group takes on a particularly simple form at a fixed point, since it becomes independent of the initial density matrix. I will discuss some simple examples for which I derive a hierarchy of fixed point solutions

  16. Chemical Classification of Space Debris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunlai; ZUO Wei; LIU Jianjun; OUYANG Ziyuan

    2004-01-01

    Space debris, here referring to all non-operating orbital objects, has steadily increased in number so that it has become a potential barrier to the exploration of space. The ever-increasing number of space debris pieces in space has created an increasingly threatening hazard to all on-the-orbit spacecraft, and all future space exploration activities have to be designed and operated with respect to the increasing threat posed by space debris. Generally, space debris is classified as large, medium and small debris pieces based on their sizes. The large debris piece is easily catalogued, but medium to small debris pieces are very difficult to track and also quite different in damage mechanisms from the large ones. In this paper, a scheme of chemical classification of space debris is developed. In our scheme, the first-order classification is employed to divide space debris into two groups: natural micrometeoroids and artificial space debris.The second-order classification is based on their chemical patterns and compositions. The natural micrometeoroids are further divided into three types, namely maric, metal and phyllosilicate micrometeorites, while the artificial space debris is divided into seven types, which are polymers, non-metal debris, metals and their alloys, oxides, sulphides and their analogs, halides and carbides. Of the latter seven types, some can also be further divided into several sub-types. Chemical classification of space debris is very useful for the study of the chemical damage mechanism of small debris pieces, and also is of great significance in constraining the origin and source of space debris and assessing their impact on spacecraft and human space activities.

  17. Chemical characterization of bohrium (element 107)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler; Bruchle; Dressler; Dullmann; Eichler; Gaggeler; Gregorich; Hoffman; Hubener; Jost; Kirbach; Laue; Lavanchy; Nitsche; Patin; Piguet; Schadel; Shaughnessy; Strellis; Taut; Tobler; Tsyganov; Turler; Vahle; Wilk; Yakushev

    2000-09-01

    The arrangement of the chemical elements in the periodic table highlights resemblances in chemical properties, which reflect the elements' electronic structure. For the heaviest elements, however, deviations in the periodicity of chemical properties are expected: electrons in orbitals with a high probability density near the nucleus are accelerated by the large nuclear charges to relativistic velocities, which increase their binding energies and cause orbital contraction. This leads to more efficient screening of the nuclear charge and corresponding destabilization of the outer d and f orbitals: it is these changes that can give rise to unexpected chemical properties. The synthesis of increasingly heavy elements, now including that of elements 114, 116 and 118, allows the investigation of this effect, provided sufficiently long-lived isotopes for chemical characterization are available. In the case of elements 104 and 105, for example, relativistic effects interrupt characteristic trends in the chemical properties of the elements constituting the corresponding columns of the periodic table, whereas element 106 behaves in accordance with the expected periodicity. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of six atoms of element 107 (bohrium, Bh), in the form of its oxychloride. We find that this compound is less volatile than the oxychlorides of the lighter elements of group VII, thus confirming relativistic calculations that predict the behaviour of bohrium, like that of element 106, to coincide with that expected on the basis of its position in the periodic table. PMID:10993071

  18. Chemical characterization of bohrium (element 107)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, R.; Brüchle, W.; Dressler, R.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eichler, B.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Gregorich, K. E.; Hoffman, D. C.; Hübener, S.; Jost, D. T.; Kirbach, U. W.; Laue, C. A.; Lavanchy, V. M.; Nitsche, H.; Patin, J. B.; Piguet, D.; Schädel, M.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Strellis, D. A.; Taut, S.; Tobler, L.; Tsyganov, Y. S.; Türler, A.; Vahle, A.; WiIk, P. A.; Yakushev, A. B.

    2000-09-01

    The arrangement of the chemical elements in the periodic table highlights resemblances in chemical properties, which reflect the elements' electronic structure. For the heaviest elements, however, deviations in the periodicity of chemical properties are expected: electrons in orbitals with a high probability density near the nucleus are accelerated by the large nuclear charges to relativistic velocities, which increase their binding energies and cause orbital contraction. This leads to more efficient screening of the nuclear charge and corresponding destabilization of the outer d and f orbitals: it is these changes that can give rise to unexpected chemical properties. The synthesis of increasingly heavy elements, now including that of elements 114, 116 and 118, allows the investigation of this effect, provided sufficiently long-lived isotopes for chemical characterization are available. In the case of elements 104 and 105, for example, relativistic effects interrupt characteristic trends in the chemical properties of the elements constituting the corresponding columns of the periodic table, whereas element 106 behaves in accordance with the expected periodicity. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of six atoms of element 107 (bohrium, Bh), in the form of its oxychloride. We find that this compound is less volatile than the oxychlorides of the lighter elements of group VII, thus confirming relativistic calculations that predict the behaviour of bohrium, like that of element 106, to coincide with that expected on the basis of its position in the periodic table.

  19. Working group 7: Ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the environmental impact of nuclear power plants. The effects of ionizing radiations, of the thermal and chemical pollution on aquatic ecosystems as well as on terrestrial ecosystems have been estimated. After a general survey of such effects and their interaction, practical conclusions in regard to determined areas such as Meuse-Escaut marine and the coast have been drawn. The contamination effects of food chains have been evaluted under deliberately pessimistic conditions with regard to the choice of the radionuclide as well as of concentration factors. Following the biodegradation conditions of the surface waters, criteria for the quality of the aquatic ecosystems have been established. Finally, attention has been paid on certain factors affecting the site selection especially within the frame of the nature conservation. The effects of cooling towers have been also considered. (G.C.)

  20. Multimedia environmental chemical partitioning from molecular information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    physicochemical and transport properties, and degradation rates. - Research Highlights: →Support vector regression-based QSFRs can be as useful as Multimedia Models →Multimedia chemical partitioning can be predicted directly from molecular information. →Molecular group counts are better input information than molecular descriptors. →Distribution of chemicals is best predicted when considering chemical families